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Sample records for anderson level ii

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SN II in host HII regions (Anderson+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Gutierrez, C. P.; Dessart, L.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Morrell, N. I.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Boffin, H. M. J.; de Jaeger, T.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Prieto, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The data analysed in this publication comprise two distinct types of observations. The first is of SN II optical spectroscopy obtained during their photospheric phases, i.e. from discovery to at most ~100 days post explosion. These data are used to extract absorption line pEW measurements. The second data set is emission line spectral observations of host HII regions of SNe II. These are used to estimate SN II environment oxygen abundances, which can be used as metallicity proxies. In the course of this work we compare our observational results with the predictions from the spectral models of Dessart et al. (2014MNRAS.440.1856D). (2 data files).

  2. Level repulsion exponent β for many-body localization transitions and for Anderson localization transitions via Dyson Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    The generalization of the Dyson Brownian motion approach of random matrices to Anderson localization (AL) models (Chalker et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 554) and to many-body localization (MBL) Hamiltonians (Serbyn and Moore 2015 arXiv:1508.07293) is revisited to extract the level repulsion exponent β, where β =1 in the delocalized phase governed by the Wigner-Dyson statistics, β =0 , in the localized phase governed by the Poisson statistics, and 0<{βc}<1 at the critical point. The idea is that the Gaussian disorder variables h i are promoted to Gaussian stationary processes h i (t) in order to sample the disorder stationary distribution with some time correlation τ. The statistics of energy levels can then be studied via Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations. For the MBL quantum spin Hamiltonian with random fields h i , we obtain β =2qn,n+1\\text{EA}(N)/qn,n\\text{EA}(N) in terms of the Edwards-Anderson matrix qnm\\text{EA}(N)\\equiv \\frac{1}{N}{\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|σ iz|{φm}> {{|}2} for the same eigenstate m  =  n and for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1. For the Anderson localization tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site energies h i , we find β =2{{Y}n,n+1}(N)/≤ft({{Y}n,n}(N)-{{Y}n,n+1}(N)\\right) in terms of the density correlation matrix {{Y}nm}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}2}|< i|{φm}> {{|}2} for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1, while the diagonal element m  =  n corresponds to the inverse participation ratio {{Y}nn}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}4} of the eigenstate |{φn}> .

  3. Surface hopping with a manifold of electronic states. II. Application to the many-body Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-02-28

    We investigate a simple surface hopping (SH) approach for modeling a single impurity level coupled to a single phonon and an electronic (metal) bath (i.e., the Anderson-Holstein model). The phonon degree of freedom is treated classically with motion along–and hops between–diabatic potential energy surfaces. The hopping rate is determined by the dynamics of the electronic bath (which are treated implicitly). For the case of one electronic bath, in the limit of small coupling to the bath, SH recovers phonon relaxation to thermal equilibrium and yields the correct impurity electron population (as compared with numerical renormalization group). For the case of out of equilibrium dynamics, SH current-voltage (I-V) curve is compared with the quantum master equation (QME) over a range of parameters, spanning the quantum region to the classical region. In the limit of large temperature, SH and QME agree. Furthermore, we can show that, in the limit of low temperature, the QME agrees with real-time path integral calculations. As such, the simple procedure described here should be useful in many other contexts.

  4. No correlation between Anderson Reservoir stage level and underlying Calaveras fault seismicity despite calculated differential stress increases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns have been raised that stresses from reservoir impoundment may trigger damaging earthquakes because rate changes have been associated with reservoir impoundment or stage-level changes globally. Here, the idea is tested blindly using Anderson Reservoir, which lies atop the seismically active Calaveras fault. The only knowledge held by the author going into the study was the expectation that reservoir levels change cyclically because of seasonal rainfall. Examination of seismicity rates near the reservoir reveals variability, but no correlation with stage-level changes. Three-dimensional fi nite-element modeling shows stress changes suffi cient for earthquake triggering along the Calaveras fault zone. Since many of the reported cases of induced triggering come from low-strain settings, it is speculated that gradual stressing from stage-level changes in high-strain settings may not be signifi cant. From this study, it can be concluded that reservoirs are not necessarily risky in active tectonic settings. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  5. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Mueller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique

    2009-11-20

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  6. Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-20) - Camas Prairie Acquisition, Anderson Ranch Dam Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Shannon C.

    2002-03-07

    BPA proposes to purchase approximately 1,370 acres of riparian and wetland habitat along Camas Creek near Hill City, Idaho as partial mitigation for impacts associated with the construction and operation of Anderson Ranch Dam. Title to the land will be held by IDFG. The land proposed for acquisition adjoins IDFG’s existing Camas Prairie Centennial Marsh Wildlife Management Area and will be managed as part of the management area. The goal of this project is to protect and enhance riparian, wetland, and upland habitats associated with the Camas Creek and Camas Prairie systems.

  7. The Anderson Current Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1994-01-01

    Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

  8. 55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with eighty-eight 1-1/2" diameter copper ion return RF balance tube systems. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. 53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch with incoming waveguide and control switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. 30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing control transmitter electronic cabinets and control modules. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    PubMed Central

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  12. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Hybrid Bloch-Anderson localization of light.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Simon; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Konotop, Vladimir V; Nolte, Stefan; Torner, Lluis; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the interplay of Bloch oscillations and Anderson localization in optics. Gradual washing out of Bloch oscillations and the formation of nearly stationary averaged intensity distributions, which are symmetric for narrow and strongly asymmetric for broad input excitations, are observed experimentally in laser-written waveguide arrays. At large disorder levels Bloch oscillations are completely destroyed and both narrow and wide excitations lead to symmetric stationary averaged intensity distributions with exponentially decaying tails.

  14. 10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING NORTHEAST (BUILDINGS 131, 130, 129, and 128 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  15. 6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING 132, FACING SOUTHEAST (BUILDINGS 124, 122, 120, and 118 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  16. 9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING WEST (BUILDINGS 126, 128, 129, 130, and 131 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. Paired-Associate Learning at Three Imagery Levels in Level I and Level II Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prawat, Richard S.

    Two views of paired-associate learning were examined by assessing the paired-associate learning efficiency of eighth grade samples identified by digit span and IQ test performance as Jensen-type Level I and Level II learners. Eighty eighth grade students ranging in age from 13 years 3 months to 14 years 10 months were selected as subjects. Three…

  18. Abnormal plasma prothrombin (PIVKA-II) levels in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Y

    1989-05-01

    The concentration of abnormal prothrombin, or the protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) in 102 patients with hepatic disorders was measured by an enzyme immunoassay method. The concentration of PIVKA-II in the plasma was elevated in 11 out of 18 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and also in a patient with hepatoblastoma. There was no correlation between serum alpha-fetoprotein and plasma PIVKA-II levels. The PIVKA-II level was normal in 11 patients who had metastatic carcinoma or cholangiocellular carcinoma. Moreover, benign diseases of the liver did not cause an elevation in PIVKA-II. PIVKA-II might be an useful marker of hepatocellular carcinoma because, like alpha-fetoprotein, its level changes in close relation to the effects of treatment.

  19. Individualized Testing System: Performance Objectives, ISCS Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation material for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program. The manual contains a composite list of selected measurable objectives for Level II of the ISCS program. It is…

  20. Spectral correlations in finite-size Anderson insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklitz, T.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate spectral correlations in quasi-one-dimensional Anderson insulators with broken time-reversal symmetry. While energy levels are uncorrelated in the thermodynamic limit of infinite wire length, some correlations remain in finite-size Anderson insulators. Asymptotic behaviors of level-level correlations in these systems are known in the large- and small-frequency limits, corresponding to the regime of classical diffusive dynamics and the deep quantum regime of strong Anderson localization. Employing nonperturbative methods and a mapping to the Coulomb-scattering problem, recently introduced by M. A. Skvortsov and P. M. Ostrovsky [JETP Lett. 85, 72 (2007), 10.1134/S0021364007010158], we derive a closed analytical expression for the spectral statistics in the classical-to-quantum region bridging the known asymptotic behaviors. We further discuss how Poisson statistics at large energies develop into Wigner-Dyson statistics as the wire-length decreases.

  1. [Increased serum PIVKA-II levels in hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, M; Takeda, K; Ohara, E; Nishimori, Y; Hisahara, T; Nishida, M; Sugiura, T

    2001-11-01

    PIVKA-II has been practically used as a tumor marker of hepatocellular carcinoma. On the other hand, increased serum PIVKA-II concentration was reported in a Japanese patient who had hyperthyroidism without liver diseases. To evaluate whether thyroid hormone is related with serum PIVKA-II, we examined serum PIVKA-II concentrations in patients with various thyroid diseases. Eight patients with Hashimoto disease, 24 patients with Graves' disease, and 8 healthy subjects were studied. There was no significant difference of serum PIVKA-II levels among the three groups. However, serum PIVKA-II concentrations(mean +/- SD mAU/ml) in hyperthyroidism(37 +/- 27) were significantly higher than those in hypothyroidism(16 +/- 9) and normal controls(12 +/- 4) (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). When hyperthyroid patients were treated by antithyroid drug or isotope, serum PIVKA-II concentrations decreased in accordance with the decrease of serum FT4 concentrations. Our data indicate that serum PIVKA-II concentration was increased in patients with hyperthyroidism, but further in vivo studies are necessary to clarify the mechanism related to increased serum PIVKA-II by thyroid hormone.

  2. 31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View of mezzanine floor level in transmitter building no. 102 showing various electronic central indicator panel to control building air conditioning, steam pressure, supply temperature, discharge temperature, supply pressure, transformer vault status, and radome conditioning system. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. 54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View from ground level in building no. 105 showing lower radar scanner switch at open port door. Note incoming waveguide and control switch at lower left of photograph and note several waveguides leaving top of scanner switch around the circumference of switch. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. View from ground level showing lower radar scanner switch with open port door in radar scanner building 105 showing emanating waveguides from lower switch in vertical run; photograph also shows catwalk to upper scanner switch in upper left side of photograph and structural supports. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. Energy transport in the Anderson insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, D. B.; Protopopov, I. V.; Burin, A. L.; Gornyi, I. V.; Santos, R. A.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the heat conductivity in Anderson insulators in the presence of a power-law interaction. Particle-hole excitations built on localized electron states are viewed as two-level systems randomly distributed in space and energy and coupled due to electron-electron interaction. A small fraction of these states form resonant pairs that in turn build a complex network allowing for energy propagation. We identify the character of energy transport through this network and evaluate the thermal conductivity. For physically relevant cases of two-dimensional and three-dimensional spin systems with 1 /r3 dipole-dipole interaction (originating from the conventional 1 /r Coulomb interaction between electrons), the found thermal conductivity κ scales with temperature as κ ∝T3 and κ ∝T4 /3 , respectively. Our results may be of relevance also to other realizations of random spin Hamiltonians with long-range interactions.

  6. Anderson and Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    The legacy of P. W. Anderson, perhaps the most fertile and influential condensed matter physicist of the second half of the twentieth century, is briefly mentioned here. I note three pervasive values. They are: emergence with its constant tendency to surprise us and to stretch our imagination, the Baconian emphasis on the experimental moorings of modern science, and mechanism as the explanatory core. Out of his work, which is spread over more than six decades and in many ways has charted modern condensed matter physics, nearly a dozen seminal contributions, chosen idiosyncratically, are mentioned at the risk of leaving out many which may also have started subfields. Some of these are: antiferromagnestism and broken symmetry, superexchange and strong electron correlations, localization in disordered systems, gauge invariance and mass, and the resonating valence bond in magnetic systems as well as in high-temperature superconductivity...

  7. Home Economics. Sample Test Items. Levels I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Educational Testing.

    A sample of behavioral objectives and related test items that could be developed for content modules in Home Economics levels I and II, this book is intended to enable teachers to construct more valid and reliable test materials. Forty-eight one-page modules are presented, and opposite each module are listed two to seven specific behavioral…

  8. Accurate energy levels for singly ionized platinum (Pt II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reader, Joseph; Acquista, Nicolo; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Engleman, Rolf, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    New observations of the spectrum of Pt II have been made with hollow-cathode lamps. The region from 1032 to 4101 A was observed photographically with a 10.7-m normal-incidence spectrograph. The region from 2245 to 5223 A was observed with a Fourier-transform spectrometer. Wavelength measurements were made for 558 lines. The uncertainties vary from 0.0005 to 0.004 A. From these measurements and three parity-forbidden transitions in the infrared, accurate values were determined for 28 even and 72 odd energy levels of Pt II.

  9. Modified Anderson orthogonality catastrophe power law in the presence of shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Swarnali; Hentschel, Martina

    2011-01-01

    We study Anderson orthogonality catastrophe (AOC) for parabolic quantum dots and focus on the effects of degeneracies, realized through the inherent shell structure of their energy levels that can be lifted through an external magnetic field, on the Anderson overlap. We find rich and interesting behaviors as a function of the strength and position of the perturbation, the system size, and the applied magnetic field. In particular, even for weak perturbations, we observe a pronounced AOC that is related to the degeneracy of energy levels. Most importantly, the power-law decay of the Anderson overlap as a function of the number of particles is modified in comparison to the metallic case due to the rearrangement of the energy-level shell structure. We support our analytical results by numerical calculations and also study the distribution of Anderson overlaps.

  10. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD (II) LEVELS AND LEAD (II) NEUROTOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of hexafl...

  11. Astronaut Anderson Works in SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia STS-107 mission launched January 16, 2003. STS-107 is strictly a multidiscipline microgravity and Earth science research mission involving 80-plus International experiments to be performed during 16-days, many of which will be managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of the research will be conducted in the Shuttle's mid deck, the area directly under the cockpit, and in the new SPACEHAB Research Double Module. This is the first flight for that module, which doubles the volume available for experiments and significantly increases the amount and complexity of research from the last dedicated Shuttle science mission, STS-95, flown in 1998 with a single SPACEHAB module. The pressurized module is carried in Columbia's payload bay and is accessible to the crew via a turnel from the Shuttle's mid deck. Pictured is an interesting view, looking through the adjoining tunnel, of astronaut Michael P. Anderson, mission specialist, performing work in SPACEHAB. The first shuttle mission in 2003, the STS-107 mission marks the 113th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the 28th flight of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia.

  12. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  13. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Mai, Zhijie; Lin, Fang; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-06-13

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength. PMID:27410338

  14. Transport and Anderson localization in disordered two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tal; Bartal, Guy; Fishman, Shmuel; Segev, Mordechai

    2007-03-01

    One of the most interesting phenomena in solid-state physics is Anderson localization, which predicts that an electron may become immobile when placed in a disordered lattice. The origin of localization is interference between multiple scatterings of the electron by random defects in the potential, altering the eigenmodes from being extended (Bloch waves) to exponentially localized. As a result, the material is transformed from a conductor to an insulator. Anderson's work dates back to 1958, yet strong localization has never been observed in atomic crystals, because localization occurs only if the potential (the periodic lattice and the fluctuations superimposed on it) is time-independent. However, in atomic crystals important deviations from the Anderson model always occur, because of thermally excited phonons and electron-electron interactions. Realizing that Anderson localization is a wave phenomenon relying on interference, these concepts were extended to optics. Indeed, both weak and strong localization effects were experimentally demonstrated, traditionally by studying the transmission properties of randomly distributed optical scatterers (typically suspensions or powders of dielectric materials). However, in these studies the potential was fully random, rather than being 'frozen' fluctuations on a periodic potential, as the Anderson model assumes. Here we report the experimental observation of Anderson localization in a perturbed periodic potential: the transverse localization of light caused by random fluctuations on a two-dimensional photonic lattice. We demonstrate how ballistic transport becomes diffusive in the presence of disorder, and that crossover to Anderson localization occurs at a higher level of disorder. Finally, we study how nonlinearities affect Anderson localization. As Anderson localization is a universal phenomenon, the ideas presented here could also be implemented in other systems (for example, matter waves), thereby making it feasible

  15. The Internal Validation of Level II and Level III Respiratory Therapy Examinations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouett, Michael L.

    This project began with the delineation of the roles and functions of respiratory therapy personnel by the American Association for Respiratory Therapy. In Phase II, The Psychological Corporation used this delineation to develop six proficiency examinations, three at each of two levels. One exam at each level was designated for the purpose of the…

  16. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Logan, David E; Galpin, Martin R; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-11-16

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger's theorem to the Mott insulator.

  17. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David E.; Galpin, Martin R.; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger’s theorem to the Mott insulator.

  18. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Logan, David E; Galpin, Martin R; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-11-16

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger's theorem to the Mott insulator. PMID:27618214

  19. Wavelengths, energy levels and hyperfine structure of Mn II and Sc II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Pickering, Juliet C.; Townley-Smith, Keeley I. M.; Hala, .

    2015-08-01

    For many decades, the Atomic Spectroscopy Groups at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Imperial College London (ICL) have measured atomic data of astronomical interest. Our spectrometers include Fourier transform (FT) spectrometers at NIST and ICL covering the region 1350 Å to 5.5 μm and a 10.7-m grating spectrometer at NIST covering wavelengths from 300 - 5000 Å. Sources for these spectra include high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode (HCL) lamps, Penning discharges, and sliding spark discharges. Recent work has focused on the measurement and analysis of wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure (HFS) constants for iron-group elements. The analysis of FT spectra of Cr I, Mn I, and Mn II is being led by ICL and is described in a companion poster [1]. Current work being led by NIST includes the analysis of HFS in Mn II, analysis of Mn II in the vacuum ultraviolet, and a comprehensive analysis of Sc II.Comprehensive HFS constants for Mn II are needed for the interpretation of stellar spectra and incorrect abundances may be obtained when HFS is omitted. Holt et al. [2] have measured HFS constants for 59 levels of Mn II using laser spectroscopy. We used FT spectra of Mn/Ni and Mn/Cu HCLs covering wavelength ranges from 1350 Å to 5.4 μm to confirm 26 of the A constants of Holt et al. and obtain values for roughly 40 additional levels. We aim to obtain HFS constants for the majority of lines showing significant HFS that are observed in chemically-peculiar stars.Spectra of Sc HCLs have been recorded from 1800 - 6700 Å using a vacuum ultraviolet FT spectrometer at NIST. Additional measurements to cover wavelengths above 6700 Å and below 1800 Å are in progress. The spectra are being analyzed by NIST and Alighar Muslim University, India in order to derive improved wavelengths, energy levels, and hyperfine structure parameters.This work was partially supported by NASA, the STFC and PPARC (UK), the Royal Society of the UK

  20. Curriculum Guides for Level I and Level II: National Manpower Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Mental Retardation, Toronto (Ontario).

    Curriculum guides to levels I and II of the Canadian National Manpower Model, which elaborate on content originally presented in 1971, are provided for personnel training programs in the field of mental retardation and related handicapping areas. The guides are said to be based on a philosophy that demands society's acceptance of retarded and…

  1. 4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 126, 124, 122, 120, and 114 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  2. Anderson localization in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Delande, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    In analogy with the usual Anderson localization taking place in time-independent disordered quantum systems where the disorder acts in configuration space, systems exposed to temporally disordered potentials can display Anderson localization in the time domain. We demonstrate this phenomenon with one-dimensional examples where a temporally disordered potential induces localization during the quantum evolution of wave packets, in contrast with a fully delocalized classical dynamics. This is an example of a time crystal phenomenon, i.e., a crystalline behavior in the time domain.

  3. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  4. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  5. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  6. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  7. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  8. Anderson localization from the replica formalism.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Kamenev, Alex; Tian, Chushun

    2005-11-11

    We study Anderson localization in quasi-one-dimensional disordered wires within the framework of the replica sigma model. Applying a semiclassical approach (geodesic action plus Gaussian fluctuations) recently introduced within the context of supersymmetry by Lamacraft, Simons, and Zirnbauer, we compute the exact density of transmission matrix eigenvalues of superconducting wires (of symmetry class CI.) For the unitary class of metallic systems (class A) we are able to obtain the density function, save for its large transmission tail.

  9. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of RNA Polymerase II Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, B. K.; Rogalski, T. M.; Tullis, G. E.; Riddle, D. L.; Golomb, M.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of RNA polymerase II levels in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have constructed nematode strains having one, two, or three copies of ama-1, the gene for the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II polypeptides and solubilized enzyme activity are invariant with gene dosage, indicating regulatory compensation. However, steady-state levels of ama-1 mRNA are directly proportional to gene dosage. These results imply that RNA polymerase II levels in C. elegans are regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:8436272

  10. Reply. [to the comment by Anderson et al. (1993)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.; Ferek, Ronald G.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1994-01-01

    While Hegg et al. (1993) accepts the criticism of Anderson et al. (1994) in principle, this involves the adoption of an aerosol composition model and the model that they propose to reconcile these observations with the assertion of Charlson et al. (1992) does not agree with many observations, particularly those made over the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the use of a gain factor (i.e. the partial derivative of aerosol mass with respect to the sulfate ion), proposed by Anderson et al., may be valid for particular cases where a proposed composition model really reflects the actual aerosol composition, this procedure is considered questionable in general. The use of sulfate as a tracer for nonsulfate aerosol mass is questionable, because in the present authors' data set, sulfate averaged only about 26% of the dry aerosol mass. The ammonium mass associated with sulfate mass is not analogous to that betwen the oxygen mass and sulfur mass in the sulfate ion. Strong chemical bonds are present between sulfur and oxygen in sulfate, whereas ammonium and sulfate in haze droplets are ions in solution that may or may not be associated with one another. Thus, there is no reason to assume that sulfate will act as a reliable tracer of ammonium mass. Hegg et al. expresses the view that their approach used for estimating sulfate light scattering efficiency is appropriate for the current level of understanding of atmospheric aerosols.

  11. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-01

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. We answer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precise sense, motivate our construction. We note that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order. We show that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized. We also study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry-Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant. We formulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry-Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Finally, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.

  12. Rituximab plus hyper-CVAD alternating with MTX/Ara-C in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: 15-year follow-up of a phase II study from the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Cheah, Chan Y; Westin, Jason R; Fayad, Luis E; Rodriguez, Maria A; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Pro, Barbara; McLaughlin, Peter; Younes, Anas; Samaniego, Felipe; Goy, Andre; Cabanillas, Fernando; Kantarjian, Hagop; Kwak, Larry W; Wang, Michael L; Romaguera, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens containing cytarabine have substantially improved remission durability and overall survival in younger adults with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). However, there have been no long-term follow-up results for patients treated with these regimens. We present long-term survival outcomes from a pivotal phase II trial of rituximab, hyper-fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with methotrexate and cytarabine (R-HCVAD/MA). At 15 years of follow-up (median: 13·4 years), the median failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients was 4·8 years and 10·7 years, respectively. The FFS seems to have plateaued after 10 years, with an estimated 15-year FFS of 30% in younger patients (≤65 years). Patients who achieved complete response (CR) after 2 cycles had a favourable median FFS of 8·8 years. Six patients developed myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukaemia (MDS/AML) whilst in first CR. The 10-year cumulative incidence of MDS/AML of patients in first remission was 6·2% (95% confidence interval: 2·5-12·2%). In patients with newly diagnosed MCL, R-HCVAD/MA showed sustained efficacy, with a median OS exceeding 10 years in all patients and freedom from disease recurrence of nearly 15 years in almost one-third of the younger patients (≤65 years).

  13. Phil Anderson's Magnetic Ideas in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Piers

    In Philip W. Anderson's research, magnetism has always played a special role, providing a prism through which other more complex forms of collective behavior and broken symmetry could be examined. I discuss his work on magnetism from the 1950s, where his early work on antiferromagnetism led to the pseudospin treatment of superconductivity -- to the 1970s and 1980s, highlighting his contribution to the physics of local magnetic moments. Phil's interest in the mechanism of moment formation, and screening evolved into the modern theory of the Kondo effect and heavy fermions.

  14. Resonant Anderson localization in segmented wires.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, Cristian; Serra, Llorenç

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a model of random segmented wire, with linear segments of two-dimensional wires joined by circular bends. The joining vertices act as scatterers on the propagating electron waves. The model leads to resonant Anderson localization when all segments are of similar length. The resonant behavior is present with one and also with several propagating modes. The probability distributions evolve from diffusive to localized regimes when increasing the number of segments in a similar way for long and short localization lengths. As a function of the energy, a finite segmented wire typically evolves from localized to diffusive to ballistic behavior in each conductance plateau.

  15. Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

  16. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part one of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  17. Individualized Testing System: Performance Assessment Resources, ISCS Level II, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is part two of two performance assessment resources booklets for Level II of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). The two booklets are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation materials for Level II of the ISCS developed as a part of the ISCS Individualized Teacher Preparation (ITP) program.…

  18. Random nanolasing in the Anderson localized regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Garcia, P. D.; Ek, S.; Gregersen, N.; Suhr, T.; Schubert, M.; Mørk, J.; Stobbe, S.; Lodahl, P.

    2014-04-01

    The development of nanoscale optical devices for classical and quantum photonics is affected by unavoidable fabrication imperfections that often impose performance limitations. However, disorder may also enable new functionalities, for example in random lasers, where lasing relies on random multiple scattering. The applicability of random lasers has been limited due to multidirectional emission, lack of tunability, and strong mode competition with chaotic fluctuations due to a weak mode confinement. The regime of Anderson localization of light has been proposed for obtaining stable multimode random lasing, and initial work concerned macroscopic one-dimensional layered media. Here, we demonstrate on-chip random nanolasers where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder. The strong confinement achieved by Anderson localization reduces the spatial overlap between lasing modes, thus preventing mode competition and improving stability. This enables highly efficient, stable and broadband wavelength-controlled lasers with very small mode volumes. Furthermore, the complex interplay between gain, dispersion-controlled slow light, and disorder is demonstrated experimentally for a non-conservative random medium. The statistical analysis shows a way towards optimizing random-lasing performance by reducing the localization length, a universal parameter.

  19. Distribution of critical temperature at Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammag, Rayda; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2016-05-01

    Based on a local mean-field theory approach at Anderson localization, we find a distribution function of critical temperature from that of disorder. An essential point of this local mean-field theory approach is that the information of the wave-function multifractality is introduced. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature (TK) shows a power-law tail in the limit of TK→0 regardless of the Kondo coupling constant. We also find that the distribution function of the ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc) gives a power-law behavior in the limit of Tc→0 when an interaction parameter for ferromagnetic instability lies below a critical value. However, the Tc distribution function stops the power-law increasing behavior in the Tc→0 limit and vanishes beyond the critical interaction parameter inside the ferromagnetic phase. These results imply that the typical Kondo temperature given by a geometric average always vanishes due to finite density of the distribution function in the TK→0 limit while the typical ferromagnetic transition temperature shows a phase transition at the critical interaction parameter. We propose that the typical transition temperature serves a criterion for quantum Griffiths phenomena vs smeared transitions: Quantum Griffiths phenomena occur above the typical value of the critical temperature while smeared phase transitions result at low temperatures below the typical transition temperature. We speculate that the ferromagnetic transition at Anderson localization shows the evolution from quantum Griffiths phenomena to smeared transitions around the critical interaction parameter at low temperatures.

  20. Heavy adatoms and Anderson localization in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Aguilar, Jose H.; Uchoa, Bruno; Covaci, Lucian; Rappoport, Tatiana G.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze electronic localization in a graphene layer doped with adatoms sitting in the center of the honeycomb hexagon, as happens with the heaviest adatoms. In this configuration, the hybridization between the adatom orbitals and its neighboring carbon atoms mediate hopping processes that connect all six vertices of the honeycomb hexagon around the impurity. The amplitudes of the hopping depend on the symmetry of the orbital that hybridizes with graphene, leading to an orbital-dependent ``plaquette disorder''. To capture the physics of localization, we propose an effective graphene-only Hamiltonian that preserves the associated orbital symmetries and conduct a scaling analysis of the local density of states (LDOS) for large system sizes. We show that adatoms that form a zero-energy resonant state lead to Anderson localization in the vicinity of the Dirac point. Among those, we show that there is a symmetry class of adatoms for which Anderson localization is suppressed, leading to an exotic quantum critical metallic state with large charge puddles, that localizes only at the Dirac point.

  1. A Fine Balance of Synaptophysin Levels Underlies Efficient Retrieval of Synaptobrevin II to Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sarah L.; Harper, Callista B.; Smillie, Karen J.; Cousin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptobrevin II (sybII) is a vesicular soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release, and thus its correct trafficking to synaptic vesicles (SVs) is critical to render them fusion competent. The SV protein synaptophysin binds to sybII and facilitates its retrieval to SVs during endocytosis. Synaptophysin and sybII are the two most abundant proteins on SVs, being present in a 1:2 ratio. Synaptophysin and sybII are proposed to form a large multimeric complex, and the copy number of the proteins in this complex is also in a 1:2 ratio. We investigated the importance of this ratio between these proteins for the localisation and trafficking of sybII in central neurons. SybII was overexpressed in mouse hippocampal neurons at either 1.6 or 2.15–2.35-fold over endogenous protein levels, in the absence or presence of varying levels of synaptophysin. In the absence of exogenous synaptophysin, exogenous sybII was dispersed along the axon, trapped on the plasma membrane and retrieved slowly during endocytosis. Co-expression of exogenous synaptophysin rescued all of these defects. Importantly, the expression of synaptophysin at nerve terminals in a 1:2 ratio with sybII was sufficient to fully rescue normal sybII trafficking. These results demonstrate that the balance between synaptophysin and sybII levels is critical for the correct targeting of sybII to SVs and suggests that small alterations in synaptophysin levels might affect the localisation of sybII and subsequent presynaptic performance. PMID:26871701

  2. A Fine Balance of Synaptophysin Levels Underlies Efficient Retrieval of Synaptobrevin II to Synaptic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah L; Harper, Callista B; Smillie, Karen J; Cousin, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Synaptobrevin II (sybII) is a vesicular soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release, and thus its correct trafficking to synaptic vesicles (SVs) is critical to render them fusion competent. The SV protein synaptophysin binds to sybII and facilitates its retrieval to SVs during endocytosis. Synaptophysin and sybII are the two most abundant proteins on SVs, being present in a 1:2 ratio. Synaptophysin and sybII are proposed to form a large multimeric complex, and the copy number of the proteins in this complex is also in a 1:2 ratio. We investigated the importance of this ratio between these proteins for the localisation and trafficking of sybII in central neurons. SybII was overexpressed in mouse hippocampal neurons at either 1.6 or 2.15-2.35-fold over endogenous protein levels, in the absence or presence of varying levels of synaptophysin. In the absence of exogenous synaptophysin, exogenous sybII was dispersed along the axon, trapped on the plasma membrane and retrieved slowly during endocytosis. Co-expression of exogenous synaptophysin rescued all of these defects. Importantly, the expression of synaptophysin at nerve terminals in a 1:2 ratio with sybII was sufficient to fully rescue normal sybII trafficking. These results demonstrate that the balance between synaptophysin and sybII levels is critical for the correct targeting of sybII to SVs and suggests that small alterations in synaptophysin levels might affect the localisation of sybII and subsequent presynaptic performance.

