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Sample records for ancestral chloroplastic carbonic

  1. Loss of the Chloroplast Transit Peptide from an Ancestral C3 Carbonic Anhydrase Is Associated with C4 Evolution in the Grass Genus Neurachne1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Harmony; Saladié, Montserrat; Sharwood, Robert; Macfarlane, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Neurachne is the only known grass lineage containing closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate, and C4 species, making it an ideal taxon with which to study the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in the grasses. To begin dissecting the molecular changes that led to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in this group, the complementary DNAs encoding four distinct β-carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms were characterized from leaf tissue of Neurachne munroi (C4), Neurachne minor (C3-C4), and Neurachne alopecuroidea (C3). Two genes (CA1 and CA2) each encode two different isoforms: CA1a/CA1b and CA2a/CA2b. Transcript analyses found that CA1 messenger RNAs were significantly more abundant than transcripts from the CA2 gene in the leaves of each species examined, constituting ∼99% of all β-CA transcripts measured. Localization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs showed that, while CA1b is a cytosolic CA in all three species, the CA1a proteins are differentially localized. The N. alopecuroidea and N. minor CA1a isoforms were imported into chloroplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells, whereas N. munroi CA1a localized to the cytosol. Sequence analysis indicated an 11-amino acid deletion in the amino terminus of N. munroi CA1a relative to the C3 and C3-C4 proteins, suggesting that chloroplast targeting of CA1a is the ancestral state and that loss of a functional chloroplast transit peptide in N. munroi CA1a is associated with the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in Neurachne spp. Remarkably, this mechanism is homoplastic with the evolution of the C4-associated CA in the dicotyledonous genus Flaveria, although the actual mutations in the two lineages differ. PMID:28153918

  2. Analyses of Charophyte Chloroplast Genomes Help Characterize the Ancestral Chloroplast Genome of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Civáň, Peter; Foster, Peter G.; Embley, Martin T.; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  3. Analyses of charophyte chloroplast genomes help characterize the ancestral chloroplast genome of land plants.

    PubMed

    Civaň, Peter; Foster, Peter G; Embley, Martin T; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes.

  4. Export of carbon from chloroplasts at night

    SciTech Connect

    Schleucher, J.; Vanderveer, P.J.; Sharkey, T.D.

    1998-12-01

    Hexose export from chloroplasts at night has been inferred in previous studies of mutant and transgenic plants. The authors have tested whether hexose export is the normal route of carbon export from chloroplasts at night. The authors used nuclear magnetic resonance to distinguish glucose (Glc) made from hexose export and Glc made from triose export. Glc synthesized in vitro from fructose-6-phosphate in the presence of deuterium-labeled water had deuterium incorporated at C-2, whereas synthesis from triose phosphates caused C-2 through C-5 to become deuterated. In both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and bean (phaseolus vulgaris L.), Glc from sucrose made at night in the presence of deuterium-enriched water was deuterated only in the C-2 position, indicating that >75% of carbon is exported as hexoses at night. In darkness the phosphate in the cytosol was 28 mM, whereas that in the chloroplasts was 5 mW, but hexose phosphates were 10-fold higher in the cytosol than in the chloroplasts. Therefore, hexose phosphates would not move out of chloroplasts without the input of energy. The authors conclude that most carbon leaves chloroplasts at night as Glc, maltose, or higher maltodextrins under normal conditions.

  5. Regulation of Chloroplastic Carbonic Anhydrase 1

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Michael A.; Grodzinski, Bernard

    1983-01-01

    It was previously reported that magnesium ion inhibited carbonic anhydrase (Bamberger and Avron 1975 Plant Physiol 56: 481-485). Studies with partially purified carbonic anhydrase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts show that the effect was the result of the chloride counterion and not the magnesium ion. Enzyme activity was reduced 50% upon addition of 3 to 10 millimolar MgCl2 or KCl while all additions of MgSO4 between 0.3 and 10 millimolar were mildly stimulatory. PMID:16663052

  6. Molecular Variation in Chloroplast DNA Regions in Ancestral Species of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, N. T.; Mori, N.; Tsunewaki, K.

    1994-01-01

    Restriction map variation in two 5-6-kb chloroplast DNA regions of five diploid Aegilops species in the section Sitopsis and two wild tetraploid wheats, Triticum dicoccoides and Triticum araraticum, was investigated with a battery of four-cutter restriction enzymes. A single accession each of Triticum durum, Triticum timopheevi and Triticum aestivum was included as a reference. More than 250 restriction sites were scored, of which only seven sites were found polymorphic in Aegilops speltoides. No restriction site polymorphisms were detected in all of the other diploid and tetraploid species. In addition, six insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected, but they were mostly unique or species-specific. Estimated nucleotide diversity was 0.0006 for A. speltoides, and 0.0000 for all the other investigated species. In A. speltoides, none of Tajima's D values was significant, indicating no clear deviation from the neutrality of molecular polymorphisms. Significant non-random association was detected for three combinations out of 10 possible pairs between polymorphic restriction sites in A. speltoides. Phylogenetic relationship among all the plastotypes (plastid genotype) suggested the diphyletic origin of T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum. A plastotype of one A. speltoides accession was identical to the major type of T. araraticum (T. timopheevi inclusively). Three of the plastotypes found in the Sitopsis species are very similar, but not identical, to that of T. dicoccoides, T. durum and T. aestivum. PMID:7916310

  7. Chloroplast and cytoplasmic enzymes : V. Pea-leaf carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Kachru, R B; Anderson, L E

    1974-09-01

    Chloroplastic and cytoplasmic forms of pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaf carbonic anhydrase were separated by isoelectric focusing. The two forms have identical pH optima, 7.0 for the hydration reaction and 7.5 for the dehydration reaction, and identical Michaelis constants for CO2, 0.03 M. Neither isozyme is affected by any of several compounds involved in carbon metabolism in the green plant.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Isolated Kalanchoe Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Carolyn; Gibbs, Martin

    1975-01-01

    Chloroplasts isolated from Kalanchoe diagremontiana leaves were capable of photosynthesizing at a rate of 5.4 μmoles of CO2 per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. The dark rate of fixation was about 1% of the light rate. A high photosynthetic rate was associated with low starch content of the leaves. Ribose 5-phosphate, fructose 1,6-diphosphate, and dithiothreitol stimulated fixation, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate and azide were inhibitors. The products of CO2 fixation were primarily those of the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle. PMID:16659249

  9. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, G.; Togasaki, R.K. ); Marcus, Y. ); Moroney, J.V. )

    1989-04-01

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases {sup 14}CO{sub 3} which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 {plus minus} 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 {plus minus} 1.9 and 2.8 {plus minus} 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 {plus minus} 14.7 and 2.8 {plus minus} 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity.

  10. Stimulation of Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Isolated Pea Chloroplasts by Catalytic Amounts of Adenine Nucleotides 1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon P.; Wiskich, Joseph T.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon dioxide-dependent O2 evolution by isolated pea (Pisum sativum var. Massey Gem) chloroplasts was increased two to 12 times by the addition of ATP. O2 evolution was also stimulated by ADP and to a lesser extent by AMP. The ATP effects were not due to broken chloroplasts present in the preparations nor was ATP acting as a phosphate source. We concluded that the adenine nucleotides were acting catalytically. The concentration of ATP required for half-maximum rate of O2 evolution was 16 to 25 μm. The degree to which ATP stimulated O2 evolution depended on the age of pea plants from which the chloroplasts were isolated. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea var. True Hybrid 102) chloroplasts did not show a consistent stimulation of O2 evolution by adenine nucleotides. The adenine nucleotide content of pea chloroplasts was not lower than that of spinach chloroplasts, but pea chloroplasts which showed a large stimulation of O2 evolution by ATP contained an ATP-hydrolyzing reaction with rates of 10 to 50 μmol ATP hydrolyzed mg chlorophyll−1 hour−1. The rate of the ATP-consuming reaction was much lower in spinach chloroplasts and in chloroplasts from older pea plants which did not show large stimulation of O2 evolution by ATP. We propose that the ATP-consuming reaction, with a high affinity for ATP, decreased the effective size of the ATP pool available for CO2 fixation. Added adenine nucleotides could be transported into the chloroplasts increasing the concentration of internal nucleotides. Calculations showed that the adenine nucleotide transporter on the outer chloroplast membranes could operate at a sufficient rate to produce such an effect. PMID:16659638

  11. C4 photosynthesis evolution in the transitional grass Neurachne: loss of a carbonic anhydrase chloroplast transit peptide.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Harmony; Saladié, Montserrat; Rolland, Vivien; Sharwood, Robert E; Macfarlane, Terry; Ludwig, Martha

    2017-02-02

    Neurachne is the only known grass lineage containing closely related C3, C3-C4 intermediate and C4 species, making it an ideal taxon with which to study the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in the grasses. To begin dissecting the molecular changes that led to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in this group, the cDNAs encoding four distinct β-carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoforms were characterized from leaf tissue of Neurachne munroi (C4), N. minor (C3-C4), and N. alopecuroidea (C3). Two genes (CA1 and CA2) each encode two different isoforms: CA1a, CA1b, CA2a and CA2b. Transcript analyses found CA1 mRNAs were significantly more abundant than transcripts from the CA2 gene in the leaves of each species examined, comprising approximately 99% of all β-CA transcripts measured. Localization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs showed that while CA1b is a cytosolic CA in all three species, the CA1a proteins are differentially localized. The N. alopecuroidea and N. minor CA1a isoforms were imported into chloroplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells whereas N. munroi CA1a localized to the cytosol. Sequence analysis indicated an 11 amino acid deletion in the N-terminus of N. munroi CA1a relative to the C3 and C3-C4 proteins, suggesting chloroplast targeting of CA1a is the ancestral state, and that loss of a functional chloroplast transit peptide in N. munroi CA1a is associated with the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in Neurachne. Remarkably, this mechanism is homoplastic with evolution of the C4-associated CA in the dicotyledonous Flaveria, although the actual mutations in the two lineages differ.

  12. Characteristics of Light-Dependent Inorganic Carbon Uptake by Isolated Spinach Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Sicher, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    The light-dependent accumulation of radioactively labeled inorganic carbon in isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts was determined by silicone oil filtering centrifugation. Intact chloroplasts, dark-incubated 60 seconds at pH 7.6 and 23°C with 0.5 millimolar sodium bicarbonate, contained 0.5 to 1.0 millimolar internal inorganic carbon. The stromal pool of inorganic carbon increased 5- to 7-fold after 2 to 3 minutes of light. The saturated internal bicarbonate concentration of illuminated spinach chloroplasts was 10- to 20-fold greater than that of the external medium. This ratio decreased at lower temperatures and with increasing external bicarbonate. Over one-half the inorganic carbon found in intact spinach chloroplasts after 2 minutes of light was retained during a subsequent 3-minute dark incubation at 5°C. Calculations of light-induced stromal alkalization based on the uptake of radioactively labeled bicarbonate were 0.4 to 0.5 pH units less than measurements performed with [14C]dimethyloxazolidine-dione. About one-third of the binding sites on the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase were radiolabeled when the enzyme was activated in situ and 14CO2 bound to the activator site was trapped in the presence of carboxypentitol bisphosphates. Deleting orthophosphate from the incubation medium eliminated inorganic carbon accumulation in the stroma. Thus, bicarbonate ion distribution across the chloroplast envelope was not strictly pH dependent as predicted by the Henderson-Hasselbach formula. This finding is potentially explained by the presence of bound CO2 in the chloroplast. PMID:16663542

  13. Inhibition of Photosynthetic Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Isolated Spinach Chloroplasts Exposed to Reduced Osmotic Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Plaut, Zvi

    1971-01-01

    Reduced osmotic potentials inhibited the rate of CO2 fixation by isolated intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. This inhibition was observed immediately after transfer of chloroplasts from a solution containing 0.33 m sorbitol to higher sorbitol concentrations, and the depressed rate remained constant. The inhibited CO2 fixation could not be attributed to a decreased rate of photosynthetic electron transport, since NADP reduction was unaffected by subjecting the chloroplasts to low potentials. It could also not result from restricted permeability to CO2, as CO2 concentrations had no effect on the relative inhibition induced by the lowered potential. A procedure was developed for the determination of several enzymes of the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle in the intact chloroplast without their being extracted. The activities of the combined three enzymes: ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase and of ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase alone were found to be inhibited at low osmotic potentials. Analysis of the photosynthetic products showed that the formation of glycerate-3-phosphate was inhibited to a greater extent than the formation of all other products. CO2 fixation was partly resumed when chloroplasts were returned from a 0.67 m sorbitol to a 0.33 m sorbitol solution, regardless whether the transfer occurred in the light or in the dark. PMID:16657842

  14. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  15. Energetic factors affecting carbon dioxide fixation in isolated chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Slovacek, R.E.; Hind, G.

    1980-03-01

    Light- and HCO/sub 3/-saturated (10 millimolar) rates of O/sub 2/ evolution (120 to 220 micromoles O/sub 2/ per milligram chlorophyll per hour), obtained with intact spinach chloroplasts, are decreased up to 3-fold by changes in assay conditions such as omission of catalase from the medium, the use of high (greater than or equal to 1 millimolar) inorganic phosphate, inclusion of NO/sub 2/- as an electron acceptor, or bright illumination at low partial pressures of O/sub 2/. These inhibitions may be reversed by addition of uncoupling levels of NH/sub 4/Cl or of antimycin concentrations that partially block cyclic electron transfer between cytochrome b/sub 6/ and cytochrome f. Measurements of the pH gradient across the thylakoid membrane with the fluorescent probe, 9-aminoacridine, indicate that changes in ..delta..pH are sufficient to account for both the inhibited and restored rates of electron transport. It follows that the rate of HCO/sub 3/-saturated photosynthesis may be restricted by a proton gradient back pressure under these conditions. The rate of O/sub 2/ evolution is also decreased 3-fold when ambient CO/sub 2/ (0.63 millimolar HCO/sub 3/- at pH 8.1) is used in place of saturating HCO/sub 3/- and chloroplasts are illuminated aerobically with catalase and a low level (0.25 millimolar) of K/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/. Only inhibitory effects are observed with additions of antimycin or NH/sub 4/Cl. Under these conditions, excessive photophosphorylation or a large pH gradient does not limit the rate of photosynthesis.

  16. Possible CO2 concentrating mechanism in chloroplasts of C3 plants. Role of carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Fridlyand, L E; Kaler, V L

    1987-12-01

    The possibility of a specific CO2 concentrating mechanism present in chloroplasts of C3 plants is analyzed. Proton gradient between thylakoids and the stroma is assumed to be the driving force for this process. The possible CO2 concentrating mechanisms are: 1. HCO3- permeation into thylakoids, its dehydration there and diffusion of CO2 formed into the stroma; 2. Dehydration of HCO3- present in the stroma at the thylakoid surface in a reaction with H+ leaving the thylakoids through: a) channels of membrane-bound carbonic anhydrase; b) channels of the ATPase complex. A system of equations describing CO3- and CO2 diffusion as well as CO2 assimilation and formation was used. The increase in photosynthesis rate, upon CO2 diffusion being facilitated in the presence of carbonic anhydrase, and due to the action of CO2 concentrating mechanisms, was numerically estimated. The CO2 concentrating mechanism was shown to function effectively only with the entire chloroplast being the CO2 concentrating zone. This is the case when the bulk of stromal carbonic anhydrase is localized near the inner chloroplast envelope. The existence of CO2 concentrating mechanisms around a single granum or around thylakoids is hardly possible. Approaches enabling the detection of similar concentrating mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Control of chloroplast formation in Euglena gracilis. Antagonism between carbon and nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Harris, R C; Kirk, J T

    1969-06-01

    between high-carbon and low-carbon cells with respect to the concentrations of individual amino acids: in particular low-carbon cells contain higher concentrations of alanine. High-carbon cells have approximately twice as much protease activity as low-carbon cells. 4. The possible biochemical basis for the differing ability of high-carbon and low-carbon cells to form chloroplasts in the light is discussed.

  18. Glyoxylate and Glutamate Effects on Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Isolated Chloroplasts and Mesophyll Cells of Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Lawyer, Arthur L.; Cornwell, Karen L.; Gee, Sherry L.; Bassham, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Addition of millimolar sodium glyoxylate to spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts was inhibitory to photosynthetic incorporation of 14CO2 under conditions of both low (0.2 millimolar or air levels) and high (9 millimolar) CO2 concentrations. Incorporation of 14C into most metabolites decreased. Labeling of 6-P-gluconate and fructose-1,6-bis-P increased. This suggested that glyoxylate inhibited photosynthetic carbon metabolism indirectly by decreasing the reducing potential of chloroplasts through reduction of glyoxylate to glycolate. This hypothesis was supported by measuring the reduction of [14C]glyoxylate by chloroplasts. Incubation of isolated mesophyll cells with glyoxylate had no effect on net photosynthetic CO2 uptake, but increased labeling was observed in 6-P-gluconate, a key indicator of decreased reducing potential. The possibility that glyoxylate was affecting photosynthetic metabolism by decreasing chloroplast pH cannot be excluded. Increased 14C-labeling of ribulose-1,5-bis-P and decreased 3-P-glyceric acid and glycolate labeling upon addition of glyoxylate to chloroplasts suggested that ribulose-bis-P carboxylase and oxygenase might be inhibited either indirectly or directly by glyoxylate. Glyoxylate addition decreased 14CO2 labeling into glycolate and glycine by isolated mesophyll cells but had no effect on net 14CO2 fixation. Glutamate had little effect on net photosynthetic metabolism in chloroplast preparations but did increase 14CO2 incorporation by 15% in isolated mesophyll cells under air levels of CO2. PMID:16663018

  19. Disruption of the plastid ycf10 open reading frame affects uptake of inorganic carbon in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, N; Dorne, A J; Amoroso, G; Sültemeyer, D F; Joyard, J; Rochaix, J D

    1997-01-01

    The product of the chloroplast ycf10 gene has been localized in the inner chloroplast envelope membrane (Sasaki et al., 1993) and found to display sequence homology with the cyanobacterial CotA product which is altered in mutants defective in CO2 transport and proton extrusion (Katoh et al., 1996a,b). In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ycf10, located between the psbI and atpH genes, encodes a putative hydrophobic protein of 500 residues, which is considerably larger than its higher plant homologue because of a long insertion that separates the conserved N and C termini. Using biolistic transformation, we have disrupted ycf10 with the chloroplast aadA expression cassette and examined the phenotype of the homoplasmic transformants. These were found to grow both photoheterotrophically and photoautotrophically under low light, thereby revealing that the Ycf10 product is not essential for the photosynthetic reactions. However, under high light these transformants did not grow photoautotrophically and barely photoheterotrophically. The increased light sensitivity of the transformants appears to result from a limitation in photochemical energy utilization and/or dissipation which correlates with a greatly diminished photosynthetic response to exogenous (CO2 + HCO3-), especially under conditions where the chloroplast inorganic carbon transport system is not induced. Mass spectrometric measurements with either whole cells or isolated chloroplasts from the transformants revealed that the CO2 and HCO3- uptake systems have a reduced affinity for their substrates. The results suggest the existence of a ycf10-dependent system within the plastid envelope which promotes efficient inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake into chloroplasts. PMID:9362486

  20. CARBONIC ANHYDRASE ACTIVITY OF INTEGRAL-FUNCTIONAL COMPLEXES OF THYLAKOID MEMBRANES OF SPINACH CHLOROPLASTS.

    PubMed

    Semenihin, A V; Zolotareva, O K

    2015-01-01

    Isolated thylakoid membranes were disrupted by treatment with nonionic detergents digitonin or dodecyl maltoside. Solubilized polypeptide complexes were separated by native gel charge shift electrophoresis. The position of ATP-synthase complex and its isolated catalytic part (CF1) within gel was determined using the color reaction for ATPase activity. Due to the presence of cytochromes, the red band in unstained gels corresponded to the cytochrome b6f complex. Localization of the cytochrome b6f complex, ATP synthase and coupling CF1 in the native gel was confirmed by their subunit composition determined after SDS-electrophoretic analysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in polypeptide zones of PS II, cytochrome b6f complex, and ATP-synthase CF1 was identified in native gels using indicator bromothymol blue. CA activity of isolated CF1 in solution was determined by infrared gas analysis as the rate of bicarbonate dehydration. The water-soluble acetazolamide, an inhibitor of CA, unlike lipophilic ethoxyzolamide inhibited CA activity of CF1 Thus, it was shown for the first time that ATP-synthase has a component which is capable of catalyzing the interconversion of forms of carbonic acid associated with proton exchange. The data obtained suggest the presence of multiple forms of carbonic anhydrase in the thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts and confirm their involvement in the proton transfer to the ATP synthase.

  1. Identification of a New Chloroplast Carbonic Anhydrase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mautusi; Lato, Scott M.; Ynalvez, Ruby A.; Xiao, Ying; Moroney, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA) are zinc-containing metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2. The three evolutionarily unrelated families of CAs are designated α-, β-, and γ-CA. Aquatic photosynthetic organisms have evolved different forms of CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to aid Rubisco in capturing CO2 from the surrounding environment. One aspect of all CCMs is the critical roles played by various specially localized extracellular and intracellular CAs. Five CAs have previously been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a green alga with a well-studied CCM. Here we identify a sixth gene encoding a β-type CA. This new β-CA, designated Cah6, is distinct from the two mitochondrial β-CAs in C. reinhardtii. Nucleotide sequence data show that the Cah6 cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 264 amino acids with a leader sequence likely targeting the protein to the chloroplast stroma. We have fused the Cah6 open reading frame to the coding sequence of maltose-binding protein in a pMal expression vector. The purified recombinant fusion protein is active and was used to partially characterize the Cah6 protein. The purified recombinant fusion protein was cleaved with protease Factor Xa to separate Cah6 from the maltose-binding protein and the purified Cah6 protein was used to raise an antibody. Western blots, immunolocalization studies, and northern blots collectively indicated that Cah6 is constitutively expressed in the stroma of chloroplasts. A possible role for Cah6 in the CCM of C. reinhardtii is proposed. PMID:15122009

  2. beta. -carotene synthesis in spinach chloroplasts is tightly linked to photosynthetic carbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Siebert, D.; Schultz, G.

    1987-04-01

    When purified, highly intact spinach chloroplasts were illuminated in the presence of NaH/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, the largest portion of acetate derived compounds formed was ..beta..-carotene and not fatty acids (20 and 2.5 natoms C incorporated/mg chlorophyll x h when 5 mM NaH /sup 14/CO/sub 3/ was used). From isotopic dilution experiments applying glyceraldehyde 3-P, dihydroxyacetone-P, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA), 2-PGA, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate, respectively, evidence was obtained that acetyl-CoA to form isopentenyl-PP (IPP) originates from a low capacity but highly effective flow from photosynthetic CO/sub 2/-fixation via 3-PGA - 2-PGA - PEP - pyruvate. Phosphoglycerate mutase in chloroplasts, of which the presence hitherto was not unequivocally proven, was detected by (i) latency technique and (ii) feeding/1-/sup 14/C/glycerate and following 3-PGA, 2-PGA, PEP and pyruvate level in chloroplasts and suspension medium. From highly effective synthesis of ..beta..-carotene from CO/sub 2/ conclusion may be drawn that pathways for both, acetyl compounds and IPP, to form isoprenoids must exist in chloroplasts.

  3. Antisense Suppression of the Small Chloroplast Protein CP12 in Tobacco Alters Carbon Partitioning and Severely Restricts Growth1[W

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas P.; Fryer, Michael J.; Singh, Prashant; Metodiev, Metodi; Lytovchenko, Anna; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Kruger, Nicholas J.; Quick, W. Paul; Lloyd, Julie C.; Raines, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    The thioredoxin-regulated chloroplast protein CP12 forms a multienzyme complex with the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). PRK and GAPDH are inactivated when present in this complex, a process shown in vitro to be dependent upon oxidized CP12. The importance of CP12 in vivo in higher plants, however, has not been investigated. Here, antisense suppression of CP12 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was observed to impact on NAD-induced PRK and GAPDH complex formation but had little effect on enzyme activity. Additionally, only minor changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation were observed. Despite this, antisense plants displayed changes in growth rates and morphology, including dwarfism and reduced apical dominance. The hypothesis that CP12 is essential to separate oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activity from Calvin-Benson cycle activity, as proposed in cyanobacteria, was tested. No evidence was found to support this role in tobacco. Evidence was seen, however, for a restriction to malate valve capacity, with decreases in NADP-malate dehydrogenase activity (but not protein levels) and pyridine nucleotide content. Antisense repression of CP12 also led to significant changes in carbon partitioning, with increased carbon allocation to the cell wall and the organic acids malate and fumarate and decreased allocation to starch and soluble carbohydrates. Severe decreases were also seen in 2-oxoglutarate content, a key indicator of cellular carbon sufficiency. The data presented here indicate that in tobacco, CP12 has a role in redox-mediated regulation of carbon partitioning from the chloroplast and provides strong in vivo evidence that CP12 is required for normal growth and development in plants. PMID:21865489

  4. Antisense suppression of the small chloroplast protein CP12 in tobacco alters carbon partitioning and severely restricts growth.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Fryer, Michael J; Singh, Prashant; Metodiev, Metodi; Lytovchenko, Anna; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Kruger, Nicholas J; Quick, W Paul; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A

    2011-10-01

    The thioredoxin-regulated chloroplast protein CP12 forms a multienzyme complex with the Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). PRK and GAPDH are inactivated when present in this complex, a process shown in vitro to be dependent upon oxidized CP12. The importance of CP12 in vivo in higher plants, however, has not been investigated. Here, antisense suppression of CP12 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was observed to impact on NAD-induced PRK and GAPDH complex formation but had little effect on enzyme activity. Additionally, only minor changes in photosynthetic carbon fixation were observed. Despite this, antisense plants displayed changes in growth rates and morphology, including dwarfism and reduced apical dominance. The hypothesis that CP12 is essential to separate oxidative pentose phosphate pathway activity from Calvin-Benson cycle activity, as proposed in cyanobacteria, was tested. No evidence was found to support this role in tobacco. Evidence was seen, however, for a restriction to malate valve capacity, with decreases in NADP-malate dehydrogenase activity (but not protein levels) and pyridine nucleotide content. Antisense repression of CP12 also led to significant changes in carbon partitioning, with increased carbon allocation to the cell wall and the organic acids malate and fumarate and decreased allocation to starch and soluble carbohydrates. Severe decreases were also seen in 2-oxoglutarate content, a key indicator of cellular carbon sufficiency. The data presented here indicate that in tobacco, CP12 has a role in redox-mediated regulation of carbon partitioning from the chloroplast and provides strong in vivo evidence that CP12 is required for normal growth and development in plants.

  5. Coordination of carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism in Salicornia europaea under salinity: Comparative proteomic analysis on chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pengxiang; Feng, Juanjuan; Jiang, Ping; Chen, Xianyang; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Nie, Lingling; Jiang, Dan; Lv, Sulian; Kuang, Tingyun; Li, Yinxin

    2011-11-01

    Halophyte, like Salicornia europaea, could make full use of marginal saline land for carbon fixation. How the photosynthesis of S. europaea is regulated under high salinity implicates a significant aspect to exploit this pioneer plant in future. Measurement of photosynthesis parameters demonstrated the reduction of photosynthesis for the 0 and 800 mM NaCl treated plants are more likely due to non-stomatal limitation, which might be caused by changes in the enzymes associated with photosynthesis. Different salinity induced ultrastructure changes other than photosynthetic apparatus damage, suggesting the photosynthesis of S. europaea might be affected via biochemical regulation. Comparative proteomics analysis of chloroplast proteins by 2-D gel electrophoresis reproducibly detected 90 differentially expressed proteins, among which 66 proteins were identified by nanoLC MS/MS. Further study of thylakoid membrane proteins by Blue-Native PAGE proved the increase in abundance of light reaction proteins under salinity. Analysis of gene expression patterns of 12 selected proteins provides evidence for the correlations between transcription and proteomics data. Based on our results, a putative model of photosynthesis regulatory network figured out proper coordination of carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolism in chloroplast of S. europaea under salinity, which provided subcellular level insight into salt tolerance mechanism in S. europaea. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Consequence of restricted mitochondrial oxidative metabolism on photosynthetic carbon assimilation in mesophyll protoplasts: Decrease in light activation of four chloroplastic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Padmasree, K.; Raghavendra, A. S.

    2001-08-01

    The patterns of light activation of 4 chloroplastic enzymes were examined in mesophyll protoplasts of pea (Pisum sativum) in the absence or presence of oligomycin (inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation) or antimycin A (inhibitor of cytochrome pathway) or salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, inhibitor of alternative pathway). The results were compared with those of DCMU (inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport). The light activation of NADP glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP-GAPDH), fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), phosphoribulokinase (PRK) (enzymes of the Calvin cycle) and NADP malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) (reflects chloroplast redox state) was more pronounced at limiting CO2 (0.1 mM NaHCO3) than that at optimal CO2 (1.0 mM NaHCO3). SHAM decreased markedly (up to 33%) the light activation of all 4 enzymes, while antimycin A or oligomycin exerted only a limited effect (<10% decrease). Antimycin A or oligomycin or SHAM had no significant effect on light activation of these 4 enzymes in isolated chloroplasts. However, DCMU caused a remarkable decrease in light activation of enzymes in both protoplasts (up to 78%) and chloroplasts (up to 69%). These results suggest that the restriction of alternative pathway of mitochondrial metabolism results in a marked decrease in the light activation of key chloroplastic enzymes in mesophyll protoplasts but not in isolated chloroplasts. Such a decrease in the light activation of enzymes could be also a secondary feedback effect because of the restriction on carbon assimilation.

  7. Chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu

    2003-01-01

    The study of chloroplast movement made a quantum leap at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Research based on reverse-genetic approaches using targeted mutants has brought new concepts to this field. One of the most exciting findings has been the discovery of photoreceptors for both accumulation and avoidance responses in Arabidopsis and in the fern Adiantum. Evidence for the adaptive advantage of chloroplast avoidance movements in plant survival has also been found. Additional discoveries include mechano-stress-induced chloroplast movement in ferns and mosses, and microtubule-mediated chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella. The possible ecological significance of chloroplast movement is discussed in the final part of this review.

  9. Carbonic Anhydrase Activity in Isolated Chloroplasts of Wild-Type and High-CO2-Dependent Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as Studied by a New Assay.

    PubMed

    Katzman, G. L.; Carlson, S. J.; Marcus, Y.; Moroney, J. V.; Togasaki, R. K.

    1994-08-01

    In an assay of carbonic anhydrase (CA), NAH14CO3 soltution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases 14CO2, which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells that have been adapted to a low-CO2 environment. The assay is initiated by illuminating the cells and is stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid-stable radioactivity. With bovine CA, 1.5 Wilbur-Anderson units (WAU) was consistently measured at 5- to 6-fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air-adapted wild-type C. reinhardtii had 740 [plus or minus] 12.4 WAU/mg chlorophyll (Chl). Sonicated chloroplasts from a mixotrophically grown wall-less strain, cw-15, had 35.5 [plus or minus] 2.6 WAU/mg Chl, whereas chloroplasts from wall-less external CA mutant strain cia5/cw-15 had 33.8 [plus or minus] 1.9 WAU/mg Chl. Sonicated chloroplasts from the wall-less mutant strain cia-3/cw-15, believed to lack an internal CA, had 2.8 [plus or minus] 3.2 WAU/mg Chl. Sonicated whole cells from cia3/cw-15 had 2.8 [plus or minus] 7.8 WAU/mg Chl. Acetazolamide, ethoxyzolamide, and p-aminomethylbenzene sulfonamide (Mafenide) at 100 [mu]M inhibited CA in sonicated chloroplasts from cia-5/cw-15. Treatment at 80[deg]C for 10 min inhibited this CA activity by 90.8 [plus or minus] 3.6%. Thus, a sensitive 14C assay has confirmed the presence of a CA in cw-15 and cia-5/cw-15 chloroplasts and the lack of a CA in cia-3/cw-15 chloroplasts. Our results indicate that HCO3- is the inorganic carbon species that is accumulated by chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas and that chloroplastic CA is responsible for the majority of internal CA activity.

  10. Suppression of Chloroplastic Alkenal/One Oxidoreductase Represses the Carbon Catabolic Pathway in Arabidopsis Leaves during Night.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Ifuku, Kentaro; Ikeda, Ken-Ichi; Inoue, Kanako Ikeda; Park, Pyoyun; Tamoi, Masahiro; Inoue, Hironori; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Saito, Ryota; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-04-01

    Lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS) possess electrophilic moieties and cause oxidative stress by reacting with cellular components. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has a chloroplast-localized alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AtAOR) for the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS, especially α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the physiological importance of AtAOR and analyzed AtAOR (aor) mutants, including a transfer DNA knockout, aor (T-DNA), and RNA interference knockdown, aor (RNAi), lines. We found that both aor mutants showed smaller plant sizes than wild-type plants when they were grown under day/night cycle conditions. To elucidate the cause of the aor mutant phenotype, we analyzed the photosynthetic rate and the respiration rate by gas-exchange analysis. Subsequently, we found that both wild-type and aor (RNAi) plants showed similar CO2 assimilation rates; however, the respiration rate was lower in aor (RNAi) than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, we revealed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity decreased and starch degradation during the night was suppressed in aor (RNAi). In contrast, the phenotype of aor (RNAi) was rescued when aor (RNAi) plants were grown under constant light conditions. These results indicate that the smaller plant sizes observed in aor mutants grown under day/night cycle conditions were attributable to the decrease in carbon utilization during the night. Here, we propose that the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS by AtAOR in chloroplasts contributes to the protection of dark respiration and supports plant growth during the night. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Suppression of Chloroplastic Alkenal/One Oxidoreductase Represses the Carbon Catabolic Pathway in Arabidopsis Leaves during Night1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ifuku, Kentaro; Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Kanako Ikeda; Park, Pyoyun; Tamoi, Masahiro; Inoue, Hironori; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Saito, Ryota

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS) possess electrophilic moieties and cause oxidative stress by reacting with cellular components. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has a chloroplast-localized alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AtAOR) for the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS, especially α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the physiological importance of AtAOR and analyzed AtAOR (aor) mutants, including a transfer DNA knockout, aor (T-DNA), and RNA interference knockdown, aor (RNAi), lines. We found that both aor mutants showed smaller plant sizes than wild-type plants when they were grown under day/night cycle conditions. To elucidate the cause of the aor mutant phenotype, we analyzed the photosynthetic rate and the respiration rate by gas-exchange analysis. Subsequently, we found that both wild-type and aor (RNAi) plants showed similar CO2 assimilation rates; however, the respiration rate was lower in aor (RNAi) than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, we revealed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity decreased and starch degradation during the night was suppressed in aor (RNAi). In contrast, the phenotype of aor (RNAi) was rescued when aor (RNAi) plants were grown under constant light conditions. These results indicate that the smaller plant sizes observed in aor mutants grown under day/night cycle conditions were attributable to the decrease in carbon utilization during the night. Here, we propose that the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS by AtAOR in chloroplasts contributes to the protection of dark respiration and supports plant growth during the night. PMID:26884484

  12. From extracellular to intracellular: the establishment of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Whatley, J M; John, P; Whatley, F R

    1979-04-11

    Paracoccus and Rhodopseudomonas are unusual among bacteria in having a majority of the biochemical features of mitochondria; blue-green algae have many of the features of chloroplasts. The theory of serial endosymbiosis proposes that a primitive eukaryote successively took up bacteria and blue-green algae to yield mitochondria and chloroplasts respectively. Possible characteristics of transitional forms are indicated both by the primitive amoeba, Pelomyxa, which lacks mitochondria but contains a permanent population of endosymbiotic bacteria, and by several anomalous eukaryotic algae, e.g. Cyanophora, which contain cyanelles instead of chloroplasts. Blue-green algae appear to be obvious precursors of red algal chloroplasts but the ancestry of other chloroplasts is less certain, though the epizoic symbiont, Prochloron, may resemble the ancestral green algal chloroplast. We speculate that the chloroplasts of the remaining algae may have been a eukaryotic origin. The evolution or organelles from endosymbiotic precursors would involve their integration with the host cell biochemically, structurally and numerically.

  13. Phosphorylation of Arabidopsis transketolase at Ser428 provides a potential paradigm for the metabolic control of chloroplast carbon metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Agostinho G.; Mehlmer, Norbert; Stael, Simon; Mair, Andrea; Parvin, Nargis; Chigri, Fatima; Teige, Markus; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger in eukaryotic cells that regulates many different cellular processes. To elucidate calcium regulation in chloroplasts, we identified the targets of calcium-dependent phosphorylation within the stromal proteome. A 73 kDa protein was identified as one of the most dominant proteins undergoing phosphorylation in a calcium-dependent manner in the stromal extracts of both Arabidopsis and Pisum. It was identified as TKL (transketolase), an essential enzyme of both the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Calcium-dependent phosphorylation of both Arabidopsis isoforms (AtTKL1 and AtTKL2) could be confirmed in vitro using recombinant proteins. The phosphorylation is catalysed by a stroma-localized protein kinase, which cannot utilize GTP. Phosphorylation of AtTKL1, the dominant isoform in most tissues, occurs at a serine residue that is conserved in TKLs of vascular plants. By contrast, an aspartate residue is present in this position in cyanobacteria, algae and mosses. Characterization of a phosphomimetic mutant (S428D) indicated that Ser428 phosphorylation exerts significant effects on the enzyme's substrate saturation kinetics at specific physiological pH values. The results of the present study point to a role for TKL phosphorylation in the regulation of carbon allocation. PMID:24328790

  14. Phosphorylation of Arabidopsis transketolase at Ser428 provides a potential paradigm for the metabolic control of chloroplast carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Agostinho G; Mehlmer, Norbert; Stael, Simon; Mair, Andrea; Parvin, Nargis; Chigri, Fatima; Teige, Markus; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2014-03-01

    Calcium is an important second messenger in eukaryotic cells that regulates many different cellular processes. To elucidate calcium regulation in chloroplasts, we identified the targets of calcium-dependent phosphorylation within the stromal proteome. A 73 kDa protein was identified as one of the most dominant proteins undergoing phosphorylation in a calcium-dependent manner in the stromal extracts of both Arabidopsis and Pisum. It was identified as TKL (transketolase), an essential enzyme of both the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Calcium-dependent phosphorylation of both Arabidopsis isoforms (AtTKL1 and AtTKL2) could be confirmed in vitro using recombinant proteins. The phosphorylation is catalysed by a stroma-localized protein kinase, which cannot utilize GTP. Phosphorylation of AtTKL1, the dominant isoform in most tissues, occurs at a serine residue that is conserved in TKLs of vascular plants. By contrast, an aspartate residue is present in this position in cyanobacteria, algae and mosses. Characterization of a phosphomimetic mutant (S428D) indicated that Ser428 phosphorylation exerts significant effects on the enzyme's substrate saturation kinetics at specific physiological pH values. The results of the present study point to a role for TKL phosphorylation in the regulation of carbon allocation.

  15. The autophagic degradation of chloroplasts via rubisco-containing bodies is specifically linked to leaf carbon status but not nitrogen status in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masanori; Wada, Shinya; Makino, Amane; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2010-11-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process facilitating the vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components and is important for nutrient recycling during starvation. We previously demonstrated that chloroplasts can be partially mobilized to the vacuole by autophagy via spherical bodies named Rubisco-containing bodies (RCBs). Although chloroplasts contain approximately 80% of total leaf nitrogen and represent a major carbon and nitrogen source for new growth, the relationship between leaf nutrient status and RCB production remains unclear. We examined the effects of nutrient factors on the appearance of RCBs in leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing stroma-targeted fluorescent proteins. In excised leaves, the appearance of RCBs was suppressed by the presence of metabolic sugars, which were added externally or were produced during photosynthesis in the light. The light-mediated suppression was relieved by the inhibition of photosynthesis. During a diurnal cycle, RCB production was suppressed in leaves excised at the end of the day with high starch content. Starchless mutants phosphoglucomutase and ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase1 produced a large number of RCBs, while starch-excess mutants starch-excess1 and maltose-excess1 produced fewer RCBs. In nitrogen-limited plants, as leaf carbohydrates were accumulated, RCB production was suppressed. We propose that there exists a close relationship between the degradation of chloroplast proteins via RCBs and leaf carbon but not nitrogen status in autophagy. We also found that the appearance of non-RCB-type autophagic bodies was not suppressed in the light and somewhat responded to nitrogen in excised leaves, unlike RCBs. These results imply that the degradation of chloroplast proteins via RCBs is specifically controlled in autophagy.

  16. Circadian Changes in Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Distribution Inside Individual Chloroplasts Can Account for the Rhythm in Dinoflagellate Carbon Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Nassoury, Nasha; Fritz, Lawrence; Morse, David

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies of photosynthetic carbon fixation in the marine alga Gonyaulax have shown that the reaction rates in vivo vary threefold between day and night but that the in vitro activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in this process, remains constant. Using protein gel blotting, we confirm that Rubisco protein levels are constant over time. We present simultaneous measurements of the rhythms of CO2 fixation and O2 evolution and show that the two rhythms are ∼6 hr out of phase. We further show that the distribution of Rubisco within chloroplasts varies as a function of circadian time and that this rhythm in Rubisco distribution correlates with the CO2 fixation rhythm. At times of high carbon fixation, Rubisco is found in pyrenoids, regions of the chloroplasts located near the cell center, and is separated from most of the light-harvesting protein PCP (for peridinin–chlorophyll a–protein), which is found in cortical regions of the plastids. We propose that the rhythm in Rubisco distribution is causally related to the rhythm in carbon fixation and suggest that several mechanisms involving enzyme sequestration could account for the increase in the efficiency of carbon fixation. PMID:11283345

  17. Synthetic chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, M.

    1980-06-01

    The principal function of the chloroplast is to capture solar quanta and to store them in some stable form. We are in the process of trying to construct a totally synthetic system that would simulate some of the reactions of the two photosystems which occur in natural chloroplasts. Toward this end, we have demonstrated a number of the reactions required in separated systems. We have shown that it is possible to transfer electrons across an insulating membrane barrier with a surfactant photosensitizer. Others have shown, and we have confirmed, that it is possible to collect the two electrons necessary for the generation of molecular hydrogen on a heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water and similarly to collect the four holes on another heterogeneous catalyst suspended in water for the generation of molecular oxygen. A synthesis of some of these molecular catalysts for both these purposes is underway, with some partial success. When these partial reactions are assembled in a system, the resulting synthetic chloroplasts will not resemble the natural entity in detailed construction as they will contain no protein.

  18. Oxygenic photosynthesis and the distribution of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    The integrated functioning of two photosystems (I and II) whether in cyanobacteria or in chloroplasts is the outstanding sign of a common ancestral origin. Many variations on the basic theme are currently evident in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms whether they are prokaryotes, unicellular, or multicellular. By conservative estimates, oxygenic photosynthesis has been around for at least ca. 2.2-2.7 billions years, consistent with cyanobacteria-type microfossils, biomarkers, and an atmospheric rise in oxygen to less than 1.0% of the present concentration. The presumptions of chloroplast formation by the cyanobacterial uptake into a eukaryote prior to 1.6 BYa ago are confounded by assumptions of host type(s) and potential tolerance of oxygen toxicity. The attempted dating and interrelationships of particular chloroplasts in various plant or animal lineages has relied heavily on phylogenomic analysis and evaluations that have been difficult to confirm separately. Many variations occur in algal groups, involving the type and number of accessory pigments, and the number(s) of membranes (2-4) enclosing a chloroplast, which can both help and complicate inferences made about early or late origins of chloroplasts. Integration of updated phylogenomics with physiological and cytological observations remains a special challenge, but could lead to more accurate assumptions of initial and extant endosymbiotic event(s) leading toward stable chloroplast associations.

  19. Ancestral hierarchy and conflict.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Christopher

    2012-05-18

    Ancestral Pan, the shared predecessor of humans, bonobos, and chimpanzees, lived in social dominance hierarchies that created conflict through individual and coalitional competition. This ancestor had male and female mediators, but individuals often reconciled independently. An evolutionary trajectory is traced from this ancestor to extant hunter-gatherers, whose coalitional behavior results in suppressed dominance and competition, except in mate competition. A territorial ancestral Pan would not have engaged in intensive warfare if we consider bonobo behavior, but modern human foragers have the potential for full-scale war. Although hunter-gatherers are able to resolve conflicts preemptively, they also use mechanisms, such as truces and peace pacts, to mitigate conflict when the costs become too high. Today, humans retain the genetic underpinnings of both conflict and conflict management; thus, we retain the potential for both war and peace.

  20. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  1. Functional remodeling of RNA processing in replacement chloroplasts by pathways retained from their predecessors.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Richard G; Howe, Christopher J

    2012-11-13

    Chloroplasts originate through the endosymbiotic integration of a host and a photosynthetic symbiont, with processes established within the host for the biogenesis and maintenance of the nascent chloroplast. It is thought that several photosynthetic eukaryotes have replaced their original chloroplasts with others derived from different source organisms in a process termed "serial endosymbiosis of chloroplasts." However, it is not known whether replacement chloroplasts are affected by the biogenesis and maintenance pathways established to support their predecessors. Here, we investigate whether pathways established during a previous chloroplast symbiosis function in the replacement chloroplasts of the dinoflagellate alga Karenia mikimotoi. We show that chloroplast transcripts in K. mikimotoi are subject to 3' polyuridylylation and extensive sequence editing. We confirm that these processes do not occur in free-living relatives of the replacement chloroplast lineage, but are otherwise found only in the ancestral, red algal-derived chloroplasts of dinoflagellates and their closest relatives. This indicates that these unusual RNA-processing pathways have been retained from the original symbiont lineage and made use of by the replacement chloroplast. Our results constitute an addition to current theories of chloroplast evolution in which chloroplast biogenesis may be radically remodeled by pathways remaining from previous symbioses.

  2. Light and CO2/cAMP Signal Cross Talk on the Promoter Elements of Chloroplastic β-Carbonic Anhydrase Genes in the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Ohno, Naoki; Nakajima, Kensuke; Matsuda, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study showed that three CO2/cAMP-responsive elements (CCRE) CCRE1, CCRE2, and CCRE3 in the promoter of the chloroplastic β-carbonic anhydrase 1 gene in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pptca1) were critical for the cAMP-mediated transcriptional response to ambient CO2 concentration. Pptca1 was activated under CO2 limitation, but the absence of light partially disabled this low-CO2-triggered transcriptional activation. This suppression effect disappeared when CCRE2 or two of three CCREs were replaced with a NotI restriction site, strongly suggesting that light signal cross-talks with CO2 on the cAMP-signal transduction pathway that targets CCREs. The paralogous chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase gene, ptca2 was also CO2/cAMP-responsive. The upstream truncation assay of the ptca2 promoter (Pptca2) revealed a short sequence of -367 to -333 relative to the transcription-start site to be a critical regulatory region for the CO2 and light responses. This core-regulatory region comprises one CCRE1 and two CCRE2 sequences. Further detailed analysis of Pptca2 clearly indicates that two CCRE2s are the cis-element governing the CO2/light response of Pptca2. The transcriptional activation of two Pptcas in CO2 limitation was evident under illumination with a photosynthetically active light wavelength, and an artificial electron acceptor from the reduction side of PSI efficiently inhibited Pptcas activation, while neither inhibition of the linear electron transport from PSII to PSI nor inhibition of ATP synthesis showed an effect on the promoter activity, strongly suggesting a specific involvement of the redox level of the stromal side of the PSI in the CO2/light cross talk.

  3. Chloroplast Proteases: Updates on Proteolysis within and across Suborganellar Compartments.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kenji; Kato, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Chloroplasts originated from the endosymbiosis of ancestral cyanobacteria and maintain transcription and translation machineries for around 100 proteins. Most endosymbiont genes, however, have been transferred to the host nucleus, and the majority of the chloroplast proteome is composed of nucleus-encoded proteins that are biosynthesized in the cytosol and then imported into chloroplasts. How chloroplasts and the nucleus communicate to control the plastid proteome remains an important question. Protein-degrading machineries play key roles in chloroplast proteome biogenesis, remodeling, and maintenance. Research in the past few decades has revealed more than 20 chloroplast proteases, which are localized to specific suborganellar locations. In particular, two energy-dependent processive proteases of bacterial origin, Clp and FtsH, are central to protein homeostasis. Processing endopeptidases such as stromal processing peptidase and thylakoidal processing peptidase are involved in the maturation of precursor proteins imported into chloroplasts by cleaving off the amino-terminal transit peptides. Presequence peptidases and organellar oligopeptidase subsequently degrade the cleaved targeting peptides. Recent findings have indicated that not only intraplastidic but also extraplastidic processive protein-degrading systems participate in the regulation and quality control of protein translocation across the envelopes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the major chloroplast proteases in terms of type, suborganellar localization, and diversification. We present details of these degradation processes as case studies according to suborganellar compartment (envelope, stroma, and thylakoids). Key questions and future directions in this field are discussed. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Discrimination against 13CO2 and C18O16O in Tobacco Plants Modified by an Antisense Construct to Have Low Chloroplastic Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T. G.; Flanagan, L. B.; Coleman, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    The physiological role of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) was examined by antisense suppression of chloroplastic CA (on average 8% of wild type) in Nicotiana tabacum. Photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics of low-CA and wild-type plants were measured concurrently with short-term, on-line stable isotope discrimination at varying vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and light intensity. Low-CA and wild-type plants were indistinguishable in the responses of assimilation, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and intercellular CO2 concentration to changing VPD or light intensity. At saturating light intensity, low-CA plants had lower discrimination against 13CO2 than wild-type plants by 1.2 to 1.8[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consequently, tissue of the low-CA plants was higher in 13C than the control plants. It was calculated that low-CA plants had chloroplast CO2 concentrations 13 to 22 [mu]mol mol-1 lower than wild-type plants. Discrimination against C18O16O in low-CA plants was 20% of that of the wild type, confirming a role of chloroplastic CA in the mechanism of discrimination against C18O16O ([delta]C18O16O). As VPD increased, stomatal closure caused a reduction in chloroplastic C02 concentration, and since VPD and chloroplastic CO2 concentration act in opposing directions on [delta]C18O16O, no effect of VPD was seen on [delta]C18O16O. PMID:12226395

  5. Photosynthetic Gas Exchange and Discrimination against 13CO2 and C18O16O in Tobacco Plants Modified by an Antisense Construct to Have Low Chloroplastic Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Williams, T. G.; Flanagan, L. B.; Coleman, J. R.

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) was examined by antisense suppression of chloroplastic CA (on average 8% of wild type) in Nicotiana tabacum. Photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics of low-CA and wild-type plants were measured concurrently with short-term, on-line stable isotope discrimination at varying vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and light intensity. Low-CA and wild-type plants were indistinguishable in the responses of assimilation, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and intercellular CO2 concentration to changing VPD or light intensity. At saturating light intensity, low-CA plants had lower discrimination against 13CO2 than wild-type plants by 1.2 to 1.8[per mille (thousand) sign]. Consequently, tissue of the low-CA plants was higher in 13C than the control plants. It was calculated that low-CA plants had chloroplast CO2 concentrations 13 to 22 [mu]mol mol-1 lower than wild-type plants. Discrimination against C18O16O in low-CA plants was 20% of that of the wild type, confirming a role of chloroplastic CA in the mechanism of discrimination against C18O16O ([delta]C18O16O). As VPD increased, stomatal closure caused a reduction in chloroplastic C02 concentration, and since VPD and chloroplastic CO2 concentration act in opposing directions on [delta]C18O16O, no effect of VPD was seen on [delta]C18O16O.

  6. Are palaeoscolecids ancestral ecdysozoans?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Thomas H P; Dong, Xiping; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2010-01-01

    The reconstruction of ancestors is a central aim of comparative anatomy and evolutionary developmental biology, not least in attempts to understand the relationship between developmental and organismal evolution. Inferences based on living taxa can and should be tested against the fossil record, which provides an independent and direct view onto historical character combinations. Here, we consider the nature of the last common ancestor of living ecdysozoans through a detailed analysis of palaeoscolecids, an early and extinct group of introvert-bearing worms that have been proposed to be ancestral ecdysozoans. In a review of palaeoscolecid anatomy, including newly resolved details of the internal and external cuticle structure, we identify specific characters shared with various living nematoid and scalidophoran worms, but not with panarthropods. Considered within a formal cladistic context, these characters provide most overall support for a stem-priapulid affinity, meaning that palaeoscolecids are far-removed from the ecdysozoan ancestor. We conclude that previous interpretations in which palaeoscolecids occupy a deeper position in the ecdysozoan tree lack particular morphological support and rely instead on a paucity of preserved characters. This bears out a more general point that fossil taxa may appear plesiomorphic merely because they preserve only plesiomorphies, rather than the mélange of primitive and derived characters anticipated of organisms properly allocated to a position deep within animal phylogeny.

  7. Import of Soluble Proteins into Chloroplasts and Potential Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sjuts, Inga; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from an endosymbiotic event in which a free-living cyanobacterium was engulfed by an ancestral eukaryotic host. During evolution the majority of the chloroplast genetic information was transferred to the host cell nucleus. As a consequence, proteins formerly encoded by the chloroplast genome are now translated in the cytosol and must be subsequently imported into the chloroplast. This process involves three steps: (i) cytosolic sorting procedures, (ii) binding to the designated receptor-equipped target organelle and (iii) the consecutive translocation process. During import, proteins have to overcome the two barriers of the chloroplast envelope, namely the outer envelope membrane (OEM) and the inner envelope membrane (IEM). In the majority of cases, this is facilitated by two distinct multiprotein complexes, located in the OEM and IEM, respectively, designated TOC and TIC. Plants are constantly exposed to fluctuating environmental conditions such as temperature and light and must therefore regulate protein composition within the chloroplast to ensure optimal functioning of elementary processes such as photosynthesis. In this review we will discuss the recent models of each individual import stage with regard to short-term strategies that plants might use to potentially acclimate to changes in their environmental conditions and preserve the chloroplast protein homeostasis. PMID:28228773

  8. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  9. Oxidative folding in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Disulfide-bonded proteins in chloroplasts from green plants exist in the envelope and the thylakoid membrane, and in the stroma and the lumen. The formation of disulfide bonds in proteins is referred to as oxidative folding and is linked to the import and folding of chloroplast proteins as well as the assembly and repair of thylakoid complexes. It is also important in the redox regulation of enzymes and signal transfer. Green-plant chloroplasts contain enzymes that can form and isomerize disulfide bonds in proteins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four proteins are identified that are relevant for the catalysis of disulfide bond formation in chloroplast proteins. The proteins' low quantum yield of Photosystem II 1 (LQY1, At1g75690) and snowy cotyledon 2 (SCO2, At3g19220) exhibits protein disulfide isomerase activity and is suggested to function in the assembly and repair of Photosystem II (PSII), and the biogenesis of thylakoids in cotyledons, respectively. The thylakoid-located Lumen thiol oxidoreductase 1 (LTO1, At4g35760) can catalyze the formation of the disulfide bond of the extrinsic PsbO protein of PSII. In addition, the stroma-located protein disulfide isomerase PDIL1-3 (At3g54960) may have a role in oxidative folding. Research on oxidative folding in chloroplasts plants is in an early stage and little is known about the mechanisms of disulfide bond formation in chloroplast proteins. The close link between the import and folding of chloroplast proteins suggests that Hsp93, a component of the inner envelope's import apparatus, may have co-chaperones that can catalyze disulfide bond formation in newly imported proteins.

  10. Chloroplast Proteases: Updates on Proteolysis within and across Suborganellar Compartments1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from the endosymbiosis of ancestral cyanobacteria and maintain transcription and translation machineries for around 100 proteins. Most endosymbiont genes, however, have been transferred to the host nucleus, and the majority of the chloroplast proteome is composed of nucleus-encoded proteins that are biosynthesized in the cytosol and then imported into chloroplasts. How chloroplasts and the nucleus communicate to control the plastid proteome remains an important question. Protein-degrading machineries play key roles in chloroplast proteome biogenesis, remodeling, and maintenance. Research in the past few decades has revealed more than 20 chloroplast proteases, which are localized to specific suborganellar locations. In particular, two energy-dependent processive proteases of bacterial origin, Clp and FtsH, are central to protein homeostasis. Processing endopeptidases such as stromal processing peptidase and thylakoidal processing peptidase are involved in the maturation of precursor proteins imported into chloroplasts by cleaving off the amino-terminal transit peptides. Presequence peptidases and organellar oligopeptidase subsequently degrade the cleaved targeting peptides. Recent findings have indicated that not only intraplastidic but also extraplastidic processive protein-degrading systems participate in the regulation and quality control of protein translocation across the envelopes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the major chloroplast proteases in terms of type, suborganellar localization, and diversification. We present details of these degradation processes as case studies according to suborganellar compartment (envelope, stroma, and thylakoids). Key questions and future directions in this field are discussed. PMID:27288365

  11. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1994-11-01

    This project was directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins that function in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. The availability of this nutrient most pervasively limits plant growth and agricultural productivity but the molecular and physiological consequences of nitrogen-deficiency are poorly understood. The model system for our studies of nitrogen-dependent regulation of chloroplast differentiation is the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown phototrophically in a continuous culture system. When 150 {mu}M nitrogen is provided at a dilution rate of 0.25 volumes of the growth medium per day, the cultures are sustained at a density of less than 10{sup 5} cells/ml and chlorophyll deficiency, the classical symptom of nitrogen-deficiency, becomes quite pronounced. We found that there is a concomitant loss of light-harvesting complexes and reduced levels of Photosystem II reaction center complexes while ATP synthetase and Photosystem I reaction centers are maintained at high levels. Moreover, reduced rates of chloroplast protein synthesis are due to differential effects on mRNA translation. In contrast, the deficiency of light-harvesting genes is due to marked reductions of the nuclear-encoded cab mRNAs. Although there is no significant reduction of the amounts of RuBPCase, we also detected substantial changes in the mRNA abundance of the alga`s two small subunit genes. All of the effects of nitrogen-limitation are readily reversible: greening of cells is completed within 24 hours after provision of 10 mM ammonium. During this time, the plastid translational constraints are disengaged and progressive changes in the abundance of nuclear transcripts occur, including a transient 30-fold elevation of {und cab} mRNAs.

  12. Effects of Arsenite, Sulfite, and Sulfate on Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Isolated Pea (Pisum sativum L., cv Little Marvel) Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ivano A.; Anderson, Louise E.

    1986-01-01

    Photosynthetic CO2-fixation in isolated pea (Pisum sativum L., cv Little Marvel) chloroplasts during induction is markedly inhibited by 0.4 millimolar sulfite. Sulfate at the same concentration has almost no effect. The 14CO2-fixation pattern indicates that the primary effect of sulfite is inhibition of the reaction catalyzed by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and a stimulation of export of intermediates out of the chloroplasts. Inhibition of light modulation of stromal enzyme activity does not appear to account for the toxicity of SO2 in this Pisum variety. Arsenite at 0.2 millimolar concentrations inhibits light activation and inhibits photosynthetic CO2 fixation. The 14CO2-fixation pattern indicates that the primary effect of arsenite is inhibition of light activation of reductive pentose phosphate pathway enzyme activity. PMID:16665056

  13. Automatic Chloroplast Movement Analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Zeidler, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In response to low or high intensities of light, the chloroplasts in the mesophyll cells of the leaf are able to increase or decrease their exposure to light by accumulating at the upper and lower sides or along the side walls of the cell respectively. This movement, regulated by the phototropin blue light photoreceptors phot1 and phot2, results in a decreased or increased transmission of light through the leaf. This way the plant is able to optimize harvesting of the incoming light or avoid damage caused by excess light. Here we describe a method that indirectly measures the movement of chloroplasts by taking advantage of the resulting change in leaf transmittance. By using a microplate reader, quantitative measurements of chloroplast accumulation or avoidance can be monitored over time, for multiple samples with relatively little hands-on time.

  14. The "fossilized" mitochondrial genome of Liriodendron tulipifera: ancestral gene content and order, ancestral editing sites, and extraordinarily low mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Aaron O; Rice, Danny W; Young, Gregory J; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2013-04-15

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants vary greatly in size, gene content, gene order, mutation rate and level of RNA editing. However, the narrow phylogenetic breadth of available genomic data has limited our ability to reconstruct these traits in the ancestral flowering plant and, therefore, to infer subsequent patterns of evolution across angiosperms. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome of Liriodendron tulipifera, the first from outside the monocots or eudicots. This 553,721 bp mitochondrial genome has evolved remarkably slowly in virtually all respects, with an extraordinarily low genome-wide silent substitution rate, retention of genes frequently lost in other angiosperm lineages, and conservation of ancestral gene clusters. The mitochondrial protein genes in Liriodendron are the most heavily edited of any angiosperm characterized to date. Most of these sites are also edited in various other lineages, which allowed us to polarize losses of editing sites in other parts of the angiosperm phylogeny. Finally, we added comprehensive gene sequence data for two other magnoliids, Magnolia stellata and the more distantly related Calycanthus floridus, to measure rates of sequence evolution in Liriodendron with greater accuracy. The Magnolia genome has evolved at an even lower rate, revealing a roughly 5,000-fold range of synonymous-site divergence among angiosperms whose mitochondrial gene space has been comprehensively sequenced. Using Liriodendron as a guide, we estimate that the ancestral flowering plant mitochondrial genome contained 41 protein genes, 14 tRNA genes of mitochondrial origin, as many as 7 tRNA genes of chloroplast origin, >700 sites of RNA editing, and some 14 colinear gene clusters. Many of these gene clusters, genes and RNA editing sites have been variously lost in different lineages over the course of the ensuing ∽200 million years of angiosperm evolution.