  3. Anderson localization of matter waves in quantum-chaos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to three-dimensional optical speckles by analyzing the statistics of the energy-level spacings. This method allows us to consider realistic models of the speckle patterns, taking into account the strongly anisotropic correlations which are realized in concrete experimental configurations. We first compute the mobility edge Ec of a speckle pattern created using a single laser beam. We find that Ec drifts when we vary the anisotropy of the speckle grains, going from higher values when the speckles are squeezed along the beam propagation axis to lower values when they are elongated. We also consider the case where two speckle patterns are superimposed, forming interference fringes, and we find that Ec is increased compared to the case of idealized isotropic disorder. We discuss the important implications of our findings for cold-atom experiments.

  4. The challenges of upgrading from ISPO Category II level to Bachelor Degree level by distance education.

    PubMed

    Kheng, Sisary

    2008-09-01

    The Cambodian School of Prosthetics and Orthotics (CSPO) in collaboration with La Trobe University, Australia, has established an upgrade programme from ISPO Category II level to a Bachelor Degree in Prosthetics and Orthotics. One group of students have completed the course and following a review process, a second group are now enrolled. The upgrade curriculum focuses on clinical reasoning and development of learning skills. A survey aimed to investigate the challenges of the programme using long distance education was prepared and data was gathered by questionnaires delivered to the organizer, host, coordinators, lecturers and students of the programme. Eleven subjects from various backgrounds participated in the questionnaire. The questionnaire showed the programme improves the capacity of the clinicians and future educators in Cambodia and the region. The distance education course delivery method was found to be beneficial for the students and allows them to remain in their home country. In addition, there is a cost reduction compared to full-time study in Australia.

  5. Oregon Title I-M Skill Check List, Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer-Aders, Cathy

    Following the Migrant Student Record Transfer System skills list, this checklist, designed for non-English speaking students, is a system for rapidly evaluating a student's skill level and for keeping track of the student's mastery of suggested objectives at the second grade level. Objectives to be mastered with 100% accuracy include: reading…

  6. Level I--Level II Abilities as They Affect Performance of Three Races in the College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreth, Langdon E.

    1978-01-01

    The hypothesis that multiple-choice exams load higher on Level II ability than on Level I ability was confirmed by correlating multiple choice tests with the Cognitive Abilities Test Nonverbal Battery, the forward digit span test, and essay measures. Differences in scores among Asian, black, white, and Mexican American students are discussed in…

  7. The Anderson Reservoir seismic gap - Induced aseismicity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    1976-01-01

    A persistent 10-km seismicity gap along the Calaveras fault appears to be related to the presence of the Leroy Anderson Reservoir in the Calaveras-Silver Creek fault zones southeast of San Jose, California. A magnitude-4.7 earthquake occurred at a depth of 5 km in the centre of the gap on October 3, 1973. The sequence of immediate aftershocks usually accompanying shallow earthquakes of this magnitude in central California did not occur. A bridge crossing the reservoir near its southeast end has been severely deformed, apparently the result of tectonic creep on the Calaveras fault. The occurrence of creep and absence of small earthquakes along the Calaveras in the vicinity of the reservoir suggest a transition from stick slip to stable sliding, possibly brought about by increased pore pressure. ?? 1976.

  8. Anderson Localization in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, Tamas G.; Pittler, Ferenc

    2010-11-05

    At low temperature the low end of the QCD Dirac spectrum is well described by chiral random matrix theory. In contrast, at high temperature there is no similar statistical description of the spectrum. We show that at high temperature the lowest part of the spectrum consists of a band of statistically uncorrelated eigenvalues obeying essentially Poisson statistics and the corresponding eigenvectors are extremely localized. Going up in the spectrum the spectral density rapidly increases and the eigenvectors become more and more delocalized. At the same time the spectral statistics gradually crosses over to the bulk statistics expected from the corresponding random matrix ensemble. This phenomenon is reminiscent of Anderson localization in disordered conductors. Our findings are based on staggered Dirac spectra in quenched lattice simulations with the SU(2) gauge group.

  9. Slow Relaxation in Anderson Critical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soonwon; Yao, Norman; Choi, Joonhee; Kucsko, Georg; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    We study the single particle dynamics in disordered systems with long range hopping, focusing on the critical cases, i.e., the hopping amplitude decays as 1 /rd in d-dimension. We show that with strong on-site potential disorder, the return probability of the particle decays as power-law in time. As on-site potential disorder decreases, the temporal profile smoothly changes from a simple power-law to the sum of multiple power-laws with exponents ranged from 0 to νmax. We analytically compute the decay exponents using a simple resonance counting argument, which quantitatively agrees with exact numerical results. Our result implies that the dynamics in Anderson Critical systems are dominated by resonances. Harvard-MIT CUA, Kwanjeong Educational Fellowship, AFOSR MURI, Samsung Scholarship.

  10. Theory of the topological anderson insulator.

    PubMed

    Groth, C W; Wimmer, M; Akhmerov, A R; Tworzydło, J; Beenakker, C W J

    2009-11-01

    We present an effective medium theory that explains the disorder-induced transition into a phase of quantized conductance, discovered in computer simulations of HgTe quantum wells. It is the combination of a random potential and quadratic corrections proportional to p2 sigma(z) to the Dirac Hamiltonian that can drive an ordinary band insulator into a topological insulator (having an inverted band gap). We calculate the location of the phase boundary at weak disorder and show that it corresponds to the crossing of a band edge rather than a mobility edge. Our mechanism for the formation of a topological Anderson insulator is generic, and would apply as well to three-dimensional semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  11. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  12. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-02

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. Weanswer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precisemore » sense, motivate our construction.Wenote that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order.Weshow that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized.Wealso study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry–Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant.Weformulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry–Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Lastly, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.« less

  13. Career Portfolio for Learning Support Students. Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youshock, Joseph; And Others

    This second level of a portfolio for learners with special needs is intended for grades 9-10. A discussion of its conceptual design describes the four educational content areas from which it was developed (career development assessment, curriculum-based vocational assessment, community-referenced assessment, and work habits assessment) and four…

  14. Specification for Qualification and Certification for Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This document defines the requirements and program for the American Welding Society (AWS) to certify advanced-level welders through an evaluation process entailing performance qualification and practical knowledge tests requiring the use of advanced reading, computational, and manual skills. The following items are included: statement of the…

  15. Importance of level mixing on accurate [Fe II] transition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, N. C.; Hibbert, A.

    2010-12-01

    Context. In a very recent measurement Gurell et al. (2009, A&A, 508, 525) commented that while the theoretical lifetime of a 4G5.5 is approximately one tenth of the lifetime of b 2H5.5 the corresponding measurement shows this to be close to one fifth. This large discrepancy is attributed to the effect of inadequate level mixing in the theoretical calculations. Aims: The aim of this work is to make a detailed analysis of these level mixing effects on transitions from various lower levels to the a 4G5.5 and b 2H5.5 levels given in three previous calculations and in the present more extensive CI calculation. Methods: The CIV3 structure codes of Hibbert (1975, Comput. Phys. Commun., 9, 141) and Hibbert et al. (1991, Comput. Phys. Commun., 64, 455) are used in the present work, combined with our “fine-tuning” extrapolation process. Results: The calculated mixing between the upper levels, obtained in previous calculations, is shown to be too weak. The stronger mixing determined in our work gives rise to a calculated lifetime for b 2H5.5 within 3% of the measured value. On the other hand our calculated lifetime for a 4G5.5 is around 20% lower than the measured value, which has fairly wide error bars. Conclusions: Our enhanced calculations explain the difference between previous calculations of the b 2H5.5 lifetime and the recent measured value and confirm the latter. We also suggest a somewhat higher value than experiment for the lifetime of a 4G5.5.

  16. Liver and plasma levels of descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA II) in vitamin K deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Harauchi, T; Takano, K; Matsuura, M; Yoshizaki, T

    1986-04-01

    Descarboxyprothrombin (PIVKA II) is a precursor of prothrombin without biological activity, and it increases with vitamin K deficiency. We studied the time course changes in liver and plasma levels of PIVKA II during the progress of vitamin K deficiency in rats. Good correlation was observed between liver PIVKA II and plasma PIVKA II and between liver or plasma PIVKA II and plasma prothrombin in experiments in which rats were fed a vitamin K-deficient diet. Feeding of a vitamin K-deficient diet or fasting caused marked increases in liver and plasma PIVKA II in male rats and a weaker response in female rats. Warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, caused an abrupt increase in liver PIVKA II, but the increase in plasma PIVKA II was delayed about 3 hr. Plasma prothrombin decreased from about 30 min later. Factor VII decreased similarly to prothrombin, and changes in the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were slower than the changes in these substances. Sex differences were not seen in these warfarin actions. These observations indicate that liver and plasma PIVKA II are sensitive markers of vitamin K deficiency in rats, and assay of PIVKA II can be useful for analyzing the action mechanism of drugs which influence blood coagulation.

  17. Increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II in the developing Down syndrome brain.

    PubMed

    Palminiello, Sonia; Kida, Elizabeth; Kaur, Kulbir; Walus, Marius; Wisniewski, Krystyna E; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Rabe, Ausma; Albertini, Giorgio; Golabek, Adam A

    2008-01-23

    By using a proteomic approach, we found increased levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS). Further immunoblot analyses showed that the levels of CA II are increased not only in the brain of adult Ts65Dn mice but also in the brain of infants and young children with DS. Cellular localization of the enzyme in human brain, predominantly in the oligodendroglia and primitive vessels in fetal brain and in the oligodendroglia and some GABAergic neurons postnatally, was similar in DS subjects and controls. Given the role of CA II in regulation of electrolyte and water balance and pH homeostasis, up-regulation of CA II may reflect a compensatory mechanism mobilized in response to structural/functional abnormalities in the developing DS brain. However, this up-regulation may also have an unfavorable effect by increasing susceptibility to seizures of children with DS.

  18. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  19. Factorial validity and measurement invariance across intelligence levels and gender of the overexcitabilities questionnaire-II (OEQ-II).

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Wim; Hofmans, Joeri; Cooremans, Sven; Staels, Eva

    2014-03-01

    The concept of overexcitability, derived from Dabrowski's theory of personality development, offers a promising approach for the study of the developmental dynamics of giftedness. The present study aimed at (a) examining the factorial structure of the Overexcitabilities Questionnaire-II scores (OEQ-II) and (b) testing measurement invariance of these scores across intelligence and gender. A sample of 641 Dutch-speaking adolescents from 11 to 15 years old, 363 girls and 278 boys, participated in this study. Results showed that a model without cross-loadings did not fit the data well (using confirmatory factor analysis), whereas a factor model in which all cross-loadings were included yielded fit statistics that were in support of the factorial structure of the OEQ-II scores (using exploratory structural equation modeling). Furthermore, our findings supported the assumption of (partial) strict measurement invariance of the OEQ-II scores across intelligence levels and across gender. Such levels of measurement invariance allow valid comparisons between factor means and factor relationships across groups. In particular, the gifted group scored significantly higher on intellectual and sensual overexcitability (OE) than the nongifted group, girls scored higher on emotional and sensual OE than boys, and boys scored higher on intellectual and psychomotor OE than girls.

  20. [Studies on the mechanism of elevation of serum PIVKA-II levels in alcoholic liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Sakizono, Kenji; Oita, Tatsuo; Eto, Masaaki; Bito, Sanae; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Kasakura, Shinpei

    2002-03-01

    We measured serum PIVKA-II concentrations in 18 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Alcoholic liver disease was diagnosed by the history of ethanol intake of more than 900 ml/day for over 10 years. Liver cirrhosis was diagnosed histologically. Infections with hepatitis B and C viruses were ruled out by assaying serum virus markers. No tumor was detected in liver by ultrasonography and computed tomography during observation period. None of the patients studied were positive for alpafetoprotein (AFP). Eight out of 18 (44.4%) patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis showed elevated serum PIVKA-II levels. In contrast, only eight out of 93 (8.6%) patients with nonalcholic liver cirrhosis had elevated serum PIVKA-II levels. PIVKA-II is well known as a tumor marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The rates of positive PIVKA-II found in alcoholic liver cirrhosis approached its rates in HCC. However, the time course for the elevation of serum PIVKA-II levels was different each other in alcoholic liver cirrhosis and HCC. In HCC, serum PIVKA-II "levels" continued to elevate until therapy. In contrast, its elevation was transient and its levels returned to baseline in alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The values of ALT (GPT), gamma-GTP, and ALP correlated poorly with serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. To investigate the mechanism by which elevation of serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis occurred, we studied the effect of vitamin K on production of PIVKA-II and AFP by hepatocytes. Hepatocytes(Alexander PLC/PRF/F cell line) were cultured in the presence of various concentrations of vitamin K (Kaytwo, Eisai, Tokyo). Vitamin K had no effect on AFP production. In contrast, PIVKA-II production was inhibited by addition of vitamin K in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, elevation of serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis was suppressed by administration of vitamin K (Kaytwo) to these patients. Taken

  1. Des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II) levels in maternal serum throughout gestation.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tomizo; Matsuyama, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Takao; Kanayama, Naohiro

    2005-06-01

    The status of vitamin K in pregnant women was investigated using the highly sensitive method for des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (protein induced by vitamin K absence [PIVKA-II]), electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. A gradual elevation of PIVKA-II related to gestational weeks was observed in healthy pregnant women, suggesting that a modest vitamin K deficiency takes place in gestation. Furthermore, throughout gestation the majority of pregnant women exceeded the healthy adult levels in PIVKA-II. Among complicated gestations of preeclampsia, a remarkable elevation of PIVKA-II was observed in severe preeclampsia, in which a high correlation between PIVKA-II level and coagulation parameters, including thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes, was revealed. These data were suggestive that the vitamin K status readily decreased into a deficient status in hypercoagulative conditions. Among other complicated gestations, a moderate elevation of PIVKA-II was demonstrated in hyperemetic conditions, and, if at all, only a slight elevation of PIVKA-II was observed in other maternal diseases. The present study is the first report regarding the changes of PIVKA-II in pregnant women.

  2. Geology of the Anderson Mesa quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.; Withington, C.F.

    1953-01-01

    The Anderson Mesa quadrangle is one of the eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of the southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteenth quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quarternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-tending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive slat and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing many thousands of tons. The ore consists of largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  3. Anderson localisation in spin chains for perfect state transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronke, Rebecca; Estarellas, Marta P.; D'Amico, Irene; Spiller, Timothy P.; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-09-01

    Anderson localisation is an important phenomenon arising in many areas of physics, and here we explore it in the context of quantum information devices. Finite dimensional spin chains have been demonstrated to be important devices for quantum information transport, and in particular can be engineered to allow for "perfect state transfer" (PST). Here we present extensive investigations of disordered PST spin chains, demonstrating spatial localisation and transport retardation effects, and relate these effects to conventional Anderson localisation. We provide thresholds for Anderson localisation in these finite quantum information systems for both the spatial and the transport domains. Finally, we consider the effect of disorder on the eigenstates and energy spectrum of our Hamiltonian, where results support our conclusions on the presence of Anderson localisation.

  4. STS-107 M.S Michael Anderson at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, STS-107 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson (gloved, in center) gets hands-on experience with equipment. Identified as a research mission, STS-107 is scheduled for launch July 19, 2001

  5. Regulation of synaptic connectivity: levels of Fasciclin II influence synaptic growth in the Drosophila CNS.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard A; Seugnet, Laurent; Thompson, Annemarie; Salvaterra, Paul M; Bate, Michael

    2002-08-01

    Much of our understanding of synaptogenesis comes from studies that deal with the development of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Although well studied, it is not clear how far the NMJ represents an adequate model for the formation of synapses within the CNS. Here we investigate the role of Fasciclin II (Fas II) in the development of synapses between identified motor neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the CNS of Drosophila. Fas II is a neural cell adhesion molecule homolog that is involved in both target selection and synaptic plasticity at the NMJ in Drosophila. In this study, we show that levels of Fas II are critical determinants of synapse formation and growth in the CNS. The initial establishment of synaptic contacts between these identified neurons is seemingly independent of Fas II. The subsequent proliferation of these synaptic connections that occurs postembryonically is, in contrast, significantly retarded by the absence of Fas II. Although the initial formation of synaptic connectivity between these neurons is seemingly independent of Fas II, we show that their formation is, nevertheless, significantly affected by manipulations that alter the relative balance of Fas II in the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Increasing expression of Fas II in either the presynaptic or postsynaptic neurons, during embryogenesis, is sufficient to disrupt the normal level of synaptic connectivity that occurs between these neurons. This effect of Fas II is isoform specific and, moreover, phenocopies the disruption to synaptic connectivity observed previously after tetanus toxin light chain-dependent blockade of evoked synaptic vesicle release in these neurons. PMID:12151538

  6. The Heritability of Jensen's Level I and II and Divergent Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzullo, Thomas R.; And Others

    Heritability is defined as the proportion of a manifested trait's varience that is due to genetic variation. Sixty-five pairs of twins were employed to investigate the heritability of: (1) short term memory (Jensen's Level 1), operationalized using of modified "digit span" test; (2) the general intellective factor (Jensen's Level II),…

  7. Gutzwiller wave-function solution for Anderson lattice model: Emerging universal regimes of heavy quasiparticle states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokiński, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spałek, Jozef

    2015-09-01

    The recently proposed diagrammatic expansion (DE) technique for the full Gutzwiller wave function (GWF) is applied to the Anderson lattice model. This approach allows for a systematic evaluation of the expectation values with full Gutzwiller wave function in finite-dimensional systems. It introduces results extending in an essential manner those obtained by means of the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), which is variationally exact only in infinite dimensions. Within the DE-GWF approach we discuss the principal paramagnetic properties and their relevance to heavy-fermion systems. We demonstrate the formation of an effective, narrow f band originating from atomic f -electron states and subsequently interpret this behavior as a direct itineracy of f electrons; it represents a combined effect of both the hybridization and the correlations induced by the Coulomb repulsive interaction. Such a feature is absent on the level of GA, which is equivalent to the zeroth order of our expansion. Formation of the hybridization- and electron-concentration-dependent narrow f band rationalizes the common assumption of such dispersion of f levels in the phenomenological modeling of the band structure of CeCoIn5. Moreover, it is shown that the emerging f -electron direct itineracy leads in a natural manner to three physically distinct regimes within a single model that are frequently discussed for 4 f - or 5 f -electron compounds as separate model situations. We identify these regimes as (i) the mixed-valence regime, (ii) Kondo/almost-Kondo insulating regime, and (iii) the Kondo-lattice limit when the f -electron occupancy is very close to the f -state half filling, →1 . The nonstandard features of the emerging correlated quantum liquid state are stressed.

  8. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  9. Reduction of Melatonin Level in Patients with Type II Diabetes and Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadi Motemayel, Fatemeh; Jazaeri, Mina; Feradmal, Javad; Zarabadi, Mahdiyeh; Hoseyni, Mostafa; Torkzaban, Parviz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Melatonin is a circulating hormone that is mainly released from the pineal gland. It possesses antioxidant, free-radical scavenging, and immune-enhancing properties. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various diseases, including diabetes and periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the possible links between salivary melatonin levels and type II diabetes and periodontal diseases. Materials and methods. A total of 30 type II diabetic patients, 30 patients with periodontal diseases, 30 type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease and 30 age- and BMI-matched controls were studied. The periodontal status was evaluated by the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Salivary melatonin levels were determined by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results. The mean of salivary melatonin level was significantly lower in patients with either periodontitis or diabetes compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.05). Salivary melatonin concentration decreased in type II diabetic patients and periodontitis patients, and then decreased reaching the lowest levels in type II diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study, it can probably be concluded that salivary level of melatonin has an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and periodontal diseases. It is also worth noting that this factor could probably be used as a pivotal biological marker in the diagnosis and possible treatment of these diseases, although further research is required to validate this hypothesis. PMID:25346835

  10. Tunable Dirac-point resonance induced by a STM-coupled Anderson impurity on a topological insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction effect between the surface states of a topological insulator (TI) and a STM-coupled Anderson impurity is studied by using equations of motion of the Green’s functions. Remarkably, we show that when a coupling between the Anderson impurity and the STM tip is included, the tunneling resonance and the Kondo peak can be tuned to be exactly at the Dirac point, by adjusting the impurity level and Fermi energy, such that the local density of states at the Dirac point is significantly enhanced. This is in contrast to the case of a STM-decoupled Anderson impurity, where both resonances are always fully suppressed at the Dirac point. Our finding suggests a pathway to experimentally control the fundamental properties of the electrons on a TI surface.

  11. Anderson localization in optical lattices with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to simple-cubic optical lattices with a superimposed disordered speckle pattern. The two mobility edges in the first band and the corresponding critical filling factors are determined as a function of the disorder strength, ranging from vanishing disorder up to the critical disorder intensity where the two mobility edges merge and the whole band becomes localized. Our theoretical analysis is based both on continuous-space models that take into account the details of the spatial correlation of the speckle pattern, and also on a simplified tight-binding model with an uncorrelated distribution of the on-site energies. The mobility edges are computed via the analysis of the energy-level statistics, and we determine the universal value of the ratio between consecutive level spacings at the mobility edge. We analyze the role of the spatial correlation of the disorder, and we also discuss a qualitative comparison with available experimental data for interacting atomic Fermi gases obtained in the moderate interaction regime.

  12. Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Milovanov, Alexander V; Iomin, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t→+∞. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ∝ t^{α}, with the exponent α=1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the

  13. Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.; Iomin, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t →+∞. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ∝ tα, with the exponent α =1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the

  14. Variation of des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II) levels in cord blood throughout gestation.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, T; Matsuyama, K; Kobayashi, T; Kanayama, N; Terao, T; Maeda, M; Ibara, S

    2001-01-01

    The variation of des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin (PIVKA-II, protein induced by vitamin K absence) levels in umbilical cord blood throughout gestation was examined using a highly sensitive method, electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). PIVKA-II levels in infants without any complications were low, but modestly high, exceeding the normal range of healthy adults during the preterm period, followed by a remarkable increase after the 37th week of gestation. Among infants complicated with severe preeclampsia a marked increase of PIVKA-II levels was observed in preterm infants, showing a good correlation with the existence ofinfarctions on the placenta. On the other hand, among infants complicated with preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) in which antibiotics were administered during the prenatal period, a moderate elevation of PIVKA-II levels was observed. These data suggest that the normal range of PIVKA-II in fetuses is modestly high compared with adults and any deficient status of vitamin K would not exist throughout the preterm period. Nevertheless, the vitamin K status might readily fall into a deficient condition in term infants. Furthermore, it is notable that vitamin K deficiency would be induced in complicated gestation with severe preeclampsia and medication with antibiotics.

  15. ENERGY LEVELS AND SPECTRAL LINES OF SINGLY IONIZED MANGANESE (Mn II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kramida, Alexander; Sansonetti, Jean E.

    2013-04-01

    This compilation revises the previously recommended list of energy levels of singly ionized manganese (Mn II) and provides a comprehensive list of observed spectral lines and transition probabilities in this spectrum. The new level optimization takes into account critically assessed uncertainties of measured wavelengths and includes about a hundred high-precision wavelengths determined by laser spectroscopy and Fourier transform techniques. Uncertainties of 63% of energy levels and 74% of Ritz wavelengths are reduced by a factor of three on average.

  16. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: Li (x) Fe(7)Se(8).

    PubMed

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of Li x Fe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that Li x Fe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  17. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: LixFe7Se8

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of LixFe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that LixFe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  18. Pepsinogen I and II, Gastrin and Cag A Serum Levels in Shiraz.

    PubMed

    Shamsdin, Seyedeh Azra; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Mehrabani, Davood; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the similar rate of HP infection, the rate of gastric cancer (GC) differs in different regions of the country. There are conflicting reports for using a panel of serologic tests such as pepsinogens I, II (PG I and PG II), and gastrin for population screening. We designed this study to assess healthy appearing adults in Shiraz, southern Iran in order to evaluate the correlation of these serological tests with demographics and lifestyle in a region with a low rate of gastric malignancy. METHODS In a population-based study, 846 out of 1978 subjects who were selected by cluster random sampling based on postal code division in Shiraz agreed to participate in the present study. A questionnaire that included age, gender, weight and height, lifestyle such as physical activity, smoking and the use of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was completed. A blood sample was taken after overnight fasting for measurements of PG I, PG II and Cag A status by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Gastrin level was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS The study included 305 men and 541 women. Their mean age was 50.53+11.4 (range: 35-99 years). The level of PG I was significantly more in males than females (116.6±57.1 vs. 103.1±55.8, p < 0.001), lower in older age groups (p = 0.01), and rural compared with urban residents (110.3+55.7 vs. 100.2+58.1, p = 0.02). The serum level of PG II was less in obese subjects (p = 0.5). There was no significant correlation between PG I, PG II, smoking, NSAID use and activity. Gastrin level were not correlated with any of the demographic characteristics. The level of Cag A was significantly different between males and females (30.5±37 vs. 37.7±41.7, p < 0.001), more in older subjects (p = 0.007) and non smokers (p = 0.001). The serum levels of PG I and PG I/PG II ratio decreased significantly in subjects with positive Cag A serology (p < 0.05). The ratio of PG I/PG II was lower than 3 in 35 (4.1%) subjects

  19. Limiting Radiotherapy to the Contralateral Retropharyngeal and High Level II Lymph Nodes in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma is Safe and Improves Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Christopher R.; Gay, Hiram A.; Haughey, Bruce H.; Nussenbaum, Brian; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wildes, Tanya M.; DeWees, Todd A.; Lewis, James S.; Thorstad, Wade L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation treatment volumes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are controversial. Here we report the outcomes, failures, and quality of life (QOL) of patients treated using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that eliminated treatment of contralateral retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RPLN) in the clinically uninvolved neck. Methods A prospective institutional database identified patients with primary oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx and unknown primary HNSCC treated using IMRT. There were three temporal groups (G1-3). G1 received comprehensive neck IMRT with parotid sparing, G2 eliminated the contralateral high level II (HLII) lymph nodes, and G3 further eliminated the contralateral RPLN in the clinically uninvolved neck. Patterns of failure and survival analyses were completed and QOL data measured by the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) was compared in a subset of patients from G1 and G3. Results There were 748 patients identified. Of the 488 patients treated in G2 or G3, 406 had a clinically uninvolved contralateral neck. There were no failures in the spared RPLNs (95% CI; 0-1.3%) or high contralateral neck (95% CI; 0-0.7%). QOL data was compared between 44 patients in G1 and 51 patients in G3. QOL improved both globally and in all domains assessed for G3 in which reduced radiotherapy volumes were used (p < 0.007). Conclusions For patients with locally advanced HNSCC, eliminating coverage to the contralateral HLII and contralateral RPLN in the clinically uninvolved side of the neck is associated with minimal risk of failure in these regions and significantly improved patient-reported QOL. PMID:25143048

  20. Polarons in π-Conjugated Polymers: Anderson or Landau?

    PubMed

    Barford, William; Marcus, Max; Tozer, Oliver Robert

    2016-02-01

    Using both analytical expressions and the density matrix renormalization group method, we study the fully quantized disordered Holstein model to investigate the localization of charges and excitons by vibrational or torsional modes-i.e., the formation of polarons-in conformationally disordered π-conjugated polymers. We identify two distinct mechanisms for polaron formation, namely Anderson localization via disorder (causing the formation of Anderson polarons) and self-localization by self-trapping via normal modes (causing the formation of Landau polarons). We identify the regimes where either description is more valid. The key distinction between Anderson and Landau polarons is that for the latter the particle wave function is a strong function of the normal coordinates, and hence the "vertical" and "relaxed" wave functions are different. This has theoretical and experimental consequences for Landau polarons. Theoretically, it means that the Condon approximation is not valid, and so care needs to be taken when evaluating transition rates. Experimentally, it means that the self-localization of the particle as a consequence of its coupling to the normal coordinates may lead to experimental observables, e.g., ultrafast fluorescence depolarization. We apply these ideas to poly(p-phenylenevinylene). We show that the high frequency C-C bond oscillation only causes Landau polarons for a very narrow parameter regime; generally we expect disorder to dominate and Anderson polarons to be a more applicable description. Similarly, for the low frequency torsional fluctuations we show that Anderson polarons are expected for realistic parameters.

  1. Modified Anderson Model——Dynamics of Brittle Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson's model has been a basic theory of fault mechanical analysis in one century. However, because of the assumptions, there are some major limitations in Anderson model, and it does not account for frequently observed oblique slips, complicated fault cases in nature and the slips occurring on pre-existing planes of weakness. On the basis of Reactivation Tendency Analysis theory proposed by Tong and Yin (2011), we proposed Modified Anderson model and extended Anderson model from 1) homogeneous media to Inhomogeneous media with pre-existing weakness(es); 2) Andersonian stress state to arbitrary stress state; 3) transient activity trend analysis to fault formation and evolution, and verified with sandbox experiments and natural cases. With Modified Anderson model, we can predict 1) the sequence of fault formation; 2) fault orientations and distribution; 3) slip directions (dip slip, oblique-dip slip, oblique slip, oblique strike slip and strike sip) of different fault when the directions of principal stress, orientations and mechanical properties (cohesion and frictional coefficient) of pre-existing weakness(es) are given. The origin of the complicated fault systems in nature can be explained reasonably. There will be a wide applications for oil and gas exploration and development, coal mining, earthquake risk evaluation, etc.

  2. PATHWAYS: An Adult Pre-GED Reading Skills Workbook. Level II. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Ollie M.

    The teacher's guide for the Pre-GED (General Educational Development) Level II reading skills student workbook of the PATHWAYS Curriculum contains a concise explanation of each skill, suggested teaching strategies, answers to the exercises, and a list of available commercial materials that may be used to supplement the exercises for each lesson.…

  3. PATHWAYS: An Adult Pre-GED Writing Skills Workbook. Level II. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Ollie M.

    The teacher's guide for the Pre-GED (General Educational Development) Level II writing skills student workbook of the PATHWAYS Curriculum provides a concise explanation of each skill presented in the 45 lessons, suggested teaching strategies, answers to the exercises, and a list of available commercial materials that may be used to supplement the…

  4. GUIDE FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PUPILS. LEVEL II, PART 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILSON, ROBERT; AND OTHERS

    THE 55 AUDIO-LINGUAL LESSON UNITS OF "TEACHING ENGLISH EARLY" ARE DESIGNED AS A GUIDE FOR THE TEACHER OF ELEMENTARY GRADE CHILDREN WHO HAVE REACHED LEVEL II IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. AIMED PRIMARILY AT THE SPANISH-SPEAKING (MEXICAN-AMERICAN) CHILD, THIS PRE-READING MATERIAL MAY BE USED WITH OTHER LANGUAGE BACKGROUNDS. (SEE THE FINAL REPORT…

  5. PATHWAYS: An Adult Pre-GED Reading Skills Workbook. Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Ollie M.

    Written to prepare the American Indian student entering a General Educational Development (GED) program, the Pre-GED Level II reading skills student workbook of the PATHWAYS Curriculum provides lessons that will teach skills needed to pass the reading and writing sections of the GED examination, along with writing skills for seeking employment.…

  6. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 2: Locating clouds tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    A comparison is made of the vertical distribution of high-level cloud tops derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements and from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for all Julys and Januarys in 1985 to 1990. The results suggest that ISCCP overestimates the pressure of high-level clouds by up to 50-150 mbar, particularly at low latitudes. This is caused by the frequent presence of clouds with diffuse tops (greater than 50% time when cloudy events are observed). The averaged vertical extent of the diffuse top is about 1.5 km. At midlatitudes where the SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressure agree best, clouds with distinct tops reach a maximum relative proportion of the total level cloud amount (about 30-40%), and diffuse-topped clouds are reduced to their minimum (30-40%). The ISCCP-defined cloud top pressure should be regarded not as the material physical height of the clouds but as the level which emits the same infrared radiance as observed. SAGE II and ISCCP cloud top pressures agree for clouds with distinct tops. There is also an indication that the cloud top pressures of optically thin clouds not overlying thicker clouds are poorly estimated by ISCCP at middle latitudes. The average vertical extent of these thin clouds is about 2.5 km.

  7. PATHWAYS: An Adult Pre-GED Writing Skills Workbook. Level II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Ollie M.

    Utilizing Southwestern Indian myths, legends, poems, history, and information on religious beliefs, architecture, fine arts, music, dance, and social practices, the Pre-GED (General Educational Development) Level II writing skills workbook, part of the PATHWAYS Curriculum, provides a culture-based GED preparatory reading and writing curriculum for…

  8. Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level II - Advanced Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with the American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level II (advanced) welders. Presented first are the scope, objectives, and requirements of the AWS…

  9. Interactive Journaling as a Brief Intervention for Level-II DUI and DWI Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheck, Amy Mary; Hoffmann, Norman G.; Proctor, Steven L.; Couillou,Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a brief alcohol intervention in increasing basic alcohol-related knowledge, and the intention to change high-risk drinking behaviors, among a sample of DUI and DWI offenders. Pre- and post-test data, in addition to program evaluation data, from 872 Level-II DUI and DWI offenders…

  10. Anderson wall and BLOCH oscillations in molecular rotation.

    PubMed

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2014-07-25

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor, the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum--the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of ℏ. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

  11. Field theory of Anderson transition of the kicked rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    We present a microscopic theory of Anderson transition in the quantum kicked rotor. The behavior of the system is shown to depend sensitively on the value of the effective Planck constant, \\tilde h . For the periodically kicked rotor, we obtain quantitative results for the time-dependent behavior of the rotor's energy that characterizes the system's localization/resonance properties. For the quasiperiodically kicked rotor, we find that for irrational values of \\tilde h/(4\\pi ) , the quantum phase transition exhibited in this system falls into the universality class of Anderson (metal-insulator) transition in disordered electronic systems; for rational values, the rotor-Anderson insulator turns into a ‘supermetal’ (i.e. the static conductivity diverges) and the system exhibits metal-supermetal transition.

  12. Algebra II: Gatekeeper Course--An Examination of CST Proficiency Levels in California and the Bay Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailer-O'Keefe, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the Algebra II course and California Star Test (CST) proficiency levels in the San Francisco Bay Area and in the State of California. CST proficiency levels are examined by grade level for the State and nine counties of the San Francisco Bay Area region. Algebra II is shown to be one of the more complicated courses in the CSU…

  13. The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy

  14. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.

    PubMed

    Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

    2014-03-21

    Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

  15. STS-89 M.S. Michael Anderson suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson smiles as he completes the donning of his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. A major in the U.S. Air Force, Anderson has a master of science degree in physics from Creighton University. He and six fellow crew members will soon depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour will lift off during a launch window that opens at 9:43 p.m. EST, Jan. 22. STS-89 is the eighth of nine planned missions to dock the Space Shuttle with Russia's Mir space station.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  17. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  18. Effect of oral water soluble vitamin K on PIVKA-II levels in newborns.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Marwaha, N; Kumar, P; Narang, A

    1995-08-01

    Intramuscular administration of vitamin K for prophylaxis against hemorrhagic disease of the newborn has the disadvantage of increased cost, pain, anxiety to parents and risk of transmission of infection. Oral route is a better alternative. Oral absorption of vitamin K has been shown to be equally good using special oral preparations. However, this preparation is not available in India. A prospective study was carried out on 51 full term, healthy breastfed newborns to evaluate if the injectable water soluble preparation of vitamin K (menadione sodium bisulphite) could be as effective. Fourteen babies received 1 mg vitamin K intramuscularly, 24 received 2 mg vitamin K orally while 13 controls did not receive vitamin K at birth. PIVKA-II levels were measured in cord blood and at 72-78 hours of age in all babies as a marker of vitamin K deficiency. The overall PIVKA-II prevalence in cord blood was 64.7%. At 72-78 hours, PIVKA-II was present in 50% of babies in IM group, 58.3% of babies in oral group and in 76.9% of babies in 'no vitamin K' group (p > 0.05). The PIVKA-II levels decreased or did not change at 72-78 hours in 91.6% of babies in oral group versus 92.8% of babies in IM group (p > 0.05). On the other hand, PIVKA-II levels increased in 30.7% of babies who did not receive vitamin K as against in 7.8% of babies receiving vitamin K in either form (p < 0.05). Hence, vitamin K prophylaxis is required for all newborns at birth and injectable vitamin K (menadione sodium bisulphite) given orally to term healthy babies is effective in preventing vitamin K deficiency state.

  19. [Clinical usefulness of serum PIVKA-II levels determined by ECLIA system as a tumor maker for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sakizono, K; Oita, T; Shibata, Y; Tamura, A; Kasakura, S

    1998-09-01

    PIVKA-II is well known as a tumor maker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We measured serum PIVKA-II concentrations with a commercially available PIVKA-II immunoassay kit (Picolumi PIVKA-II: Eisai Co., Ltd., Tokyo) using Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA). ECLIA system is a novel immunoassay system using a Ruthenium (II) Tris (bipyridyl) luminesced by electric energy. Cut off value was 40 mAU/ml by receiver-operating characteristic curves as a tumor maker for HCC. Eighty-nine out of 142 (62.2%) patients with HCC had elevated serum PIVKA-II levels and seventeen out of 36 (47.2%) patients whose tumor size was below 2 cm in diameter showed high PIVKA-II levels. We determined the serial changes in serum PIVKA-II levels of two patients with HCC following initial therapy. In these patients, elevations of serum PIVKA-II levels determined by ECLIA system preceded the HCC relapse detected by imaging diagnostic procedures. In summary, this assay system is suitable for detecting small increases in PIVKA-II concentrations. Determination of PIVKA-II by this assay system is found to be useful for the early detection of HCC.

  20. Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

  1. Qualitative breakdown of the noncrossing approximation for the symmetric one-channel Anderson impurity model at all temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sposetti, C. N.; Manuel, L. O.; Roura-Bas, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Anderson impurity model is studied by means of the self-consistent hybridization expansions in its noncrossing (NCA) and one-crossing (OCA) approximations. We have found that for the one-channel spin-1 /2 particle-hole symmetric Anderson model, the NCA results are qualitatively wrong for any temperature, even when the approximation gives the exact threshold exponents of the ionic states. Actually, the NCA solution describes an overscreened Kondo effect, because it is the same as for the two-channel infinite-U single-level Anderson model. We explicitly show that the NCA is unable to distinguish between these two very different physical systems, independently of temperature. Using the impurity entropy as an example, we show that the low-temperature values of the NCA entropy for the symmetric case yield the limit Simp(T =0 ) →ln√{2 }, which corresponds to the zero temperature entropy of the overscreened Kondo model. Similar pathologies are predicted for any other thermodynamic property. On the other hand, we have found that the OCA approach lifts the artificial mapping between the models and restores correct properties of the ground state, for instance, a vanishing entropy at low enough temperatures Simp(T =0 ) →0 . Our results indicate that the very well known NCA should be used with caution close to the symmetric point of the Anderson model.

  2. Usefulness of ED036 kit for measuring serum PIVKA-II levels in small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuromatsu, R; Tanaka, M; Shimauchi, Y; Shimada, M; Tanikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokoo, T

    1997-08-01

    As a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), serum protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) has high specificity, yet its sensitivity is relatively low, marking it less suitable to serve as an adjunct in the diagnosis of small HCC. Recently, the ED036 kit (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan), whose detection limit is approximately ten times superior to that of a conventional kit (Eitest MONOP II, Eisai) has been developed. In this study, serum PIVKA-II levels in serum samples from 83 patients with benign chronic liver diseases (CLD) and 129 patients with HCC were measured with those two kits. With the ED036 kit, the cut-off value was set at 40 mAU/ml. For PIVKA-II measured with the ED036 kit, sensitivity was 45.0%, specificity 92.8%, and accuracy 63.7%, when we discriminated patients with HCC from those with CLD without HCC. While maintaining a high specificity, of 92.8%, the ED036 kit showed a significantly higher sensitivity than the conventional kit (45.0% versus 27.9%; P < 0.0001). With patients who had HCC consisting of a single nodule 30 mm or less in diameter, the positivity rate for serum PIVKA-II with the ED036 kit was significantly greater than the rate with the conventional kit (21.4% versus 9.5%; P < 0.005). Thus, the ED036 kit was thought to be more useful than the conventional kit as a tumor marker for small HCC.

  3. An Anderson-like model of the QCD chiral transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G.; Pittler, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    We study the problems of chiral symmetry breaking and eigenmode localisation in finite-temperature QCD by looking at the lattice Dirac operator as a random Hamiltonian. We recast the staggered Dirac operator into an unconventional three-dimensional Anderson Hamiltonian ("Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian") carrying internal degrees of freedom, with disorder provided by the fluctuations of the gauge links. In this framework, we identify the features relevant to chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low-lying Dirac eigenmodes in the ordering of the local Polyakov lines, and in the related correlation between spatial links across time slices, thus tying the two phenomena to the deconfinement transition. We then build a toy model based on QCD and on the Dirac-Anderson approach, replacing the Polyakov lines with spin variables and simplifying the dynamics of the spatial gauge links, but preserving the above-mentioned relevant dynamical features. Our toy model successfully reproduces the main features of the QCD spectrum and of the Dirac eigenmodes concerning chiral symmetry breaking and localisation, both in the ordered (deconfined) and disordered (confined) phases. Moreover, it allows us to study separately the roles played in the two phenomena by the diagonal and the off-diagonal terms of the Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian. Our results support our expectation that chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low modes are closely related, and that both are triggered by the deconfinement transition.

  4. Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea…

  5. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-03-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early.

  6. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-06-24

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  7. Polaronic conduction and Anderson localization in reduced strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Yang, YiHsun; Olmstead, Marjorie A.; Bordia, Rajendra K.; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2015-12-01

    Electron transport mechanisms in reduced Sr0.5Ba0.5Nb2O6 (SBN50) are investigated from ˜100 to 955 K through an analysis of the electrical conductivity (σ) and the Seebeck coefficient (S) with respect to temperature (T). Notably, experimental evidence is presented that supports a scenario of Anderson localization below 600 K and carrier excitation across a mobility edge at higher temperature. As a relaxor ferroelectric, stoichiometric SBN has intrinsic disorder associated with both the distribution of Sr/Ba vacancies and the formation of polarized nanoregions. The removal of oxygen through reduction generates conduction electrons in SBN. At the lowest temperatures measured (100-155 K), the electrical conductivity exhibits a temperature dependence characteristic of variable range hopping, followed by a transition to small polaron hopping at intermediate temperatures (250-545 K). In both the variable range and small polaron hopping regimes, a semiconductor-like temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity (dσ/dT > 0) was observed. However, above 615 K, dσ/dT decreases dramatically and eventually becomes metal-like (dσ/dT < 0). Concomitantly, the Seebeck coefficient exhibits a linear dependence on lnT from 615 to 955 K with the same slope (˜104 μ V/K) for both polycrystalline SBN50 and single crystalline SBN61 (both reduced), indicating a similar, constant density of states near the Fermi level for both compositions. The application of Seebeck coefficient theory to this inherently disordered material reveals that the excitation of carriers across a mobility edge is likely responsible for the change in dσ/dT at high temperature. Such findings may have a significant impact in the field of conductive ferroelectrics.

  8. Excessive Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Levels in Drinkable Water Sources in Areas Along the Lake Victoria Shorelines in Siaya County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wambu, Enos W; Omwoyo, Wesley N; Akenga, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Copper(II) and zinc(II) levels in drinkable water sources in the alluvium areas of the Lake Victoria Basin in Siaya County of Kenya were evaluated to assess the risk posed to resident communities by hydrogeological accumulation of toxic residues in the sedimentary regions of the lake basin. The levels of the metals in water were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Metal concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 4.29 mg/L for Cu(II) and 0.03 to 1.62 mg/L for Zn(II), which were both higher than those normally recorded in natural waters. The Cu(II) levels also exceeded WHO guidelines for drinking water in 27% of the samples. The highest prevalence of excessive Cu(II) was found among dams and open pans (38%), piped water (33%) and spring water (25%). It was estimated that 18.2% of the resident communities in the current study area are exposed to potentially toxic levels of Cu(II) through their drinking water. PMID:26615531

  9. Excessive Copper(II) and Zinc(II) Levels in Drinkable Water Sources in Areas Along the Lake Victoria Shorelines in Siaya County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wambu, Enos W; Omwoyo, Wesley N; Akenga, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Copper(II) and zinc(II) levels in drinkable water sources in the alluvium areas of the Lake Victoria Basin in Siaya County of Kenya were evaluated to assess the risk posed to resident communities by hydrogeological accumulation of toxic residues in the sedimentary regions of the lake basin. The levels of the metals in water were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Metal concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 4.29 mg/L for Cu(II) and 0.03 to 1.62 mg/L for Zn(II), which were both higher than those normally recorded in natural waters. The Cu(II) levels also exceeded WHO guidelines for drinking water in 27% of the samples. The highest prevalence of excessive Cu(II) was found among dams and open pans (38%), piped water (33%) and spring water (25%). It was estimated that 18.2% of the resident communities in the current study area are exposed to potentially toxic levels of Cu(II) through their drinking water.

  10. Louisa Garrett Anderson (1873-1943), surgeon and suffragette.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Jennian F

    2008-11-01

    Louisa Garrett Anderson, daughter of Britain's first woman doctor, has been largely forgotten today despite the fact that her contribution to the women's movement was as great as that of her mother. Recognized by her contemporaries as an important figure in the suffrage campaign, Anderson chose to lend her support through high-profile action, being one of the few women doctors in her generation who risked their professional as well as their personal reputation in the fight for women's rights by becoming a suffragette - in her case, even going so far as to spend a month in prison for breaking a window on a demonstration. On the outbreak of war, with only the clinical experience she had gained as outpatient surgeon in a women's hospital, Anderson established a series of women-run military hospitals where she was a Chief Surgeon. The most successful was the Endell Street Military Hospital in London, funded by the Royal Army Medical Corps and the only army hospital ever to be run and staffed entirely by women. Believing that a doctor had an obligation to take a lead in public affairs, Anderson continued campaigning for women's issues in the unlikely setting of Endell Street, ensuring that their activities remained in the public eye through constant press coverage. Anderson's achievement was that her work played no small part in expunging the stigma of the militant years in the eyes of the public and - more importantly - was largely instrumental in putting women doctors on equal terms with their male colleagues. PMID:18952990

  11. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (NORWTH00120010) Town Highway 012 Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NORWTH00120010 on town highway 12 crossing Bloody Brook, Norwich, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, available from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting the Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 8.98-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left bank upstream and the left and right banks downstream are forested. The immediate right bank upstream is covered by shrub and brush with pasture on the overbank. Town Highway 12 runs along the valley of Bloody Brook; however, at structure NORWTH00120010 the road crosses Bloody Brook at a 90-degree angle. In the study area, Bloody Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.014 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 51.0 mm or 0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on October 31, 1994, indicated that the reach was unstable. The town highway 12 crossing of Bloody Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment is protected by sparse type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter). The channel is skewed 0 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees

  13. COMPREHENSIVE OBSERVATIONS OF THE ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AND IMPROVED ENERGY LEVELS FOR SINGLY IONIZED CHROMIUM (Cr II)

    SciTech Connect

    Sansonetti, Craig J.; Nave, Gillian; Reader, Joseph; Kerber, Florian

    2012-10-15

    We report new observations of the spectrum of singly ionized chromium (Cr II) in the region 1142-3954 A. The spectra were recorded with the National Institute of Standards and Technology 10.7 m normal-incidence vacuum spectrograph and FT700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. More than 3600 lines are classified as transitions among 283 even and 368 odd levels. The new spectral data are used to re-optimize the energy levels, reducing their uncertainties by a typical factor of 20.

  14. Quality assurance plan for the High Level Controller for the CBMS Block II

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.W.; Robbins, I.F.; Stewart, K.A.; Terry, C.L.; Whitaker, R.A.; Wolf, D.A.; Zager, J.C.

    1997-09-01

    This document establishes the software Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the High Level Controller for the Chemical and Biological Mass Spectrometer Block II (HLC/CBMS-II) project activities under the Computing, Robotics, and Education (CRE) Directorate management. It defines the requirements and assigns responsibilities for ensuring, with a high degree of confidence, that project objectives will be achieved as planned. The CBMS Program was awarded to ORNL by the US Army Chemical and Biological Defense command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to design the next version (Block II) mass spectrometer for the detection and identification of chemical and biological warfare agents, to fabricate four engineering prototypes, and to construct eight preproduction units. Section 1 of this document provides an introduction to the HLC/CBMS-II project QAP. Sections 2 and 3 describe the specific aspects of quality assurance as applicable to the project. Section 4 reviews the project approach to risk management. The Risk Management Matrix given in Appendix A is a tool to assess, prioritize, and prevent problems before they occur; therefore, the matrix will be reviewed and revised on a periodic basis. Appendix B shows the quality assurance criteria of the DOE Order 5700.6C and their applicability to this project.

  15. Anderson transition in low-dimensional disordered systems driven by long-range nonrandom hopping.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Malyshev, V A; Sierra, G; Martín-Delgado, M A; Rodríguez-Laguna, J; Domínguez-Adame, F

    2003-01-17

    The single-parameter scaling hypothesis predicts the absence of delocalized states for noninteracting quasiparticles in low-dimensional disordered systems. We show analytically, using a supersymmetric method combined with a renormalization group analysis, as well as numerically that extended states may occur in the one- and two-dimensional Anderson model with a nonrandom hopping falling off as some power of the distance between sites. The different size scaling of the bare level spacing and the renormalized magnitude of the disorder seen by the quasiparticles finally results in the delocalization of states at one of the band edges of the quasiparticle energy spectrum.

  16. SAGE II Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties at Non-Volcanic Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Burton, Sharon P.; Luo, Bei-Ping; Peter, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Since 2000, stratospheric aerosol levels have been relatively stable and at the lowest levels observed in the historical record. Given the challenges of making satellite measurements of aerosol properties at these levels, we have performed a study of the sensitivity of the product to the major components of the processing algorithm used in the production of SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements and the retrieval process that produces the operational surface area density (SAD) product. We find that the aerosol extinction measurements, particularly at 1020 nm, remain robust and reliable at the observed aerosol levels. On the other hand, during background periods, the SAD operational product has an uncertainty of at least a factor of 2 during due to the lack of sensitivity to particles with radii less than 100 nm.

  17. The FERRUM project: Experimental transition probabilities from highly excited even 5s levels in Cr ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.; Hartman, H.; Bäckström, E.

    2014-10-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the five levels in the 3d4(a5D)5s e6D term in Cr ii at an energy around 83 000 cm-1, and log(gf) values for 38 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes are obtained using time-resolved, laser-induced fluorescence on ions from a laser-produced plasma. Since the levels have the same parity as the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, we used a two-photon excitation scheme. This process is greatly facilitated by the presence of the 3d4(a5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer.

  18. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  19. Precision lifetime measurements of N ii levels with the beam-foil-laser method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudinet-Robinet, Y.; Garnir, H.-P.; Dumont, P.-D.; Résimont, J.

    1990-08-01

    Precision lifetime measurements using laser excitation of a fast ion beam preexcited in a carbon foil are reported for two levels in N ii. The cascade-free decays of the fluorescence intensities give lifetimes of 0.249+/-0.004 and 0.267+/-0.010 ns for the N ii 2p3d 1F° and 2p3s 1P° levels, respectively. The lifetime result for the 2p3d 1F° level-which is weakly repopulated by long-lived cascades-is in good agreement with beam-foil values and with the theoretical lifetime of McEachran and Cohen [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 27, 119 (1982)]. The lifetime result for the 2p3s 1P ° level-which is strongly repopulated by cascades-differs significantly from most of the previous experimental values but is in good agreement with the theoretical lifetimes of Luken and Sinanoglu [J. Chem. Phys. 64, 3141 (1976)], Beck and Nicolaides [Phys. Lett. 56A, 265 (1976)], McEachran and Cohen, and Fawcett [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 37, 411 (1987)]. The f-value trend for the 2p2 1D-2p3s 1P° transition along the C i sequence is discussed.

  20. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene disruption causes increased adrenal angiotensin II and aldosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Somanna, Naveen K; Pandey, Kailash N

    2007-07-01

    Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene leads to elevated arterial blood pressure and congestive heart failure in mice lacking NPRA. This study was aimed at determining whether Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene copy number affects adrenal ANG II and aldosterone (Aldo) levels in a gene-dose-dependent manner in Npr1 gene-targeted mice. Adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels increased in 1-copy mice compared with 2-copy mice, but decreased in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. In contrast, renal ANG II levels decreased in 1-copy (25%), 3-copy (38%), and 4-copy (39%) mice compared with 2-copy mice. The low-salt diet stimulated adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (20 and 2,441%), 2-copy (15 and 2,339%), 3-copy (20 and 424%), and 4-copy (31 and 486%) mice, respectively. The high-salt diet suppressed adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (46 and 29%) and 2-copy (38 and 17%) mice. On the other hand, the low-salt diet stimulated renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (45%), 2-copy (45%), 3-copy (59%), and 4-copy (48%) mice. However, the high-salt diet suppressed renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (28%) and 2-copy (27%) mice. In conclusion, NPRA signaling antagonizes adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in a gene-dose dependent manner. Increased adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels may play an important role in elevated arterial blood pressure and progressive hypertension, leading to renal and vascular injury in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice.

  1. High levels of MHC class II allelic diversity in lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorschner, M.O.; Duris, T.; Bronte, C.R.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.; Phillips, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence variation in a 216 bp portion of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II B1 domain was examined in 74 individual lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from different locations in Lake Superior. Forty-three alleles were obtained which encoded 71-72 amino acids of the mature protein. These sequences were compared with previous data obtained from five Pacific salmon species and Atlantic salmon using the same primers. Although all of the lake trout alleles clustered together in the neighbor-joining analysis of amino acid sequences, one amino acid allelic lineage was shared with Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a species in another genus which probably diverged from Salvelinus more than 10-20 million years ago. As shown previously in other salmonids, the level of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution (d(N)) exceeded the level of synonymous substitution (d(S)). The level of nucleotide diversity at the MHC class II B1 locus was considerably higher in lake trout than in the Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lake trout colonized Lake Superior from more than one refuge following the Wisconsin glaciation. Recent population bottlenecks may have reduced nucleotide diversity in Pacific salmon populations.

  2. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  3. Energy levels and mean lives of Cl II to Cl VII.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashkin, S.; Martinson, I.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the spectra of chlorine between 500 and 2800 A using the beam-foil technique. Over 200 multiplets have been observed, many of which had not been reported earlier. A number of such transitions could be classified, and several new term values are proposed for Cl IV, Cl V, Cl VI , and Cl VII. Mean lives of various excited levels were measured for Cl II to Cl VII. The results are compared with theoretical calculations and other measurements in appropriate isoelectronic systems.

  4. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with Anderson-localized modes.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Luca; Thyrrestrup, Henri; Stobbe, Søren; Garcia, Pedro David; Smolka, Stephan; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-03-12

    A major challenge in quantum optics and quantum information technology is to enhance the interaction between single photons and single quantum emitters. This requires highly engineered optical cavities that are inherently sensitive to fabrication imperfections. We have demonstrated a fundamentally different approach in which disorder is used as a resource rather than a nuisance. We generated strongly confined Anderson-localized cavity modes by deliberately adding disorder to photonic crystal waveguides. The emission rate of a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in the waveguide was enhanced by a factor of 15 on resonance with the Anderson-localized mode, and 94% of the emitted single photons coupled to the mode. Disordered photonic media thus provide an efficient platform for quantum electrodynamics, offering an approach to inherently disorder-robust quantum information devices.

  5. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  6. Perturbative Interpretation of Adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer Free Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Muneki; Takahashi, Chako; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In conventional well-known derivation methods for the adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) free energy, special assumptions that are difficult to mathematically justify except in some mean-field models, must be made. Here, we present a new adaptive TAP free energy derivation method. Using this derivation technique, without any special assumptions, the adaptive TAP free energy can be simply obtained as a high-temperature expansion of the Gibbs free energy.

  7. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  8. Categorization of nocturnal drainage flows in the Anderson Creek valley

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Walton, J.J.

    1981-06-01

    A network of eight meteorological towers was operated over about a one-year period within the Anderson Creek valley in the Geysers Geothermal Area of northern California. The purpose was to define the noctural wind and temperature structure along the valley's sloped surfaces for use in evaluating the frequency of drainage flows throughout the year and to assess the representativeness of the flows observed during the few nights that intensive studies were undertaken. (ACR)

  9. Anderson localization and the theory of dirty superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapitulnik, A.; Kotliar, G.

    1985-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of Anderson localization in dirty superconductors. The scale dependence of the diffusion in the vicinity of the mobility edge results in a strong renormalization of the zero-temperature coherence length. This implies the breakdown of the Ginzburg criterion close to the metal-insulator transition and thus the importance of fluctuations in this regime. The upper critical field is calculated, and possible experiments are also discussed.

  10. Ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenbecler, R.; Fulco, J. R.; Gill, W.; Scalapino, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The ground-state energy, hybridization matrix element, local moment, and spin-density correlations of a one-dimensional, finite-chain, periodic, symmetric Anderson model are obtained by numerical simulations and compared with perturbation theory and strong-coupling results. It is found that the local f-electron spins are compensated by correlation with other f-electrons as well as band electrons leading to a nonmagnetic ground state.

  11. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  12. Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

    We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

  13. A Suitable Option for Gustilo and Anderson Grade III Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Zhijun; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Yuhuan; Xu, Lusheng; Yu, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury remains difficult, particularly due to the incidence of wound infections, delayed fracture union, and traumatic extremity amputation. However, little data is available on delayed skin graft or flap reconstructions of Gustilo grade III injury, especially using new technologies of wound coverage, such as vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with limited internal and/or external fixation. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and May 2013, we performed the VSD technique combined with limited internal and/or external fixation on 38 patients (22 males and 16 females, with a mean age of 36.5 years) with Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. VSD was regularly changed and delayed skin grafts or flaps were used to cover the defect. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 36 were available for evaluation. The complications, wound healing, infections, and bony union were assessed for a mean duration of 2.5 years (range, 1–4 years). Results Complications were seen in 5 of the 36 cases: 2 cases had infection alone, 1 case had delayed union or nonunion, 1 case had infection and delayed union, and 1 case had wound necrosis, infection, and nonunion. VSD was regularly changed 2–6 times. Morphological appearance and functional recovery were satisfactory in all cases. Conclusions Using VSD before skin grafts or flaps coverage, combined with limited internal and/or external fixation, is a suitable option for Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. PMID:27564219

  14. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  15. A Suitable Option for Gustilo and Anderson Grade III Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Zhijun; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Yuhuan; Xu, Lusheng; Yu, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury remains difficult, particularly due to the incidence of wound infections, delayed fracture union, and traumatic extremity amputation. However, little data is available on delayed skin graft or flap reconstructions of Gustilo grade III injury, especially using new technologies of wound coverage, such as vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with limited internal and/or external fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between June 2008 and May 2013, we performed the VSD technique combined with limited internal and/or external fixation on 38 patients (22 males and 16 females, with a mean age of 36.5 years) with Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. VSD was regularly changed and delayed skin grafts or flaps were used to cover the defect. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 36 were available for evaluation. The complications, wound healing, infections, and bony union were assessed for a mean duration of 2.5 years (range, 1-4 years). RESULTS Complications were seen in 5 of the 36 cases: 2 cases had infection alone, 1 case had delayed union or nonunion, 1 case had infection and delayed union, and 1 case had wound necrosis, infection, and nonunion. VSD was regularly changed 2-6 times. Morphological appearance and functional recovery were satisfactory in all cases. CONCLUSIONS Using VSD before skin grafts or flaps coverage, combined with limited internal and/or external fixation, is a suitable option for Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. PMID:27564219

  16. Centrifugal Distortion Causes Anderson Localization in Laser Kicked Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floss, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2014-05-01

    The periodically kicked 2D rotor is a textbook model in nonlinear dynamics. The classical kicked rotor can exhibit truly chaotic motion, whilst in the quantum regime this chaotic motion is suppressed by a mechanism similar to Anderson Localization. Up to now, these effects have been mainly observed in an atom optics analogue of a quantum rotor: cold atoms in a standing light wave. We demonstrate that common linear molecules (like N2, O2, CO2, ...), kicked by a train of short linearly polarized laser pulses, can exhibit a new mechanism for dynamical Anderson Localization due to their non-rigidity. When the pulses are separated by the rotational revival time trev = πℏ / B , the angular momentum J grows ballistically (Quantum Resonance). We show that, due to the centrifugal distortion of fast spinning molecules, above some critical value J =Jcr the Quantum Resonance is suppressed via the mechanism of Anderson Localization. This leads to a non-sinusoidal oscillation of the angular momentum distribution, which may be experimentally observed even at ambient conditions by using current techniques for laser molecular alignment.