  15. Chloroplast RNA polymerases: Role in chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Thomas; Aleynikova, Anastasia Yu; Zubo, Yan O; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2015-09-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by two types of RNA polymerase in angiosperms: the bacterial type plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) and one (RPOTp in monocots) or two (RPOTp and RPOTmp in dicots) nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase(s) (NEP). PEP is a bacterial-type multisubunit enzyme composed of core subunits (coded for by the plastid rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1 and rpoC2 genes) and additional protein factors (sigma factors and polymerase associated protein, PAPs) encoded in the nuclear genome. Sigma factors are required by PEP for promoter recognition. Six different sigma factors are used by PEP in Arabidopsis plastids. NEP activity is represented by phage-type RNA polymerases. Only one NEP subunit has been identified, which bears the catalytic activity. NEP and PEP use different promoters. Many plastid genes have both PEP and NEP promoters. PEP dominates in the transcription of photosynthesis genes. Intriguingly, rpoB belongs to the few genes transcribed exclusively by NEP. Both NEP and PEP are active in non-green plastids and in chloroplasts at all stages of development. The transcriptional activity of NEP and PEP is affected by endogenous and exogenous factors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chloroplast thioredoxin systems: prospects for improving photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, Lauri; Toivola, Jouni; Diaz, Manuel Guinea; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2017-09-26

    Thioredoxins (TRXs) are protein oxidoreductases that control the structure and function of cellular proteins by cleavage of a disulphide bond between the side chains of two cysteine residues. Oxidized thioredoxins are reactivated by thioredoxin reductases (TR) and a TR-dependent reduction of TRXs is called a thioredoxin system. Thiol-based redox regulation is an especially important mechanism to control chloroplast proteins involved in biogenesis, in regulation of light harvesting and distribution of light energy between photosystems, in photosynthetic carbon fixation and other biosynthetic pathways, and in stress responses of plants. Of the two plant plastid thioredoxin systems, the ferredoxin-dependent system relays reducing equivalents from photosystem I via ferredoxin and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) to chloroplast proteins, while NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC) forms a complete thioredoxin system including both reductase and thioredoxin domains in a single polypeptide. Chloroplast thioredoxins transmit environmental light signals to biochemical reactions, which allows fine tuning of photosynthetic processes in response to changing environmental conditions. In this paper we focus on the recent reports on specificity and networking of chloroplast thioredoxin systems and evaluate the prospect of improving photosynthetic performance by modifying the activity of thiol regulators in plants.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements

    PubMed Central

    WADA, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts move toward weak light to increase photosynthetic efficiency, and migrate away from strong light to protect chloroplasts from photodamage and eventual cell death. These chloroplast behaviors were first observed more than 100 years ago, but the underlying mechanism has only recently been identified. Ideal plant materials, such as fern gametophytes for photobiological and cell biological approaches, and Arabidopsis thaliana for genetic analyses, have been used along with sophisticated methods, such as partial cell irradiation and time-lapse video recording under infrared light to study chloroplast movement. These studies have revealed precise chloroplast behavior, and identified photoreceptors, other relevant protein components, and novel actin filament structures required for chloroplast movement. In this review, our findings regarding chloroplast and nuclear movements are described. PMID:27840388

  18. Chloroplast heterogeneity and historical admixture within the genus Malus.

    PubMed

    Volk, Gayle M; Henk, Adam D; Baldo, Angela; Fazio, Gennaro; Chao, C Thomas; Richards, Christopher M

    2015-07-01

    • The genus Malus represents a unique and complex evolutionary context in which to study domestication. Several Malus species have provided novel alleles and traits to the cultivars. The extent of admixture among wild Malus species has not been well described, due in part to limited sampling of individuals within a taxon.• Four chloroplast regions (1681 bp total) were sequenced and aligned for 412 Malus individuals from 30 species. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed using maximum parsimony. The distribution of chloroplast haplotypes among species was examined using statistical parsimony, phylogenetic trees, and a median-joining network.• Chloroplast haplotypes are shared among species within Malus. Three major haplotype-sharing networks were identified. One includes species native to China, Western North America, as well as Malus domestica Borkh, and its four primary progenitor species: M. sieversii (Ledeb.) M. Roem., M. orientalis Uglitzk., M. sylvestris (L.) Mill., and M. prunifolia (Willd.) Borkh; another includes five Chinese Malus species, and a third includes the three Malus species native to Eastern North America.• Chloroplast haplotypes found in M. domestica belong to a single, highly admixed network. Haplotypes shared between the domesticated apple and its progenitors may reflect historical introgression or the retention of ancestral polymorphisms. Multiple individuals should be sampled within Malus species to reveal haplotype heterogeneity, if complex maternal contributions to named species are to be recognized. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  19. Proteomics of the chloroplast envelope membranes from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Myriam; Salvi, Daniel; Brugière, Sabine; Miras, Stéphane; Kowalski, Solène; Louwagie, Mathilde; Garin, Jérôme; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2003-05-01

    The development of chloroplasts and the integration of their function within a plant cell rely on the presence of a complex biochemical machinery located within their limiting envelope membranes. To provide the most exhaustive view of the protein repertoire of chloroplast envelope membranes, we analyzed this membrane system using proteomics. To this purpose, we first developed a procedure to prepare highly purified envelope membranes from Arabidopsis chloroplasts. We then extracted envelope proteins using different methods, i.e. chloroform/methanol extraction and alkaline or saline treatments, in order to retrieve as many proteins as possible, from the most to least hydrophobic ones. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses were then performed on each envelope membrane subfraction, leading to the identification of more than 100 proteins. About 80% of the identified proteins are known to be, or are very likely, located in the chloroplast envelope. The validation of localization in the envelope of two phosphate transporters exemplifies the need for a combination of strategies to perform the most exhaustive identification of genuine chloroplast envelope proteins. Interestingly, some of the identified proteins are found to be Nalpha-acetylated, which indicates the accurate location of the N terminus of the corresponding mature protein. With regard to function, more than 50% of the identified proteins have functions known or very likely to be associated with the chloroplast envelope. These proteins are a) involved in ion and metabolite transport, b) components of the protein import machinery, and c) involved in chloroplast lipid metabolism. Some soluble proteins, like proteases, proteins involved in carbon metabolism, or proteins involved in responses to oxidative stress, were associated with envelope membranes. Almost one-third of the proteins we identified have no known function. The present work helps understanding chloroplast envelope metabolism at

  20. The evolution of chloroplast genes and genomes in ferns.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Paul G; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Davidson, Jacob B; Grusz, Amanda L; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2011-07-01

    Most of the publicly available data on chloroplast (plastid) genes and genomes come from seed plants, with relatively little information from their sister group, the ferns. Here we describe several broad evolutionary patterns and processes in fern plastid genomes (plastomes), and we include some new plastome sequence data. We review what we know about the evolutionary history of plastome structure across the fern phylogeny and we compare plastome organization and patterns of evolution in ferns to those in seed plants. A large clade of ferns is characterized by a plastome that has been reorganized with respect to the ancestral gene order (a similar order that is ancestral in seed plants). We review the sequence of inversions that gave rise to this organization. We also explore global nucleotide substitution patterns in ferns versus those found in seed plants across plastid genes, and we review the high levels of RNA editing observed in fern plastomes.

  1. Recreating a functional ancestral archosaur visual pigment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Belinda S W; Jönsson, Karolina; Kazmi, Manija A; Donoghue, Michael J; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2002-09-01

    The ancestors of the archosaurs, a major branch of the diapsid reptiles, originated more than 240 MYA near the dawn of the Triassic Period. We used maximum likelihood phylogenetic ancestral reconstruction methods and explored different models of evolution for inferring the amino acid sequence of a putative ancestral archosaur visual pigment. Three different types of maximum likelihood models were used: nucleotide-based, amino acid-based, and codon-based models. Where possible, within each type of model, likelihood ratio tests were used to determine which model best fit the data. Ancestral reconstructions of the ancestral archosaur node using the best-fitting models of each type were found to be in agreement, except for three amino acid residues at which one reconstruction differed from the other two. To determine if these ancestral pigments would be functionally active, the corresponding genes were chemically synthesized and then expressed in a mammalian cell line in tissue culture. The expressed artificial genes were all found to bind to 11-cis-retinal to yield stable photoactive pigments with lambda(max) values of about 508 nm, which is slightly redshifted relative to that of extant vertebrate pigments. The ancestral archosaur pigments also activated the retinal G protein transducin, as measured in a fluorescence assay. Our results show that ancestral genes from ancient organisms can be reconstructed de novo and tested for function using a combination of phylogenetic and biochemical methods.

  2. [Chloroplast Deg proteases].

    PubMed

    Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Luciński, Robert; Baranek, Małgorzata; Sikora, Bogna; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    For some chloroplast proteases ATP binding and hydrolysis is not necessary for their catalytic activity, most probably because even strongly unfolded substrates may penetrate their catalytic chamber. Deg1, 2, 5 and 8 are the best known of Arabidopsis thaliana ATP- independent chloroplast proteases, encoded by orthologues of genes coding for DegP, DegQ and DegS proteases of Escherichia coli. Current awareness in the area of structure and functions of chloroplast Degs is much more limited vs the one about their bacterial counterparts. Deg5 and Deg8 form a catalytic heterododecamer which is loosely attached to luminal side of thylakoid membrane. The complex catalyses--supported by Deg1 and one of FtsH proteases--the degradation of PsbA damaged due to plant exposition to elevated irradiance and thus these protease are of key importance for the plants' sensitivity to photoinhibition. Deg2 role in the disposal of damaged PsbA has not been elucidated. Recombinant Deg1 may degrade PsbO and plastocyanin in vitro but it is not clear whether this reaction is performed in vivo as well.

  3. Chloroplast Structure and Function Is Altered in the NCS2 Maize Mitochondrial Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Roussell, Deborah L.; Thompson, Deborah L.; Pallardy, Steve G.; Miles, Donald; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonchromosomal stripe 2 (NCS2) mutant of maize (Zea mays L.) has a DNA rearrangement in the mitochondrial genome that segregates with the abnormal growth phenotype. Yet, the NCS2 characteristic phenotype includes striped sectors of pale-green tissue on the leaves. This suggests a chloroplast abnormality. To characterize the chloroplasts present in the mutant sectors, we examined the chloroplast structure by electron microscopy, chloroplast function by radiolabeled carbon dioxide fixation and fluorescence induction kinetics, and thylakoid protein composition by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The data from these analyses suggest abnormal or prematurely arrested chloroplast development. Deleterious effects of the NCS2 mutant mitochondria upon the cells of the leaf include structural and functional alterations in the both the bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668157

  4. The chloroplast proteome: a survey from the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii perspective with a focus on distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Hippler, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged to be an important model organism for the study of oxygenic eukaryotic photosynthesis as well as other processes occurring in the chloroplast. However, the chloroplast proteome in C. reinhardtii has only recently been comprehensively characterized, made possible by proteomics emerging as an accessible and powerful tool over the last decade. In this review, we introduce a compiled list of 996 experimentally chloroplast-localized proteins for C. reinhardtii, stemming largely from our previous proteomic dataset comparing chloroplasts and mitochondria samples to localize proteins. In order to get a taste of some cellular functions taking place in the C. reinhardtii chloroplast, we will focus this review particularly on metabolic differences between chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii and higher plants. Areas that will be covered are photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, fermentative metabolism, ferredoxins and ferredoxin-interacting proteins.

  5. Immunofluorescent quantitation of chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Leech, R M; Marrison, J L

    1996-12-01

    Using scanning light microscopy software to detect and measure immunofluorescence in leaf sections Rubisco concentration in situ in chloroplasts has been accurately determined throughout development. The fluorescence measurements were calibrated by comparison with values for Rubisco accumulation obtained from rocket immuno-electrophoresis profiles of soluble protein from isolated cells and from chloroplasts using a purified sample of Rubisco as the standard. It has been shown that in situ immunofluorescence can be used for cytoquantitation of proteins within individual chloroplasts to a sensitivity of 1fg and also for the comparison of the protein levels in adjacent chloroplasts and cells. Several important applications of this new technique are discussed.

  6. Chloroplast gene arrangement variation within a closely related group of green algae (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Letsch, Molly R; Lewis, Louise A

    2012-09-01

    The 22 published chloroplast genomes of green algae, representing sparse taxonomic sampling of diverse lineages that span over one billion years of evolution, each possess a unique gene arrangement. In contrast, many of the >190 published embryophyte (land plant) chloroplast genomes have relatively conserved architectures. To determine the phylogenetic depth at which chloroplast gene rearrangements occur in green algae, a 1.5-4 kb segment of the chloroplast genome was compared across nine species in three closely related genera of Trebouxiophyceae (Chlorophyta). In total, four distinct gene arrangements were obtained for the three genera Elliptochloris, Hemichloris, and Coccomyxa. In Elliptochloris, three distinct chloroplast gene arrangements were detected, one of which is shared with members of its sister genus Hemichloris. Both species of Coccomyxa examined share the fourth arrangement of this genome region, one characterized by very long spacers. Next, the order of genes found in this segment of the chloroplast genome was compared across green algae and land plants. As taxonomic ranks are not equivalent among different groups of organisms, the maximum molecular divergence among taxa sharing a common gene arrangement in this genome segment was compared. Well-supported clades possessing a single gene order had similar phylogenetic depth in green algae and embryophytes. When the dominant gene order of this chloroplast segment in embryophytes was assumed to be ancestral for land plants, the maximum molecular divergence was found to be over two times greater in embryophytes than in trebouxiophyte green algae. This study greatly expands information about chloroplast genome variation in green algae, is the first to demonstrate such variation among congeneric green algae, and further illustrates the fluidity of green algal chloroplast genome architecture in comparison to that of many embryophytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. When directed evolution met ancestral enzyme resurrection.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The directed evolution of ancestral -resurrected- enzymes can give a new twist in protein engineering approaches towards more versatile and robust biocatalysts. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Transplastomic integration of a cyanobacterial bicarbonate transporter into tobacco chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Pengelly, J J L; Förster, B; von Caemmerer, S; Badger, M R; Price, G D; Whitney, S M

    2014-07-01

    Improving global yields of agricultural crops is a complex challenge with evidence indicating benefits in productivity are achieved by enhancing photosynthetic carbon assimilation. Towards improving rates of CO2 capture within leaf chloroplasts, this study shows the versatility of plastome transformation for expressing the Synechococcus PCC7002 BicA bicarbonate transporter within tobacco plastids. Fractionation of chloroplast membranes from transplastomic tob(BicA) lines showed that ~75% of the BicA localized to the thylakoid membranes and ~25% to the chloroplast envelope. BicA levels were highest in young emerging tob(BicA) leaves (0.12 μmol m(-2), ≈7mg m(-2)) accounting for ~0.1% (w/w) of the leaf protein. In these leaves, the molar amount of BicA was 16-fold lower than the abundant thylakoid photosystem II D1 protein (~1.9 μmol m(-2)) which was comparable to the 9:1 molar ratio of D1:BicA measured in air-grown Synechococcus PCC7002 cells. The BicA produced had no discernible effect on chloroplast ultrastructure, photosynthetic CO2-assimilation rates, carbon isotope discrimination, or growth of the tob(BicA) plants, implying that the bicarbonate transporter had little or no activity. These findings demonstrate the utility of plastome transformation for targeting bicarbonate transporter proteins into the chloroplast membranes without impeding growth or plastid ultrastructure. This study establishes the span of experimental measurements required to verify heterologous bicarbonate transporter function and location in chloroplasts and underscores the need for more detailed understanding of BicA structure and function to identify solutions for enabling its activation and operation in leaf chloroplasts.

  9. Multiplexed fragaria chloroplast genome sequencing

    Treesearch

    W. Njuguna; A. Liston; R. Cronn; N.V. Bassil

    2010-01-01

    A method to sequence multiple chloroplast genomes using ultra high throughput sequencing technologies was recently described. Complete chloroplast genome sequences can resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels and identify informative point mutations and indels. The objective of this research was to sequence multiple Fragaria...

  10. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  11. Deep phylogeny, ancestral groups and the four ages of life.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2010-01-12

    Organismal phylogeny depends on cell division, stasis, mutational divergence, cell mergers (by sex or symbiogenesis), lateral gene transfer and death. The tree of life is a useful metaphor for organismal genealogical history provided we recognize that branches sometimes fuse. Hennigian cladistics emphasizes only lineage splitting, ignoring most other major phylogenetic processes. Though methodologically useful it has been conceptually confusing and harmed taxonomy, especially in mistakenly opposing ancestral (paraphyletic) taxa. The history of life involved about 10 really major innovations in cell structure. In membrane topology, there were five successive kinds of cell: (i) negibacteria, with two bounding membranes, (ii) unibacteria, with one bounding and no internal membranes, (iii) eukaryotes with endomembranes and mitochondria, (iv) plants with chloroplasts and (v) finally, chromists with plastids inside the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane chemistry divides negibacteria into the more advanced Glycobacteria (e.g. Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria) with outer membrane lipolysaccharide and primitive Eobacteria without lipopolysaccharide (deserving intenser study). It also divides unibacteria into posibacteria, ancestors of eukaryotes, and archaebacteria-the sisters (not ancestors) of eukaryotes and the youngest bacterial phylum. Anaerobic eobacteria, oxygenic cyanobacteria, desiccation-resistant posibacteria and finally neomura (eukaryotes plus archaebacteria) successively transformed Earth. Accidents and organizational constraints are as important as adaptiveness in body plan evolution.

  12. Deep phylogeny, ancestral groups and the four ages of life

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Organismal phylogeny depends on cell division, stasis, mutational divergence, cell mergers (by sex or symbiogenesis), lateral gene transfer and death. The tree of life is a useful metaphor for organismal genealogical history provided we recognize that branches sometimes fuse. Hennigian cladistics emphasizes only lineage splitting, ignoring most other major phylogenetic processes. Though methodologically useful it has been conceptually confusing and harmed taxonomy, especially in mistakenly opposing ancestral (paraphyletic) taxa. The history of life involved about 10 really major innovations in cell structure. In membrane topology, there were five successive kinds of cell: (i) negibacteria, with two bounding membranes, (ii) unibacteria, with one bounding and no internal membranes, (iii) eukaryotes with endomembranes and mitochondria, (iv) plants with chloroplasts and (v) finally, chromists with plastids inside the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane chemistry divides negibacteria into the more advanced Glycobacteria (e.g. Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria) with outer membrane lipolysaccharide and primitive Eobacteria without lipopolysaccharide (deserving intenser study). It also divides unibacteria into posibacteria, ancestors of eukaryotes, and archaebacteria—the sisters (not ancestors) of eukaryotes and the youngest bacterial phylum. Anaerobic eobacteria, oxygenic cyanobacteria, desiccation-resistant posibacteria and finally neomura (eukaryotes plus archaebacteria) successively transformed Earth. Accidents and organizational constraints are as important as adaptiveness in body plan evolution. PMID:20008390

  13. Chloroplast Microsatellite Diversity in Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, F.; Bitocchi, E.; Bellucci, E.; Rau, D.; Rodriguez, M.; Attene, G.; Papa, R.; Nanni, L.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary studies that are aimed at defining the processes behind the present level and organization of crop genetic diversity represent the fundamental bases for biodiversity conservation and use. A Mesoamerican origin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris was recently suggested through analysis of nucleotide polymorphism at the nuclear level. Here, we have used chloroplast microsatellites to investigate the origin of the common bean, on the basis of the specific characteristics of these markers (no recombination, haploid genome, uniparental inheritance), to validate these recent findings. Indeed, comparisons of the results obtained through analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA should allow the resolution of some of the contrasting information available on the evolutionary processes. The main outcomes of the present study are: (i) confirmation at the chloroplast level of the results obtained through nuclear data, further supporting the Mesoamerican origin of P. vulgaris, with central Mexico representing the cradle of its diversity; (ii) identification of a putative ancestral plastidial genome, which is characteristic of a group of accessions distributed from central Mexico to Peru, but which have not been highlighted beforehand through analyses at the nuclear level. Finally, the present study suggests that when a single species is analyzed, there is the need to take into account the complexity of the relationships between P. vulgaris and its closely related and partially intercrossable species P. coccineus and P. dumosus. Thus, the present study stresses the importance for the investigation of the speciation processes of these taxa through comparisons of both plastidial and nuclear variability. This knowledge will be fundamental not only from an evolutionary point of view, but also to put P. coccineus and P. dumosus germplasm to better use as a source of useful diversity for P. vulgaris breeding. PMID:23346091

  14. Chloroplast Microsatellite Diversity in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, F; Bitocchi, E; Bellucci, E; Rau, D; Rodriguez, M; Attene, G; Papa, R; Nanni, L

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary studies that are aimed at defining the processes behind the present level and organization of crop genetic diversity represent the fundamental bases for biodiversity conservation and use. A Mesoamerican origin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris was recently suggested through analysis of nucleotide polymorphism at the nuclear level. Here, we have used chloroplast microsatellites to investigate the origin of the common bean, on the basis of the specific characteristics of these markers (no recombination, haploid genome, uniparental inheritance), to validate these recent findings. Indeed, comparisons of the results obtained through analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA should allow the resolution of some of the contrasting information available on the evolutionary processes. The main outcomes of the present study are: (i) confirmation at the chloroplast level of the results obtained through nuclear data, further supporting the Mesoamerican origin of P. vulgaris, with central Mexico representing the cradle of its diversity; (ii) identification of a putative ancestral plastidial genome, which is characteristic of a group of accessions distributed from central Mexico to Peru, but which have not been highlighted beforehand through analyses at the nuclear level. Finally, the present study suggests that when a single species is analyzed, there is the need to take into account the complexity of the relationships between P. vulgaris and its closely related and partially intercrossable species P. coccineus and P. dumosus. Thus, the present study stresses the importance for the investigation of the speciation processes of these taxa through comparisons of both plastidial and nuclear variability. This knowledge will be fundamental not only from an evolutionary point of view, but also to put P. coccineus and P. dumosus germplasm to better use as a source of useful diversity for P. vulgaris breeding.

  15. Controversy on chloroplast origins.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, P J; Penny, D; Hendy, M D; Howe, C J; Beanland, T J; Larkum, A W

    1992-04-20

    Controversy exists over the origins of photosynthetic organelles in that contradictory trees arise from different sequence, biochemical and ultrastructural data sets. We propose a testable hypothesis which explains this inconsistency as a result of the differing GC contents of sequences. We report that current methods of tree reconstruction tend to group sequences with similar GC contents irrespective of whether the similar GC content is due to common ancestry or is independently acquired. Nuclear encoded sequences (high GC) give different trees from chloroplast encoded sequences (low GC). We find that current data is consistent with the hypothesis of multiple origins for photosynthetic organelles and single origins for each type of light harvesting complex.

  16. From bacteria to chloroplasts: evolution of the chloroplast SRP system.

    PubMed

    Ziehe, Dominik; Dünschede, Beatrix; Schünemann, Danja

    2017-05-01

    Chloroplasts derive from a prokaryotic symbiont that lost most of its genes during evolution. As a result, the great majority of chloroplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and are posttranslationally imported into the organelle. The chloroplast genome encodes only a few proteins. These include several multispan thylakoid membrane proteins which are synthesized on thylakoid-bound ribosomes and cotranslationally inserted into the membrane. During evolution, ancient prokaryotic targeting machineries were adapted and combined with novel targeting mechanisms to facilitate post- and cotranslational protein transport in chloroplasts. This review focusses on the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) protein transport system, which has been intensively studied in higher plants. The cpSRP system derived from the prokaryotic SRP pathway, which mediates the cotranslational protein transport to the bacterial plasma membrane. Chloroplasts contain homologs of several components of the bacterial SRP system. The function of these conserved components in post- and/or cotranslational protein transport and chloroplast-specific modifications of these transport mechanisms are described. Furthermore, recent studies of cpSRP systems in algae and lower plants are summarized and their impact on understanding the evolution of the cpSRP system are discussed.

  17. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  18. Understanding Brassicaceae evolution through ancestral genome reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Murat, Florent; Louis, Alexandra; Maumus, Florian; Armero, Alix; Cooke, Richard; Quesneville, Hadi; Roest Crollius, Hugues; Salse, Jerome

    2015-12-10

    Brassicaceae is a family of green plants of high scientific and economic interest, including thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), cruciferous vegetables (cabbages) and rapeseed. We reconstruct an evolutionary framework of Brassicaceae composed of high-resolution ancestral karyotypes using the genomes of modern A. thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, Capsella rubella, Brassica rapa and Thellungiella parvula. The ancestral Brassicaceae karyotype (Brassicaceae lineages I and II) is composed of eight protochromosomes and 20,037 ordered and oriented protogenes. After speciation, it evolved into the ancestral Camelineae karyotype (eight protochromosomes and 22,085 ordered protogenes) and the proto-Calepineae karyotype (seven protochromosomes and 21,035 ordered protogenes) genomes. The three inferred ancestral karyotype genomes are shown here to be powerful tools to unravel the reticulated evolutionary history of extant Brassicaceae genomes regarding the fate of ancestral genes and genomic compartments, particularly centromeres and evolutionary breakpoints. This new resource should accelerate research in comparative genomics and translational research by facilitating the transfer of genomic information from model systems to species of agronomic interest.

  19. Tagetitoxin inhibits chloroplast RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, D.E.; Durbin, R.D.

    1987-04-01

    Tagetitoxin is a non-host specific phytotoxin which inhibits chloroplast development. Chloroplast encoded gene products as well as their transcripts are conspicuously depleted in toxin-treated tissue. Intact chloroplasts from 8-9 day old peas were incubated for 60 min. in the presence of tagetitoxin. This treatment reduced RNA synthesis but did not affect protein synthesis as measured by the incorporation of radiolabeled uridine or methionine, respectively. Tagetitoxin also inhibited chloroplast RNA synthesis in vitro. Total UTP incorporation was reduced 50% by 0.5..mu..M tagetitoxin in transcriptionally active chloroplast extracts containing 5mg/ml protein. In vitro transcription with purified E. coli RNA polymerase was also inhibited by tagetitoxin, yet wheat germ RNA polymerase II and several bacteriophage RNA polymerase enzymes were unaffected. Recent evidence suggests that RNA polymerase from chloroplasts and prokaryotes may share extensive homology. In light of this evidence and the authors own data, they propose that tagetitoxin directly inhibits chloroplast RNA polymerase.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  1. Dynamics of Chloroplast Translation during Chloroplast Differentiation in Maize.

    PubMed

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Barkan, Alice

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplast genomes in land plants contain approximately 100 genes, the majority of which reside in polycistronic transcription units derived from cyanobacterial operons. The expression of chloroplast genes is integrated into developmental programs underlying the differentiation of photosynthetic cells from non-photosynthetic progenitors. In C4 plants, the partitioning of photosynthesis between two cell types, bundle sheath and mesophyll, adds an additional layer of complexity. We used ribosome profiling and RNA-seq to generate a comprehensive description of chloroplast gene expression at four stages of chloroplast differentiation, as displayed along the maize seedling leaf blade. The rate of protein output of most genes increases early in development and declines once the photosynthetic apparatus is mature. The developmental dynamics of protein output fall into several patterns. Programmed changes in mRNA abundance make a strong contribution to the developmental shifts in protein output, but output is further adjusted by changes in translational efficiency. RNAs with prioritized translation early in development are largely involved in chloroplast gene expression, whereas those with prioritized translation in photosynthetic tissues are generally involved in photosynthesis. Differential gene expression in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts results primarily from differences in mRNA abundance, but differences in translational efficiency amplify mRNA-level effects in some instances. In most cases, rates of protein output approximate steady-state protein stoichiometries, implying a limited role for proteolysis in eliminating unassembled or damaged proteins under non-stress conditions. Tuned protein output results from gene-specific trade-offs between translational efficiency and mRNA abundance, both of which span a large dynamic range. Analysis of ribosome footprints at sites of RNA editing showed that the chloroplast translation machinery does not generally

  2. Dynamics of Chloroplast Translation during Chloroplast Differentiation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Barkan, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes in land plants contain approximately 100 genes, the majority of which reside in polycistronic transcription units derived from cyanobacterial operons. The expression of chloroplast genes is integrated into developmental programs underlying the differentiation of photosynthetic cells from non-photosynthetic progenitors. In C4 plants, the partitioning of photosynthesis between two cell types, bundle sheath and mesophyll, adds an additional layer of complexity. We used ribosome profiling and RNA-seq to generate a comprehensive description of chloroplast gene expression at four stages of chloroplast differentiation, as displayed along the maize seedling leaf blade. The rate of protein output of most genes increases early in development and declines once the photosynthetic apparatus is mature. The developmental dynamics of protein output fall into several patterns. Programmed changes in mRNA abundance make a strong contribution to the developmental shifts in protein output, but output is further adjusted by changes in translational efficiency. RNAs with prioritized translation early in development are largely involved in chloroplast gene expression, whereas those with prioritized translation in photosynthetic tissues are generally involved in photosynthesis. Differential gene expression in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts results primarily from differences in mRNA abundance, but differences in translational efficiency amplify mRNA-level effects in some instances. In most cases, rates of protein output approximate steady-state protein stoichiometries, implying a limited role for proteolysis in eliminating unassembled or damaged proteins under non-stress conditions. Tuned protein output results from gene-specific trade-offs between translational efficiency and mRNA abundance, both of which span a large dynamic range. Analysis of ribosome footprints at sites of RNA editing showed that the chloroplast translation machinery does not generally

  3. Speciation as a sieve for ancestral polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rafael F; Hahn, Matthew W

    2017-08-09

    Because they are considered rare, balanced polymorphisms are often discounted as crucial constituents of genome-wide variation in sequence diversity. Despite its perceived rarity, however, long-term balancing selection can elevate genetic diversity and significantly affect observed divergence between species. Here, we discuss how ancestral balanced polymorphisms can be "sieved" by the speciation process, which sorts them unequally across descendant lineages. After speciation, ancestral balancing selection is revealed by genomic regions of high divergence between species. This signature, which resembles that of other evolutionary processes, can potentially confound genomic studies of population divergence and inferences of "islands of speciation." © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  5. Transients in chloroplast gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Allen, John F.

    2008-04-18

    Transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes is demonstrated by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). These genes encode apoproteins of the reaction centres of photosystem I and photosystem II. Their transcription is regulated by changes in wavelength of light selectively absorbed by photosystem I and photosystem II, and therefore by the redox state of an electron carrier located between the two photosystems. Chloroplast transcriptional redox regulation is shown to have greater amplitude, and the kinetics of transcriptional changes are more complex, than suggested by previous experiments using only DNA probes in Northern blot experiments. Redox effects on chloroplast transcription appear to be superimposed on an endogenous rhythm of mRNA abundance. The functional significance of these transients in chloroplast gene transcription is discussed.

  6. Phylogenomics of primates and their ancestral populations

    PubMed Central

    Siepel, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Genome assemblies are now available for nine primate species, and large-scale sequencing projects are underway or approved for six others. An explicitly evolutionary and phylogenetic approach to comparative genomics, called phylogenomics, will be essential in unlocking the valuable information about evolutionary history and genomic function that is contained within these genomes. However, most phylogenomic analyses so far have ignored the effects of variation in ancestral populations on patterns of sequence divergence. These effects can be pronounced in the primates, owing to large ancestral effective population sizes relative to the intervals between speciation events. In particular, local genealogies can vary considerably across loci, which can produce biases and diminished power in many phylogenomic analyses of interest, including phylogeny reconstruction, the identification of functional elements, and the detection of natural selection. At the same time, this variation in genealogies can be exploited to gain insight into the nature of ancestral populations. In this Perspective, I explore this area of intersection between phylogenetics and population genetics, and its implications for primate phylogenomics. I begin by “lifting the hood” on the conventional tree-like representation of the phylogenetic relationships between species, to expose the population-genetic processes that operate along its branches. Next, I briefly review an emerging literature that makes use of the complex relationships among coalescence, recombination, and speciation to produce inferences about evolutionary histories, ancestral populations, and natural selection. Finally, I discuss remaining challenges and future prospects at this nexus of phylogenetics, population genetics, and genomics. PMID:19801602

  7. Reconstructing ancestral gene content by coevolution.

    PubMed

    Tuller, Tamir; Birin, Hadas; Gophna, Uri; Kupiec, Martin; Ruppin, Eytan

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the gene content of ancestral genomes is a fundamental challenge in molecular evolution. Due to the statistical nature of this problem, ancestral genomes inferred by the maximum likelihood (ML) or the maximum-parsimony (MP) methods are prone to considerable error rates. In general, these errors are difficult to abolish by using longer genomic sequences or by analyzing more taxa. This study describes a new approach for improving ancestral genome reconstruction, the ancestral coevolver (ACE), which utilizes coevolutionary information to improve the accuracy of such reconstructions over previous approaches. The principal idea is to reduce the potentially large solution space by choosing a single optimal (or near optimal) solution that is in accord with the coevolutionary relationships between protein families. Simulation experiments, both on artificial and real biological data, show that ACE yields a marked decrease in error rate compared with ML or MP. Applied to a large data set (95 organisms, 4873 protein families, and 10,000 coevolutionary relationships), some of the ancestral genomes reconstructed by ACE were remarkably different in their gene content from those reconstructed by ML or MP alone (more than 10% in some nodes). These reconstructions, while having almost similar likelihood/parsimony scores as those obtained with ML/MP, had markedly higher concordance with the coevolutionary information. Specifically, when ACE was implemented to improve the results of ML, it added a large number of proteins to those encoded by LUCA (last universal common ancestor), most of them ribosomal proteins and components of the F(0)F(1)-type ATP synthase/ATPases, complexes that are vital in most living organisms. Our analysis suggests that LUCA appears to have been bacterial-like and had a genome size similar to the genome sizes of many extant organisms.

  8. Light and low-CO2-dependent LCIB-LCIC complex localization in the chloroplast supports the carbon-concentrating mechanism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takashi; Tsujikawa, Tomoki; Hatano, Kyoko; Ozawa, Shin-Ichiro; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2010-09-01

    The carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is essential to support photosynthesis under CO2-limiting conditions in aquatic photosynthetic organisms, including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The CCM is assumed to be comprised of inorganic carbon transport systems that, in conjunction with carbonic anhydrases, maintain high levels of CO2 around ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in a specific compartment called the pyrenoid. A set of transcripts up-regulated during the induction of the CCM was identified previously and designated as low-CO2 (LC)-inducible genes. Although the functional importance of one of these LC-inducible genes, LciB, has been shown recently, the biochemical properties and detailed subcellular localization of its product LCIB remain to be elucidated. Here, using yeast two-hybrid, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses we provide evidence to demonstrate that LCIB interacts with the LCIB homologous protein LCIC in yeast and in vivo. We also show that LCIB and LCIC are co-localized in the vicinity of the pyrenoid under LC conditions in the light, forming a hexamer complex of approximately 350 kDa, as estimated by gel filtration chromatography. LCIB localization around the pyrenoid was dependent on light illumination and LC conditions during active operation of the CCM. In contrast, in the dark or under high-CO2 conditions when the CCM was inactive, LCIB immediately diffused away from the pyrenoid. Based on these observations, we discuss possible functions of the LCIB-LCIC complex in the CCM.

  9. Adaptive evolution of chloroplast genome structure inferred using a parametric bootstrap approach

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liying; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Wang, Li-San; Tang, Jijun; Rymarquis, Linda; Stern, David B; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2006-01-01

    Background Genome rearrangements influence gene order and configuration of gene clusters in all genomes. Most land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) share a highly conserved gene content and with notable exceptions, a largely co-linear gene order. Conserved gene orders may reflect a slow intrinsic rate of neutral chromosomal rearrangements, or selective constraint. It is unknown to what extent observed changes in gene order are random or adaptive. We investigate the influence of natural selection on gene order in association with increased rate of chromosomal rearrangement. We use a novel parametric bootstrap approach to test if directional selection is responsible for the clustering of functionally related genes observed in the highly rearranged chloroplast genome of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, relative to ancestral chloroplast genomes. Results Ancestral gene orders were inferred and then subjected to simulated rearrangement events under the random breakage model with varying ratios of inversions and transpositions. We found that adjacent chloroplast genes in C. reinhardtii were located on the same strand much more frequently than in simulated genomes that were generated under a random rearrangement processes (increased sidedness; p < 0.0001). In addition, functionally related genes were found to be more clustered than those evolved under random rearrangements (p < 0.0001). We report evidence of co-transcription of neighboring genes, which may be responsible for the observed gene clusters in C. reinhardtii cpDNA. Conclusion Simulations and experimental evidence suggest that both selective maintenance and directional selection for gene clusters are determinants of chloroplast gene order. PMID:16469102

  10. Chloroplast in Plant-Virus Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Xian; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the chloroplast is the organelle that conducts photosynthesis. It has been known that chloroplast is involved in virus infection of plants for approximate 70 years. Recently, the subject of chloroplast-virus interplay is getting more and more attention. In this article we discuss the different aspects of chloroplast-virus interaction into three sections: the effect of virus infection on the structure and function of chloroplast, the role of chloroplast in virus infection cycle, and the function of chloroplast in host defense against viruses. In particular, we focus on the characterization of chloroplast protein-viral protein interactions that underlie the interplay between chloroplast and virus. It can be summarized that chloroplast is a common target of plant viruses for viral pathogenesis or propagation; and conversely, chloroplast and its components also can play active roles in plant defense against viruses. Chloroplast photosynthesis-related genes/proteins (CPRGs/CPRPs) are suggested to play a central role during the complex chloroplast-virus interaction. PMID:27757106

  11. AKR2A-mediated import of chloroplast outer membrane proteins is essential for chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wonsil; Lee, Yong Jik; Kim, Dae Heon; Lee, Junho; Kim, Soojin; Sohn, Eun Ju; Hwang, Inhwan

    2008-02-01

    In plant cells, chloroplasts have essential roles in many biochemical reactions and physiological responses. Chloroplasts require numerous protein components, but only a fraction of these proteins are encoded by the chloroplast genome. Instead, most are encoded by the nuclear genome and imported into chloroplasts from the cytoplasm post-translationally. Membrane proteins located in the chloroplast outer envelope membrane (OEM) have a critical function in the import of proteins into the chloroplast. However, the biogenesis of chloroplast OEM proteins remains poorly understood. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis ankyrin repeat protein, AKR2A, plays an essential role in the biogenesis of the chloroplast OEM proteins. AKR2A binds to chloroplast OEM protein targeting signals, as well as to chloroplasts. It also displays chaperone activity towards chloroplast OEM proteins, and facilitates the targeting of OEP7 to chloroplasts in vitro. AKR2A RNAi in plants with an akr2b knockout background showed greatly reduced levels of chloroplast proteins, including OEM proteins, and chloroplast biogenesis was also defective. Thus, AKR2A functions as a cytosolic mediator for sorting and targeting of nascent chloroplast OEM proteins to the chloroplast.

  12. Evolution of Chloroplast J Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chi-Chou; Chen, Lih-Jen; Su, Pai-Hsiang; Li, Hsou-min

    2013-01-01

    Hsp70 chaperones are involved in multiple biological processes and are recruited to specific processes by designated J domain-containing cochaperones, or J proteins. To understand the evolution and functions of chloroplast Hsp70s and J proteins, we identified the Arabidopsis chloroplast J protein constituency using a combination of genomic and proteomic database searches and individual protein import assays. We show that Arabidopsis chloroplasts have at least 19 J proteins, the highest number of confirmed J proteins for any organelle. These 19 J proteins are classified into 11 clades, for which cyanobacteria and glaucophytes only have homologs for one clade, green algae have an additional three clades, and all the other 7 clades are specific to land plants. Each clade also possesses a clade-specific novel motif that is likely used to interact with different client proteins. Gene expression analyses indicate that most land plant-specific J proteins show highly variable expression in different tissues and are down regulated by low temperatures. These results show that duplication of chloroplast Hsp70 in land plants is accompanied by more than doubling of the number of its J protein cochaperones through adding new J proteins with novel motifs, not through duplications within existing families. These new J proteins likely recruit chloroplast Hsp70 to perform tissue specific functions related to biosynthesis rather than to stress resistance. PMID:23894646

  13. Chloroplast evolution: secondary symbiogenesis and multiple losses.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2002-01-22

    Chloroplasts originated from cyanobacteria only once, but have been laterally transferred to other lineages by symbiogenetic cell mergers. Such secondary symbiogenesis is rarer and chloroplast losses commoner than often assumed.

  14. Distinguishing Recent Admixture from Ancestral Population Structure

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, Montgomery

    2017-01-01

    We develop and test two methods for distinguishing between recent admixture and ancestral population structure as explanations for greater similarity of one of two populations to an outgroup population. This problem arose when Neanderthals were found to be slightly more similar to nonAfrican than to African populations. The excess similarity is consistent with both recent admixture from Neanderthals into the ancestors of nonAfricans and subdivision in the ancestral population. Although later studies showed that there had been recent admixture, distinguishing between these two classes of models will be important in other situations, particularly when high-coverage genomes cannot be obtained for all populations. One of our two methods is based on the properties of the doubly conditioned frequency spectrum combined with the unconditional frequency spectrum. This method does not require a linkage map and can be used when there is relatively low coverage. The second method uses the extent of linkage disequilibrium among closely linked markers. PMID:28186554

  15. Mesophyll Chloroplast Investment in C3, C4 and C2 Species of the Genus Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Hoffmann, Natalie; Covshoff, Sarah; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Sage, Rowan F

    2016-05-01

    The mesophyll (M) cells of C4 plants contain fewer chloroplasts than observed in related C3 plants; however, it is uncertain where along the evolutionary transition from C3 to C4 that the reduction in M chloroplast number occurs. Using 18 species in the genus Flaveria, which contains C3, C4 and a range of C3-C4 intermediate species, we examined changes in chloroplast number and size per M cell, and positioning of chloroplasts relative to the M cell periphery. Chloroplast number and coverage of the M cell periphery declined in proportion to increasing strength of C4 metabolism in Flaveria, while chloroplast size increased with increasing C4 cycle strength. These changes increase cytosolic exposure to the cell periphery which could enhance diffusion of inorganic carbon to phosphenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), a cytosolic enzyme. Analysis of the transcriptome from juvenile leaves of nine Flaveria species showed that the transcript abundance of four genes involved in plastid biogenesis-FtsZ1, FtsZ2, DRP5B and PARC6-was negatively correlated with variation in C4 cycle strength and positively correlated with M chloroplast number per planar cell area. Chloroplast size was negatively correlated with abundance of FtsZ1, FtsZ2 and PARC6 transcripts. These results indicate that natural selection targeted the proteins of the contractile ring assembly to effect the reduction in chloroplast numbers in the M cells of C4 Flaveria species. If so, efforts to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 plants might evaluate whether inducing transcriptome changes similar to those observed in Flaveria could reduce M chloroplast numbers, and thus introduce a trait that appears essential for efficient C4 function.

  16. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  17. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  18. CHLOROPLAST DEVELOPMENT IN OCHROMONAS DANICA

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Sarah P.

    1962-01-01

    When dark-grown cells of Ochromonas danica are placed in the light, the amount of chlorophyll a per cell increases 82-fold; the content of carotenoid pigment, 24-fold. Concomitantly with this increase in chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment, the small proplastid of dark-grown cells develops into a large lamellate chloroplast. During the first 12 hours in the light, vesicles appear within the loose clusters of dense chloroplast granules, enlarge, align themselves into rows (plates in three dimensions), and fuse into discs. Double discs may form from the more or less simultaneous fusion of two adjacent plates of vesicles or by the addition of vesicles to an already formed single disc. Three-disc bands arise by the addition of a disc to an already formed two-disc band through the approach and fusion of more vesicles. After 24 hours in the light, most of the chloroplast bands contain three discs, but the chloroplasts are still small. After 48 hours in the light, almost all the cells contain full-sized chloroplasts with a full complement of three-disc bands. However, at this time the amount of chlorophyll a and carotenoid pigment is only one-half of maximum. During the next 3 days in the light, as the number of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules per chloroplast approximately doubles, there is a compression of the discs in each band (from 180 to 130 A) and a precise alignment of their membranes. Changes also occur in the nucleus when dark-grown cells are placed in the light. There is an increase in the number of small nucleolar bodies, many of which lie directly against the nuclear envelope, and in a few cells a dense mass of granules is seen between the two membranes of the nuclear envelope. PMID:13947686

  19. Photosynthesis of root chloroplasts developed in Arabidopsis lines overexpressing GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Daichi; Noguchi, Ko; Fujinuma, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sugimoto, Keiko; Niyogi, Krishna K; Wada, Hajime; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2013-08-01

    In plants, genes involved in photosynthesis are encoded separately in nuclei and plastids, and tight cooperation between these two genomes is therefore required for the development of functional chloroplasts. Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are involved in chloroplast development, directly targeting photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes for up-regulation. Although overexpression of GLKs leads to chloroplast development in non-photosynthetic organs, the mechanisms of coordination between the nuclear gene expression influenced by GLKs and the photosynthetic processes inside chloroplasts are largely unknown. To elucidate the impact of GLK-induced expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes on the construction of photosynthetic systems, chloroplast morphology and photosynthetic characteristics in greenish roots of Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing GLKs were compared with those in wild-type roots and leaves. Overexpression of GLKs caused up-regulation of not only their direct targets but also non-target nuclear and plastid genes, leading to global induction of chloroplast biogenesis in the root. Large antennae relative to reaction centers were observed in wild-type roots and were further enhanced by GLK overexpression due to the increased expression of target genes associated with peripheral light-harvesting antennae. Photochemical efficiency was lower in the root chloroplasts than in leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that the imbalance in the photosynthetic machinery decreases the efficiency of light utilization in root chloroplasts. Despite the low photochemical efficiency, root photosynthesis contributed to carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, GLK overexpression increased CO₂ fixation and promoted phototrophic performance of the root, showing the potential of root photosynthesis to improve effective carbon utilization in plants.

  20. Photosynthesis of Root Chloroplasts Developed in Arabidopsis Lines Overexpressing GOLDEN2-LIKE Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Daichi; Noguchi, Ko; Fujinuma, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sugimoto, Keiko; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Wada, Hajime; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2013-01-01

    In plants, genes involved in photosynthesis are encoded separately in nuclei and plastids, and tight cooperation between these two genomes is therefore required for the development of functional chloroplasts. Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are involved in chloroplast development, directly targeting photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes for up-regulation. Although overexpression of GLKs leads to chloroplast development in non-photosynthetic organs, the mechanisms of coordination between the nuclear gene expression influenced by GLKs and the photosynthetic processes inside chloroplasts are largely unknown. To elucidate the impact of GLK-induced expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes on the construction of photosynthetic systems, chloroplast morphology and photosynthetic characteristics in greenish roots of Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing GLKs were compared with those in wild-type roots and leaves. Overexpression of GLKs caused up-regulation of not only their direct targets but also non-target nuclear and plastid genes, leading to global induction of chloroplast biogenesis in the root. Large antennae relative to reaction centers were observed in wild-type roots and were further enhanced by GLK overexpression due to the increased expression of target genes associated with peripheral light-harvesting antennae. Photochemical efficiency was lower in the root chloroplasts than in leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that the imbalance in the photosynthetic machinery decreases the efficiency of light utilization in root chloroplasts. Despite the low photochemical efficiency, root photosynthesis contributed to carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, GLK overexpression increased CO2 fixation and promoted phototrophic performance of the root, showing the potential of root photosynthesis to improve effective carbon utilization in plants. PMID:23749810

  1. Measuring CO2 and HCO3- permeabilities of isolated chloroplasts using a MIMS-18O approach.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Chochois, Vincent; Poiré, Richard; Price, G Dean; Badger, Murray R

    2017-06-01

    To support photosynthetic CO2 fixation by Rubisco, the chloroplast must be fed with inorganic carbon in the form of CO2 or bicarbonate. However, the mechanisms allowing the rapid passage of this gas and this charged molecule through the bounding membranes of the chloroplast envelope are not yet completely elucidated. We describe here a method allowing us to measure the permeability of these two molecules through the chloroplast envelope using a membrane inlet mass spectrometer and 18O-labelled inorganic carbon. We established that the internal stromal carbonic anhydrase activity is not limiting for this technique, and precisely measured the chloroplast surface area and permeability values for CO2 and bicarbonate. This was performed on chloroplasts from several plant species, with values ranging from 2.3 × 10-4 m s-1 to 8 × 10-4 m s-1 permeability for CO2 and 1 × 10-8 m s-1 for bicarbonate. We were able to apply our method to chloroplasts from an Arabidopsis aquaporin mutant, and this showed that CO2 permeability was reduced 50% in the mutant compared with the wild-type reference. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Functional chloroplasts in metazoan cells - a unique evolutionary strategy in animal life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Among metazoans, retention of functional diet-derived chloroplasts (kleptoplasty) is known only from the sea slug taxon Sacoglossa (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia). Intracellular maintenance of plastids in the slug's digestive epithelium has long attracted interest given its implications for understanding the evolution of endosymbiosis. However, photosynthetic ability varies widely among sacoglossans; some species have no plastid retention while others survive for months solely on photosynthesis. We present a molecular phylogenetic hypothesis for the Sacoglossa and a survey of kleptoplasty from representatives of all major clades. We sought to quantify variation in photosynthetic ability among lineages, identify phylogenetic origins of plastid retention, and assess whether kleptoplasty was a key character in the radiation of the Sacoglossa. Results Three levels of photosynthetic activity were detected: (1) no functional retention; (2) short-term retention lasting about one week; and (3) long-term retention for over a month. Phylogenetic analysis of one nuclear and two mitochondrial loci revealed reciprocal monophyly of the shelled Oxynoacea and shell-less Plakobranchacea, the latter comprising a monophyletic Plakobranchoidea and paraphyletic Limapontioidea. Only species in the Plakobranchoidea expressed short- or long-term kleptoplasty, most belonging to a speciose clade of slugs bearing parapodia (lateral flaps covering the dorsum). Bayesian ancestral character state reconstructions indicated that functional short-term retention arose once in the last common ancestor of Plakobranchoidea, and independently evolved into long-term retention in four derived species. Conclusion We propose a sequential progression from short- to long-term kleptoplasty, with different adaptations involved in each step. Short-term kleptoplasty likely arose as a deficiency in plastid digestion, yielding additional energy via the release of fixed carbon. Functional short

  3. Protein import into chloroplasts requires a chloroplast ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, D.; Blobel, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H/sup +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requires a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors.

  4. Mesophyll cells of C4 plants have fewer chloroplasts than those of closely related C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Stata, Matt; Sage, Tammy L; Rennie, Troy D; Khoshravesh, Roxana; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Khaikin, Yannay; Ludwig, Martha; Sage, Rowan F

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of C(4) photosynthesis from C(3) ancestors eliminates ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation in the mesophyll (M) cell chloroplast while activating phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation in the cytosol. These changes may lead to fewer chloroplasts and different chloroplast positioning within M cells. To evaluate these possibilities, we compared chloroplast number, size and position in M cells of closely related C(3), C(3) -C(4) intermediate and C(4) species from 12 lineages of C(4) evolution. All C(3) species had more chloroplasts per M cell area than their C(4) relatives in high-light growth conditions. C(3) species also had higher chloroplast coverage of the M cell periphery than C(4) species, particularly opposite intercellular air spaces. In M cells from 10 of the 12 C(4) lineages, a greater fraction of the chloroplast envelope was pulled away from the plasmalemma in the C(4) species than their C(3) relatives. C(3) -C(4) intermediate species generally exhibited similar patterns as their C(3) relatives. We interpret these results to reflect adaptive shifts that facilitate efficient C(4) function by enhancing diffusive access to the site of primary carbon fixation in the cytosol. Fewer chloroplasts in C(4) M cells would also reduce shading of the bundle sheath chloroplasts, which also generate energy required by C(4) photosynthesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mutational Dynamics of Aroid Chloroplast Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J.; Matthews, Peter J.; Collins, Lesley J.; Hendy, Michael D.; Lockhart, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  6. The arc mutants of Arabidopsis with fewer large chloroplasts have a lower mesophyll conductance.

    PubMed

    Weise, Sean E; Carr, David J; Bourke, Ashley M; Hanson, David T; Swarthout, Debbie; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthetic cells of most land plant lineages have numerous small chloroplasts even though most algae, and even the early diverging land plant group the hornworts, tend to have one or a few large chloroplasts. One constraint that small chloroplasts could improve is the resistance to CO2 diffusion from the atmosphere to the chloroplast stroma. We examined the mesophyll conductance (inverse of the diffusion resistance) of mutant Arabidopsis thaliana plants with one or only a few large chloroplasts per cell. The accumulation and replication of chloroplasts (arc) mutants of A. thaliana were studied by model fitting to gas exchange data and (13)CO2 discrimination during carbon fixation. The two methods generally agreed, but the value of the CO2 compensation point of Rubisco (Γ *) used in the model had a large impact on the estimated photosynthetic parameters, including mesophyll conductance. We found that having only a few large chloroplasts per cell resulted in a 25-50 % reduction in the mesophyll conductance at ambient CO2.

  7. Cytosolic events involved in chloroplast protein targeting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Wook; Jung, Chanjin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-02-01

    Chloroplasts are unique organelles that are responsible for photosynthesis. Although chloroplasts contain their own genome, the majority of chloroplast proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome. These proteins are transported to the chloroplasts after translation in the cytosol. Chloroplasts contain three membrane systems (outer/inner envelope and thylakoid membranes) that subdivide the interior into three soluble compartments known as the intermembrane space, stroma, and thylakoid lumen. Several targeting mechanisms are required to deliver proteins to the correct chloroplast membrane or soluble compartment. These mechanisms have been extensively studied using purified chloroplasts in vitro. Prior to targeting these proteins to the various compartments of the chloroplast, they must be correctly sorted in the cytosol. To date, it is not clear how these proteins are sorted in the cytosol and then targeted to the chloroplasts. Recently, the cytosolic carrier protein AKR2 and its associated cofactor Hsp17.8 for outer envelope membrane proteins of chloroplasts were identified. Additionally, a mechanism for controlling unimported plastid precursors in the cytosol has been discovered. This review will mainly focus on recent findings concerning the possible cytosolic events that occur prior to protein targeting to the chloroplasts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, M. R.; Ellis, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Chloroplasts isolated from young spinach leaves incorporate [3H]uridine into RNA. This incorporation shows an absolute requirement for light and does not occur in lysed chloroplasts. Fractionation by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of the RNA synthesized in vitro reveals a major discrete product of molecular weight 2.7×106 and two minor products of molecular weight 1.2×106 and 0.47×106. These discrete products are super-imposed on a background of polydisperse RNA. The incorporation of 32Pi into chloroplast rRNA species (mol.wt. 1.05×106 and 0.56×106) in excised spinach leaves proceeds after a distinct lag period compared with the incorporation into cytoplasmic rRNA species (mol.wt. 1.34×106 and 0.7×106). Incorporation of 32Pi into chloroplast RNA species of molecular weight 2.7×106, 1.2×106, 0.65×106 and 0.47×106 proceeds without such a time-lag. The kinetics of labelling of the individual RNA components is consistent with the rapidly labelled RNA species of molecular weight 1.2×106 and 0.65×106 being precursors to the more slowly labelled rRNA species of molecular weight 1.05×106 and 0.56×106 respectively. PMID:4723226

  9. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  10. In search of ancestral Kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Sisson, T.W.; Ui, T.; Naka, J.

    2000-01-01

    Submersible observations and samples show that the lower south flank of Hawaii, offshore from Kilauea volcano and the active Hilina slump system, consists entirely of compositionally diverse volcaniclastic rocks; pillow lavas are confined to shallow slopes. Submarine-erupted basalt clasts have strongly variable alkalic and transitional basalt compositions (to 41% SiO2, 10.8% alkalies), contrasting with present-day Kilauea tholeiites. The volcaniclastic rocks provide a unique record of ancestral alkalic growth of an archetypal hotspot volcano, including transition to its tholeiitic shield stage, and associated slope-failure events.

  11. Chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is essential for chloroplast anchorage to the plasma membrane and chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Kazusato; Yamasato, Akihiro; Kong, Sam-Geun; Kasahara, Masahiro; Nakai, Masato; Takahashi, Fumio; Ogura, Yasunobu; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2008-10-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. Previously, we isolated the chloroplast unusual positioning1 (chup1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This mutant is defective in normal chloroplast relocation movement and shows aggregation of chloroplasts at the bottom of palisade mesophyll cells. The isolated gene encodes a protein with an actin-binding motif. Here, we used biochemical analyses to determine the subcellular localization of full-length CHUP1 on the chloroplast outer envelope. A CHUP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, which was detected at the outermost part of mesophyll cell chloroplasts, complemented the chup1 phenotype, but GFP-CHUP1, which was localized mainly in the cytosol, did not. Overexpression of the N-terminal hydrophobic region (NtHR) of CHUP1 fused with GFP (NtHR-GFP) induced a chup1-like phenotype, indicating a dominant-negative effect on chloroplast relocation movement. A similar pattern was found in chloroplast OUTER ENVELOPE PROTEIN7 (OEP7)-GFP transformants, and a protein containing OEP7 in place of NtHR complemented the mutant phenotype. Physiological analyses of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing truncated CHUP1 in a chup1 mutant background and cytoskeletal inhibitor experiments showed that the coiled-coil region of CHUP1 anchors chloroplasts firmly on the plasma membrane, consistent with the localization of coiled-coil GFP on the plasma membrane. Thus, CHUP1 localization on chloroplasts, with the N terminus inserted into the chloroplast outer envelope and the C terminus facing the cytosol, is essential for CHUP1 function, and the coiled-coil region of CHUP1 prevents chloroplast aggregation and participates in chloroplast relocation movement.

  12. Programmed chloroplast destruction during leaf senescence involves 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX)

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Armin; Kang, ChulHee; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Christiane; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence is the terminal stage in the development of perennial plants. Massive physiological changes occur that lead to the shut down of photosynthesis and a cessation of growth. Leaf senescence involves the selective destruction of the chloroplast as the site of photosynthesis. Here, we show that 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX) accomplishes a key role in the destruction of chloroplasts in senescing plants and propose a critical role of its NH2-terminal chloroplast transit peptide. The 13-LOX enzyme identified here accumulated in the plastid envelope and catalyzed the dioxygenation of unsaturated membrane fatty acids, leading to a selective destruction of the chloroplast and the release of stromal constituents. Because 13-LOX pathway products comprise compounds involved in insect deterrence and pathogen defense (volatile aldehydes and oxylipins), a mechanism of unmolested nitrogen and carbon relocation is suggested that occurs from leaves to seeds and roots during fall. PMID:26969728

  13. Programmed chloroplast destruction during leaf senescence involves 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX).

    PubMed

    Springer, Armin; Kang, ChulHee; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Christiane; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen

    2016-03-22

    Leaf senescence is the terminal stage in the development of perennial plants. Massive physiological changes occur that lead to the shut down of photosynthesis and a cessation of growth. Leaf senescence involves the selective destruction of the chloroplast as the site of photosynthesis. Here, we show that 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX) accomplishes a key role in the destruction of chloroplasts in senescing plants and propose a critical role of its NH2-terminal chloroplast transit peptide. The 13-LOX enzyme identified here accumulated in the plastid envelope and catalyzed the dioxygenation of unsaturated membrane fatty acids, leading to a selective destruction of the chloroplast and the release of stromal constituents. Because 13-LOX pathway products comprise compounds involved in insect deterrence and pathogen defense (volatile aldehydes and oxylipins), a mechanism of unmolested nitrogen and carbon relocation is suggested that occurs from leaves to seeds and roots during fall.