  17. On the Anderson localization conjecture in Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Constanze; Busse, Kyle; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In 1958, Anderson suggested that sufficiently large impurities in a semi-conductor could lead to spatial localization of electrons. This idea unfolded into the field of Anderson Localization, one of the most fascinating phenomena in solid-state physics as it plays a major role in the conductive properties of imperfectly ordered materials. The Anderson Localization Conjecture claims that random disorder of any strength causes localization of electrons in the medium. The problem has proven to be highly non-trivial. Over the years the community has argued whether spatial localization occurs in 2D for small impurities. From a mathematical standpoint, the conjecture is still considered an open question. In 2013, Liaw challenged the commonly held assumption that localization holds in 2D by introducing a new mathematically more rigorous method to test for extended states, and applying it to the discrete random Schrödinger operator. One of the advantages of the underlying method is its versatility. It can be applied to any ordered system such as colloids, crystals, and atomic lattices. In a cross-disciplinary effort we merge this method with a numerical code used to simulate 2D physics systems, in preparation for experimentally testing the theory against complex plasma crystals.

  18. Expression levels of urotensin II are associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress in patients with severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    He, W-Y; Chen, G-J; Lai, X; Wu, F; Tang, C-S; Zhang, A-H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain a leading cause of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. We aim to study urotensin II (UII) and its association with the markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in placentas of patients with severe preeclampsia (SPE). Thirty-three patients with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and twenty-two healthy pregnant women designated as healthy controls were recruited. Expression levels of UII, UII receptor (GPR14) and the markers of ERS in placenta specimens of patients were performed. Plasma and urinary UII levels were measured by radioimmunoassay method. Our study showed that the plasma levels of UII in patients with hypertensive disorders during pregnancy were significantly higher than that of the healthy control group. However, the urinary levels of UII had no difference in two groups. The expression level of mRNA and protein of UII, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose regulation protein 78 in placentas of SPE was significantly increased. Immunohistochemical analyses show that the expression levels of UII and ERS markers were mainly located in the cytoplasm of placental trophoblastic cells. Moreover, expression level of UII mRNA and protein was positively correlated with that of the markers of ERS. The positive correlation between UII and ERS markers expression level also corresponded with the level of patient's systolic blood pressure and proteinuria. In conclusion, we first verify that expression of UII is associated with ERS in patients with SPE. Our results indicate that UII may trigger ERS in placental trophoblastic cells in patients with preeclampsia.

  19. Level II Milestone Review of LLNL Program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M F; Benson, D J; Yip, S

    2003-01-14

    This document describes an evaluation of the Level II Milestone achievements of the LLNL program on Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives on January 14, 2003. ''The Grain-Scale Dynamics in Explosives Program'' is a mixture of advanced computational methodology and physico-chemical theory applied to understanding deflagration and detonation of plastic-bonded explosives from the nano to the macro scales. At many points, the modeling is tied directly to experiments within the precisions of both. Advances are needed in the experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of detonations. Work reported in this review represents significant, cross-pollinating advances in each area. The team successfully carried out ALE-3D simulations of deflagration in PBX with grain scale effects. (Milestone requirements 1 and 2), interpreted experimental data on flame speed vs. pressure and sensitivity to global kinetics in terms of ALE-3D simulations (Milestone requirement 3), and used the results of these simulations to develop a continuum reactive flow model that captures some of these effects (Milestone requirement 4). By comparing experiments and detonation velocities in small diameter, unconfined explosives, they found non-idealities that remain at intermediate diameters (ca. 1.5 mm) that require further analysis. In all of these areas, the project team has met, indeed exceeded, their Level II Milestone goals.

  20. The Ce 4{ital f} surface shift: A test for the Anderson-impurity Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Duo, L.; De Rossi, S.; Vavassori, P.; Ciccacci, F.; Olcese, G.L.; Chiaia, G.; Lindau, I.

    1996-12-01

    Evidence is provided of the role of the different hybridization strengths between the surface and the bulk in determining the magnitude of the surface shift for the shallow Ce 4{ital f} levels, with respect to the deeper core levels. This was achieved by comparing the photoemission core levels for a weakly hybridized case (CeAl) to a case of intermediate hybridization ({gamma}-Ce). For CeAl a 4{ital f} surface shift of 0.45 eV was observed, similar to that for the 5{ital p} core level, whereas a smaller (if any) 4{ital f} surface shift was observed for {gamma}-Ce. Model calculations based on the Anderson impurity Hamiltonian are shown to give a correct evaluation of this effect, which can be exploited as a way of testing the results of such a description for the Ce {ital f} states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Development of High Level Trigger Software for Belle II at SuperKEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Mineo, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Belle collaboration has been trying for 10 years to reveal the mystery of the current matter-dominated universe. However, much more statistics is required to search for New Physics through quantum loops in decays of B mesons. In order to increase the experimental sensitivity, the next generation B-factory, SuperKEKB, is planned. The design luminosity of SuperKEKB is 8 x 1035cm-2s-1 a factor 40 above KEKB's peak luminosity. At this high luminosity, the level 1 trigger of the Belle II experiment will stream events of 300 kB size at a 30 kHz rate. To reduce the data flow to a manageable level, a high-level trigger (HLT) is needed, which will be implemented using the full offline reconstruction on a large scale PC farm. There, physics level event selection is performed, reducing the event rate by ~ 10 to a few kHz. To execute the reconstruction the HLT uses the offline event processing framework basf2, which has parallel processing capabilities used for multi-core processing and PC clusters. The event data handling in the HLT is totally object oriented utilizing ROOT I/O with a new method of object passing over the UNIX socket connection. Also under consideration is the use of the HLT output as well to reduce the pixel detector event size by only saving hits associated with a track, resulting in an additional data reduction of ~ 100 for the pixel detector. In this contribution, the design and implementation of the Belle II HLT are presented together with a report of preliminary testing results.

  2. Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

    2002-01-11

    An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods.

  3. Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

    2002-01-11

    An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

  4. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anuar, Afiq A.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on: updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, and the electron-dedicated track fitting algorithm based on Gaussian Sum Filter.

  5. Oxidative Modification in Human Hair: The Effect of the Levels of Cu (II) Ions, UV Exposure and Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Grosvenor, Anita J; Marsh, Jennifer; Thomas, Ancy; Vernon, James A; Harland, Duane P; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2016-01-01

    Protein oxidative degradation is implicated in a wide range of deleterious effects. For human hair, this oxidative damage can lead to significant observable changes in fiber physical and visual properties. A redox proteomic approach was applied to map molecular modification in human hair proteins and correlate this modification with the abundance of copper (II) ions, the levels of UV exposure and the general level of hair pigmentation. An increase in oxidative modification was observed with increasing copper (II) ion levels, regardless of the pigmentation level. Significantly, increased protein oxidative modification was also observed to occur in both lightly and darkly pigmented hair tresses even in the absence of irradiation, albeit at lower relative levels. Modification levels increased with increased copper (II) ion concentration. This new finding indicates that the level of copper (II) ions in human hair plays a key role in mediating protein oxidation, with or without exposure to UV light. Overall, these results strongly suggest that minimization of the level of copper (II) ions in human hair will mitigate and/or slow protein oxidative modification and therefore lower overall hair damage.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of disordered polymer optical fibers for transverse Anderson localization of light.

    PubMed

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Mirr, Craig R; Koch, Karl W; Mafi, Arash

    2013-07-29

    We develop and characterize a disordered polymer optical fiber that uses transverse Anderson localization as a novel waveguiding mechanism. The developed polymer optical fiber is composed of 80,000 strands of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) that are randomly mixed and drawn into a square cross section optical fiber with a side width of 250 μm. Initially, each strand is 200 μm in diameter and 8-inches long. During the mixing process of the original fiber strands, the fibers cross over each other; however, a large draw ratio guarantees that the refractive index profile is invariant along the length of the fiber for several tens of centimeters. The large refractive index difference of 0.1 between the disordered sites results in a small localized beam radius that is comparable to the beam radius of conventional optical fibers. The input light is launched from a standard single mode optical fiber using the butt-coupling method and the near-field output beam from the disordered fiber is imaged using a 40X objective and a CCD camera. The output beam diameter agrees well with the expected results from the numerical simulations. The disordered optical fiber presented in this work is the first device-level implementation of 2D Anderson localization, and can potentially be used for image transport and short-haul optical communication systems.

  7. Angiotensin II Levels in Gingival Tissues from Healthy Individuals, Patients with Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth and Non Responders on Nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Anitha; Balaji, Thodur Madapusi

    2015-01-01

    Context The Renin Angiotensin system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (DIGO), a fibrotic condition, caused by Phenytoin, Nifedipine and Cyclosporine. Aim This study quantified Angiotensin II levels in gingival tissue samples obtained from healthy individuals, patients on Nifedipine manifesting/not manifesting drug induced gingival overgrowth. Materials and Methods Gingival tissue samples were obtained from healthy individuals (n=24), patients on nifidipine manifesting gingival overgrowth (n= 18) and patients on nifidipine not manifesting gingival overgrowth (n=8). Angiotensin II levels were estimated in the samples using a commercially available ELISA kit. Results Angiotensin II levels were significantly elevated in patients on Nifedipine manifesting gingival overgrowth compared to the other 2 groups (p<0.01). Conclusion The results of the study give an insight into the role played by Angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of drug induced gingival overgrowth. PMID:26436057

  8. [Development of highly sensitive assay for detection of low serum level of PIVKA-II and its clinical usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sakizono, K; Oita, T; Kuroda, M; Kasakura, S

    1996-09-01

    PIVKA-II is well known as a tumor marker of hepatocellular carcinoma. We describe the adaptations to render a commercially available PIVKA-II immunoassay kit (Eitest MONO P-II: Eisai Co., Ltd, Tokyo) more sensitive and evaluated clinical usefulness of this highly sensitive assay for early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. We measured serum PIVKA-II concentrations with the Eitest kit as described for the kit. To measure serum PIVKA-II concentrations below the sensitivity limit of the Eitest kit (0.0625AU/ml), linearity was determined using a series of dilutions of standard antigen diluted in standard diluent, including PIVKA-II concentrations of 0.002, 0.004, 0.008, 0.016, 0.031, 0.0625AU/ml. The assay was found to be liner from 0.004AU/ml. In this way, one can detect as low PIVKA-II concentrations as 0.004AU/ml. The repeatability-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) obtained from sixteen repeated assays of four sera were distributed between 3.63 and 18.75% and the reproducibility-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) obtained from ten repeated assays of four sera were distributed between 6.27 and 14.04%. We determined the serial changes in serum PIVKA-II levels of two patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after the resection of hepatic tumor. In these patients, elevation of serum PIVKA-II level determined by the highly sensitive assay preceded the detection of relapse by imaging diagnostic procedures. In summary, the assay system we developed has good accuracy and reproducibility for assaying low concentrations of PIVKA-II in serum and is suitable for detecting small increases in PIVKA-II concentrations. This assay system may be useful to earlier detect a relapse of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Type II deiodinase polymorphisms and serum thyroid hormone levels in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Luo, M; Zhou, X H; Zou, T; Keyim, K; Dong, L M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated type II deiodinase (DIO2) polymorphisms and serum thyroid hormone levels in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in a Uygur population. We studied the DIO2 Thr92Ala (rs225014) and ORFa-Gly3Asp (rs12885300) polymorphisms of 129 unrelated MCI cases and 131 matched controls. All subjects were genotyped using SNaPshot SNP genotyping assays. Serum thyroid hormone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Levels of serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine in the MCI group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Genotype and allele frequencies in the DIO2 gene between the MCI and control groups were not significantly different. There was no association in genotype and allele frequencies of Thr92Ala between genders in both groups. ORFa-Gly3Asp genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different in patients and controls by gender. The Asp allele was less frequent among male MCI patients compared to controls (odds ratio = 0.471, 95% confidence interval = 0.261-0.848). However, female Asp carriers were more frequent among MCI patients than among controls (odds ratio = 2.842, 95% confidence interval = 1.326-6.09). Serum levels of triiodothyronine and thyroxine were lower in individuals of the Ala/Ala genotype than in those with the Thr/Thr or Thr/Ala genotype. Serum levels of triiodothyronine were lower in male Gly/Gly carriers than in Gly/Asp or Asp/Asp carriers. Decreased serum levels of triiodothyronine and thyroxine may influence the incidence of MCI in the Uygur population. DIO2 gene polymorphisms may play a role in the incidence of MCI in male patients. PMID:26125736

  10. The Influence of Alcoholic Liver Disease on Serum PIVKA-II Levels in Patients without Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kang, Seong Hee; Lee, Beom Jae; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Prothrombin induced by vitamin K deficiency or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) is a widely used diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the correlation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and serum PIVKA-II levels in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 2,528 CLD patients without HCC. Among these patients, 76 exhibited serum high PIVKA-II levels of >125 mAU/mL (group 1). We categorized 76 control patients matched by age, sex, and the presence of liver cirrhosis from the remaining patients who were negative for serum PIVKA-II (group 2). Results Group 1 revealed increased antibiotic usage (23.7% vs 2.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of ALD (60.5% vs 14.5%, p<0.001) as well as elevated aspartate aminotransferase (52.5 IU/L vs 30.5 IU/L, p=0.025) and γ glutamyl transpeptidase (67.5 IU/L vs 36.5 IU/L, p=0.005) levels compared with group 2. Further, group 1 was significantly associated with a worse Child-Pugh class than group 2. In the multivariate analysis, ALD (odds ratio [OR], 7.151; p<0.001) and antibiotic usage (OR, 5.846; p<0.001) were significantly associated with positive PIVKA-II levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that ALD and antibiotics usage may be confounding factors when interpreting high serum PIVKA-II levels in patients without HCC. Therefore, serum PIVKA-II levels in patients with ALD or in patients administered antibiotics should be interpreted with caution. PMID:25473073

  11. Comparison between SAGE II and ISCCP high-level clouds. 1: Global and zonal mean cloud amounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Xiaohan; Rossow, William B.; Rind, David

    1995-01-01

    Global high-level clouds identified in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation measurements for January and July in the period 1985 to 1990 are compared with near-nadir-looking observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Global and zonal mean high-level cloud amounts from the two data sets agree very well, if clouds with layer extinction coefficients of less than 0.008/km at 1.02 micrometers wavelength are removed from the SAGE II results and all detected clouds are interpreted to have an average horizontal size of about 75 km along the 200 km transimission path length of the SAGE II observations. The SAGE II results are much more sensitive to variations of assumed cloud size than to variations of detection threshold. The geographical distribution of cloud fractions shows good agreement, but systematic regional differences also indicate that the average cloud size varies somewhat among different climate regimes. The more sensitive SAGE II results show that about one third of all high-level clouds are missed by ISCCP but that these clouds have very low optical thicknesses (less than 0.1 at 0.6 micrometers wavelength). SAGE II sampling error in monthly zonal cloud fraction is shown to produce no bias, to be less than the intraseasonal natural variability, but to be comparable with the natural variability at longer time scales.

  12. Corticosteroid injections in the treatment of trigger finger: a level I and II systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fleisch, Sheryl B; Spindler, Kurt P; Lee, Donald H

    2007-03-01

    Trigger finger is a tendinitis (stenosing tenosynovitis) with multiple management approaches. We conducted an evidence-based medicine systematic review of level I and II prospective randomized controlled trials to determine the effectiveness of corticosteroid injection in managing trigger finger. MEDLINE, Cochrane database, and secondary references were reviewed to locate all English-language prospective randomized controlled trials evaluating trigger finger treatment. Four studies using injectable corticosteroids were identified, based on the following inclusion criteria: all were prospective randomized controlled trials of adults with >85% follow-up. This review indicates that the incidence of trigger finger is greatest in women (75%), with an average patient age range of 52 to 62 years. Combined analysis of these four studies shows that corticosteroid injections are effective in 57% of patients. PMID:17341673

  13. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    The beam commissioning software framework of NSLS-II project adopts a client/server based architecture to replace the more traditional monolithic high level application approach. It is an open structure platform, and we try to provide a narrow API set for client application. With this narrow API, existing applications developed in different language under different architecture could be ported to our platform with small modification. This paper describes system infrastructure design, client API and system integration, and latest progress. As a new 3rd generation synchrotron light source with ultra low emittance, there are new requirements and challenges to control and manipulate the beam. A use case study and a theoretical analysis have been performed to clarify requirements and challenges to the high level applications (HLA) software environment. To satisfy those requirements and challenges, adequate system architecture of the software framework is critical for beam commissioning, study and operation. The existing traditional approaches are self-consistent, and monolithic. Some of them have adopted a concept of middle layer to separate low level hardware processing from numerical algorithm computing, physics modelling, data manipulating, plotting, and error handling. However, none of the existing approaches can satisfy the requirement. A new design has been proposed by introducing service oriented architecture technology. The HLA is combination of tools for accelerator physicists and operators, which is same as traditional approach. In NSLS-II, they include monitoring applications and control routines. Scripting environment is very important for the later part of HLA and both parts are designed based on a common set of APIs. Physicists and operators are users of these APIs, while control system engineers and a few accelerator physicists are the developers of these APIs. With our Client/Server mode based approach, we leave how to retrieve information to the

  14. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  15. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Gołek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  16. STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  17. Theory of the Anderson transition in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander; Garst, Markus

    2011-08-12

    We present the first microscopic theory of transport in quasiperiodically driven environments ("kicked rotors"), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of a dimensionless Planck constant h: for irrational values of h/(4π) they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we describe the corresponding localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a "supermetal." We discuss the ensuing possibility of a metal-supermetal quantum phase transition.

  18. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  19. Theory of the Anderson transition in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander; Garst, Markus

    2011-08-12

    We present the first microscopic theory of transport in quasiperiodically driven environments ("kicked rotors"), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of a dimensionless Planck constant h: for irrational values of h/(4π) they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we describe the corresponding localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a "supermetal." We discuss the ensuing possibility of a metal-supermetal quantum phase transition. PMID:21902396

  20. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  1. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson smiles as he undergoes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  2. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment during training at SPACEHAB. STS-107 is a research mission. The primary payload is the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM). The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). Also part of the payload is the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

  3. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  4. Influence of luminosity leveling on the CDF-II B-Physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Matthew; Lewis, Jonathan; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The effective bandwidth of the CDF-II level 1 trigger is approximately 25 kHz. Some of this bandwidth is used to record events that form the data sets used by the high p{sub T} physics analyses. The remaining bandwidth is used by triggers that are sensitive to hadronic B decays and provide one of the most important samples used for the study of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. At high luminosities, the hadronic B triggers have rates that greatly exceed the available bandwidth. Rather than incur large dead-times associated with these excessive rates, these B triggers are prescaled to limit the total trigger rate to the effective level 1 trigger bandwidth. The prescales are dynamically adjusted as the store progresses so that all of the bandwidth that is not used for the high p{sub T} physics program is used to record hadronic B triggers. In principle, the luminosity could be held at a more constant level throughout the store in such a way that the integrated luminosity would be the same as that obtained from a normal store. It has been suggested that this would allow B triggers to be recorded with lower prescales and consequently with higher B{sub s}{sup 0} signal efficiencies. This note describes a parametric model of the high p{sub T} and hadronic B triggers used by CDF and compares the yields of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} decays that would result with and without luminosity leveling.

  5. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    SciTech Connect

    Geveci, Berk; Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four

  6. [Level of knowledge of patients with type II diabetes mellitus in primary care].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro Chonsa, F; Lara Valdivielso, E; Muñoz Cacho, P; Herrera Plaza, T; Rodríguez Cordero, R; Mayo Alastrey, M A

    1991-01-01

    A personal interview to 148 patients was carried out with the aim of getting to know the level of information of type II diabetic patients at an Urban Health Center in Santander. A validated questionnaire made up of 14 questions on general aspects of diabetis, dietetic habits and capability to handle complications was used. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of questionnaire was 0.69. The correct answer average was 6.3 (IC = 5.9-6.5). Patients were best informed about general aspects and had much less information with regard to the handling of complications and to their diet. The differences among these three sections of questions were significative (p less than 0.001). The patients under diet treatment obtained worse results than those treated with oral hipoglucemiants and insulin. Our results are worse than those reported by other similar populations at a national level. Also, and due to the differences in knowledge within this group, we believe that the establishment of groups and subgroups when educating diabetic patients is possible and also highly recommended.

  7. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  8. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  9. Exponential Orthogonality Catastrophe at the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the orthogonality catastrophe at the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). The typical overlap F between the ground state of a Fermi liquid and the one of the same system with an added potential impurity is found to decay at the AMIT exponentially with system size L as F ˜exp (-c Lη) , where η is the power of multifractal intensity correlations. Thus, strong disorder typically increases the sensitivity of a system to an added impurity exponentially. We recover, on the metallic side of the transition, Anderson's result that the fidelity F decays with a power law F ˜L-q (EF) with system size L . Its power increases as the Fermi energy EF approaches the mobility edge EM as q (EF)˜[(EF-EM )/EM]-ν η , where ν is the critical exponent of the correlation length ξc. On the insulating side of the transition, F is constant for system sizes exceeding the localization length ξ . While these results are obtained for the typical fidelity F , we find that log F is widely, log normally, distributed with a width diverging at the AMIT. As a consequence, the mean value of the fidelity F converges to one at the AMIT, in strong contrast to its typical value which converges to zero exponentially fast with system size L . This counterintuitive behavior is explained as a manifestation of multifractality at the AMIT.

  10. Anderson Localization in Quantum Chaos: Scaling and Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, A. M.; Wang, J.

    2007-10-01

    The one-parameter scaling theory is a powerful tool to investigate Anderson localization effects in disordered systems. In this paper we show that this theory can be adapted to the context of quantum chaos provided that the classical phase space is homogeneous, not mixed. The localization problem in this case is defined in momentum, not in real space. We then employ the one-parameter scaling theory to: (a) propose a precise characterization of the type of classical dynamics related to the Wigner-Dyson and Poisson statistics which also predicts in which situations Anderson localization corrections invalidate the relation between classical chaos and random matrix theory encoded in the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, (b) to identify the universality class associated with the metal-insulator transition in quantum chaos. In low dimensions it is characterized by classical superdiffusion, in higher dimensions it has in general a quantum origin as in the case of disordered systems. We illustrate these two cases by studying 1d kicked rotors with non-analytical potentials and a 3d kicked rotor with a smooth potential.

  11. Block Lanczos density-matrix renormalization group method for general Anderson impurity models: Application to magnetic impurity problems in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a block Lanczos (BL) recursive technique to construct quasi-one-dimensional models, suitable for density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations, from single- as well as multiple-impurity Anderson models in any spatial dimensions. This new scheme, named BL-DMRG method, allows us to calculate not only local but also spatially dependent static and dynamical quantities of the ground state for general Anderson impurity models without losing elaborate geometrical information of the lattice. We show that the BL-DMRG method can be easily extended to treat a multiorbital Anderson impurity model where not only inter- and intraorbital Coulomb interactions but also Hund's coupling and pair hopping interactions are included. We also show that the symmetry adapted BL bases can be utilized, when it is appropriate, to reduce the computational cost. As a demonstration, we apply the BL-DMRG method to three different models for graphene with a structural defect and with a single hydrogen or fluorine absorbed, where a single Anderson impurity is coupled to conduction electrons in the honeycomb lattice. These models include (i) a single adatom on the honeycomb lattice, (ii) a substitutional impurity in the honeycomb lattice, and (iii) an effective model for a single carbon vacancy in graphene. Our analysis of the local dynamical magnetic susceptibility and the local density of states at the impurity site reveals that, for the particle-hole symmetric case at half-filling of electron density, the ground state of model (i) behaves as an isolated magnetic impurity with no Kondo screening, while the ground state of the other two models forms a spin-singlet state where the impurity moment is screened by the conduction electrons. We also calculate the real-space dependence of the spin-spin correlation functions between the impurity site and the conduction sites for these three models. Our results clearly show that, reflecting the presence or absence of unscreened

  12. Additions to the Spectrum and Energy Levels and a Critical Compilation of Singly-Ionized Boron, B II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabtsev, A. N.; Kink, I.; Awaya, Y.; Ekberg, J. O.; Mannervik, S.; Ölme, A.; Martinson, I.

    2005-01-01

    We have undertaken a number of experimental studies of the structure of singly ionized boron, B II. Much of this work was initially motivated by a search for the "missing" 2s3s 1S term. There was a surprising disagreement between theory and experiment for this level. In this context lots of data for B II were collected over the years, from beam-foil experiments, high-resolution spark spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The new material, which includes more than 80 newly classified (or revised) spectral lines, has now been thoroughly analyzed. This was followed by a critical compilation of all known levels and lines of B II, along with the theoretical interpretation of the levels, classifications of the lines and calculated transition probabilities for most lines.

  13. Interpretation of high-dimensional numerical results for the Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2014-12-15

    The existence of the upper critical dimension d{sub c2} = 4 for the Anderson transition is a rigorous consequence of the Bogoliubov theorem on renormalizability of φ{sup 4} theory. For d ≥ 4 dimensions, one-parameter scaling does not hold and all existent numerical data should be reinterpreted. These data are exhausted by the results for d = 4, 5 from scaling in quasi-one-dimensional systems and the results for d = 4, 5, 6 from level statistics. All these data are compatible with the theoretical scaling dependences obtained from Vollhardt and Wolfle’s self-consistent theory of localization. The widespread viewpoint that d{sub c2} = ∞ is critically discussed.

  14. Tripeptidyl Peptidase II Mediates Levels of Nuclear Phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2*

    PubMed Central

    Wiemhoefer, Anne; Stargardt, Anita; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Renner, Maria C.; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Stap, Jan; Raspe, Marcel A.; Tomkinson, Birgitta; Kessels, Helmut W.; Ovaa, Huib; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Florea, Bogdan; Reits, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) is a serine peptidase involved in various biological processes, including antigen processing, cell growth, DNA repair, and neuropeptide mediated signaling. The underlying mechanisms of how a peptidase can influence this multitude of processes still remain unknown. We identified rapid proteomic changes in neuroblastoma cells following selective TPP2 inhibition using the known reversible inhibitor butabindide, as well as a new, more potent, and irreversible peptide phosphonate inhibitor. Our data show that TPP2 inhibition indirectly but rapidly decreases the levels of active, di-phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2 in the nucleus, thereby down-regulating signal transduction downstream of growth factors and mitogenic stimuli. We conclude that TPP2 mediates many important cellular functions by controlling ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation. For instance, we show that TPP2 inhibition of neurons in the hippocampus leads to an excessive strengthening of synapses, indicating that TPP2 activity is crucial for normal brain function. PMID:26041847

  15. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  16. High levels of Nrf2 determine chemoresistance in type II endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Chen, Ning; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2010-01-01

    Type II endometrial cancer, which mainly presents as serous and clear cell types, has proved to be the most malignant and recurrent carcinoma among various female genital malignancies. The transcription factor, Nrf2, was first described as having chemopreventive activity. Activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense response protects cells against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of environmental insults by upregulating an array of genes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore cellular redox homeostasis. However, the cancer-promoting role of Nrf2 has recently been revealed. Nrf2 is constitutively upregulated in several types of human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of Nrf2 expression sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, the constitutive level of Nrf2 was compared in different types of human endometrial tumors. It was found that Nrf2 was highly expressed in endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC), whereas complex hyperplasia (CH) and endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) had no or marginal expression of Nrf2. Likewise, the ESC derived SPEC-2 cell line had a higher level of Nrf2 expression and was more resistant to the toxic effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel than that of the Ishikawa cell line, which was generated from EEC. Silencing of Nrf2 rendered SPEC-2 cells more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs while it had a limited effect on Ishikawa cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression by overexpressing Keap1 sensitized SPEC-2 cells or SPEC-2-derived xenografts to chemotherapeutic treatments using both cell culture and SCID mouse models. Collectively, we provide a molecular basis for the use of Nrf2 inhibitors to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and to combat chemoresistance, the biggest obstacle in chemotherapy. PMID:20530669

  17. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has…

  18. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... made the initial changes to the Price-Anderson Act amounts on October 27, 2005 (70 FR 61885), and the... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... 3150-AJ25 Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations...

  19. 77 FR 67057 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Anderson County, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board CSX Transportation, Inc.--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Anderson... the track in Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tenn. The line traverses United States Postal Service...

  20. ESCRT-II controls retinal axon growth by regulating DCC receptor levels and local protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Konopacki, Filip A.; Dwivedy, Asha; Bellon, Anaïs; Blower, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis and local protein synthesis (LPS) act coordinately to mediate the chemotropic responses of axons, but the link between these two processes is poorly understood. The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a key regulator of cargo sorting in the endocytic pathway, and here we have investigated the role of ESCRT-II, a critical ESCRT component, in Xenopus retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons. We show that ESCRT-II is present in RGC axonal growth cones (GCs) where it co-localizes with endocytic vesicle GTPases and, unexpectedly, with the Netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC). ESCRT-II knockdown (KD) decreases endocytosis and, strikingly, reduces DCC in GCs and leads to axon growth and guidance defects. ESCRT-II-depleted axons fail to turn in response to a Netrin-1 gradient in vitro and many axons fail to exit the eye in vivo. These defects, similar to Netrin-1/DCC loss-of-function phenotypes, can be rescued in whole (in vitro) or in part (in vivo) by expressing DCC. In addition, ESCRT-II KD impairs LPS in GCs and live imaging reveals that ESCRT-II transports mRNAs in axons. Collectively, our results show that the ESCRT-II-mediated endocytic pathway regulates both DCC and LPS in the axonal compartment and suggest that ESCRT-II aids gradient sensing in GCs by coupling endocytosis to LPS. PMID:27248654

  1. Alcohol and Alcohol Safety. Volume II of II. A Curriculum Manual for Elementary Level. A Teacher's Activities Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; Platt, Judith

    This curriculum manual for the elementary school level is the first in a series on alcohol and alcohol safety and is designed as a teacher's activities guide. Each activity provided is a self-contained learning experience which requires varying numbers of class period and focuses on one or more objectives. Activities are numbered consecutively and…

  2. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model.

    PubMed

    Orth, Christoph P; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L

    2016-04-05

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase.

  3. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model.

    PubMed

    Orth, Christoph P; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase. PMID:27045779

  4. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase. PMID:27045779

  5. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase.

  6. 78 FR 11626 - Foreign-Trade Zone 176-Rockford, IL, Authorization of Production Activity, AndersonBrecon Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... public comment (77 FR 64311, 10-19-2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the..., AndersonBrecon Inc. (Medical Device Kitting), Rockford, IL On October 12, 2012, AndersonBrecon...

  7. Anderson Localization, Non-linearity and Stable Genetic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Charles L.

    2006-07-01

    In many models of genotypic evolution, the vector of genotype populations satisfies a system of linear ordinary differential equations. This system of equations models a competition between differential replication rates (fitness) and mutation. Mutation operates as a generalized diffusion process on genotype space. In the large time asymptotics, the replication term tends to produce a single dominant quasi-species, unless the mutation rate is too high, in which case the asymptotic population becomes de-localized. We introduce a more macroscopic picture of genotypic evolution wherein a random fitness term in the linear model produces features analogous to Anderson localization. When coupled with density dependent non-linearities, which limit the population of any given genotype, we obtain a model whose large time asymptotics display stable genotypic diversity.

  8. Permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization in magnetophotonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, R.; Namdar, A.

    2016-11-01

    This theoretical study was carried out to investigate the permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization of light in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals. It was shown that the disorder create the resonant transmittance modes associated with enhanced Faraday rotations inside the photonic band gap. The average localization length of the right- and left-handed circular polarizations (RCP and LCP), the total transmittance together with the ensemble average of the RCP and LCP phases, and the Faraday rotation of the structure were also investigated. For this purpose, the off-diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor were varied for various wavelengths of incident light. The obtained results revealed the nonreciprocal property of circular eigen modes. This study can potentially open up a new aspect for utilizing the disorder magnetophotonic structures in nonreciprocal systems such as isolators and circulators.

  9. X-slave boson approach to the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.; Foglio, M. E.

    2001-05-01

    The periodic anderson model (PAM) in the limit U=∞, can be studied by employing the Hubbard X operators to project out the unwanted states. In a previous work, we have studied the cumulant expansion of this Hamiltonian employing the hybridization as a perturbation, but probability conservation of the local states (completeness) is not usually satisfied when partial expansions like the "chain approximation (CHA)" are employed. To consider this problem, we use a technique similar to the one employed by Coleman to treat the same problem with slave-bosons in the mean-field approximation. Assuming a particular renormalization for hybridization, we obtain a description that avoids an unwanted phase transition that appears in the mean-field slave-boson method at intermediate temperatures.

  10. X-boson cumulant approach to the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.; Foglio, M. E.

    2002-07-01

    The periodic Anderson model can be studied in the limit U=∞ by employing the Hubbard X operators to project out the unwanted states. We had already studied this problem by employing the cumulant expansion with the hybridization as perturbation, but the probability conservation of the local states (completeness) is not usually satisfied when partial expansions like the ``chain approximation'' (CHA) are employed. To rectify this situation, we modify the CHA by employing a procedure that was used in the mean-field approximation of Coleman's slave-boson method. Our technique reproduces the features of that method in its region of validity, but avoids the unwanted phase transition that appears in the same method both when μ>>Ef at low T and for all values of the parameters at intermediate temperatures. Our method also has a dynamic character that is absent from the mean-field slave-boson method.

  11. Lifshitz Transitions in Magnetic Phases of the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the reconstruction of a Fermi surface, which is called a Lifshitz transition, in magnetically ordered phases of the periodic Anderson model on a square lattice with a finite Coulomb interaction between f electrons. We apply the variational Monte Carlo method to the model by using the Gutzwiller wavefunctions for the paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and charge-density-wave states. We find that an antiferromagnetic phase is realized around half-filling and a ferromagnetic phase is realized when the system is far away from half-filling. In both magnetic phases, Lifshitz transitions take place. By analyzing the electronic states, we conclude that the Lifshitz transitions to large ordered-moment states can be regarded as itinerant-localized transitions of the f electrons.

  12. Limb salvage talectomy for 3C Gustilo–Anderson fracture

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Hasan Raza; Pillai, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Foot fractures vary in severity with complex midfoot fractures having poor morbidity rates and high amputation rates. Complex midfoot fractures are rarely reported since they are uncommon and only treated in specialist centres. Given the important role of the midfoot in foot function, reconstruction is preferable. Soft tissue management on the dorsal aspect of the foot poses further challenges to reconstructive surgeons. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who sustained an open 3C Gustilo–Anderson fracture that was initially treated with open reduction internal fixation and free flap. She subsequently developed flap and internal fixation failure with osteomyelitis of the talus. We report a good outcome using primary limb shortening with a talectomy, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis using external fixation and a combination of vancomycin-loaded calcium sulphate and intravenous antibiotics in our patient. PMID:27173882

  13. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

  14. Three-dimensional Anderson localization in variable scale disorder.

    PubMed

    McGehee, W R; Kondov, S S; Xu, W; Zirbel, J J; DeMarco, B

    2013-10-01

    We report on the impact of variable-scale disorder on 3D Anderson localization of a noninteracting ultracold atomic gas. A spin-polarized gas of fermionic atoms is localized by allowing it to expand in an optical speckle potential. Using a sudden quench of the localized density distribution, we verify that the density profile is representative of the underlying single-particle localized states. The geometric mean of the disordering potential correlation lengths is varied by a factor of 4 via adjusting the aperture of the speckle focusing lens. We observe that the root-mean-square size of the localized gas increases approximately linearly with the speckle correlation length, in qualitative agreement with the scaling predicted by weak scattering theory.

  15. Topological Anderson insulators in systems without time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Avishai, Y.; Wang, X. R.

    2016-06-01

    Occurrence of the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in a HgTe quantum well suggests that when time-reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained, the pertinent topological phase transition, marked by re-entrant 2 e2/h quantized conductance contributed by helical edge states, is driven by disorder. Here we show that when TRS is broken, the physics of the TAI becomes even richer. The pattern of longitudinal conductance and nonequilibrium local current distribution displays novel TAI phases characterized by nonzero Chern numbers, indicating the occurrence of multiple chiral edge modes. Tuning either disorder or Fermi energy (in both topologically trivial and nontrivial phases), drives transitions between these distinct TAI phases, characterized by jumps of the quantized conductance from 0 to e2/h and from e2/h to 2 e2/h . An effective medium theory based on the Born approximation yields an accurate description of different TAI phases in parameter space.

  16. Topology, delocalization via average symmetry and the symplectic Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Kane, C L

    2012-12-14

    A field theory of the Anderson transition in two-dimensional disordered systems with spin-orbit interactions and time-reversal symmetry is developed, in which the proliferation of vortexlike topological defects is essential for localization. The sign of vortex fugacity determines the Z(2) topological class of the localized phase. There are two distinct fixed points with the same critical exponents, corresponding to transitions from a metal to an insulator and a topological insulator, respectively. The critical conductivity and correlation length exponent of these transitions are computed in an N=1-[symbol: see text] expansion in the number of replicas, where for small [symbol: see text] the critical points are perturbatively connected to the Kosterlitz-Thouless critical point. Delocalized states, which arise at the surface of weak topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators, occur because vortex proliferation is forbidden due to the presence of symmetries that are violated by disorder, but are restored by disorder averaging.

  17. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

  18. Elevated Adiponectin Levels Suppress Perivascular and Aortic Inflammation and Prevent AngII-induced Advanced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wågsäter, Dick; Vorkapic, Emina; van Stijn, Caroline M. W.; Kim, Jason; Lusis, Aldons J.; Eriksson, Per; Tangirala, Rajendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a degenerative disease characterized by aortic dilation and rupture leading to sudden death. Currently, no non-surgical treatments are available and novel therapeutic targets are needed to prevent AAA. We investigated whether increasing plasma levels of adiponectin (APN), a pleiotropic adipokine, provides therapeutic benefit to prevent AngII-induced advanced AAA in a well-established preclinical model. In the AngII-infused hyperlipidemic low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mouse (LDLR−/−) model, we induced plasma APN levels using a recombinant adenovirus expressing mouse APN (AdAPN) and as control, adenovirus expressing green florescent protein (AdGFP). APN expression produced sustained and significant elevation of total and high-molecular weight APN levels and enhanced APN localization in the artery wall. AngII infusion for 8 weeks induced advanced AAA development in AdGFP mice. Remarkably, APN inhibited the AAA development in AdAPN mice by suppressing aortic inflammatory cell infiltration, medial degeneration and elastin fragmentation. APN inhibited the angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT1R), inflammatory cytokine and mast cell protease expression, and induced lysyl oxidase (LOX) in the aortic wall, improved systemic cytokine profile and attenuated adipose inflammation. These studies strongly support APN therapeutic actions through multiple mechanisms inhibiting AngII-induced AAA and increasing plasma APN levels as a strategy to prevent advanced AAA. PMID:27659201

  19. Fire Fighter Level I-II-III [and] Practical Skills Test. Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series. Final Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Practical skills tests are provided for fire fighter trainees in the Wisconsin Fire Service Certification Series, Fire Fighter Levels I, II, and III. A course introduction appears first and contains this information: recommended instructional sequence, required facilities, instructional methodology, requirements for certification, course…

  20. Simultaneous resection of liver cell adenomas and an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt with elevation of serum PIVKA-II level.

    PubMed

    Seyama, Yasuji; Sano, Keiji; Tang, Wei; Kokudo, Norihiro; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2006-09-01

    A 27-year-old woman with no history of liver disease or oral contraceptive use presented with sudden abdominal pain. Laboratory data showed mild liver dysfunction with jaundice. Computed tomography and angiography revealed centrally located large liver cell adenomas (LCAs) and an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt (IHPSS) in the left lobe. The serum des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (known as "protein induced by a lack of vitamin K or antagonist II," PIVKA-II) level was extremely high (6,647 mAU/ml), indicating malignant transformation of the tumors. Under the diagnosis of LCAs and IHPSS, the patient underwent simultaneous resection of the four liver tumors and portovenous shunt, and the hepatic vascular abnormality was resolved. The pathological diagnosis was LCAs without hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-PIVKA-II monoclonal antibody showed positive staining of the adenoma cells. This case shows that LCA without malignant transformation can produce PIVKA-II, leading to high serum levels of PIVKA-II. Simultaneous resection of multiple tumors and closure of the portosystemic shunt are strongly recommended in a patient with LCA associated with IHPSS.

  1. Transport across an Anderson quantum dot in the intermediate coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Grifoni, Milena

    2013-09-01

    We describe linear and nonlinear transport across a strongly interacting single impurity Anderson model quantum dot with intermediate coupling to the leads, i.e. with tunnel coupling Γ of the order of the thermal energy k B T. The coupling is large enough that sequential tunneling processes (second order in the tunneling Hamiltonian) alone do not suffice to properly describe the transport characteristics. Upon applying a density matrix approach, the current is expressed in terms of rates obtained by considering a very small class of diagrams which dress the sequential tunneling processes by charge fluctuations. We call this the "dressed second order" (DSO) approximation. One advantage of the DSO is that, still in the Coulomb blockade regime, it can describe the crossover from thermally broadened to tunneling broadened conductance peaks. When the temperature is decreased even further ( k B T < Γ), the DSO captures Kondesque behaviours of the Anderson quantum dot qualitatively: we find a zero bias anomaly of the differential conductance versus applied bias, an enhancement of the conductance with decreasing temperature as well as universality of the shape of the conductance as function of the temperature. We can without complications address the case of a spin degenerate level split energetically by a magnetic field. In case spin dependent chemical potentials are assumed and only one of the four chemical potentials is varied, the DSO yields in principle only one resonance. This seems to be in agreement with experiments with pseudo spin [U. Wilhelm, J. Schmid, J. Weis, K.V. Klitzing, Physica E 14, 385 (2002)]. Furthermore, we get qualitative agreement with experimental data showing a cross-over from the Kondo to the empty orbital regime.

  2. Clinical evaluation of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) levels in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma following interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Minakuchi, K; Murata, K; Kaminoh, T; Takada, K; Takashima, S; Nakamura, K; Onoyama, Y

    1993-01-01

    Fourteen patients with unrespectable HCC were treated with various interventional radiology (IVR) procedures. The initial therapeutic response was determined using computed tomography (CT) findings, and determinations of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and protein induced by Vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) levels. When CT studies of the initial response to IVR were compared with changes in the serum AFP and PIVKA-II levels, the AFP level was found to correlate more closely than the PIVKA-II levels. The PIVKA-II level correlated more closely than the AFP level in cases with poor response to IVR. Both of these tumor markers should be measured in combination with the diagnostic imagings for follow-up studies of IVR.

  3. Atomic-level insights into metabolite recognition and specificity of the SAM-II riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Kelley, Jennifer M.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Although S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), a metabolic by-product of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), differs from SAM only by a single methyl group and an overall positive charge, SAH binds the SAM-II riboswitch with more than 1000-fold less affinity than SAM. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the molecular basis of such high selectivity in ligand recognition by SAM-II riboswitch. The biosynthesis of SAM exclusively generates the (S,S) stereoisomer, and (S,S)-SAM can spontaneously convert to the (R,S) form. We, therefore, also examined the effects of (R,S)-SAM binding to SAM-II and its potential biological function. We find that the unfavorable loss in entropy in SAM-II binding is greater for (S,S)- and (R,S)-SAM than SAH, which is compensated by stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the riboswitch. The positively charged sulfonium moiety on SAM acts as the crucial anchor point responsible for the formation of key ionic interactions as it fits favorably in the negatively charged binding pocket. In contrast, SAH, with its lone pair of electrons on the sulfur, experiences repulsion in the binding pocket of SAM-II and is enthalpically destabilized. In the presence of SAH, similar to the unbound riboswitch, the pseudoknot structure of SAM-II is not completely formed, thus exposing the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Unlike SAM, this may further facilitate ribosomal assembly and translation initiation. Our analysis of the conformational ensemble sampled by SAM-II in the absence of ligands and when bound to SAM or SAH reveals that ligand binding follows a combination of conformational selection and induced-fit mechanisms. PMID:22194311

  4. Random Walks in Anderson's Garden: A Journey from Cuprates to Cooper Pair Insulators and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Anderson's Garden is a drawing presented to Philip W. Anderson on the eve of his 60th birthday celebration, in 1983, by a colleague (author unknown). This cartoon (Fig. 1) succinctly depicts some of Anderson's pre-1983 works. As an avid reader of Anderson's papers, a random walk in Anderson's garden had become a part of my routine since graduate school days. This was of immense help and prepared me for a wonderful collaboration with Anderson on the theory of high-Tc cuprates and quantum spin liquids at Princeton. Here I narrate this story, ending with a brief summary of my ongoing theoretical efforts to extend Anderson's RVB theory for superconductivity to encompass the recently observed high-temperature (Tc ~ 203K) superconductivity in solid H2S at pressure ~200GPa. In H2S molecule, four valence electrons form two saturated covalent bonds, H-S-H. These bond singlets are confined Cooper pairs close to chemical potential. Solid H2S is a Cooper pair insulator. Pressure changes the structure and not the number of valence electrons. Bond singlet pairing tendency continues and new S-S and H-H bonds are formed. S-S bonds are mostly saturated. However, hydrogen sublattice has unsaturated H-H bonds. It prepares ground for a RVB superconducting state.

  5. Levels of acarboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) and coagulation factors in warfarin-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Umeki, S; Umeki, Y

    1990-04-01

    PIVKA-II (protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II) was determined and compared with other coagulation factors in normal subjects and patients treated with the anticoagulant warfarin. In 18 (60%) of 30 patients treated with warfarin, PIVKA-II values were 1 microgram/ml or more, although they were less than 1 microgram/ml in all 39 normal subjects (100%). In patients treated with warfarin, values of prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time were significantly higher than those in normal subjects. However, values of hepaplastintest (normotest) and thrombotest in the patients were greatly lower than those in normal subjects. There were no significant differences between bleeding time or plasma fibrinogen values in the patients and normal subjects. The values of PIVKA-II were inversely correlated (P less than 0.01) with those of hepaplastintest and thrombotest. The measurement of PIVKA-II in the plasma should be useful in detecting vitamin K-deficient status among haemorrhagic disorders.

  6. The Anderson model for electron localisation non-linear σ model, asymptotic gauge invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruisken, Adrianus M. M.; Schäfer, Lothar

    1982-01-01

    The Anderson model for localisation problems is treated with field theory, employing the replica trick. We show that no valid perturbation theory results out of the usual ( S2) 2 formalism due to mishandling of symmetries. The problem is reformulated in terms of matrix fields. It is shown that the Anderson model asymptotically exhibits an exact local gauge symmetry. Elimination of massive longitudinal components leads to a non-compact σ model, obtained earlier for the description of electronic disorder. We thus establish that the Anderson model is in the same universality class as Wegner's gauge invariant real matrix model.

  7. Routes Towards Anderson-Like Localization of Bose-Einstein Condensates in Disordered Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, T.; Drenkelforth, S.; Kruse, J.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J.; Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-10-21

    We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, possible routes towards Anderson-like localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in disordered potentials. The dependence of this quantum interference effect on the nonlinear interactions and the shape of the disorder potential is investigated. Experiments with an optical lattice and a superimposed disordered potential reveal the lack of Anderson localization. A theoretical analysis shows that this absence is due to the large length scale of the disorder potential as well as its screening by the nonlinear interactions. Further analysis shows that incommensurable superlattices should allow for the observation of the crossover from the nonlinear screening regime to the Anderson localized case within realistic experimental parameters.

  8. Angiotensin II plasma levels are linked to disease severity and predict fatal outcomes in H7N9-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fengming; Guo, Jing; Zou, Zhen; Liu, Jun; Cao, Bin; Zhang, Shuyang; Li, Hui; Wang, Wei; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Song; Pan, Jingcao; Bao, Changjun; Zeng, Mei; Xiao, Haixia; Qian, Guirong; Hu, Xinjun; Chen, Yuanting; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Huandi; Zhu, Jindong; Gao, Hainv; Yang, Shigui; Liu, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shufa; Yang, Jiezuan; Diao, Hongyan; Cao, Hongcui; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Min; Tan, Shuguang; Guo, Dan; Zhao, Xiliang; Ye, Yicong; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yingchun; Penninger, Josef M; Li, Dangsheng; Gao, George F; Jiang, Chengyu; Li, Lanjuan

    2014-05-06

    A novel influenza A (H7N9) virus of avian origin emerged in eastern China in the spring of 2013. This virus causes severe disease in humans, including acute and often lethal respiratory failure. As of January 2014, 275 cases of H7N9-infected patients had been reported, highlighting the urgency of identifying biomarkers for predicting disease severity and fatal outcomes. Here, we show that plasma levels of angiotensin II, a major regulatory peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, are markedly elevated in H7N9 patients and are associated with disease progression. Moreover, the sustained high levels of angiotensin II in these patients are strongly correlated with mortality. The predictive value of angiotensin II is higher than that of C-reactive protein and some clinical parameters such as the PaO2/FiO2 ratio (partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen). Our findings indicate that angiotensin II is a biomarker for lethality in flu infections.

  9. Effects of correlated hybridization in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Líbero, Valter; Veiga, Rodrigo

    2013-03-01

    The development of new materials often dependents on the theoretical foundations which study the microscopic matter, i.e., the way atoms interact and create distinct configurations. Among the interesting materials, those with partially filled d or f orbitals immersed in nonmagnetic metals have been described by the Anderson model, which takes into account Coulomb correlation (U) when a local level (energy Ed) is doubled occupied, and an electronic hybridization between local levels and conduction band states. In addition, here we include a correlated hybridization term, which depends on the local-level occupation number involved. This term breaks particle-hole symmetry (even when U + 2Ed = 0), enhances charge fluctuations on local levels and as a consequence strongly modifies the crossover between the Hamiltonian fixed-points, even suppressing one or other. We exemplify these behaviors showing data obtained from the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) computation for the impurity temperature-dependent specific heat, entropy and magnetic susceptibility. The interleaving procedure is used to recover the continuum spectrum after the NRG-logarithmic discretization of the conduction band. Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP.

  10. Evaluability Assessment of the Title II Basic Skills Improvement Program: Implications for State-Level Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Aurelia C.; Bourexis, Patricia S.

    The implications of the lessons learned through an evaluability assessment (EA) of the Title II Basic Skills Improvement Program (BSIP) for State Education Agency (SEA) support of model demonstration programs are discussed. The purposes, methodology and uses of the EA process are presented. Also included is a discussion of the details of the…

  11. COURSE OUTLINE FOR FIRST SIX WEEKS FOR SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    THE FIRST 6-WEEK UNIT CONCERNS ANIMAL LIFE, AND TOPICS INCLUDE PROTOZOA, INVERTEBRATES, AND VERTEBRATES. UNIT II, "THE HUMAN BODY", INCLUDES BODY SYSTEMS, HEALTH, AND SAFETY. TEXTBOOK REFERENCES, CONTENT OUTLINE, TEACHING SUGGESTIONS, REFERENCE READINGS, AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS ARE GIVEN UNDER EACH TOPIC. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT FIRST EXPERIENCES WITH…

  12. Study of radioactivity levels in granite of Gable Gattar II in the north eastern desert of Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shershaby, A

    2002-07-01

    The present work deals with the radioactivity of granites in Gable Gattar II, which is located in the north eastern desert of Egypt. Fifty samples from the area of Gable Gattar II were investigated. The radionuclides of the samples, in Bq/kg, have been measured using a hyper-pure germanium spectrometer. The dose obtained for 238U and 232Th ranged from 165 +/- 5 to 27,851 +/- 836 and 71 +/- 2 to 274 +/- 8 Bq/kg, respectively. The dose of 40K only changes slightly. To assess the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity in the samples, the radium equivalent activity, the absorbed dose rate and the external hazard index were calculated. This study provides a baseline map of radioactivity background levels in the Egyptian environment and will be used as reference information to assess any changes in the radioactive background level due to geological processes. The Gable Gattar granite, from uranium mineralization, has high economic potential.

  13. Scaling of Von Neumann Entropy at the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip

    Extensive body of work has shown that for the model of a non-interacting electron in a random potential there is a quantum critical point for dimensions greater than two — a metal-insulator transition. This model also plays an important role in the plateau-to-plateu transition in the integer quantum Hall effect, which is also correctly captured by a scaling theory. Yet, in neither of these cases the ground state energy shows any non-analyticity as a function of a suitable tuning parameter, typically considered to be a hallmark of a quantum phase transition, similar to the non-analyticity of the free energy in a classical phase transition. Here we show that von Neumann entropy (entanglement entropy) is non-analytic at these phase transitions and can track the fundamental changes in the internal correlations of the ground state wave function. In particular, it summarizes the spatially wildly fluctuating intensities of the wave function close to the criticality of the Anderson transition. It is likely that all quantum phase transitions can be similarly described.

  14. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  15. Kondo hole route to incoherence in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of disorder and interactions in strongly correlated electronic systems is a subject of perennial interest. In this work, we have investigated the effect of Kondo-hole type disorder on the dynamics and transport properties of heavy fermion systems. We employ the periodic Anderson model within the framework of coherent potential approximation and dynamical mean field theory. The crossover from lattice coherent behaviour to an incoherent single-impurity behaviour is reflected in all aspects: a highly frequency (ω)-dependent hybridization becomes almost flat, the coherence peak in resistivity (per impurity) gives way to a Hammann form that saturates at low temperature (T); the Drude peak and the mid-infrared peak in the optical conductivity vanish almost completely. The zero temperature resistivity can be captured in a closed form expression, and we show how the Nordheim's rule gets strongly modified in these systems. The thermopower exhibits a characteristic peak, which changes sign with increasing disorder, and its location is shown to correspond to the low energy scale of the system (ωL). In fact, the thermopower appears to be much more sensitive to disorder variations than the resistivity. A comparison to experiments yields quantitative agreement. JNCASR and CSIR

  16. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  17. Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities in arbitrary conduction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Tong, Ning-Hua; Cao, Zhan; Sun, Qing-Feng; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities is a key quantity in understanding the physics of Kondo screening. Traditional numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation of the impurity contribution χimp to susceptibility, defined originally by Wilson in a flat wide band, has been generalized before to structured conduction bands. The results brought about non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic Kondo behaviors in χimp, even when the bands are not gapped at the Fermi energy. Here, we use the full density-matrix (FDM) NRG to present high-quality data for the local susceptibility χloc and to compare them with χimp obtained by the traditional NRG. Our results indicate that those exotic behaviors observed in χimp are unphysical. Instead, the low-energy excitations of the impurity in arbitrary bands only without gap at the Fermi energy are still a Fermi liquid and paramagnetic. We also demonstrate that unlike the traditional NRG yielding χloc less accurate than χimp, the FDM method allows a high-precision dynamical calculation of χloc at much reduced computational cost, with an accuracy at least one order higher than χimp. Moreover, artifacts in the FDM algorithm to χimp and origins of the spurious non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic features are clarified. Our work provides an efficient high-precision algorithm to calculate the spin susceptibility of impurity for arbitrary structured bands, while negating the applicability of Wilson's definition to such cases.

  18. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peirong

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  19. Impurity-induced antiferromagnetic domains in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, A.; Bai, Z. J.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    A central feature of the periodic Anderson model is the competition between antiferromagnetism, mediated by the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction at small conduction electron-local electron hybridization V , and singlet formation at large V . At zero temperature, and in dimension d >1 , these two phases are separated by a quantum critical point Vc. We use quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations to explore the effect of impurities which have a local hybridization V*Vc . We measure the suppression of singlet correlations and the antiferromagnetic correlations which form around the impurity, as well as the size of the resulting domain. Exact diagonalization calculations for linear chains allow us to verify that the qualitative features obtained at intermediate coupling and finite T persist to strong coupling and T =0 , regimes which are difficult to access with QMC. Our calculations agree qualitatively with NMR measurements in CeCoIn5 -xCdx .

  20. Theory of Anderson pseudospin resonance with Higgs mode in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A superconductor illuminated by an ac electric field with frequency Ω is theoretically found to generate a collective precession of Anderson's pseudospins, and hence a coherent amplitude oscillation of the order parameter, with a doubled frequency 2 Ω through a nonlinear light-matter coupling. We provide a fundamental theory, based on the mean-field formalism, to show that the induced pseudospin precession resonates with the Higgs amplitude mode of the superconductor at 2 Ω =2 Δ with 2 Δ being the superconducting gap. The resonant precession is accompanied by a divergent enhancement of the third-harmonic generation (THG). By decomposing the THG susceptibility into the bare one and vertex correction, we find that the enhancement of the THG cannot be explained by individual quasiparticle excitations (pair breaking), so that the THG serves as a smoking gun for an identification of the collective Higgs mode. We further explore the effect of electron-electron scattering on the pseudospin resonance by applying the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to the attractive Hubbard model driven by ac electric fields. The result indicates that the pseudospin resonance is robust against electron correlations, although the resonance width is broadened due to electron scattering, which determines the lifetime of the Higgs mode.

  1. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Automotive Exteriors, LLC, working out of Troy, Michigan. The workers provided office, engineering and sales... Employment and Training Administration Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy, MI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for...

  2. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  3. Absorption and emission in quantum dots: Fermi surface effects of Anderson excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmes, R. W.; Sindel, M.; Borda, L.; von Delft, J.

    2005-09-01

    Recent experiments measuring the emission of exciton recombination in a self-organized single quantum dot (QD) have revealed that different effects occur when the wetting layer surrounding the QD becomes filled with electrons because the resulting Fermi sea can hybridize with the local electron levels on the dot. Motivated by these experiments, we study an extended Anderson model, which describes a local conduction band level coupled to a Fermi sea, but also includes a local valence band level. We are interested, in particular, in how many-body correlations resulting from the presence of the Fermi sea affect the absorption and emission spectra. Using Wilson’s numerical renormalization group method, we calculate the zero-temperature absorption (emission) spectrum of a QD, which starts from (ends up in) a strongly correlated Kondo ground state. We predict two features: First, we find that the spectrum shows a power-law divergence close to the threshold, with an exponent that can be understood by analogy to the well-known x-ray edge absorption problem. Second, the threshold energy ω0 —below which no photon is absorbed (above which no photon is emitted)—shows a marked, monotonic shift as a function of the exciton binding energy Uexc .

  4. Low Level of Microsatellite Instability Correlates with Poor Clinical Prognosis in Stage II Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Ehsan Nazemalhosseini; Kashfi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Mirtalebi, Hanieh; Taleghani, Mohammad Yaghoob; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Savabkar, Sanaz; Pourhoseingholi, Mohammad Amin; Jalaeikhoo, Hasan; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microsatellite instability (MSI) on the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) requires more investigation. We assessed the role of MSI status in survival of individuals diagnosed with primary colorectal cancer. In this retrospective cross-sectional study the MSI status was determined in 158 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors and their matched normal tissues from patients who underwent curative surgery. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to assess the clinical prognostic significance. In this study we found that MSI-H tumors were predominantly located in the colon versus rectum (p = 0.03), associated with poorer differentiation (p = 0.003) and TNM stage II/III of tumors (p = 0.02). In CRC patients with stage II, MSI-L cases showed significantly poorer survival compared with patients who had MSI-H or MSS tumors (p = 0.04). This study indicates that MSI-L tumors correlate with poorer clinical outcome in patients with stage II tumors (p = 0.04) or in tumors located in the colon (p = 0.02). MSI-L characterizes a distinct subgroup of CRC patients who have a poorer outcome. This study suggests that MSI status in CRC, as a clinical prognostic marker, is dependent on other factors, such as tumor stage and location. PMID:27429617

  5. Wegner estimates, Lifshitz tails, and Anderson localization for Gaussian random magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Naomasa

    2016-07-01

    The Wegner estimate for the Hamiltonian of the Anderson model for the special Gaussian random magnetic field is extended to more general magnetic fields. The Lifshitz tail upper bounds of the integrated density of states as analyzed by Nakamura are reviewed and extended so that Gaussian random magnetic fields can be treated. By these and multiscale analysis, the Anderson localization at low energies is proven.