  14. Ancestral polyploidy in seed plants and angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuannian; Wickett, Norman J; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Chanderbali, André S; Landherr, Lena; Ralph, Paula E; Tomsho, Lynn P; Hu, Yi; Liang, Haiying; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Clifton, Sandra W; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Schuster, Stephan C; Ma, Hong; Leebens-Mack, Jim; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2011-05-05

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, followed by gene loss and diploidization has long been recognized as an important evolutionary force in animals, fungi and other organisms, especially plants. The success of angiosperms has been attributed, in part, to innovations associated with gene or whole-genome duplications, but evidence for proposed ancient genome duplications pre-dating the divergence of monocots and eudicots remains equivocal in analyses of conserved gene order. Here we use comprehensive phylogenomic analyses of sequenced plant genomes and more than 12.6 million new expressed-sequence-tag sequences from phylogenetically pivotal lineages to elucidate two groups of ancient gene duplications-one in the common ancestor of extant seed plants and the other in the common ancestor of extant angiosperms. Gene duplication events were intensely concentrated around 319 and 192 million years ago, implicating two WGDs in ancestral lineages shortly before the diversification of extant seed plants and extant angiosperms, respectively. Significantly, these ancestral WGDs resulted in the diversification of regulatory genes important to seed and flower development, suggesting that they were involved in major innovations that ultimately contributed to the rise and eventual dominance of seed plants and angiosperms.

  15. Regulatory genes in the ancestral chordate genomes.

    PubMed

    Satou, Yutaka; Wada, Shuichi; Sasakura, Yasunori; Satoh, Nori

    2008-12-01

    Changes or innovations in gene regulatory networks for the developmental program in the ancestral chordate genome appear to be a major component in the evolutionary process in which tadpole-type larvae, a unique characteristic of chordates, arose. These alterations may include new genetic interactions as well as the acquisition of new regulatory genes. Previous analyses of the Ciona genome revealed that many genes may have emerged after the divergence of the tunicate and vertebrate lineages. In this paper, we examined this possibility by examining a second non-vertebrate chordate genome. We conclude from this analysis that the ancient chordate included almost the same repertory of regulatory genes, but less redundancy than extant vertebrates, and that approximately 10% of vertebrate regulatory genes were innovated after the emergence of vertebrates. Thus, refined regulatory networks arose during vertebrate evolution mainly as preexisting regulatory genes multiplied rather than by generating new regulatory genes. The inferred regulatory gene sets of the ancestral chordate would be an important foundation for understanding how tadpole-type larvae, a unique characteristic of chordates, evolved.

  16. Ancestral Relationships Using Metafounders: Finite Ancestral Populations and Across Population Relationships.

    PubMed

    Legarra, Andres; Christensen, Ole F; Vitezica, Zulma G; Aguilar, Ignacio; Misztal, Ignacy

    2015-06-01

    Recent use of genomic (marker-based) relationships shows that relationships exist within and across base population (breeds or lines). However, current treatment of pedigree relationships is unable to consider relationships within or across base populations, although such relationships must exist due to finite size of the ancestral population and connections between populations. This complicates the conciliation of both approaches and, in particular, combining pedigree with genomic relationships. We present a coherent theoretical framework to consider base population in pedigree relationships. We suggest a conceptual framework that considers each ancestral population as a finite-sized pool of gametes. This generates across-individual relationships and contrasts with the classical view which each population is considered as an infinite, unrelated pool. Several ancestral populations may be connected and therefore related. Each ancestral population can be represented as a "metafounder," a pseudo-individual included as founder of the pedigree and similar to an "unknown parent group." Metafounders have self- and across relationships according to a set of parameters, which measure ancestral relationships, i.e., homozygozities within populations and relationships across populations. These parameters can be estimated from existing pedigree and marker genotypes using maximum likelihood or a method based on summary statistics, for arbitrarily complex pedigrees. Equivalences of genetic variance and variance components between the classical and this new parameterization are shown. Segregation variance on crosses of populations is modeled. Efficient algorithms for computation of relationship matrices, their inverses, and inbreeding coefficients are presented. Use of metafounders leads to compatibility of genomic and pedigree relationship matrices and to simple computing algorithms. Examples and code are given. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Ancestral Relationships Using Metafounders: Finite Ancestral Populations and Across Population Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Legarra, Andres; Christensen, Ole F.; Vitezica, Zulma G.; Aguilar, Ignacio; Misztal, Ignacy

    2015-01-01

    Recent use of genomic (marker-based) relationships shows that relationships exist within and across base population (breeds or lines). However, current treatment of pedigree relationships is unable to consider relationships within or across base populations, although such relationships must exist due to finite size of the ancestral population and connections between populations. This complicates the conciliation of both approaches and, in particular, combining pedigree with genomic relationships. We present a coherent theoretical framework to consider base population in pedigree relationships. We suggest a conceptual framework that considers each ancestral population as a finite-sized pool of gametes. This generates across-individual relationships and contrasts with the classical view which each population is considered as an infinite, unrelated pool. Several ancestral populations may be connected and therefore related. Each ancestral population can be represented as a “metafounder,” a pseudo-individual included as founder of the pedigree and similar to an “unknown parent group.” Metafounders have self- and across relationships according to a set of parameters, which measure ancestral relationships, i.e., homozygozities within populations and relationships across populations. These parameters can be estimated from existing pedigree and marker genotypes using maximum likelihood or a method based on summary statistics, for arbitrarily complex pedigrees. Equivalences of genetic variance and variance components between the classical and this new parameterization are shown. Segregation variance on crosses of populations is modeled. Efficient algorithms for computation of relationship matrices, their inverses, and inbreeding coefficients are presented. Use of metafounders leads to compatibility of genomic and pedigree relationship matrices and to simple computing algorithms. Examples and code are given. PMID:25873631

  18. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  19. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Treesearch

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  20. Chloroplast avoidance movement reduces photodamage in plants.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Miyao, Mitsue; Wada, Masamitsu

    When plants are exposed to light levels higher than those required for photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are generated in the chloroplasts and cause photodamage. This can occur even under natural growth conditions. To mitigate photodamage, plants have developed several protective mechanisms. One is chloroplast avoidance movement, in which chloroplasts move from the cell surface to the side walls of cells under high light conditions, although experimental support is still awaited. Here, using different classes of mutant defective in chloroplast avoidance movement, we show that these mutants are more susceptible to damage in high light than wild-type plants. Damage of the photosynthetic apparatus and subsequent bleaching of leaf colour and necrosis occur faster under high light conditions in the mutants than in wild-type plants. We conclude that chloroplast avoidance movement actually decreases the amount of light absorption by chloroplasts, and might therefore be important to the survival of plants under natural growth conditions.

  1. Chloroplast division checkpoint in eukaryotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont. It is believed that the synchronization of endosymbiotic and host cell division, as is commonly seen in existing algae, was a critical step in establishing the permanent organelle. Algal cells typically contain one or only a small number of chloroplasts that divide once per host cell cycle. This division is based partly on the S-phase–specific expression of nucleus-encoded proteins that constitute the chloroplast-division machinery. In this study, using the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that cell-cycle progression is arrested at the prophase when chloroplast division is blocked before the formation of the chloroplast-division machinery by the overexpression of Filamenting temperature-sensitive (Fts) Z2-1 (Fts72-1), but the cell cycle progresses when chloroplast division is blocked during division-site constriction by the overexpression of either FtsZ2-1 or a dominant-negative form of dynamin-related protein 5B (DRP5B). In the cells arrested in the prophase, the increase in the cyclin B level and the migration of cyclin-dependent kinase B (CDKB) were blocked. These results suggest that chloroplast division restricts host cell-cycle progression so that the cell cycle progresses to the metaphase only when chloroplast division has commenced. Thus, chloroplast division and host cell-cycle progression are synchronized by an interactive restriction that takes place between the nucleus and the chloroplast. In addition, we observed a similar pattern of cell-cycle arrest upon the blockage of chloroplast division in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa, raising the possibility that the chloroplast division checkpoint contributed to the establishment of the permanent organelle. PMID:27837024

  2. Enclosure of Mitochondria by Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. Harold; Rigsby, Luanne L.; Akin, Danny E.

    1983-01-01

    In Panicum species of the Laxa group, some of which have characteristics intermediate to C3 and C4 photosynthesis species, some mitochondria in leaf bundle sheath cells are surrounded by chloroplasts when viewed in profile. Serial sectioning of leaves of one Laxa species, Panicum schenckii Hack, shows that these mitochondria are enclosed by chloroplasts. Complete enclosure rather than invagination also is indicated by absence of two concentric chloroplast membranes surrounding the mitochondrial profiles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16662844

  3. Chloroplast actin filaments organize meshwork on the photorelocated chloroplasts in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kanegae, Takeshi; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kadota, Akeo

    2011-02-01

    Cytoskeleton dynamics during phototropin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation movement was analyzed in protonemal cells of actin- and microtubule-visualized lines of Physcomitrella patens expressing GFP- or tdTomato-talin and GFP-tubulin. Using newly developed epi- and trans-microbeam irradiation systems that permit fluorescence observation of the cell under blue microbeam irradiation inducing chloroplast relocation, it was revealed that meshwork of actin filaments formed at the chloroplast-accumulating area both in the avoidance and accumulation movements. The structure disappeared soon when blue microbeam was turned off, and it was not induced under red microbeam irradiation that did not evoke chloroplast relocation movement. In contrast, no apparent change in microtubule organization was detected during the movements. The actin meshwork was composed of short actin filaments distinct from the cytoplasmic long actin cables and was present between the chloroplasts and plasma membrane. The short actin filaments emerged from around the chloroplast periphery towards the center of chloroplast. Showing highly dynamic behavior, the chloroplast actin filaments (cp-actin filaments) were rapidly organized into meshwork on the chloroplast surface facing plasma membrane. The actin filament configuration on a chloroplast led to the formation of actin meshwork area in the cell as the chloroplasts arrived at and occupied the area. After establishment of the meshwork, cp-actin filaments were still highly dynamic, showing appearance, disappearance, severing and bundling of filaments. These results indicate that the cp-actin filaments have significant roles in the chloroplast movement and positioning in the cell.

  4. Chloroplast research in the genomic age.

    PubMed

    Leister, Dario

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplast research takes significant advantage of genomics and genome sequencing, and a new picture is emerging of how the chloroplast functions and communicates with other cellular compartments. In terms of evolution, it is now known that only a fraction of the many proteins of cyanobacterial origin were rerouted to higher plant plastids. Reverse genetics and novel mutant screens are providing a growing catalogue of chloroplast protein-function relationships, and the characterization of plastid-to-nucleus signalling mutants reveals cell-organelle interactions. Recent advances in transcriptomics and proteomics of the chloroplast make this organelle one of the best understood of all plant cell compartments.

  5. Isolation of Chloroplasts from Plant Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Smith, Matthew D; Chuong, Simon D X

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts can be isolated from higher plants directly following homogenization; however, the resulting yield, purity, and intactness are often low, necessitating a large amount of starting material. This protocol is optimized to produce a high yield of pure chloroplasts from isolated Arabidopsis protoplasts. The two-part method is a simple, scaled-down, and low-cost procedure that readily provides healthy mesophyll protoplasts, which are then ruptured to release intact chloroplasts. Chloroplasts isolated using this method are competent for use in biochemical, cellular, and molecular analyses. © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Functional Characterization of the GATA Transcription Factors GNC and CGA1 Reveals Their Key Role in Chloroplast Development, Growth, and Division in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Zubo, Yan O.; Tapken, Wiebke; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lavanway, Ann M.; Howard, Louisa; Pilon, Marinus; Kieber, Joseph J.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts develop from proplastids in a process that requires the interplay of nuclear and chloroplast genomes, but key steps in this developmental process have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that the nucleus-localized transcription factors GATA NITRATE-INDUCIBLE CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA1 (CGA1) regulate chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GNC and CGA1 are highly expressed in green tissues, and the phytohormone cytokinin regulates their expression. A gnc cga1 mutant exhibits a reduction in overall chlorophyll levels as well as in chloroplast size in the hypocotyl. Ectopic overexpression of either GNC or CGA1 promotes chloroplast biogenesis in hypocotyl cortex and root pericycle cells, based on increases in the number and size of the chloroplasts, and also results in expanded zones of chloroplast production into the epidermis of hypocotyls and cotyledons and into the cortex of roots. Ectopic overexpression also promotes the development of etioplasts from proplastids in dark-grown seedlings, subsequently enhancing the deetiolation process. Inducible expression of GNC demonstrates that GNC-mediated chloroplast biogenesis can be regulated postembryonically, notably so for chloroplast production in cotyledon epidermal cells. Analysis of the gnc cga1 loss-of-function and overexpression lines supports a role for these transcription factors in regulating the effects of cytokinin on chloroplast division. These data support a model in which GNC and CGA1 serve as two of the master transcriptional regulators of chloroplast biogenesis, acting downstream of cytokinin and mediating the development of chloroplasts from proplastids and enhancing chloroplast growth and division in specific tissues. PMID:22811435

  7. Functional characterization of the GATA transcription factors GNC and CGA1 reveals their key role in chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Zubo, Yan O; Tapken, Wiebke; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lavanway, Ann M; Howard, Louisa; Pilon, Marinus; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2012-09-01

    Chloroplasts develop from proplastids in a process that requires the interplay of nuclear and chloroplast genomes, but key steps in this developmental process have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that the nucleus-localized transcription factors GATA NITRATE-INDUCIBLE CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA1 (CGA1) regulate chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GNC and CGA1 are highly expressed in green tissues, and the phytohormone cytokinin regulates their expression. A gnc cga1 mutant exhibits a reduction in overall chlorophyll levels as well as in chloroplast size in the hypocotyl. Ectopic overexpression of either GNC or CGA1 promotes chloroplast biogenesis in hypocotyl cortex and root pericycle cells, based on increases in the number and size of the chloroplasts, and also results in expanded zones of chloroplast production into the epidermis of hypocotyls and cotyledons and into the cortex of roots. Ectopic overexpression also promotes the development of etioplasts from proplastids in dark-grown seedlings, subsequently enhancing the deetiolation process. Inducible expression of GNC demonstrates that GNC-mediated chloroplast biogenesis can be regulated postembryonically, notably so for chloroplast production in cotyledon epidermal cells. Analysis of the gnc cga1 loss-of-function and overexpression lines supports a role for these transcription factors in regulating the effects of cytokinin on chloroplast division. These data support a model in which GNC and CGA1 serve as two of the master transcriptional regulators of chloroplast biogenesis, acting downstream of cytokinin and mediating the development of chloroplasts from proplastids and enhancing chloroplast growth and division in specific tissues.

  8. Chloroplast movement provides photoprotection to plants by redistributing PSII damage within leaves.

    PubMed

    Davis, Phillip A; Hangarter, Roger P

    2012-09-01

    Plants use light to fix carbon through the process of photosynthesis but light also causes photoinhibition, by damaging photosystem II (PSII). Plants can usually adjust their rate of PSII repair to equal the rate of damage, but under stress conditions or supersaturating light-intensities damage may exceed the rate of repair. Light-induced chloroplast movements are one of the many mechanisms plants have evolved to minimize photoinhibition. We found that chloroplast movements achieve a measure of photoprotection to PSII by altering the distribution of photoinhibition through depth in leaves. When chloroplasts are in the low-light accumulation arrangement a greater proportion of PSII damage occurs near the illuminated surface than for leaves where the chloroplasts are in the high-light avoidance arrangement. According to our findings chloroplast movements can increase the overall efficiency of leaf photosynthesis in at least two ways. The movements alter light profiles within leaves to maximize photosynthetic output and at the same time redistribute PSII damage throughout the leaf to reduce the amount of inhibition received by individual chloroplasts and prevent a decrease in photosynthetic potential.

  9. Photosynthesis and Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Levels in Intact Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Sicher, Richard C.; Jensen, Richard G.

    1979-01-01

    The response of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate levels and CO2 fixation rates in isolated, intact spinach chloroplasts to pyrophosphate, triose phosphates, dl-glyceraldehyde, O2, catalase, and irradiance during photosynthesis has been studied. Within 1 minute in the light, a rapid accumulation of ribulose bisphosphate was measured in most preparations of intact chloroplasts, and this subsequently dropped as CO2 fixation increased. Pyrophosphate, triose phosphates, and catalase increased CO2 fixation and also the levels of ribulose bisphosphate. CO2 fixation was inhibited by dl-glyceraldehyde and O2 with corresponding decreases in ribulose bisphosphate. When the rate of photosynthesis decreased at limiting irradiances (low light), the level of ribulose bisphosphate in the chloroplast did not always decrease, suggesting that ribulose bisphosphate was not limiting CO2 fixation under these conditions. When triose phosphates (fructose bisphosphate plus aldolase) were added to suspensions of chloroplasts at low irradiances, ribulose bisphosphate increased while CO2 fixation decreased. These observations provide considerable evidence that high ribulose bisphosphate levels clearly are not solely sufficient to permit rapid rates of CO2 fixation, but that factors other than ribulose bisphosphate concentration are overriding the control of photosynthesis. Isolated chloroplasts are capable of using carbon reserves to produce considerable ribulose bisphosphate. Upon illumination in the absence of CO2 and O2, intact chloroplasts produced up to 13 millimolar ribulose bisphosphate. PMID:16661074

  10. Rapid mass movement of chloroplasts during segment formation of the calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba.

    PubMed

    Larkum, Anthony W D; Salih, Anya; Kühl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i) the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii) the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3-5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ∼0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity.

  11. Assessing the Accuracy of Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul D; Pollock, David D; Blackburne, Benjamin P; Goldstein, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic inference of ancestral protein sequences is a powerful technique for the study of molecular evolution, but any conclusions drawn from such studies are only as good as the accuracy of the reconstruction method. Every inference method leads to errors in the ancestral protein sequence, resulting in potentially misleading estimates of the ancestral protein's properties. To assess the accuracy of ancestral protein reconstruction methods, we performed computational population evolution simulations featuring near-neutral evolution under purifying selection, speciation, and divergence using an off-lattice protein model where fitness depends on the ability to be stable in a specified target structure. We were thus able to compare the thermodynamic properties of the true ancestral sequences with the properties of “ancestral sequences” inferred by maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Surprisingly, we found that methods such as maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood that reconstruct a “best guess” amino acid at each position overestimate thermostability, while a Bayesian method that sometimes chooses less-probable residues from the posterior probability distribution does not. Maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony apparently tend to eliminate variants at a position that are slightly detrimental to structural stability simply because such detrimental variants are less frequent. Other properties of ancestral proteins might be similarly overestimated. This suggests that ancestral reconstruction studies require greater care to come to credible conclusions regarding functional evolution. Inferred functional patterns that mimic reconstruction bias should be reevaluated. PMID:16789817

  12. A large population of small chloroplasts in tobacco leaf cells allows more effective chloroplast movement than a few enlarged chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Won Joong; Park, Youn-Il; Suh, KyeHong; Raven, John A; Yoo, Ook Joon; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2002-05-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants that contained only one to three enlarged chloroplasts per leaf mesophyll cell by introducing NtFtsZ1-2, a cDNA for plastid division. These plants were used to investigate the advantages of having a large population of small chloroplasts rather than a few enlarged chloroplasts in a leaf mesophyll cell. Despite the similarities in photosynthetic components and ultrastructure of photosynthetic machinery between wild-type and transgenic plants, the overall growth of transgenic plants under low- and high-light conditions was retarded. In wild-type plants, the chloroplasts moved toward the face position under low light and toward the profile position under high-light conditions. However, chloroplast rearrangement in transgenic plants in response to light conditions was not evident. In addition, transgenic plant leaves showed greatly diminished changes in leaf transmittance values under both light conditions, indicating that chloroplast rearrangement was severely retarded. Therefore, under low-light conditions the incomplete face position of the enlarged chloroplasts results in decreased absorbance of light energy. This, in turn, reduces plant growth. Under high-light conditions, the amount of absorbed light exceeds the photosynthetic utilization capacity due to the incomplete profile position of the enlarged chloroplasts, resulting in photodamage to the photosynthetic machinery, and decreased growth. The presence of a large number of small and/or rapidly moving chloroplasts in the cells of higher land plants permits more effective chloroplast phototaxis and, hence, allows more efficient utilization of low-incident photon flux densities. The photosynthetic apparatus is, consequently, protected from damage under high-incident photon flux densities.

  13. Exploring mechanisms linked to differentiation and function of dimorphic chloroplasts in the single cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici.

    PubMed

    Rosnow, Josh; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Berry, James O; Okita, Thomas W; Edwards, Gerald E

    2014-01-21

    In the model single-cell C4 plant Bienertia sinuspersici, chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded photosynthetic enzymes, characteristically confined to either bundle sheath or mesophyll cells in Kranz-type C4 leaves, all occur together within individual leaf chlorenchyma cells. Intracellular separation of dimorphic chloroplasts and key enzymes within central and peripheral compartments allow for C4 carbon fixation analogous to NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) Kranz type species. Several methods were used to investigate dimorphic chloroplast differentiation in B. sinuspersici. Confocal analysis revealed that Rubisco-containing chloroplasts in the central compartment chloroplasts (CCC) contained more photosystem II proteins than the peripheral compartment chloroplasts (PCC) which contain pyruvate,Pi dikinase (PPDK), a pattern analogous to the cell type-specific chloroplasts of many Kranz type NAD-ME species. Transient expression analysis using GFP fusion constructs containing various lengths of a B. sinuspersici Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) gene and the transit peptide of PPDK revealed that their import was not specific to either chloroplast type. Immunolocalization showed the rbcL-specific mRNA binding protein RLSB to be selectively localized to the CCC in B. sinuspersici, and to Rubisco-containing BS chloroplasts in the closely related Kranz species Suaeda taxifolia. Comparative fluorescence analyses were made using redox-sensitive and insensitive GFP forms, as well comparative staining using the peroxidase indicator 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB), which demonstrated differences in stromal redox potential, with the CCC having a more negative potential than the PCC. Both CCC RLSB localization and the differential chloroplast redox state are suggested to have a role in post-transcriptional rbcL expression.

  14. Exploring mechanisms linked to differentiation and function of dimorphic chloroplasts in the single cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the model single-cell C4 plant Bienertia sinuspersici, chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded photosynthetic enzymes, characteristically confined to either bundle sheath or mesophyll cells in Kranz-type C4 leaves, all occur together within individual leaf chlorenchyma cells. Intracellular separation of dimorphic chloroplasts and key enzymes within central and peripheral compartments allow for C4 carbon fixation analogous to NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) Kranz type species. Several methods were used to investigate dimorphic chloroplast differentiation in B. sinuspersici. Results Confocal analysis revealed that Rubisco-containing chloroplasts in the central compartment chloroplasts (CCC) contained more photosystem II proteins than the peripheral compartment chloroplasts (PCC) which contain pyruvate,Pi dikinase (PPDK), a pattern analogous to the cell type-specific chloroplasts of many Kranz type NAD-ME species. Transient expression analysis using GFP fusion constructs containing various lengths of a B. sinuspersici Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) gene and the transit peptide of PPDK revealed that their import was not specific to either chloroplast type. Immunolocalization showed the rbcL-specific mRNA binding protein RLSB to be selectively localized to the CCC in B. sinuspersici, and to Rubisco-containing BS chloroplasts in the closely related Kranz species Suaeda taxifolia. Comparative fluorescence analyses were made using redox-sensitive and insensitive GFP forms, as well comparative staining using the peroxidase indicator 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB), which demonstrated differences in stromal redox potential, with the CCC having a more negative potential than the PCC. Conclusions Both CCC RLSB localization and the differential chloroplast redox state are suggested to have a role in post-transcriptional rbcL expression. PMID:24443986

  15. Chloroplast division: a work of ARTEMIS.

    PubMed

    Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2002-12-23

    Chloroplasts contain three membrane systems that constrict together during division of the organelle. A newly identified protein, ARTEMIS, may shed light on the nuclear control of chloroplast division, and also on the mechanism of thylakoid membrane fission and how this is coordinated with fission of the two envelope membranes.

  16. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  17. Ancestral vertebrate complexity of the opioid system.

    PubMed

    Larhammar, Dan; Bergqvist, Christina; Sundström, Görel

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of the opioid peptides and nociceptin/orphanin as well as their receptors has been difficult to resolve due to variable evolutionary rates. By combining sequence comparisons with information on the chromosomal locations of the genes, we have deduced the following evolutionary scenario: The vertebrate predecessor had one opioid precursor gene and one receptor gene. The two genome doublings before the vertebrate radiation resulted in three peptide precursor genes whereupon a fourth copy arose by a local gene duplication. These four precursors diverged to become the prepropeptides for endorphin (POMC), enkephalins, dynorphins, and nociceptin, respectively. The ancestral receptor gene was quadrupled in the genome doublings leading to delta, kappa, and mu and the nociceptin/orphanin receptor. This scenario is corroborated by new data presented here for coelacanth and spotted gar, representing two basal branches in the vertebrate tree. A third genome doubling in the ancestor of teleost fishes generated additional gene copies. These results show that the opioid system was quite complex already in the first vertebrates and that it has more components in teleost fishes than in mammals. From an evolutionary point of view, nociceptin and its receptor can be considered full-fledged members of the opioid system.

  18. Matrilocal residence is ancestral in Austronesian societies

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Fiona M.; Gray, Russell D.; Greenhill, Simon J.; Mace, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The nature of social life in human prehistory is elusive, yet knowing how kinship systems evolve is critical for understanding population history and cultural diversity. Post-marital residence rules specify sex-specific dispersal and kin association, influencing the pattern of genetic markers across populations. Cultural phylogenetics allows us to practise ‘virtual archaeology’ on these aspects of social life that leave no trace in the archaeological record. Here we show that early Austronesian societies practised matrilocal post-marital residence. Using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo comparative method implemented in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework, we estimated the type of residence at each ancestral node in a sample of Austronesian language trees spanning 135 Pacific societies. Matrilocal residence has been hypothesized for proto-Oceanic society (ca 3500 BP), but we find strong evidence that matrilocality was predominant in earlier Austronesian societies ca 5000–4500 BP, at the root of the language family and its early branches. Our results illuminate the divergent patterns of mtDNA and Y-chromosome markers seen in the Pacific. The analysis of present-day cross-cultural data in this way allows us to directly address cultural evolutionary and life-history processes in prehistory. PMID:19324748

  19. Chloroplast DNA restriction site variation and phylogeny of the Berberidaceae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y D; Jansen, R K

    1998-12-01

    Comparative restriction site mapping of the chloroplast genome was performed to examine phylogenetic relationships among 27 species representing 16 genera of the Berberidaceae and two outgroups. Chloroplast genomes of the species included in this study showed no major structural rearrangements (i.e., they are collinear to tobacco cpDNA) except for the extension of the inverted repeat in species of Berberis and Mahonia. Excluding several regions that exhibited severe length variation, a total of 501 phylogenetically informative sites was mapped for ten restriction enzymes. The strict consensus tree of 14 equally parsimonious trees indicated that some berberidaceous genera (Berberis, Mahonia, Diphylleia) are not monophyletic. To explore phylogenetic utility of different parsimony methods phylogenetic trees were generated using Wagner, Dollo, and weighted parsimony for a reduced data set that included 18 species. One of the most significant results was the recognition of the four chromosomal groups, which were strongly supported regardless of the parsimony method used. The most notable difference among the trees produced by the three parsimony methods was the relationships among the four chromosomal groups. The cpDNA trees also strongly supported a close relationship of several generic pairs (e.g., Berberis-Mahonia, Epimedium-Vancouveria, etc.). Maximum likelihood values were computed for the four different tree topologies of the chromosomal groups, two Wagner, one Dollo, and one weighted topology. The results indicate that the weighted tree has the highest likelihood value. The lowest likelihood value was obtained for the Dollo tree, which had the highest bootstrap and decay values. Separate analyses using only the Inverted Repeat (IR) region resulted in a tree that is identical to the weighted tree. Poor resolution and/or support for the relationships among the four chromosomal lineages of the Berberidaceae indicate that they may have radiated from an ancestral

  20. Molecular basis of chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is an essential physiological response for sessile plant survival and the optimization of photosynthetic ability. Simple but effective experiments on the physiological, cell biological and molecular genetic aspects have been widely used to investigate the signaling components of chloroplast photorelocation movement in Arabidopsis for the past few decades. Although recent knowledge on chloroplast photorelocation movement has led us to a deeper understanding of its physiological and molecular basis, the biochemical roles of the downstream factors remain largely unknown. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances regarding chloroplast photorelocation movement and propose that a new high-resolution approach is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying actin-based chloroplast photorelocation movement.

  1. Systematics and morphological evolution within the moss family Bryaceae: a comparison between parsimony and Bayesian methods for reconstruction of ancestral character states.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Niklas; Holyoak, David T; Newton, Angela E

    2007-06-01

    The Bryaceae are a large cosmopolitan moss family including genera of significant morphological and taxonomic complexity. Phylogenetic relationships within the Bryaceae were reconstructed based on DNA sequence data from all three genomic compartments. In addition, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference were employed to reconstruct ancestral character states of 38 morphological plus four habitat characters and eight insertion/deletion events. The recovered phylogenetic patterns are generally in accord with previous phylogenies based on chloroplast DNA sequence data and three major clades are identified. The first clade comprises Bryum bornholmense, B. rubens, B. caespiticium, and Plagiobryum. This corroborates the hypothesis suggested by previous studies that several Bryum species are more closely related to Plagiobryum than to the core Bryum species. The second clade includes Acidodontium, Anomobryum, and Haplodontium, while the third clade contains the core Bryum species plus Imbribryum. Within the latter clade, B. subapiculatum and B. tenuisetum form the sister clade to Imbribryum. Reconstructions of ancestral character states under maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference suggest fourteen morphological synapomorphies for the ingroup and synapomorphies are detected for most clades within the ingroup. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian reconstructions of ancestral character states are mostly congruent although Bayesian inference shows that the posterior probability of ancestral character states may decrease dramatically when node support is taken into account. Bayesian inference also indicates that reconstructions may be ambiguous at internal nodes for highly polymorphic characters.

  2. Carbonic anhydrase and the molecular evolution of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Martha

    2012-01-01

    C(4) photosynthesis, a biochemical CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM), evolved more than 60 times within the angiosperms from C(3) ancestors. The genus Flaveria, which contains species demonstrating C(3), C(3)-C(4), C(4)-like or C(4) photosynthesis, is a model for examining the molecular evolution of the C(4) pathway. Work with carbonic anhydrase (CA), and C(3) and C(4) Flaveria congeners has added significantly to the understanding of this process. The C(4) form of CA3, a β-CA, which catalyses the first reaction in the C(4) pathway by hydrating atmospheric CO(2) to bicarbonate in the cytosol of mesophyll cells (mcs), evolved from a chloroplastic C(3) ancestor. The molecular modifications to the ancestral CA3 gene included the loss of the sequence encoding the chloroplast transit peptide, and mutations in regulatory regions that resulted in high levels of expression in the C(4) mesophyll. Analyses of the CA3 proteins and regulatory elements from Flaveria photosynthetic intermediates indicated C(4) biochemistry very likely evolved in a specific, stepwise manner in this genus. The details of the mechanisms involved in the molecular evolution of other C(4) plant β-CAs are unknown; however, comparative genetics indicate gene duplication and neofunctionalization played significant roles as they did in Flaveria. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. The RNA recognition motif protein CP33A is a global ligand of chloroplast mRNAs and is essential for plastid biogenesis and plant development.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Marlene; Fuß, Janina; Kühn, Kristina; Krause, Kirsten; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Chloroplast RNA metabolism depends on a multitude of nuclear-encoded RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Most known chloroplast RBPs address specific RNA targets and RNA-processing functions. However, members of the small chloroplast ribonucleoprotein family (cpRNPs) play a global role in processing and stabilizing chloroplast RNAs. Here, we show that the cpRNP CP33A localizes to a distinct sub-chloroplastic domain and is essential for chloroplast development. The loss of CP33A yields albino seedlings that exhibit aberrant leaf development and can only survive in the presence of an external carbon source. Genome-wide RNA association studies demonstrate that CP33A associates with all chloroplast mRNAs. For a given transcript, quantification of CP33A-bound versus free RNAs demonstrates that CP33A associates with the majority of most mRNAs analyzed. Our results further show that CP33A is required for the accumulation of a number of tested mRNAs, and is particularly relevant for unspliced and unprocessed precursor mRNAs. Finally, CP33A fails to associate with polysomes or to strongly co-precipitate with ribosomal RNA, suggesting that it defines a ribodomain that is separate from the chloroplast translation machinery. Collectively, these findings suggest that CP33A contributes to globally essential RNA processes in the chloroplasts of higher plants.

  4. Major evolutionary transitions of life, metabolic scaling and the number and size of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Okie, Jordan G; Smith, Val H; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes

    2016-05-25

    We investigate the effects of trophic lifestyle and two types of major evolutionary transitions in individuality-the endosymbiotic acquisition of organelles and development of multicellularity-on organellar and cellular metabolism and allometry. We develop a quantitative framework linking the size and metabolic scaling of eukaryotic cells to the abundance, size and metabolic scaling of mitochondria and chloroplasts and analyse a newly compiled, unprecedented database representing unicellular and multicellular cells covering diverse phyla and tissues. Irrespective of cellularity, numbers and total volumes of mitochondria scale linearly with cell volume, whereas chloroplasts scale sublinearly and sizes of both organelles remain largely invariant with cell size. Our framework allows us to estimate the metabolic scaling exponents of organelles and cells. Photoautotrophic cells and organelles exhibit photosynthetic scaling exponents always less than one, whereas chemoheterotrophic cells and organelles have steeper respiratory scaling exponents close to one. Multicellularity has no discernible effect on the metabolic scaling of organelles and cells. In contrast, trophic lifestyle has a profound and uniform effect, and our results suggest that endosymbiosis fundamentally altered the metabolic scaling of free-living bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts, from steep ancestral scaling to a shallower scaling in their endosymbiotic descendants.

  5. Diverse origins of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of chloroplast peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2017-07-01

    Chloroplasts are believed to be descendants of ancestral cyanobacteria that had peptidoglycan layer between the outer and the inner membranes. Historically, the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa and the rhizopod Paulinella chromatophora were believed to harbor symbiotic cyanobacteria having peptidoglycan, which were conventionally named "cyanelles". In addition, the complete set of genes involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan has been found in the moss Physcomitrella patens and some plants and algae. The presence of peptidoglycan-like structures was demonstrated by a new metabolic labeling technique in P. patens. However, many green algae and all known red algae lack peptidoglycan-related genes. That is the reason why we questioned the origin of peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzymes in the chloroplasts of the green algae and plants. We performed phylogenetic analysis of ten enzymes involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan exploiting the Gclust homolog clusters and additional genomic data. As expected, all the identified genes encoded in the chromatophore genome of P. chromatophora were closely related to cyanobacterial homologs. In the green algae and plants, only two genes, murA and mraY, were found to be closely related to cyanobacterial homologs. The origins of all other genes were diverse. Unfortunately, the origins of C. paradoxa genes were not clearly determined because of incompleteness of published genomic data. We discuss on the probable evolutionary scenarios to explain the mostly non-cyanobacterial origins of the biosynthetic enzymes of chloroplast peptidoglycan: A plausible one includes extensive multiple horizontal gene transfers during the early evolution of Viridiplantae.

  6. Distinctive architecture of the chloroplast genome in the chlorophycean green alga Stigeoclonium helveticum.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Anne-Sophie; Brouard, Jean-Simon; Charlebois, Patrick; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique

    2006-11-01

    The chloroplast genome has experienced many architectural changes during the evolution of chlorophyte green algae, with the class Chlorophyceae displaying the lowest degree of ancestral traits. We have previously shown that the completely sequenced chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) of Chamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonadales) and Scenedesmus obliquus (Sphaeropleales) are highly scrambled in gene order relative to one another. Here, we report the complete cpDNA sequence of Stigeoclonium helveticum (Chaetophorales), a member of a third chlorophycean lineage. This genome, which encodes 97 genes and contains 21 introns (including four putatively trans-spliced group II introns inserted at novel sites), is remarkably rich in derived features and extremely rearranged relative to its chlorophycean counterparts. At 223,902 bp, Stigeoclonium cpDNA is the largest chloroplast genome sequenced thus far, and in contrast to those of Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus, features no large inverted repeat. Interestingly, the pattern of gene distribution between the DNA strands and the bias in base composition along each strand suggest that the Stigeoclonium genome replicates bidirectionally from a single origin. Unlike most known trans-spliced group II introns, those of Stigeoclonium exhibit breaks in domains I and II. By placing our comparative genome analyses in a phylogenetic framework, we inferred an evolutionary scenario of the mutational events that led to changes in genome architecture in the Chlorophyceae.

  7. Major evolutionary transitions of life, metabolic scaling and the number and size of mitochondria and chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Okie, Jordan G.; Smith, Val H.; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of trophic lifestyle and two types of major evolutionary transitions in individuality—the endosymbiotic acquisition of organelles and development of multicellularity—on organellar and cellular metabolism and allometry. We develop a quantitative framework linking the size and metabolic scaling of eukaryotic cells to the abundance, size and metabolic scaling of mitochondria and chloroplasts and analyse a newly compiled, unprecedented database representing unicellular and multicellular cells covering diverse phyla and tissues. Irrespective of cellularity, numbers and total volumes of mitochondria scale linearly with cell volume, whereas chloroplasts scale sublinearly and sizes of both organelles remain largely invariant with cell size. Our framework allows us to estimate the metabolic scaling exponents of organelles and cells. Photoautotrophic cells and organelles exhibit photosynthetic scaling exponents always less than one, whereas chemoheterotrophic cells and organelles have steeper respiratory scaling exponents close to one. Multicellularity has no discernible effect on the metabolic scaling of organelles and cells. In contrast, trophic lifestyle has a profound and uniform effect, and our results suggest that endosymbiosis fundamentally altered the metabolic scaling of free-living bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts, from steep ancestral scaling to a shallower scaling in their endosymbiotic descendants. PMID:27194700

  8. Analysis of chloroplast movement and relocation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu; Kong, Sam-Geun

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is essential for the sessile plant survival and plays a role for efficient photosynthesis and avoiding photodamage of chloroplasts. There are several ways to observe or detect chloroplast movement directly or indirectly. Here, techniques for the induction of chloroplast movement and how to detect the responses, as well as various points of attention and advice for the experiments, are described.

  9. Rapid isolation of intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Joly, David; Carpentier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, a rapid method to isolate intact chloroplasts from spinach leaves is described. Intact chloroplasts are isolated using two short centrifugation steps and avoiding the use of percoll gradient. Intactness of chloroplast is evaluated by the inability of potassium ferricyanide to enter inside the chloroplasts and to act as an electron acceptor for photosystem II.

  10. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1991-12-01

    The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

  11. Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis during Chloroplast Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Heintze, Adolf; Görlach, Jörn; Leuschner, Carola; Hoppe, Petra; Hagelstein, Petra; Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Schultz, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    The chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis of very young leaves is supplied by the plastidic CO2 → pyruvate → acetyl-coenzyme A (C3 → C2) metabolism (D Schulze-Siebert, G Schultz [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1233-1237) and occurs via the plastidic mevalonate pathway. The plastidic C3 → C2 metabolism and/or plastidic mevalonate pathway of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings changes from maximal activity at the leaf base (containing developing chloroplasts with incomplete thylakoid stacking but a considerable rate of photosynthetic CO2-fixation) almost to ineffectivity at the leaf tip (containing mature chloroplasts with maximal photosynthetic activity). The ability to import isopentenyl diphosphate from the extraplastidic space gradually increases to substitute for the loss of endogenous intermediate supply for chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis (change from autonomic to division-of-labor stage). Fatty acid synthesis from NaH14CO3 decreases in the same manner as shown for leaf sections and chloroplasts isolated from these. Evidence has been obtained for a drastic decrease of pyruvate decarboxylase-dehydrogenase activity during chloroplast development compared with other anabolic chloroplast pathways (synthesis of aromatic amino acid and branched chain amino acids). The noncompetition of pyruvate and acetate in isotopic dilution studies indicates that both a pyruvate-derived and an acetate-derived compound are simultaneously needed to form introductory intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, presumably acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:16667567

  12. Chloroplast DNA Replication Is Regulated by the Redox State Independently of Chloroplast Division in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kabeya, Yukihiro; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts arose from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and multiply by division. In algal cells, chloroplast division is regulated by the cell cycle so as to occur only once, in the S phase. Chloroplasts possess multiple copies of their own genome that must be replicated during chloroplast proliferation. In order to examine how chloroplast DNA replication is regulated in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we first asked whether it is regulated by the cell cycle, as is the case for chloroplast division. Chloroplast DNA is replicated in the light and not the dark phase, independent of the cell cycle or the timing of chloroplast division in photoautotrophic culture. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron transfer blocked chloroplast DNA replication. However, chloroplast DNA was replicated when the cells were grown heterotrophically in the dark, raising the possibility that chloroplast DNA replication is coupled with the reducing power supplied by photosynthesis or the uptake of acetate. When dimethylthiourea, a reactive oxygen species scavenger, was added to the photoautotrophic culture, chloroplast DNA was replicated even in the dark. In contrast, when methylviologen, a reactive oxygen species inducer, was added, chloroplast DNA was not replicated in the light. Moreover, the chloroplast DNA replication activity in both the isolated chloroplasts and nucleoids was increased by dithiothreitol, while it was repressed by diamide, a specific thiol-oxidizing reagent. These results suggest that chloroplast DNA replication is regulated by the redox state that is sensed by the nucleoids and that the disulfide bonds in nucleoid-associated proteins are involved in this regulatory activity. PMID:23447524

  13. Yeast Ancestral Genome Reconstructions: The Possibilities of Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannier, Eric

    In 2006, a debate has risen on the question of the efficiency of bioinformatics methods to reconstruct mammalian ancestral genomes. Three years later, Gordon et al. (PLoS Genetics, 5(5), 2009) chose not to use automatic methods to build up the genome of a 100 million year old Saccharomyces cerevisiae ancestor. Their manually constructed ancestor provides a reference genome to test whether automatic methods are indeed unable to approach confident reconstructions. Adapting several methodological frameworks to the same yeast gene order data, I discuss the possibilities, differences and similarities of the available algorithms for ancestral genome reconstructions. The methods can be classified into two types: local and global. Studying the properties of both helps to clarify what we can expect from their usage. Both methods propose contiguous ancestral regions that come very close (> 95% identity) to the manually predicted ancestral yeast chromosomes, with a good coverage of the extant genomes.

  14. Phylogeographical variation of chloroplast DNA in cork oak (Quercus suber).

    PubMed

    Lumaret, Roselyne; Tryphon-Dionnet, Mathieu; Michaud, Henri; Sanuy, Aurélie; Ipotesi, Emilie; Born, Céline; Mir, Céline

    2005-10-01

    In the last decades, the geographical location of the centre of origin of Quercus suber (cork oak), a strictly western Mediterranean oak species, has been the subject of controversy. RFLP variation over the whole chloroplast DNA molecule and PCR-RFLPs over seven specific cpDNA fragments were analysed phylogeographically to reconstruct the evolutionary history of cork oak. Nine chlorotypes of the 'suber' cpDNA lineage were identified throughout the species range. Using closely related Mediterranean oak species as outgroup, the chlorotypes showed a clear phylogeographical pattern of three groups corresponding to potential glacial refuges in Italy, North Africa and Iberia. The most ancestral and recent groups were observed in populations located in the eastern and western parts of the species range, respectively. Several unrelated chlorotypes of the 'ilex' cpDNA lineage were also identified in specific western areas. The results support a Middle-Eastern or a central Mediterranean origin for cork oak with subsequent westward colonization during the Tertiary Period, and suggest that the 'ilex' chlorotype variation does not reflect entirely cytoplasmic introgression by Q. ilex but originated partly in Q. suber.

  15. ProCARs: Progressive Reconstruction of Ancestral Gene Orders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of ancestral gene order reconstruction from extant genomes, there exist two main computational approaches: rearrangement-based, and homology-based methods. The rearrangement-based methods consist in minimizing a total rearrangement distance on the branches of a species tree. The homology-based methods consist in the detection of a set of potential ancestral contiguity features, followed by the assembling of these features into Contiguous Ancestral Regions (CARs). Results In this paper, we present a new homology-based method that uses a progressive approach for both the detection and the assembling of ancestral contiguity features into CARs. The method is based on detecting a set of potential ancestral adjacencies iteratively using the current set of CARs at each step, and constructing CARs progressively using a 2-phase assembling method. Conclusion We show the usefulness of the method through a reconstruction of the boreoeutherian ancestral gene order, and a comparison with three other homology-based methods: AnGeS, InferCARs and GapAdj. The program, written in Python, and the dataset used in this paper are available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/procars/. PMID:26040958

  16. A family of selfish minicircular chromosomes with jumbled chloroplast gene fragments from a dinoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Cavalier-Smith, T; Green, B R

    2001-08-01

    Chloroplast genes of several dinoflagellate species are located on unigenic DNA minicircular chromosomes. We have now completely sequenced five aberrant minicircular chromosomes from the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra. These probably nonfunctional DNA circles lack complete genes, with each being composed of several short fragments of two or three different chloroplast genes and a common conserved region with a tripartite 9G-9A-9G core like the putative replicon origin of functional single-gene circular chloroplast chromosomes. Their sequences imply that all five circles evolved by differential deletions and duplications from common ancestral circles bearing fragments of four genes: psbA, psbC, 16S rRNA, and 23S rRNA. It appears that recombination between separate unigenic chromosomes initially gave intermediate heterodimers, which were subsequently stabilized by deletions that included part or all of one putative replicon origin. We suggest that homologous recombination at the 9G-9A-9G core regions produced a psbA/psbC heterodimer which generated two distinct chimeric circles by differential deletions and duplications. A 23S/16S rRNA heterodimer more likely formed by illegitimate recombination between 16S and 23S rRNA genes. Homologous recombination between the 9G-9A-9G core regions of both heterodimers and additional differential deletions and duplications could then have yielded the other three circles. Near identity of the gene fragments and 9G-9A-9G cores, despite diverging adjacent regions, may be maintained by gene conversion. The conserved organization of the 9G-9A-9G cores alone favors the idea that they are replicon origins and suggests that they may enable the aberrant minicircles to parasitize the chloroplast's replication machinery as selfish circles.

  17. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ∼15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04889.001 PMID:25584625

  18. β-Carboxysomal proteins assemble into highly organized structures in Nicotiana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Myat T; Occhialini, Alessandro; Andralojc, P John; Devonshire, Jean; Hines, Kevin M; Parry, Martin A J; Hanson, Maureen R

    2014-07-01

    The photosynthetic efficiency of C3 plants suffers from the reaction of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) with O2 instead of CO2 , leading to the costly process of photorespiration. Increasing the concentration of CO2 around Rubisco is a strategy used by photosynthetic prokaryotes such as cyanobacteria for more efficient incorporation of inorganic carbon. Engineering the cyanobacterial CO2 -concentrating mechanism, the carboxysome, into chloroplasts is an approach to enhance photosynthesis or to compartmentalize other biochemical reactions to confer new capabilities on transgenic plants. We have chosen to explore the possibility of producing β-carboxysomes from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, a model freshwater cyanobacterium. Using the agroinfiltration technique, we have transiently expressed multiple β-carboxysomal proteins (CcmK2, CcmM, CcmL, CcmO and CcmN) in Nicotiana benthamiana with fusions that target these proteins into chloroplasts, and that provide fluorescent labels for visualizing the resultant structures. By confocal and electron microscopic analysis, we have observed that the shell proteins of the β-carboxysome are able to assemble in plant chloroplasts into highly organized assemblies resembling empty microcompartments. We demonstrate that a foreign protein can be targeted with a 17-amino-acid CcmN peptide to the shell proteins inside chloroplasts. Our experiments establish the feasibility of introducing carboxysomes into chloroplasts for the potential compartmentalization of Rubisco or other proteins. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Subcomplexes of Ancestral Respiratory Complex I Subunits Rapidly Turn Over in Vivo as Productive Assembly Intermediates in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Carrie, Chris; Gawryluk, Ryan M. R.; Solheim, Cory; Gray, Michael W.; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Subcomplexes of mitochondrial respiratory complex I (CI; EC 1.6.5.3) are shown to turn over in vivo, and we propose a role in an ancestral assembly pathway. By progressively labeling Arabidopsis cell cultures with 15N and isolating mitochondria, we have identified CI subcomplexes through differences in 15N incorporation into their protein subunits. The 200-kDa subcomplex, containing the ancestral γ-carbonic anhydrase (γ-CA), γ-carbonic anhydrase-like, and 20.9-kDa subunits, had a significantly higher turnover rate than intact CI or CI+CIII2. In vitro import of precursors for these CI subunits demonstrated rapid generation of subcomplexes and revealed that their specific abundance varied when different ancestral subunits were imported. Time course studies of precursor import showed the further assembly of these subcomplexes into CI and CI+CIII2, indicating that the subcomplexes are productive intermediates of assembly. The strong transient incorporation of new subunits into the 200-kDa subcomplex in a γ-CA mutant is consistent with this subcomplex being a key initiator of CI assembly in plants. This evidence alongside the pattern of coincident occurrence of genes encoding these particular proteins broadly in eukaryotes, except for opisthokonts, provides a framework for the evolutionary conservation of these accessory subunits and evidence of their function in ancestral CI assembly. PMID:23271729

  20. Importance of phosphatidylcholine on the chloroplast surface.

    PubMed

    Botella, César; Jouhet, Juliette; Block, Maryse A

    2017-01-01

    In plant cells, phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major glycerolipid of most membranes but practically lacking from the plastid internal membranes. In chloroplasts, PC is absent from the thylakoids and the inner envelope membrane. It is however the main component of the outer envelope membrane, where it exclusively distributes in the outer monolayer. This unique distribution is likely related with operational compartmentalization of plant lipid metabolism. In this review, we summarize the different mechanisms involved in homeostasis of PC in plant cells. The specific origin of chloroplast PC is examined and the involvement of the P4-ATPase family of phospholipid flippases (ALA) is considered with a special attention to the recently reported effect of the endoplasmic reticulum-localized ALA10 on modification of chloroplast PC desaturation. The different possible roles of chloroplast PC are then discussed and analyzed in consideration of plant physiology.

  1. Ancestral Rocky Mountian Tectonics: A Sedimentary Record of Ancestral Front Range and Uncompahgre Exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. M.; Saylor, J. E.; Lapen, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Ancestral Rocky Mountains (ARM) encompass multiple crustal provinces with characteristic crystallization ages across the central and western US. Two driving mechanisms have been proposed to explain ARM deformation. (1) Ouachita-Marathon collision SE of the ARM uplifts has been linked to an E-to-W sequence of uplift and is consistent with proposed disruption of a larger Paradox-Central Colorado Trough Basin by exhumation of the Uncompahgre Uplift. Initial exhumation of the Amarillo-Wichita Uplift to the east would provide a unique ~530 Ma signal absent from source areas to the SW, and result in initial exhumation of the Ancestral Front Range. (2) Alternatively, deformation due to flat slab subduction along a hypothesized plate boundary to the SW suggests a SW-to-NE younging of exhumation. This hypothesis suggests a SW-derived Grenville signature, and would trigger uplift of the Uncompahgre first. We analyzed depositional environments, sediment dispersal patterns, and sediment and basement zircon U-Pb and (U-Th)/He ages in 3 locations in the Paradox Basin and Central Colorado Trough (CCT). The Paradox Basin exhibits an up-section transition in fluvial style that suggests a decrease in overbank stability and increased lateral migration. Similarly, the CCT records a long-term progradation of depositional environments from marginal marine to fluvial, indicating that sediment supply in both basins outpaced accommodation. Preliminary provenance results indicate little to no input from the Amarillo-Wichita uplift in either basin despite uniformly westward sediment dispersal systems in both basins. Results also show that the Uncompahgre Uplift was the source for sediment throughout Paradox Basin deposition. These observations are inconsistent with the predictions of scenario 1 above. Rather, they suggest either a synchronous response to tectonic stress across the ARM provinces or an SW-to-NE pattern of deformation.

  2. Effects of Pronase on Isolated Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Leonard; Franceschi, Vincent R.; Stocking, C. Ralph

    1979-01-01

    Subjecting isolated spinach chloroplasts to mild proteolysis (10-minute incubation at 20 C in 500 micrograms per milliliter pronase) caused chloroplast clumping but did not affect their integrity as measured by their ability to carry out light stimulated, glycerate-3-P-dependent O2 evolution. Transmission electron microscopy revealed no detectable differences between the control and treated plastids. Mild proteolysis inactivated exogenously added pyruvate kinase and should be a useful technique in certain enzyme distribution studies. Images PMID:16661083

  3. Endogenous nitric oxide generation in protoplast chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Prommer, Judith; Watanabe, Masami

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : NO generation is studied in the protoplast chloroplasts. NO, ONOO ( - ) and ROS (O ( 2 ) ( - ) and H ( 2 ) O ( 2 ) ) are generated in chloroplasts. Nitric oxide synthase-like protein appears to be involved in NO generation. Nitric oxide stimulates chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast differentiation. The present study was conducted to better understand the process of NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts. NO, peroxynitrite and superoxide anion were investigated in the protoplasts and isolated chloroplasts using specific dyes, confocal laser scanning and light microscopy. The level of NO was highest after protoplast isolation and subsequently decreased during culture. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of PTIO, suggests that diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA) detected NO. Detection of peroxynitrite, a reaction product of NO and superoxide anion, further suggests NO generation. Moreover, generation of NO and peroxynitrite in the chloroplasts of wild-type Arabidopsis and their absence or weak signals in the leaf-derived protoplasts of Atnoa1 mutants confirmed the reactivity of DAF-2DA and aminophenyl fluorescein to NO and peroxynitrite, respectively. Isolated chloroplasts also showed signal of NO. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of 100 μM nitric oxide synthase inhibitors [L-NNA, Nω-nitro-L-arginine and PBIT, S,S'-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-ethanediyl)-bis-isothiourea] revealed that nitric oxide synthase-like system is involved in NO synthesis. Suppression of NO signal in the protoplasts isolated in the presence of cycloheximide suggests de novo synthesis of NO generating protein during the process of protoplast isolation. Furthermore, the lack of inhibition of NO production by sodium tungstate (250 μM) and inhibition by L-NNA, and PBIT suggest involvement NOS-like protein, but not nitrate reductase, in NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts.

  4. Clumped isotope paleothermometry of the Mio-Pliocene freshwater Lake Mohave. Lower ancestral Colorado River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. A.; Huntington, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Bouse Formation are an archive of ancestral Colorado River integration in the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene. In Mohave Valley along the California-Arizona-Nevada border, exposures of the Bouse Formation are observed ~400 m above the modern river elevation, which has been interpreted as evidence of tectonic uplift following a regionally extensive marine incursion and integration of the ancestral Colorado River by capture. However, recent investigations instead favor a "top-down" process of river integration by sequential infilling of freshwater lakes that does not require subsequent tectonic uplift. Accurate interpretation of the Bouse Formation's depositional environment is needed to test these models and ultimately, constrain the timing and mechanism of southwestern Colorado Plateau uplift. To further constrain interpretations of depositional environment, we present new clumped isotope analyses with major and trace element geochemistry and scanning electron microscopy of carbonate samples from the Bouse Formation in Mohave Valley. Here the Bouse Formation contains three distinct facies: basal marl and limestone overlain by thick beds of calcareous claystone interbedded with siltstone and sandstone and locally overlain by tufa. Bulk geochemistry of all facies is consistent with a similar freshwater source yet each facies is isotopically distinct, potentially indicating a strong influence of facies-specific fractionation processes. Carbonate formation temperatures measured in tufa samples are variable, suggesting multiple generations of calcite precipitation. Formation temperatures from basal marl and claystone samples are generally consistent with near-surface lake temperatures, broadly supporting a lacustrine depositional environment and "top-down" process of ancestral Colorado River integration. More broadly, our results quantify the variability in carbonate formation temperatures with different lacustrine facies and

  5. Essentials of Proteolytic Machineries in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kenji; Kato, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2017-01-09

    Plastids are unique organelles that can alter their structure and function in response to environmental and developmental stimuli. Chloroplasts are one type of plastid and are the sites for various metabolic processes, including photosynthesis. For optimal photosynthetic activity, the chloroplast proteome must be properly shaped and maintained through regulated proteolysis and protein quality control mechanisms. Enzymatic functions and activities are conferred by protein maturation processes involving consecutive proteolytic reactions. Protein abundances are optimized by the balanced protein synthesis and degradation, which is depending on the metabolic status. Malfunctioning proteins are promptly degraded. Twenty chloroplast proteolytic machineries have been characterized to date. Specifically, processing peptidases and energy-driven processive proteases are the major players in chloroplast proteome biogenesis, remodeling, and maintenance. Recently identified putative proteases are potential regulators of photosynthetic functions. Here we provide an updated, comprehensive overview of chloroplast protein degradation machineries and discuss their importance for photosynthesis. Wherever possible, we also provide structural insights into chloroplast proteases that implement regulated proteolysis of substrate proteins/peptides. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Model of Chloroplast Growth Regulation in Mesophyll Cells.

    PubMed

    Paton, Kelly M; Anderson, Lisa; Flottat, Pauline; Cytrynbaum, Eric N

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplasts regulate their growth to optimize photosynthesis. Quantitative data show that the ratio of total chloroplast area to mesophyll cell area is constant across different cells within a single species and also across species. Wild-type chloroplasts exhibit little scatter around this trend; highly irregularly shaped mutant chloroplasts exhibit more scatter. Here we propose a model motivated by a bacterial quorum-sensing model consisting of a switch-like signaling network that turns off chloroplast growth. We calculated the dependence of the location of the relevant saddle-node bifurcation on the geometry of the chloroplasts. Our model exhibits a linear trend, with linearly growing scatter dependent on chloroplast shape, consistent with the data. When modeled chloroplasts are of a shape that grows with a constant area-to-volume ratio (disks, cylinders), we find a linear trend with minimal scatter. Chloroplasts with area and volume that do not grow proportionally (spheres) exhibit a linear trend with additional scatter.

  7. Reconstruction of the ancestral marsupial karyotype from comparative gene maps

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing number of assembled mammalian genomes makes it possible to compare genome organisation across mammalian lineages and reconstruct chromosomes of the ancestral marsupial and therian (marsupial and eutherian) mammals. However, the reconstruction of ancestral genomes requires genome assemblies to be anchored to chromosomes. The recently sequenced tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) genome was assembled into over 300,000 contigs. We previously devised an efficient strategy for mapping large evolutionarily conserved blocks in non-model mammals, and applied this to determine the arrangement of conserved blocks on all wallaby chromosomes, thereby permitting comparative maps to be constructed and resolve the long debated issue between a 2n = 14 and 2n = 22 ancestral marsupial karyotype. Results We identified large blocks of genes conserved between human and opossum, and mapped genes corresponding to the ends of these blocks by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A total of 242 genes was assigned to wallaby chromosomes in the present study, bringing the total number of genes mapped to 554 and making it the most densely cytogenetically mapped marsupial genome. We used these gene assignments to construct comparative maps between wallaby and opossum, which uncovered many intrachromosomal rearrangements, particularly for genes found on wallaby chromosomes X and 3. Expanding comparisons to include chicken and human permitted the putative ancestral marsupial (2n = 14) and therian mammal (2n = 19) karyotypes to be reconstructed. Conclusions Our physical mapping data for the tammar wallaby has uncovered the events shaping marsupial genomes and enabled us to predict the ancestral marsupial karyotype, supporting a 2n = 14 ancestor. Futhermore, our predicted therian ancestral karyotype has helped to understand the evolution of the ancestral eutherian genome. PMID:24261750

  8. Activation of polyphenol oxidase of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, N E

    1973-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or -18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density.Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles x mg(-1) chlorophyll x hr(-1). Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes.Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  9. Activation of Polyphenol Oxidase of Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or —18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density. Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles × mg−1 chlorophyll × hr−1. Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes. Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  10. Distribution of enzymes in mesophyll and parenchyma-sheath chloroplasts of maize leaves in relation to the C4-dicarboxylic acid pathway of photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Slack, C. R.; Hatch, M. D.; Goodchild, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    1. Mesophyll and parenchyma-sheath chloroplasts of maize leaves were separated by density fractionation in non-aqueous media. 2. An investigation of the distribution of photosynthetic enzymes indicated that the mesophyll chloroplasts probably contain the entire leaf complement of pyruvate,Pi dikinase, NADP-specific malate dehydrogenase, glycerate kinase and nitrite reductase and most of the adenylate kinase and pyrophosphatase. The fractionation pattern of phosphopyruvate carboxylase suggested that this enzyme may be associated with the bounding membrane of mesophyll chloroplasts. 3. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase, ribose phosphate isomerase, phosphoribulokinase, fructose diphosphate aldolase, alkaline fructose diphosphatase and NADP-specific `malic' enzyme appear to be wholly localized in the parenchyma-sheath chloroplasts. Phosphoglycerate kinase and NADP-specific glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase, on the other hand, are distributed approximately equally between the two types of chloroplast. 4. After exposure of illuminated leaves to 14CO2 for 25sec., labelled malate, aspartate and 3-phosphoglycerate had similar fractionation patterns, and a large proportion of each was isolated with mesophyll chloroplasts. Labelled fructose phosphates and ribulose phosphates were mainly isolated in fractions containing parenchyma-sheath chloroplasts, and dihydroxyacetone phosphate had a fractionation pattern intermediate between those of C4 dicarboxylic acids and sugar phosphates. 6. These results indicate that the mesophyll and parenchyma-sheath chloroplasts have a co-operative function in the operation of the C4-dicarboxylic acid pathway. Possible routes for the transfer of carbon from C4 dicarboxylic acids to sugars are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1 PMID:4309527

  11. Isolated plant mitochondria import chloroplast precursor proteins in vitro with the same efficiency as chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Suzanne P; Tan, Fui-Ching; Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Thompson, Simon J; Mullineaux, Philip M; Creissen, Gary P; von Stedingk, Erik; Glaser, Elzbieta; Smith, Alison G; Robinson, Colin

    2002-02-15

    Most chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins are synthesized with N-terminal presequences that direct their import into the appropriate organelle. In this report we have analyzed the specificity of standard in vitro assays for import into isolated pea chloroplasts and mitochondria. We find that chloroplast protein import is highly specific because mitochondrial proteins are not imported to any detectable levels. Surprisingly, however, pea mitochondria import a range of chloroplast protein precursors with the same efficiency as chloroplasts, including those of plastocyanin, the 33-kDa photosystem II protein, Hcf136, and coproporphyrinogen III oxidase. These import reactions are dependent on the Deltaphi across the inner mitochondrial membrane, and furthermore, marker enzyme assays and Western blotting studies exclude any import by contaminating chloroplasts in the preparation. The pea mitochondria specifically recognize information in the chloroplast-targeting presequences, because they also import a fusion comprising the presequence of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase linked to green fluorescent protein. However, the same construct is targeted exclusively into chloroplasts in vivo indicating that the in vitro mitochondrial import reactions are unphysiological, possibly because essential specificity factors are absent in these assays. Finally, we show that disruption of potential amphipathic helices in one presequence does not block import into pea mitochondria, indicating that other features are recognized.