  6. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  7. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  8. On one-step replica symmetry breaking in the Edwards–Anderson spin glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ferraro, Gino; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Aurell, Erik

    2016-07-01

    We consider a one-step replica symmetry breaking description of the Edwards–Anderson spin glass model in 2D. The ingredients of this description are a Kikuchi approximation to the free energy and a second-level statistical model built on the extremal points of the Kikuchi approximation, which are also fixed points of a generalized belief propagation (GBP) scheme. We show that a generalized free energy can be constructed where these extremal points are exponentially weighted by their Kikuchi free energy and a Parisi parameter y, and that the Kikuchi approximation of this generalized free energy leads to second-level, one-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB), GBP equations. We then proceed analogously to the Bethe approximation case for tree-like graphs, where it has been shown that 1RSB belief propagation equations admit a survey propagation solution. We discuss when and how the one-step-replica symmetry breaking GBP equations that we obtain also allow a simpler class of solutions which can be interpreted as a class of generalized survey propagation equations for the single instance graph case.

  9. Parabolic Anderson Model in a Dynamic Random Environment: Random Conductances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, D.; den Hollander, F.; Maillard, G.

    2016-06-01

    The parabolic Anderson model is defined as the partial differential equation ∂ u( x, t)/ ∂ t = κ Δ u( x, t) + ξ( x, t) u( x, t), x ∈ ℤ d , t ≥ 0, where κ ∈ [0, ∞) is the diffusion constant, Δ is the discrete Laplacian, and ξ is a dynamic random environment that drives the equation. The initial condition u( x, 0) = u 0( x), x ∈ ℤ d , is typically taken to be non-negative and bounded. The solution of the parabolic Anderson equation describes the evolution of a field of particles performing independent simple random walks with binary branching: particles jump at rate 2 d κ, split into two at rate ξ ∨ 0, and die at rate (- ξ) ∨ 0. In earlier work we looked at the Lyapunov exponents λ p(κ ) = limlimits _{tto ∞} 1/t log {E} ([u(0,t)]p)^{1/p}, quad p in {N} , qquad λ 0(κ ) = limlimits _{tto ∞} 1/2 log u(0,t). For the former we derived quantitative results on the κ-dependence for four choices of ξ : space-time white noise, independent simple random walks, the exclusion process and the voter model. For the latter we obtained qualitative results under certain space-time mixing conditions on ξ. In the present paper we investigate what happens when κΔ is replaced by Δ𝓚, where 𝓚 = {𝓚( x, y) : x, y ∈ ℤ d , x ˜ y} is a collection of random conductances between neighbouring sites replacing the constant conductances κ in the homogeneous model. We show that the associated annealed Lyapunov exponents λ p (𝓚), p ∈ ℕ, are given by the formula λ p({K} ) = {sup} {λ p(κ ) : κ in {Supp} ({K} )}, where, for a fixed realisation of 𝓚, Supp(𝓚) is the set of values taken by the 𝓚-field. We also show that for the associated quenched Lyapunov exponent λ 0(𝓚) this formula only provides a lower bound, and we conjecture that an upper bound holds when Supp(𝓚) is replaced by its convex hull. Our proof is valid for three classes of reversible ξ, and for all 𝓚

  10. Attractive Hubbard model with disorder and the generalized Anderson theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, E. Z. Kuleeva, N. A. Sadovskii, M. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using the generalized DMFT+Σ approach, we study the influence of disorder on single-particle properties of the normal phase and the superconducting transition temperature in the attractive Hubbard model. A wide range of attractive potentials U is studied, from the weak coupling region, where both the instability of the normal phase and superconductivity are well described by the BCS model, to the strong-coupling region, where the superconducting transition is due to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs, formed at temperatures much higher than the superconducting transition temperature. We study two typical models of the conduction band with semi-elliptic and flat densities of states, respectively appropriate for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For the semi-elliptic density of states, the disorder influence on all single-particle properties (e.g., density of states) is universal for an arbitrary strength of electronic correlations and disorder and is due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band. In the case of a flat density of states, universality is absent in the general case, but still the disorder influence is mainly due to band widening, and the universal behavior is restored for large enough disorder. Using the combination of DMFT+Σ and Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink approximations, we study the disorder influence on the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} for a range of characteristic values of U and disorder, including the BCS-BEC crossover region and the limit of strong-coupling. Disorder can either suppress T{sub c} (in the weak-coupling region) or significantly increase T{sub c} (in the strong-coupling region). However, in all cases, the generalized Anderson theorem is valid and all changes of the superconducting critical temperature are essentially due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band.

  11. Higher-level phylogeny of Foraminifera inferred from the RNA polymerase II (RPB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Longet, David; Pawlowski, Jan

    2007-08-01

    Macroevolutionary relations among main lineages of Foraminifera have traditionally been inferred from the small subunit ribosomal genes (SSU rDNA). However, important discrepancies in the rates of SSU rDNA evolution between major lineages led to difficulties in accurate interpretation of SSU-based phylogenetic reconstructions. Recently, actin and beta-tubulin sequences have been used as alternative markers of foraminiferal phylogeny and their analyses globally confirm results obtained with SSU rDNA. In order to test new protein markers, we sequenced a fragment of the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1), a nuclear encoded single copy gene, for 8 foraminiferal species representing major orders of Foraminifera. Analyses of our data robustly confirm previous SSU rDNA and actin phylogenies and show (i) the paraphyly and ancestral position of monothalamid Foraminifera; (ii) the independent origin of miliolids; (iii) the monophyly of rotaliids, including buliminids and globigerinids; and (iv) the polyphyly of planktonic families Globigerinidae and Candeinidae. Additionally, the RPB1 phylogeny suggests Allogromiidae as the most ancestral foraminiferal lineage. In the light of our study, RPB1 appears as a valuable phylogenetic marker, particularly useful for groups of protists showing extreme variations of evolutionary rates in ribosomal genes.

  12. Teaching Games Level Design Using the StarCraft II Editor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetser, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Level design is often characterised as "where the rubber hits the road" in game development. It is a core area of games design, alongside design of game rules and narrative. However, there is a lack of literature dedicated to documenting teaching games design, let alone the more specialised topic of level design. Furthermore, there…

  13. Theoretical foundations of spatially-variant mathematical morphology part ii: gray-level images.

    PubMed

    Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Schonfeld, Dan

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatially-variant (SV) mathematical morphology theory for gray-level signals and images in the Euclidean space. The proposed theory preserves the geometrical concept of the structuring function, which provides the foundation of classical morphology and is essential in signal and image processing applications. We define the basic SV gray-level morphological operators (i.e., SV gray-level erosion, dilation, opening, and closing) and investigate their properties. We demonstrate the ubiquity of SV gray-level morphological systems by deriving a kernel representation for a large class of systems, called V-systems, in terms of the basic SV graylevel morphological operators. A V-system is defined to be a gray-level operator, which is invariant under gray-level (vertical) translations. Particular attention is focused on the class of SV flat gray-level operators. The kernel representation for increasing V-systems is a generalization of Maragos' kernel representation for increasing and translation-invariant function-processing systems. A representation of V-systems in terms of their kernel elements is established for increasing and upper-semi-continuous V-systems. This representation unifies a large class of spatially-variant linear and non-linear systems under the same mathematical framework. Finally, simulation results show the potential power of the general theory of gray-level spatially-variant mathematical morphology in several image analysis and computer vision applications. PMID:18369253

  14. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level II. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 10 booklets presents 13 legends and 7 stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this second level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Crow, Muckleshoot, Skokomish, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne,…

  15. Precocene II, a Trichothecene Production Inhibitor, Binds to Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel and Increases the Superoxide Level in Mitochondria of Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tomohiro; Sakamoto, Naoko; Suzuki, Michio; Kimura, Makoto; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    Precocene II, a constituent of essential oils, shows antijuvenile hormone activity in insects and inhibits trichothecene production in fungi. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which precocene II inhibits trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum, the main causal agent of Fusarium head blight and trichothecene contamination in grains. Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, was identified as the precocene II-binding protein by an affinity magnetic bead method. Precocene II increased the superoxide level in mitochondria as well as the amount of oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Ascorbic acid, glutathione, and α-tocopherol promoted trichothecene production by the fungus. These antioxidants compensated for the inhibitory activity of precocene II on trichothecene production. These results suggest that the binding of precocene II to VDAC may cause high superoxide levels in mitochondria, which leads to stopping of trichothecene production. PMID:26248339

  16. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  17. Beam-laser lifetime measurements for some selected levels in singly ionized thulium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Georg; McCurdy, Michelle M.; Pinnington, Eric H.

    1999-11-01

    The lifetimes of 16 levels in Tm II have been measured using the fast-beam-laser technique to resolve the disagreement between time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements recently published by Anderson, Den Hartog, and Lawler [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 13, 2382 (1996)] and a new relativistic Hartree-Fock calculation by Quinet, Palmeri, and Biémont [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 62, 625 (1999)]. In all cases except one, our results support the previous measurement, but with a higher precision.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (BRNATH00660028) on Town Highway 66, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severence, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The Town Highway 66 crossing of the Locust Creek is a 41-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 39 ft steel stringer type bridge with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 24, 1994). The clear span is 36.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The upstream right wingwall is protected by stone fill. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E.

  19. Basic Properties of Conductivity and Normal Hall Effect in the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-04-01

    Exact formulas of diagonal conductivity σxx and Hall conductivity σxy are derived from the Kubo formula in hybridized two-orbital systems with arbitrary band dispersions. On the basis of the theoretical framework for the Fermi liquid based on these formulas, the ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model with electron correlation and weak impurity scattering are studied on the square lattice. It is shown that imbalance of the mass-renormalization factors causes remarkable increase in σxx and σxy in the valence-fluctuation regime as the f level increases while the cancellation of the renormalization factors causes slight increase in σxx and σxy in the Kondo regime. The Hall coefficient RH shows almost constant behavior in both the regimes. Near half filling, RH is expressed by the total hole density as R{H} = 1/(bar{n}{hole}e) while RH approaches zero near quarter filling, which reflects the curvature of the Fermi surface. These results hold as far as the damping rate for f electrons is less than about 10% of the renormalized hybridization gap. From these results we discuss pressure dependence of residual resistivity and normal Hall effect in Ce- and Yb-based heavy electron systems.

  20. Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in addition to the regular exchange Kondo interaction between the S=1 f spins and the s=1/2 spins of the conduction electrons. The resulting effective Kondo lattice model can describe both the Kondo regime and a weak delocalization of the 5f electrons. Within this model we compute the Kondo and Curie temperatures as a function of model parameters, namely the Kondo exchange interaction constant JK, the magnetic intersite exchange interaction JH, and the effective f bandwidth. We deduce, therefore, a phase diagram of the model which yields the coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and also accounts for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of uranium compounds such as UTe.

  1. Anderson localization to enhance light-matter interaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Pedro David

    2016-04-01

    Deliberately introducing disorder in low-dimensional nanostructures like photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) [1] or photonic crystals (PCs) [2] leads to Anderson localization where light is efficiently trapped by random multiple scattering with the lattice imperfections. These disorder-induced optical modes hace been demonstrated to be very promising for cavity-quantum electrodynamics (QED) experiments where the radiative emission rate of single quantum emitters can be controlled when tuned through resonance with one of these random cavities. Our statistical analysis of the emission dynamics from single quantum dots embeded in disordered PCWs [3] provides detailed insigth about the statistical properties of QED in these complex nanostructures. In addition, using internal light sources reveals new physics in the form of nonuniversal intensity correlations between the different scattered paths within the structure which imprint the local QED properties deep inside the complex structure onto the far-field intensity pattern [2]. Finally, increasing the optical gain in PCWs allows on-chip random nanolasing where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder which enables highly efficient, stable, and broadband tunable lasers with very small mode volumes [4]. The figure of merit of these disorder-induced cavities is their localization length which determines to a large degree the coupling efficiency of a quantum emitter to a disorder-induced cavity as well as the efficiency of random lasing and reveals a strongly dispersive behavior and a non-trivial dependence on disorder in PCWs [5]. [1] L. Sapienza, H. Thyrrestrup, S. Stobbe, P.D. Garcia, S. Smolka, and P. Lodahl, Science 327, 1352 (2010). [2] P. D. García, S. Stobbe, I. Soellner and P. Lodahl, Physical Review Letters 109, 253902 (2012). [3] A. Javadi, S. Maibom, L. Sapienza, H. Thyrrestrup, P.D. Garcia, and P. Lodahl, Opt. Express 22, 30992 (2014). [4] J. Liu, P. D. Garcia, S. Ek, N. Gregersen, T. Suhr, M

  2. Rubella-associated arthritis. II. Relationship between circulating immune complex levels and joint manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, V K; Tingle, A J; Schulzer, M

    1986-01-01

    The role played by raised circulating immune complex (CIC) levels in the pathogenesis of rubella-associated joint reactions has been assessed during the course of RA 27/3 rubella immunisation and epidemic wild rubella infection. CIC levels were evaluated by C1q microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Raji cell ELISA techniques. Mean CIC levels were generally higher both before and after immunisation among individuals developing vaccine-associated arthritis than among those developing arthralgia or no joint symptoms. However, these differences reached statistical significance only with CIC (Raji) techniques at six and 12 weeks postimmunisation. The proportion of individuals within each group having raised CIC levels (greater than or equal to 2SD above normal control values) was also higher in the postvaccine arthritis group, though statistically significant differences were not found with either Raji or C1q techniques. These data do not support a direct role for raised CIC levels in the pathogenesis of rubella-associated arthritis or arthralgia. PMID:3484934

  3. PRESTO-II: a low-level waste environmental transport and risk assessment code

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Emerson, C.J.; Chester, R.O.; Little, C.A.; Hiromoto, G.

    1986-04-01

    PRESTO-II (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations) is a computer code designed for the evaluation of possible health effects from shallow-land and, waste-disposal trenches. The model is intended to serve as a non-site-specific screening model for assessing radionuclide transport, ensuing exposure, and health impacts to a static local population for a 1000-year period following the end of disposal operations. Human exposure scenarios considered include normal releases (including leaching and operational spillage), human intrusion, and limited site farming or reclamation. Pathways and processes of transit from the trench to an individual or population include ground-water transport, overland flow, erosion, surface water dilution, suspension, atmospheric transport, deposition, inhalation, external exposure, and ingestion of contaminated beef, milk, crops, and water. Both population doses and individual doses, as well as doses to the intruder and farmer, may be calculated. Cumulative health effects in terms of cancer deaths are calculated for the population over the 1000-year period using a life-table approach. Data are included for three example sites: Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and West Valley, New York. A code listing and example input for each of the three sites are included in the appendices to this report.

  4. Continuous assimilation of simulated Geosat altimetric sea level into an eddy-resolving numerical ocean model. I - Sea level differences. II - Referenced sea level differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Warren B.; Tai, Chang-Kou; Holland, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The optimal interpolation method of Lorenc (1981) was used to conduct continuous assimilation of altimetric sea level differences from the simulated Geosat exact repeat mission (ERM) into a three-layer quasi-geostrophic eddy-resolving numerical ocean box model that simulates the statistics of mesoscale eddy activity in the western North Pacific. Assimilation was conducted continuously as the Geosat tracks appeared in simulated real time/space, with each track repeating every 17 days, but occurring at different times and locations within the 17-day period, as would have occurred in a realistic nowcast situation. This interpolation method was also used to conduct the assimilation of referenced altimetric sea level differences into the same model, performing the referencing of altimetric sea sevel differences by using the simulated sea level. The results of this dynamical interpolation procedure are compared with those of a statistical (i.e., optimum) interpolation procedure.

  5. Zolpidem, a novel nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic. II. Effects on cerebellar cyclic GMP levels and cerebral monoamines.

    PubMed

    Scatton, B; Claustre, Y; Dennis, T; Nishikawa, T

    1986-05-01

    The effect of zolpidem, a novel nonbenzodiazepine short-acting hypnotic, on cerebellar cyclic GMP (cGMP) and biochemical indices of cerebral norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine metabolism has been investigated in the rat and mouse. Zolpidem diminished the levels of cerebellar cGMP in the rat markedly (ED50 = 0.7 mg/kg i.p.). This effect was antagonized, in a competitive manner, by the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788. The zolpidem-induced decrease of cerebellar cGMP levels was rapid in onset and of short duration (less than 1 hr). When given in combination with muscimol (in a dose which by itself did not alter cerebellar cGMP content) zolpidem potentiated the diminution of the cyclic nucleotide levels induced by the gamma-aminobutyric acid mimetic. Zolpidem (up to 30 mg/kg i.p.) failed to alter the rate of utilization of norepinephrine or the levels of total 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyleneglycol or 3-methoxy, 4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol sulfate in the rat brain. However, the compound (10-30 mg/kg) diminished serotonin synthesis in the hippocampus, striatum and frontal cortex. At high doses (30-100 mg/kg i.p.), zolpidem also decreased the rate of utilization of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the rat striatum. Moreover, zolpidem (10 mg/kg i.p.) prevented partially the haloperidol-induced increase in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations in both striatum and frontal cortex. Finally, zolpidem prevented the increase in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the frontal cortex induced by electric footshock stress in rats (ED50 = 2 mg/kg i.p.) and BALB/C mice. This effect was antagonized by coadministration of Ro 15-1788. PMID:2871179

  6. A study of the human immune response to Lolium perenne (rye) pollen and its components, Lol p I and Lol p II (Rye I and Rye II). II. Longitudinal variation of antibody levels in relation to symptomatology and pollen exposure and correction of seasonally elevated antibody levels to basal values.

    PubMed

    Freidhoff, L R; Ehrlich-Kautzky, E; Meyers, D A; Marsh, D G

    1987-11-01

    This study used a standardized, dialyzed, Lolium perenne (ryegrass) pollen extract and two of its well-characterized components, Lol p I (Rye I) and Lol p II (Rye II), to characterize the longitudinal variation of both IgE and IgG antibody (Ab) levels, as well as total serum IgE levels, in 20 grass-allergic subjects followed for 13 months. Ab levels declined toward a basal level just before, and increased just after, the grass-pollination season, returning to the same basal level just before the next grass-pollination season. The least complex allergen, Lol II, demonstrated the most uniform pattern of variation in both IgE and IgG Ab levels. Total serum IgE levels demonstrated the least regular pattern of variation. Grass-pollen counts were strongly correlated with symptom-medication scores for these subjects (rs = 0.87). Initial values were correlated with the rise in total IgE and IgE Ab to Lol II across the grass-pollen season. Skin test results were correlated with initial IgE Ab levels for L. perenne pollen extract and Lol II. Finally, a procedure for correcting IgE Ab levels to basal values was proposed and tested. The correction procedure, for each IgE Ab, was based on the average rise during the grass-pollination season (or average decline after the grass-pollination season) observed for all subjects with that IgE Ab.

  7. Density matrix renormalization group study in energy space for a single-impurity Anderson model and an impurity quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    The density matrix renormalization group method is introduced in energy space to study Anderson impurity models. The method allows for calculations in the thermodynamic limit and is advantageous for studying not only the dynamical properties, but also the quantum entanglement of the ground state at the vicinity of an impurity quantum phase transition. This method is applied to obtain numerically exactly the ground-state phase diagram of the single-impurity Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling. The calculation of local static quantities shows that the phase diagram contains two distinct phases, the local moment (LM) phase and the asymmetric strong coupling (ASC) phase, but no Kondo screening phase. These results are supported by the local spin and charge excitation spectra, which exhibit qualitatively different behavior in these two phases and also reveal the existence of the valence fluctuating point at the phase boundary. For comparison, we also study the low-energy effective pseudogap Anderson model using the method introduced here. Although the high-energy excitations are obviously different, we find that the ground-state phase diagram and the asymptotically low-energy excitations are in good quantitative agreement with those for the single-impurity Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice, thus providing a quantitative justification for the previous studies based on low-energy approximate approaches. Furthermore, we find that the lowest entanglement level is doubly degenerate for the LM phase, whereas it is singlet for the ASC phase and is accidentally threefold degenerate at the valence fluctuating point. This should be contrasted with the degeneracy of the energy spectrum because the ground state is found to be always singlet. Our results therefore clearly demonstrate that the low-lying entanglement spectrum can be used to determine with high accuracy the phase boundary of the impurity quantum phase transition.

  8. Community-Based Career Guidance Practices. Vol. II--Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manatee Junior Coll., Bradenton, FL.

    This collection of eighty-six secondary level career guidance practices contains the following nine types of activities: novel practices such as games and role enactments, volunteering, field trips, special career emphases, intern/extern practices, work experience and exploration practices, exchanges, mobile practices, and educator in-services. A…

  9. State Level Collaborative Planning. Community Education Proven Practices II. Bulletin No. 2431.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Community Education Unit.

    A study examined state-level collaborative planning strategies that have been developed in Wisconsin to coordinate the efforts of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and the state's higher educational institutions with respect to the development of community education in the state. During the study the following areas were explored: the…

  10. Studies on porcine pancreatic elastase activity. II. Immunoreactive elastase level during acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Matsuno, S; Noto, N; Saitoh, Y; Sato, T

    1980-06-01

    Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis was produced in pig to study serum concentration of elastase and its physiological role. Pancreatitis was induced in two groups of young pigs by the injection of autologous bile. One group was injected with autologous bile (0.5 ml/kg) at high pressure, and the second group was injected as low pressure (100 cm H2O). Then femoral blood, portal blood and thoracic lymph were sampled at scheduled time intervals. The control level of immunoreactive elastase was around 90 ng/ml in each site, which significantly increased beginning 15 min after bile injection; the level of immunoreactive elastase was higher in the thoracic lymph duct than in the femoral and portal vein. The total and free elastase of both groups in pancreatic tissue were significantly decreased in pancreatitis, and an abundance of immunoreactive elastase was found in the ascites. The increasing pattern of immunoreactive elastase and amylase after bile injection was very similar. Therefore, the level of immunoreactive elastase was considered to be inadequate to determine the grade of severity of pancreatitis as well as the level of amylase which is already known.

  11. Reactivity II: A Second Foundation-Level Course in Integrated Organic, Inorganic, and Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Johnson, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    A foundation-level course is described that integrates material related to reactivity in organic, inorganic, and biochemistry. Designed for second-year students, the course serves majors in chemistry, biochemistry, and biology, as well as prehealth-professions students. Building on an earlier course that developed concepts of nucleophiles and…

  12. Homemade Equipment for the Teaching of Electrochemistry at Advanced Level. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a detailed description for the construction of equipment needed to investigate acid/base equilibria through the measurement of pH and potentiometric titrations. Suggested experiments and calibration techniques are explained. This information helps to solve the problems of inadequate, expensive equipment required for A-level chemistry…

  13. Exciton level structure and dynamics in the CP47 antenna complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.C.; Jankowiak, R.; Small, G.J. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA ); Yocum, C.F. ); Picorel, R. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO ); Alfonso, M. ); Seibert, M. )

    1994-08-04

    Persistent nonphotochemical and population bottleneck hole-burning results obtained as a function of burn wavelength are reported for the CP47 proximal antenna protein complex of photosystem II. Attention is focused on the lower energy chlorophyll a Q[sub y] states. Results are presented for the CP47 complex from two preparations. The Chl a content per CP47 complex was determined, spectroscopically, to be 14 [+-] 2. On the basis of the analysis of the hole spectra and the 4.2 K static fluorescence spectrum, the lowest energy state of CP47 lies at 690 nm (fluorescence origin at 691 nm). The width of the weak 690-nm absorption band from inhomogeneous broadening is 100 cm[sup [minus]1]. The linear electron-phonon coupling of the 690-nm state is weak with a Huang-Rhys factor (S) of about 0.2 and a mean phonon frequency ([Omega][sub m]) of 120 cm[sup [minus]1], which explains why the Stokes shift (2S[Omega][sub m]) is so small. The 690-nm state is found to be excitonically correlated with a hitherto unobserved state at 687 nm. However, the combined absorption intensity of the 690- and 687-nm states was determined to be equivalent to only 1 Chl a molecule. Results are presented which illustrate that these two states are fragile (i.e., their associated chlorophyll a molecules are disrupted). Thus, it is possible that the correct number of Chl a molecules is 2, not 1. 53 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate enhances the phase II enzyme activities via the increase in intranuclear Nrf2 level and cytosolic p21 level.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Keisuke; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Azuma, Hideki; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    (1'S)-acetoxychavicol acetate ((S)-ACA) exhibits chemopreventive effects on chemically induced tumor formation. It has been shown that ACA inhibited the development of azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis through its suppression of cell proliferation in the colonic mucosa and its induction of glutathione S-transferase and quinone oxidoreductase 1 in vivo. In this study, we investigated how ACA induced these enzymes by using rat intestine epithelial cells (IEC6) in vitro. ACA induced glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD (P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activities, increased intracellular glutathione (GSH) level, and upregulated intranuclear Nrf2 and cytosolic p21. It suggested that activation of phase II enzymes via Nrf2 associated with p21 is one of possible mechanisms of ACA to prevent advance of carcinogenesis.

  15. Vitronectin and dermcidin serum levels predict the metastatic progression of AJCC I-II early-stage melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Erramuzpe, Asier; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Cortés, Jesús; García-Vázquez, María D; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Izu, Rosa; Luís Díaz-Ramón, Jose; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2016-10-01

    Like many cancers, an early diagnosis of melanoma is fundamental to ensure a good prognosis, although an important proportion of stage I-II patients may still develop metastasis during follow-up. The aim of this work was to discover serum biomarkers in patients diagnosed with primary melanoma that identify those at a high risk of developing metastasis during the follow-up period. Proteomic and mass spectrophotometry analysis was performed on serum obtained from patients who developed metastasis during the first years after surgery for primary tumors and compared with that from patients who remained disease-free for more than 10 years after surgery. Five proteins were selected for validation as prognostic factors in 348 melanoma patients and 100 controls by ELISA: serum amyloid A and clusterin; immune system proteins; the cell adhesion molecules plakoglobin and vitronectin and the antimicrobial protein dermcidin. Compared to healthy controls, melanoma patients have high serum levels of these proteins at the moment of melanoma diagnosis, although the specific values were not related to the histopathological stage of the tumors. However, an analysis based on classification together with multivariate statistics showed that tumor stage, vitronectin and dermcidin levels were associated with the metastatic progression of patients with early-stage melanoma. Although melanoma patients have increased serum dermcidin levels, the REPTree classifier showed that levels of dermcidin <2.98 μg/ml predict metastasis in AJCC stage II patients. These data suggest that vitronectin and dermcidin are potent biomarkers of prognosis, which may help to improve the personalized medical care of melanoma patients and their survival. PMID:27216146

  16. Particulates in domestic premises. II. Ambient levels and indoor-outdoor relationships.

    PubMed

    Lefcoe, N M; Inculet, I I

    1975-12-01

    Three indoor environments, two residential and on institutional, were monitored for particulate and gaseous air pollutants over a one-year period. Inside air particulate levels decreased at night and under conditions of no household activity. Different homes showed different time lags in correlating inside vs outside particle counts. Indoor particle count reduction correlated to rate of air flow through the precipitator. The standard, portable household vacuum cleaner produced about a 100% increase in counts of particles measuring 1.0 mum and larger, as compared to a 50% increase produced by the central vacuum system. Particulates that were smaller than 1.0 mum were not substantially affected by smoking. The indoor gaseous pollutants showed very low maximum levels.

  17. The molecular potential energy surface and vibrational energy levels of methyl fluoride. Part II.

    PubMed

    Manson, Steven A; Law, Mark M; Atkinson, Ian A; Thomson, Grant A

    2006-06-28

    New analytical bending and stretching, ground electronic state, potential energy surfaces for CH(3)F are reported. The surfaces are expressed in bond-length, bond-angle internal coordinates. The four-dimensional stretching surface is an accurate, least squares fit to over 2000 symmetrically unique ab initio points calculated at the CCSD(T) level. Similarly, the five-dimensional bending surface is a fit to over 1200 symmetrically unique ab initio points. This is an important first stage towards a full nine-dimensional potential energy surface for the prototype CH(3)F molecule. Using these surfaces, highly excited stretching and (separately) bending vibrational energy levels of CH(3)F are calculated variationally using a finite basis representation method. The method uses the exact vibrational kinetic energy operator derived for XY(3)Z systems by Manson and Law (preceding paper, Part I, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006, 8, DOI: 10.1039/b603106d). We use the full C(3v) symmetry and the computer codes are designed to use an arbitrary potential energy function. Ultimately, these results will be used to design a compact basis for fully coupled stretch-bend calculations of the vibrational energy levels of the CH(3)F system.

  18. Reduced high-energy phosphate levels in rat hearts. II. Effects of sodium cyanate.

    PubMed

    Allison, T B; Pieper, G M; Clayton, F C; Eliot, R S

    1976-06-01

    The effects of increased blood-oxygen affinity, due to carbamylation of hemoglobin in vivo, on aerobic metabolism in the heart were studied in rats. Adult male rats were injected intraperitoneally 3 times weekly for 10 wk with sodium cyanate (60 mg/kg). Significant derangement of blood-oxygen interaction was observed. Oxygen-dissociation curves were left shifted by 13 mmHg (35.1-21.8), and the overall deoxygenation rate (k) was reduced 41% (6.142-3.624; s(-1)); P is less than 0.001 for each parameter. Heart ATP and PCr levels were reduced (ATP: 19.4-16.7; PCr: 15.0-11.0, mum/g dry wt; P is less than 0.001 for each). In addition, glycogen levels fell (161.4-112.9, mum C6/g dry wt; P is less than 0.001). Myocardial lactate levels increased 54% (2.6-4.0, mum/g dry wt; P is less than 0.01) in the cyanate-treated group. These findings strongly suggest a hypoxia-induced activation of glycolysis as a consequence of altered oxidative metabolism in rats treated with sodium cyanate. PMID:937561

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The HII Region Discovery Survey (HRDS). II. (Anderson+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Rood, R. T.

    2011-08-01

    Our observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) 100m telescope from 2008 June through 2010 October. We assembled our target list from the following multi-frequency, large solid angle Galactic surveys: the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (VGPS: Stil et al. 2006AJ....132.1158S), the NRAO VLA Sky Survey at 20cm continuum (NVSS: Condon et al. 1998, Cat. VIII/65), the Southern Galactic Plane Survey at 21cm HI and continuum (SGPS: Haverkorn et al. 2006ApJS..167..230H), the VLA MAGPIS at 20cm continuum (Helfand et al. 2006, Cat. J/AJ/131/2525), and the Spitzer 24um MIPSGAL survey (Carey et al. 2009PASP..121...76C). Our analysis here also uses 8.0um data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE: Benjamin et al. 2003PASP..115..953B), which were obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. (4 data files).

  20. Exciting Molecules Close to the Rotational Quantum Resonance: Anderson Wall and Rotational Bloch Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2016-05-19

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under conditions close to the quantum resonance. The quantum resonance effect causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that a disturbance of the quantum resonance, either by the centrifugal distortion of the rotating molecules or a controlled detuning of the pulse train period from the so-called rotational revival time, eventually halts the growth by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum, the Anderson wall. Below the wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

  1. John Anderson's development of (situational) realism and its bearing on psychology today.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Fiona J

    2009-10-01

    In 1927, the Scottish philosopher John Anderson arrived in Australia to take up the chair of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. By the late 1930s, the "macrostructure" of his realist system was in place. It includes a theory of process and a substantial metaphysics, one that opposes positivism, linguistic philosophy and all forms of idealism. However, beyond Australia it remains largely unknown, despite its bearing on a number of current issues in psychology and the social sciences generally. This article outlines Anderson's transition from Hegelian idealism to realism, describes aspects of his ontology and epistemology, compares some of Anderson's ideas with Dewey's pragmatism and explains their relevance to present-day psychology. PMID:20027696

  2. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-29

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization. PMID:27517785

  3. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization.

  4. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Stimulates Tenocyte Migration with Up-Regulation of Dynamin II Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm2). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore. PMID:22666495

  5. Low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration with up-regulation of dynamin II expression.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Miao-Sui; Chen, Ying-Hsun; Liang, Fang-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to treat sports-related tendinopathy or tendon injury. Tendon healing requires tenocyte migration to the repair site, followed by proliferation and synthesis of the extracellular matrix. This study was designed to determine the effect of laser on tenocyte migration. Furthermore, the correlation between this effect and expression of dynamin 2, a positive regulator of cell motility, was also investigated. Tenocytes intrinsic to rat Achilles tendon were treated with low-level laser (660 nm with energy density at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 J/cm(2)). Tenocyte migration was evaluated by an in vitro wound healing model and by transwell filter migration assay. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were determined by reverse transcription/real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and Western blot analysis respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was used to evaluate the dynamin 2 expression in tenocytes. Tenocytes with or without laser irradiation was treated with dynasore, a dynamin competitor and then underwent transwell filter migration assay. In vitro wound model revealed that more tenocytes with laser irradiation migrated across the wound border to the cell-free zone. Transwell filter migration assay confirmed that tenocyte migration was enhanced dose-dependently by laser. Real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis demonstrated that mRNA and protein expressions of dynamin 2 were up-regulated by laser irradiation dose-dependently. Confocal microscopy showed that laser enhanced the expression of dynamin 2 in cytoplasm of tenocytes. The stimulation effect of laser on tenocytes migration was suppressed by dynasore. In conclusion, low-level laser irradiation stimulates tenocyte migration in a process that is mediated by up-regulation of dynamin 2, which can be suppressed by dynasore.

  6. The production of interferon-gamma in response to a major peanut allergy, Ara h II correlates with serum levels of IgE anti-Ara h II.

    PubMed

    Dorion, B J; Burks, A W; Harbeck, R; Williams, L W; Trumble, A; Helm, R M; Leung, D Y

    1994-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to examine the potential role of T cells in the pathogenesis of peanut allergy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with peanut allergy, patients with asthma, and nonatopic normal control subjects were assessed for proliferation after stimulation with a 17 kd major peanut allergen (Ara h II), ovalbumin, casein, soy, and Candida albicans. We found that Ara h II and C. albicans induced significantly higher levels of proliferation than ovalbumin, casein, and soy. Because interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) play critical roles in IgE regulation, we assessed the production of these cytokines after stimulation with C. albicans and Ara h II. C. albicans stimulated similar levels of IFN-gamma in all three study groups. In contrast, after stimulation with Ara h II, culture supernatants from PBMCs of subjects with peanut allergy contained significantly lower levels of IFN-gamma than did the PBMCs of the two control groups (p = 0.02). More important, there was a significant (p = 0.05) inverse correlation between the serum IgE anti-Ara h II levels and IFN-gamma production by PBMCs from the respective peanut-allergic patients. IL-4 protein was not detected in culture supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Ara h II. However, amplification of cytokine gene transcripts by polymerase chain reaction did demonstrate IL-4 expression in Ara h II-stimulated PBMCs from both patients with peanut allergy and control subjects. These data suggest that the level of IFN-gamma production in response to Ara h II may be an important factor in determining the development of peanut-specific IgE responses.

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 47 (PLYMTH00540047) on Town Highway 54, crossing Pinney Hollow Brook, Plymouth, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PLYMTH00540047 on Town Highway 54 crossing Pinney Hollow Brook, Plymouth, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gathered from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 7.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Pinney Hollow Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 57 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 45.7 mm (0.150 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on March 30, 1995 and Level II site visit on October 2, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 54 crossing of Pinney Hollow Brook is a 30-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 27-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 25.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Scour protection measures at the site included

  8. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  9. Mean-field theory and ɛ expansion for Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.; Lubensky, T. C.

    1981-03-01

    A general field-theoretic formulation of the Anderson model for the localization of wave functions in a random potential is given in terms of n-component replicated fields in the limit n-->0, and is analyzed primarily for spatial dimension d>=4. Lengths ξ1 and ξ2 associated with the spatial decay of correlations in the single-particle and two-particle Green's functions, respectively, are introduced. Two different regimes, the weak coupling and strong coupling, are distinguished depending on whether ξ-11 or ξ-12, respectively, vanishes as the mobility energy, Ec, is approached. The weak-coupling regime vanishes as d-->4+. Mean-field theory is developed from the uniform minimum of the Lagrangian for both the strong- and weak-coupling cases. For the strong-coupling case it gives the exponents va=14, γa=βa=12, η=0, and μ=1, where βa is the exponent associated with the density of extended states and μ is that associated with the conductivity. Simple heuristic arguments are used to verify the correctness of these unusual mean-field values. Infrared divergences in perturbation theory for the strong-coupling case occur for d<8, and an ɛ expansion (ɛ=8-d) is developed which is found to be identical to that previously analyzed for the statistics of lattice animals and which gives βa=12-ɛ12, η=-ɛ9, va=14+ɛ36, and μ=1-5ɛ36. The results are consistent with the Ward identity, which in combination with scaling arguments requires that βa+γa=1. The treatment takes account of the fact that the average of the on-site Green's function [G(x-->,x-->E)]av is nonzero and is predicated on this quantity being real, i.e., on the density of states vanishing at the mobility edge. We also show that localized states emerge naturally from local minima of finite action in the Lagrangian. These instanton solutions are analyzed on a lattice where the cutoff produced by the lattice constant leads to lattice instantons which exist for all d, in contrast to the case for the

  10. Alcohol Intake and Serum Glucose Levels from the Perspective of a Mendelian Randomization Design: The KCPS-II Biobank

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Yon Ho; Lee, Sun Ju; Jee, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that alcohol intake is associated with increased fasting serum glucose (FSG), but the nature of the relationship remains unknown. We used Mendelian randomization analysis to assess the causal effect of alcohol intake on FSG in a middle-aged Korean population. Methods Clinical data including FSG and alcohol intake were collected from 156,386 Koreans aged 20 years or older who took part in the Korean Cancer Prevention Study-II (KCPS-II) Biobank Cohort. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs671 in ALDH2 was genotyped among 2,993 men and 1,374 women in 2016. This was a randomly selected subcohort of KCPS-II Biobank participants. Results Alcohol consumption was positively associated with FSG level in men, but not in women. The rs671 major G allele was associated with increased alcohol intake (F-statistic = 302.62) and an increase in FSG in men. Using Mendelian randomization analysis, alcohol intake increased FSG by 1.78 mg/dL per alcohol unit (10 g ethanol) per day (95% CI: 0.97–2.59) in men. The associations became stronger when we excluded heavy drinkers and the elderly. However, in women, no significant association between rs671 and alcohol or serum glucose was found. Conclusion Using Mendelian randomization analysis, we suggest a causal relationship between alcohol intake and FSG among Korean men. Moreover, we found that the ALDH2 variant rs671 was not associated with FSG among Korean women. PMID:27632197

  11. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  12. Non-perturbative Anderson localization in heavy-tailed potentials via large deviations moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-09-01

    We study a class of Anderson Hamiltonians with heavy-tailed independent and identically distributed random potential on graphs with sub-exponential growth of the balls and of the number of self-avoiding paths connecting pairs of points. We show that for a class of marginal distributions, Anderson localization occurs non-perturbatively, i.e., for any nonzero amplitude of the potential, like in one-dimensional systems. The proof is based on the moment analysis of the Green functions via large deviations estimates.

  13. Wildlife Impact Assessment: Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1986-05-01

    This report presents an analysis of impacts on wildlife and their habitats as a result of construction and operation of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects in Idaho. The objectives were to: (1) determine the probable impacts of development and operation of the Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects to wildlife and their habitats; (2) determine the wildlife and habitat impacts directly attributable to hydroelectric development and operation; (3) briefly identify the current major concerns for wildlife in the vicinities of the hydroelectric projects; and (4) provide for consultation and coordination with interested agencies, tribes, and other entities expressing interest in the project.

  14. Financial protection against nuclear hazards: thirty years' experience under the Price-Anderson Act

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, L.R.; Hayn, I.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the operation of the Price-Anderson Act in the light of the last 10 years' experience and the changes that have occurred during that period both in the law and regulations and in the nuclear and insurance industries, and to provide an independent analysis of various proposals to extend or amend the Act prior to its 1987 expiration. The report does not analyze the impact of the Silkwood v. Kerr McGee Corp. decision. The five chapters cover historical background, financial protection under the Price-Anderson Act and in the absence of the Act, fundamental policy issues, and alternative proposals.

  15. Anderson localization in one-dimension with Levy-type disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Conrad; Ekuma, Chinedu; Terletska, Hanna; Meng, Ziyang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Abstract: Quantum transport through disordered systems has been the subject of extensive research since Anderson's seminal theory of localization. Motivated by experimental realizations of light transport across media exhibiting Levy-type fluctuations, we study the one-dimensional Anderson model where the random site energies are governed by a probability distribution with a broad tail, otherwise known as Levy-type. We numerically compute the Lyapunov exponent and its variance. This exponent is a self-averaging quantity whose inverse in certain cases can be used to define the localization length. Furthermore, we check for the validity of single parameter scaling (SPS), and its dependence on the Levy index.

  16. Entanglement Area Law in Disordered Free Fermion Anderson Model in One, Two, and Three Dimensions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pouranvari, Mohammad; Zhang, Yuhui; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We calculate numerically the entanglement entropy of free fermion ground states in one-, two-, and three-dimensional Anderson models and find that it obeys the area law as long as the linear size of the subsystem is sufficiently larger than the mean free path. This result holds in the metallic phase of the three-dimensional Anderson model, where the mean free path is finite although the localization length is infinite. Relation between the present results and earlier ones on area law violation in special one-dimensional models that support metallic phases is discussed.

  17. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (HUNTTH00290029) on Town Highway 29, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00290029 on Town Highway 29 crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.16-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.024 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 53 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 112.0 mm (0.367 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 29 crossing of Cobb Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995) and a wooden deck. The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 27 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway was measured to be 20 degrees. VTAOT records indicate an opening-skew-to-roadway of zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 23 (WALDTH00060023) on Town Highway 6, crossing Stannard Brook, Walden, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00060023 on Town Highway 6 crossing Stannard Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 5.61-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the upstream surface cover is shrub and brushland with some trees. The downstream surface cover is forest. In the study area, Stannard Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 54 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 64.0 mm (0.210 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 8, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 6 crossing of Stannard Brook is a 59-ft-long (bottom width), two-lane pipe arch culvert consisting of one 22-foot corrugated plate pipe arch span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 21.9 ft.The pipe arch is supported by vertical, concrete kneewalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the mean

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 6 (FAYSTH00010006) on Town Highway 1, crossing Shepard Brook, Fayston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FAYSTH00010006 on Town Highway 1 crossing Shepard Brook, Fayston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Shepard Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 72.6 mm (0.238 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 2, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Shepard Brook is a 42-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 40-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 39.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the calculated opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Scour, 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth, was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The left abutment is

  1. Anderson localization and layered superconductor 2H-NbSe[sub 2-x]S[sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Ken; Yokota, Kazuhide; Takemoto, Jiro; Tanokura, Yoshiko; Sekine, Tomoyuki )

    1993-04-01

    The zero-field critical temperature and the coherence length in the layered superconductor 2H-NbSe[sub 2-x]S[sub x] (x=0-2.0) were investigated. The zero-field critical temperature decreases with increasing the residual resistivity. This result can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional Anderson localization with the mobility edge below the Fermi level. The coherence length as a function of x can be explained by the theory of the anisotropic three-dimensional dirty superconductor. However it shows anomalous behavior when x-0.6. This may be relevant to the change of the crystal structure or the disappearance of the CDW. The effective mass ratio does not depend on x when x[le]0.4.

  2. Improving Limit Surface Search Algorithms in RAVEN Using Acceleration Schemes: Level II Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-07-01

    The RAVEN code is becoming a comprehensive tool to perform Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA); Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and Propagation; and Verification and Validation (V&V). The RAVEN code is being developed to support the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway by developing an advanced set of methodologies and algorithms for use in advanced risk analysis. The RISMC approach uses system simulator codes applied to stochastic analysis tools. The fundamental idea behind this coupling approach to perturb (by employing sampling strategies) timing and sequencing of events, internal parameters of the system codes (i.e., uncertain parameters of the physics model) and initial conditions to estimate values ranges and associated probabilities of figures of merit of interest for engineering and safety (e.g. core damage probability, etc.). This approach applied to complex systems such as nuclear power plants requires performing a series of computationally expensive simulation runs. The large computational burden is caused by the large set of (uncertain) parameters characterizing those systems. Consequently, exploring the uncertain/parametric domain, with a good level of confidence, is generally not affordable, considering the limited computational resources that are currently available. In addition, the recent tendency to develop newer tools, characterized by higher accuracy and larger computational resources (if compared with the presently used legacy codes, that have been developed decades ago), has made this issue even more compelling. In order to overcome to these limitations, the strategy for the exploration of the uncertain/parametric space needs to use at best the computational resources focusing the computational effort in those regions of the uncertain/parametric space that are “interesting” (e.g., risk-significant regions of the input space) with respect the targeted Figures Of Merit (FOM): for example, the failure of the system

  3. The level and nature of autistic intelligence II: what about Asperger syndrome?

    PubMed

    Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Mottron, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A distinctively uneven profile of intelligence is a feature of the autistic spectrum. Within the spectrum, Asperger individuals differ from autistics in their early speech development and in being less likely to be characterized by visuospatial peaks. While different specific strengths characterize different autistic spectrum subgroups, all such peaks of ability have been interpreted as deficits: isolated, aberrant, and irreconcilable with real human intelligence. This view has recently been challenged by findings of autistic strengths in performance on Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM), an important marker of general and fluid intelligence. We investigated whether these findings extend to Asperger syndrome, an autistic spectrum subgroup characterized by verbal peaks of ability, and whether the cognitive mechanisms underlying autistic and Asperger RPM performance differ. Thirty-two Asperger adults displayed a significant advantage on RPM over Wechsler Full-Scale and Performance scores relative to their typical controls, while in 25 Asperger children an RPM advantage was found over Wechsler Performance scores only. As previously found with autistics, Asperger children and adults achieved RPM scores at a level reflecting their Wechsler peaks of ability. Therefore, strengths in RPM performance span the autistic spectrum and imply a common mechanism advantageously applied to different facets of cognition. Autistic spectrum intelligence is atypical, but also genuine, general, and underestimated.

  4. Quantum Calculation of Inelastic CO Collisions with H. II. Pure Rotational Quenching of High Rotational Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Kyle M.; Song, L.; Yang, B. H.; Groenenboom, G. C.; van der Avoird, A.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.; Stancil, P. C.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon monoxide is a simple molecule present in many astrophysical environments, and collisional excitation rate coefficients due to the dominant collision partners are necessary to accurately predict spectral line intensities and extract astrophysical parameters. We report new quantum scattering calculations for rotational deexcitation transitions of CO induced by H using the three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) of Song et al. State-to-state cross sections for collision energies from 10-5 to 15,000 cm-1 and rate coefficients for temperatures ranging from 1 to 3000 K are obtained for CO (v = 0, j) deexcitation from j=1-45 to all lower j‧ levels, where j is the rotational quantum number. Close-coupling and coupled-states calculations were performed in full-dimension for j=1-5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 while scaling approaches were used to estimate rate coefficients for all other intermediate rotational states. The current rate coefficients are compared with previous scattering results using earlier PESs. Astrophysical applications of the current results are briefly discussed.

  5. I.I. Rabi Prize Talk: Artificial gauge fields in multi-level atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, Ian

    2015-05-01

    We used Raman lasers to induce artificial gauge fields or spin-orbit coupling in the three-level system formed by the f=1 electronic ground state manifold of rubidium-87. In this colloquium I will report on two effects of this laser-coupling. I will explore the itinerant magnetic phases present in a spin-1 spin-orbit coupled atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC); in this system, itinerant ferromagnetic order is stabilized by the spin-orbit coupling, vanishing in its absence. We first located a second-order phase transition that continuously stiffens until, at a tricritical point, it transforms into a first-order transition. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. We engineered a two-dimensional magnetic lattice in an elongated strip geometry, with effective per-plaquette flux about 4/3 times the flux quanta. We imaged the localized edge and bulk states of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in this strip, with single lattice-site resolution along the narrow direction. Further, we observed both the skipping orbits of excited atoms traveling down our system's edges, analogues to edge magnetoplasmons in 2-D electron systems. Our lattice's long direction consisted of the sites of an optical lattice and its narrow direction consisted of the internal atomic spin states: a synthetic dimension.

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 9 (BLOOVT01020009) on State Route 102, crossing the Nulhegan River, Bloomfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BLOOVT01020009 on State Route 102 crossing the Nulhegan River, Bloomfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 144-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except for the downstream right bank area which is shrub and brush land. The Nulhegan River flows into the Connecticut River 210 feet downstream of this bridge. In the study area, the Nulhegan River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 164 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 152 mm (0.498 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 6, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. This was due to numerous point bars and side bars indicating an unstable thalweg. The State Route 102 crossing of the Nulhegan River is a 134-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 130-foot steel-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The field measured clear span was 131.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with rip-rapped spill-through slopes. The

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (ROYATH00540026) on Town Highway 54, crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROYATH00540026 on Town Highway 54 crossing Broad Brook, Royalton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 11.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks. The right bank, upstream and downstream of the bridge, is forested. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 66.3 mm (0.218 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 13, 1995 and the Level II site visit on July 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 54 crossing of Broad Brook is a 29-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.3 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete face laid-up stone abutment with concrete wingwalls on the left and a laid-up stone

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (HARDELMSTR0042) on Elm Street, crossing Cooper Brook, Hardwick, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HARDELMSTR0042 on Elm Street crossing Cooper Brook, Hardwick, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are primarily grass covered with some brush along the immediate channel banks except the upstream right bank and overbank which is forested and the downstream left overbank which has a lumberyard. In the study area, Cooper Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are sand and gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 1.25 mm (0.00409 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Elm Street crossing of Cooper Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. On August 17, 1995 the site was revisited to investigate

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (HUNTTH00220032) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220032 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 5.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 127 mm (0.416 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 36-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 34-foot steel-beam span and a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 12, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 35.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (HUNTTH00220031) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220031 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 5.01-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of trees and brush. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.06 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from boulder to gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 107.0 mm (0.352 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 30-foot steel I-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 31.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The VTAOT computed opening-skewto-roadway is 2 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (FFIETH00470046) on Town Highway 47, crossing Black Creek, Fairfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FFIETH00470046 on Town Highway 47 crossing Black Creek, Fairfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gathered from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 37.8 mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Black Creek has a meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.0005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 51 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 0.189 mm (0.00062 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 12, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 47 crossing of Black Creek is a 35-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-ft steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 28.0 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-toroadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 6.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed just downstream of the

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (CRAFTH00550029) on Town Highway 55, crossing the Black River, Craftsbury, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CRAFTH00550029 on town highway 55 crossing the Black River, Craftsbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province of north-central Vermont in the town of Craftsbury. The 24.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have woody vegetation coverage except for the upstream left bank and the downstream right bank, which have more brush cover than trees. In the study area, the Black River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 5.5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is sand and gravel (D50 is 44.7 mm or 0.147 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 55 crossing of the Black Riveris a 32-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 28-foot span steel stringer superstructure with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (CAMBTH00460028) on Town Highway 46, crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00460028 on Town Highway 46 crossing the Seymour River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 9.94-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Seymour River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 81 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 62.0 mm (0.204 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of the Seymour River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 33-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.6 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 0.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (CAMBTH00750053) on Town Highway 75, crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CAMBTH00750053 on Town Highway 75 crossing the Brewster River, Cambridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 4.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest, except for the downstream right overbank area which has a barn surrounded by grass and shrubs. In the study area, the Brewster River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.05 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 84.4 mm (0.277 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 75 crossing of the Brewster River is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway as surveyed is 10 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 21 (MORETH00010021) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cox Brook, Moretown, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MORETH00010021 on Town Highway 1 crossing Cox Brook, Moretown, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 2.85-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly forested. In the study area, Cox Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 23 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.5 mm (0.156 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Cox Brook is a 29-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 40 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment downstream during the Level I assessment. The

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (DANVTH00010004) on Town Highway 1, crossing Joes Brook, Danville, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DANVTH00010004 on Town Highway 1 crossing Joes Brook, Danville, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 42.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture along the upstream and downstream left banks with trees and brush along the immediate banks. The upstream and downstream right banks are forested. In the study area, Joes Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 68 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 80.1 mm (0.263 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 22, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Joes Brook is a 49-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 45-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 45 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening and the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 44 (CHESVT00110044) on State Route 11, crossing Andover Brook, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT00110044 on State Route 11 crossing Andover Brook, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 12.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with dense woody vegetation on the immediate banks except the downstream left bank of the bridge which is forested. In the study area, Andover Brook has an incised, meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 74 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 83.6 mm (0.274 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 11, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of Andover Brook is a 58-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 56-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 52.9 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1.8 ft

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 48 (FFIETH00300048) on Town Highway 30, crossing Wanzer Brook, Fairfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FFIETH00300048 on Town Highway 30 crossing Wanzer Brook, Fairfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 6.78-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover upstream of the bridge and on the downstream right bank is primarily pasture. The downstream left bank is forested. In the study area, Wanzer Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 65 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 111 mm (0.364 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 11, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 30 crossing of Wanzer Brook is a 31-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 28-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical stone wall abutments with concrete caps and “kneewall” footings. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5 (DUMMVT00300005) on State Route 30, crossing Stickney Brook, Dummerston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DUMMVT00300005 on State Route 30 crossing Stickney Brook, Dummerston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 6.31-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest and brush. In the study area, Stickney Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 80 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material is predominantly cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 80.3 mm (0.264 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 12, 1996, indicated that the reach was aggrading. The State Route 30 crossing of Stickney Brook is a 84-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 82-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 79.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the toe of the right spill-through slope during

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BURKTH00070016) on Town Highway 7, crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00070016 on Town Highway 7 crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 6.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the left bank upstream which is brushland. In the study area, Dish Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 40 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 94.1 mm (0.309 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of Dish Mill Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left and right

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 6 (MORRTH00030006) on Town Highway 3, crossing Ryder Brook, Morristown, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MORRTH00030006 on Town Highway 3 crossing Ryder Brook, Morristown, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 19.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover also is forested. In the study area, Ryder Brook has a straight channel with an average channel top width of 450 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The predominant channel bed material is silt and clay with a median grain size (D50) of 0.0719 mm (0.000236 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 18, 1996, indicated that the reach was aggraded, but the channel through the bridge was scoured. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Ryder Brook is a 72-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 70-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, January 31, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments and wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. Channel scour under the bridge was evident at this site during the Level I assessment. The depth of the channel increases from 3 feet at the upstream bridge face to 10 feet at the downstream bridge face. The

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 20 (BRISTH00270020) on Town Highway 27, crossing Little Notch Brook, Bristol, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRISTH00270020 on Town Highway 27 crossing Little Notch Brook, Bristol, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 8.43-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of pasture with trees, shrubs, and brush along the road embankments and the stream banks, except for the downstream left overbank area. Surface cover on the downstream left overbank is forest with dense undergrowth consisting of vines, shrubs, and brush. In the study area, Little Notch Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 47 feet and an average bank height of 3 feet. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 66.0 mm (0.216 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 19, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 27 crossing of Little Notch Brook is a 48-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 45-foot steel pony-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 42.8 feet. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 1 (JAY-TH00040001) on Town Highway 4, crossing Crook Brook, Jay, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAY-TH00040001 on Town Highway 4 crossing Crook Brook, Jay, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 20.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is thick woody vegetation and/or forest except for the upstream right bank and overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Crook Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 48.7 mm (0.160 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 4 crossing of Crook Brook is a 49-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 45-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 42 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening. The opening-skew-to-roadway is also 5 degrees. Channel scour is present along the left abutment. The scoured area was 1.5 ft deeper

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 68 (NFIETH00960068) on Town Highway 96, crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NFIETH00960068 on Town Highway 96 crossing the Dog River, Northfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 30.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the left bank upstream and downstream is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The right bank upstream is forested and the downstream right bank is pasture. Vermont state route 12A runs parallel to the river on the right bank. In the study area, the Dog River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 70 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 47.9 mm (0.157 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 96 crossing of the Dog River is a 45-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 41.5 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (BRISTH00030031) on Town Highway 3, crossing the New Haven River, Bristol, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRISTH00030031 on Town Highway 3 crossing the New Haven River, Bristol, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central, western Vermont. The 69.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream left overbank which has closely spaced houses with lawns. In the study area, the New Haven River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 136 ft and an average bank height of 13 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 233 mm (0.765 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 20, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of the New Haven River is a 105-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 101-ft-long pony truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 98 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees to the opening, with no opening-skew-to-roadway. A local scour hole 3 ft deeper than the mean thalweg

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (PLYMTH00080037) on Town Highway 8, crossing Broad Brook, Plymouth, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Medalie, Laura

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PLYMTH00080037 on Town Highway 8 crossing Broad Brook, Plymouth, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gathered from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 5.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 46 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 87.5 mm (0.287 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 3, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to cut-banks present on the upstream left bank and the downstream left and right banks. The Town Highway 8 crossing of Broad Brook is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 28-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 27.0 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. During the Level I assessment, it was

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (SHEFTH00410018) on Town Highway 41, crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHEFTH00410018 on Town Highway 41 crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 16.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Millers Run has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 50.9 mm (0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable, which is evident in the moderate to severe fluvial erosion in the upstream reach. The Town Highway 41 crossing of the Millers Run is a 30-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 28-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening. The computed

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 15 (BOLTTH00150015) on Town Highway 15, crossing Joiner Brook, Bolton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BOLTTH00150015 on Town Highway 15 crossing Joiner Brook, Bolton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north central Vermont. The 9.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture (lawn) downstream of the bridge and on the upstream right bank. The surface cover on the upstream left bank is shrub and brushland. In the study area, Joiner Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 61 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 43.6 mm (0.143 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 15 crossing of Joiner Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 36-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 3, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 34.6 ft. The bridge is supported by nearly vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 1.5 ft deeper than the

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 17 (LYNDTH00020017) on Town Highway 2, crossing Hawkins Brook, Lyndon, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LYNDTH00020017 on Town Highway 2 crossing Hawkins Brook, Lyndon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 7.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the left and right upstream overbanks. The downstream left and right overbanks are brushland.In the study area, Hawkins Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 78 ft and an average bank height of 7.3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 46.6 mm (0.153 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 4, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with the presence of point bars and side bars.The Town Highway 2 crossing of Hawkins Brook is a 49-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 46-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 43 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is zero

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 36 (DUXBTH00040036) on Town Highway 4, crossing Crossett Brook, Duxbury, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DUXBTH00040036 on Town Highway 4 crossing the Crossett Brook, Duxbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north-central Vermont. The 4.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the upstream left overbank is pasture. The upstream and downstream right overbanks are forested. The downstream left overbank is brushland, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation.In the study area, the Crossett Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 55 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 51.6 mm (0.169 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 4 crossing of the Crossett Brook is a 29-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 44 (LINCTH00330044) on Town Highway 33, crossing the New Haven River, Lincoln, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LINCTH00330044 on Town Highway 33 crossing the New Haven River, Lincoln, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 6.3-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest.In the study area, the New Haven River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 101.9 mm (0.334 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 10, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 33 crossing of the New Haven River is a 33-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot timber-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 14, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.3 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, wood-beam crib abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees.A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment during the Level I assessment. The

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 67 (MTHOTH00120067) on Town Highway 12, crossing Freeman Brook, Mount Holly, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Severance, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MTHOTH00120067 on Town Highway 12 crossing Freeman Brook, Mount Holly, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 11.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forested. In the study area, Freeman Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 51 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 55.7 mm (0.183 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 12 crossing of Freeman Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 30-foot prestressed concrete-slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 15, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. Along the upstream right wingwall, the right abutment and the downstream right wingwall, a scour hole approximately 1.0 to 2.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 27 (WSTOTH00070027) on Town Highway 7, crossing Jenny Coolidge Brook, Weston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WSTOTH00070027 on Town Highway 7 crossing Jenny Coolidge Brook, Weston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 2.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture downstream of the bridge while upstream of the bridge is forested. In the study area, the Jenny Coolidge Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 51 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 122 mm (0.339 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 20, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Jenny Coolidge Brook is a 52-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 50-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 7, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 49.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. The legs of the skeleton-type right abutment were exposed approximately 2 feet

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (ANDOTH00010008) on Town Highway 1, crossing Andover Branch, Andover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOTH00010008 on Town Highway 1 crossing the Andover Branch, Andover , Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 5.30-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover along the immediate banks, both upstream and downstream of the bridge, is grass while farther upstream and downstream, the surface cover is primarily forest.In the study area, the Andover Branch has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 35 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 63.6 mm (0.209 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Andover Branch is a 54-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 51-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees.A scour hole 0.7 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (LINCTH00010013) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cota Brook, Lincoln, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LINCTH00010013 on Town Highway 1 crossing Cota Brook, Lincoln, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 3.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest along the upstream right bank and brushland along the upstream left bank. Downstream of the bridge, the surface cover is pasture along the left and right banks. In the study area, Cota Brook has an sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 34.7 mm (0.114 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 10, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to cut-banks and wide, vegetated point bars upstream and downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Cota Brook is a 38-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 36-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 14, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 34.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (ROCHTH00370028) on Town Highway 37, crossing Brandon Brook, Rochester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHTH00370028 on Town Highway 37 crossing Brandon Brook, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from VTAOT files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 8.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the upstream left overbank although the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The upstream right overbank and downstream left and right overbanks are forested. In the study area, the Brandon Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 44 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 84.2 mm (0.276 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 12, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 8, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 37 crossing of the Brandon Brook is a 33-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 31-foot timber-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, timber log cribbing abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is zero