  12. REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE genes from Arabidopsis thaliana help to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment

    DOE PAGES

    Larkin, Robert M.; Stefano, Giovanni; Ruckle, Michael E.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Eukaryotic cells require mechanisms to establish the proportion of cellular volume devoted to particular organelles. These mechanisms are poorly understood. From a screen for plastid-to-nucleus signaling mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, we cloned a mutant allele of a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function that is homologous to two other Arabidopsis genes of unknown function and Arabidopsis. In contrast to FRIENDLY, these three homologs of FRIENDLY are found only in photosynthetic organisms. Based on these data, we proposed that FRIENDLY expanded into a small gene family to help regulate the energy metabolism of cells that contain both mitochondria andmore » chloroplasts. Indeed, we found that knocking out these genes caused a number of chloroplast phenotypes, including a reduction in the proportion of cellular volume devoted to chloroplasts to 50% of wild type. Thus, we refer to these genes as REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE (REC). The size of the chloroplast compartment was reduced most in rec1 mutants. The REC1 protein accumulated in the cytosol and the nucleus. REC1 was excluded from the nucleus when plants were treated with amitrole, which inhibits cell expansion and chloroplast function. Finally, we conclude that REC1 is an extraplastidic protein that helps to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment, and that signals derived from cell expansion or chloroplasts may regulate REC1.« less

  13. REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE genes from Arabidopsis thaliana help to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.; Stefano, Giovanni; Ruckle, Michael E.; Stavoe, Andrea K.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Brandizzi, Federica; Malmstrom, Carolyn M.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require mechanisms to establish the proportion of cellular volume devoted to particular organelles. These mechanisms are poorly understood. From a screen for plastid-to-nucleus signaling mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, we cloned a mutant allele of a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function that is homologous to two other Arabidopsis genes of unknown function and to FRIENDLY, which was previously shown to promote the normal distribution of mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In contrast to FRIENDLY, these three homologs of FRIENDLY are found only in photosynthetic organisms. Based on these data, we proposed that FRIENDLY expanded into a small gene family to help regulate the energy metabolism of cells that contain both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Indeed, we found that knocking out these genes caused a number of chloroplast phenotypes, including a reduction in the proportion of cellular volume devoted to chloroplasts to 50% of wild type. Thus, we refer to these genes as REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE (REC). The size of the chloroplast compartment was reduced most in rec1 mutants. The REC1 protein accumulated in the cytosol and the nucleus. REC1 was excluded from the nucleus when plants were treated with amitrole, which inhibits cell expansion and chloroplast function. We conclude that REC1 is an extraplastidic protein that helps to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment, and that signals derived from cell expansion or chloroplasts may regulate REC1. PMID:26862170

  14. REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE genes from Arabidopsis thaliana help to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Robert M; Stefano, Giovanni; Ruckle, Michael E; Stavoe, Andrea K; Sinkler, Christopher A; Brandizzi, Federica; Malmstrom, Carolyn M; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2016-02-23

    Eukaryotic cells require mechanisms to establish the proportion of cellular volume devoted to particular organelles. These mechanisms are poorly understood. From a screen for plastid-to-nucleus signaling mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, we cloned a mutant allele of a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function that is homologous to two other Arabidopsis genes of unknown function and to FRIENDLY, which was previously shown to promote the normal distribution of mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In contrast to FRIENDLY, these three homologs of FRIENDLY are found only in photosynthetic organisms. Based on these data, we proposed that FRIENDLY expanded into a small gene family to help regulate the energy metabolism of cells that contain both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Indeed, we found that knocking out these genes caused a number of chloroplast phenotypes, including a reduction in the proportion of cellular volume devoted to chloroplasts to 50% of wild type. Thus, we refer to these genes as REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE (REC). The size of the chloroplast compartment was reduced most in rec1 mutants. The REC1 protein accumulated in the cytosol and the nucleus. REC1 was excluded from the nucleus when plants were treated with amitrole, which inhibits cell expansion and chloroplast function. We conclude that REC1 is an extraplastidic protein that helps to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment, and that signals derived from cell expansion or chloroplasts may regulate REC1.

  15. Chloroplast genomes: diversity, evolution, and applications in genetic engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Daniell, Henry; Lin, Choun -Sea; Yu, Ming; ...

    2016-06-23

    Chloroplasts play a crucial role in sustaining life on earth. The availability of over 800 sequenced chloroplast genomes from a variety of land plants has enhanced our understanding of chloroplast biology, intracellular gene transfer, conservation, diversity, and the genetic basis by which chloroplast transgenes can be engineered to enhance plant agronomic traits or to produce high-value agricultural or biomedical products. In this review, we discuss the impact of chloroplast genome sequences on understanding the origins of economically important cultivated species and changes that have taken place during domestication. Here, we also discuss the potential biotechnological applications of chloroplast genomes.

  16. Yeast ancestral genome reconstructions: the possibilities of computational methods II.

    PubMed

    Chauve, Cedric; Gavranovic, Haris; Ouangraoua, Aida; Tannier, Eric

    2010-09-01

    Since the availability of assembled eukaryotic genomes, the first one being a budding yeast, many computational methods for the reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and gene orders have been developed. The difficulty has always been to assess their reliability, since we often miss a good knowledge of the true ancestral genomes to compare their results to, as well as a good knowledge of the evolutionary mechanisms to test them on realistic simulated data. In this study, we propose some measures of reliability of several kinds of methods, and apply them to infer and analyse the architectures of two ancestral yeast genomes, based on the sequence of seven assembled extant ones. The pre-duplication common ancestor of S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata has been inferred manually by Gordon et al. (Plos Genet. 2009). We show why, in this case, a good convergence of the methods is explained by some properties of the data, and why results are reliable. In another study, Jean et al. (J. Comput Biol. 2009) proposed an ancestral architecture of the last common ancestor of S. kluyveri, K. thermotolerans, K. lactis, A. gossypii, and Z. rouxii inferred by a computational method. In this case, we show that the dataset does not seem to contain enough information to infer a reliable architecture, and we construct a higher resolution dataset which gives a good reliability on a new ancestral configuration.

  17. Male androphilia in the ancestral environment. An ethnological analysis.

    PubMed

    VanderLaan, Doug P; Ren, Zhiyuan; Vasey, Paul L

    2013-12-01

    The kin selection hypothesis posits that male androphilia (male sexual attraction to adult males) evolved because androphilic males invest more in kin, thereby enhancing inclusive fitness. Increased kin-directed altruism has been repeatedly documented among a population of transgendered androphilic males, but never among androphilic males in other cultures who adopt gender identities as men. Thus, the kin selection hypothesis may be viable if male androphilia was expressed in the transgendered form in the ancestral past. Using the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS), we examined 46 societies in which male androphilia was expressed in the transgendered form (transgendered societies) and 146 comparison societies (non-transgendered societies). We analyzed SCCS variables pertaining to ancestral sociocultural conditions, access to kin, and societal reactions to homosexuality. Our results show that ancestral sociocultural conditions and bilateral and double descent systems were more common in transgendered than in non-transgendered societies. Across the entire sample, descent systems and residence patterns that would presumably facilitate increased access to kin were associated with the presence of ancestral sociocultural conditions. Among transgendered societies, negative societal attitudes toward homosexuality were unlikely. We conclude that the ancestral human sociocultural environment was likely conducive to the expression of the transgendered form of male androphilia. Descent systems, residence patterns, and societal reactions to homosexuality likely facilitated investments in kin by transgendered males. Given that contemporary transgendered male androphiles appear to exhibit elevated kin-directed altruism, these findings further indicate the viability of the kin selection hypothesis.

  18. Enzyme functional evolution through improved catalysis of ancestrally nonpreferred substrates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruiqi; Hippauf, Frank; Rohrbeck, Diana; Haustein, Maria; Wenke, Katrin; Feike, Janie; Sorrelle, Noah; Piechulla, Birgit; Barkman, Todd J

    2012-02-21

    In this study, we investigated the role for ancestral functional variation that may be selected upon to generate protein functional shifts using ancestral protein resurrection, statistical tests for positive selection, forward and reverse evolutionary genetics, and enzyme functional assays. Data are presented for three instances of protein functional change in the salicylic acid/benzoic acid/theobromine (SABATH) lineage of plant secondary metabolite-producing enzymes. In each case, we demonstrate that ancestral nonpreferred activities were improved upon in a daughter enzyme after gene duplication, and that these functional shifts were likely coincident with positive selection. Both forward and reverse mutagenesis studies validate the impact of one or a few sites toward increasing activity with ancestrally nonpreferred substrates. In one case, we document the occurrence of an evolutionary reversal of an active site residue that reversed enzyme properties. Furthermore, these studies show that functionally important amino acid replacements result in substrate discrimination as reflected in evolutionary changes in the specificity constant (k(cat)/K(M)) for competing substrates, even though adaptive substitutions may affect K(M) and k(cat) separately. In total, these results indicate that nonpreferred, or even latent, ancestral protein activities may be coopted at later times to become the primary or preferred protein activities.

  19. An experimental phylogeny to benchmark ancestral sequence reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Ryan N.; Radford, Caelan E.; Roof, Kelsey A.; Natarajan, Divya K.; Gaucher, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is a still-burgeoning method that has revealed many key mechanisms of molecular evolution. One criticism of the approach is an inability to validate its algorithms within a biological context as opposed to a computer simulation. Here we build an experimental phylogeny using the gene of a single red fluorescent protein to address this criticism. The evolved phylogeny consists of 19 operational taxonomic units (leaves) and 17 ancestral bifurcations (nodes) that display a wide variety of fluorescent phenotypes. The 19 leaves then serve as ‘modern' sequences that we subject to ASR analyses using various algorithms and to benchmark against the known ancestral genotypes and ancestral phenotypes. We confirm computer simulations that show all algorithms infer ancient sequences with high accuracy, yet we also reveal wide variation in the phenotypes encoded by incorrectly inferred sequences. Specifically, Bayesian methods incorporating rate variation significantly outperform the maximum parsimony criterion in phenotypic accuracy. Subsampling of extant sequences had minor effect on the inference of ancestral sequences. PMID:27628687

  20. Enzyme functional evolution through improved catalysis of ancestrally nonpreferred substrates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruiqi; Hippauf, Frank; Rohrbeck, Diana; Haustein, Maria; Wenke, Katrin; Feike, Janie; Sorrelle, Noah; Piechulla, Birgit; Barkman, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role for ancestral functional variation that may be selected upon to generate protein functional shifts using ancestral protein resurrection, statistical tests for positive selection, forward and reverse evolutionary genetics, and enzyme functional assays. Data are presented for three instances of protein functional change in the salicylic acid/benzoic acid/theobromine (SABATH) lineage of plant secondary metabolite-producing enzymes. In each case, we demonstrate that ancestral nonpreferred activities were improved upon in a daughter enzyme after gene duplication, and that these functional shifts were likely coincident with positive selection. Both forward and reverse mutagenesis studies validate the impact of one or a few sites toward increasing activity with ancestrally nonpreferred substrates. In one case, we document the occurrence of an evolutionary reversal of an active site residue that reversed enzyme properties. Furthermore, these studies show that functionally important amino acid replacements result in substrate discrimination as reflected in evolutionary changes in the specificity constant (kcat/KM) for competing substrates, even though adaptive substitutions may affect KM and kcat separately. In total, these results indicate that nonpreferred, or even latent, ancestral protein activities may be coopted at later times to become the primary or preferred protein activities. PMID:22315396

  1. Chloroplast anchoring: its implications for the regulation of intracellular chloroplast distribution.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shingo; Takamatsu, Hideyasu; Sakurai-Ozato, Nami

    2009-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of organelles plays a pivotal role in the maintenance and adaptation of a wide spectrum of cellular activities in plants. Chloroplasts are a special type of organelle able to photosynthesize, capturing light energy to fix atmospheric CO2. Consequently, the intracellular positioning of chloroplasts is crucial for plant growth and development. Knowledge of the photoreceptors and cellular apparatus responsible for chloroplast movement has gradually accumulated over time, yet recent advances have allowed improved understanding. In this article, several aspects of research progress into the mechanisms for maintaining the specific intracellular distribution patterns of chloroplasts, namely, chloroplast anchoring, are summarized, together with a brief consideration of the future prospects of this subject. Our discussion covers developmental, physiological, ecophysiological, and recent cell biological research areas.

  2. Evolutionary development of redox regulation in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Monica; Uberegui, Estefania; Schürmann, Peter; Buchanan, Bob B

    2014-09-20

    The post-translational modification of thiol groups stands out as a key strategy that cells employ for metabolic regulation and adaptation to changing environmental conditions. Nowhere is this more evident than in chloroplasts-the O2-evolving photosynthetic organelles of plant cells that are fitted with multiple redox systems, including the thioredoxin (Trx) family of oxidoreductases functional in the reversible modification of regulatory thiols of proteins in all types of cells. The best understood member of this family in chloroplasts is the ferredoxin-linked thioredoxin system (FTS) by which proteins are modified via light-dependent disulfide/dithiol (S-S/2SH) transitions. Discovered in the reductive activation of enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle in illuminated chloroplast preparations, recent studies have extended the role of the FTS far beyond its original boundaries to include a spectrum of cellular processes. Together with the NADP-linked thioredoxin reductase C-type (NTRC) and glutathione/glutaredoxin systems, the FTS also plays a central role in the response of chloroplasts to different types of stress. The comparisons of redox regulatory networks functional in chloroplasts of land plants with those of cyanobacteria-prokaryotes considered to be the ancestors of chloroplasts-and different types of algae summarized in this review have provided new insight into the evolutionary development of redox regulation, starting with the simplest O2-evolving organisms. The evolutionary appearance, mode of action, and specificity of the redox regulatory systems functional in chloroplasts, as well as the types of redox modification operating under diverse environmental conditions stand out as areas for future study.

  3. Heme content in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Determination of the physiological relevance of this inhibition requires a sensitive measurement which can distinguish regulatory free heme from heme which is an integral part of functional hemoproteins. A preliminary estimate was provided by reconstituting peroxidase activity from apo-peroxidase and the heme contained in broken plastids. However, subsequent experiments have suggested that this initial estimate was too large due to reconstitution of apo-peroxidase with heme from functional hemoproteins (i.e. heme stealing). The authors have now refined the measurement techniques to greatly reduce the extent of this heme stealing. Incubation of broken plastids with apo-peroxidase at 10C resolves the kinetics of reconstitution into two components. A fast component levels off after 100 min, and a slow component increases linearly for up to 6 hours. They believe that the heme which reconstitutes during the fast phase represents free heme, and the linear slow component represents heme stealing. In support of this theory, incubation at 15C increases the rate of both components. However, extrapolation to zero time of the slow components of the 10C and 15C time courses results in equivalent amounts of heme. Based on this kinetic differentiation between free heme and hemoprotein heme, chloroplasts isolated from cucumber cotyledons after 30 h of greening contain substantially greater amounts of free heme than etioplasts.

  4. Low but structured chloroplast diversity in Atherosperma moschatum (Atherospermataceae) suggests bottlenecks in response to the Pleistocene glacials

    PubMed Central

    Worth, James R. P.; Marthick, James R.; Jordan, Gregory J.; Vaillancourt, René E.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The cool temperate rainforests of Australia were much reduced in range during the cold and dry glacial periods, although genetic evidence indicates that two key rainforest species, Nothofagus cunninghamii and Tasmannia lanceolata, survived within multiple locations and underwent only local range expansions at the end of the Last Glacial. To better understand the glacial response of a co-occurring but wind-dispersed and less cold-tolerant rainforest tree species, Atherosperma moschatum, a chloroplast phylogeographic study was undertaken. Methods A total of 3294 bp of chloroplast DNA sequence was obtained for 155 samples collected from across the species' range. Key Results The distribution of six haplotypes observed in A. moschatum was geographically structured with an inferred ancestral haplotype restricted to Tasmania, while three non-overlapping and endemic haplotypes were found on the mainland of south-eastern Australia. Last glacial refugia for A. moschatum are likely to have occurred in at least one location in western Tasmania and in Victoria and within at least two locations in the Great Dividing Range of New South Wales. Nucleotide diversity of A. moschatum was lower (π = 0·00021) than either N. cunninghamii (0·00101) or T. lanceolata (0·00073), and was amongst the lowest recorded for any tree species. Conclusions This study provides evidence for past bottlenecks having impacted the chloroplast diversity of A. moschatum as a result of the species narrower climatic niche during glacials. This hypothesis is supported by the star-like haplotype network and similar estimated rates of chloroplast DNA substitution for A. moschatum and the two more cold tolerant and co-occurring species that have higher chloroplast diversity, N. cunninghamii and T. lanceolata. PMID:21856633

  5. Complete chloroplast genome of Macadamia integrifolia confirms the position of the Gondwanan early-diverging eudicot family Proteaceae.

    PubMed

    Nock, Catherine J; Baten, Abdul; King, Graham J

    2014-01-01

    Sequence data from the chloroplast genome have played a central role in elucidating the evolutionary history of flowering plants, Angiospermae. In the past decade, the number of complete chloroplast genomes has burgeoned, leading to well-supported angiosperm phylogenies. However, some relationships, particulary among early-diverging lineages, remain unresolved. The diverse Southern Hemisphere plant family Proteaceae arose on the ancient supercontinent Gondwana early in angiosperm history and is a model group for adaptive radiation in response to changing climatic conditions. Genomic resources for the family are limited, and until now it is one of the few early-diverging 'basal eudicot' lineages not represented in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. The chloroplast genome of the Australian nut crop tree Macadamia integrifolia was assembled de novo from Illumina paired-end sequence reads. Three contigs, corresponding to a collapsed inverted repeat, a large and a small single copy region were identified, and used for genome reconstruction. The complete genome is 159,714 bp in length and was assembled at deep coverage (3.29 million reads; ~2000 x). Phylogenetic analyses based on 83-gene and inverted repeat region alignments, the largest sequence-rich datasets to include the basal eudicot family Proteaceae, provide strong support for a Proteales clade that includes Macadamia, Platanus and Nelumbo. Genome structure and content followed the ancestral angiosperm pattern and were highly conserved in the Proteales, whilst size differences were largely explained by the relative contraction of the single copy regions and expansion of the inverted repeats in Macadamia. The Macadamia chloroplast genome presented here is the first in the Proteaceae, and confirms the placement of this family with the morphologically divergent Plantanaceae (plane tree family) and Nelumbonaceae (sacred lotus family) in the basal eudicot order Proteales. It provides a high-quality reference genome for

  6. The ancestral flower of angiosperms and its early diversification

    PubMed Central

    Sauquet, Hervé; von Balthazar, Maria; Magallón, Susana; Doyle, James A.; Endress, Peter K.; Bailes, Emily J.; Barroso de Morais, Erica; Bull-Hereñu, Kester; Carrive, Laetitia; Chartier, Marion; Chomicki, Guillaume; Coiro, Mario; Cornette, Raphaël; El Ottra, Juliana H. L.; Epicoco, Cyril; Foster, Charles S. P.; Jabbour, Florian; Haevermans, Agathe; Haevermans, Thomas; Hernández, Rebeca; Little, Stefan A.; Löfstrand, Stefan; Luna, Javier A.; Massoni, Julien; Nadot, Sophie; Pamperl, Susanne; Prieu, Charlotte; Reyes, Elisabeth; dos Santos, Patrícia; Schoonderwoerd, Kristel M.; Sontag, Susanne; Soulebeau, Anaëlle; Staedler, Yannick; Tschan, Georg F.; Wing-Sze Leung, Amy; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and a series of important palaeobotanical discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of angiosperm diversification. Yet, the origin and early evolution of their most characteristic feature, the flower, remains poorly understood. In particular, the structure of the ancestral flower of all living angiosperms is still uncertain. Here we report model-based reconstructions for ancestral flowers at the deepest nodes in the phylogeny of angiosperms, using the largest data set of floral traits ever assembled. We reconstruct the ancestral angiosperm flower as bisexual and radially symmetric, with more than two whorls of three separate perianth organs each (undifferentiated tepals), more than two whorls of three separate stamens each, and more than five spirally arranged separate carpels. Although uncertainty remains for some of the characters, our reconstruction allows us to propose a new plausible scenario for the early diversification of flowers, leading to new testable hypotheses for future research on angiosperms. PMID:28763051

  7. The ancestral flower of angiosperms and its early diversification.

    PubMed

    Sauquet, Hervé; von Balthazar, Maria; Magallón, Susana; Doyle, James A; Endress, Peter K; Bailes, Emily J; Barroso de Morais, Erica; Bull-Hereñu, Kester; Carrive, Laetitia; Chartier, Marion; Chomicki, Guillaume; Coiro, Mario; Cornette, Raphaël; El Ottra, Juliana H L; Epicoco, Cyril; Foster, Charles S P; Jabbour, Florian; Haevermans, Agathe; Haevermans, Thomas; Hernández, Rebeca; Little, Stefan A; Löfstrand, Stefan; Luna, Javier A; Massoni, Julien; Nadot, Sophie; Pamperl, Susanne; Prieu, Charlotte; Reyes, Elisabeth; Dos Santos, Patrícia; Schoonderwoerd, Kristel M; Sontag, Susanne; Soulebeau, Anaëlle; Staedler, Yannick; Tschan, Georg F; Wing-Sze Leung, Amy; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and a series of important palaeobotanical discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of angiosperm diversification. Yet, the origin and early evolution of their most characteristic feature, the flower, remains poorly understood. In particular, the structure of the ancestral flower of all living angiosperms is still uncertain. Here we report model-based reconstructions for ancestral flowers at the deepest nodes in the phylogeny of angiosperms, using the largest data set of floral traits ever assembled. We reconstruct the ancestral angiosperm flower as bisexual and radially symmetric, with more than two whorls of three separate perianth organs each (undifferentiated tepals), more than two whorls of three separate stamens each, and more than five spirally arranged separate carpels. Although uncertainty remains for some of the characters, our reconstruction allows us to propose a new plausible scenario for the early diversification of flowers, leading to new testable hypotheses for future research on angiosperms.

  8. Chloroplast iron-sulfur cluster protein maturation requires the essential cysteine desulfurase CpNifS.

    PubMed

    Van Hoewyk, Douglas; Abdel-Ghany, Salah E; Cohu, Christopher M; Herbert, Stephen K; Kugrens, Paul; Pilon, Marinus; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2007-03-27

    NifS-like proteins provide the sulfur (S) for the formation of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters, an ancient and essential type of cofactor found in all three domains of life. Plants are known to contain two distinct NifS-like proteins, localized in the mitochondria (MtNifS) and the chloroplast (CpNifS). In the chloroplast, five different Fe-S cluster types are required in various proteins. These plastid Fe-S proteins are involved in a variety of biochemical pathways including photosynthetic electron transport and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation. In vitro, the chloroplastic cysteine desulfurase CpNifS can release elemental sulfur from cysteine for Fe-S cluster biogenesis in ferredoxin. However, because of the lack of a suitable mutant allele, the role of CpNifS has not been studied thus far in planta. To study the role of CpNifS in Fe-S cluster biogenesis in vivo, the gene was silenced by using an inducible RNAi (interference) approach. Plants with reduced CpNifS expression exhibited chlorosis, a disorganized chloroplast structure, and stunted growth and eventually became necrotic and died before seed set. Photosynthetic electron transport and carbon dioxide assimilation were severely impaired in the silenced plant lines. The silencing of CpNifS decreased the abundance of all chloroplastic Fe-S proteins tested, representing all five Fe-S cluster types. Mitochondrial Fe-S proteins and respiration were not affected, suggesting that mitochondrial and chloroplastic Fe-S assembly operate independently. These findings indicate that CpNifS is necessary for the maturation of all plastidic Fe-S proteins and, thus, essential for plant growth.

  9. Carbohydrate breakdown by chloroplasts of Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Stitt, M; Rees, T A

    1980-01-17

    1. The aims of this work were to discover the pathways of starch breakdown and carbohydrate metabolism in intact isolated chloroplasts from shoots of Pisum sativum. 2. 14C from starch, labelled by supplying [14C]glucose to chloroplasts, appeared, during starch breakdown, in CO2, maltose and the fraction of the acidic compounds that contained 3-phosphoglycerate and sugar phosphates. 3. When intact chloroplasts were incubated in the dark, 3-phosphoglycerate, triose phosphates and, to a lesser extent, hexose 6-phosphates accumulated in the medium at rates comparable to those of starch breakdown in leaves. This accumulation was dependent upon orthophosphate. 4. The patterns of 14CO2 production from specifically labelled [14C]glucose supplied to isolated chloroplasts were those expected of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway with extensive recycling, and glycolysis. The respone of this pattern to lack of orthophosphate, addition of unlabelled intermediates, and 2-phosphoglycollate confirmed this view. 5. Starch breakdown in pea chloroplasts is held to be dominantly phosphorolytic with the products being metabolized via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis to 3-phosphoglycerate, triose phosphates and CO2 that are exported to the cytoplasm.

  10. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  11. Isolation and Suborganellar Fractionation of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Flores-Pérez, Úrsula; Jarvis, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplasts are structurally complex organelles containing ~2000-3000 proteins. They are delimited by a double membrane system or envelope, have an inner aqueous compartment called the stroma, and possess a second internal membrane system called the thylakoids. Thus, determining the suborganellar location of a chloroplast protein is vital to understanding or verifying its function. One way in which protein localization can be addressed is through fractionation. Here we present two rapid and simple methods that may be applied sequentially on the same day: (a) The isolation of intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants that may be used directly (e.g., for functional studies such as protein import analysis), or for further processing as follows; (b) separation of isolated chloroplasts into three suborganellar fractions (envelope membranes, a soluble fraction containing stromal proteins, and the thylakoids). These methods are routinely used in our laboratory, and they provide a good yield of isolated chloroplasts and suborganellar fractions that can be used for various downstream applications.

  12. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  13. Betaine synthesis in chenopods: localization in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; May A.M.; Grumet, R.; Bode, J.; Jamieson, G.C.; Rhodes, D.

    1985-06-01

    Plants from several families (Chenopodiaceae, Gramineae, Compositae) accumulate betaine (glycine betaine) in response to salt or water stress via the pathway: choline betainal (betaine aldehyde) betaine. Betaine accumulation is probably a metabolic adaptation to stress. Intact protoplasts from leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) oxidized ( UC)choline to betainal and betaine, as did protoplast lysates. Upon differential centrifugation, the ( UC)choline-oxidizing activity of lysates sedimented with chloroplasts. Chloroplasts purified from protoplast lysates by a Percoll cushion procedure retained strong ( UC)choline-oxidizing activity, although the proportion of the intermediate, ( UC)betainal, in the reaction products was usually higher than for protoplasts. Isolated chloroplasts also readily oxidized ( UC)betainal to betaine. Light increased the oxidation of both ( UC)choline and ( UC)betainal by isolated chloroplasts. Similar results were obtained with another chenopod (Beta vulgaris) but not with pea (Pisum sativum), a species that accumulates no betaine. The chloroplast site for betaine synthesis in chenopods contrasts with the mitochondrial site in mammals.

  14. Vectorial photocurrents and photoconductivity in metalized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E. )

    1990-08-09

    A novel photobiophysical phenomenon was observed in isolated spinach chloroplasts that were metalized by precipitating colloidal platinum onto the surface of the thylakoid membranes. A two-point irradiation and detection system was constructed in which a continuous-beam helium-neon laser ({lambda} = 632.8 nm) was used to irradiate the platinized chloroplasts at varying perpendicular distances (Figure 1) from a single linear platinum electrode in pressure contact with the platinized chloroplasts. No external voltage bias was applied to the system. The key objective of the experiments reported in this report was to measure the relative photoconductivity of the chloroplast-metal composite matrix. Unlike conventional photosynthetic electrochemical cells, in which irradiated chloroplasts are in close proximity to an electrode or linked to the electrode by an electrode-active mediator, the flow of photocurrent was through the biocomposite material. A sustained steady-state vectorial flow of current in the plane of the entrapped composite from the point of laser irradiation to the wire electrode was measured.

  15. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  16. Roles of actin cytoskeleton for regulation of chloroplast anchoring.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuuki; Takagi, Shingo

    2017-08-22

    Chloroplasts are known to maintain specific intracellular distribution patterns under specific environmental conditions, enabling the optimal performance of photosynthesis. To this end, chloroplasts are anchored in the cortical cytoplasm. In leaf epidermal cells of aquatic monocot Vallisneria, we recently demonstrated that the anchored chloroplasts are rapidly de-anchored upon irradiation with high-intensity blue light and that the process is probably mediated by the blue-light receptor phototropins. Chloroplast de-anchoring is a necessary step rendering the previously anchored chloroplasts mobile to allow their migration. In this article, based on the results obtained in Vallisneria together with those in other plant species, we briefly discussed possible modes of regulation of chloroplast anchoring and de-anchoring by actin cytoskeleton. The topics include roles of photoreceptor systems, actin-filament-dependent and -independent chloroplast anchoring, and independence of chloroplast de-anchoring from actomyosin and microtubule systems.

  17. Mergers and acquisitions: malaria and the great chloroplast heist.

    PubMed

    McFadden, G I

    2000-01-01

    The origin of the relict chloroplast recently identified in malarial parasites has been mysterious. Several new papers suggest that the parasites obtained their chloroplasts in an ancient endosymbiotic event that also created some major algal groups.

  18. Mergers and acquisitions: malaria and the great chloroplast heist

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2000-01-01

    The origin of the relict chloroplast recently identified in malarial parasites has been mysterious. Several new papers suggest that the parasites obtained their chloroplasts in an ancient endosymbiotic event that also created some major algal groups. PMID:11178253

  19. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness.

  20. Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles to Augment Photosynthesis of Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunxia; Li, Shengliang; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2017-05-02

    By coating chloroplasts with conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs), a new bio-optical hybrid photosynthesis system (chloroplast/CPNs) is developed. Since CPNs possess unique light harvesting ability, including the ultraviolet part that chloroplasts absorb less, chloroplast/CPN complexes can capture broader range of light to accelerate the electron transport rates in photosystem II (PS II), the critical protein complex in chloroplasts, and augment photosynthesis beyond natural chloroplasts. The degree of spectral overlay between emission of CPNs and absorption of chloroplasts is critical for the enhanced photosynthesis. This work exhibits good potential to explore new and facile nanoengineering strategy for reforming chloroplast with light-harvesting nanomaterials to enhance solar energy conversion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The Low CO2-Inducible 36-Kilodalton Protein Is Localized to the Chloroplast Envelope of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanov, Z.; Mason, C. B.; Geraghty, A. M.; Spalding, M. H.; Moroney, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    The localization of the 36-kD polypeptide of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii induced by photoautotrophic growth on low CO2 concentrations (0.03% in air [v/v], low CO2-grown cells) has been investigated. This polypeptide was specifically localized to the chloroplast envelope membranes isolated from low CO2-grown cells and was not present in the chloroplast envelopes isolated from high (5% CO2 in air [v/v]) CO2-grown cells. The 36-kD protein does not show carbonic anhydrase activity and was not present on the plasma membranes isolated from low CO2-grown cells. This protein may, in part, account for the different inorganic carbon uptake characteristics observed in chloroplasts isolated from high and low CO2-grown cells of C. reinhardtii. PMID:12231773

  2. Non-invasive, whole-plant imaging of chloroplast movement and chlorophyll fluorescence reveals photosynthetic phenotypes independent of chloroplast photorelocation defects in chloroplast division mutants.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Siddhartha; Cruz, Jeffrey A; Jiao, Yuhua; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2015-10-01

    Leaf chloroplast movement is thought to optimize light capture and to minimize photodamage. To better understand the impact of chloroplast movement on photosynthesis, we developed a technique based on the imaging of reflectance from leaf surfaces that enables continuous, high-sensitivity, non-invasive measurements of chloroplast movement in multiple intact plants under white actinic light. We validated the method by measuring photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis chloroplast division mutants with drastically enlarged chloroplasts, and in phototropin mutants with impaired photorelocation but normal chloroplast morphology, under different light regimes. Additionally, we expanded our platform to permit simultaneous image-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and chloroplast movement. We show that chloroplast division mutants with enlarged, less-mobile chloroplasts exhibit greater photosystem II photodamage than is observed in the wild type, particularly under fluctuating high levels of light. Comparison between division mutants and the severe photorelocation mutant phot1-5 phot2-1 showed that these effects are not entirely attributable to diminished photorelocation responses, as previously hypothesized, implying that altered chloroplast morphology affects other photosynthetic processes. Our dual-imaging platform also allowed us to develop a straightforward approach to correct non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) calculations for interference from chloroplast movement. This correction method should be generally useful when fluorescence and reflectance are measured in the same experiments. The corrected data indicate that the energy-dependent (qE) and photoinhibitory (qI) components of NPQ contribute differentially to the NPQ phenotypes of the chloroplast division and photorelocation mutants. This imaging technology thus provides a platform for analyzing the contributions of chloroplast movement, chloroplast morphology and other phenotypic attributes to the

  3. Raffinose in chloroplasts is synthesized in the cytosol and transported across the chloroplast envelope.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Keller, Felix

    2009-12-01

    In chloroplasts, several water-soluble carbohydrates have been suggested to act as stress protectants. The trisaccharide raffinose (alpha-1,6-galactosyl sucrose) is such a carbohydrate but has received little attention. We here demonstrate by compartmentation analysis of leaf mesophyll protoplasts that raffinose is clearly (to about 20%) present in chloroplasts of cold-treated common bugle (Ajuga reptans L.), spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.] plants. The two dedicated enzymes needed for raffinose synthesis, galactinol synthase and raffinose synthase, were found to be extra-chloroplastic (probably cytosolic) in location, suggesting that the chloroplast envelope contains a raffinose transporter. Uptake experiments with isolated Ajuga and Arabidopsis chloroplasts clearly demonstrated that raffinose is indeed transported across the chloroplast envelope by a raffinose transporter, probably actively. Raffinose uptake into Ajuga chloroplasts was a saturable process with apparent K(m) and v(max) values of 27.8 mM and 3.3 micromol mg(-1) Chl min(-1), respectively.

  4. A Putative Chloroplast Thylakoid Metalloprotease VIRESCENT3 Regulates Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yafei; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Jingxia; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis and many other essential plant metabolic processes, and chloroplast development is an integral part of plant growth and development. Mutants defective in chloroplast development can display various color phenotypes including the intriguing virescence phenotype, which shows yellow/white coloration at the leaf base and greening toward the leaf tip. Through large scale genetic screens, we identified a series of new virescent mutants including virescent3-1 (vir3-1), vir4-1, and vir5-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We showed that VIR3 encodes a putative chloroplast metalloprotease by map-based cloning. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that the conserved histidine 235 residue in the zinc binding motif HEAGH of VIR3 is indispensable for VIR3 accumulation in the chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of VIR3 was confirmed by the transient expression of VIR3-GFP in leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, taking advantage of transgenic lines expressing VIR3-FLAG, we demonstrated that VIR3 is an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein that mainly resides in the stromal lamellae. Moreover, topology analysis using transgenic lines expressing a dual epitope-tagged VIR3 indicated that both the N and C termini of VIR3 are located in the stroma, and the catalytic domain of VIR3 is probably facing the stroma. Blue native gel analysis indicated that VIR3 is likely present as a monomer or part of a small complex in the thylakoid membrane. This work not only implicates VIR3 as a new factor involved in early chloroplast development but also provides more insight into the roles of chloroplast proteases in chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:26702056

  5. A Putative Chloroplast Thylakoid Metalloprotease VIRESCENT3 Regulates Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yafei; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Jingxia; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-02-12

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis and many other essential plant metabolic processes, and chloroplast development is an integral part of plant growth and development. Mutants defective in chloroplast development can display various color phenotypes including the intriguing virescence phenotype, which shows yellow/white coloration at the leaf base and greening toward the leaf tip. Through large scale genetic screens, we identified a series of new virescent mutants including virescent3-1 (vir3-1), vir4-1, and vir5-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We showed that VIR3 encodes a putative chloroplast metalloprotease by map-based cloning. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that the conserved histidine 235 residue in the zinc binding motif HEAGH of VIR3 is indispensable for VIR3 accumulation in the chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of VIR3 was confirmed by the transient expression of VIR3-GFP in leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, taking advantage of transgenic lines expressing VIR3-FLAG, we demonstrated that VIR3 is an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein that mainly resides in the stromal lamellae. Moreover, topology analysis using transgenic lines expressing a dual epitope-tagged VIR3 indicated that both the N and C termini of VIR3 are located in the stroma, and the catalytic domain of VIR3 is probably facing the stroma. Blue native gel analysis indicated that VIR3 is likely present as a monomer or part of a small complex in the thylakoid membrane. This work not only implicates VIR3 as a new factor involved in early chloroplast development but also provides more insight into the roles of chloroplast proteases in chloroplast biogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  7. The chloroplast genome exists in multimeric forms

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xingwang; Wing, R.A.; Gruissem, W. )

    1989-06-01

    Chloroplast DNA conformation was analyzed by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The authors found that spinach leaf chloroplast DNA molecules exist in at least four distinct forms with the apparent molecular weights of monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Two-dimensional gel analysis of DNA after UV nicking and in the presence of ethidium bromide indicates that they are not isomers that differ in superhelical density. DNA gyrase decatenation analysis demonstrates that the majority of the DNA molecules are oligomers rather than catenanes. The relative amounts of monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer forms, quantitated by molecular hybridization, are 1, 1/3, 1/9, and 1/27, respectively, and do not change during leaf maturation. The possible mechanisms of chloroplast DNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  8. Engineered Chloroplast Genome just got Smarter

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuangxia; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplasts are known to sustain life on earth by providing food, fuel and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. However, the chloroplast genome has also been smartly engineered to confer valuable agronomic traits and/or serve as bioreactors for production of industrial enzymes, biopharmaceuticals, bio-products or vaccines. The recent breakthrough in hyper-expression of biopharmaceuticals in edible leaves has facilitated the advancement to clinical studies by major pharmaceutical companies. This review critically evaluates progress in developing new tools to enhance or simplify expression of targeted genes in chloroplasts. These tools hold the promise to further the development of novel fuels and products, enhance the photosynthetic process, and increase our understanding of retrograde signaling and cellular processes. PMID:26440432

  9. Application of a simplified method of chloroplast enrichment to small amounts of tissue for chloroplast genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Ito, Motomi; Hattori, Chie; Nozoe, Shogo; Takahashi, Daiki; Nakamasu, Riku; Sakagami, Taishi; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S; L'Huillier, Laurent; Isagi, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    High-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can recover complete chloroplast genome sequences, but the sequence data are usually dominated by sequences from nuclear/mitochondrial genomes. To overcome this deficiency, a simple enrichment method for chloroplast DNA from small amounts of plant tissue was tested for eight plant species including a gymnosperm and various angiosperms. Chloroplasts were enriched using a high-salt isolation buffer without any step gradient procedures, and enriched chloroplast DNA was sequenced by multiplexed high-throughput sequencing. Using this simple method, significant enrichment of chloroplast DNA-derived reads was attained, allowing deep sequencing of chloroplast genomes. As an example, the chloroplast genome of the conifer Callitris sulcata was assembled, from which polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated successfully. This chloroplast enrichment method from small amounts of plant tissue will be particularly useful for studies that use sequencers with relatively small throughput and that cannot use large amounts of tissue (e.g., for endangered species).

  10. Chloroplasts can move in any direction to avoid strong light.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts migrate in response to different light intensities. Under weak light, chloroplasts gather at an illuminated area to maximize light absorption and photosynthesis rates (the accumulation response). In contrast, chloroplasts escape from strong light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). Photoreceptors involved in these phenomena have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and Adiantum capillus-veneris. Chloroplast behavior has been studied in detail during the accumulation response, but not for the avoidance response. Hence, we analyzed the chloroplast avoidance response in detail using dark-adapted Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophyte cells and partial cell irradiation with a microbeam of blue light. Chloroplasts escaped from an irradiated spot. Both duration of this response and the distance of the migrated chloroplasts were proportional to the total fluence irradiated. The speed of movement during the avoidance response was dependent on the fluence rate, but the speed of the accumulation response towards the microbeam from cell periphery was constant irrespective of fluence rate. When a chloroplast was only partially irradiated with a strong microbeam, it moved away towards the non-irradiated region within a few minutes. During this avoidance response two additional microbeam irradiations were applied to different locus of the same chloroplast. Under these conditions the chloroplast changed the moving direction after a lag time of a few minutes without rolling. Taken together, these findings indicate that chloroplasts can move in any direction and never have an intrinsic polarity. Similar phenomenon was observed in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana palisade cells.

  11. Chloroplast signaling within, between and beyond cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2015-01-01

    The most conspicuous function of plastids is the oxygenic photosynthesis of chloroplasts, yet plastids are super-factories that produce a plethora of compounds that are indispensable for proper plant physiology and development. Given their origins as free-living prokaryotes, it is not surprising that plastids possess their own genomes whose expression is essential to plastid function. This semi-autonomous character of plastids requires the existence of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that provide reliable communication between them and other cellular compartments. Such intracellular signaling is necessary for coordinating whole-cell responses to constantly varying environmental cues and cellular metabolic needs. This is achieved by plastids acting as receivers and transmitters of specific signals that coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes according to particular needs. In this review we will consider the so-called retrograde signaling occurring between plastids and nuclei, and between plastids and other organelles. Another important role of the plastid we will discuss is the involvement of plastid signaling in biotic and abiotic stress that, in addition to influencing retrograde signaling, has direct effects on several cellular compartments including the cell wall. We will also review recent evidence pointing to an intriguing function of chloroplasts in regulating intercellular symplasmic transport. Finally, we consider an intriguing yet less widely known aspect of plant biology, chloroplast signaling from the perspective of the entire plant. Thus, accumulating evidence highlights that chloroplasts, with their complex signaling pathways, provide a mechanism for exquisite regulation of plant development, metabolism and responses to the environment. As chloroplast processes are targeted for engineering for improved productivity the effect of such modifications on chloroplast signaling will have to be carefully considered in order to avoid

  12. A practical approach to detect ancestral haplotypes in livestock populations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Molano, Enrique; Tsiokos, Dimitrios; Chatziplis, Dimitrios; Jorjani, Hossein; Degano, Lorenzo; Diaz, Clara; Rossoni, Attilio; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Seefried, Franz; Varona, Luis; Vicario, Daniele; Nicolazzi, Ezequiel L; Banos, Georgios

    2016-06-24

    The effects of different evolutionary forces are expected to lead to the conservation, over many generations, of particular genomic regions (haplotypes) due to the development of linkage disequilibrium (LD). The detection and identification of early (ancestral) haplotypes can be used to clarify the evolutionary dynamics of different populations as well as identify selection signatures and genomic regions of interest to be used both in conservation and breeding programs. The aims of this study were to develop a simple procedure to identify ancestral haplotypes segregating across several generations both within and between populations with genetic links based on whole-genome scanning. This procedure was tested with simulated and then applied to real data from different genotyped populations of Spanish, Fleckvieh, Simmental and Brown-Swiss cattle. The identification of ancestral haplotypes has shown coincident patterns of selection across different breeds, allowing the detection of common regions of interest on different bovine chromosomes and mirroring the evolutionary dynamics of the studied populations. These regions, mainly located on chromosomes BTA5, BTA6, BTA7 and BTA21 are related with certain animal traits such as coat colour and milk protein and fat content. In agreement with previous studies, the detection of ancestral haplotypes provides useful information for the development and comparison of breeding and conservation programs both through the identification of selection signatures and other regions of interest, and as indicator of the general genetic status of the populations.

  13. Advanced Intestinal Cancers often Maintain a Multi-Ancestral Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Christopher D.; Szulczewski, Joseph M.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Paul Olson, Terrah J.; Clipson, Linda; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Middlebrooks, Malisa; Thliveris, Andrew T.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Washington, Mary Kay; Newton, Michael A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    A widely accepted paradigm in the field of cancer biology is that solid tumors are uni-ancestral being derived from a single founder and its descendants. However, data have been steadily accruing that indicate early tumors in mice and humans can have a multi-ancestral origin in which an initiated primogenitor facilitates the transformation of neighboring co-genitors. We developed a new mouse model that permits the determination of clonal architecture of intestinal tumors in vivo and ex vivo, have validated this model, and then used it to assess the clonal architecture of adenomas, intramucosal carcinomas, and invasive adenocarcinomas of the intestine. The percentage of multi-ancestral tumors did not significantly change as tumors progressed from adenomas with low-grade dysplasia [40/65 (62%)], to adenomas with high-grade dysplasia [21/37 (57%)], to intramucosal carcinomas [10/23 (43%]), to invasive adenocarcinomas [13/19 (68%)], indicating that the clone arising from the primogenitor continues to coexist with clones arising from co-genitors. Moreover, neoplastic cells from distinct clones within a multi-ancestral adenocarcinoma have even been observed to simultaneously invade into the underlying musculature [2/15 (13%)]. Thus, intratumoral heterogeneity arising early in tumor formation persists throughout tumorigenesis. PMID:26919712

  14. The Effect of Recombination on the Reconstruction of Ancestral Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel; Posada, David

    2010-01-01

    While a variety of methods exist to reconstruct ancestral sequences, all of them assume that a single phylogeny underlies all the positions in the alignment and therefore that recombination has not taken place. Using computer simulations we show that recombination can severely bias ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR), and quantify this effect. If recombination is ignored, the ancestral sequences recovered can be quite distinct from the grand most recent common ancestor (GMRCA) of the sample and better resemble the concatenate of partial most recent common ancestors (MRCAs) at each recombination fragment. When independent phylogenetic trees are assumed for the different recombinant segments, the estimation of the fragment MRCAs improves significantly. Importantly, we show that recombination can change the biological predictions derived from ASRs carried out with real data. Given that recombination is widespread on nuclear genes and in particular in RNA viruses and some bacteria, the reconstruction of ancestral sequences in these cases should consider the potential impact of recombination and ideally be carried out using approaches that accommodate recombination. PMID:20124027

  15. Deciphering the diploid ancestral genome of the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Mandáková, Terezie; Wu, Jian; Xie, Qi; Lysak, Martin A; Wang, Xiaowu

    2013-05-01

    The genus Brassica includes several important agricultural and horticultural crops. Their current genome structures were shaped by whole-genome triplication followed by extensive diploidization. The availability of several crucifer genome sequences, especially that of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), enables study of the evolution of the mesohexaploid Brassica genomes from their diploid progenitors. We reconstructed three ancestral subgenomes of B. rapa (n = 10) by comparing its whole-genome sequence to ancestral and extant Brassicaceae genomes. All three B. rapa paleogenomes apparently consisted of seven chromosomes, similar to the ancestral translocation Proto-Calepineae Karyotype (tPCK; n = 7), which is the evolutionarily younger variant of the Proto-Calepineae Karyotype (n = 7). Based on comparative analysis of genome sequences or linkage maps of Brassica oleracea, Brassica nigra, radish (Raphanus sativus), and other closely related species, we propose a two-step merging of three tPCK-like genomes to form the hexaploid ancestor of the tribe Brassiceae with 42 chromosomes. Subsequent diversification of the Brassiceae was marked by extensive genome reshuffling and chromosome number reduction mediated by translocation events and followed by loss and/or inactivation of centromeres. Furthermore, via interspecies genome comparison, we refined intervals for seven of the genomic blocks of the Ancestral Crucifer Karyotype (n = 8), thus revising the key reference genome for evolutionary genomics of crucifers.

  16. Reaching Children through Their Ancestral Language and Authentic Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Kay Thorpe

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a program of Eastern Cherokee ancestral language restoration in Cherokee, North Carolina. One of the primary goals of the program is to enhance the self-concept of the children and motivate the students to experience academic excitement and success. The use of authentic legends and stories is one method…

  17. Musculature in sipunculan worms: ontogeny and ancestral states.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja; Rice, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics suggests that the Sipuncula fall into the Annelida, although they are morphologically very distinct and lack segmentation. To understand the evolutionary transformations from the annelid to the sipunculan body plan, it is important to reconstruct the ancestral states within the respective clades at all life history stages. Here we reconstruct the ancestral states for the head/introvert retractor muscles and the body wall musculature in the Sipuncula using Bayesian statistics. In addition, we describe the ontogenetic transformations of the two muscle systems in four sipunculan species with different developmental modes, using F-actin staining with fluorescent-labeled phalloidin in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. All four species, which have smooth body wall musculature and less than the full set of four introvert retractor muscles as adults, go through developmental stages with four retractor muscles that are eventually reduced to a lower number in the adult. The circular and sometimes the longitudinal body wall musculature are split into bands that later transform into a smooth sheath. Our ancestral state reconstructions suggest with nearly 100% probability that the ancestral sipunculan had four introvert retractor muscles, longitudinal body wall musculature in bands and circular body wall musculature arranged as a smooth sheath. Species with crawling larvae have more strongly developed body wall musculature than those with swimming larvae. To interpret our findings in the context of annelid evolution, a more solid phylogenetic framework is needed for the entire group and more data on ontogenetic transformations of annelid musculature are desirable.

  18. Ancestral gene synteny reconstruction improves extant species scaffolding.

    PubMed

    Anselmetti, Yoann; Berry, Vincent; Chauve, Cedric; Chateau, Annie; Tannier, Eric; Bérard, Sèverine

    2015-01-01

    We exploit the methodological similarity between ancestral genome reconstruction and extant genome scaffolding. We present a method, called ARt-DeCo that constructs neighborhood relationships between genes or contigs, in both ancestral and extant genomes, in a phylogenetic context. It is able to handle dozens of complete genomes, including genes with complex histories, by using gene phylogenies reconciled with a species tree, that is, annotated with speciation, duplication and loss events. Reconstructed ancestral or extant synteny comes with a support computed from an exhaustive exploration of the solution space. We compare our method with a previously published one that follows the same goal on a small number of genomes with universal unicopy genes. Then we test it on the whole Ensembl database, by proposing partial ancestral genome structures, as well as a more complete scaffolding for many partially assembled genomes on 69 eukaryote species. We carefully analyze a couple of extant adjacencies proposed by our method, and show that they are indeed real links in the extant genomes, that were missing in the current assembly. On a reduced data set of 39 eutherian mammals, we estimate the precision and sensitivity of ARt-DeCo by simulating a fragmentation in some well assembled genomes, and measure how many adjacencies are recovered. We find a very high precision, while the sensitivity depends on the quality of the data and on the proximity of closely related genomes.

  19. Ancestral gene synteny reconstruction improves extant species scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We exploit the methodological similarity between ancestral genome reconstruction and extant genome scaffolding. We present a method, called ARt-DeCo that constructs neighborhood relationships between genes or contigs, in both ancestral and extant genomes, in a phylogenetic context. It is able to handle dozens of complete genomes, including genes with complex histories, by using gene phylogenies reconciled with a species tree, that is, annotated with speciation, duplication and loss events. Reconstructed ancestral or extant synteny comes with a support computed from an exhaustive exploration of the solution space. We compare our method with a previously published one that follows the same goal on a small number of genomes with universal unicopy genes. Then we test it on the whole Ensembl database, by proposing partial ancestral genome structures, as well as a more complete scaffolding for many partially assembled genomes on 69 eukaryote species. We carefully analyze a couple of extant adjacencies proposed by our method, and show that they are indeed real links in the extant genomes, that were missing in the current assembly. On a reduced data set of 39 eutherian mammals, we estimate the precision and sensitivity of ARt-DeCo by simulating a fragmentation in some well assembled genomes, and measure how many adjacencies are recovered. We find a very high precision, while the sensitivity depends on the quality of the data and on the proximity of closely related genomes. PMID:26450761

  20. Isolation of Ancestral Sylvatic Dengue Virus Type 1, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina

    2010-01-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle. PMID:21029545

  1. Are survival processing memory advantages based on ancestral priorities?

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Nicholas C; McCabe, David P

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that our memory systems are especially tuned to process information according to its survival relevance, and that inducing problems of "ancestral priorities" faced by our ancestors should lead to optimal recall performance (Nairne & Pandeirada, Cognitive Psychology, 2010). The present study investigated the specificity of this idea by comparing an ancestor-consistent scenario and a modern survival scenario that involved threats that were encountered by human ancestors (e.g., predators) or threats from fictitious creatures (i.e., zombies). Participants read one of four survival scenarios in which the environment and the explicit threat were either consistent or inconsistent with ancestrally based problems (i.e., grasslands-predators, grasslands-zombies, city-attackers, city-zombies), or they rated words for pleasantness. After rating words based on their survival relevance (or pleasantness), the participants performed a free recall task. All survival scenarios led to better recall than did pleasantness ratings, but recall was greater when zombies were the threat, as compared to predators or attackers. Recall did not differ for the modern (i.e., city) and ancestral (i.e., grasslands) scenarios. These recall differences persisted when valence and arousal ratings for the scenarios were statistically controlled as well. These data challenge the specificity of ancestral priorities in survival-processing advantages in memory.

  2. Molecular Evolution of the Substrate Specificity of Chloroplastic Aldolases/Rubisco Lysine Methyltransferases in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sheng; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Mininno, Morgane; Gigarel, Océane; Brugière, Sabine; Bastien, Olivier; Tardif, Marianne; Ravanel, Stéphane; Alban, Claude

    2016-04-04

    Rubisco and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) are involved in CO2 fixation in chloroplasts. Both enzymes are trimethylated at a specific lysine residue by the chloroplastic protein methyltransferase LSMT. Genes coding LSMT are present in all plant genomes but the methylation status of the substrates varies in a species-specific manner. For example, chloroplastic FBAs are naturally trimethylated in both Pisum sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas the Rubisco large subunit is trimethylated only in the former species. The in vivo methylation status of aldolases and Rubisco matches the catalytic properties of AtLSMT and PsLSMT, which are able to trimethylate FBAs or FBAs and Rubisco, respectively. Here, we created chimera and site-directed mutants of monofunctional AtLSMT and bifunctional PsLSMT to identify the molecular determinants responsible for substrate specificity. Our results indicate that the His-Ala/Pro-Trp triad located in the central part of LSMT enzymes is the key motif to confer the capacity to trimethylate Rubisco. Two of the critical residues are located on a surface loop outside the methyltransferase catalytic site. We observed a strict correlation between the presence of the triad motif and the in vivo methylation status of Rubisco. The distribution of the motif into a phylogenetic tree further suggests that the ancestral function of LSMT was FBA trimethylation. In a recent event during higher plant evolution, this function evolved in ancestors of Fabaceae, Cucurbitaceae, and Rosaceae to include Rubisco as an additional substrate to the archetypal enzyme. Our study provides insight into mechanisms by which SET-domain protein methyltransferases evolve new substrate specificity. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic Evolution of the Chloroplast Genome in the Green Algal Classes Pedinophyceae and Trebouxiophyceae

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Monique; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of trebouxiophycean chloroplast genomes revealed little information regarding the evolutionary dynamics of this genome because taxon sampling was too sparse and the relationships between the sampled taxa were unknown. We recently sequenced the chloroplast genomes of 27 trebouxiophycean and 2 pedinophycean green algae to resolve the relationships among the main lineages recognized for the Trebouxiophyceae. These taxa and the previously sampled members of the Pedinophyceae and Trebouxiophyceae are included in the comparative chloroplast genome analysis we report here. The 38 genomes examined display considerable variability at all levels, except gene content. Our results highlight the high propensity of the rDNA-containing large inverted repeat (IR) to vary in size, gene content and gene order as well as the repeated losses it experienced during trebouxiophycean evolution. Of the seven predicted IR losses, one event demarcates a superclade of 11 taxa representing 5 late-diverging lineages. IR expansions/contractions account not only for changes in gene content in this region but also for changes in gene order and gene duplications. Inversions also led to gene rearrangements within the IR, including the reversal or disruption of the rDNA operon in some lineages. Most of the 20 IR-less genomes are more rearranged compared with their IR-containing homologs and tend to show an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the IR-less superclade, several ancestral operons were disrupted, a few genes were fragmented, and a subgroup of taxa features a G+C-biased nucleotide composition. Our analyses also unveiled putative cases of gene acquisitions through horizontal transfer. PMID:26139832

  4. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  5. Lipid trafficking at endoplasmic reticulum-chloroplast membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Block, Maryse A; Jouhet, Juliette

    2015-08-01

    Glycerolipid synthesis in plant cells is characterized by an intense trafficking of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and chloroplasts. Initially, fatty acids are synthesized within chloroplasts and are exported to the ER where they are used to build up phospholipids and triacylglycerol. Ultimately, derivatives of these phospholipids return to chloroplasts to form galactolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol, the main and essential lipids of photosynthetic membranes. Lipid trafficking was proposed to transit through membrane contact sites (MCSs) connecting both organelles. Here, we review recent insights into ER-chloroplast MCSs and lipid trafficking between chloroplasts and the ER.

  6. Energetic cost of protein import across the envelope membranes of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M

    2013-01-15

    Chloroplasts are the organelles of green plants in which light energy is transduced into chemical energy, forming ATP and reduced carbon compounds upon which all life depends. The expenditure of this energy is one of the central issues of cellular metabolism. Chloroplasts contain ~3,000 proteins, among which less than 100 are typically encoded in the plastid genome. The rest are encoded in the nuclear genome, synthesized in the cytosol, and posttranslationally imported into the organelle in an energy-dependent process. We report here a measurement of the amount of ATP hydrolyzed to import a protein across the chloroplast envelope membranes--only the second complete accounting of the cost in Gibbs free energy of protein transport to be undertaken. Using two different precursors prepared by three distinct techniques, we show that the import of a precursor protein into chloroplasts is accompanied by the hydrolysis of ~650 ATP molecules. This translates to a ΔG(protein) (transport) of some 27,300 kJ/mol protein imported. We estimate that protein import across the plastid envelope membranes consumes ~0.6% of the total light-saturated energy output of the organelle.

  7. Energetic cost of protein import across the envelope membranes of chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lan-Xin; Theg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts are the organelles of green plants in which light energy is transduced into chemical energy, forming ATP and reduced carbon compounds upon which all life depends. The expenditure of this energy is one of the central issues of cellular metabolism. Chloroplasts contain ∼3,000 proteins, among which less than 100 are typically encoded in the plastid genome. The rest are encoded in the nuclear genome, synthesized in the cytosol, and posttranslationally imported into the organelle in an energy-dependent process. We report here a measurement of the amount of ATP hydrolyzed to import a protein across the chloroplast envelope membranes—only the second complete accounting of the cost in Gibbs free energy of protein transport to be undertaken. Using two different precursors prepared by three distinct techniques, we show that the import of a precursor protein into chloroplasts is accompanied by the hydrolysis of ∼650 ATP molecules. This translates to a ΔGprotein transport of some 27,300 kJ/mol protein imported. We estimate that protein import across the plastid envelope membranes consumes ∼0.6% of the total light-saturated energy output of the organelle. PMID:23277572

  8. Transport of Phosphoenolpyruvate by Chloroplasts from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. Exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard; Holtum, Joseph A. M.; Latzko, Erwin

    1988-01-01

    Chloroplasts from CAM-Mesembryanthemum crystallinum can transport phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) across the envelope. The initial velocities of PEP uptake in the dark at 4°C exhibited saturation kinetics with increasing external PEP concentration. PEP uptake had a Vmax of 6.46 (±0.05) micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour and an apparent Kmpep of 0.148 (±0.004) millimolar. The uptake was competitively inhibited by Pi (apparent Ki = 0.19 millimolar), by glycerate 3-phosphate (apparent Ki = 0.13 millimolar), and by dihydroxyacetone phosphate, but malate and pyruvate were without effect. The chloroplasts were able to synthesize PEP when presented with pyruvate. PEP synthesis was light dependent. The prolonged synthesis and export of PEP from the chloroplasts required the presence of Pi or glycerate 3-phosphate in the external medium. It is suggested that the transport of pyruvate and PEP across the chloroplasts envelope is required during the gluconeogenic conversion of carbon from malate to storage carbohydrate in the light. PMID:16666128

  9. Engineering photorespiration in chloroplasts: a novel strategy for increasing biomass production.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sarwar

    2007-10-01

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism is rate limiting in C3 plants because of a competing process: photorespiration. Photorespiration lowers the energy efficiency of photosynthesis by metabolizing glycolate produced by the oxygenate activity of Rubisco. The chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana have recently been reported to contain a novel respiratory pathway that converts glycolate directly to glycerate and thus increases productivity by improving photosynthesis in transgenic plants. This pathway promises to widen the applicability of the approach to other C3 plants.

  10. Evidence-based green algal genomics reveals marine diversity and ancestral characteristics of land plants

    DOE PAGES

    van Baren, Marijke J.; Bachy, Charles; Reistetter, Emily Nahas; ...

    2016-03-31

    Prasinophytes are widespread marine green algae that are related to plants. Abundance of the genus Micromonas has reportedly increased in the Arctic due to climate-induced changes. Thus, studies of these organisms are important for marine ecology and understanding Virdiplantae evolution and diversification. We generated evidence-based Micromonas gene models using proteomics and RNA-Seq to improve prasinophyte genomic resources. First, sequences of four chromosomes in the 22 Mb Micromonas pusilla (CCMP1545) genome were finished. Comparison with the finished 21 Mb Micromonas commoda (RCC299) shows they share ≤ 8,142 of ~10,000 protein-encoding genes, depending on the analysis method. Unlike RCC299 and other sequencedmore » eukaryotes, CCMP1545 has two abundant repetitive intron types and a high percent (26%) GC splice donors. Micromonas has more genus-specific protein families (19%) than other genome sequenced prasinophytes (11%). Comparative analyses using predicted proteomes from other prasinophytes reveal proteins likely related to scale formation and ancestral photosynthesis. Our studies also indicate that peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis enzymes have been lost in multiple independent events in select prasinophytes and most plants. However, CCMP1545, polar Micromonas CCMP2099 and prasinophytes from other claasses retain the entire PG pathway, like moss and glaucophyte algae. Multiple vascular plants that share a unique bi-domain protein also have the pathway, except the Penicillin-Binding-Protein. Alongside Micromonas experiments using antibiotics that halt bacterial PG biosynthesis, the findings highlight unrecognized phylogenetic complexity in the PG-pathway retention and implicate a role in chloroplast structure of division in several extant Vridiplantae lineages. Extensive differences in gene loss and architecture between related prasinophytes underscore their extensive divergence. PG biosynthesis genes from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that became the

  11. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes*

    PubMed Central

    Yamburenko, Maria V.; Zubo, Yan O.; Börner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis. PMID:24078671

  12. Abscisic acid represses the transcription of chloroplast genes.

    PubMed

    Yamburenko, Maria V; Zubo, Yan O; Vanková, Radomíra; Kusnetsov, Victor V; Kulaeva, Olga N; Börner, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown effects of abscisic acid (ABA) on nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. ABA effects on the transcription of chloroplast genes, however, have not been investigated yet thoroughly. This work, therefore, studied the effects of ABA (75 μM) on transcription and steady-state levels of transcripts in chloroplasts of basal and apical segments of primary leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Basal segments consist of young cells with developing chloroplasts, while apical segments contain the oldest cells with mature chloroplasts. Exogenous ABA reduced the chlorophyll content and caused changes of the endogenous concentrations not only of ABA but also of cytokinins to different extents in the basal and apical segments. It repressed transcription by the chloroplast phage-type and bacteria-type RNA polymerases and lowered transcript levels of most investigated chloroplast genes drastically. ABA did not repress the transcription of psbD and a few other genes and even increased psbD mRNA levels under certain conditions. The ABA effects on chloroplast transcription were more pronounced in basal vs. apical leaf segments and enhanced by light. Simultaneous application of cytokinin (22 μM 6-benzyladenine) minimized the ABA effects on chloroplast gene expression. These data demonstrate that ABA affects the expression of chloroplast genes differentially and points to a role of ABA in the regulation and coordination of the activities of nuclear and chloroplast genes coding for proteins with functions in photosynthesis.

  13. Chloroplast DNA codes for transfer RNA.

    PubMed Central

    McCrea, J M; Hershberger, C L

    1976-01-01

    Transfer RNA's were isolated from Euglena gracilis. Chloroplast cistrons for tRNA were quantitated by hybridizing tRNA to ct DNA. Species of tRNA hybridizing to ct DNA were partially purified by hybridization-chromatography. The tRNA's hybridizing to ct DNA and nuclear DNA appear to be different. Total cellular tRNA was hybridized to ct DNA to an equivalent of approximately 25 cistrons. The total cellular tRNA was also separated into 2 fractions by chromatography on dihydroxyboryl substituted amino ethyl cellulose. Fraction I hybridized to both nuclear and ct DNA. Hybridizations to ct DNA indicated approximately 18 cistrons. Fraction II-tRNA hybridized only to ct DNA, saturating at a level of approximately 7 cistrons. The tRNA from isolated chloroplasts hybridized to both chloroplast and nuclear DNA. The level of hybridization to ct DNA indicated approximately 18 cistrons. Fraction II-type tRNA could not be detected in the isolated chloroplasts. PMID:823529

  14. The evolution of chloroplast RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Lehwark, Pascal; Morton, Brian R; Maier, Uwe G

    2006-10-01

    RNA editing alters the nucleotide sequence of an RNA molecule so that it deviates from the sequence of its DNA template. Different RNA-editing systems are found in the major eukaryotic lineages, and these systems are thought to have evolved independently. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of data on C-to-U editing sites in land plant chloroplasts and propose a model for the evolution of RNA editing in land plants. First, our data suggest that the limited RNA-editing system of seed plants and the much more extensive systems found in hornworts and ferns are of monophyletic origin. Further, although some eukaryotic editing systems appear to have evolved to regulate gene expression, or at least are now involved in gene regulation, there is no evidence that RNA editing plays a role in gene regulation in land plant chloroplasts. Instead, our results suggest that land plant chloroplast C-to-U RNA editing originated as a mechanism to generate variation at the RNA level, which could complement variation at the DNA level. Under this model, many of the original sites, particularly in seed plants, have been subsequently lost due to mutation at the DNA level, and the function of extant sites is merely to conserve certain codons. This is the first comprehensive model for the evolution of the chloroplast RNA-editing system of land plants and may also be applicable to the evolution of RNA editing in plant mitochondria.

  15. Chloroplast DNA variation of northern red oak

    Treesearch

    Jeanne Romero-Severson; Preston Aldrich; Yi Feng; Weilin Sun; Charles Michler

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was examined in 48 northern red oaks at 14 sites representing contrasting glacial histories and age structures within the state of Indiana in the United States. PCR-RFLP of three intergenic regions revealed five haplotypes. Haplotype I was common to seven sites and was the most frequent (17 trees). Haplotype II was common to five sites...

  16. The oligomeric stromal proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Jean-Benoit; Cai, Yang; Sun, Qi; Zabrouskov, Vladimir; Giacomelli, Lisa; Rudella, Andrea; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Rutschow, Heidi; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2006-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the stromal proteome in its oligomeric state extracted from highly purified chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. 241 proteins (88% with predicted cTP), mostly assembled in oligomeric complexes, were identified by mass spectrometry with emphasis on distinguishing between paralogues. This is critical because different paralogues in a gene family often have different subcellular localizations and/or different expression patterns and functions. The native protein masses were determined for all identified proteins. Comparison with the few well characterized stromal complexes from A. thaliana confirmed the accuracy of the native mass determination, and by extension, the usefulness of the native mass data for future in-depth protein interaction studies. Resolved protein interactions are discussed and compared with an extensive collection of native mass data of orthologues in other plants and bacteria. Relative protein expression levels were estimated from spot intensities and also provided estimates of relative concentrations of individual proteins. No such quantification has been reported so far. Surprisingly proteins dedicated to chloroplast protein synthesis, biogenesis, and fate represented nearly 10% of the total stroma protein mass. Oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis, and Calvin cycle represented together about 75%, nitrogen assimilation represented 5-7%, and all other pathways such as biosynthesis of e.g. fatty acids, amino acids, nucleotides, tetrapyrroles, and vitamins B(1) and B(2) each represented less than 1% of total protein mass. Several proteins with diverse functions outside primary carbon metabolism, such as the isomerase ROC4, lipoxygenase 2 involved in jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and a carbonic anhydrase (CA1), were surprisingly abundant in the range of 0.75-1.5% of the total stromal mass. Native images with associated information are available via the Plastid Proteome Database.

  17. Inferring the Early Evolution of Translation: Ancestral Reconstruction, Compositional Analysis, and Functional Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, G. P.; Gogarten, J. P.

    2010-04-01

    Using ancestral sequence reconstruction and compositional analysis, it is possible to reconstruct the ancestral functions of many enzymes involved in protein synthesis, elucidating the early functional evolution of the translation machinery and genetic code.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine is transferred from chemically-defined liposomes to chloroplasts through proteins of the chloroplast outer envelope membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Congfei; Andersson, Mats X; Zhang, Hongsheng; Aronsson, Henrik

    2015-01-02

    Chloroplasts maintain their lipid balance through a tight interplay with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts contains a large proportion of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is synthesized in the ER and also a possible precursor for thylakoid galactolipids. The mechanism for PC transport from the ER to chloroplasts is not known. Using isolated chloroplasts and liposomes containing radiolabeled PC we investigated non-vesicular transport of PC in vitro. PC uptake in chloroplasts was time and temperature dependent, but nucleotide independent. Increased radius of liposomes stimulated PC uptake, and protease treatment of the chloroplasts impaired PC uptake. This implies that the chloroplast outer envelopes contains an exposed proteinaceous machinery for the uptake of PC from closely apposed membranes. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of complex resistance transposons from an ancestral mercury transposon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Yamamoto, T; Sawai, T

    1983-03-01

    The molecular interrelationship of a transposon family which confers multiple antibiotic resistance and is assumed to have been generated from an ancestral mercury transposon was analyzed. Initially, the transposons Tn2613 (7.2 kilobases), encoding mercury resistance, and Tn2608 (13.5 kilobases), encoding mercury, streptomycin, and sulfonamide resistances, were isolated and their structures were analyzed. Next, the following transposons were compared with respect to their genetic and physical maps: Tn2613 and Tn501, encoding mercury resistance; Tn2608 and Tn21, encoding mercury, streptomycin, and sulfonamide resistance; Tn2607 and Tn4, encoding streptomycin, sulfonamide, and ampicillin resistance; and Tn2603, encoding mercury, streptomycin, sulfonamide, and ampicillin resistance. The results suggest that the transposons encoding multiple resistance were evolved from an ancestral mercury transposon.

  20. Single-crossover recombination and ancestral recombination trees.

    PubMed

    Baake, Ellen; von Wangenheim, Ute

    2014-05-01

    We consider the Wright-Fisher model for a population of [Formula: see text] individuals, each identified with a sequence of a finite number of sites, and single-crossover recombination between them. We trace back the ancestry of single individuals from the present population. In the [Formula: see text] limit without rescaling of parameters or time, this ancestral process is described by a random tree, whose branching events correspond to the splitting of the sequence due to recombination. With the help of a decomposition of the trees into subtrees, we calculate the probabilities of the topologies of the ancestral trees. At the same time, these probabilities lead to a semi-explicit solution of the deterministic single-crossover equation. The latter is a discrete-time dynamical system that emerges from the Wright-Fisher model via a law of large numbers and has been waiting for a solution for many decades.

  1. Resurrection of an ancestral 5S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Fox, George E

    2011-07-22

    In addition to providing phylogenetic relationships, tree making procedures such as parsimony and maximum likelihood can make specific predictions of actual historical sequences. Resurrection of such sequences can be used to understand early events in evolution. In the case of RNA, the nature of parsimony is such that when applied to multiple RNA sequences it typically predicts ancestral sequences that satisfy the base pairing constraints associated with secondary structure. The case for such sequences being actual ancestors is greatly improved, if they can be shown to be biologically functional. A unique common ancestral sequence of 28 Vibrio 5S ribosomal RNA sequences predicted by parsimony was resurrected and found to be functional in the context of the E. coli cellular environment. The functionality of various point variants and intermediates that were constructed as part of the resurrection were examined in detail. When separately introduced the changes at single stranded positions and individual double variants at base-paired positions were also viable. An additional double variant was examined at a different base-paired position and it was also valid. The results show that at least in the case of the 5S rRNAs considered here, ancestors predicted by parsimony are likely to be realistic when the prediction is not overly influenced by single outliers. It is especially noteworthy that the phenotype of the predicted ancestors could be anticipated as a cumulative consequence of the phenotypes of the individual variants that comprised them. Thus, point mutation data is potentially useful in evaluating the reasonableness of ancestral sequences predicted by parsimony or other methods. The results also suggest that in the absence of significant tertiary structure constraints double variants that preserve pairing in stem regions will typically be accepted. Overall, the results suggest that it will be feasible to resurrect additional meaningful 5S rRNA ancestors as well

  2. Ancestral facial morphology of Old World higher primates.

    PubMed Central

    Benefit, B R; McCrossin, M L

    1991-01-01

    Fossil remains of the cercopithecoid Victoria-pithecus recently recovered from middle Miocene deposits of Maboko Island (Kenya) provide evidence of the cranial anatomy of Old World monkeys prior to the evolutionary divergence of the extant subfamilies Colobinae and Cercopithecinae. Victoria-pithecus shares a suite of craniofacial features with the Oligocene catarrhine Aegyptopithecus and early Miocene hominoid Afropithecus. All three genera manifest supraorbital costae, anteriorly convergent temporal lines, the absence of a postglabellar fossa, a moderate to long snout, great facial height below the orbits, a deep cheek region, and anteriorly tapering premaxilla. The shared presence of these features in a catarrhine generally ancestral to apes and Old World monkeys, an early ape, and an early Old World monkey indicates that they are primitive characteristics that typified the last common ancestor of Hominoidea and Cercopithecoidea. These results contradict prevailing cranial morphotype reconstructions for ancestral catarrhines as Colobus- or Hylobates-like, characterized by a globular anterior braincase and orthognathy. By resolving several equivocal craniofacial morphocline polarities, these discoveries lay the foundation for a revised interpretation of the ancestral cranial morphology of Catarrhini more consistent with neontological and existing paleontological evidence. Images PMID:2052606

  3. Ancestral facial morphology of Old World higher primates.

    PubMed

    Benefit, B R; McCrossin, M L

    1991-06-15

    Fossil remains of the cercopithecoid Victoria-pithecus recently recovered from middle Miocene deposits of Maboko Island (Kenya) provide evidence of the cranial anatomy of Old World monkeys prior to the evolutionary divergence of the extant subfamilies Colobinae and Cercopithecinae. Victoria-pithecus shares a suite of craniofacial features with the Oligocene catarrhine Aegyptopithecus and early Miocene hominoid Afropithecus. All three genera manifest supraorbital costae, anteriorly convergent temporal lines, the absence of a postglabellar fossa, a moderate to long snout, great facial height below the orbits, a deep cheek region, and anteriorly tapering premaxilla. The shared presence of these features in a catarrhine generally ancestral to apes and Old World monkeys, an early ape, and an early Old World monkey indicates that they are primitive characteristics that typified the last common ancestor of Hominoidea and Cercopithecoidea. These results contradict prevailing cranial morphotype reconstructions for ancestral catarrhines as Colobus- or Hylobates-like, characterized by a globular anterior braincase and orthognathy. By resolving several equivocal craniofacial morphocline polarities, these discoveries lay the foundation for a revised interpretation of the ancestral cranial morphology of Catarrhini more consistent with neontological and existing paleontological evidence.

  4. An ancestral bacterial division system is widespread in eukaryotic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Leger, Michelle M; Petrů, Markéta; Žárský, Vojtěch; Eme, Laura; Vlček, Čestmír; Harding, Tommy; Lang, B Franz; Eliáš, Marek; Doležal, Pavel; Roger, Andrew J

    2015-08-18

    Bacterial division initiates at the site of a contractile Z-ring composed of polymerized FtsZ. The location of the Z-ring in the cell is controlled by a system of three mutually antagonistic proteins, MinC, MinD, and MinE. Plastid division is also known to be dependent on homologs of these proteins, derived from the ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to plastids. In contrast, the mitochondria of model systems such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mammals, and Arabidopsis thaliana seem to have replaced the ancestral α-proteobacterial Min-based division machinery with host-derived dynamin-related proteins that form outer contractile rings. Here, we show that the mitochondrial division system of these model organisms is the exception, rather than the rule, for eukaryotes. We describe endosymbiont-derived, bacterial-like division systems comprising FtsZ and Min proteins in diverse less-studied eukaryote protistan lineages, including jakobid and heterolobosean excavates, a malawimonad, stramenopiles, amoebozoans, a breviate, and an apusomonad. For two of these taxa, the amoebozoan Dictyostelium purpureum and the jakobid Andalucia incarcerata, we confirm a mitochondrial localization of these proteins by their heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The discovery of a proteobacterial-like division system in mitochondria of diverse eukaryotic lineages suggests that it was the ancestral feature of all eukaryotic mitochondria and has been supplanted by a host-derived system multiple times in distinct eukaryote lineages.

  5. An ancestral bacterial division system is widespread in eukaryotic mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Leger, Michelle M.; Petrů, Markéta; Žárský, Vojtěch; Eme, Laura; Vlček, Čestmír; Harding, Tommy; Lang, B. Franz; Eliáš, Marek; Doležal, Pavel; Roger, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial division initiates at the site of a contractile Z-ring composed of polymerized FtsZ. The location of the Z-ring in the cell is controlled by a system of three mutually antagonistic proteins, MinC, MinD, and MinE. Plastid division is also known to be dependent on homologs of these proteins, derived from the ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to plastids. In contrast, the mitochondria of model systems such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mammals, and Arabidopsis thaliana seem to have replaced the ancestral α-proteobacterial Min-based division machinery with host-derived dynamin-related proteins that form outer contractile rings. Here, we show that the mitochondrial division system of these model organisms is the exception, rather than the rule, for eukaryotes. We describe endosymbiont-derived, bacterial-like division systems comprising FtsZ and Min proteins in diverse less-studied eukaryote protistan lineages, including jakobid and heterolobosean excavates, a malawimonad, stramenopiles, amoebozoans, a breviate, and an apusomonad. For two of these taxa, the amoebozoan Dictyostelium purpureum and the jakobid Andalucia incarcerata, we confirm a mitochondrial localization of these proteins by their heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The discovery of a proteobacterial-like division system in mitochondria of diverse eukaryotic lineages suggests that it was the ancestral feature of all eukaryotic mitochondria and has been supplanted by a host-derived system multiple times in distinct eukaryote lineages. PMID:25831547

  6. The Ancestral Eutherian Karyotype Is Present in Xenarthra

    PubMed Central

    Svartman, Marta; Stone, Gary; Stanyon, Roscoe

    2006-01-01

    Molecular studies have led recently to the proposal of a new super-ordinal arrangement of the 18 extant Eutherian orders. From the four proposed super-orders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra were considered the most basal. Chromosome-painting studies with human probes in these two mammalian groups are thus key in the quest to establish the ancestral Eutherian karyotype. Although a reasonable amount of chromosome-painting data with human probes have already been obtained for Afrotheria, no Xenarthra species has been thoroughly analyzed with this approach. We hybridized human chromosome probes to metaphases of species (Dasypus novemcinctus, Tamandua tetradactyla, and Choloepus hoffmanii) representing three of the four Xenarthra families. Our data allowed us to review the current hypotheses for the ancestral Eutherian karyotype, which range from 2n = 44 to 2n = 48. One of the species studied, the two-toed sloth C. hoffmanii (2n = 50), showed a chromosome complement strikingly similar to the proposed 2n = 48 ancestral Eutherian karyotype, strongly reinforcing it. PMID:16848642

  7. The ancestral eutherian karyotype is present in Xenarthra.

    PubMed

    Svartman, Marta; Stone, Gary; Stanyon, Roscoe

    2006-07-01

    Molecular studies have led recently to the proposal of a new super-ordinal arrangement of the 18 extant Eutherian orders. From the four proposed super-orders, Afrotheria and Xenarthra were considered the most basal. Chromosome-painting studies with human probes in these two mammalian groups are thus key in the quest to establish the ancestral Eutherian karyotype. Although a reasonable amount of chromosome-painting data with human probes have already been obtained for Afrotheria, no Xenarthra species has been thoroughly analyzed with this approach. We hybridized human chromosome probes to metaphases of species (Dasypus novemcinctus, Tamandua tetradactyla, and Choloepus hoffmanii) representing three of the four Xenarthra families. Our data allowed us to review the current hypotheses for the ancestral Eutherian karyotype, which range from 2n = 44 to 2n = 48. One of the species studied, the two-toed sloth C. hoffmanii (2n = 50), showed a chromosome complement strikingly similar to the proposed 2n = 48 ancestral Eutherian karyotype, strongly reinforcing it.

  8. Cases In Which Ancestral Maximum Likelihood Will Be Confusingly Misleading.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Tomer; Chor, Benny

    2017-03-02

    Ancestral maximum likelihood (AML) is a phylogenetic tree reconstruction criteria that "lies between" maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML). ML has long been known to be statistically consistent. On the other hand, Felsenstein (1978) showed that MP is statistically inconsistent, and even positively misleading: There are cases where the parsimony criteria, applied to data generated according to one tree topology, will be optimized on a different tree topology. The question of weather AML is statistically consistent or not has been open for a long time. Mosel, Roch, and Steel (2009) have shown that AML can "shrink" short tree edges, resulting in a star tree with no internal resolution, which yields a better AML score than the original (resolved) model. This result implies that AML is statistically inconsistent, but not that it is positively misleading, because the star tree is compatible with any other topology. We show that AML is confusingly misleading: For some simple, four taxa (resolved) tree, the ancestral likelihood optimization criteria is maximized on an incorrect (resolved) tree topology, as well as on a star tree (both with specific edge lengths), while the tree with the original, correct topology, has strictly lower ancestral likelihood. Interestingly, the two short edges in the incorrect, resolved tree topology are of length zero, and are not adjacent, so this resolved tree is in fact a simple path. While for MP, the underlying phenomenon can be described as long edge attraction, it turns out that here we have long edge repulsion.

  9. Distinctive Architecture of the Chloroplast Genome in the Chlorodendrophycean Green Algae Scherffelia dubia and Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, Monique; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Chlorodendrophyceae is a small class of green algae belonging to the core Chlorophyta, an assemblage that also comprises the Pedinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae. Here we describe for the first time the chloroplast genomes of chlorodendrophycean algae (Scherffelia dubia, 137,161 bp; Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881, 100,264 bp). Characterized by a very small single-copy (SSC) region devoid of any gene and an unusually large inverted repeat (IR), the quadripartite structures of the Scherffelia and Tetraselmis genomes are unique among all core chlorophytes examined thus far. The lack of genes in the SSC region is offset by the rich and atypical gene complement of the IR, which includes genes from the SSC and large single-copy regions of prasinophyte and streptophyte chloroplast genomes having retained an ancestral quadripartite structure. Remarkably, seven of the atypical IR-encoded genes have also been observed in the IRs of pedinophycean and trebouxiophycean chloroplast genomes, suggesting that they were already present in the IR of the common ancestor of all core chlorophytes. Considering that the relationships among the main lineages of the core Chlorophyta are still unresolved, we evaluated the impact of including the Chlorodendrophyceae in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. The trees we inferred using data sets of 79 and 108 genes from 71 chlorophytes indicate that the Chlorodendrophyceae is a deep-diverging lineage of the core Chlorophyta, although the placement of this class relative to the Pedinophyceae remains ambiguous. Interestingly, some of our phylogenomic trees together with our comparative analysis of gene order data support the monophyly of the Trebouxiophyceae, thus offering further evidence that the previously observed affiliation between the Chlorellales and Pedinophyceae is the result of systematic errors in phylogenetic reconstruction. PMID:26849226

  10. Distinctive Architecture of the Chloroplast Genome in the Chlorodendrophycean Green Algae Scherffelia dubia and Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Monique; de Cambiaire, Jean-Charles; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Chlorodendrophyceae is a small class of green algae belonging to the core Chlorophyta, an assemblage that also comprises the Pedinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae. Here we describe for the first time the chloroplast genomes of chlorodendrophycean algae (Scherffelia dubia, 137,161 bp; Tetraselmis sp. CCMP 881, 100,264 bp). Characterized by a very small single-copy (SSC) region devoid of any gene and an unusually large inverted repeat (IR), the quadripartite structures of the Scherffelia and Tetraselmis genomes are unique among all core chlorophytes examined thus far. The lack of genes in the SSC region is offset by the rich and atypical gene complement of the IR, which includes genes from the SSC and large single-copy regions of prasinophyte and streptophyte chloroplast genomes having retained an ancestral quadripartite structure. Remarkably, seven of the atypical IR-encoded genes have also been observed in the IRs of pedinophycean and trebouxiophycean chloroplast genomes, suggesting that they were already present in the IR of the common ancestor of all core chlorophytes. Considering that the relationships among the main lineages of the core Chlorophyta are still unresolved, we evaluated the impact of including the Chlorodendrophyceae in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. The trees we inferred using data sets of 79 and 108 genes from 71 chlorophytes indicate that the Chlorodendrophyceae is a deep-diverging lineage of the core Chlorophyta, although the placement of this class relative to the Pedinophyceae remains ambiguous. Interestingly, some of our phylogenomic trees together with our comparative analysis of gene order data support the monophyly of the Trebouxiophyceae, thus offering further evidence that the previously observed affiliation between the Chlorellales and Pedinophyceae is the result of systematic errors in phylogenetic reconstruction.

  11. Effects of reduced chloroplast gene copy number on chloroplast gene expression in maize.

    PubMed

    Udy, Dylan B; Belcher, Susan; Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Gualberto, José M; Barkan, Alice

    2012-11-01

    Chloroplasts and other members of the plastid organelle family contain a small genome of bacterial ancestry. Young chloroplasts contain hundreds of genome copies, but the functional significance of this high genome copy number has been unclear. We describe molecular phenotypes associated with mutations in a nuclear gene in maize (Zea mays), white2 (w2), encoding a predicted organellar DNA polymerase. Weak and strong mutant alleles cause a moderate (approximately 5-fold) and severe (approximately 100-fold) decrease in plastid DNA copy number, respectively, as assayed by quantitative PCR and Southern-blot hybridization of leaf DNA. Both alleles condition a decrease in most chloroplast RNAs, with the magnitude of the RNA deficiencies roughly paralleling that of the DNA deficiency. However, some RNAs are more sensitive to a decrease in genome copy number than others. The rpoB messenger RNA (mRNA) exhibited a unique response, accumulating to dramatically elevated levels in response to a moderate reduction in plastid DNA. Subunits of photosynthetic enzyme complexes were reduced more severely than were plastid mRNAs, possibly because of impaired translation resulting from limiting ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, and ribosomal protein mRNA. These results indicate that chloroplast genome copy number is a limiting factor for the expression of a subset of chloroplast genes in maize. Whereas in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) a pair of orthologous genes function redundantly to catalyze DNA replication in both mitochondria and chloroplasts, the w2 gene is responsible for virtually all chloroplast DNA replication in maize. Mitochondrial DNA copy number was reduced approximately 2-fold in mutants harboring strong w2 alleles, suggesting that w2 also contributes to mitochondrial DNA replication.

  12. Analysis of Protein Import into Chloroplasts Isolated from Stressed Plants.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qihua; Jarvis, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Chloroplasts are organelles with many vital roles in plants, which include not only photosynthesis but numerous other metabolic and signaling functions. Furthermore, chloroplasts are critical for plant responses to various abiotic stresses, such as salinity and osmotic stresses. A chloroplast may contain up to ~3,000 different proteins, some of which are encoded by its own genome. However, the majority of chloroplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and synthesized in the cytosol, and these proteins need to be imported into the chloroplast through translocons at the chloroplast envelope membranes. Recent studies have shown that the chloroplast protein import can be actively regulated by stress. To biochemically investigate such regulation of protein import under stress conditions, we developed the method described here as a quick and straightforward procedure that can easily be achieved in any laboratory. In this method, plants are grown under normal conditions and then exposed to stress conditions in liquid culture. Plant material is collected, and chloroplasts are then released by homogenization. The crude homogenate is separated by density gradient centrifugation, enabling isolation of the intact chloroplasts. Chloroplast yield is assessed by counting, and chloroplast intactness is checked under a microscope. For the protein import assays, purified chloroplasts are incubated with (35)S radiolabeled in vitro translated precursor proteins, and time-course experiments are conducted to enable comparisons of import rates between genotypes under stress conditions. We present data generated using this method which show that the rate of protein import into chloroplasts from a regulatory mutant is specifically altered under osmotic stress conditions.

  13. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis. PMID:25329378

  14. Photosynthetic electron flow to oxygen and diffusion of hydrogen peroxide through the chloroplast envelope via aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Mubarakshina Borisova, Maria M; Kozuleva, Marina A; Rudenko, Natalia N; Naydov, Ilya A; Klenina, Irina B; Ivanov, Boris N

    2012-08-01

    Light-induced generation of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide in isolated thylakoids has been studied with a lipophilic spin probe, cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-4-isobutyramido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinium (TMT-H) to detect superoxide radicals, and the spin trap α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitron (4-POBN) to detect hydrogen peroxide-derived hydroxyl radicals. Accumulation of the radical products of the above reactions has been followed using electron paramagnetic resonance. It is found that the increased production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide in higher light is due to the enhanced production of these species within the thylakoid membrane, rather than outside the membrane. Fluorescent probe Amplex red, which forms fluorescent product, resorufin, in the reaction with hydrogen peroxide, has been used to detect hydrogen peroxide outside isolated chloroplasts using confocal microscopy. Resorufin fluorescence outside the chloroplasts is found to be suppressed by 60% in the presence of the inhibitor of aquaporins, acetazolamide (AZA), indicating that hydrogen peroxide can diffuse through the chloroplast envelope aquaporins. It is demonstrated that AZA also inhibits carbonic anhydrase activity of the isolated envelope. We put forward a hypothesis that carbonic anhydrase presumably can be attached to the envelope aquaporins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Post-translational Modifications in Regulation of Chloroplast Function: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Koskela, Minna M.; Mulo, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins enable fast modulation of protein function in response to metabolic and environmental changes. Phosphorylation is known to play a major role in regulating distribution of light energy between the Photosystems (PS) I and II (state transitions) and in PSII repair cycle. In addition, thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation of Calvin cycle enzymes has been shown to determine the efficiency of carbon assimilation. Besides these well characterized modifications, recent methodological progress has enabled identification of numerous other types of PTMs in various plant compartments, including chloroplasts. To date, at least N-terminal and Lys acetylation, Lys methylation, Tyr nitration and S-nitrosylation, glutathionylation, sumoylation and glycosylation of chloroplast proteins have been described. These modifications impact DNA replication, control transcriptional efficiency, regulate translational machinery and affect metabolic activities within the chloroplast. Moreover, light reactions of photosynthesis as well as carbon assimilation are regulated at multiple levels by a number of PTMs. It is likely that future studies will reveal new metabolic pathways to be regulated by PTMs as well as detailed molecular mechanisms of PTM-mediated regulation. PMID:28280500

  16. Ions channels/transporters and chloroplast regulation.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Tomizioli, Martino; Flori, Serena; Sautron, Emeline; Villanova, Valeria; Rolland, Norbert; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-07-01

    Ions play fundamental roles in all living cells and their gradients are often essential to fuel transports, to regulate enzyme activities and to transduce energy within and between cells. Their homeostasis is therefore an essential component of the cell metabolism. Ions must be imported from the extracellular matrix to their final subcellular compartments. Among them, the chloroplast is a particularly interesting example because there, ions not only modulate enzyme activities, but also mediate ATP synthesis and actively participate in the building of the photosynthetic structures by promoting membrane-membrane interaction. In this review, we first provide a comprehensive view of the different machineries involved in ion trafficking and homeostasis in the chloroplast, and then discuss peculiar functions exerted by ions in the frame of photochemical conversion of absorbed light energy.

  17. Protein trafficking to the complex chloroplasts of Euglena.

    PubMed

    Vacula, Rostislav; Sláviková, Silvia; Schwartzbach, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are delivered to Euglena chloroplasts using the secretory pathway. We describe analytical methods to study the intracellular trafficking of Euglena chloroplast proteins and a method to isolate preparative amounts of intact import competent chloroplasts for biochemical studies. Cells are pulse labeled with 35S-sulfate and chased with unlabeled sulfate allowing the trafficking and posttranslational processing of the labeled protein to be followed. Sucrose gradients are used to separate a 35S-labeled cell lysate into cytoplasmic, endoplasmic reticuum (ER), Golgi apparatus, chloroplast and mitochondrial fractions. Immunoprecipitation of each gradient fraction allows identification of the intracellular compartment containing a specific 35S-labeled protein at different times after synthesis delineating the trafficking pathway. Because sucrose gradients cannot be used to isolate preparative amounts of highly purified chloroplasts for biochemical characterization, a preparative high-yield procedure using Percoll gradients to isolate highly purified import competent chloroplasts is also presented.

  18. Alterations in rice chloroplast integrity, photosynthesis and metabolome associated with pathogenesis of Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srayan; Kanwar, Poonam; Jha, Gopaljee

    2017-01-01

    Sheath blight disease is caused by a necrotrophic fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and it continues to be a challenge for sustainable rice cultivation. In this study, we adopted a multi-pronged approach to understand the intricacies of rice undergoing susceptible interactions with R. solani. Extensive anatomical alteration, chloroplast localized ROS, deformed chloroplast ultrastructure along with decreased photosynthetic efficiency were observed in infected tissue. GC-MS based metabolite profiling revealed accumulation of glycolysis and TCA cycle intermediates, suggesting enhanced respiration. Several aromatic and aliphatic amino acids along with phenylpropanoid intermediates were also accumulated, suggesting induction of secondary metabolism during pathogenesis. Furthermore, alterations in carbon metabolism along with perturbation of hormonal signalling were highlighted in this study. The gene expression analysis including RNAseq profiling reinforced observed metabolic alterations in the infected tissues. In conclusion, the present study unravels key events associated during susceptible rice-R. solani interactions and identifies metabolites and transcripts that are accumulated in infected tissues. PMID:28165003

  19. Physical interaction between peroxisomes and chloroplasts elucidated by in situ laser analysis.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Kazusato; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Mano, Shoji; Kondo, Maki; Yamada, Kenji; Hayashi, Makoto; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Kadota, Akeo; Sakamoto, Wataru; Higashi, Shoichi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Shigemasa, Akinori; Iino, Takanori; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Nishimura, Mikio

    2015-03-30

    Life on earth relies upon photosynthesis, which consumes carbon dioxide and generates oxygen and carbohydrates. Photosynthesis is sustained by a dynamic environment within the plant cell involving numerous organelles with cytoplasmic streaming. Physiological studies of chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes show that these organelles actively communicate during photorespiration, a process by which by-products produced by photosynthesis are salvaged. Nevertheless, the mechanisms enabling efficient exchange of metabolites have not been clearly defined. We found that peroxisomes along chloroplasts changed shape from spherical to elliptical and their interaction area increased during photorespiration. We applied a recent femtosecond laser technology to analyse adhesion between the organelles inside palisade mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis leaves and succeeded in estimating their physical interactions under different environmental conditions. This is the first application of this estimation method within living cells. Our findings suggest that photosynthetic-dependent interactions play a critical role in ensuring efficient metabolite flow during photorespiration.

  20. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Nar1 Gene Encodes a Chloroplast Membrane Protein Involved in Nitrite Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rexach, Jesus; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2000-01-01

    A key step for nitrate assimilation in photosynthetic eukaryotes occurs within chloroplasts, where nitrite is reduced to ammonium, which is incorporated into carbon skeletons. The Nar1 gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is clustered with five other genes for nitrate assimilation, all of them regulated by nitrate. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA and cDNA of Nar1 and comparative studies of strains having or lacking Nar1 have been performed. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that Nar1 encodes a chloroplast membrane protein with substantial identity to putative formate and nitrite transporters in bacteria. Use of antibodies against NAR1 has corroborated its location in the plastidic membrane. Characterization of strains having or lacking this gene suggests that NAR1 is involved in nitrite transport in plastids, which is critical for cell survival under limiting nitrate conditions, and controls the amount of nitrate incorporated by the cells under limiting CO2 conditions. PMID:10948261

  1. Cell-type-specific differentiation of chloroplasts in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Majeran, Wojciech; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2009-02-01

    In leaves of C4 grasses such as maize, photosynthetic activities are partitioned between bundle-sheath and mesophyll cells, leading to increased photosynthetic yield, particularly under stress conditions. As we discuss here, recent comparative chloroplast proteome analyses in maize have shown specific adaptation to C4-cell-specific differentiation of the photosynthetic apparatus, primary and secondary metabolism and metabolite transporters, as well as the chloroplast protein homeostasis machinery. Furthermore, a novel bundle-sheath-enriched 1000-kDa NADPH dehydrogenase 'supercomplex' has been identified, and we discuss its possible role in inorganic carbon concentration. These breakthroughs provide new opportunities to further unravel C4 pathways and to increase crop productivity through metabolic engineering of C4 pathways into C3 plants, such as rice.

  2. [Thermoluminescence and electric polarization in chloroplasts].

    PubMed

    Noks, P P; Venediktov, P S; Kononenko, A A; Rubin, A B; Garab, D

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of pea chloroplasts to electric field causes the appearance of a new thermoluminescence (TL) band at--(40-50) degrees C and a reduction of the intensity of its main bands. Extents of intensity drop are different for different components of TL and depend on the temperature of illumination. The charge traps responsible for the individual TL components seem to be localized in microsurroundings having different field susceptibility. The electric field effects observable at different temperatures are in correlation with the thermodepolarization currents which reflect the mobility and number of charged groups undergoing a field-induced displacement in chloroplast membranes. Dehydration. of chloroplast film preparations causes a reduction in the intensities of the TL peaks and thermodepolarization currents and a shift of the peaks positions toward higher temperatures. It is assumed that the traps of the recombining charges have two different conformations, each with its own frequency factor for the recombination reaction. Changes in the thermoluminescence behavior in applied electric field are due to the polarization of the traps, which increases the existence probability of a conformation with a high frequency factor.

  3. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile ({sup 3}H)methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the ({sup 3}H)methyl group.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate negatively regulates chloroplast division in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kumiko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Wada, Hajime

    2015-03-01

    Chloroplast division is performed by the constriction of envelope membranes at the division site. Although constriction of a ring-like protein complex has been shown to be involved in chloroplast division, it remains unknown how membrane lipids participate in the process. Here, we show that phosphoinositides with unknown function in envelope membranes are involved in the regulation of chloroplast division in Arabidopsis thaliana. PLASTID DIVISION1 (PDV1) and PDV2 proteins interacted specifically with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4K) decreased the level of PI4P in chloroplasts and accelerated chloroplast division. Knockout of PI4Kβ2 expression or downregulation of PI4Kα1 expression resulted in decreased levels of PI4P in chloroplasts and increased chloroplast numbers. PI4Kα1 is the main contributor to PI4P synthesis in chloroplasts, and the effect of PI4K inhibition was largely abolished in the pdv1 mutant. Overexpression of DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN5B (DRP5B), another component of the chloroplast division machinery, which is recruited to chloroplasts by PDV1 and PDV2, enhanced the effect of PI4K inhibition, whereas overexpression of PDV1 and PDV2 had additive effects. The amount of DRP5B that associated with chloroplasts increased upon PI4K inhibition. These findings suggest that PI4P is a regulator of chloroplast division in a PDV1- and DRP5B-dependent manner. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Chloroplast targeting factor AKR2 evolved from an ankyrin repeat domain coincidentally binds two chloroplast lipids

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Heon; Park, Mi-Jeong; Gwon, Gwang Hyeon; Silkov, Antonina; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Yang, Eun Chan; Song, Seohyeon; Song, Kyungyoung; Kim, Younghyun; Yoon, Hwan Su; Honig, Barry; Cho, Wonhwa; Cho, Yunje; Hwang, Inhwan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In organellogenesis of the chloroplast from endosymbiotic cyanobacterium, the establishment of protein targeting mechanisms to the chloroplast should have been pivotal. However, it is still mysterious how these mechanisms were established and how they work in plant cells. Here, we show that AKR2A, the cytosolic targeting factor for chloroplast outer membrane (COM) proteins, evolved from the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the host cell by stepwise extensions of its N-terminal domain, and two lipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) of the endosymbiont were selected to function as the AKR2A receptor. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and mutational analysis of the ARD identified two adjacent sites for coincidental and synergistic binding of MGDG and PG. Based on these findings, we propose that the targeting mechanism of COM proteins was established using components from both the endosymbiont and host cell through a modification of the protein-protein interacting ARD into a lipid binding domain. PMID:25203210

  6. The Role of Pea Chloroplast [alpha]-Glucosidase in Transitory Starch Degradation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z.; Duke, S. H.; Henson, C. A.

    1995-05-01

    Pea chloroplastic [alpha]-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.20) involved in transitory starch degradation was purified to apparent homogeneity by ion exchange, reactive dye, hydroxylapatite, hydrophobic interaction, and gel filtration column chromatography. The native molecular mass and the subunit molecular mass were about 49.1 and 24.4 kD, respectively, suggesting that the enzyme is a homodimer. The enzyme had a Km of 7.18 mM for maltose. The enzyme's maximal activity at pH 7.0 and stability at pH 6.5 are compatible with the diurnal oscillations of the chloroplastic stromal pH and transitory starch accumulation. This pH modulation of the [alpha]-glucosidase's activity and stability is the only mechanism known to regulate starch degradative enzymes in leaves. Although the enzyme was specific for the [alpha]-D-glucose in the nonreducing end as the glycon, the aglycon moieties could be composed of a variety of groups. However, the hydrolysis rate was greatly influenced by the aglycon residues. Also, the enzyme could hydrolyze glucans in which carbon 1 of the glycon was linked to different carbon positions of the penultimate glucose residue. The ability of the [alpha]-glucosidase to hydrolyze [alpha]-1,2- and [alpha]-1,3-glucosidic bonds may be vital if these bonds exist in starch granules because they would be barriers to other starch degradative enzymes. This purified pea chloroplastic [alpha]-glucosidase was demonstrated to initiate attacks on native transitory chloroplastic starch granules.

  7. Omp85Tt from Thermus thermophilus HB27: an Ancestral Type of the Omp85 Protein Family▿

    PubMed Central

    Nesper, Jutta; Brosig, Alexander; Ringler, Philippe; Patel, Geetika J.; Müller, Shirley A.; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H.; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the Omp85 family are involved in the assembly of β-barrel outer membrane proteins or in the translocation of proteins across the outer membrane in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The cell envelope of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 is multilayered, including an outer membrane that is not well characterized. Neither the precise lipid composition nor much about integral membrane proteins is known. The genome of HB27 encodes one Omp85-like protein, Omp85Tt, representing an ancestral type of this family. We overexpressed Omp85Tt in T. thermophilus and purified it from the native outer membranes. In the presence of detergent, purified Omp85Tt existed mainly as a monomer, composed of two stable protease-resistant modules. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated predominantly β-sheet secondary structure. Electron microscopy of negatively stained lipid-embedded Omp85Tt revealed ring-like structures with a central cavity of ∼1.5 nm in diameter. Single-channel conductance recordings indicated that Omp85Tt forms ion channels with two different conducting states, characterized by conductances of ∼0.4 nS and ∼0.65 nS, respectively. PMID:18456816

  8. Omp85(Tt) from Thermus thermophilus HB27: an ancestral type of the Omp85 protein family.

    PubMed

    Nesper, Jutta; Brosig, Alexander; Ringler, Philippe; Patel, Geetika J; Müller, Shirley A; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2008-07-01

    Proteins belonging to the Omp85 family are involved in the assembly of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins or in the translocation of proteins across the outer membrane in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The cell envelope of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 is multilayered, including an outer membrane that is not well characterized. Neither the precise lipid composition nor much about integral membrane proteins is known. The genome of HB27 encodes one Omp85-like protein, Omp85(Tt), representing an ancestral type of this family. We overexpressed Omp85(Tt) in T. thermophilus and purified it from the native outer membranes. In the presence of detergent, purified Omp85(Tt) existed mainly as a monomer, composed of two stable protease-resistant modules. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure. Electron microscopy of negatively stained lipid-embedded Omp85(Tt) revealed ring-like structures with a central cavity of approximately 1.5 nm in diameter. Single-channel conductance recordings indicated that Omp85(Tt) forms ion channels with two different conducting states, characterized by conductances of approximately 0.4 nS and approximately 0.65 nS, respectively.

  9. Cadmium accumulation in chloroplasts and its impact on chloroplastic processes in barley and maize.

    PubMed

    Lysenko, Eugene A; Klaus, Alexander A; Pshybytko, Natallia L; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2015-08-01

    Data on cadmium accumulation in chloroplasts of terrestrial plants are scarce and contradictory. We introduced CdSO4 in hydroponic media to the final concentrations 80 and 250 μM and studied the accumulation of Cd in chloroplasts of Hordeum vulgare and Zea mays. Barley accumulated more Cd in the chloroplasts as compared to maize, whereas in the leaves cadmium accumulation was higher in maize. The cadmium content in the chloroplasts of two species varied from 49 to 171 ng Cd/mg chlorophyll, which corresponds to one Cd atom per 728-2,540 chlorophyll molecules. Therefore, Mg(2+) can be substituted by Cd(2+) in a negligible amount of antenna chlorophylls only. The percentage of chloroplastic cadmium can be estimated as 0.21-1.32 % of all the Cd in a leaf. Photochemistry (F v/F m, ΦPSII, qP) was not influenced by Cd. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll-excited state (NPQ) was greatly reduced in barley but not in maize. The decrease in NPQ was due to its fast relaxing component; the slow relaxing component rose slightly. In chloroplasts, Cd did not affect mRNA levels, but content of some photosynthetic proteins was reduced: slightly in the leaves of barley and heavily in the leaves of maize. In all analyzed C3-species, the effect of Cd on the content of photosynthetic proteins was mild or absent. This is most likely the first evidence of severe reduction of photosynthetic proteins in leaves of a Cd-treated C4-plant.

  10. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  11. Looking for a substituent of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying Ping; Yeoh, Loo Yew; Chee, Swee Yong; Lim, Tuck Meng

    2017-04-01

    Spinach's chloroplasts electron transport features are often adapted to build biofuel cells or biosensors for environment conservation. This approach may raise food security issues. The present study aimed to test on in vitro functional activity of chloroplasts from selected underutilized leaves of: Pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius), oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) in comparison with spinach (Spinacia oleracea). The leaves' electrical conductivity was measured to evaluate the initial cell permeability. We applied Hill's reaction to determine the photoreduction capacity of the chloroplasts. Initial electrical conductivity of leaves ranged from 11.5 to 18.5 µs/cm/g followed the order of water lettucechloroplasts. Chloroplasts of oil palm frond and water lettuce showed low photoreduction rate of 14 to 22%. On the other hand, the chloroplasts of both spinach and pandan leaves exerted an initial photoreduction rate which was above 90%. The photoreduction rate of these chloroplasts remained to above 60% even after 30 day-storage at -20°C. In comparison with spinach, pandan leaves' chloroplasts possessed similar in vitro functional activity and storage stability at 4°C and -20°C. This warrants further investigation on chloroplasts of pandan leaves for higher-value applications.

  12. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field. PMID:26793223

  13. Fine tuning chloroplast movements through physical interactions between phototropins

    PubMed Central

    Sztatelman, Olga; Łabuz, Justyna; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Bażant, Aneta; Zgłobicki, Piotr; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Strzałka, Wojciech; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Phototropins are plant photoreceptors which regulate numerous responses to blue light, including chloroplast relocation. Weak blue light induces chloroplast accumulation, whereas strong light leads to an avoidance response. Two Arabidopsis phototropins are characterized by different light sensitivities. Under continuous light, both can elicit chloroplast accumulation, but the avoidance response is controlled solely by phot2. As well as continuous light, brief light pulses also induce chloroplast displacements. Pulses of 0.1s and 0.2s of fluence rate saturating the avoidance response lead to transient chloroplast accumulation. Longer pulses (up to 20s) trigger a biphasic response, namely transient avoidance followed by transient accumulation. This work presents a detailed study of transient chloroplast responses in Arabidopsis. Phototropin mutants display altered chloroplast movements as compared with the wild type: phot1 is characterized by weaker responses, while phot2 exhibits enhanced chloroplast accumulation, especially after 0.1s and 0.2s pulses. To determine the cause of these differences, the abundance and phosphorylation levels of both phototropins, as well as the interactions between phototropin molecules are examined. The formation of phototropin homo- and heterocomplexes is the most plausible explanation of the observed phenomena. The physiological consequences of this interplay are discussed, suggesting the universal character of this mechanism that fine-tunes plant reactions to blue light. Additionally, responses in mutants of different protein phosphatase 2A subunits are examined to assess the role of protein phosphorylation in signaling of chloroplast movements. PMID:27406783

  14. New insights into dynamic actin-based chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is essential for plants to survive under various environmental light conditions. Phototropins-plant-specific blue-light-activated receptor kinases-mediate the response by perceiving light intensity and direction. Recently, novel chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments have been identified as playing a pivotal role in the directional chloroplast photorelocation movement. Encouraging progress has recently been made in this field of research through molecular genetics and cell biological analyses. This review describes factors that have been identified as being involved in chloroplast movement and their roles in the regulation of cp-actin filaments, thus providing a basis for reflection on their biochemical activities and functions.

  15. The complete chloroplast genome of Phalaenopsis "Tiny Star".

    PubMed

    Kim, Goon-Bo; Kwon, Youngeun; Yu, Hee-Ju; Lim, Ki-Byung; Seo, Jae-Hwan; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete chloroplast DNA sequence of Phalaenopsis "Tiny Star" based on Illumina sequencing. The total length of the chloroplast genome is 148,918 bp long with GC content of 36.7%. It contains 70 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Comparative analysis with the reported orchid chloroplast sequences identified unique InDel variations in the "Tiny Star" chloroplast genome that have potential as genetic markers to investigate the maternal lineage of Phalaenopsis and Doritaenopsis cultivars.

  16. Uptake and incorporation of iron in sugar beet chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Solti, Adám; Kovács, Krisztina; Basa, Brigitta; Vértes, Attila; Sárvári, Eva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts contain 80-90% of iron taken up by plant cells. Though some iron transport-related envelope proteins were identified recently, the mechanism of iron uptake into chloroplasts remained unresolved. To shed more light on the process of chloroplast iron uptake, trials were performed with isolated intact chloroplasts of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). Iron uptake was followed by measuring the iron content of chloroplasts in the form of ferrous-bathophenantroline-disulphonate complex after solubilising the chloroplasts in reducing environment. Ferric citrate was preferred to ferrous citrate as substrate for chloroplasts. Strong dependency of ferric citrate uptake on photosynthetic electron transport activity suggests that ferric chelate reductase uses NADPH, and is localised in the inner envelope membrane. The K(m) for iron uptake from ferric-citrate pool was 14.65 ± 3.13 μM Fe((III))-citrate. The relatively fast incorporation of (57)Fe isotope into Fe-S clusters/heme, detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy, showed the efficiency of the biosynthetic machinery of these cofactors in isolated chloroplasts. The negative correlation between the chloroplast iron concentration and the rate of iron uptake refers to a strong feedback regulation of the uptake. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A role for mechanosensitive channels in chloroplast and bacterial fission.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Haswell, Elizabeth

    2012-02-01

    The division site in both chloroplasts and bacteria is established by the medial placement of the FtsZ ring, a process that is in part regulated by the evolutionarily conserved components of the Min system. We recently showed that mechanosensitive ion channels influence FtsZ ring assembly in both Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts and in Escherichia coli; in chloroplasts they do so through the same genetic pathway as the Min system. Here we describe the effect of heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis MS channel homolog MSL2 on FtsZ ring placement in E. coli. We also discuss possible molecular mechanisms by which MS channels might influence chloroplast or bacterial division.

  18. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field.

  19. Mutations That Alter the Transmission of Chloroplast Genes in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Ruth; Ramanis, Zenta

    1974-01-01

    Two mutations are described that alter the pattern of inheritance of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas. The mutant gene mat-1 linked to the mating type allele mt- greatly increases the frequency of exceptional zygotes, i.e., zygotes that transmit chloroplast genes from the mt- (male) parent. In some crosses, 80-90% of the zygotes are biparental, transmitting chloroplast genes from both parents. The mat-2 mutation, linked to mt+, acts to decrease the frequency of exceptional zygotes below the spontaneous level. The mutant effects are discussed in terms of a DNA modification-restriction system, postulated to regulate the transmission of chloroplast DNA in zygotes. PMID:4531010

  20. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe G; Bozarth, Andrew; Funk, Helena T; Zauner, Stefan; Rensing, Stefan A; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Börner, Thomas; Tillich, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions. PMID:18755031

  1. The chloroplast ATP synthase features the characteristic redox regulation machinery.

    PubMed

    Hisabori, Toru; Sunamura, Ei-Ichiro; Kim, Yusung; Konno, Hiroki

    2013-11-20

    Regulation of the activity of the chloroplast ATP synthase is largely accomplished by the chloroplast thioredoxin system, the main redox regulation system in chloroplasts, which is directly coupled to the photosynthetic reaction. We review the current understanding of the redox regulation system of the chloroplast ATP synthase. The thioredoxin-targeted portion of the ATP synthase consists of two cysteines located on the central axis subunit γ. The redox state of these two cysteines is under the influence of chloroplast thioredoxin, which directly controls rotation during catalysis by inducing a conformational change in this subunit. The molecular mechanism of redox regulation of the chloroplast ATP synthase has recently been determined. Regulation of the activity of the chloroplast ATP synthase is critical in driving efficiency into the ATP synthesis reaction in chloroplasts. The molecular architecture of the chloroplast ATP synthase, which confers redox regulatory properties requires further investigation, in light of the molecular structure of the enzyme complex as well as the physiological significance of the regulation system.

  2. Ancestral Components of Admixed Genomes in a Mexican Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas A.; Coram, Marc A.; Shriver, Mark D.; Romieu, Isabelle; Barsh, Gregory S.; London, Stephanie J.; Tang, Hua

    2011-01-01

    For most of the world, human genome structure at a population level is shaped by interplay between ancient geographic isolation and more recent demographic shifts, factors that are captured by the concepts of biogeographic ancestry and admixture, respectively. The ancestry of non-admixed individuals can often be traced to a specific population in a precise region, but current approaches for studying admixed individuals generally yield coarse information in which genome ancestry proportions are identified according to continent of origin. Here we introduce a new analytic strategy for this problem that allows fine-grained characterization of admixed individuals with respect to both geographic and genomic coordinates. Ancestry segments from different continents, identified with a probabilistic model, are used to construct and study “virtual genomes” of admixed individuals. We apply this approach to a cohort of 492 parent–offspring trios from Mexico City. The relative contributions from the three continental-level ancestral populations—Africa, Europe, and America—vary substantially between individuals, and the distribution of haplotype block length suggests an admixing time of 10–15 generations. The European and Indigenous American virtual genomes of each Mexican individual can be traced to precise regions within each continent, and they reveal a gradient of Amerindian ancestry between indigenous people of southwestern Mexico and Mayans of the Yucatan Peninsula. This contrasts sharply with the African roots of African Americans, which have been characterized by a uniform mixing of multiple West African populations. We also use the virtual European and Indigenous American genomes to search for the signatures of selection in the ancestral populations, and we identify previously known targets of selection in other populations, as well as new candidate loci. The ability to infer precise ancestral components of admixed genomes will facilitate studies of disease

  3. Ancestral components of admixed genomes in a Mexican cohort.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas A; Coram, Marc A; Shriver, Mark D; Romieu, Isabelle; Barsh, Gregory S; London, Stephanie J; Tang, Hua

    2011-12-01

    For most of the world, human genome structure at a population level is shaped by interplay between ancient geographic isolation and more recent demographic shifts, factors that are captured by the concepts of biogeographic ancestry and admixture, respectively. The ancestry of non-admixed individuals can often be traced to a specific population in a precise region, but current approaches for studying admixed individuals generally yield coarse information in which genome ancestry proportions are identified according to continent of origin. Here we introduce a new analytic strategy for this problem that allows fine-grained characterization of admixed individuals with respect to both geographic and genomic coordinates. Ancestry segments from different continents, identified with a probabilistic model, are used to construct and study "virtual genomes" of admixed individuals. We apply this approach to a cohort of 492 parent-offspring trios from Mexico City. The relative contributions from the three continental-level ancestral populations-Africa, Europe, and America-vary substantially between individuals, and the distribution of haplotype block length suggests an admixing time of 10-15 generations. The European and Indigenous American virtual genomes of each Mexican individual can be traced to precise regions within each continent, and they reveal a gradient of Amerindian ancestry between indigenous people of southwestern Mexico and Mayans of the Yucatan Peninsula. This contrasts sharply with the African roots of African Americans, which have been characterized by a uniform mixing of multiple West African populations. We also use the virtual European and Indigenous American genomes to search for the signatures of selection in the ancestral populations, and we identify previously known targets of selection in other populations, as well as new candidate loci. The ability to infer precise ancestral components of admixed genomes will facilitate studies of disease

  4. Visual system evolution and the nature of the ancestral snake.

    PubMed

    Simões, B F; Sampaio, F L; Jared, C; Antoniazzi, M M; Loew, E R; Bowmaker, J K; Rodriguez, A; Hart, N S; Hunt, D M; Partridge, J C; Gower, D J

    2015-07-01

    The dominant hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of snakes from 'lizards' (non-snake squamates) is that stem snakes acquired many snake features while passing through a profound burrowing (fossorial) phase. To investigate this, we examined the visual pigments and their encoding opsin genes in a range of squamate reptiles, focusing on fossorial lizards and snakes. We sequenced opsin transcripts isolated from retinal cDNA and used microspectrophotometry to measure directly the spectral absorbance of the photoreceptor visual pigments in a subset of samples. In snakes, but not lizards, dedicated fossoriality (as in Scolecophidia and the alethinophidian Anilius scytale) corresponds with loss of all visual opsins other than RH1 (λmax 490-497 nm); all other snakes (including less dedicated burrowers) also have functional sws1 and lws opsin genes. In contrast, the retinas of all lizards sampled, even highly fossorial amphisbaenians with reduced eyes, express functional lws, sws1, sws2 and rh1 genes, and most also express rh2 (i.e. they express all five of the visual opsin genes present in the ancestral vertebrate). Our evidence of visual pigment complements suggests that the visual system of stem snakes was partly reduced, with two (RH2 and SWS2) of the ancestral vertebrate visual pigments being eliminated, but that this did not extend to the extreme additional loss of SWS1 and LWS that subsequently occurred (probably independently) in highly fossorial extant scolecophidians and A. scytale. We therefore consider it unlikely that the ancestral snake was as fossorial as extant scolecophidians, whether or not the latter are para- or monophyletic.

  5. Genomic evolution in domestic cattle: ancestral haplotypes and healthy beef.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Joseph F; Steele, Edward J; Lester, Susan; Kalai, Oscar; Millman, John A; Wolrige, Lindsay; Bayard, Dominic; McLure, Craig; Dawkins, Roger L

    2011-05-01

    We have identified numerous Ancestral Haplotypes encoding a 14-Mb region of Bota C19. Three are frequent in Simmental, Angus and Wagyu and have been conserved since common progenitor populations. Others are more relevant to the differences between these 3 breeds including fat content and distribution in muscle. SREBF1 and Growth Hormone, which have been implicated in the production of healthy beef, are included within these haplotypes. However, we conclude that alleles at these 2 loci are less important than other sequences within the haplotypes. Identification of breeds and hybrids is improved by using haplotypes rather than individual alleles.

  6. Transit peptide elements mediate selective protein targeting to two different types of chloroplasts in the single-cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Diana; Bohnhorst, Philipp; Shekhar, Vinay; Hwang, Inhwan; Offermann, Sascha

    2017-01-01

    Bienertia sinuspersici is a terrestrial plant that performs C4 photosynthesis within individual cells through operating a carbon concentrating mechanism between different subcellular domains including two types of chloroplasts. It is currently unknown how differentiation of two highly specialized chloroplasts within the same cell occurs as no similar cases have been reported. Here we show that this differentiation in photosynthetic cells of B. sinuspersici is enabled by a transit peptide (TP) mediated selective protein targeting mechanism. Mutations in the TPs cause loss of selectivity but not general loss of chloroplast import, indicating the mechanism operates by specifically blocking protein accumulation in one chloroplast type. Hybrid studies indicate that this selectivity is transferable to transit peptides of plants which perform C4 by cooperative function of chloroplasts between two photosynthetic cells. Codon swap experiments as well as introducing an artificial bait mRNA show that RNA affects are not crucial for the sorting process. In summary, our analysis shows how the mechanism of subcellular targeting to form two types of chloroplast within the same cell can be achieved. This information is not only crucial for understanding single-cell C4 photosynthesis; it provides new insights in control of subcellular protein targeting in cell biology. PMID:28112241

  7. Light-Induced Chloroplast Shrinkage in vivo Detectable After Rapid Isolation of Chloroplasts From Pisum sativum 1

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1968-01-01

    A light-induced shrinkage of chloroplasts in vivo could be detected with chloroplasts isolated within 2 minutes of harvesting pea plants. As determined both by packed volume and Coulter counter, the mean volume of chloroplasts from plants in the dark was 39 μ3, whereas it was 31 μ3 for chloroplasts from plants in the light. Upon illumination of the plants, the half-time for the chloroplast shrinkage in vivo was about 3 minutes, and the half-time for the reversal in the dark was about 5 minutes. A plant growth temperature of 20° was optimal for the volume change. The chloroplast shrinkage was half-maximal for a light intensity of 400 lux incident on the plants and was light-saturated near 2000 lux. The light-absorbing pigment responsible for the volume change was chlorophyll. This light-induced shrinkage resulted in a flattening and slight indenting of the chloroplasts. This chloroplast flattening upon illumination of the plants may accompany an increase in the photosynthetic efficiency of chloroplasts. PMID:16656840

  8. The chloroplast RNA helicase ISE2 is required for multiple chloroplast RNA processing steps in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Krzysztof; McCray, Tyra N; Ernest, Ben; Fernandez, Jessica C; Howell, Katharine A; Lane, Thomas; Staton, Margaret; Burch-Smith, Tessa M

    2017-03-27

    INCREASED SIZE EXCLUSION LIMIT2 (ISE2) is a chloroplast-localized RNA helicase that is indispensable for proper plant development. Chloroplasts in leaves with reduced ISE2 expression have previously been shown to exhibit reduced thylakoid contents and increased stromal volume, indicative of defective development. It has recently been reported that ISE2 is required for the splicing of group II introns from chloroplast transcripts. The current study extends these findings, and presents evidence for ISE2's role in multiple aspects of chloroplast RNA processing beyond group II intron splicing. Loss of ISE2 from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves resulted in defects in C-to-U RNA editing, altered accumulation of chloroplast transcripts and chloroplast-encoded proteins, and defective processing of chloroplast ribosomal RNAs. Potential ISE2 substrates were identified by RNA immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (RIP-seq), and the diversity of RNA species identified supports ISE2's involvement in multiple aspects of chloroplast RNA metabolism. Comprehensive phylogenetic analyses revealed that ISE2 is a non-canonical Ski2-like RNA helicase that represents a separate sub-clade unique to green photosynthetic organisms, consistent with its function as an essential protein. Thus ISE2's evolutionary conservation may be explained by its numerous roles in regulating chloroplast gene expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Homologous and heterologous reconstitution of Golgi to chloroplast transport and protein import into the complex chloroplasts of Euglena.

    PubMed

    Sláviková, Silvia; Vacula, Rostislav; Fang, Zhiwei; Ehara, Tomoko; Osafune, Tetsuaki; Schwartzbach, Steven D

    2005-04-15

    Euglena complex chloroplasts evolved through secondary endosymbiosis between a phagotrophic trypanosome host and eukaryotic algal endosymbiont. Cytoplasmically synthesized chloroplast proteins are transported in vesicles as integral membrane proteins from the ER to the Golgi apparatus to the Euglena chloroplast. Euglena chloroplast preprotein pre-sequences contain a functional N-terminal ER-targeting signal peptide and a domain having characteristics of a higher plant chloroplast targeting transit peptide, which contains a hydrophobic stop-transfer membrane anchor sequence that anchors the precursor in the vesicle membrane. Pulse-chase subcellular fractionation studies showed that (35)S-labeled precursor to the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein accumulated in the Golgi apparatus of Euglena incubated at 15 degrees C and transport to the chloroplast resumed after transfer to 26 degrees C. Transport of the (35)S-labeled precursor to the chlorophyll a/b binding protein from Euglena Golgi membranes to Euglena chloroplasts and import into chloroplasts was reconstituted using Golgi membranes isolated from 15 degrees C cells returned to 26 degrees C. Transport was dependent upon extra- and intrachloroplast ATP and GTP hydrolysis. Golgi to chloroplast transport was not inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide indicating that fusion of Golgi vesicles to the chloroplast envelope does not require N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF). This suggests that N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are not utilized in the targeting fusion reaction. The Euglena precursor to the chloroplast-localized small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase was not imported into isolated pea chloroplasts. A precursor with the N-terminal signal peptide deleted was imported, indicating that the Euglena pre-sequence has a transit peptide that functions in pea chloroplasts. A precursor to the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase with

  10. Differential positioning of C(4) mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts: recovery of chloroplast positioning requires the actomyosin system.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Kawasaki, Michio; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In C(4) plants, bundle sheath (BS) chloroplasts are arranged in the centripetal position or in the centrifugal position, although mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are evenly distributed along cell membranes. To examine the molecular mechanism for the intracellular disposition of these chloroplasts, we observed the distribution of actin filaments in BS and M cells of the C(4) plants finger millet (Eleusine coracana) and maize (Zea mays) using immunofluorescence. Fine actin filaments encircled chloroplasts in both cell types, and an actin network was observed adjacent to plasma membranes. The intracellular disposition of both chloroplasts in finger millet was disrupted by centrifugal force but recovered within 2 h in the dark. Actin filaments remained associated with chloroplasts during recovery. We also examined the effects of inhibitors on the rearrangement of chloroplasts. Inhibitors of actin polymerization, myosin-based activities and cytosolic protein synthesis blocked migration of chloroplasts. In contrast, a microtubule-depolymerizing drug had no effect. These results show that C(4) plants possess a mechanism for keeping chloroplasts in the home position which is dependent on the actomyosin system and cytosolic protein synthesis but not tubulin or light.

  11. CLUMPED CHLOROPLASTS 1 is required for plastid separation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Sage, Tammy L.; Liu, Yi; Ahmad, Tiara R.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Shiu, Shin-Han; Froehlich, John E.; Imre, Kathleen M.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, clumped chloroplasts 1 (clmp1), in which disruption of a gene of unknown function causes chloroplasts to cluster instead of being distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The phenotype affects chloroplasts and nongreen plastids in multiple organs and cell types, but is detectable only at certain developmental stages. In young leaf petioles of clmp1, where clustering is prevalent, cells lacking chloroplasts are detected, suggesting impaired chloroplast partitioning during mitosis. Although organelle distribution and partitioning are actin-dependent in plants, the actin cytoskeleton in clmp1 is indistinguishable from that in WT, and peroxisomes and mitochondria are distributed normally. A CLMP1-YFP fusion protein that complements clmp1 localizes to discrete foci in the cytoplasm, most of which colocalize with the cell periphery or with chloroplasts. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that chloroplasts within clmp1 clusters are held together by membranous connections, including thin isthmi characteristic of late-stage chloroplast division. This finding suggests that constriction of dividing chloroplasts proceeds normally in clmp1, but separation is impaired. Consistently, chloroplast size and number, as well as positioning of the plastid division proteins FtsZ and ARC5/DRP5B, are unaffected in clmp1, indicating that loss of CLMP1-mediated chloroplast separation does not prevent otherwise normal division. CLMP1-like sequences are unique to green algae and land plants, and the CLMP1 sequence suggests that it functions through protein–protein interactions. Our studies identify a unique class of proteins required for plastid separation after the constriction stage of plastid division and indicate that CLMP1 activity is also required for plastid distribution and partitioning during cell division. PMID:22025705

  12. CLUMPED CHLOROPLASTS 1 is required for plastid separation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Sage, Tammy L; Liu, Yi; Ahmad, Tiara R; Marshall, Wallace F; Shiu, Shin-Han; Froehlich, John E; Imre, Kathleen M; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2011-11-08

    We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, clumped chloroplasts 1 (clmp1), in which disruption of a gene of unknown function causes chloroplasts to cluster instead of being distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The phenotype affects chloroplasts and nongreen plastids in multiple organs and cell types, but is detectable only at certain developmental stages. In young leaf petioles of clmp1, where clustering is prevalent, cells lacking chloroplasts are detected, suggesting impaired chloroplast partitioning during mitosis. Although organelle distribution and partitioning are actin-dependent in plants, the actin cytoskeleton in clmp1 is indistinguishable from that in WT, and peroxisomes and mitochondria are distributed normally. A CLMP1-YFP fusion protein that complements clmp1 localizes to discrete foci in the cytoplasm, most of which colocalize with the cell periphery or with chloroplasts. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that chloroplasts within clmp1 clusters are held together by membranous connections, including thin isthmi characteristic of late-stage chloroplast division. This finding suggests that constriction of dividing chloroplasts proceeds normally in clmp1, but separation is impaired. Consistently, chloroplast size and number, as well as positioning of the plastid division proteins FtsZ and ARC5/DRP5B, are unaffected in clmp1, indicating that loss of CLMP1-mediated chloroplast separation does not prevent otherwise normal division. CLMP1-like sequences are unique to green algae and land plants, and the CLMP1 sequence suggests that it functions through protein-protein interactions. Our studies identify a unique class of proteins required for plastid separation after the constriction stage of plastid division and indicate that CLMP1 activity is also required for plastid distribution and partitioning during cell division.

  13. Control of starch granule numbers in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Crumpton-Taylor, Matilda; Grandison, Scott; Png, Kenneth M Y; Bushby, Andrew J; Smith, Alison M

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate starch granule numbers in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Lack of quantitative information on the extent of genetic, temporal, developmental, and environmental variation in granule numbers is an important limitation in understanding control of starch degradation and the mechanism of granule initiation. Two methods were developed for reliable estimation of numbers of granules per chloroplast. First, direct measurements were made on large series of consecutive sections of mesophyll tissue obtained by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. Second, average numbers were calculated from the starch contents of leaves and chloroplasts and estimates of granule mass based on granule dimensions. Examination of wild-type plants and accumulation and regulation of chloroplast (arc) mutants with few, large chloroplasts provided the following new insights. There is wide variation in chloroplast volumes in cells of wild-type leaves. Granule numbers per chloroplast are correlated with chloroplast volume, i.e. large chloroplasts have more granules than small chloroplasts. Mature leaves of wild-type plants and arc mutants have approximately the same number of granules per unit volume of stroma, regardless of the size and number of chloroplasts per cell. Granule numbers per unit volume of stroma are also relatively constant in immature leaves but are greater than in mature leaves. Granule initiation occurs as chloroplasts divide in immature leaves, but relatively little initiation occurs in mature leaves. Changes in leaf starch content over the diurnal cycle are largely brought about by changes in the volume of a fixed number of granules.

  14. Photosynthesis-dependent formation of convoluted plasma membrane domains in Chara internodal cells is independent of chloroplast position.

    PubMed

    Foissner, Ilse; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit

    2015-07-01

    The characean green alga Chara australis forms complex plasma membrane convolutions called charasomes when exposed to light. Charasomes are involved in local acidification of the surrounding medium which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. They have hitherto been only described in the internodal cells and in close contact with the stationary chloroplasts. Here, we show that charasomes are not only present in the internodal cells of the main axis, side branches, and branchlets but that the plasma membranes of chloroplast-containing nodal cells, protonemata, and rhizoids are also able to invaginate into complex domains. Removal of chloroplasts by local irradiation with intense light revealed that charasomes can develop at chloroplast-free "windows" and that the resulting pH banding pattern is independent of chloroplast or window position. Charasomes were not detected along cell walls containing functional plasmodesmata. However, charasomes formed next to a smooth wound wall which was deposited onto the plasmodesmata-containing wall when the neighboring cell was damaged. In contrast, charasomes were rarely found at uneven, bulged wound walls which protrude into the streaming endoplasm and which were induced by ligation or puncturing. The results of this study show that charasome formation, although dependent on photosynthesis, does not require intimate contact with chloroplasts. Our data suggest further that the presence of plasmodesmata inhibits charasome formation and/or that exposure to the outer medium is a prerequisite for charasome formation. Finally, we hypothesize that the absence of charasomes at bulged wound walls is due to the disturbance of uniform laminar mass streaming.

  15. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2017-05-09

    Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ancestral vascular tube formation and its adoption by tumors.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Tomás; Lammert, Eckhard

    2009-10-01

    Similar to growing and metabolically active tissues, tumors require a dense vasculature to gain access to oxygen and nutrients. However, blood vessels in tumors differ from vessels in normal tissues in many respects. In particular, the tumor vasculature is in an active state of angiogenesis or vasculogenesis, and it is immature and leaky. Blood vessels are multicellular tubes formed by polarized endothelial cells, which face the patent vascular lumen with their apical cell surface, whereas their basal cell surface faces extracellular matrix on the outside of the vessels. The same cell polarity can be found in other tubular structures, such as in the bronchial tubes of the lung or the kidney tubules. In contrast, blood vessels in invertebrates often have a vascular lumen lined by basal cell surfaces. These vessels are often formed by a process named 'ancestral vascular tube formation'. Here, we discuss the hypothesis that the supply of tumors with blood can be achieved by both endothelial cell-lined tubes as well as tubes formed by the tumor cells themselves using the ancestral vascular tube formation mechanism. We discuss this hypothesis with a particular focus on gastrointestinal tumors.

  17. Functional conservation of an ancestral Pellino protein in helminth species

    PubMed Central

    Cluxton, Christopher D.; Caffrey, Brian E.; Kinsella, Gemma K.; Moynagh, Paul N.; Fares, Mario A.; Fallon, Padraic G.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system of H. sapiens has innate signaling pathways that arose in ancestral species. This is exemplified by the discovery of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using free-living model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster. The TLR pathway is ubiquitous and controls sensitivity to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in eukaryotes. There is, however, a marked absence of this pathway from the plathyhelminthes, with the exception of the Pellino protein family, which is present in a number of species from this phylum. Helminth Pellino proteins are conserved having high similarity, both at the sequence and predicted structural protein level, with that of human Pellino proteins. Pellino from a model helminth, Schistosoma mansoni Pellino (SmPellino), was shown to bind and poly-ubiquitinate human IRAK-1, displaying E3 ligase activity consistent with its human counterparts. When transfected into human cells SmPellino is functional, interacting with signaling proteins and modulating mammalian signaling pathways. Strict conservation of a protein family in species lacking its niche signalling pathway is rare and provides a platform to examine the ancestral functions of Pellino proteins that may translate into novel mechanisms of immune regulation in humans. PMID:26120048

  18. Some Properties of the Chloroplast Envelope as Revealed by Electrophoretic Mobility Studies of Intact Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Stocking, C. Ralph; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    1982-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of mature spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var. Americana) chloroplasts sampled over a 7-month period was between −2.03 and −2.45 micrometers per second per volt per centimeter when suspended in a solution containing 1 millimolar CaCl2. The surface charge density of EDTA-treated chloroplasts was calculated to be −7,400 electrostatic units per square centimeter representing, on the average, one electronic charge per 645 square Angstroms. Electrophoretic mobility increases during plastid maturation. Calcium, but not magnesium, generally stabilized the envelope of isolated plastids against small increases in surface charge that occur with time in the absence of calcium. Pronase caused a sharp, but temporary, decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of chloroplasts. This was interpreted as representing a transient binding of pronase to the envelope surface during proteolysis. No −SH groups were detected on the surface of the plastid envelope. Inasmuch as the isoelectric point of intact chloroplasts was found to be at pH 4.5, it is likely that the major part of the total surface charge results from the presence of exposed carboxyl groups of intrinsic envelope proteins that are not readily hydrolyzed by mild pronase treatment. PMID:16662663

  19. Evidence-based green algal genomics reveals marine diversity and ancestral characteristics of land plants

    SciTech Connect

    van Baren, Marijke J.; Bachy, Charles; Reistetter, Emily Nahas; Purvine, Samuel O.; Grimwood, Jane; Sudek, Sebastian; Yu, Hang; Poirier, Camille; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Wong, Chee -Hong; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Schmutz, Jeremy; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2016-03-31

    Prasinophytes are widespread marine green algae that are related to plants. Abundance of the genus Micromonas has reportedly increased in the Arctic due to climate-induced changes. Thus, studies of these organisms are important for marine ecology and understanding Virdiplantae evolution and diversification. We generated evidence-based Micromonas gene models using proteomics and RNA-Seq to improve prasinophyte genomic resources. First, sequences of four chromosomes in the 22 Mb Micromonas pusilla (CCMP1545) genome were finished. Comparison with the finished 21 Mb Micromonas commoda (RCC299) shows they share ≤ 8,142 of ~10,000 protein-encoding genes, depending on the analysis method. Unlike RCC299 and other sequenced eukaryotes, CCMP1545 has two abundant repetitive intron types and a high percent (26%) GC splice donors. Micromonas has more genus-specific protein families (19%) than other genome sequenced prasinophytes (11%). Comparative analyses using predicted proteomes from other prasinophytes reveal proteins likely related to scale formation and ancestral photosynthesis. Our studies also indicate that peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis enzymes have been lost in multiple independent events in select prasinophytes and most plants. However, CCMP1545, polar Micromonas CCMP2099 and prasinophytes from other claasses retain the entire PG pathway, like moss and glaucophyte algae. Multiple vascular plants that share a unique bi-domain protein also have the pathway, except the Penicillin-Binding-Protein. Alongside Micromonas experiments using antibiotics that halt bacterial PG biosynthesis, the findings highlight unrecognized phylogenetic complexity in the PG-pathway retention and implicate a role in chloroplast structure of division in several extant Vridiplantae lineages. Extensive differences in gene loss and architecture between related prasinophytes underscore their extensive divergence. PG biosynthesis genes from the

  20. The chloroplast genomes of the green algae Pyramimonas, Monomastix, and Pycnococcus shed new light on the evolutionary history of prasinophytes and the origin of the secondary chloroplasts of euglenids.

    PubMed

    Turmel, Monique; Gagnon, Marie-Christine; O'Kelly, Charley J; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude

    2009-03-01

    Because they represent the earliest divergences of the Chlorophyta and include the smallest known eukaryotes (e.g., the coccoid Ostreococcus), the morphologically diverse unicellular green algae making up the Prasinophyceae are central to our understanding of the evolutionary patterns that accompanied the radiation of chlorophytes and the reduction of cell size in some lineages. Seven prasinophyte lineages, four of which exhibit a coccoid cell organization (no flagella nor scales), were uncovered from analysis of nuclear-encoded 18S rDNA data; however, their order of divergence remains unknown. In this study, the chloroplast genome sequences of the scaly quadriflagellate Pyramimonas parkeae (clade I), the coccoid Pycnococcus provasolii (clade V), and the scaly uniflagellate Monomastix (unknown affiliation) were determined, annotated, and compared with those previously reported for green algae/land plants, including two prasinophytes (Nephroselmis olivacea, clade III and Ostreococcus tauri, clade II). The chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans and the euglenid Euglena gracilis, whose chloroplasts originate presumably from distinct green algal endosymbionts, were also included in our comparisons. The three newly sequenced prasinophyte genomes differ considerably from one another and from their homologs in overall structure, gene content, and gene order, with the 80,211-bp Pycnococcus and 114,528-bp Monomastix genomes (98 and 94 conserved genes, respectively) resembling the 71,666-bp Ostreococcus genome (88 genes) in featuring a significantly reduced gene content. The 101,605-bp Pyramimonas genome (110 genes) features two conserved genes (rpl22 and ycf65) and ancestral gene linkages previously unrecognized in chlorophytes as well as a DNA primase gene putatively acquired from a virus. The Pyramimonas and Euglena cpDNAs revealed uniquely shared derived gene clusters. Besides providing unequivocal evidence that the green algal ancestor of the euglenid chloroplasts

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with altered chloroplast numbers and chloroplast movement exhibit impaired adjustments to both low and high light.

    PubMed

    Königer, Martina; Delamaide, Joy A; Marlow, Elizabeth D; Harris, Gary C

    2008-01-01

    The effects of chloroplast number and size on the capacity for blue light-dependent chloroplast movement, the ability to increase light absorption under low light, and the susceptibility to photoinhibition were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Leaves of wild-type and chloroplast number mutants with mean chloroplast numbers ranging from 120 to two per mesophyll cell were analysed. Chloroplast movement was monitored as changes in light transmission through the leaves. Light transmission was used as an indicator of the ability of leaves to optimize light absorption. The ability of leaves to deal with 3 h of high light stress at 10 degrees C and their capacity to recover in low light was determined by measuring photochemical efficiencies of PSII using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Chloroplast movement was comparable in leaves ranging in chloroplast numbers from 120 to 30 per mesophyll cell: the final light transmission levels after exposure to 0.1 (accumulation response) and 100 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) (avoidance response) were indistinguishable, the chloroplasts responded quickly to small increases in light intensity and the kinetics of movement were similar. However, when chloroplast numbers per mesophyll cell decreased to 18 or below, the accumulation response was significantly reduced. The avoidance response was only impaired in mutants with nine or fewer chloroplasts, both in terms of final transmission levels and the speed of movement. Only mutants lacking both blue light receptors (phot1/phot2) or those with drastically reduced chloroplast numbers and severely impacted avoidance responses showed a reduced ability to recover from high light stress.

  2. Why have chloroplasts developed a unique motility system?

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Dolja, Valerian V; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-10-01

    Organelle movement in plants is dependent on actin filaments with most of the organelles being transported along the actin cables by class XI myosins. Although chloroplast movement is also actin filament-dependent, a potential role of myosin motors in this process is poorly understood. Interestingly, chloroplasts can move in any direction, and change the direction within short time periods, suggesting that chloroplasts use the newly formed actin filaments rather than preexisting actin cables. Furthermore, the data on myosin gene knockouts and knockdowns in Arabidopsis and tobacco do not support myosins' XI role in chloroplast movement. Our recent studies revealed that chloroplast movement and positioning are mediated by the short actin filaments localized at chloroplast periphery (cp-actin filaments) rather than cytoplasmic actin cables. The accumulation of cp-actin filaments depends on kinesin-like proteins, KAC1 and KAC2, as well as on a chloroplast outer membrane protein CHUP1. We propose that plants evolved a myosin XI-independent mechanism of the actin-based chloroplast movement that is distinct from the mechanism used by other organelles.

  3. The complete chloroplast genome of common walnut (Juglans regia)

    Treesearch

    Yiheng ​Hu; Keith E. Woeste; Meng Dang; Tao Zhou; Xiaojia Feng; Guifang Zhao; Zhanlin Liu; Zhonghu Li; Peng. Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Common walnut (Juglans regia L.) is cultivated in temperate regions worldwide for its wood and nuts. The complete chloroplast genome of J. regia was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This is the first complete chloroplast sequence for the Juglandaceae, a family that includes numerous species of economic importance....

  4. Processing peptidases in mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Pedro Filipe; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2013-02-01

    Most of the mitochondrial and chloroplastic proteins are nuclear encoded and synthesized in the cytosol as precursor proteins with N-terminal extensions called targeting peptides. Targeting peptides function as organellar import signals, they are recognized by the import receptors and route precursors through the protein translocons across the organellar membranes. After the fulfilled function, targeting peptides are proteolytically cleaved off inside the organelles by different processing peptidases. The processing of mitochondrial precursors is catalyzed in the matrix by the Mitochondrial Processing Peptidase, MPP, the Mitochondrial Intermediate Peptidase, MIP (recently called Octapeptidyl aminopeptidase 1, Oct1) and the Intermediate cleaving peptidase of 55kDa, Icp55. Furthermore, different inner membrane peptidases (Inner Membrane Proteases, IMPs, Atp23, rhomboids and AAA proteases) catalyze additional processing functions, resulting in intra-mitochondrial sorting of proteins, the targeting to the intermembrane space or in the assembly of proteins into inner membrane complexes. Chloroplast targeting peptides are cleaved off in the stroma by the Stromal Processing Peptidase, SPP. If the protein is further translocated to the thylakoid lumen, an additional thylakoid-transfer sequence is removed by the Thylakoidal Processing Peptidase, TPP. Proper function of the D1 protein of Photosystem II reaction center requires its C-terminal processing by Carboxy-terminal processing protease, CtpA. Both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts, the cleaved targeting peptides are finally degraded by the Presequence Protease, PreP. The organellar proteases involved in precursor processing and targeting peptide degradation constitute themselves a quality control system ensuring the correct maturation and localization of proteins as well as assembly of protein complexes, contributing to sustenance of organelle functions. Dysfunctions of several mitochondrial processing proteases have

  5. Posttranslational Modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M.; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T.; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A.; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants’ survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  6. Engineering chloroplasts to improve Rubisco catalysis: prospects for translating improvements into food and fiber crops.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E

    2017-01-01

    494 I. 495 II. 496 III. 496 IV. 499 V. 499 VI. 501 VII. 501 VIII. 502 IX. 505 X. 506 507 References 507 SUMMARY: The uncertainty of future climate change is placing pressure on cropping systems to continue to provide stable increases in productive yields. To mitigate future climates and the increasing threats against global food security, new solutions to manipulate photosynthesis are required. This review explores the current efforts available to improve carbon assimilation within plant chloroplasts by engineering Rubisco, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation. Fixation of CO2 and subsequent cycling of 3-phosphoglycerate through the Calvin cycle provides the necessary carbohydrate building blocks for maintaining plant growth and yield, but has to compete with Rubisco oxygenation, which results in photorespiration that is energetically wasteful for plants. Engineering improvements in Rubisco is a complex challenge and requires an understanding of chloroplast gene regulatory pathways, and the intricate nature of Rubisco catalysis and biogenesis, to transplant more efficient forms of Rubisco into crops. In recent times, major advances in Rubisco engineering have been achieved through improvement of our knowledge of Rubisco synthesis and assembly, and identifying amino acid catalytic switches in the L-subunit responsible for improvements in catalysis. Improving the capacity of CO2 fixation in crops such as rice will require further advances in chloroplast bioengineering and Rubisco biogenesis.

  7. Chloroplast-localized 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is critical for maize endosperm starch accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Spielbauer, Gertraud; Li, Li; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Do, Phuc Thi; Fouquet, Romain; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gierl, Alfons; Settles, A. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Plants have duplicate versions of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) enzymes with a subset localized to the chloroplast. The chloroplast oxPPP provides NADPH and pentose sugars for multiple metabolic pathways. This study identified two loss-of-function alleles of the Zea mays (maize) chloroplast-localized oxPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). These mutations caused a rough endosperm seed phenotype with reduced embryo oil and endosperm starch. Genetic translocation experiments showed that pgd3 has separate, essential roles in both endosperm and embryo development. Endosperm metabolite profiling experiments indicated that pgd3 shifts redox-related metabolites and increases reducing sugars similar to starch-biosynthetis mutants. Heavy isotope-labelling experiments indicates that carbon flux into starch is altered in pgd3 mutants. Labelling experiments with a loss of cytosolic 6PGDH did not affect flux into starch. These results support the known role for plastid-localized oxPPP in oil synthesis and argue that amyloplast-localized oxPPP reactions are integral to endosperm starch accumulation in maize kernels. PMID:23530131

  8. Chloroplast-localized 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is critical for maize endosperm starch accumulation.

    PubMed

    Spielbauer, Gertraud; Li, Li; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Do, Phuc Thi; Fouquet, Romain; Fernie, Alisdair R; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gierl, Alfons; Settles, A Mark

    2013-05-01

    Plants have duplicate versions of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) enzymes with a subset localized to the chloroplast. The chloroplast oxPPP provides NADPH and pentose sugars for multiple metabolic pathways. This study identified two loss-of-function alleles of the Zea mays (maize) chloroplast-localized oxPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). These mutations caused a rough endosperm seed phenotype with reduced embryo oil and endosperm starch. Genetic translocation experiments showed that pgd3 has separate, essential roles in both endosperm and embryo development. Endosperm metabolite profiling experiments indicated that pgd3 shifts redox-related metabolites and increases reducing sugars similar to starch-biosynthetis mutants. Heavy isotope-labelling experiments indicates that carbon flux into starch is altered in pgd3 mutants. Labelling experiments with a loss of cytosolic 6PGDH did not affect flux into starch. These results support the known role for plastid-localized oxPPP in oil synthesis and argue that amyloplast-localized oxPPP reactions are integral to endosperm starch accumulation in maize kernels.

  9. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  10. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  11. Noncoding chloroplast DNA variation in Mexican pines.

    PubMed

    Perez de la Rosa, J; Harris, S A; Farjon, A

    1995-11-01

    Universal primers were used for PCR amplification of three noncoding regions of chloroplast DNA in order to study restriction site variation in 12 Mexican pine species. Two length mutations were identified that are of diagnostic value for two subgenera or sections of the genus. Phylogenetic analysis of the restriction site and length variation showed patterns of variation largely consistent with previous arrangements of these pines, except for the position of Pinus nelsonii, indicating that Pinus section Parraya Mayr, as circumscribed by Little and Critchfield (1969) and later authors, is not a monophyletic group.

  12. Membrane heredity and early chloroplast evolution.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2000-04-01

    Membrane heredity was central to the unique symbiogenetic origin from cyanobacteria of chloroplasts in the ancestor of Plantae (green plants, red algae, glaucophytes) and to subsequent lateral transfers of plastids to form even more complex photosynthetic chimeras. Each symbiogenesis integrated disparate genomes and several radically different genetic membranes into a more complex cell. The common ancestor of Plantae evolved transit machinery for plastid protein import. In later secondary symbiogeneses, signal sequences were added to target proteins across host perialgal membranes: independently into green algal plastids (euglenoids, chlorarachneans) and red algal plastids (alveolates, chromists). Conservatism and innovation during early plastid diversification are discussed.

  13. Complete chloroplast genome of Macadamia integrifolia confirms the position of the Gondwanan early-diverging eudicot family Proteaceae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sequence data from the chloroplast genome have played a central role in elucidating the evolutionary history of flowering plants, Angiospermae. In the past decade, the number of complete chloroplast genomes has burgeoned, leading to well-supported angiosperm phylogenies. However, some relationships, particulary among early-diverging lineages, remain unresolved. The diverse Southern Hemisphere plant family Proteaceae arose on the ancient supercontinent Gondwana early in angiosperm history and is a model group for adaptive radiation in response to changing climatic conditions. Genomic resources for the family are limited, and until now it is one of the few early-diverging 'basal eudicot' lineages not represented in chloroplast phylogenomic analyses. Results The chloroplast genome of the Australian nut crop tree Macadamia integrifolia was assembled de novo from Illumina paired-end sequence reads. Three contigs, corresponding to a collapsed inverted repeat, a large and a small single copy region were identified, and used for genome reconstruction. The complete genome is 159,714bp in length and was assembled at deep coverage (3.29 million reads; ~2000 x). Phylogenetic analyses based on 83-gene and inverted repeat region alignments, the largest sequence-rich datasets to include the basal eudicot family Proteaceae, provide strong support for a Proteales clade that includes Macadamia, Platanus and Nelumbo. Genome structure and content followed the ancestral angiosperm pattern and were highly conserved in the Proteales, whilst size differences were largely explained by the relative contraction of the single copy regions and expansion of the inverted repeats in Macadamia. Conclusions The Macadamia chloroplast genome presented here is the first in the Proteaceae, and confirms the placement of this family with the morphologically divergent Plantanaceae (plane tree family) and Nelumbonaceae (sacred lotus family) in the basal eudicot order Proteales. It provides a

  14. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-01-01

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner. PMID:26043396

  15. The complete chloroplast genome of the Dendrobium strongylanthum (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae).

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Complete chloroplast genome sequence is very useful for studying the phylogenetic and evolution of species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum was constructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The chloroplast genome is 153 058 bp in length with 37.6% GC content and consists of two inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 316 bp. The IR regions are separated by large single-copy region (LSC, 85 836 bp) and small single-copy (SSC, 14 590 bp) region. A total of 130 chloroplast genes were successfully annotated, including 84 protein coding genes, 38 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum is related to that of the Dendrobium officinal.

  16. Licensed to Kill: Mitochondria, Chloroplasts, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, Olivier; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is crucial in plant organogenesis and survival. In this review the involvement of mitochondria and chloroplasts in PCD execution is critically assessed. Recent findings support a central role for mitochondria in PCD, with newly identified components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC), FOF1 ATP synthase, cardiolipins, and ATPase AtOM66. While chloroplasts received less attention, their contribution to PCD is well supported, suggesting that they possibly contribute by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of light or even contribute through cytochrome f release. Finally we discuss two working models where mitochondria and chloroplasts could cooperatively execute PCD: mitochondria initiate the commitment steps and recruit chloroplasts for swift execution or, alternatively, mitochondria and chloroplasts could operate in parallel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-04

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  18. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-01

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  19. Differential loss of ancestral gene families as a source of genomic divergence in animals.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L; Friedman, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A phylogenetic approach was used to reconstruct the pattern of an apparent loss of 2106 ancestral gene families in four animal genomes (Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, human and fugu). Substantially higher rates of loss of ancestral gene families were found in the invertebrates than in the vertebrates. These results indicate that the differential loss of ancestral gene families can be a significant factor in the evolutionary diversification of organisms. PMID:15101434

  20. Estimation of ancestral inbreeding effects on stillbirth, calving ease and birthweight in German Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, D; Bennewitz, J; Wellmann, R; Thaller, G

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the effect of different measurements of ancestral inbreeding on birthweight, calving ease and stillbirth were analysed. Three models were used to estimate the effect of ancestral inbreeding, and the estimated regression coefficient of phenotypic data on different measurements of ancestral inbreeding was used to quantify the effect of ancestral inbreeding. The first model included only one measurement of inbreeding, whereas the second model included the classical inbreeding coefficients and one alternative inbreeding coefficient. The third model included the classical inbreeding coefficients, the interaction between classical inbreeding and ancestral inbreeding, and the classical inbreeding coefficients of the dam. Phenotypic data for this study were collected from February 1998 to December 2008 on three large commercial milk farms. During this time, 36,477 calving events were recorded. All calves were weighed after birth, and 8.08% of the calves died within 48 h after calving. Calving ease was recorded on a scale between 1 and 4 (1 = easy birth, 4 = surgery), and 69.95, 20.91, 8.92 and 0.21% of the calvings were scored with 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The average inbreeding coefficient of inbred animals was 0.03, and average ancestral inbreeding coefficients were 0.08 and 0.01, depending on how ancestral inbreeding was calculated. Approximately 26% of classically non-inbred animals showed ancestral inbreeding. Correlations between different inbreeding coefficients ranged between 0.46 and 0.99. No significant effect of ancestral inbreeding was found for calving ease, because the number of animals with reasonable high level of ancestral inbreeding was too low. Significant effects of ancestral inbreeding were estimated for birthweight and stillbirth. Unfavourable effects of ancestral inbreeding were observed for birthweight. However, favourable purging effects were estimated for stillbirth, indicating that purging could be partly beneficial for genetic

  1. Circadian regulation of chloroplastic f and m thioredoxins through control of the CCA1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Barajas-López, Juan de Dios; Serrato, Antonio Jesus; Cazalis, Roland; Meyer, Yves; Chueca, Ana; Reichheld, Jean Philippe; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2011-03-01

    Chloroplastic thioredoxins f and m (TRX f and TRX m) mediate light regulation of carbon metabolism through the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. The role of TRX f and m in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes is best known among the TRX family. However, the discoveries of new potential targets extend the functions of chloroplastic TRXs to other processes in non-photosynthetic tissues. As occurs with numerous chloroplast proteins, their expression comes under light regulation. Here, the focus is on the light regulation of TRX f and TRX m in pea and Arabidopsis during the day/night cycle that is maintained during the subjective night. In pea (Pisum sativum), TRX f and TRX m1 expression is shown to be governed by a circadian oscillation exerted at both the transcriptional and protein levels. Binding shift assays indicate that this control probably involves the interaction of the CCA1 transcription factor and an evening element (EE) located in the PsTRX f and PsTRX m1 promoters. In Arabidopsis, among the multigene family of TRX f and TRX m, AtTRX f2 and AtTRX m2 mRNA showed similar circadian oscillatory regulation, suggesting that such regulation is conserved in plants. However, this oscillation was disrupted in plants overexpressing CCA1 (cca1-ox) or repressing CCA1 and LHY (cca1-lhy). The physiological role of the oscillatory regulation of chloroplastic TRX f and TRX m in plants during the day/night cycle is discussed.

  2. Circadian regulation of chloroplastic f and m thioredoxins through control of the CCA1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    de Dios Barajas-López, Juan; Serrato, Antonio Jesus; Cazalis, Roland; Meyer, Yves; Chueca, Ana; Reichheld, Jean Philippe; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplastic thioredoxins f and m (TRX f and TRX m) mediate light regulation of carbon metabolism through the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. The role of TRX f and m in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes is best known among the TRX family. However, the discoveries of new potential targets extend the functions of chloroplastic TRXs to other processes in non-photosynthetic tissues. As occurs with numerous chloroplast proteins, their expression comes under light regulation. Here, the focus is on the light regulation of TRX f and TRX m in pea and Arabidopsis during the day/night cycle that is maintained during the subjective night. In pea (Pisum sativum), TRX f and TRX m1 expression is shown to be governed by a circadian oscillation exerted at both the transcriptional and protein levels. Binding shift assays indicate that this control probably involves the interaction of the CCA1 transcription factor and an evening element (EE) located in the PsTRX f and PsTRX m1 promoters. In Arabidopsis, among the multigene family of TRX f and TRX m, AtTRX f2 and AtTRX m2 mRNA showed similar circadian oscillatory regulation, suggesting that such regulation is conserved in plants. However, this oscillation was disrupted in plants overexpressing CCA1 (cca1-ox) or repressing CCA1 and LHY (cca1-lhy). The physiological role of the oscillatory regulation of chloroplastic TRX f and TRX m in plants during the day/night cycle is discussed. PMID:21196476

  3. Characterization of cooperative bicarbonate uptake into chloroplast stroma in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Takashi; Sato, Emi; Iguchi, Hiro; Fukuda, Yuri; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The supply of inorganic carbon (Ci; CO2 and HCO3–) is an environmental rate-limiting factor in aquatic photosynthetic organisms. To overcome the difficulty in acquiring Ci in limiting-CO2 conditions, an active Ci uptake system called the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is induced to increase CO2 concentrations in the chloroplast stroma. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, HLA3, and a formate/nitrite transporter homolog, LCIA, are reported to be associated with HCO3– uptake [Wang and Spalding (2014) Plant Physiol 166(4):2040–2050]. However, direct evidence of the route of HCO3– uptake from the outside of cells to the chloroplast stroma remains elusive owing to a lack of information on HLA3 localization and comparative analyses of the contribution of HLA3 and LCIA to the CCM. In this study, we revealed that HLA3 and LCIA are localized to the plasma membrane and chloroplast envelope, respectively. Insertion mutants of HLA3 and/or LCIA showed decreased Ci affinities/accumulation, especially in alkaline conditions where HCO3– is the predominant form of Ci. HLA3 and LCIA formed protein complexes independently, and the absence of LCIA decreased HLA3 mRNA accumulation, suggesting the presence of unidentified retrograde signals from the chloroplast to the nucleus to maintain HLA3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, although single overexpression of HLA3 or LCIA in high CO2 conditions did not affect Ci affinity, simultaneous overexpression of HLA3 with LCIA significantly increased Ci affinity/accumulation. These results highlight the HLA3/LCIA-driven cooperative uptake of HCO3– and a key role of LCIA in the maintenance of HLA3 stability as well as Ci affinity/accumulation in the CCM. PMID:26015566

  4. Systematics, biogeography, and character evolution of Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae) inferred from nuclear and chloroplast DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changkyun; Deng, Tao; Wen, Jun; Nie, Ze-Long; Sun, Hang

    2015-06-01

    The genus Deutzia (Hydrangeaceae), containing ca. 60 species circumscribed in three sections, is disjunctly distributed in eastern Asia and Central America (Mexico). Although the genus is well delimited, its subdivisions into sections and series have not been the subject of an explicit test of monophyly based on molecular data. A comprehensive examination of the evolutionary relationships within the genus is thus still lacking. We present a fossil-calibrated, molecular phylogeny of Deutzia based on two nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS and 26S) and three chloroplast DNA regions (matK, rbcL, and trnL-F intergenic spacer). Within this framework, we examine character evolution in petal arrangement, filament shape, and the number of stamens, and infer the ancestral area and biogeographic history of the genus. Our molecular phylogeny suggests that Deutzia is monophyletic. Two major clades are recovered: one composed of the species of sect. Neodeutzia from Mexico, and the other containing all remaining Deutzia species of sections Mesodeutzia and Deutzia from SW China and Northeast Asia. The latter two Asian sections were each revealed to be polyphyletic. The induplicate petals, 2-dentate filaments, and polystemonous androecia are inferred to be ancestral character states. Biogeographic reconstructions suggest a Northeast Asian origin for the genus and subsequent spread to Mexico during the Oligocene and to SW China during the Miocene. Based on our results, a new infrageneric classification of Deutzia inferred from molecular phylogeny is required. We propose to merge sections Mesodeutzia and Deutzia to ensure the monophyly at the sectional level. Cooling trends during the Oligocene resulted in isolation, separating eastern Asian and Mexican taxa, while the warm period during the middle Miocene stimulated the diversification from Northeast Asia to SW China. The uplift in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and monsoon regimes are important in promoting high species diversification of

  5. The complete chloroplast genome of Ginkgo biloba reveals the mechanism of inverted repeat contraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Wu, Chung-Shien; Huang, Ya-Yi; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2012-01-01

    We determined the complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo), the only relict of ginkgophytes from the Triassic Period. The cpDNA molecule of ginkgo is quadripartite and circular, with a length of 156,945 bp, which is 6,458 bp shorter than that of Cycas taitungensis. In ginkgo cpDNA, rpl23 becomes pseudo, only one copy of ycf2 is retained, and there are at least five editing sites. We propose that the retained ycf2 is a duplicate of the ancestral ycf2, and the ancestral one has been lost from the inverted repeat A (IR(A)). This loss event should have occurred and led to the contraction of IRs after ginkgos diverged from other gymnosperms. A novel cluster of three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, trnY-AUA, trnC-ACA, and trnSeC-UCA, was predicted to be located between trnC-GCA and rpoB of the large single-copy region. Our phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that the three predicted tRNA genes are duplicates of trnC-GCA. Interestingly, in ginkgo cpDNA, the loss of one ycf2 copy does not significantly elevate the synonymous rate (Ks) of the retained copy, which disagrees with the view of Perry and Wolfe (2002) that one of the two-copy genes is subjected to elevated Ks when its counterpart has been lost. We hypothesize that the loss of one ycf2 is likely recent, and therefore, the acquired Ks of the retained copy is low. Our data reveal that ginkgo possesses several unique features that contribute to our understanding of the cpDNA evolution in seed plants.

  6. Application of a simplified method of chloroplast enrichment to small amounts of tissue for chloroplast genome sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Ito, Motomi; Hattori, Chie; Nozoe, Shogo; Takahashi, Daiki; Nakamasu, Riku; Sakagami, Taishi; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Isagi, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: High-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can recover complete chloroplast genome sequences, but the sequence data are usually dominated by sequences from nuclear/mitochondrial genomes. To overcome this deficiency, a simple enrichment method for chloroplast DNA from small amounts of plant tissue was tested for eight plant species including a gymnosperm and various angiosperms. Methods: Chloroplasts were enriched using a high-salt isolation buffer without any step gradient procedures, and enriched chloroplast DNA was sequenced by multiplexed high-throughput sequencing. Results: Using this simple method, significant enrichment of chloroplast DNA-derived reads was attained, allowing deep sequencing of chloroplast genomes. As an example, the chloroplast genome of the conifer Callitris sulcata was assembled, from which polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated successfully. Discussion: This chloroplast enrichment method from small amounts of plant tissue will be particularly useful for studies that use sequencers with relatively small throughput and that cannot use large amounts of tissue (e.g., for endangered species). PMID:28529832

  7. Chloroplast targeting of FtsHprotease is essential for chloroplast development and thylakoid stability at elevated temperatures in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    AtFtsH11 is a chloroplast and mitochondria dual targeted metalloprotease, identified as essential for Arabidopsis plant to survive at moderate high temperatures at all developmental stages. Our study showed that FtsH11 plays critical roles in both the early stages of chloroplast biogenesis and main...

  8. FastML: a web server for probabilistic reconstruction of ancestral sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Penn, Osnat; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Cohen, Ofir; Cannarozzi, Gina; Zomer, Oren; Pupko, Tal

    2012-01-01

    Ancestral sequence reconstruction is essential to a variety of evolutionary studies. Here, we present the FastML web server, a user-friendly tool for the reconstruction of ancestral sequences. FastML implements various novel features that differentiate it from existing tools: (i) FastML uses an indel-coding method, in which each gap, possibly spanning multiples sites, is coded as binary data. FastML then reconstructs ancestral indel states assuming a continuous time Markov process. FastML provides the most likely ancestral sequences, integrating both indels and characters; (ii) FastML accounts for uncertainty in ancestral states: it provides not only the posterior probabilities for each character and indel at each sequence position, but also a sample of ancestral sequences from this posterior distribution, and a list of the k-most likely ancestral sequences; (iii) FastML implements a large array of evolutionary models, which makes it generic and applicable for nucleotide, protein and codon sequences; and (iv) a graphical representation of the results is provided, including, for example, a graphical logo of the inferred ancestral sequences. The utility of FastML is demonstrated by reconstructing ancestral sequences of the Env protein from various HIV-1 subtypes. FastML is freely available for all academic users and is available online at http://fastml.tau.ac.il/. PMID:22661579

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck var 'Ridge Pineapple': organization and phylogenetic relationships to other angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Bausher, Michael G; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Lee, Seung-Bum; Jansen, Robert K; Daniell, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Background The production of Citrus, the largest fruit crop of international economic value, has recently been imperiled due to the introduction of the bacterial disease Citrus canker. No significant improvements have been made to combat this disease by plant breeding and nuclear transgenic approaches. Chloroplast genetic engineering has a number of advantages over nuclear transformation; it not only increases transgene expression but also facilitates transgene containment, which is one of the major impediments for development of transgenic trees. We have sequenced the Citrus chloroplast genome to facilitate genetic improvement of this crop and to assess phylogenetic relationships among major lineages of angiosperms. Results The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Citrus sinensis is 160,129 bp in length, and contains 133 genes (89 protein-coding, 4 rRNAs and 30 distinct tRNAs). Genome organization is very similar to the inferred ancestral angiosperm chloroplast genome. However, in Citrus the infA gene is absent. The inverted repeat region has expanded to duplicate rps19 and the first 84 amino acids of rpl22. The rpl22 gene in the IRb region has a nonsense mutation resulting in 9 stop codons. This was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing using primers that flank the IR/LSC boundaries. Repeat analysis identified 29 direct and inverted repeats 30 bp or longer with a sequence identity ≥ 90%. Comparison of protein-coding sequences with expressed sequence tags revealed six putative RNA edits, five of which resulted in non-synonymous modifications in petL, psbH, ycf2 and ndhA. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods of a dataset composed of 61 protein-coding genes for 30 taxa provide strong support for the monophyly of several major clades of angiosperms, including monocots, eudicots, rosids and asterids. The MP and ML trees are incongruent in three areas: the position of Amborella and Nymphaeales, relationship

  10. A multi-locus chloroplast phylogeny for the Cucurbitaceae and its implications for character evolution and classification.

    PubMed

    Kocyan, Alexander; Zhang, Li-Bing; Schaefer, Hanno; Renner, Susanne S

    2007-08-01

    Cucurbitaceae contain c. 800 species in 130 genera and are among the economically most important families of plants. We inferred their phylogeny based on chloroplast DNA sequences from two genes, one intron, and two spacers (rbcL, matK, trnL, trnL-trnF, rpl20-rps12) obtained for 171 species in 123 genera. Molecular data weakly support the traditional subfamilies Cucurbitoideae (111 genera) and Nhandiroboideae (19 genera, 60 species), and recover most of the eleven tribes, but almost none of the subtribes. Indofevillea khasiana is sister to all other Cucurbitoideae, and the genera of Joliffieae plus a few Trichosantheae form a grade near the base of Cucurbitoideae. A newly discovered large clade consists of the ancestrally Asian genera Nothoalsomitra, Luffa, Gymnopetalum, Hodgsonia, Trichosanthes, and the New World tribe Sicyeae. Genera that are poly- or paraphyletic include Ampelosicyos, Cucumis, Ibervillea, Neoachmandra, Psiguria, Trichosanthes, and Xerosicyos. Flower characters, especially number of free styles, fusion of filaments and/or anthers, tendril type, and pollen size, exine, and aperture number correlate well with the chloroplast phylogeny, while petal and fruit characters as well as karyotype exhibit much evolutionary flexibility.

  11. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  12. Female song is widespread and ancestral in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Odom, Karan J; Hall, Michelle L; Riebel, Katharina; Omland, Kevin E; Langmore, Naomi E

    2014-03-04

    Bird song has historically been considered an almost exclusively male trait, an observation fundamental to the formulation of Darwin's theory of sexual selection. Like other male ornaments, song is used by male songbirds to attract females and compete with rivals. Thus, bird song has become a textbook example of the power of sexual selection to lead to extreme neurological and behavioural sex differences. Here we present an extensive survey and ancestral state reconstruction of female song across songbirds showing that female song is present in 71% of surveyed species including 32 families, and that females sang in the common ancestor of modern songbirds. Our results reverse classical assumptions about the evolution of song and sex differences in birds. The challenge now is to identify whether sexual selection alone or broader processes, such as social or natural selection, best explain the evolution of elaborate traits in both sexes.

  13. Computational analysis and functional expression of ancestral copepod luciferase.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Noda-Ogura, Akiko; Imanishi, Tadashi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Gojobori, Takashi; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2013-10-10

    We recently reported the cDNA sequences of 11 copepod luciferases from the superfamily Augaptiloidea in the order Calanoida. They were classified into two groups, Metridinidae and Heterorhabdidae/Lucicutiidae families, by phylogenetic analyses. To elucidate the evolutionary processes, we have now further isolated 12 copepod luciferases from Augaptiloidea species (Metridia asymmetrica, Metridia curticauda, Pleuromamma scutullata, Pleuromamma xiphias, Lucicutia ovaliformis and Heterorhabdus tanneri). Codon-based synonymous/nonsynonymous tests of positive selection for 25 identified copepod luciferases suggested that positive Darwinian selection operated in the evolution of Heterorhabdidae luciferases, whereas two types of Metridinidae luciferases had diversified via neutral mechanism. By in silico analysis of the decoded amino acid sequences of 25 copepod luciferases, we inferred two protein sequences as ancestral copepod luciferases. They were expressed in HEK293 cells where they exhibited notable luciferase activity both in intracellular lysates and cultured media, indicating that the luciferase activity was established before evolutionary diversification of these copepod species.

  14. Experimental evidence for the thermophilicity of ancestral life.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Mitsuo; Nemoto, Naoki; Mase, Tomoko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2013-07-02

    Theoretical studies have focused on the environmental temperature of the universal common ancestor of life with conflicting conclusions. Here we provide experimental support for the existence of a thermophilic universal common ancestor. We present the thermal stabilities and catalytic efficiencies of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDK), designed using the information contained in predictive phylogenetic trees, that seem to represent the last common ancestors of Archaea and of Bacteria. These enzymes display extreme thermal stabilities, suggesting thermophilic ancestries for Archaea and Bacteria. The results are robust to the uncertainties associated with the sequence predictions and to the tree topologies used to infer the ancestral sequences. Moreover, mutagenesis experiments suggest that the universal ancestor also possessed a very thermostable NDK. Because, as we show, the stability of an NDK is directly related to the environmental temperature of its host organism, our results indicate that the last common ancestor of extant life was a thermophile that flourished at a very high temperature.

  15. Catastrophic debris avalanche from ancestral Mount Shasta volcano, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandell, D. R.; Miller, C. D.; Glicken, H. X.; Christiansen, R. L.; Newhall, C. G.

    1984-03-01

    A debris-avalanche deposit extends 43 km northwestward from the base of Mount Shasta across the floor of Shasta Valley, California, where it covers an area of at least 450 km2. The surface of the deposit is dotted with hundreds of mounds, hills, and ridges, all formed of blocks of pyroxene andesite and unconsolidated volcaniclastic deposits derived from an ancestral Mount Shasta. Individual hills are separated by flat-topped laharlike deposits that also form the matrix of the debris avalanche and slope northwestward about 5 m/km. Radiometric ages of rocks in the deposit and of a postavalanche basalt flow indicate that the avalanche occurred between about 300,000 and 360,000 yr ago. An inferred average thickness of the deposit, plus a computed volume of about 4 km3 for the hills and ridges, indicate an estimated volume of about 26 km3, making it the largest known Quaternary landslide on Earth.

  16. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the “germ-line multipotency program” and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells. PMID:26644562

  17. The Chloroplast Genome of Pellia endiviifolia: Gene Content, RNA-Editing Pattern, and the Origin of Chloroplast Editing

    PubMed Central

    Grosche, Christopher; Funk, Helena T.; Maier, Uwe G.; Zauner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that can act upon transcripts from mitochondrial, nuclear, and chloroplast genomes. In chloroplasts, single-nucleotide conversions in mRNAs via RNA editing occur at different frequencies across the plant kingdom. These range from several hundred edited sites in some mosses and ferns to lower frequencies in seed plants and the complete lack of RNA editing in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Here, we report the sequence and edited sites of the chloroplast genome from the liverwort Pellia endiviifolia. The type and frequency of chloroplast RNA editing display a pattern highly similar to that in seed plants. Analyses of the C to U conversions and the genomic context in which the editing sites are embedded provide evidence in favor of the hypothesis that chloroplast RNA editing evolved to compensate mutations in the first land plants. PMID:23221608

  18. The workflow for quantitative proteome analysis of chloroplast development and differentiation, chloroplast mutants, and protein interactions by spectral counting.

    PubMed

    Friso, Giulia; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter outlines a quantitative proteomics workflow using a label-free spectral counting technique. The workflow has been tested on different aspects of chloroplast biology in maize and Arabidopsis, including chloroplast mutant analysis, cell-type specific chloroplast differentiation, and the proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. The workflow involves one-dimensional SDS-PAGE of the proteomes of leaves or chloroplast subfractions, tryptic digestions, online LC-MS/MS using a mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy and duty cycle, followed by semiautomatic data processing. The bioinformatics analysis can effectively select best gene models and deals with quantification of closely related proteins; the workflow avoids overidentification of proteins and results in more accurate protein quantification. The final output includes pairwise comparative quantitative analysis, as well as hierarchical clustering for discovery of temporal and spatial patterns of protein accumulation. A brief discussion about potential pitfalls, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of spectral counting, is provided.

  19. The chloroplast genome of Pellia endiviifolia: gene content, RNA-editing pattern, and the origin of chloroplast editing.

    PubMed

    Grosche, Christopher; Funk, Helena T; Maier, Uwe G; Zauner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that can act upon transcripts from mitochondrial, nuclear, and chloroplast genomes. In chloroplasts, single-nucleotide conversions in mRNAs via RNA editing occur at different frequencies across the plant kingdom. These range from several hundred edited sites in some mosses and ferns to lower frequencies in seed plants and the complete lack of RNA editing in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Here, we report the sequence and edited sites of the chloroplast genome from the liverwort Pellia endiviifolia. The type and frequency of chloroplast RNA editing display a pattern highly similar to that in seed plants. Analyses of the C to U conversions and the genomic context in which the editing sites are embedded provide evidence in favor of the hypothesis that chloroplast RNA editing evolved to compensate mutations in the first land plants.

  20. Chloroplast DNA sequence of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum (Chlorophyceae): Unique genome architecture, derived characters shared with the Chaetophorales and novel genes acquired through horizontal transfer

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Jean-Simon; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Background To gain insight into the branching order of the five main lineages currently recognized in the green algal class Chlorophyceae and to expand our understanding of chloroplast genome evolution, we have undertaken the sequencing of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) from representative taxa. The complete cpDNA sequences previously reported for Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonadales), Scenedesmus (Sphaeropleales), and Stigeoclonium (Chaetophorales) revealed tremendous variability in their architecture, the retention of only few ancestral gene clusters, and derived clusters shared by Chlamydomonas and Scenedesmus. Unexpectedly, our recent phylogenies inferred from these cpDNAs and the partial sequences of three other chlorophycean cpDNAs disclosed two major clades, one uniting the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales (CS clade) and the other uniting the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales (OCC clade). Although molecular signatures provided strong support for this dichotomy and for the branching of the Oedogoniales as the earliest-diverging lineage of the OCC clade, more data are required to validate these phylogenies. We describe here the complete cpDNA sequence of Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales). Results Like its three chlorophycean homologues, the 196,547-bp Oedogonium chloroplast genome displays a distinctive architecture. This genome is one of the most compact among photosynthetic chlorophytes. It has an atypical quadripartite structure, is intron-rich (17 group I and 4 group II introns), and displays 99 different conserved genes and four long open reading frames (ORFs), three of which are clustered in the spacious inverted repeat of 35,493 bp. Intriguingly, two of these ORFs (int and dpoB) revealed high similarities to genes not usually found in cpDNA. At the gene content and gene order levels, the Oedogonium genome most closely resembles its Stigeoclonium counterpart. Characters shared by these chlorophyceans but missing in members of the CS clade

  1. (Calcium gating of proton fluxes in chloroplasts)

    SciTech Connect

    Dilley, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    Work supported by this grant has been aimed at better understanding the still-mysterious phenomenon of sequestered proton gradients which strong evidence suggests can energize ATP formation in chloroplast organelle membranes. Results from several laboratories support the notion that chloroplasts can couple the energy of H{sup +} gradients. Research in may lab has, since 1983, been deeply involved in a two-pronged approach, (A) identifying and quantitating sequestered proton buffering groups and (B) trying to elucidate just how the sequestered H{sup +} gradient is maintained and what regulates the switching between the localized and delocalized coupling modes. One aspect we have worked on under DOE auspices is the question whether the localized H{sup +} coupling, routinely detected in my lab by a protocol which measures the number of single-turnover flashes (usually fired at 5 Hz) required to reach the energization threshold for ATP formation, can continue in steady illumination. It is possible to consider that a localized coupling response could be observed in the initial energization transient followed obligatorily by the sustained H{sup +} gradient equilibrating with the lumen bulk phase. If that occurred, it would have very important ramifications as to how one evaluates the possible physiological meaning of localized'' coupling. To test this, we developed a steady illumination protocol which is briefly discussed.

  2. Complete sequence of Euglena gracilis chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hallick, R B; Hong, L; Drager, R G; Favreau, M R; Monfort, A; Orsat, B; Spielmann, A; Stutz, E

    1993-01-01

    We report the complete DNA sequence of the Euglena gracilis, Pringsheim strain Z chloroplast genome. This circular DNA is 143,170 bp, counting only one copy of a 54 bp tandem repeat sequence that is present in variable copy number within a single culture. The overall organization of the genome involves a tandem array of three complete and one partial ribosomal RNA operons, and a large single copy region. There are genes for the 16S, 5S, and 23S rRNAs of the 70S chloroplast ribosomes, 27 different tRNA species, 21 ribosomal proteins plus the gene for elongation factor EF-Tu, three RNA polymerase subunits, and 27 known photosynthesis-related polypeptides. Several putative genes of unknown function have also been identified, including five within large introns, and five with amino acid sequence similarity to genes in other organisms. This genome contains at least 149 introns. There are 72 individual group II introns, 46 individual group III introns, 10 group II introns and 18 group III introns that are components of twintrons (introns-within-introns), and three additional introns suspected to be twintrons composed of multiple group II and/or group III introns, but not yet characterized. At least 54,804 bp, or 38.3% of the total DNA content is represented by introns. PMID:8346031

  3. Ferredoxin-linked chloroplast enzymes. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes research on ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase. One of the primary goals of the original proposal was to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes that are located in spinach chloroplasts and utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, it was proposed that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase be determined. The amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. An aim related to elucidating the binding sites on these enzymes for ferredoxin was to determine whether there is a common site on ferredoxin involved in binding to all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. One additional aim was to characterize thioredoxin binding by FTR and determine whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress has been made on most of these original projects, although work conducted on FTR is still in its preliminary stages.

  4. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  5. Heteroplasmy of chloroplast DNA in Medicago.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L B; Palmer, J D

    1989-01-01

    Two chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions exhibiting a high frequency of intra- or inter-species variation were identified in 12 accessions of the genus Medicago. Restriction maps of both regions were prepared for alfalfa, and the probable nature of the events causing the DNA differences was identified. Specific DNA fragments were then cloned for use in identification of variants in each region. Two each of M. sativa ssp. varia and ssp. caerulea and one of six M. sativa ssp. sativa single plants examined possessed cpDNA heterogeneity as identified by screening extracts for fragments generated by the presence and absence of a specific Xba I restriction site. Three plants of M. sativa ssp. sativa, two of each of sspp. varia and caerulea, and three M. scutellata were also examined for single-plant cpDNA heterogeneity at a hypervariable region where differences resulted from small insertion-deletion events. A single M. scutellata plant with mixed cpDNAs was identified. Sorting out was seen when one spp. sativa plant with mixed plastid types identifiable by the Xba I restriction site difference was vegetatively propagated. This indicated that the initial stock plant was heteroplastidic. Controlled crosses will be required in order to test whether heteroplasmy results from chloroplast transmission in the pollen and to examine the dynamic of sorting out. However, heteroplasmy is apparently not a rare situation in Medicago.

  6. Palaeohistological Evidence for Ancestral High Metabolic Rate in Archosaurs.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Lucas J; Guénard, Guillaume; Botha-Brink, Jennifer; Cubo, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    Metabolic heat production in archosaurs has played an important role in their evolutionary radiation during the Mesozoic, and their ancestral metabolic condition has long been a matter of debate in systematics and palaeontology. The study of fossil bone histology provides crucial information on bone growth rate, which has been used to indirectly investigate the evolution of thermometabolism in archosaurs. However, no quantitative estimation of metabolic rate has ever been performed on fossils using bone histological features. Moreover, to date, no inference model has included phylogenetic information in the form of predictive variables. Here we performed statistical predictive modeling using the new method of phylogenetic eigenvector maps on a set of bone histological features for a sample of extant and extinct vertebrates, to estimate metabolic rates of fossil archosauromorphs. This modeling procedure serves as a case study for eigenvector-based predictive modeling in a phylogenetic context, as well as an investigation of the poorly known evolutionary patterns of metabolic rate in archosaurs. Our results show that Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs exhibit metabolic rates very close to those found in modern birds, that archosaurs share a higher ancestral metabolic rate than that of extant ectotherms, and that this derived high metabolic rate was acquired at a much more inclusive level of the phylogenetic tree, among non-archosaurian archosauromorphs. These results also highlight the difficulties of assigning a given heat production strategy (i.e., endothermy, ectothermy) to an estimated metabolic rate value, and confirm findings of previous studies that the definition of the endotherm/ectotherm dichotomy may be ambiguous.

  7. Ancestral dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure promotes epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of obesity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ancestral environmental exposures to a variety of environmental factors and toxicants have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease. The present work examined the potential transgenerational actions of the insecticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) on obesity and associated disease. Methods Outbred gestating female rats were transiently exposed to a vehicle control or DDT and the F1 generation offspring bred to generate the F2 generation and F2 generation bred to generate the F3 generation. The F1 and F3 generation control and DDT lineage rats were aged and various pathologies investigated. The F3 generation male sperm were collected to investigate methylation between the control and DDT lineage male sperm. Results The F1 generation offspring (directly exposed as a fetus) derived from the F0 generation exposed gestating female rats were not found to develop obesity. The F1 generation DDT lineage animals did develop kidney disease, prostate disease, ovary disease and tumor development as adults. Interestingly, the F3 generation (great grand-offspring) had over 50% of males and females develop obesity. Several transgenerational diseases previously shown to be associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity were observed in the testis, ovary and kidney. The transgenerational transmission of disease was through both female (egg) and male (sperm) germlines. F3 generation sperm epimutations, differential DNA methylation regions (DMR), induced by DDT were identified. A number of the genes associated with the DMR have previously been shown to be associated with obesity. Conclusions Observations indicate ancestral exposure to DDT can promote obesity and associated disease transgenerationally. The etiology of disease such as obesity may be in part due to environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance. PMID:24228800

  8. Ancestral European roots of Helicobacter pylori in India

    PubMed Central

    Devi, S Manjulata; Ahmed, Irshad; Francalacci, Paolo; Hussain, M Abid; Akhter, Yusuf; Alvi, Ayesha; Sechi, Leonardo A; Mégraud, Francis; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2007-01-01

    Background The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is co-evolved with its host and therefore, origins and expansion of multiple populations and sub populations of H. pylori mirror ancient human migrations. Ancestral origins of H. pylori in the vast Indian subcontinent are debatable. It is not clear how different waves of human migrations in South Asia shaped the population structure of H. pylori. We tried to address these issues through mapping genetic origins of present day H. pylori in India and their genomic comparison with hundreds of isolates from different geographic regions. Results We attempted to dissect genetic identity of strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the 7 housekeeping genes (atpA, efp, ureI, ppa, mutY, trpC, yphC) and phylogeographic analysis of haplotypes using MEGA and NETWORK software while incorporating DNA sequences and genotyping data of whole cag pathogenicity-islands (cagPAI). The distribution of cagPAI genes within these strains was analyzed by using PCR and the geographic type of cagA phosphorylation motif EPIYA was determined by gene sequencing. All the isolates analyzed revealed European ancestry and belonged to H. pylori sub-population, hpEurope. The cagPAI harbored by Indian strains revealed European features upon PCR based analysis and whole PAI sequencing. Conclusion These observations suggest that H. pylori strains in India share ancestral origins with their European counterparts. Further, non-existence of other sub-populations such as hpAfrica and hpEastAsia, at least in our collection of isolates, suggest that the hpEurope strains enjoyed a special fitness advantage in Indian stomachs to out-compete any endogenous strains. These results also might support hypotheses related to gene flow in India through Indo-Aryans and arrival of Neolithic practices and languages from the Fertile Crescent. PMID:17584914

  9. Ancestral European roots of Helicobacter pylori in India.

    PubMed

    Devi, S Manjulata; Ahmed, Irshad; Francalacci, Paolo; Hussain, M Abid; Akhter, Yusuf; Alvi, Ayesha; Sechi, Leonardo A; Mégraud, Francis; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2007-06-20

    The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is co-evolved with its host and therefore, origins and expansion of multiple populations and sub populations of H. pylori mirror ancient human migrations. Ancestral origins of H. pylori in the vast Indian subcontinent are debatable. It is not clear how different waves of human migrations in South Asia shaped the population structure of H. pylori. We tried to address these issues through mapping genetic origins of present day H. pylori in India and their genomic comparison with hundreds of isolates from different geographic regions. We attempted to dissect genetic identity of strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of the 7 housekeeping genes (atpA, efp, ureI, ppa, mutY, trpC, yphC) and phylogeographic analysis of haplotypes using MEGA and NETWORK software while incorporating DNA sequences and genotyping data of whole cag pathogenicity-islands (cagPAI). The distribution of cagPAI genes within these strains was analyzed by using PCR and the geographic type of cagA phosphorylation motif EPIYA was determined by gene sequencing. All the isolates analyzed revealed European ancestry and belonged to H. pylori sub-population, hpEurope. The cagPAI harbored by Indian strains revealed European features upon PCR based analysis and whole PAI sequencing. These observations suggest that H. pylori strains in India share ancestral origins with their European counterparts. Further, non-existence of other sub-populations such as hpAfrica and hpEastAsia, at least in our collection of isolates, suggest that the hpEurope strains enjoyed a special fitness advantage in Indian stomachs to out-compete any endogenous strains. These results also might support hypotheses related to gene flow in India through Indo-Aryans and arrival of Neolithic practices and languages from the Fertile Crescent.

  10. The chloroplast membrane associated ceQORH putative quinone oxidoreductase reduces long-chain, stress-related oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Curien, Gilles; Giustini, Cécile; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Mas-Y-Mas, Sarah; Cobessi, David; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Matringe, Michel; Grechkin, Alexander; Rolland, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Under oxidative stress conditions the lipid constituents of cells can undergo oxidation whose frequent consequence is the production of highly reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. These molecules are toxic because they can add to biomolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) and several enzyme activities cooperate to eliminate these reactive electrophile species. CeQORH (chloroplast envelope Quinone Oxidoreductase Homolog, At4g13010) is associated with the inner membrane of the chloroplast envelope and imported into the organelle by an alternative import pathway. In the present study, we show that the recombinant ceQORH exhibits the activity of a NADPH-dependent α,β-unsaturated oxoene reductase reducing the double bond of medium-chain (C⩾9) to long-chain (18 carbon atoms) reactive electrophile species deriving from poly-unsaturated fatty acid peroxides. The best substrates of ceQORH are 13-lipoxygenase-derived γ-ketols. γ-Ketols are spontaneously produced in the chloroplast from the unstable allene oxide formed in the biochemical pathway leading to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, a precursor of the defense hormone jasmonate. In chloroplasts, ceQORH could detoxify 13-lipoxygenase-derived γ-ketols at their production sites in the membranes. This finding opens new routes toward the understanding of γ-ketols role and detoxification.

  11. Photosynthesis by isolated chloroplasts. Reversal of orthophosphate inhibition by Calvin-cycle intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W.; Walker, D. A.; Baldry, C. W.

    1968-01-01

    1. The orthophosphate inhibition of photosynthesis by isolated spinach chloroplasts can be reversed by 3-phosphoglycerate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-diphosphate. 2. Metabolically related compounds such as ribulose 1,5-diphosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconate and phosphoenolpyruvate are ineffective. 3. The kinetics of reversal are characteristic of the intermediate used, but, in each instance, the onset of oxygen evolution is accompanied by a carbon dioxide fixation and except with 3-phosphoglycerate the stoicheiometry is close to unity. 4. The nature of orthophosphate inhibition and its reversal is discussed in relation to metabolic control of photosynthesis. PMID:5642624

  12. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1991-12-01

    The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

  13. GLK gene pairs regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David W; Martin, David J; Copley, Martin J; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2002-09-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that requires close co-ordination between two genomes. Many of the proteins that accumulate in the chloroplast are encoded by the nuclear genome, and the developmental transition from proplastid to chloroplast is regulated by nuclear genes. Here we show that a pair of Golden 2-like (GLK) genes regulates chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. The GLK proteins are members of the GARP superfamily of transcription factors, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the maize, rice and Arabidopsis GLK gene pairs comprise a distinct group within the GARP superfamily. Further phylogenetic analysis suggests that the gene pairs arose through separate duplication events in the monocot and dicot lineages. As in rice, AtGLK1 and AtGLK2 are expressed in partially overlapping domains in photosynthetic tissue. Insertion mutants demonstrate that this expression pattern reflects a degree of functional redundancy as single mutants display normal phenotypes in most photosynthetic tissues. However, double mutants are pale green in all photosynthetic tissues and chloroplasts exhibit a reduction in granal thylakoids. Products of several genes involved in light harvesting also accumulate at reduced levels in double mutant chloroplasts. GLK genes therefore regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

  14. Global RNA association with the transcriptionally active chromosome of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lehniger, Marie-Kristin; Finster, Sabrina; Melonek, Joanna; Oetke, Svenja; Krupinska, Karin; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2017-09-08

    Processed chloroplast RNAs are co-enriched with preparations of the chloroplast transcriptionally active chromosome. Chloroplast genomes are organized as a polyploid DNA-protein structure called the nucleoid. Transcriptionally active chloroplast DNA together with tightly bound protein factors can be purified by gel filtration as a functional entity called the transcriptionally active chromosome (TAC). Previous proteomics analyses of nucleoids and of TACs demonstrated a considerable overlap in protein composition including RNA binding proteins. Therefore the RNA content of TAC preparations from Nicotiana tabacum was determined using whole genome tiling arrays. A large number of chloroplast RNAs was found to be associated with the TAC. The pattern of RNAs attached to the TAC consists of RNAs produced by different chloroplast RNA polymerases and differs from the pattern of RNA found in input controls. An analysis of RNA splicing and RNA editing of selected RNA species demonstrated that TAC-associated RNAs are processed to a similar extent as the RNA in input controls. Thus, TAC fractions contain a specific subset of the processed chloroplast transcriptome.

  15. Influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast relocations.

    PubMed

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses.

  16. Chloroplasts move towards the nearest anticlinal walls under dark condition.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular positions in response to their light environment. Under darkness, chloroplasts assume special positions that are different from those under light conditions. Here, we analyzed chloroplast dark positioning using Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophyte cells. When chloroplasts were transferred into darkness, during the first 1-5 h, they moved towards the anticlinal cell walls bordering the adjacent cells rather rapidly. Then, they slowed down and accumulated at the anticlinal walls gradually over the following 24-36 h. The chloroplast movements could be roughly classified into two different categories: initial rapid straight movement and later, slow staggering movement. When the chloroplast accumulation response was induced in dark-adapted cells by partial cell irradiation with a microbeam targeted to the center of the cells, chloroplasts moved towards the beam spot from the anticlinal walls. However, when the microbeam was switched off, they moved to the nearest anticlinal walls and not to their original positions if they were not the closest, indicating that they know the direction of the nearest anticlinal wall and do not have particular areas that they migrate to during dark positioning.

  17. Does Chloroplast Size Influence Photosynthetic Nitrogen Use Efficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Ren, Binbin; Ding, Lei; Shen, Qirong; Peng, Shaobing; Guo, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) supply frequently results in a decreased photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), which indicates a less efficient use of accumulated Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Chloroplasts are the location of Rubisco and the endpoint of CO2 diffusion, and they play a vital important role in photosynthesis. However, the effects of chloroplast development on photosynthesis are poorly explored. In the present study, rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L., cv. ‘Shanyou 63’, and ‘Yangdao 6’) were grown hydroponically with three different N levels, morphological characteristics, photosynthetic variables and chloroplast size were measured. In Shanyou 63, a negative relationship between chloroplast size and PNUE was observed across three different N levels. Here, plants with larger chloroplasts had a decreased ratio of mesophyll conductance (gm) to Rubisco content (gm/Rubisco) and a lower Rubisco specific activity. In Yangdao 6, there was no change in chloroplast size and no decline in PNUE or gm/Rubisco ratio under high N supply. It is suggested that large chloroplasts under high N supply is correlated with the decreased Rubisco specific activity and PNUE. PMID:23620801

  18. Chloroplasts in anther endothecium of Zea mays (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Katherine M; Egger, Rachel L; Walbot, Virginia

    2015-11-01

    Although anthers of Zea mays, Oryza sativa, and Arabidopsis thaliana have been studied intensively using genetic and biochemical analyses in the past 20 years, few updates to anther anatomical and ultrastructural descriptions have been reported. For example, no transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the premeiotic maize anther have been published. Here we report the presence of chloroplasts in maize anthers. TEM imaging, electron acceptor photosynthesis assay, in planta photon detection, microarray analysis, and light and fluorescence microscopy were used to investigate the presence of chloroplasts in the maize anther. Most cells of the maize subepidermal endothecium have starch-containing chloroplasts that do not conduct measurable photosynthesis in vitro. The maize anther contains chloroplasts in most subepidermal, endothecial cells. Although maize anthers receive sufficient light to photosynthesize in vivo and the maize anther transcribes >96% of photosynthesis-associated genes found in the maize leaf, no photosynthetic light reaction activity was detected in vitro. The endothecial cell layer should no longer be defined as a complete circle viewed transversely in anther lobes, because chloroplasts are observed only in cells directly beneath the epidermis and not those adjacent to the connective tissue. We propose that chloroplasts be a defining characteristic of differentiated endothecial cells and that nonsubepidermal endothecial cells that lack chloroplasts be defined as a separate cell type, the interendothecium. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection

    PubMed Central

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that sees some sporadic reports every now and then. The plants have 2 energy generating sub-cellular organelles- mitochondria and chloroplasts unlike animals that just have mitochondria. The presence of chloroplast as an additional energy transducing and ROS generating compartment in a plant cell inclines to advocate the involvement of chloroplasts in PCD execution process. As chloroplasts are supposed to be progenies of unicellular photosynthetic organisms that evolved as a result of endosymbiosis, the possibility of retaining some of the components involved in bacterial PCD by chloroplasts cannot be ruled out. Despite several excellent reviews on PCD in plants, there is a void on an update of information at a place on the regulation of PCD by chloroplast. This review has been written to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of chloroplast in PCD process and the possible future course of the field. PMID:25760871

  20. ACTION OF TRITON X-100 ON CHLOROPLAST MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Deamer, David W.; Crofts, Antony

    1967-01-01

    Addition of Triton X-100 to chloroplast suspensions to a final concentration of 100–200 µM causes an approximate tripling of chloroplast volume and complete inhibition of light-induced conformational changes, light-dependent hydrogen ion transport, and photophosphorylation. Electron microscopic studies show that chloroplasts treated in this manner manifest extensive swelling in the form of vesicles within their inner membrane structure. Triton was adsorbed to chloroplast membranes in a manner suggesting a partition between the membrane phase and the suspending medium, rather than a strong, irreversible binding. This adsorption results in the production of pores through which ions may freely pass, and it is suggested that the inhibition of conformational changes, hydrogen ion transport, and photophosphorylation by Triton is due to an inability of treated chloroplast membranes to maintain a light-dependent pH gradient. The observed swelling is due to water influx in response to a fixed, osmotically active species within the chloroplasts, after ionic equilibrium has occurred. This is supported by the fact that chloroplasts will shrink upon Triton addition if a nonpenetrating, osmotically active material such as dextran or polyvinylpyrrolidone is present externally in sufficient concentration (>0.1 mM) to offset the osmotic activity of the internal species. PMID:6039379

  1. Does chloroplast size influence photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency?

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Ren, Binbin; Ding, Lei; Shen, Qirong; Peng, Shaobing; Guo, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) supply frequently results in a decreased photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), which indicates a less efficient use of accumulated Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Chloroplasts are the location of Rubisco and the endpoint of CO2 diffusion, and they play a vital important role in photosynthesis. However, the effects of chloroplast development on photosynthesis are poorly explored. In the present study, rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L., cv. 'Shanyou 63', and 'Yangdao 6') were grown hydroponically with three different N levels, morphological characteristics, photosynthetic variables and chloroplast size were measured. In Shanyou 63, a negative relationship between chloroplast size and PNUE was observed across three different N levels. Here, plants with larger chloroplasts had a decreased ratio of mesophyll conductance (gm) to Rubisco content (gm/Rubisco) and a lower Rubisco specific activity. In Yangdao 6, there was no change in chloroplast size and no decline in PNUE or gm/Rubisco ratio under high N supply. It is suggested that large chloroplasts under high N supply is correlated with the decreased Rubisco specific activity and PNUE.

  2. Chloroplast: The Trojan Horse in Plant-Virus Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Chakraborty, Supriya

    2017-01-05

    Chloroplast is one of the most dynamic organelle of a plant cell. It carries out photosynthesis, synthesizes major phytohormones, takes active part in defence response, and is crucial for inter-organelle signaling. Viruses, on the other hand, are extremely strategic in manipulating the internal environment of the host cell. Chloroplast, a prime target for viruses, undergoes enormous structural and functional damage during viral infection. In fact, large proportions of affected gene products in a virus infected plant are closely associated to chloroplast and photosynthesis process. Although chloroplast is deficient in gene-silencing machinery, it elicits effector-triggered immune response against viral pathogens. Virus infection induces the organelle to produce extensive network of stromules which are involved in both viral propagation and anti-viral defence. From last few decades' study, involvement of chloroplast in regulating plant-virus interaction has become increasingly evident. Current review presents an exhaustive account of these facts, with their implication in pathogenicity. We have attempted to highlight the intricacies of chloroplast-virus interaction and explained the existing gaps in current knowledge, which will promote the virologists to utilize the chloroplast genome-based antiviral resistance in economically important crops. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Sugars on Blue Light-Induced Chloroplast Relocations

    PubMed Central

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses. PMID:19516992

  4. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  5. Fine tuning chloroplast movements through physical interactions between phototropins.

    PubMed

    Sztatelman, Olga; Łabuz, Justyna; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Bażant, Aneta; Zgłobicki, Piotr; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Strzałka, Wojciech; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-09-01

    Phototropins are plant photoreceptors which regulate numerous responses to blue light, including chloroplast relocation. Weak blue light induces chloroplast accumulation, whereas strong light leads to an avoidance response. Two Arabidopsis phototropins are characterized by different light sensitivities. Under continuous light, both can elicit chloroplast accumulation, but the avoidance response is controlled solely by phot2. As well as continuous light, brief light pulses also induce chloroplast displacements. Pulses of 0.1s and 0.2s of fluence rate saturating the avoidance response lead to transient chloroplast accumulation. Longer pulses (up to 20s) trigger a biphasic response, namely transient avoidance followed by transient accumulation. This work presents a detailed study of transient chloroplast responses in Arabidopsis. Phototropin mutants display altered chloroplast movements as compared with the wild type: phot1 is characterized by weaker responses, while phot2 exhibits enhanced chloroplast accumulation, especially after 0.1s and 0.2s pulses. To determine the cause of these differences, the abundance and phosphorylation levels of both phototropins, as well as the interactions between phototropin molecules are examined. The formation of phototropin homo- and heterocomplexes is the most plausible explanation of the observed phenomena. The physiological consequences of this interplay are discussed, suggesting the universal character of this mechanism that fine-tunes plant reactions to blue light. Additionally, responses in mutants of different protein phosphatase 2A subunits are examined to assess the role of protein phosphorylation in signaling of chloroplast movements. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  7. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals.

  8. Chloroplast microsatellite primers for cacao (Theobroma cacao) and other Malvaceae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Y; Motilal, Lambert A; Dempewolf, Hannes; Maharaj, Kamaldeo; Cronk, Q C B

    2011-12-01

    Chloroplast microsatellites were developed in Theobroma cacao to examine the genetic diversity of cacao cultivars in Trinidad and Tobago. Nine polymorphic microsatellites were designed from the chloroplast genomes of two T. cacao accessions. These microsatellites were tested in 95 hybrid accessions from Trinidad and Tobago. An average of 2.9 alleles per locus was found. These chloroplast microsatellites, particularly the highly polymorphic pentameric repeat, were useful in assessing genetic variation in T. cacao. In addition, these markers should also prove to be useful for population genetic studies in other species of Malvaceae.

  9. Seamless editing of the chloroplast genome in plants.

    PubMed

    Martin Avila, Elena; Gisby, Martin F; Day, Anil

    2016-07-29

    Gene editing technologies enable the precise insertion of favourable mutations and performance enhancing trait genes into chromosomes whilst excluding all excess DNA from modified genomes. The technology gives rise to a new class of biotech crops which is likely to have widespread applications in agriculture. Despite progress in the nucleus, the seamless insertions of point mutations and non-selectable foreign genes into the organelle genomes of crops have not been described. The chloroplast genome is an attractive target to improve photosynthesis and crop performance. Current chloroplast genome engineering technologies for introducing point mutations into native chloroplast genes leave DNA scars, such as the target sites for recombination enzymes. Seamless editing methods to modify chloroplast genes need to address reversal of site-directed point mutations by template mediated repair with the vast excess of wild type chloroplast genomes that are present early in the transformation process. Using tobacco, we developed an efficient two-step method to edit a chloroplast gene by replacing the wild type sequence with a transient intermediate. This was resolved to the final edited gene by recombination between imperfect direct repeats. Six out of 11 transplastomic plants isolated contained the desired intermediate and at the second step this was resolved to the edited chloroplast gene in five of six plants tested. Maintenance of a single base deletion mutation in an imperfect direct repeat of the native chloroplast rbcL gene showed the limited influence of biased repair back to the wild type sequence. The deletion caused a frameshift, which replaced the five C-terminal amino acids of the Rubisco large subunit with 16 alternative residues resulting in a ~30-fold reduction in its accumulation. We monitored the process in vivo by engineering an overlapping gusA gene downstream of the edited rbcL gene. Translational coupling between the overlapping rbcL and gusA genes

  10. Reconstruction of an ancestral Yersinia pestis genome and comparison with an ancient sequence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We propose the computational reconstruction of a whole bacterial ancestral genome at the nucleotide scale, and its validation by a sequence of ancient DNA. This rare possibility is offered by an ancient sequence of the late middle ages plague agent. It has been hypothesized to be ancestral to extant Yersinia pestis strains based on the pattern of nucleotide substitutions. But the dynamics of indels, duplications, insertion sequences and rearrangements has impacted all genomes much more than the substitution process, which makes the ancestral reconstruction task challenging. Results We use a set of gene families from 13 Yersinia species, construct reconciled phylogenies for all of them, and determine gene orders in ancestral species. Gene trees integrate information from the sequence, the species tree and gene order. We reconstruct ancestral sequences for ancestral genic and intergenic regions, providing nearly a complete genome sequence for the ancestor, containing a chromosome and three plasmids. Conclusion The comparison of the ancestral and ancient sequences provides a unique opportunity to assess the quality of ancestral genome reconstruction methods. But the quality of the sequencing and assembly of the ancient sequence can also be questioned by this comparison. PMID:26450112

  11. Adaptive Memory: Ancestral Priorities and the Mnemonic Value of Survival Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairne, James S.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary psychologists often propose that humans carry around "stone-age" brains, along with a toolkit of cognitive adaptations designed originally to solve hunter-gatherer problems. This perspective predicts that optimal cognitive performance might sometimes be induced by ancestrally-based problems, those present in ancestral environments,…

  12. Estimating ancestral ranges: testing methods with a clade of neotropical lizards (iguania: liolaemidae).

    PubMed

    Díaz Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the ancestral ranges of distribution of a monophyletic clade, called the ancestral area, is one of the central objectives of historical biogeography. In this study, I used three common methodologies to establish the ancestral area of an important clade of Neotropical lizards, the family Liolaemidae. The methods used were: Fitch optimization, Weighted Ancestral Area Analysis and Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis (DIVA). A main difference from previous studies is that the areas used in the analysis are defined based on actual distributions of the species of Liolaemidae, instead of areas defined arbitrarilyor based on other taxa. The ancestral area of Liolaemidae found by Fitch optimization is Prepuna on Argentina, Central Chile and Coastal Peru. Weighted Ancestral Area Analysis found Central Chile, Coquimbo, Payunia, Austral Patagonia and Coastal Peru. Dispersal-Vicariance analysis found an ancestral area that includes almost all the areas occupied by Liolaemidae, except Atacama, Coquimbo and Austral Patagonia. The results can be resumed on two opposing hypothesis: a restricted ancestral area for the ancestor of Liolaemidae in Central Chile and Patagonia, or a widespread ancestor distributed along the Andes. Some limitations of the methods were identified, for example the excessive importance of plesiomorphic areas in the cladograms.

  13. Adaptive Memory: Ancestral Priorities and the Mnemonic Value of Survival Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nairne, James S.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary psychologists often propose that humans carry around "stone-age" brains, along with a toolkit of cognitive adaptations designed originally to solve hunter-gatherer problems. This perspective predicts that optimal cognitive performance might sometimes be induced by ancestrally-based problems, those present in ancestral environments,…

  14. Estimating Ancestral Ranges: Testing Methods with a Clade of Neotropical Lizards (Iguania: Liolaemidae)

    PubMed Central

    Díaz Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the ancestral ranges of distribution of a monophyletic clade, called the ancestral area, is one of the central objectives of historical biogeography. In this study, I used three common methodologies to establish the ancestral area of an important clade of Neotropical lizards, the family Liolaemidae. The methods used were: Fitch optimization, Weighted Ancestral Area Analysis and Dispersal-Vicariance Analysis (DIVA). A main difference from previous studies is that the areas used in the analysis are defined based on actual distributions of the species of Liolaemidae, instead of areas defined arbitrarilyor based on other taxa. The ancestral area of Liolaemidae found by Fitch optimization is Prepuna on Argentina, Central Chile and Coastal Peru. Weighted Ancestral Area Analysis found Central Chile, Coquimbo, Payunia, Austral Patagonia and Coastal Peru. Dispersal-Vicariance analysis found an ancestral area that includes almost all the areas occupied by Liolaemidae, except Atacama, Coquimbo and Austral Patagonia. The results can be resumed on two opposing hypothesis: a restricted ancestral area for the ancestor of Liolaemidae in Central Chile and Patagonia, or a widespread ancestor distributed along the Andes. Some limitations of the methods were identified, for example the excessive importance of plesiomorphic areas in the cladograms. PMID:22028873

  15. Estimation of the ancestral effective population sizes of African great apes under different selection regimes.

    PubMed

    Schrago, Carlos G

    2014-08-01

    Reliable estimates of ancestral effective population sizes are necessary to unveil the population-level phenomena that shaped the phylogeny and molecular evolution of the African great apes. Although several methods have previously been applied to infer ancestral effective population sizes, an analysis of the influence of the selective regime on the estimates of ancestral demography has not been thoroughly conducted. In this study, three independent data sets under different selective regimes were used were composed to tackle this issue. The results showed that selection had a significant impact on the estimates of ancestral effective population sizes of the African great apes. The inference of the ancestral demography of African great apes was affected by the selection regime. The effects, however, were not homogeneous along the ancestral populations of great apes. The effective population size of the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was more impacted by the selection regime when compared to the same parameter in the ancestor of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas. Because the selection regime influenced the estimates of ancestral effective population size, it is reasonable to assume that a portion of the discrepancy found in previous studies that inferred the ancestral effective population size may be attributable to the differential action of selection on the genes sampled.

  16. Enumeration of Ancestral Configurations for Matching Gene Trees and Species Trees.

    PubMed

    Disanto, Filippo; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2017-09-01

    Given a gene tree and a species tree, ancestral configurations represent the combinatorially distinct sets of gene lineages that can reach a given node of the species tree. They have been introduced as a data structure for use in the recursive computation of the conditional probability under the multispecies coalescent model of a gene tree topology given a species tree, the cost of this computation being affected by the number of ancestral configurations of the gene tree in the species tree. For matching gene trees and species trees, we obtain enumerative results on ancestral configurations. We study ancestral configurations in balanced and unbalanced families of trees determined by a given seed tree, showing that for seed trees with more than one taxon, the number of ancestral configurations increases for both families exponentially in the number of taxa n. For fixed n, the maximal number of ancestral configurations tabulated at the species tree root node and the largest number of labeled histories possible for a labeled topology occur for trees with precisely the same unlabeled shape. For ancestral configurations at the root, the maximum increases with [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is a quadratic recurrence constant. Under a uniform distribution over the set of labeled trees of given size, the mean number of root ancestral configurations grows with [Formula: see text] and the variance with ∼[Formula: see text]. The results provide a contribution to the combinatorial study of gene trees and species trees.

  17. Chloroplast biogenesis: The use of mutants to study the etioplast–chloroplast transition

    PubMed Central

    Philippar, Katrin; Geis, Tina; Ilkavets, Iryna; Oster, Ulrike; Schwenkert, Serena; Meurer, Jörg; Soll, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    In angiosperm plants, the etioplast–chloroplast transition is light-dependent. A key factor in this process is the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A (PORA), which catalyzes the light-induced reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. The import pathway of the precursor protein prePORA into chloroplasts was analyzed in vivo and in vitro by using homozygous loss-of-function mutants in genes coding for chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) or for members of the outer-envelope solute-channel protein family of 16 kDa (OEP16), both of which have been implied to be key factors for the import of prePORA. Our in vivo analyses show that cao or oep16 mutants contain a normally structured prolamellar body that contains the protochlorophyllide holochrome. Furthermore, etioplasts from cao and oep16 mutants contain PORA protein as found by mass spectrometry. Our data demonstrate that both CAO and OEP16 are dispensable for chloroplast biogenesis and play no central role in the import of prePORA in vivo and in vitro as further indicated by protein import studies. PMID:17202255

  18. Chloroplast biogenesis: the use of mutants to study the etioplast-chloroplast transition.

    PubMed

    Philippar, Katrin; Geis, Tina; Ilkavets, Iryna; Oster, Ulrike; Schwenkert, Serena; Meurer, Jörg; Soll, Jürgen

    2007-01-09

    In angiosperm plants, the etioplast-chloroplast transition is light-dependent. A key factor in this process is the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A (PORA), which catalyzes the light-induced reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. The import pathway of the precursor protein prePORA into chloroplasts was analyzed in vivo and in vitro by using homozygous loss-of-function mutants in genes coding for chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) or for members of the outer-envelope solute-channel protein family of 16 kDa (OEP16), both of which have been implied to be key factors for the import of prePORA. Our in vivo analyses show that cao or oep16 mutants contain a normally structured prolamellar body that contains the protochlorophyllide holochrome. Furthermore, etioplasts from cao and oep16 mutants contain PORA protein as found by mass spectrometry. Our data demonstrate that both CAO and OEP16 are dispensable for chloroplast biogenesis and play no central role in the import of prePORA in vivo and in vitro as further indicated by protein import studies.

  19. Transformation of the Cyanidioschyzon merolae chloroplast genome: prospects for understanding chloroplast function in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Zienkiewicz, Maksymilian; Krupnik, Tomasz; Drożak, Anna; Golke, Anna; Romanowska, Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    We have successfully transformed an exthemophilic red alga with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, rendering this organism insensitive to its toxicity. Our work paves the way to further work with this new modelorganism. Here we report the first successful attempt to achieve a stable, under selectable pressure, chloroplast transformation in Cyanidioschizon merolae-an extremophilic red alga of increasing importance as a new model organism. The following protocol takes advantage of a double homologous recombination phenomenon in the chloroplast, allowing to introduce an exogenous, selectable gene. For that purpose, we decided to use chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), as chloroplasts are particularly vulnerable to chloramphenicol lethal effects (Zienkiewicz et al. in Protoplasma, 2015, doi: 10.1007/s00709-015-0936-9 ). We adjusted two methods of DNA delivery: the PEG-mediated delivery and the biolistic bombardment based delivery, either of these methods work sufficiently with noticeable preference to the former. Application of a codon-optimized sequence of the cat gene and a single colony selection yielded C. merolae strains, capable of resisting up to 400 µg/mL of chloramphenicol. Our method opens new possibilities in production of site-directed mutants, recombinant proteins and exogenous protein overexpression in C. merolae-a new model organism.

  20. Complete chloroplast genome sequences of Solanum commersonii and its application to chloroplast genotype in somatic hybrids with Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Cheon, Kyeong-Sik; Hong, Su-Young; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Mekapogu, Manjulatha; Yu, Yei-Soo; Park, Tae-Ho

    2016-10-01

    Chloroplast genome of Solanum commersonii and S olanum tuberosum were completely sequenced, and Indel markers were successfully applied to distinguish chlorotypes demonstrating the chloroplast genome was randomly distributed during protoplast fusion. Somatic hybridization has been widely employed for the introgression of resistance to several diseases from wild Solanum species to overcome sexual barriers in potato breeding. Solanum commersonii is a major resource used as a parent line in somatic hybridization to improve bacterial wilt resistance in interspecies transfer to cultivated potato (S. tuberosum). Here, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genomes of Lz3.2 (S. commersonii) and S. tuberosum (PT56), which were used to develop fusion products, then compared them with those of five members of the Solanaceae family, S. tuberosum, Capsicum annum, S. lycopersicum, S. bulbocastanum and S. nigrum and Coffea arabica as an out-group. We then developed Indel markers for application in chloroplast genotyping. The complete chloroplast genome of Lz3.2 is composed of 155,525 bp, which is larger than the PT56 genome with 155,296 bp. Gene content, order and orientation of the S. commersonii chloroplast genome were highly conserved with those of other Solanaceae species, and the phylogenetic tree revealed that S. commersonii is located within the same node of S. tuberosum. However, sequence alignment revealed nine Indels between S. commersonii and S. tuberosum in their chloroplast genomes, allowing two Indel markers to be developed. The markers could distinguish the two species and were successfully applied to chloroplast genotyping (chlorotype) in somatic hybrids and their progenies. The results obtained in this study confirmed the random distribution of the chloroplast genome during protoplast fusion and its maternal inheritance and can be applied to select proper plastid genotypes in potato breeding program.

  1. Chloroplast Phylogenomic Inference of Green Algae Relationships.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linhua; Fang, Ling; Zhang, Zhenhua; Chang, Xin; Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2016-02-05

    The green algal phylum Chlorophyta has six diverse classes, but the phylogenetic relationship of the classes within Chlorophyta remains uncertain. In order to better understand the ancient Chlorophyta evolution, we have applied a site pattern sorting method to study compositional heterogeneity and the model fit in the green algal chloroplast genomic data. We show that the fastest-evolving sites are significantly correlated with among-site compositional heterogeneity, and these sites have a much poorer fit to the evolutionary model. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that the class Chlorophyceae is a monophyletic group, and the classes Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae are non-monophyletic groups. Our proposed phylogenetic tree of Chlorophyta will offer new insights to investigate ancient green algae evolution, and our analytical framework will provide a useful approach for evaluating and mitigating the potential errors of phylogenomic inferences.

  2. Origins of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A computer branching model is used to analyze cellular evolution. Attention is given to certain key amino acids and nucleotide residues (ferredoxin, 5s ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes) because of their commonality over a wide variety of cell types. Each amino acid or nucleotide residue is a sequence in an inherited biological trait; and the branching method is employed to align sequences so that changes reflect substitution of one residue for another. Based on the computer analysis, the symbiotic theory of cellular evolution is considered the most probable. This theory holds that organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplasts invaded larger bodies, e.g., bacteria, and combined functions to form eucaryotic cells.

  3. Origins of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A computer branching model is used to analyze cellular evolution. Attention is given to certain key amino acids and nucleotide residues (ferredoxin, 5s ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes) because of their commonality over a wide variety of cell types. Each amino acid or nucleotide residue is a sequence in an inherited biological trait; and the branching method is employed to align sequences so that changes reflect substitution of one residue for another. Based on the computer analysis, the symbiotic theory of cellular evolution is considered the most probable. This theory holds that organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplasts invaded larger bodies, e.g., bacteria, and combined functions to form eucaryotic cells.

  4. Preparation and proteomic analysis of chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics of chloroplast ribosomes in spinach and Chlamydomonas revealed unique protein composition and structures of plastid ribosomes. These studies have suggested the presence of some ribosomal proteins unique to plastid ribosomes which may be involved in plastid-unique translation regulation. Considering the strong background of genetic analysis and molecular biology in Arabidopsis, the in-depth proteomic characterization of Arabidopsis plastid ribosomes would facilitate further understanding of plastid translation in higher plants. Here, I describe simple and rapid methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomes from Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis using sucrose gradients. I also describe purity criteria and methods for yield estimation of the purified plastid ribosomes and subunits, methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomal proteins, as well as the identification of some Arabidopsis plastid ribosomal proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  5. Chloroplast Phylogenomic Inference of Green Algae Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linhua; Fang, Ling; Zhang, Zhenhua; Chang, Xin; Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2016-01-01

    The green algal phylum Chlorophyta has six diverse classes, but the phylogenetic relationship of the classes within Chlorophyta remains uncertain. In order to better understand the ancient Chlorophyta evolution, we have applied a site pattern sorting method to study compositional heterogeneity and the model fit in the green algal chloroplast genomic data. We show that the fastest-evolving sites are significantly correlated with among-site compositional heterogeneity, and these sites have a much poorer fit to the evolutionary model. Our phylogenomic analyses suggest that the class Chlorophyceae is a monophyletic group, and the classes Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae are non-monophyletic groups. Our proposed phylogenetic tree of Chlorophyta will offer new insights to investigate ancient green algae evolution, and our analytical framework will provide a useful approach for evaluating and mitigating the potential errors of phylogenomic inferences. PMID:26846729

  6. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi Xia; Zheng, Jun; Gao, Guo; Kong, Yi Fei; Zhi, Xiao; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xue Qing; Cui, Da Xiang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new method of one-pot biosynthesizing of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), using chloroplasts as reductants and stabilizers is reported. The as-prepared GNPs were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of the GNPs was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method against gastric mucous cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Rhodamine 6G as a Raman probe was used for investigating surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement of GNPs. The transmission electron microscopy results indicated that the GNPs were spherical in structure and almost 20 nm in diameter. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy exhibited an absorption peak at 545 nm. The GNPs exhibited high crystallinity, with the (111) plane as the predominant orientation, clarified by X-ray powder diffraction. In addition, a potential mechanism was proposed to interpret the formation process of GNPs, mainly based on the analysis of FTIR results. The FTIR spectrum confirmed that the GNPs were carried with N-H groups. Toxicological assays of as-prepared GNPs revealed that the green GNPs were nontoxic. SERS analysis revealed that the GNPs without any treatment could substantially enhance the Raman signals of rhodamine 6G. The Raman enhancement factor was calculated to be nearly 10(10) orders of magnitude. In conclusion, the GNPs with good biocompatibility and excellent SERS effect were successfully synthesized using chloroplasts. These biogenetic GNPs have great potential for ultrasensitive detection of biomarkers in vitro and in vivo based on SERS.

  7. Participation of chloroplasts in plant apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, Vitaly D; Lagunova, Elena M; Kiselevsky, Dmitry B; Dzyubinskaya, Elena V; Makarova, Yana V; Gusev, Mikhail V

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are known to participate in the initiation of programmed cell death (PCD) in animals and in plants. The role of chloroplasts in PCD is still unknown. We describe a new system to study PCD in plants; namely, leaf epidermal peels. The peel represents a monolayer consisting of cells of two types: phototrophic (guard cells) and chemotrophic (epidermal cells). The peels from pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves were treated by cyanide as an inducer of PCD. We found an apoptosis-enhancing effect of illumination on chloroplast-containing guard cells, but not on chloroplastless epidermal cells. Antioxidants and anaerobiosis prevented the CN(-)-induced apoptosis of cells of both types in the dark and in the light. On the other hand, methyl viologen and menadione known as ROS-generating reagents as well as the Hill reaction electron acceptors (BQ, DAD, TMPD, or DPIP) that are not oxidized spontaneously by O2 were shown to prevent the CN(-)-induced nucleus destruction in guard cells. Apoptosis of epidermal cells was potentiated by these reagents, and they had no influence on the CN- effect. The light-dependent activation of CN(-)-induced apoptosis of guard cells was suppressed by DCMU, stigmatellin or DNP-INT, by a protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine as well as by cysteine and serine protease inhibitors. The above data suggest that apoptosis of guard cells is initiated upon a combined action of two factors, i.e., ROS and reduced plastoquinone of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain. As to reduction of ubiquinone in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, it seems to be antiapoptotic for the guard cell.

  8. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria — ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  9. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  10. Synthesis of Proteins by Isolated Euglena gracilis Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aurea C.

    1976-01-01

    Intact Euglena gracilis chloroplasts, which had been purified on gradients of silica sol, incorporated [35S]methionine or [3H]leucine into soluble and membrane-bound products, using light as the only source of energy. The chloroplasts were osmotically shocked, fractionated on discontinuous gradients of sucrose, and the products of protein synthesis of the different fractions characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The soluble fraction resolved into three zones of radioactivity, the major one corresponding to the large subunit or ribulose diphosphate carboxylase. The thylakoid membrane fraction contained nine labeled polypeptides, the two most prominent in the region of 31 and 42 kilodaltons. The envelope fraction contained a major radioactive peak of about 48 kilodaltons and four other minor peaks. The patterns of protein synthesis by isolated Euglena chloroplasts are broadly similar to those observed with chloroplasts of spinach and pea. PMID:16659752

  11. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  12. Chloroplast genome variation in upland and lowland switchgrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) exists at multiple ploidies and two phenotypically distinct ecotypes. To facilitate interploidal comparisons and to understand the extent of sequence variation within existing breeding pools, two complete switchgrass chloroplast genomes were sequenced from individu...

  13. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  14. Protein disulfide isomerase as a regulator of chloroplast translational activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungmook; Mayfield, S.P.

    1997-12-12

    Light-regulated translation of chloroplast messenger RNAs (mRNAs) requires transacting factors that interact with the 5{prime} untranslated region (UTR) of these mRNAs. Chloroplast polyadenylate-binding protein (cPABP) specifically binds to the 5{prime}-UTR of the psbA mRNA and is essential for translation of this mRNA. A protein disulfide isomeriase that is localized to the chloroplast and copurifies with cPABP was shown to modulate the binding of cPABP to the 5{prime}-UTR of the psbA mRNA by reversibly changing the redox status of cPaBP through redox potential or adenosine 5{prime}-diphosphate-dependent phosphorylation. This mechanism allows for a simple reversible switch regulating gene expression in the chloroplast. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  16. Possible rules for the ancestral origin of Hox gene collinearity.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Gaunt, Alexander L

    2016-12-07

    The Hox gene cluster is believed to have formed from a single ProtoHox gene by repeated cycles of the following events: tandem gene duplication, mutation to generate a new expression boundary along the embryonic axis, and acquisition of a new Hox patterning function. The Hox cluster in Bilateria evolved in compliance with the so-called collinearity rule. That is, the order of the genes along the chromosome corresponds with the order of their embryonic expression domains along the head-tail axis. Gaunt (2015) suggested that collinearity may have arisen as a mechanism to minimise the incidence of boundaries between active and inactive genes within the Hox cluster. We now attempt to clarify the model by presenting it in the form of three rules: 1) no two Hox genes may persist in the same cluster with the same anterior boundary of activity in the same tissue; 2) an inactive Hox gene must not be flanked by two active Hox genes; 3) an active Hox gene must not be flanked by two inactive genes. We provide evidence and illustrative computer simulations to show that these rules, which can apply only to partially overlapping patterns of Hox activity, may account for the ancestral origin of Hox gene collinearity.

  17. Mitochondrial introgression suggests extensive ancestral hybridization events among Saccharomyces species.

    PubMed

    Peris, David; Arias, Armando; Orlić, Sandi; Belloch, Carmela; Pérez-Través, Laura; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic plastids and mitochondrial genomes is common, and plays an important role in organism evolution. In yeasts, recent mitochondrial HGT has been suggested between S. cerevisiae and S. paradoxus. However, few strains have been explored given the lack of accurate mitochondrial genome annotations. Mitochondrial genome sequences are important to understand how frequent these introgressions occur, and their role in cytonuclear incompatibilities and fitness. Indeed, most of the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller genetic incompatibilities described in yeasts are driven by cytonuclear incompatibilities. We herein explored the mitochondrial inheritance of several worldwide distributed wild Saccharomyces species and their hybrids isolated from different sources and geographic origins. We demonstrated the existence of several recombination points in mitochondrial region COX2-ORF1, likely mediated by either the activity of the protein encoded by the ORF1 (F-SceIII) gene, a free-standing homing endonuclease, or mostly facilitated by A+T tandem repeats and regions of integration of GC clusters. These introgressions were shown to occur among strains of the same species and among strains of different species, which suggests a complex model of Saccharomyces evolution that involves several ancestral hybridization events in wild environments.

  18. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  19. Ancestral TSH mechanism signals summer in a photoperiodic mammal.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Elodie A; Lincoln, Gerald A; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Dardente, Hugues; Masson-Pévet, Mireille; Morgan, Peter J; Hazlerigg, David G

    2008-08-05

    In mammals, day-length-sensitive (photoperiodic) seasonal breeding cycles depend on the pineal hormone melatonin, which modulates secretion of reproductive hormones by the anterior pituitary gland [1]. It is thought that melatonin acts in the hypothalamus to control reproduction through the release of neurosecretory signals into the pituitary portal blood supply, where they act on pituitary endocrine cells [2]. Contrastingly, we show here that during the reproductive response of Soay sheep exposed to summer day lengths, the reverse applies: Melatonin acts directly on anterior-pituitary cells, and these then relay the photoperiodic message back into the hypothalamus to control neuroendocrine output. The switch to long days causes melatonin-responsive cells in the pars tuberalis (PT) of the anterior pituitary to increase production of thyrotrophin (TSH). This acts locally on TSH-receptor-expressing cells in the adjacent mediobasal hypothalamus, leading to increased expression of type II thyroid hormone deiodinase (DIO2). DIO2 initiates the summer response by increasing hypothalamic tri-iodothyronine (T3) levels. These data and recent findings in quail [3] indicate that the TSH-expressing cells of the PT play an ancestral role in seasonal reproductive control in vertebrates. In mammals this provides the missing link between the pineal melatonin signal and thyroid-dependent seasonal biology.

  20. Ancestral resurrection reveals evolutionary mechanisms of kinase plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Conor J; Hanson-Smith, Victor; Kennedy, Kristopher J; Miller, Chad J; Lou, Hua Jane; Johnson, Alexander D; Turk, Benjamin E; Holt, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases have evolved diverse specificities to enable cellular information processing. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying kinase diversification, we studied the CMGC protein kinases using ancestral reconstruction. Within this group, the cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) require proline at the +1 position of their substrates, while Ime2 prefers arginine. The resurrected common ancestor of CDKs, MAPKs, and Ime2 could phosphorylate substrates with +1 proline or arginine, with preference for proline. This specificity changed to a strong preference for +1 arginine in the lineage leading to Ime2 via an intermediate with equal specificity for proline and arginine. Mutant analysis revealed that a variable residue within the kinase catalytic cleft, DFGx, modulates +1 specificity. Expansion of Ime2 kinase specificity by mutation of this residue did not cause dominant deleterious effects in vivo. Tolerance of cells to new specificities likely enabled the evolutionary divergence of kinases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04126.001 PMID:25310241

  1. Color vision of ancestral organisms of higher primates.

    PubMed

    Nei, M; Zhang, J; Yokoyama, S

    1997-06-01

    The color vision of mammals is controlled by photosensitive proteins called opsins. Most mammals have dichromatic color vision, but hominoids and Old World (OW) monkeys enjoy trichromatic vision, having the blue-, green-, and red-sensitive opsin genes. Most New World (NW) monkeys are either dichromatic or trichromatic, depending on the sex and genotype. Trichromacy in higher primates is believed to have evolved to facilitate the detection of yellow and red fruits against dappled foliage, but the process of evolutionary change from dichromacy to trichromacy is not well understood. Using the parsimony and the newly developed Bayesian methods, we inferred the amino acid sequences of opsins of ancestral organisms of higher primates. The results suggest that the ancestors of OW and NW monkeys lacked the green gene and that the green gene later evolved from the red gene. The fact that the red/green opsin gene has survived the long nocturnal stage of mammalian evolution and that it is under strong purifying selection in organisms that live in dark environments suggests that this gene has another important function in addition to color vision, probably the control of circadian rhythms.

  2. Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs through Topological Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Pablo G.; Levine, Arnold J.; Rabadán, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    The recent explosion of genomic data has underscored the need for interpretable and comprehensive analyses that can capture complex phylogenetic relationships within and across species. Recombination, reassortment and horizontal gene transfer constitute examples of pervasive biological phenomena that cannot be captured by tree-like representations. Starting from hundreds of genomes, we are interested in the reconstruction of potential evolutionary histories leading to the observed data. Ancestral recombination graphs represent potential histories that explicitly accommodate recombination and mutation events across orthologous genomes. However, they are computationally costly to reconstruct, usually being infeasible for more than few tens of genomes. Recently, Topological Data Analysis (TDA) methods have been proposed as robust and scalable methods that can capture the genetic scale and frequency of recombination. We build upon previous TDA developments for detecting and quantifying recombination, and present a novel framework that can be applied to hundreds of genomes and can be interpreted in terms of minimal histories of mutation and recombination events, quantifying the scales and identifying the genomic locations of recombinations. We implement this framework in a software package, called TARGet, and apply it to several examples, including small migration between different populations, human recombination, and horizontal evolution in finches inhabiting the Galápagos Islands. PMID:27532298

  3. Estimating Causal Effects with Ancestral Graph Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    Malinsky, Daniel; Spirtes, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present an algorithm for estimating bounds on causal effects from observational data which combines graphical model search with simple linear regression. We assume that the underlying system can be represented by a linear structural equation model with no feedback, and we allow for the possibility of latent variables. Under assumptions standard in the causal search literature, we use conditional independence constraints to search for an equivalence class of ancestral graphs. Then, for each model in the equivalence class, we perform the appropriate regression (using causal structure information to determine which covariates to include in the regression) to estimate a set of possible causal effects. Our approach is based on the “IDA” procedure of Maathuis et al. (2009), which assumes that all relevant variables have been measured (i.e., no unmeasured confounders). We generalize their work by relaxing this assumption, which is often violated in applied contexts. We validate the performance of our algorithm on simulated data and demonstrate improved precision over IDA when latent variables are present. PMID:28217244

  4. Female rule in lemurs is ancestral and hormonally mediated

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Joseph M. A.; Drea, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Female social dominance (FSD) over males is unusual in mammals, yet characterizes most Malagasy lemurs, which represent almost 30% of all primates. Despite its prevalence in this suborder, both the evolutionary trajectory and proximate mechanism of FSD remain unclear. Potentially associated with FSD is a suite of behavioural, physiological and morphological traits in females that implicates (as a putative mechanism) ‘masculinization’ via androgen exposure; however, relative to conspecific males, female lemurs curiously show little evidence of raised androgen concentrations. By observing mixed‐sex pairs of related Eulemur species, we identified two key study groups ‐‐ one comprised of species expressing FSD and increased female scent marking, the other comprised of species (from a recently evolved clade) showing equal status between the sexes and the more traditional pattern of sexually dimorphic behaviour. Comparing females from these two groups, we show that FSD is associated with more masculine androgen profiles. Based on the widespread prevalence of male‐like features in female lemurs and a current phylogeny, we suggest that relaxation of hormonally mediated FSD emerged only recently and that female masculinization may be the ancestral lemur condition, an idea that could revolutionize our understanding of the ancient socioecology and evolution of primate social systems. PMID:25950904

  5. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  6. Ancestral role of caudal genes in axis elongation and segmentation.

    PubMed

    Copf, Tijana; Schröder, Reinhard; Averof, Michalis

    2004-12-21

    caudal (cad/Cdx) genes are essential for the formation of posterior structures in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and vertebrates. In contrast to Drosophila, the majority of arthropods generate their segments sequentially from a posteriorly located growth zone, a process known as short-germ development. caudal homologues are expressed in the growth zone of diverse short-germ arthropods, but until now their functional role in these animals had not been studied. Here, we use RNA interference to examine the function of caudal genes in two short-germ arthropods, the crustacean Artemia franciscana and the beetle Tribolium castaneum. We show that, in both species, caudal is required for the formation of most body segments. In animals with reduced levels of caudal expression, axis elongation stops, resulting in severe truncations that remove most trunk segments. We also show that caudal function is required for the early phases of segmentation and Hox gene expression. The observed phenotypes suggest that in arthropods caudal had an ancestral role in axis elongation and segmentation, and was required for the formation of most body segments. Similarities to the function of vertebrate Cdx genes in the presomitic mesoderm, from which somites are generated, indicate that this role may also predate the origin of the Bilateria.

  7. The common ancestral core of vertebrate and fungal telomerase RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaodong; Li, Yang; Honda, Shinji; Hoffmann, Steve; Marz, Manja; Mosig, Axel; Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Stadler, Peter F.; Selker, Eric U.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein with an intrinsic telomerase RNA (TER) component. Within yeasts, TER is remarkably large and presents little similarity in secondary structure to vertebrate or ciliate TERs. To better understand the evolution of fungal telomerase, we identified 74 TERs from Pezizomycotina and Taphrinomycotina subphyla, sister clades to budding yeasts. We initially identified TER from Neurospora crassa using a novel deep-sequencing–based approach, and homologous TER sequences from available fungal genome databases by computational searches. Remarkably, TERs from these non-yeast fungi have many attributes in common with vertebrate TERs. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of highly conserved regions within Pezizomycotina TERs revealed two core domains nearly identical in secondary structure to the pseudoknot and CR4/5 within vertebrate TERs. We then analyzed N. crassa and Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase reconstituted in vitro, and showed that the two RNA core domains in both systems can reconstitute activity in trans as two separate RNA fragments. Furthermore, the primer-extension pulse-chase analysis affirmed that the reconstituted N. crassa telomerase synthesizes TTAGGG repeats with high processivity, a common attribute of vertebrate telomerase. Overall, this study reveals the common ancestral cores of vertebrate and fungal TERs, and provides insights into the molecular evolution of fungal TER structure and function. PMID:23093598

  8. Characterization of Chloroplast Protein Import without Tic56, a Component of the 1-Megadalton Translocon at the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts1

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Montandon, Cyril; Hause, Gerd; Majovsky, Petra; Kessler, Felix; Baginsky, Sacha; Agne, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    We report on the characterization of Tic56, a unique component of the recently identified 1-MD translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TIC) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising Tic20, Tic100, and Tic214. We isolated Tic56 by copurification with Tandem Affinity Purification-tagged Toc159 in the absence of precursor protein, indicating spontaneous and translocation-independent formation of the translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) and TIC supercomplexes. Tic56 mutant plants have an albino phenotype and are unable to grow without an external carbon source. Using specific enrichment of protein amino termini, we analyzed the tic56-1 and plastid protein import2 (toc159) mutants to assess the in vivo import capacity of plastids in mutants of an outer and inner envelope component of the anticipated TOC-TIC supercomplex. In both mutants, we observed processing of several import substrates belonging to various pathways. Our results suggest that despite the severe developmental defects, protein import into Tic56-deficient plastids is functional to a considerable degree, indicating the existence of alternative translocases at the inner envelope membrane. PMID:25588737

  9. Characterization of chloroplast protein import without Tic56, a component of the 1-megadalton translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Daniel; Montandon, Cyril; Hause, Gerd; Majovsky, Petra; Kessler, Felix; Baginsky, Sacha; Agne, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    We report on the characterization of Tic56, a unique component of the recently identified 1-MD translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TIC) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising Tic20, Tic100, and Tic214. We isolated Tic56 by copurification with Tandem Affinity Purification-tagged Toc159 in the absence of precursor protein, indicating spontaneous and translocation-independent formation of the translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) and TIC supercomplexes. Tic56 mutant plants have an albino phenotype and are unable to grow without an external carbon source. Using specific enrichment of protein amino termini, we analyzed the tic56-1 and plastid protein import2 (toc159) mutants to assess the in vivo import capacity of plastids in mutants of an outer and inner envelope component of the anticipated TOC-TIC supercomplex. Inboth mutants, we observed processing of several import substrates belonging to various pathways. Our results suggest that despite the severe developmental defects, protein import into Tic56-deficient plastids is functional to a considerable degree, indicating the existence of alternative translocases at the inner envelope membrane.

  10. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  11. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Tanaecium tetragonolobum: The First Bignoniaceae Plastome

    PubMed Central

    Nazareno, Alison Gonçalves; Carlsen, Monica; Lohmann, Lúcia Garcez

    2015-01-01

    Bignoniaceae is a Pantropical plant family that is especially abundant in the Neotropics. Members of the Bignoniaceae are diverse in many ecosystems and represent key components of the Tropical flora. Despite the ecological importance of the Bignoniaceae and all the efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group, whole chloroplast genome information has not yet been reported for any members of the family. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tanaecium tetragonolobum (Jacq.) L.G. Lohmann, which was reconstructed using de novo and referenced-based assembly of single-end reads generated by shotgun sequencing of total genomic DNA in an Illumina platform. The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum exhibits the general structure of flowering plants, and is similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum is a circular molecule of 153,776 base pairs (bp) with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a large single copy region (LSC, 84,612 bp) and a small single copy region (SSC, 17,586 bp) separated by inverted repeat regions (IRs, 25,789 bp). In addition, the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum has 38.3% GC content and includes 121 genes, of which 86 are protein-coding, 31 are transfer RNA, and four are ribosomal RNA. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum presents a total of 47 tandem repeats and 347 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with mononucleotides being the most common and di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexanucleotides occurring with less frequency. The results obtained here were compared to other chloroplast genomes of Lamiales available to date, providing new insight into the evolution of chloroplast genomes within Lamiales. Overall, the evolutionary rates of genes in Lamiales are lineage-, locus-, and region-specific, indicating that the evolutionary pattern of nucleotide substitution in chloroplast genomes of flowering plants is complex

  12. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sazzad; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome, and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbor the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologs to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e (CP, chloroplast localized), have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologs of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1, thylakoid formation 1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor, curvature thylakoid 1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components. PMID:25295043

  13. Sequence evidence for the symbiotic origins of chloroplasts and mitochondria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is investigated on the basis of prokaryotic and early-eukaryotic evolutionary trees derived from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the method of Dayhoff (1979). Trees for bacterial ferrodoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes, the lipid-binding subunit of ATPase, and dihydrofolate reductase are presented and discussed. Good agreement among the trees is found, and it is argued that the mitochondria and chloroplasts evolved by multiple symbiotic events.

  14. [Chloroplast genetic engineering: a new approach in plant biotechnology].

    PubMed

    Su, Tao; Zhan, Ya-Guang; Han, Mei; Hao, Ai-Ping

    2005-07-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering, offers several advantages over nuclear transformation, including high level of gene expression, increased biosafety, remedying some limitations associated with nuclear genetic transformation, such as gene silencing and the stability of transformed genes. It is now regarded as an attractive new transgenic technique and further development of biotechnology in agriculture. In this article we reviewed the characteristics, applications of chloroplast genetic engineering and its promising prospects were discussed.

  15. Sequence evidence for the symbiotic origins of chloroplasts and mitochondria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is investigated on the basis of prokaryotic and early-eukaryotic evolutionary trees derived from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the method of Dayhoff (1979). Trees for bacterial ferrodoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes, the lipid-binding subunit of ATPase, and dihydrofolate reductase are presented and discussed. Good agreement among the trees is found, and it is argued that the mitochondria and chloroplasts evolved by multiple symbiotic events.

  16. Reinterpretation of Halokinetic Features in the Ancestral Rocky Mountains Paradox Salt Basin, Utah and Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Giles, K. A.; Rowan, M. G.; Hearon, T. E., IV

    2016-12-01

    The Paradox Basin in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado is a foreland basin formed in response to flexural loading by the Pennsylvanian-aged Uncompaghre uplift during the Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogen. Thick sequences of evaporites (Paradox Formation) were deposited within the foreland basin, which interfinger with clastic sediments in the foredeep and carbonates around the basin margin. Differential loading of the Pennsylvanian-Jurassic sediments onto the evaporites drove synsedimentary halokinesis, creating a series of salt walls and adjacent minibasins within the larger foreland basin. The growing salt walls within the basin influenced patterns of sediment deposition from the Pennsylvanian through the Cretaceous. By integrating previously published mapping with recent field observations, mapping, and subsurface interpretations of well logs and 2D seismic lines, we present interpretations of the timing, geometry, and nature of halokinesis within the Paradox Basin, which record the complex salt tectonic history in the basin. Furthermore, we present recent work on the relationships between the local passive salt history and the formation of syndepositional counter-regional extensional fault systems within the foreland. These results will be integrated into a new regional salt-tectonic and stratigraphic framework of the Paradox Basin, and have broader implications for interpreting sedimentary records in other basins with a mobile substrate.

  17. Chloroplast membrane transport: interplay of prokaryotic and eukaryotic traits.

    PubMed

    Vothknecht, Ute C; Soll, Jürgen

    2005-07-18

    Chloroplasts are specific plant organelles of prokaryotic origin. They are separated from the surrounding cell by a double membrane, which represents an effective barrier for the transport of metabolites and proteins. Specific transporters in the inner envelope membrane have been described, which facilitate the exchange of metabolites. In contrast, the outer envelope has been viewed for a long time as a molecular sieve that offers a mere size constriction to the passage of molecules. This view has been challenged lately, and a number of specific and regulated pore proteins of the outer envelope (OEPs) have been identified. These pores seem to have originated by adaptation of outer membrane proteins of the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. In a similar fashion, the transport of proteins across the two envelope membranes is achieved by two hetero-oligomeric protein complexes called Toc (translocon in the outer envelope of chloroplasts) and Tic (translocon in the inner envelope of chloroplasts). The phylogenetic provenance of the translocon components is less clear, but at least the channel protein of the Toc translocon is of cyanobacterial origin. Characteristic of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts is furthermore a specialized internal membrane system, the thylakoids, on which the components of the photosynthetic machinery are located. Despite the importance of this membrane, very little is known about its phylogenetic origin or the manner of its synthesis. Vipp1 appears to be a ubiquitous component of thylakoid formation, while in chloroplasts of land plants, additionally a vesicle transport system of eukaryotic origin might be involved in this process.

  18. Role of mitochondria in sulfolipid biosynthesis by Euglena chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Saidha, T.; Schiff, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    Sulfate activation occurs in Euglena mitochondria the authors now find that the sulfate activating enzymes are absent from Euglena chloroplasts. Cells of mutant W/sub 10/BSmL lacking plastids also lack detectable sulfolipid (SL) when grown on /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ indicating that SL is absent from the mitochondria and is exclusively in the plastids. Plastids alone will convert /sup 35/S-cysteine to /sup 35/SL in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/; light is stimulatory. Under similar conditions, chloroplasts and mitochondria incubated together convert /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ to plastid-localized /sup 35/SL but either organelle incubated alone fails to effect this conversion. Unlabeled cysteine blocks SL labeling from sulfate in the mixed incubation; since cysteine is formed from sulfate by Euglena mitochrondria, cysteine (and other compounds) may move from the mitochondrion to the chloroplast to provide the sulfo group for SL formation. Although mitochondria form labeled protein from /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ via cysteine, chloroplasts alone do not form labeled protein from /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/ in light or darkness; incubation of chloroplasts plus mitochondria under these conditions labels chloroplast protein.

  19. Chloroplasts continuously monitor photoreceptor signals during accumulation movement.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-07-01

    Under low light conditions, chloroplasts gather at a cell surface to maximize light absorption for efficient photosynthesis, which is called the accumulation response. Phototropin1 (phot1) and phototropin2 (phot2) were identified as blue light photoreceptors in the accumulation response that occurs in Arabidopsis thaliana and Adiantum capillus-veneris with neochrome1 (neo1) as a red light photoreceptor in A. capillus-veneris. However, the signal molecule that is emitted from the photoreceptors and transmitted to the chloroplasts is not known. To investigate this topic, the accumulation response was induced by partial cell irradiation with a microbeam of red, blue and far-red light in A. capillus-veneris gametophyte cells. Chloroplasts moved towards the irradiated region and were able to sense the signal as long as its signal flowed. The signal from neo1 had a longer life than the signal that came from phototropins. When two microbeams with the same wavelength and the same fluence rate were placed 20 μm apart from each other and were applied to a dark-adapted cell, chloroplasts at an equidistant position always moved towards the center (midpoint) of the two microbeams, but not towards either one. This result indicates that chloroplasts are detecting the concentration of the signal but not the direction of signal flow. Chloroplasts repeatedly move and stop at roughly 10 s intervals during the accumulation response, suggesting that they monitor the intermittent signal waves from photoreceptors.

  20. Interaction of actin and the chloroplast protein import apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jouhet, Juliette; Gray, John C

    2009-07-10

    Actin filaments are major components of the cytoskeleton and play numerous essential roles, including chloroplast positioning and plastid stromule movement, in plant cells. Actin is present in pea chloroplast envelope membrane preparations and is localized at the surface of the chloroplasts, as shown by agglutination of intact isolated chloroplasts by antibodies to actin. To identify chloroplast envelope proteins involved in actin binding, we have carried out actin co-immunoprecipitation and co-sedimentation experiments on detergent-solubilized pea chloroplast envelope membranes. Proteins co-immunoprecipitated with actin were identified by mass spectrometry and by Western blotting and included the Toc159, Toc75, Toc34, and Tic110 components of the TOC-TIC protein import apparatus. A direct interaction of actin with Escherichia coli-expressed Toc159, but not Toc33, was shown by co-sedimentation experiments, suggesting that Toc159 is the component of the TOC complex that interacts with actin on the cytosolic side of the outer envelope membrane. The physiological significance of this interaction is unknown, but it may play a role in the import of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis proteins.

  1. Speed of signal transfer in the chloroplast accumulation response.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-05-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plants to perform efficient photosynthesis. Phototropins were identified as blue-light receptors for chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana and in the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, whereas neochrome functions as a dual red/blue light receptor in the latter. However, the signal transduction pathways involved in chloroplast movement remain to be clarified. To investigate the kinetic properties of signalling from these photoreceptors to the chloroplasts, we deduced the speed of signal transfer using Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophytes. When a region of dark-adapted gametophyte cells was subjected to microbeam irradiation, chloroplasts moved towards the irradiated area even in subsequent darkness. We therefore recorded the movement and calculated the speeds of signal transfer by time-lapse imaging. Movement speeds under red or blue light were similar, e.g., about 1.0 microm min(-1) in prothallial cells. However, speeds varied according to cell polarity in protonemal cells. The speed of signal transfer from the protonemal apex to the base was approximately 0.7 microm min(-1), but roughly 2.3 microm min(-1) in the opposite direction. The speed of signal transfer in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells was approximately 0.8 microm min(-1) by comparison. Surprisingly, chloroplasts located farthest away from the microbeam were found to move faster than those in close proximity to the site of irradiation both in Adiantum capillus-veneris and A. thaliana.

  2. Cell biology of the chloroplast symbiosis in sacoglossan sea slugs.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sidney K; Curtis, Nicholas E

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts removed from their species of origin may survive for various periods and even photosynthesize in foreign cells. One of the best studied and impressively long, naturally occurring examples of chloroplast persistence, and function inside foreign cells are the algal chloroplasts taken up by specialized cells of certain sacoglossan sea slugs, a phenomenon called chloroplast symbiosis or kleptoplasty. Among sacoglossan species, kleptoplastic associations vary widely in length and function, with some animals immediately digesting chloroplasts, while others maintain functional plastids for over 10 months. Kleptoplasty is a complex process in long-term associations, and research on this topic has focused on a variety of aspects including plastid uptake and digestive physiology of the sea slugs, the longevity and maintenance of symbiotic associations, biochemical interactions between captured algal plastids and slug cells, and the role of horizontal gene transfers between the sea slug and algal food sources. Although the biochemistry underlying chloroplast symbiosis has been extensively examined in only a few slug species, it is obvious that the mechanisms vary from species to species. In this chapter, we examine those mechanisms from early discoveries to the most current research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surveying the Oligomeric State of Arabidopsis thaliana Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, Peter K; Mantegazza, Otho; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Weber, Andreas P M

    2017-01-09

    Blue native-PAGE (BN-PAGE) resolves protein complexes in their native state. When combined with immunoblotting, it can be used to identify the presence of high molecular weight complexes at high resolution for any protein, given a suitable antibody. To identify proteins in high molecular weight complexes on a large scale and to bypass the requirement for specific antibodies, we applied a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) approach to BN-PAGE-resolved chloroplasts. Fractionation of the gel into six bands allowed identification and label-free quantification of 1000 chloroplast proteins with native molecular weight separation. Significantly, this approach achieves a depth of identification comparable with traditional shotgun proteomic analyses of chloroplasts, indicating much of the known chloroplast proteome is amenable to MS/MS identification under our fractionation scheme. By limiting the number of fractionation bands to six, we facilitate scaled-up comparative analyses, as we demonstrate with the reticulata chloroplast mutant displaying a reticulated leaf phenotype. Our comparative proteomics approach identified a candidate interacting protein of RETICULATA as well as effects on lipid remodeling proteins, amino acid metabolic enzymes, and plastid division machinery. We additionally highlight selected proteins from each sub-compartment of the chloroplast that provide novel insight on known or hypothesized protein complexes to further illustrate the utility of this approach. Our results demonstrate the high sensitivity and reproducibility of this technique, which is anticipated to be widely adaptable to other sub-cellular compartments.

  4. Energetic and regulatory role of proton potential in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, A N

    2012-09-01

    The review focuses on the energetic and regulatory role of proton potential in the activity of chloroplasts, the light energy-converting organelles of plant cells. Mechanisms of generation of the transmembrane difference of electrochemical potentials of hydrogen ions (Δµ(~)(H+)) in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes are considered. Methods for measuring the intrathylakoid pH in chloroplasts are described. It is shown that under conditions of phosphorylation in chloroplasts, the pH of the intrathylakoid space decreases moderately (pH(in) ≥ 6.0-6.2, at the stroma pH(out) ≈ 7.8-8.0), with a corresponding concentration component of Δµ(~)(H+) equal to ΔpH ≤ 1.6-2.0. On analyzing the energy and structural features of ATP synthase of chloroplasts, we conclude that the energy stored as the concentration component of the proton potential ΔpH is sufficient to sustain ATP synthesis. The mechanisms of pH-dependent regulation of electron transport in chloroplasts (photosynthetic control of electron transport, enhancement of non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll excitation in the light-harvesting antenna, light-induced activation of the Calvin-Benson cycle reactions, activation of ATP synthase) are considered briefly.

  5. Novel mechanisms for maturation of chloroplast transfer RNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming Jing; Davis, N. Wayne; Gegenheimer, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Despite the prokaryotic origins of chloroplasts, a plant chloroplast tRNA precursor is processed in a homologous in vitro system by a pathway distinct from that observed in Escherichia coli, but identical to that utilized for maturation of nuclear pre-tRNAs. The mature tRNA 5' terminus is generated by the site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of an RNase P (or P-type) activity. The 3' end is likewise produced by a single precise endonucleolytic cut at the 3' terminus of the encoded tRNA domain. This is the first complete structural characterization of an organellar tRNA processing system using a homologous substrate. In contrast to eubacterial RNase P, chloroplast RNase P does not appear to contain an RNA subunit. The chloroplast activity bands with bulk protein at 1.28 g/ml in CsCI density gradients, whereas E.coli RNase P bands as ribonucleoprotein at 1.73 g/ml. Chloroplast RNase P activity survives treatment with micrococcal nuclease (MN) at levels 10- to 100-fold higher than those required to totally inactivate the E.coli enzyme. The chloroplast system is sensitive to a suppression of tRNA processing, caused by binding of inactive MN to pre-tRNA substrate, which is readily overcome by addition of carrier RNA to the assay. Images PMID:16453848

  6. Amino acid incorporation by ribosomes and polyribosomes from wheat chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Hadziyev, D.; Zalik, Saul

    1970-01-01

    Sucrose-gradient and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that chloroplast polyribosomes from 4-day-old seedlings had mono-, di-, tri-, tetra- and traces of penta-ribosomes, in contrast with those from 7-day-old seedlings in which only the mono-, di- and traces of tri-ribosomes were present. Without Mg2+ the polyribosomes dissociated into ribosomal subunits. The rate of l-[U-14C]phenylalanine incorporation was threefold greater for preparations from 4- than from 7-day-old seedlings. Incorporation by the latter was stimulated by polyuridylic acid. The rates of incorporation were similar whether the reaction mixture contained chloroplast or wheat-germ transfer RNA and amino acid synthetases purified on methylated albumin-on-kieselguhr and Sephadex G-75 columns respectively. The cofactor requirement was the same as for isolated intact chloroplasts. Osmotic rupture of chloroplasts with and without Triton X-100 revealed the presence of free and bound ribosomes. Free single ribosomes isolated by osmotic shrinkage or prepared by pancreatic ribonuclease digestion of chloroplast polyribosomes had negligible incorporation activity. This activity was increased by washing or by polyuridylic acid, but was still only a fraction of that given by polyribosomes. A comparison of incorporation activity of chloroplast polyribosomes with those from the surrounding cytoplasm showed the former to be 20 times more active. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 9. PMID:5411422

  7. Regulation of Chloroplast Photosynthetic Activity by Exogenous Magnesium 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.

    1978-01-01

    Magnesium was most inhibitory to photosynthetic reactions by intact chloroplasts when the magnesium was added in the dark before illumination. Two millimolar MgCl2, added in the dark, inhibited CO2-dependent O2 evolution by Hordeum vulgare L. and Spinacia oleracea L. (C3 plants) chloroplasts 70 to 100% and inhibited (pyruvate + oxaloacetate)-dependent O2 evolution by Digitaria sanguinalis L. (C4 plant) mesophyll chloroplasts from 80 to 100%. When Mg2+ was added in the light, O2 evolution was reduced only slightly. O2 evolution in the presence of phosphoglycerate was less sensitive to Mg2+ inhibition than was CO2-dependent O2 evolution. Magnesium prevented the light activation of several photosynthetic enzymes. Two millimolar Mg2+ blocked the light activation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase in D. sanguinalis mesophyll chloroplasts, and the light activation of phosphoribulokinase, NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase in barley chloroplasts. The results suggest that Mg2+ inhibits chloroplast photosynthesis by preventing the light activation of certain enzymes. PMID:16660509

  8. Interspecific chloroplast recombination in a Nicotiana somatic hybrid.

    PubMed

    Medgyesy, P; Fejes, E; Maliga, P

    1985-10-01

    Genetic recombination between chloroplasts of two flowering plant species, Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, after somatic cell fusion is described. The parental lines differed in three cytoplasmic genetic markers. The N. tabacum mutant SR1-A15 was streptomycin-resistant, defective in chloroplast greening, and lincomycin-sensitive. The N. plumbaginifolia mutant LR400 was streptomycin-sensitive, normal green, and lincomycin-resistant. Streptomycin-resistant clones in cell culture are identified by their ability to form a green callus on a selective medium. Streptomycin resistance in the SR1-A15 mutant could not be expressed due to defective chloroplasts. Protoplasts of the two species were fused, and calli grown from the fused population were screened for the expression of streptomycin resistance from the SR1-A15 line as the result of interspecific chloroplast recombination. A somatic hybrid, pt14, expressed a new combination of the cytoplasmic genetic markers. In the pt14 chloroplast genome three N. tabacum and four N. plumbaginifolia parent specific restriction sites have been identified, indicating that the pt14 chloroplast genome contains at least six recombination sites.

  9. Transmission of paternal chloroplasts in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Horlow, C; Goujaud, J; Lépingle, A; Missonier, C; Bourgin, J P

    1990-09-01

    Medgyesy et al. (1986, Mol. Gen. Genet. 204, 195-198) have described in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and in an interspecific cross involving N. plumbaginifolia and N. tabacum a procedure for selecting cell lines derived from seedlings carrying paternal chloroplasts by taking advantage of a plastid-encoded mutation which confers resistance to streptomycin. We have extended their demonstration of occasional transmission of chloroplasts through pollen to the case of an intraspecific cross in N. tabacum. The line used as maternal parent, ITB19(sua), displayed a cytoplasmic male sterility due to the presence of a cytoplasm originating from N. suaveolens. The line used as paternal parent, SR1, was fertile and possessed mutant chloroplasts conferring resistance to streptomycin. From cell lines derived from 204 seedlings, three were regenerated into streptomycin-resistant buds. The plants derived from these three clones were male-sterile. Their progeny, after crossing with a wild type tobacco line, XHFD8, was resistant to streptomycin. Tests of resistance of the seedlings to tentoxin and restriction analyses of the chloroplast DNA indicated that two clones still had the maternal chloroplasts and were thus probably new streptomycin-resistant mutants, whereas the third one had acquired the chloroplasts of the paternal parent, but had retained the mitochondria of the maternal parent.

  10. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  11. Ferns, mosses and liverworts as model systems for light-mediated chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-11-17

    Light-induced chloroplast movement is found in most plant species, including algae and land plants. In land plants with multiple small chloroplasts, under weak light conditions, the chloroplasts move towards the light and accumulate on the periclinal cell walls to efficiently perceive light for photosynthesis (the accumulation response). Under strong light conditions, chloroplasts escape from light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). In most plant species, blue light induces chloroplast movement, and phototropin receptor kinases are the blue light receptors. Molecular mechanisms for photoreceptors, signal transduction and chloroplast motility systems are being studied using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, to further understand the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary history of chloroplast movement in green plants, analyses using other plant systems are required. Here, we review recent works on chloroplast movement in green algae, liverwort, mosses and ferns that provide new insights on chloroplast movement.

  12. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pseudotaxus chienii developed from the whole chloroplast genome of Taxus chinensis var. mairei (Taxaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qi; Zhang, Hanrui; He, Yipeng; Wang, Ting; Su, Yingjuan

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Pseudotaxus chienii (Taxaceae) is an old rare species endemic to China that has adapted well to ecological heterogeneity with high genetic diversity in its nuclear genome. However, the genetic variation in its chloroplast genome is unknown. Methods and Results: Eighteen chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) were developed from the whole chloroplast genome of Taxus chinensis var. mairei and successfully amplified in four P. chienii populations and one T. chinensis var. mairei population. Of these loci, 10 were polymorphic in P. chienii, whereas six were polymorphic in T. chinensis var. mairei. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.000 to 0.641 and 0.000 to 0.545 for P. chienii and T. chinensis var. mairei, respectively. Conclusions: The 18 cpSSRs will be used to further investigate the chloroplast genetic structure and adaptive evolution in P. chienii populations. PMID:28337394

  13. Multiple feedbacks between chloroplast and whole plant in the context of plant adaptation and acclimation to the environment

    PubMed Central

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Stewart, Jared J.; Adams, William W.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on feedback pathways that serve to match plant energy acquisition with plant energy utilization, and thereby aid in the optimization of chloroplast and whole-plant function in a given environment. First, the role of source–sink signalling in adjusting photosynthetic capacity (light harvesting, photochemistry and carbon fixation) to meet whole-plant carbohydrate demand is briefly reviewed. Contrasting overall outcomes, i.e. increased plant growth versus plant growth arrest, are described and related to respective contrasting environments that either do or do not present opportunities for plant growth. Next, new insights into chloroplast-generated oxidative signals, and their modulation by specific components of the chloroplast's photoprotective network, are reviewed with respect to their ability to block foliar phloem-loading complexes, and, thereby, affect both plant growth and plant biotic defences. Lastly, carbon export capacity is described as a newly identified tuning point that has been subjected to the evolution of differential responses in plant varieties (ecotypes) and species from different geographical origins with contrasting environmental challenges. PMID:24591724

  14. Multiple feedbacks between chloroplast and whole plant in the context of plant adaptation and acclimation to the environment.

    PubMed

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Stewart, Jared J; Adams, William W

    2014-04-19

    This review focuses on feedback pathways that serve to match plant energy acquisition with plant energy utilization, and thereby aid in the optimization of chloroplast and whole-plant function in a given environment. First, the role of source-sink signalling in adjusting photosynthetic capacity (light harvesting, photochemistry and carbon fixation) to meet whole-plant carbohydrate demand is briefly reviewed. Contrasting overall outcomes, i.e. increased plant growth versus plant growth arrest, are described and related to respective contrasting environments that either do or do not present opportunities for plant growth. Next, new insights into chloroplast-generated oxidative signals, and their modulation by specific components of the chloroplast's photoprotective network, are reviewed with respect to their ability to block foliar phloem-loading complexes, and, thereby, affect both plant growth and plant biotic defences. Lastly, carbon export capacity is described as a newly identified tuning point that has been subjected to the evolution of differential responses in plant varieties (ecotypes) and species from different geographical origins with contrasting environmental challenges.

  15. Proteomic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants uncovers novel proteins potentially involved in the development of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    de Luna-Valdez, L A; Martínez-Batallar, A G; Hernández-Ortiz, M; Encarnación-Guevara, S; Ramos-Vega, M; López-Bucio, J S; León, P; Guevara-García, A A

    2014-12-05

    Plant cells outstand for their ability to generate biomass from inorganic sources, this phenomenon takes place within the chloroplasts. The enzymatic machinery and developmental processes of chloroplasts have been subject of research for several decades, and this has resulted in the identification of a plethora of proteins that are essential for their development and function. Mutant lines for the genes that code for those proteins, often display pigment-accumulation defects (e.g., albino phenotypes). Here, we present a comparative proteomic analysis of four chloroplast-biogenesis affected mutants (cla1-1, clb2, clb5, clb19) aiming to identify novel proteins involved in the regulation of chloroplast development in Arabidopsis thaliana. We performed 2D-PAGE separation of the protein samples. These samples were then analyzed by computational processing of gel images in order to select protein spots with abundance shifts of at least twofold, statistically significant according to Student's t-test (P<0.01). These spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry for protein identification. This process resulted in the discovery of three novel proteins potentially involved in the development of A. thaliana chloroplasts, as their associated mutant lines segregate pigment-deficient plants with abnormal chloroplasts, and altered mRNA accumulation of chloroplast-development marker genes. This report highlights the potential of using a comparative proteomics strategy for the study of biological processes. Particularly, we compared the proteomes of wild-type seedlings and four mutant lines of A. thaliana affected in chloroplast biogenesis. From this proteomic analysis it was possible to detect common mechanisms in the mutants to respond to stress and cope with heterotrophy. Notably, it was possible to identify three novel proteins potentially involved in the development or functioning of chloroplasts, also it was demonstrated that plants annotated to carry T-DNA insertions

  16. Improvement of Bacillus circulans beta-amylase activity attained using the ancestral mutation method.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Kan; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Koikeda, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2010-07-01

    Thermostabilization of enzymes is one of the greatest challenges of protein engineering. The ancestral mutation method, which introduces ancestral residues into a target enzyme, has previously been developed and used to improve the thermostabilities of thermophilic enzymes. Herein, we report a study that used the ancestral mutation method to improve the thermostability of Bacillus circulans beta-amylase, a mesophilic enzyme. A bacterial, common-ancestral beta-amylase sequence was inferred using a phylogenetic tree composed of higher plant and bacterial amylase sequences. Eighteen mutants containing ancestral residues were designed, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Several of these mutants were more thermostable than that of the wild-type amylase. Notably, one mutant had both greater activity and greater thermostability. The relationship between the extent to which the amino acid residues within 5 A of the mutation site were evolutionarily conserved and the extent to which thermostability was improved was examined. Apparently, it is necessary to conserve the residues surrounding an ancestral residue if thermostability is to be improved by the ancestral mutation method.

  17. Characterization of Reconstructed Ancestral Proteins Suggests a Change in Temperature of the Ancient Biosphere.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Satoshi

    2017-08-06

    Understanding the evolution of ancestral life, and especially the ability of some organisms to flourish in the variable environments experienced in Earth's early biosphere, requires knowledge of the characteristics and the environment of these ancestral organisms. Information about early life and environmental conditions has been obtained from fossil records and geological surveys. Recent advances in phylogenetic analysis, and an increasing number of protein sequences available in public databases, have made it possible to infer ancestral protein sequences possessed by ancient organisms. However, the in silico studies that assess the ancestral base content of ribosomal RNAs, the frequency of each amino acid in ancestral proteins, and estimate the environmental temperatures of ancient organisms, show conflicting results. The characterization of ancestral proteins reconstructed in vitro suggests that ancient organisms had very thermally stable proteins, and therefore were thermophilic or hyperthermophilic. Experimental data supports the idea that only thermophilic ancestors survived the catastrophic increase in temperature of the biosphere that was likely associated with meteorite impacts during the early history of Earth. In addition, by expanding the timescale and including more ancestral proteins for reconstruction, it appears as though the Earth's surface temperature gradually decreased over time, from Archean to present.

  18. On the Number of Non-equivalent Ancestral Configurations for Matching Gene Trees and Species Trees.

    PubMed

    Disanto, Filippo; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2017-09-14

    An ancestral configuration is one of the combinatorially distinct sets of gene lineages that, for a given gene tree, can reach a given node of a specified species tree. Ancestral configurations have appeared in recursive algebraic computations of the conditional probability that a gene tree topology is produced under the multispecies coalescent model for a given species tree. For matching gene trees and species trees, we study the number of ancestral configurations, considered up to an equivalence relation introduced by Wu (Evolution 66:763-775, 2012) to reduce the complexity of the recursive probability computation. We examine the largest number of non-equivalent ancestral configurations possible for a given tree size n. Whereas the smallest number of non-equivalent ancestral configurations increases polynomially with n, we show that the largest number increases with [Formula: see text], where k is a constant that satisfies [Formula: see text]. Under a uniform distribution on the set of binary labeled trees with a given size n, the mean number of non-equivalent ancestral configurations grows exponentially with n. The results refine an earlier analysis of the number of ancestral configurations considered without applying the equivalence relation, showing that use of the equivalence relation does not alter the exponential nature of the increase with tree size.

  19. In vitro evaluation of mitochondrial-chloroplast subcellular localization of heme oxygenase1 (HO1) in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shubham; Verma, Khushbu; Shekhawat, Gyan Singh

    2014-05-01

    Heme oxygenase1 (HO1) catalyzes the degradation of heme in to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and ferrous ions. Its role in higher plants has been found as an antioxidant and precursor of phytochrome synthesis. The present study focuses on subcellular localization of HO1 in leaves of soybean has been investigated. Most activity appeared to be located within chloroplast due to its role in phytochrome synthesis but mitochondria also share its localization. Mitochondrial location of HO1 might be on its inner membranous space due to its role in the synthesis of electron donor species which facilitates HO1 catalyzed reaction. Study reports the co-localization of HO1 in both chloroplast and mitochondria.

  20. Rapid severing and motility of chloroplast-actin filaments are required for the chloroplast avoidance response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yanagida, Toshio; Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-02-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis thaliana) relay blue light intensity information to the chloroplasts, which move toward weak light (the accumulation response) and away from strong light (the avoidance response). Chloroplast-actin (cp-actin) filaments are vital for mediating these chloroplast photorelocation movements. In this report, we examine in detail the cp-actin filament dynamics by which the chloroplast avoidance response is regulated. Although stochastic dynamics of cortical actin fragments are observed on the chloroplasts, the basic mechanisms underlying the disappearance (including severing and turnover) of the cp-actin filaments are regulated differently from those of cortical actin filaments. phot2 plays a pivotal role in the strong blue light-induced severing and random motility of cp-actin filaments, processes that are therefore essential for asymmetric cp-actin formation for the avoidance response. In addition, phot2 functions in the bundling of cp-actin filaments that is induced by dark incubation. By contrast, the function of phot1 is dispensable for these responses. Our findings suggest that phot2 is the primary photoreceptor involved in the rapid reorganization of cp-actin filaments that allows chloroplasts to change direction rapidly and control the velocity of the avoidance movement according to the light's intensity and position.

  1. Evidence for chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase participating in the chloroplastic respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Gombos, Z.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-07-01

    A method for isolating intact chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 was developed from the Klein, Chen, Gibbs, Platt-Aloia procedure. Protoplasts, generated by treatment with autolysine, were lysed with a solution of digitonin and fractionated on Percoll step gradients. The chloroplasts were assessed to be 90% intact (ferricyanide assay) and free from cytoplasmic contamination (NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase activity) and to range from 2 to 5% in mitochondrial contamination (cytochrome c oxidase activity). About 25% of the cellular succinate dehydrogenase activity (21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, as determined enzymically) was placed within the chloroplast. Chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase had a K{sub m} for succinate of 0.55 millimolar and was associated with the thylakoidal material derived from the intact chloroplasts. This same thylakoidal material, with an enzymic assay of 21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour was able to initiate a light-dependent uptake of oxygen at a rate of 16.4 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour when supplied with succinate and methyl viologen. Malonate was an apparent competitive inhibitor of this reaction. The succinate dehydrogenase activity present in the chloroplast was sufficient to account for the photoanaerobic rate of acetate dissimilation in H{sub 2} adapted Chlamydomonas.

  2. Hominoid seminal protein evolution and ancestral mating behavior.

    PubMed

    Carnahan, Sarah J; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I

    2008-10-01

    Hominoid mating systems show extensive variation among species. The degree of sexual dimorphism in body size and canine size varies among primates in accordance with their mating system, as does the testes size and the consistency of ejaculated semen, in response to differing levels of sperm competition. To investigate patterns of evolution at hominoid seminal proteins and to make inferences regarding the mating systems of extinct taxa, we sequenced the entire coding region of the prostate-specific transglutaminase (TGM4) gene in human, chimpanzee, bonobo, western lowland gorilla, eastern lowland gorilla, orangutan, and siamang, including multiple humans, chimps, and gorillas. Partial DNA sequence of the coding regions was also obtained for one eastern lowland gorilla at the semenogelin genes (SEMG1 and SEMG2), which code for the predominant proteins in semen. Patterns of nucleotide variation and inferred protein sequence change were evaluated within and between species. Combining the present data with previous studies demonstrates a high rate of amino acid substitutions, and low intraspecific variation, at seminal proteins in Pan, presumably driven by strong sperm competition. Both gorilla species apparently possess nonfunctional TGM4, SEMG1, and SEMG2 genes, suggesting that gorillas have had low sperm competition, and therefore their current polygynous mating system, for a long time before their divergence. Similarly, orangutans show longstanding stasis at TGM4, which may be interpreted as evidence for an unchanging mating system for most of their evolution after their divergence from African apes. In contrast to the great apes, the data from humans could be interpreted as evidence of fluctuations between different mating systems or alternatively as a relaxed functional constraint in these proteins. It is our hope that this study is a first step toward developing a model to predict ancestral mating systems from extant molecular data to complement interpretations

  3. Genome-Wide Inference of Ancestral Recombination Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Gronau, Ilan; Siepel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The complex correlation structure of a collection of orthologous DNA sequences is uniquely captured by the “ancestral recombination graph” (ARG), a complete record of coalescence and recombination events in the history of the sample. However, existing methods for ARG inference are computationally intensive, highly approximate, or limited to small numbers of sequences, and, as a consequence, explicit ARG inference is rarely used in applied population genomics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm for ARG inference that is efficient enough to apply to dozens of complete mammalian genomes. The key idea of our approach is to sample an ARG of chromosomes conditional on an ARG of chromosomes, an operation we call “threading.” Using techniques based on hidden Markov models, we can perform this threading operation exactly, up to the assumptions of the sequentially Markov coalescent and a discretization of time. An extension allows for threading of subtrees instead of individual sequences. Repeated application of these threading operations results in highly efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo samplers for ARGs. We have implemented these methods in a computer program called ARGweaver. Experiments with simulated data indicate that ARGweaver converges rapidly to the posterior distribution over ARGs and is effective in recovering various features of the ARG for dozens of sequences generated under realistic parameters for human populations. In applications of ARGweaver to 54 human genome sequences from Complete Genomics, we find clear signatures of natural selection, including regions of unusually ancient ancestry associated with balancing selection and reductions in allele age in sites under directional selection. The patterns we observe near protein-coding genes are consistent with a primary influence from background selection rather than hitchhiking, although we cannot rule out a contribution from recurrent selective sweeps. PMID:24831947

  4. Ancestral Heterogeneity in a Bi-ethnic Stroke Population

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Lynda D; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Burke, David T; Sun, Yan V; Long, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To test for and characterize heterogeneity in ancestral contributions to individuals among a population of Mexican American (MA) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) stroke/TIA cases, data from a community-based stroke surveillance study in south Texas were used. Strokes/TIA cases were identified (2004–2006) with a random sample asked to provide blood. Race-ethnicity was self-reported. Thirty-three ancestry informative markers (AIMs) were genotyped and individual genetic admixture estimated using maximum likelihood methods. Three hypotheses were tested for each MA using likelihood ratio tests: 1) H0: μi=0 (100% Native American), 2) H0: μi=1.00 (100% European), 3) H0: μi=0.59 (average European). Among 154 self-identified MAs, estimated European ancestry varied from 0.26–0.98, with an average of 0.59(se=0.014). We rejected hypothesis 1 for every MA and rejected hypothesis 2 for all but two MAs. We rejected hypothesis 3 for 40 MAs (20<59%, 20>59%). Among 84 self-identified NHWs, the estimated fraction of European ancestry ranged from 0.83–1.0, with an average of 0.97 (se=0.014). Self-identified MAs, and to a lesser extent NHWs, from an established bi-ethnic community were heterogeneous with respect to genetic admixture. Researchers should not use simple race-ethnic categories as proxies for homogeneous genetic populations when conducting gene mapping and disease association studies in multi-ethnic populations. PMID:21668907

  5. The Microcephalin Ancestral Allele in a Neanderthal Individual

    PubMed Central

    Lari, Martina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Milani, Lucio; Corti, Giorgio; Balsamo, Carlotta; Vai, Stefania; Catalano, Giulio; Pilli, Elena; Longo, Laura; Condemi, Silvana; Giunti, Paolo; Hänni, Catherine; De Bellis, Gianluca; Orlando, Ludovic; Barbujani, Guido; Caramelli, David

    2010-01-01

    Background The high frequency (around 0.70 worlwide) and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years) of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the first PCR amplification and high- throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy). We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. Conclusions/Significance The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS) Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA. PMID:20498832

  6. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  7. Geography disentangles introgression from ancestral polymorphism in Lake Malawi cichlids.

    PubMed

    Mims, Meryl C; Darrin Hulsey, C; Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M; Streelman, J Todd

    2010-03-01

    Phenotypically diverse Lake Malawi cichlids exhibit similar genomes. The extensive sharing of genetic polymorphism among forms has both intrigued and frustrated biologists trying to understand the nature of diversity in this and other rapidly evolving systems. Shared polymorphism might result from hybridization and/or the retention of ancestrally polymorphic alleles. To examine these alternatives, we used new genomic tools to characterize genetic differentiation in widespread, geographically structured populations of Labeotropheus fuelleborni and Metriaclima zebra. These phenotypically distinct species share mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and show greater mtDNA differentiation among localities than between species. However, Bayesian analysis of nuclear single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data revealed two distinct genetic clusters corresponding perfectly to morphologically diagnosed L. fuelleborni and M. zebra. This result is a function of the resolving power of the multi-locus dataset, not a conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial partitions. Locus-by-locus analysis showed that mtDNA differentiation between species (F(CT)) was nearly identical to the median single-locus SNP F(CT). Finally, we asked whether there is evidence for gene flow at sites of co-occurrence. We used simulations to generate a null distribution for the level of differentiation between co-occurring populations of L. fuelleborni and M. zebra expected if there was no hybridization. The null hypothesis was rejected for the SNP data; populations that co-occur at rock reef sites were slightly more similar than expected by chance, suggesting recent gene flow. The coupling of numerous independent markers with extensive geographic sampling and simulations utilized here provides a framework for assessing the prevalence of gene flow in recently diverged species.

  8. Ancestral Genomes, Sex, and the Population Structure of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Bastos-Rodrigues, Luciana; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Teixeira, Santuza M. R; Chiari, Egler; Junqueira, Ângela C. V; Fernandes, Octavio; Macedo, Andréa M; Machado, Carlos Renato; Pena, Sérgio D. J

    2006-01-01

    Acquisition of detailed knowledge of the structure and evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi populations is essential for control of Chagas disease. We profiled 75 strains of the parasite with five nuclear microsatellite loci, 24Sα RNA genes, and sequence polymorphisms in the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. We also used sequences available in GenBank for the mitochondrial genes cytochrome B and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1. A multidimensional scaling plot (MDS) based in microsatellite data divided the parasites into four clusters corresponding to T. cruzi I (MDS-cluster A), T. cruzi II (MDS-cluster C), a third group of T. cruzi strains (MDS-cluster B), and hybrid strains (MDS-cluster BH). The first two clusters matched respectively mitochondrial clades A and C, while the other two belonged to mitochondrial clade B. The 24Sα rDNA and microsatellite profiling data were combined into multilocus genotypes that were analyzed by the haplotype reconstruction program PHASE. We identified 141 haplotypes that were clearly distributed into three haplogroups (X, Y, and Z). All strains belonging to T. cruzi I (MDS-cluster A) were Z/Z, the T. cruzi II strains (MDS-cluster C) were Y/Y, and those belonging to MDS-cluster B (unclassified T. cruzi) had X/X haplogroup genotypes. The strains grouped in the MDS-cluster BH were X/Y, confirming their hybrid character. Based on these results we propose the following minimal scenario for T. cruzi evolution. In a distant past there were at a minimum three ancestral lineages that we may call, respectively, T. cruzi I, T. cruzi II, and T. cruzi III. At least two hybridization events involving T. cruzi II and T. cruzi III produced evolutionarily viable progeny. In both events, the mitochondrial recipient (as identified by the mitochondrial clade of the hybrid strains) was T. cruzi II and the mitochondrial donor was T. cruzi III. PMID:16609729

  9. Reconstructing the ancestral butterfly eye: focus on the opsins.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Adriana D

    2008-06-01

    The eyes of butterflies are remarkable, because they are nearly as diverse as the colors of wings. Much of eye diversity can be traced to alterations in the number, spectral properties and spatial distribution of the visual pigments. Visual pigments are light-sensitive molecules composed of an opsin protein and a chromophore. Most butterflies have eyes that contain visual pigments with a wavelength of peak absorbance, lambda(max), in the ultraviolet (UV, 300-400 nm), blue (B, 400-500 nm) and long wavelength (LW, 500-600 nm) part of the visible light spectrum, respectively, encoded by distinct UV, B and LW opsin genes. In the compound eye of butterflies, each individual ommatidium is composed of nine photoreceptor cells (R1-9) that generally express only one opsin mRNA per cell, although in some butterfly eyes there are ommatidial subtypes in which two opsins are co-expressed in the same photoreceptor cell. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of opsin cDNAs from the five butterfly families, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Lycaenidae and Riodinidae, and comparative analysis of opsin gene expression patterns from four of the five families, I propose a model for the patterning of the ancestral butterfly eye that is most closely aligned with the nymphalid eye. The R1 and R2 cells of the main retina expressed UV-UV-, UV-B- or B-B-absorbing visual pigments while the R3-9 cells expressed a LW-absorbing visual pigment. Visual systems of existing butterflies then underwent an adaptive expansion based on lineage-specific B and LW opsin gene multiplications and on alterations in the spatial expression of opsins within the eye. Understanding the molecular sophistication of butterfly eye complexity is a challenge that, if met, has broad biological implications.

  10. Ancestral and novel roles of Pax family genes in mollusks.

    PubMed

    Scherholz, Maik; Redl, Emanuel; Wollesen, Tim; de Oliveira, André Luiz; Todt, Christiane; Wanninger, Andreas

    2017-03-16

    Pax genes are transcription factors with significant roles in cell fate specification and tissue differentiation during animal ontogeny. Most information on their tempo-spatial mode of expression is available from well-studied model organisms where the Pax-subfamilies Pax2/5/8, Pax6, and Paxα/β are mainly involved in the development of the central nervous system (CNS), the eyes, and other sensory organs. In certain taxa, Pax2/5/8 seems to be additionally involved in the development of excretion organs. Data on expression patterns in lophotrochozoans, and in particular in mollusks, are very scarce for all the above-mentioned Pax-subfamilies, which hampers reconstruction of their putative ancestral roles in bilaterian animals. Thus, we studied the developmental expression of Pax2/5/8, Pax6, and the lophotrochozoan-specific Paxβ in the worm-shaped mollusk Wirenia argentea, a member of Aplacophora that together with Polyplacophora forms the Aculifera, the proposed sister taxon to all primarily single-shelled mollusks (Conchifera). All investigated Pax genes are expressed in the developing cerebral ganglia and in the ventral nerve cords, but not in the lateral nerve cords of the tetraneural nervous system. Additionally, Pax2/5/8 is expressed in epidermal spicule-secreting or associated cells of the larval trunk and in the region of the developing protonephridia. We found no indication for an involvement of the investigated Pax genes in the development of larval or adult sensory organs of Wirenia argentea. Pax2/5/8 seems to have a conserved role in the development of the CNS, whereas expression in the spicule-secreting tissues of aplacophorans and polyplacophorans suggests co-option in aculiferan skeletogenesis. The Pax6 expression pattern in Aculifera largely resembles the common bilaterian expression during CNS development. All data available on Paxβ expression argue for a common role in lophotrochozoan neurogenesis.

  11. On the tomato trail: in search of ancestral roots.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, Barry

    2010-01-01

    A profile of Roger Chetelat, the director of the C.M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center at the University of California, Davis. Chetelat maintains one of the largest collections of tomato seeds in the world. Many of those seeds come from wild tomato species that Chetelat and his associates collect on field research trips to the dry coastal areas of Chile, Peru, and Ecuador. Wild tomatoes are tough, versatile organisms that have evolved resistance to virtually all common tomato diseases and pests and stubbornly tolerate extreme environmental conditions. Some boast extraordinarily high levels of sugars, beta carotene, vitamin C, lycopene, and antioxidants. Chetelat has dedicated his career to finding and preserving these genetic riches. Modern cultivated tomatoes are a frail, inbred lot. They all trace their origins to a single, wild tomato plant that underwent a random mutation sometime in prehistory. Because of this genetic fluke, that plant's fruits were plump, juicy, and many, many times larger than the output of its progenitors. Offspring from that tomato were taken away from the Andes and domesticated in what is present-day Mexico, becoming severed from their wild ancestors and the vast pool of genetic diversity that tomatoes had evolved over the millennia. Botanists call this a “bottleneck.” It leaves subsequent generations susceptible to disease and unable to adjust to rapid climate changes. The stored wild seeds at the Rick Center enable plant breeders to re-incorporate desirable wild traits into new tomato varieties, literally reconnecting them to their ancestral roots, ensuring that this vast reservoir of genetic diversity will be available when it is needed.

  12. Plausibility of inferred ancestral phenotypes and the evaluation of alternative models of limb evolution in scincid lizards.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Adam; Lee, Michael S Y

    2010-06-23

    Phylogenetic approaches to inferring ancestral character states are becoming increasingly sophisticated; however, the potential remains for available methods to yield strongly supported but inaccurate ancestral state estimates. The consistency of ancestral states inferred for two or more characters affords a useful criterion for evaluating ancestral trait reconstructions. Ancestral state estimates for multiple characters that entail plausible phenotypes when considered together may reasonably be assumed to be reliable. However, the accuracy of inferred ancestral states for one or more characters may be questionable where combined reconstructions imply implausible phenotypes for a proportion of internal nodes. This criterion for assessing reconstructed ancestral states is applied here in evaluating inferences of ancestral limb morphology in the scincid lizard clade Lerista. Ancestral numbers of digits for the manus and pes inferred assuming the models that best fit the data entail ancestral digit configurations for many nodes that differ fundamentally from configurations observed among known species. However, when an alternative model is assumed for the pes, inferred ancestral digit configurations are invariably represented among observed phenotypes. This indicates that a suboptimal model for the pes (and not the model providing the best fit to the data) yields accurate ancestral state estimates.

  13. Dimorphic chloroplasts in the epidermis of Podostemoideae, a subfamily of the unique aquatic angiosperm family Podostemaceae.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Rieko; Yoshihama, Isao; Imaichi, Ryoko

    2011-09-01

    Plants of the Podostemoideae, a subfamily of the unique aquatic angiosperm family Podostemaceae, which are found in rapids and waterfalls of the tropics and subtropics, have two different sizes of chloroplasts in their epidermis. These small and large chloroplasts are located separately in each epidermal cell along its upper and inner tangential walls, respectively. This is the first case of the chloroplast dimorphism in a single epidermal cell of angiosperms. While the large chloroplasts have well developed starch grains, the small chloroplasts have a normal granal ultrastructure but very few starch grains. This suggests that the small chloroplasts mainly function in CO(2) uptake for photosynthesis from torrential water.

  14. Proliferation of group II introns in the chloroplast genome of the green alga Oedocladium carolinianum (Chlorophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Otis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background The chloroplast genome sustained extensive changes in architecture during the evolution of the Chlorophyceae, a morphologically and ecologically diverse class of green algae belonging to the Chlorophyta; however, the forces driving these changes are poorly understood. The five orders recognized in the Chlorophyceae form two major clades: the CS clade consisting of the Chlamydomonadales and Sphaeropleales, and the OCC clade consisting of the Oedogoniales, Chaetophorales, and Chaetopeltidales. In the OCC clade, considerable variations in chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) structure, size, gene order, and intron content have been observed. The large inverted repeat (IR), an ancestral feature characteristic of most green plants, is present in Oedogonium cardiacum (Oedogoniales) but is lacking in the examined members of the Chaetophorales and Chaetopeltidales. Remarkably, the Oedogonium 35.5-kb IR houses genes that were putatively acquired through horizontal DNA transfer. To better understand the dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution in the Oedogoniales, we analyzed the cpDNA of a second representative of this order, Oedocladium carolinianum. Methods The Oedocladium cpDNA was sequenced and annotated. The evolutionary distances separating Oedocladium and Oedogonium cpDNAs and two other pairs of chlorophycean cpDNAs were estimated using a 61-gene data set. Phylogenetic analysis of an alignment of group IIA introns from members of the OCC clade was performed. Secondary structures and insertion sites of oedogonialean group IIA introns were analyzed. Results The 204,438-bp Oedocladium genome is 7.9 kb larger than the Oedogonium genome, but its repertoire of conserved genes is remarkably similar and gene order differs by only one reversal. Although the 23.7-kb IR is missing the putative foreign genes found in Oedogonium, it contains sequences coding for a putative phage or bacterial DNA primase and a hypothetical protein. Intergenic sequences are 1.5-fold longer and

  15. The Physcomitrella patens Chloroplast Proteome Changes in Response to Protoplastation

    PubMed Central

    Fesenko, Igor; Seredina, Anna; Arapidi, Georgij; Ptushenko, Vasily; Urban, Anatoly; Butenko, Ivan; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Babalyan, Konstantin; Knyazev, Andrey; Khazigaleeva, Regina; Pushkova, Elena; Anikanov, Nikolai; Ivanov, Vadim; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant protoplasts are widely used for genetic manipulation and functional studies in transient expression systems. However, little is known about the molecular pathways involved in a cell response to the combined stress factors resulted from protoplast generation. Plants often face more than one type of stress at a time, and how plants respond to combined stress factors is therefore of great interest. Here, we used protoplasts of the moss Physcomitrella patens as a model to study the effects of short-term stress on the chloroplast proteome. Using label-free comparative quantitative proteomic analysis (SWATH-MS), we quantified 479 chloroplast proteins, 219 of which showed a more than 1.4-fold change in abundance in protoplasts. We additionally quantified 1451 chloroplast proteins using emPAI. We observed degradation of a significant portion of the chloroplast proteome following the first hour of stress imposed by the protoplast isolation process. Electron-transport chain (ETC) components underwent the heaviest degradation, resulting in the decline of photosynthetic activity. We also compared the proteome changes to those in the transcriptional level of nuclear-encoded chloroplast genes. Globally, the levels of the quantified proteins and their corresponding mRNAs showed limited correlation. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and components of the outer chloroplast membrane showed decreases in both transcript and protein abundance. However, proteins like dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2-cys peroxiredoxin B responsible for ROS detoxification increased in abundance. Further, genes such as thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase were induced at the transcriptional level but down-regulated at the proteomic level. Together, our results demonstrate that the initial chloroplast reaction to stress is due changes at the proteomic level. PMID:27867392

  16. Chloroplast DNA Sequence Homologies among Vascular Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Lamppa, Gayle K.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    1979-01-01

    The extent of sequence conservation in the chloroplast genome of higher plants has been investigated. Supercoiled chloroplast DNA, prepared from pea seedlings, was labeled in vitro and used as a probe in reassociation experiments with a high concentration of total DNAs extracted from several angiosperms, gymnosperms, and lower vascular plants. In each case the probe reassociation was accelerated, demonstrating that some chloroplast sequences have been highly conserved throughout the evolution of vascular plants. Only among the flowering plants were distinct levels of cross-reaction with the pea chloroplast probe evident; broad bean and barley exhibited the highest and lowest levels, respectively. With the hydroxylapatite assay these levels decreased with a decrease in probe fragment length (from 1,860 to 735 bases), indicating that many conserved sequences in the chloroplast genome are separated by divergent sequences on a rather fine scale. Despite differences observed in levels of homology with the hydroxylapatite assay, S1 nuclease analysis of heteroduplexes showed that outside of the pea family the extent of sequence relatedness between the probe and various heterologous DNAs is approximately the same: 30%. In our interpretation, the fundamental changes in the chloroplast genome during angiosperm evolution involved the rearrangement of this 30% with respect to the more rapidly changing sequences of the genome. These rearrangements may have been more extensive in dicotyledons than in monocotyledons. We have estimated the amount of conserved and divergent DNA interspersed between one another. From the reassociation experiments, determinations were made of the percentage of chloroplast DNA in total DNA extracts from different higher plants; this value remained relatively constant when compared with the large variation in the diploid genome size of the plants. PMID:16660786

  17. Photonic multilayer structure of Begonia chloroplasts enhances photosynthetic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew; Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Phrathep, O-Phart; Lawson, Tracy; Oulton, Ruth; Whitney, Heather M

    2016-10-24

    Enhanced light harvesting is an area of interest for optimizing both natural photosynthesis and artificial solar energy capture(1,2). Iridescence has been shown to exist widely and in diverse forms in plants and other photosynthetic organisms and symbioses(3,4), but there has yet to be any direct link demonstrated between iridescence and photosynthesis. Here we show that epidermal chloroplasts, also known as iridoplasts, in shade-dwelling species of Begonia(5), notable for their brilliant blue iridescence, have a photonic crystal structure formed from a periodic arrangement of the light-absorbing thylakoid tissue itself. This structure enhances photosynthesis in two ways: by increasing light capture at the predominantly green wavelengths available in shade conditions, and by directly enhancing quantum yield by 5-10% under low-light conditions. These findings together imply that the iridoplast is a highly modified chloroplast structure adapted to make best use of the extremely low-light conditions in the tropical forest understorey in which it is found(5,6). A phylogenetically diverse range of shade-dwelling plant species has been found to produce similarly structured chloroplasts(7-9), suggesting that the ability to produce chloroplasts whose membranes are organized as a multilayer with photonic properties may be widespread. In fact, given the well-established diversity and plasticity of chloroplasts(10,11), our results imply that photonic effects may be important even in plants that do not show any obvious signs of iridescence to the naked eye but where a highly ordered chloroplast structure may present a clear blue reflectance at the microscale. Chloroplasts are generally thought of as purely photochemical; we suggest that one should also think of them as a photonic structure with a complex interplay between control of light propagation, light capture and photochemistry.

  18. Eukaryotic Hsp70 chaperones in the intermembrane space of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bionda, Tihana; Gross, Lucia E; Becker, Thomas; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G; Leisegang, Matthias S; Karas, Michael; Schleiff, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Multiple eukaryotic Hsp70 typically localized in the cytoplasm are also distributed to the intermembrane space of chloroplasts and might thereby represent the missing link in energizing protein translocation. Protein translocation into organelles is a central cellular process that is tightly regulated. It depends on signals within the preprotein and on molecular machines catalyzing the process. Molecular chaperones participate in transport and translocation of preproteins into organelles to control folding and to provide energy for the individual steps. While most of the processes are explored and the components are identified, the transfer of preproteins into and across the intermembrane space of chloroplasts is not yet understood. The existence of an energy source in this compartment is discussed, because the required transit peptide length for successful translocation into chloroplasts is shorter than that found for mitochondria where energy is provided exclusively by matrix chaperones. Furthermore, a cytosolic-type Hsp70 homologue was proposed as component of the chloroplast translocon in the intermembrane space energizing the initial translocation. The molecular identity of such intermembrane space localized Hsp70 remained unknown, which led to a controversy concerning its existence. We identified multiple cytosolic Hsp70s by mass spectrometry on isolated, thermolysin-treated Medicago sativa chloroplasts. The localization of these Hsp70s of M. sativa or Arabidopsis thaliana in the intermembrane space was confirmed by a self-assembly GFP-based in vivo system. The localization of cytosolic Hsp70s in the stroma of chloroplasts or different mitochondrial compartments could not be observed. Similarly, we could not identify any cytosolic Hsp90 in the intermembrane space of chloroplast. With respect to our results we discuss the possible targeting and function of the Hsp70 found in the intermembrane space.

  19. Analysis of Protein Interactions at Native Chloroplast Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Nabok, Alexei; Mustafa, Mohd K.; Al-Ammar, Rukaiah; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Smith, David P.; Abell, Ben M.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE). We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins. PMID:22479632

  20. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  1. Chloroplast genome structure in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin; Tan, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying-Ying; Song, Yu; Yang, Jun-Bo; Corlett, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Aquifoliaceae is the largest family in the campanulid order Aquifoliales. It consists of a single genus, Ilex, the hollies, which is the largest woody dioecious genus in the angiosperms. Most species are in East Asia or South America. The taxonomy and evolutionary history remain unclear due to the lack of a robust species-level phylogeny. We produced the first complete chloroplast genomes in this family, including seven Ilex species, by Illumina sequencing of long-range PCR products and subsequent reference-guided de novo assembly. These genomes have a typical bicyclic structure with a conserved genome arrangement and moderate divergence. The total length is 157,741 bp and there is one large single-copy region (LSC) with 87,109 bp, one small single-copy with 18,436 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions (IR) with 52,196 bp. A total of 144 genes were identified, including 96 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA and 8 rRNA. Thirty-four repetitive sequences were identified in Ilex pubescens, with lengths >14 bp and identity >90%, and 11 divergence hotspot regions that could be targeted for phylogenetic markers. This study will contribute to improved resolution of deep branches of the Ilex phylogeny and facilitate identification of Ilex species. PMID:27378489

  2. Chloroplast genome structure in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae).

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Tan, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying-Ying; Song, Yu; Yang, Jun-Bo; Corlett, Richard T

    2016-07-05

    Aquifoliaceae is the largest family in the campanulid order Aquifoliales. It consists of a single genus, Ilex, the hollies, which is the largest woody dioecious genus in the angiosperms. Most species are in East Asia or South America. The taxonomy and evolutionary history remain unclear due to the lack of a robust species-level phylogeny. We produced the first complete chloroplast genomes in this family, including seven Ilex species, by Illumina sequencing of long-range PCR products and subsequent reference-guided de novo assembly. These genomes have a typical bicyclic structure with a conserved genome arrangement and moderate divergence. The total length is 157,741 bp and there is one large single-copy region (LSC) with 87,109 bp, one small single-copy with 18,436 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions (IR) with 52,196 bp. A total of 144 genes were identified, including 96 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA and 8 rRNA. Thirty-four repetitive sequences were identified in Ilex pubescens, with lengths >14 bp and identity >90%, and 11 divergence hotspot regions that could be targeted for phylogenetic markers. This study will contribute to improved resolution of deep branches of the Ilex phylogeny and facilitate identification of Ilex species.

  3. Characterization of chloroplastic fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases as lysine-methylated proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Mininno, Morgane; Brugière, Sabine; Pautre, Virginie; Gilgen, Annabelle; Ma, Sheng; Ferro, Myriam; Tardif, Marianne; Alban, Claude; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2012-06-15

    In pea (Pisum sativum), the protein-lysine methyltransferase (PsLSMT) catalyzes the trimethylation of Lys-14 in the large subunit (LS) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the enzyme catalyzing the CO(2) fixation step during photosynthesis. Homologs of PsLSMT, herein referred to as LSMT-like enzymes, are found in all plant genomes, but methylation of LS Rubisco is not universal in the plant kingdom, suggesting a species-specific protein substrate specificity of the methyltransferase. In this study, we report the biochemical characterization of the LSMT-like enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtLSMT-L), with a focus on its substrate specificity. We show that, in Arabidopsis, LS Rubisco is not naturally methylated and that the physiological substrates of AtLSMT-L are chloroplastic fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase isoforms. These enzymes, which are involved in the assimilation of CO(2) through the Calvin cycle and in chloroplastic glycolysis, are trimethylated at a conserved lysyl residue located close to the C terminus. Both AtLSMT-L and PsLSMT are able to methylate aldolases with similar kinetic parameters and product specificity. Thus, the divergent substrate specificity of LSMT-like enzymes from pea and Arabidopsis concerns only Rubisco. AtLSMT-L is able to interact with unmethylated Rubisco, but the complex is catalytically unproductive. Trimethylation does not modify the kinetic properties and tetrameric organization of aldolases in vitro. The identification of aldolases as methyl proteins in Arabidopsis and other species like pea suggests a role of protein lysine methylation in carbon metabolism in chloroplasts.

  4. A tomato chloroplast-targeted DnaJ protein protects Rubisco activity under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Kong, Fanying; Zhang, Song; Meng, Xia; Wang, Yong; Meng, Qingwei

    2015-06-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the biological processes most sensitive to heat stress in plants. Carbon assimilation, which depends on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), is one of the major sites sensitive to heat stress in photosynthesis. In this study, the roles of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) chloroplast-targeted DnaJ protein (SlCDJ2) in resisting heat using sense and antisense transgenic tomatoes were examined. SlCDJ2 was found to be uniformly distributed in the thylakoids and stroma of the chloroplasts. Under heat stress, sense plants exhibited higher chlorophyll contents and fresh weights, and lower accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and membrane damage. Moreover, Rubisco activity, Rubisco large subunit (RbcL) content, and CO2 assimilation capacity were all higher in sense plants and lower in antisense plants compared with wild-type plants. Thus, SlCDJ2 contributes to maintenance of CO2 assimilation capacity mainly by protecting Rubisco activity under heat stress. SlCDJ2 probably achieves this by keeping the levels of proteolytic enzymes low, which prevents accelerated degradation of Rubisco under heat stress. Furthermore, a chloroplast heat-shock protein 70 was identified as a binding partner of SlCDJ2 in yeast two-hybrid assays. Taken together, these findings establish a role for SlCDJ2 in maintaining Rubisco activity in plants under heat stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Characterization of Chloroplastic Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolases as Lysine-methylated Proteins in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Mininno, Morgane; Brugière, Sabine; Pautre, Virginie; Gilgen, Annabelle; Ma, Sheng; Ferro, Myriam; Tardif, Marianne; Alban, Claude; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    In pea (Pisum sativum), the protein-lysine methyltransferase (PsLSMT) catalyzes the trimethylation of Lys-14 in the large subunit (LS) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the enzyme catalyzing the CO2 fixation step during photosynthesis. Homologs of PsLSMT, herein referred to as LSMT-like enzymes, are found in all plant genomes, but methylation of LS Rubisco is not universal in the plant kingdom, suggesting a species-specific protein substrate specificity of the methyltransferase. In this study, we report the biochemical characterization of the LSMT-like enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtLSMT-L), with a focus on its substrate specificity. We show that, in Arabidopsis, LS Rubisco is not naturally methylated and that the physiological substrates of AtLSMT-L are chloroplastic fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase isoforms. These