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (WWINTH00370034) on Town Highway 37, crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WWINTH00370034 on Town Highway 37 crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture except for the upstream left bank where there is mostly shrubs and brush. In the study area, Mill Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ ft, an average channel top width of 52 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 43.4 mm (0.142 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. Point bars were observed upstream and downstream of this site. Furthermore, slip failure of the bank material was noted downstream at a cut-bank on the left side of the channel across from a point bar. The Town Highway 37 crossing of Mill Brook is a 37-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of one 32-foot wood thru-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 29.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutment walls with

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (LINCTH00060046) on Town Highway 6, crossing the New Haven River, Lincoln, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure LINCTH00060046 on Town Highway 6 crossing the New Haven River, Lincoln, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 45.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly suburban and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. The downstream right overbank near the bridge is suburban with buildings, homes, lawns, and pavement (less than fifty percent). The downstream left overbank is brushland while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the New Haven River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 95 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 120.7 mm (0.396 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 13, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 34 crossing of the New Haven River is a 85-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of an 80-foot steel arch truss (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 14, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 69 feet. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 36 (STOWTH00430036) on Town Highway 43, crossing Miller Brook, Stowe, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure STOWTH00430036 on Town Highway 43 crossing the Miller Brook, Stowe, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north central Vermont. The 5.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly forested. In the study area, the Miller Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 70.4 mm (0.231 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 15, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 43 crossing of the Miller Brook is a 24-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 21-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 21.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening and the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is also 10 degrees. The footing on the left abutment was exposed 2.5 ft and the footing on the right abutment was exposed 3.0 ft during

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 8 (NEWFTH00010008) on Town Highway 1, crossing Wardsboro Brook, Newfane, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Degnan, James

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWFTH00010008 on Town Highway 1 crossing Wardsboro Brook, Newfane, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (Federal Highway Administration, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southestern Vermont. The 6.91-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream right overbank and downstream left and right overbanks. The surface cover on the upstream left overbank is pasture. In the study area, Wardsboro Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 63 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 95.4 mm (0.313 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 21, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Wardsboro Brook is a 32-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the computed opening while the openingskew-to-roadway is 45 degrees

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (JERITH0020038) on Town Highway 20, crossing the Lee River, Jericho, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JERITH00200038 on Town Highway 20 crossing the Lee River, Jericho, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province and the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 12.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover on the upstream and downstream right overbank is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The surface cover on the upstream and downstream left overbank is forested. In the study area, the Lee River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 89 ft and an average bank height of 14 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 45.9 mm (0.151 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 2, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 20 crossing of the Lee River is a 49-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a steel through truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 12, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 44 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 32 (TUNBTH00600032) on Town Highway 60, crossing First Branch White River, Tunbridge, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TUNBTH00600032 on Town Highway 60 crossing the First Branch White River, Tunbridge, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 92.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream and downstream of the bridge, while woody vegetation sparsely covers the immediate banks. In the study area, the First Branch White River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.001 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 82 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 24.4 mm (0.08 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 18, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable, as a result of block failure of moderately eroded banks. The Town Highway 60 crossing of the First Branch White River is a 74-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 71-foot timber thru-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 24, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 64 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutments with upstream wingwalls. The channel is not skewed to the opening

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 40 (ROCKTH00140040) on Town Highway 14, crossing the Williams River, Rockingham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCKTH00140040 on Town Highway 14 crossing the Williams River, Rockingham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 99.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture downstream of the bridge. Upstream of the bridge, the left bank is forested and the right bank is suburban. In the study area, the Williams River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 154 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from silt and clay to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 45.4 mm (0.149 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 4, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 14 crossing of the Williams River is a 106-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of two steel-beam spans with a maximum span length of 73 ft (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 94.5 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete abutment with wingwalls on the left, a vertical, laid-up stone abutment on the right and a concrete pier. The channel is skewed

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (NEWFTH00350042) on Town Highway 35, crossing Stratton Hill Brook, Newfane, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWFTH00350042 on Town Highway 35 crossing Stratton Hill Brook, Newfane, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 1.16-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forested. In the study area, Stratton Hill Brook has an incised, striaght channel with a slope of approximately 0.1 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 36 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 121 mm (0.396 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 20, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 34 crossing of Stratton Hill Brook is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 32-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with upstream wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. During the Level I assessment, it was observed that the right abutment footing was exposed 1.5 feet. The only scour protection measure at the

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (ROCHTH00400025) on Town Highway 40, crossing Corporation Brook, Rochester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHTH00400025 on Town Highway 40 crossing Corporation Brook, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, from Vermont Agency of Transportation files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.97-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream left and right overbanks, and the downstream left overbank. On the downstream right overbank, the surface cover is predominately brushland. In the study area, Corporation Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 37 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 101 mm (0.332 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 12, 1995 and Level I and II site visit on July 8, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Corporation Brook is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 26-foot steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 1

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 31 (JERITH00350031) on Town Highway 35, crossing Mill Brook, Jericho, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JERITH00350031 on Town Highway 35 crossing Mill Brook, Jericho, Vermont (figures 1– 8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gathered from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province and the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 15.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. The downstream left overbank is pasture. The downstream right overbank is brushland. In the study area, the Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 117 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 81.1 mm (0.266 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 3, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The Town Highway 35 crossing of the Mill Brook is a 53-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 50-foot steel-beam span with a wooden deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 48 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, concrete abutment with wingwalls on the left. On the right, the abutment and wingwalls

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 51 (JERITH00590051) on Town Highway 59, crossing The Creek, Jericho, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JERITH00590051 on Town Highway 59 crossing The Creek, Jericho, Vermont (figures 1– 8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (Federal Highway Administration, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province and the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 10.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the left and right overbanks, upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, The Creek has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from silt to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 58.6 mm (0.192 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 3, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 59 crossing of The Creek is a 33-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 28-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 11, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 26 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the computed opening

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (DUXBTH00120037) on Town Highway 12, crossing Ridley Brook, Duxbury, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Ivanhoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DUXBTH00120037 on Town Highway 12 crossing Ridley Brook, Duxbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in north central Vermont. The 10.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Ridley Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 67 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 123 mm (0.404 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 1, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 12 crossing of Ridley Brook is a 33-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of five 30-ft steel rolled beams (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, October 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. A scour hole 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment and downstream

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7H (HUNTTH0001007H) on Town Highway 1, crossing Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH001007H on Town Highway 1 crossing the Cobb Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–10). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.In August 1976, Hurricane Belle caused flooding at this site which resulted in road and bridge damage (figures 7-8). This was approximately a 25-year flood event (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1978). The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge. Downstream of the bridge is brushland and pasture.In the study area, the Cobb Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 65.5 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 24, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Cobb Brook is a 23-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 20-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, June 21, 1996). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (ROCHTH00210034) on Town Highway 21, crossing the White River, Rochester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Degnan, James

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHTH00210034 on Town Highway 21 crossing the White River, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 74.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is suburban on the upstream and downstream left overbanks, though brush prevails along the immediate banks. On the upstream and downstream right overbanks, the surface cover is pasture with brush and trees along the immediate banks.In the study area, the White River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.002 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 102 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 74.4 mm (0.244 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 23, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 21 crossing of the White River is a 72-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of 70-foot steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 22, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 67.0 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (BRADTH00270022) on Town Highway 27, crossing the Waits River, Bradford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRADTH00270022 on Town Highway 27 crossing the Waits River, Bradford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, obtained from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 153-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. However, in the vicinity of the study site, the upstream and downstream left banks are suburban and the upstream and downstream right banks are shrub and brushland. In the study area, the Waits River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.0002 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 125 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from silt and clay to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 0.393 mm (0.00129 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 27 crossing of the Waits River is a 109-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 104-ft steel-truss span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 16, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 99.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. No evidence of scour was observed during the Level I assessment

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 5C (CORITH0003005C) on Town Highway 3, crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Severance, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CORITH0003005C on Town Highway 3 crossing Cooksville Brook, Corinth, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 20.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with a residence on the upstream right bank near the bridge. The immediate channel banks have some woody vegetation cover. In the study area, Cooksville Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 46 ft and an average channel depth of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranged from sand to cobble and had a median grain size (D50) of 41.0 mm (0.135 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 5, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Cooksville Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 37-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 17, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls on the left abutment. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (SHEFTH00410018) on Town Highway 41, crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHEFTH00410018 on Town Highway 41 crossing Millers Run, Sheffield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 16.2-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Millers Run has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 50.9 mm (0.167 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 1, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable, which is evident in the moderate to severe fluvial erosion in the upstream reach. The Town Highway 41 crossing of the Millers Run is a 30-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 28-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.2 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening. The computed

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (MAIDTH00070004) on Town Highway 7, crossing Cutler Mill Brook, Maidstone, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MAIDTH00070004 on Town Highway 7 crossing the Cutler Mill Brook, Maidstone, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 18.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly shrub and brushland. In the study area, the Cutler Mill Brook has a non-incised, meandering channel with local braiding and a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 27.6 mm (0.091 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 19, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to large meanders in the channel. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Cutler Mill Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 22-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 5, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 21.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. A scour hole 2.0 ft deeper than

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (CRAFTH00550029) on Town Highway 55, crossing the Black River, Craftsbury, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CRAFTH00550029 on town highway 55 crossing the Black River, Craftsbury, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province of north-central Vermont in the town of Craftsbury. The 24.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have woody vegetation coverage except for the upstream left bank and the downstream right bank, which have more brush cover than trees. In the study area, the Black River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 41 ft and an average channel depth of 5.5 ft. The predominant channel bed material is sand and gravel (D50 is 44.7 mm or 0.147 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 55 crossing of the Black Riveris a 32-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 28-foot span steel stringer superstructure with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. A scour hole 2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (FFIETH00470046) on Town Highway 47, crossing Black Creek, Fairfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure FFIETH00470046 on Town Highway 47 crossing Black Creek, Fairfield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gathered from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 37.8 mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream and downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Black Creek has a meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.0005 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 51 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 0.189 mm (0.00062 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 12, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 47 crossing of Black Creek is a 35-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-ft steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 28.0 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, laid-up stone abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-toroadway is zero degrees. A scour hole 6.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed just downstream of the

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 26 (WSTOTH00070026) on Town Highway 7, crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Hammond, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WSTOTH00070026 on Town Highway 7 crossing Greendale Brook, Weston, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south central Vermont. The 3.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, the Greendale Brook has a sinuous, non-incised, non-alluvial channel with a slope of approximately 0.015 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 38 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 64.8 mm (0.213 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 19, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. The channel has moved to the right, however, scour countermeasures are in place along the upstream right bank. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Greendale Brook is a 52-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot steel-beam span with a concrete deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, April 07, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 48.6 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 50 degrees to the opening while the opening

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 18 (GROTTH00480018) on Town Highway 48, crossing the Wells River Groton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GROTTH00480018 on Town Highway 48 crossing the Wells River, Groton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in eastern Vermont. The 53.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the right bank upstream and the left bank downstream while the surface cover is shrub and brushland along the left bank upstream and the right bank downstream. The immediate banks are vegetated with brush and scattered trees. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 66.7 mm (0.219 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 48 crossing of the Wells River is a 38-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 36-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 33.7 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 41 (ROCKTH00390041) on Town Highway 39, crossing the Saxtons River, Rockingham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCKTH00390041 on Town Highway 39 crossing the Saxtons River, Rockingham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 57.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of forest on the left bank and pasture with some trees on the right bank. In the study area, the Saxtons River has an sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.009 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 112 ft and an average bank height of 10 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 103 mm (0.339 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 15, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable. There are wide point bars, cut-banks with fallen trees, and areas of localized channel scour along the left bank, where there is bedrock exposure at the surface. The Town Highway 39 crossing of the Saxtons River is an 85-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 82-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 31, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments without wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (WALLVT01030049) on State Highway 103, crossing Freeman Brook, Wallingford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Severance, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALLVT01030049 on State Highway 103 crossing Freeman Brook, Wallingford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 11.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with trees and brush on the immediate banks except for the upstream left overbank which is tree covered. A levee composed of stone fill was constructed along the upstream left bank in order to keep flow from reaching the flood plain left (south) of the brook. In the study area, Freeman Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 62.9 mm (0.206 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 10, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Highway 103 crossing of the Freeman Brook is a 54-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 50-foot concrete T-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 15, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 25 degrees to

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 2 (RYEGTH00020002) on Town Highway 2, crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RYEGTH00020002 on Town Highway 2 crossing the Wells River, Ryegate, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 75.7-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of cut grass, trees, and brush on the flood plains while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Wells River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.006 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 110 ft and an average bank height of 12 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 82.3 mm (0.270 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 24, 1995, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable with moderate fluvial erosion and meandering downstream of the bridge. The Town Highway 2 crossing of the Wells River is a 79-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 75.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments, the left has a spill-through embankment, with wingwalls. The channel is not skewed

  3. 77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Surface Transportation Board Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- J. Emil... exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc. (Anderson) and to operate 1.006... it. See Mannheim Armitage Ry.--Acquis. & Operation Exemption--Certain Trackage Rights of J....

  4. Frontal Plane Motion of the Pelvis and Hip during Gait Stance Discriminates Children with Diplegia Levels I and II of the GMFCS.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Franco, Rosa de Lourdes Lima Dias; Furtado, Sheyla Cavalcanti; Barela, Ana Maria Forti; Deluzio, Kevin John; Mancini, Marisa Cotta

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine if gait waveform could discriminate children with diplegic cerebral palsy of the GMFCS levels I and II. Patients. Twenty-two children with diplegia, 11 classified as level I and 11 as level II of the GMFCS, aged 7 to 12 years. Methods. Gait kinematics included angular displacement of the pelvis and lower limb joints during the stance phase. Principal components (PCs) analyses followed by discriminant analysis were conducted. Results. PC1s of the pelvis and hip in the frontal plane differ significantly between groups and captured 80.5% and 86.1% of the variance, respectively. PC1s captured the magnitude of the pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angle during the stance phase. Children GMFCS level II walked with reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction angles, and these variables could discriminate the groups with a cross-validation of 95.5%. Conclusion. Reduced pelvic obliquity and hip adduction were observed between children GMFCS level II compared to level I. These results could help the classification process of mild-to-moderate children with diplegia. In addition, it highlights the importance of rehabilitation programs designed to improve pelvic and hip mobility in the frontal plane of diplegic cerebral palsy children level II of the GMFCS.

  5. Modulating the level of the Rpb7 subunit of RNA polymerase II affects cell separation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Sharma, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    The rpb7(+) gene encodes the seventh largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and is essential for survival of yeast cells. To gain insight into its functions, we expressed rpb7(+) under the control of the nmt1 promoter and investigated its role in regulating multiple phenotypes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We observed that low rpb7(+) levels resulted in slow growth of cells under optimum growth conditions. However, no growth defect was observed under different stress conditions tested in this study. Our results also showed that the most prominent phenotype of cells expressing reduced rpb7(+) is a defect in cell separation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis further revealed that the transcription of specific cell septation genes was significantly reduced in these cells. Collectively, results presented in this study highlight the distinct role of Rpb7p in regulating cell separation in S. pombe.

  6. ["Analysis of fate" in psychiatry and psychotherapy. II. Correlations withe the level of general psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Grünner, O

    1976-07-01

    We demonstrated in a group of 166 psychiatric patients, with disorders of schizophrenic and cyclothymic circle and with neuroses too, significant relations between the results of the projection test of Szondi and between the greatness of total psychopathology, evaluated by means of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inquiry (M.M.P.I.). We could ascertain, that the patients with the higher level of total psychopathology (evaluated by means of M.M.P.I.) have also a greater number of abnormal results according to the projection test of Szondi. At these patients we saw significantly more "valve groups", which witness to the irresolution in the instinctive motivations of behaviour. At these patients we could ascertain further the greater number of those personalities, which according to the projection test of Szondi suffered from a lack of breaking and self-critical elements in their behaviour. Subjects with heightened values of M.M.P.I. have significantly more results with abnormal relations of masculinity and of feminity according to the sexual index of Szondi test. The choices and the selection from the set of 48 fixed photographies, which the patient realises at the Szondi test in teen repeated sessions, form so a significant relation not only to the psychiatric diagnoses, as was ascertained in the first part of this work, but also to the height of total psychopathology, evaluated by means of the M.M.P.I. The familial subconsciousness influences so significantly the consciousness of personality and can participate substantially in the development of psychopathologic symptoms. PMID:1015733

  7. Significance of post-traumatic maxillary sinus fluid, or lack of fluid, in a level II trauma population.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Andrew; Burns, Judah; Scheinfeld, Meir H

    2015-12-01

    Our goal was to test the predictive value of high-attenuation material within the maxillary sinus for adjacent facial bone fracture. After IRB approval, all blunt trauma facial CTs performed over a 5-month period at a level II trauma center were reviewed in consensus by three radiologists for the presence of facial fractures or high attenuation maxillary sinus opacity (≥30HU, ≥40HU, or ≥50HU). Three classes of fractures were analyzed: any fracture, any fracture contiguous with the maxillary sinus, and only fractures not contiguous with the maxillary sinus. Statistics were calculated using two-by-two tables. A total of 844 cases were reviewed with 273 patients having any fracture. There were 402 hemi-faces with any fracture and 62 hemi-faces with fracture contiguous with the maxillary sinus. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for any fracture (using the ≥40HU threshold) were 13, 99, 85, and 78 % respectively; for fracture contiguous with the sinus, these were 71, 99, 72, and 99 % respectively; and for only non-contiguous fractures, these were 2.3, 96, 13, and 80 %, respectively. We conclude that in this level II trauma population, lack of high attenuation maxillary sinus material nearly ruled out fractures in contiguity with the sinus. High-attenuation sinus material is only moderately predictive of a fracture contiguous with the maxillary sinus. Therefore, if after careful review a fracture is not identified, the radiologist should not be overly concerned that a fracture is being missed. High-attenuation sinus material is a poor marker for fractures not contiguous with the maxillary sinus. PMID:26335132

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 23 (GLOVTH00410023) on Town Highway 41, crossing Sherburne Brook, Glover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GLOVTH00410023 on Town Highway 41 crossing Sherburne Brook, Glover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.57-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily forest with small areas of lawn and a home on the right overbank and a gravel roadway along the upstream left bank. In the study area, Sherburne Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 33 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 57.3 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 24, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 41 crossing of Sherburne Brook is a 24-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 21-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 20.3 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, granite block abutments. The channel is skewed approximately 55 degrees to the opening while the measured opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. One foot

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (BRIDTH00040042) on Town Highway 04, crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00040042 on town highway 4 crossing Dailey Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 2.20-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the overbanks are covered by shrubs and trees except for the upstream right overbank where there is a house. Dailey Hollow Brook enters Dailey Hollow Branch at the downstream face of the bridge. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.035 ft/ft. The channel top width and channel depth upstream of the bridge is 19 ft and 3 ft, respectively. Downstream of the bridge and the confluence the channel top width and channel depth is 39 ft and 2 ft respectively. The predominant channel bed material is cobble and gravel (D50 is 64.7 mm or 0.212 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 4 crossing of Dailey Hollow Brook is a 25-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches) exists along all four wingwalls, the downstream right road approach

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 15 (BRIDTH00220015) on Town Highway 22, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00220015 on town highway 22 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 1.73-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left and right banks have dense tree cover. The upstream right bank of Dailey Hollow Branch is adjacent to town highway 22. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.035 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 30 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 108 mm (0.354 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1 and 2, 1994, indicates that the reach is stable. The town highway 22 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 22-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 22-ft. steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 24, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) protects the left abutment, but it’s condition was reported as eroded. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protects the upstream left wingwall

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (BRIDTH00330030) on Town Highway 33, crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00330030 on town highway 33 crossing Dailey Hollow Branch, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 7.51-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Dailey Hollow Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 60.7 mm (0.199 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 1, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 33 crossing of Dailey Hollow Branch is a 31-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Type-2 stone-fill (less than 36 inches diameter) protection was found at all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (HUNTTH00210034) on Town Highway 21, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00210034 on Town Highway 21 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 6.23-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 43 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 21 crossing of Brush Brook is a 28-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 26-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 25.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with a wingwall on the upstream right. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. A tributary enters Brush Brook on the right bank immediately downstream of the bridge. At the confluence, the

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (HUNTTH00220033) on Town Highway 22, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HUNTTH00220033 on Town Highway 22 crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 8.65-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right overbank which is pasture. In the study area, Brush Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 42 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 76.7 mm (0.252 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 26, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 22 crossing of Brush Brook is a 40-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23.5-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 36.9 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (PFRDTH00030013) on Town Highway 3, crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PFRDTH00030013 on Town Highway 3 crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in western Vermont. The 17.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass along the downstream right bank while the remaining banks are primarily forested. In the study area, Furnace Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 49 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 70.2 mm (0.230 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 20, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Furnace Brook is a 75-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 72-ft-long steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 14, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through slopes. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. The opening-skew-to-roadway was determined from surveyed data collected at the bridge although, information provided from the

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (MANCUS00070024) on U.S. Route 7, crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCUS00070024 on U.S. Route 7 crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 8.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the primary surface cover consists of brush and trees. In the study area, Lye Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 66 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 6, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. Although, the immediate reach is considered stable, upstream of the bridge the Lye Brook valley is very steep (0.05 ft/ft). Extreme events in a valley this steep may quickly reveal the instability of the channel. In the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Manchester (Federal Emergency Management Agency, January, 1985), Lye Brook’s overbanks were described as “boulder strewn” after the August 1976 flood. The U.S. Route 7 crossing of Lye Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 17 (NEWHTH00200017) on Town Highway 20, crossing Little Otter Creek, New Haven, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure NEWHTH00200017 on Town Highway 20 crossing Little Otter Creek, New Haven, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the Champlain section of the St. Lawrence Valley physiographic province in west-central Vermont. The 10.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and wetland basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is shrubland on the downstream right overbank. The surface cover of the downstream left overbank, the upstream right overbank and the upstream left overbank is wetland and pasture. In the study area, Little Otter Creek has a meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.0007 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 97 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from silt and clay to cobble. Medium sized silt and clay is the channel material upstream of the approach cross-section and downstream of the exit cross-section. The median grain size (D50) of the silt and clay channel bed material is 1.52 mm (0.005 ft), which was used for contraction and abutment scour computations. From the approach cross-section, under the bridge, and to the exit cross-section, stone fill is the channel bed material. The median grain size (D50) of the stone fill channel bed material is 95.7 mm (0.314 ft). The stone fill median grain size was used solely for armoring computations. The geomorphic assessment at the

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 20 (GRAFTH00010020) on Town Highway 1, crossing the Saxtons River, Grafton Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure GRAFTH00010020 on Town Highway 1 crossing the Saxtons River, Grafton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 33.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream of the bridge and shrub and brush downstream. In the study area, the Saxtons River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 97 ft and an average bank height of 2 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 58.6 mm (0.192 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 21, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to distinctive cut bank development on the upstream right bank and point bar development on the upstream left bank and downstream right bank. The Town Highway 1 crossing of the Saxtons River is a 191-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three steel-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through embankments and two piers. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening. The opening-skew-to-roadway is 45

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 40 (ANDOVT00110040) on State Route 11, crossing Lyman Brook, Andover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOVT00110040 on State Route 11 crossing Lyman Brook, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 4.18-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, Lyman Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 42 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 86.0 mm (0.282 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 9, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 11 crossing of Lyman Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot concrete tee-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 0 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (CONCTH00580033) on Town Highway 58, crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CONCTH00580033 on Town Highway 58 crossing Miles Stream, Concord, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 17.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Downstream of the bridge, the right bank is forested and the left bank has shrubs and brush. In the study area, Miles Stream has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 91 ft and an average bank height of 7 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 61.6 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 15, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 58 crossing of Miles Stream is a 44-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 39-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 37.4 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with stone fill in front creating spillthrough embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (BRNETH00070045) on Town Highway 7, crossing the Stevens River, Barnet, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRNETH00070045 on Town Highway 7 crossing the Stevens River, Barnet, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 41.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest upstream and pasture downstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. In the study area, the Stevens River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 100 ft and an average bank height of 17 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 105 mm (0.344 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 22, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of the Stevens River is a 37-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 34-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 16, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 33 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees. The only scour protection measure at

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (ANDOTH00230025) on Town Highway 23, crossing Andover Branch, Andover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOTH00230025 on Town Highway 23 crossing the Andover Branch, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in south-central Vermont. The 6.74-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture on the right overbank and forest on the left overbank while the immediate banks, both upstream and downstream, are forested. In the study area, the Andover Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 55 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 78.4 mm (0.257 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 27, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 23 crossing of the Andover Branch is a 25-ft-long, two-lane structure consisting of a multi-plate corrugated steel arch culvert with concrete footings (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The culvert is mitered at the inlet and outlet. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. The footings are exposed approximately 1.25 ft, with the

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (HARDTH00310029) on Town Highway 31, crossing the Lamoille River, Hardwick, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure HARDTH00310029 on town highway 31 crossing the Lamoille River, Hardwick, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province of north-central Vermont. The 64.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture except for the immediate downstream channel banks and the downstream left overbank which are brush covered. In the study area, the Lamoille River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.001 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 84 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are cobble and gravel with a median grain size (D50) of 36.1 mm (0.119 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 26, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 31 crossing of the Lamoille River is a 65-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 61-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 27, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, stone abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment has a concrete facing and a concrete subfooter. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (JAMATH00010025) on Town Highway 1, crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure JAMATH00010025 on Town Highway 1 crossing Ball Mountain Brook, Jamaica, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 29.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the downstream right bank which is pasture with some trees along the channel. In the study area, Ball Mountain Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.021 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 86 ft and an average bank height of 9 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 222 mm (0.727 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 13, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Ball Mountain Brook is a 78-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 75-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 29, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 73 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (BENNCYDEPO0043) on Depot Street, crossing the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BENNCYDEPO0043 on the Depot Street crossing of the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 30.1-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural and forested basin. The bridge site is located within an urban setting in the Town of Bennington with buildings and parking lots on overbanks. In the study area, the Walloomsac River has a straight channel with constructed channel banks through much of the reach. The channel is located on a delta and has a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 48 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 108 mm (0.356 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Depot Street crossing of the Walloomsac River is a 46-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 40-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 13, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. Scour countermeasures at the site include type-2 stone fill (less than 36

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (CHESVT01030016) on State Route 103, crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHESVT01030016 on State Route 103 crossing the Williams River, Chester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in southeastern Vermont. The 15.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture except for the downstream right overbank which is forested. In the study area, the Williams River has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.008 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 56 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 67.5 mm (0.222 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on September 16, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The State Route 103 crossing of the Williams River is a 162-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of three steel-beam spans (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 13, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 157.7 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments and piers with no wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 55 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 55 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (CHELTH00460043) on Town Highway 46, crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure CHELTH00460043 on Town Highway 46 crossing Jail Brook, Chelsea, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 4.68-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is best described as suburban with homes, lawns, and a few trees. In the study area, Jail Brook has an incised, straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 32 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from coarse sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 43.0 mm (0.141 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 18, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 46 crossing of Jail Brook is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 23-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 22.8 ft.The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately zero degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also zero degrees. Channel scour was not observed. However, the left abutment footing was exposed one foot. Scour

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (SUNDFLR0030012) on Forest Land Road 3, crossing Roaring Branch Brook, Sunderland, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SUNDFLR0030012 on Forest Land Road (FLR) 3 (FAS 114) crossing Roaring Branch Brook, Sunderland, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 4.93-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is dense forest along the left bank and primarily shrubs and trees along the right bank, both upstream and downstream of the bridge. In the study area, Roaring Branch Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 33 ft and an average bank height of 4 ft. The channel bed material ranges from cobble to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 139 mm (0.457 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 30, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. Forest Land Road 3 (FAS 114) crossing of Roaring Branch Brook is a 37-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 35-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, December 14, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7 (ANDOTH00010007) on Town Highway 1, crossing Andover Brook, Andover, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ANDOTH00010007 on Town Highway 1 crossing Andover Branch, Andover, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in southern Vermont. The 7.21-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Downstream of the bridge, the banks and overbanks are forested. In the study area, Andover Branch has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 58.0 mm (0.19 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to evidence of lateral movement of the channel 200 feet upstream along the left bank and near the bridge along the right bank. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Andover Branch is a 32-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 29-foot concrete slab span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (PFRDTH00030013) on Town Highway 3, crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Robert H.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure PFRDTH00030013 on Town Highway 3 crossing Furnace Brook, Pittsford, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in western Vermont. The 17.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass along the downstream right bank while the remaining banks are primarily forested. In the study area, Furnace Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 49 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material ranges from gravel to bedrock with a median grain size (D50) of 70.2 mm (0.230 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 20, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 3 crossing of Furnace Brook is a 75-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 72-ft-long steel stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 14, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with spill-through slopes. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. The opening-skew-to-roadway was determined from surveyed data collected at the bridge although, information provided from the

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 24 (MANCUS00070024) on U.S. Route 7, crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MANCUS00070024 on U.S. Route 7 crossing Lye Brook, Manchester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 8.13-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the primary surface cover consists of brush and trees. In the study area, Lye Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 66 ft and an average bank height of 11 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 90.0 mm (0.295 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 6, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. Although, the immediate reach is considered stable, upstream of the bridge the Lye Brook valley is very steep (0.05 ft/ft). Extreme events in a valley this steep may quickly reveal the instability of the channel. In the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Manchester (Federal Emergency Management Agency, January, 1985), Lye Brook’s overbanks were described as “boulder strewn” after the August 1976 flood. The U.S. Route 7 crossing of Lye Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 13 (SHARTH00040013) on Town Highway 4, crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHARTH00040013 on Town Highway 4 crossing Broad Brook, Sharon, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 16.6-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is brushland on the downstream left overbank and row crops on the right overbank, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Upstream of the bridge, the overbanks are forested.In the study area, Broad Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 69 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 112 mm (0.369 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visit on April 11, 1995 and Level II site visit on July 23, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable.The Town Highway 4 crossing of Broad Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete tee beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (DORSTH00100029) on Town Highway 10, crossing the Mettawee River, Dorset, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure DORSTH00100029 on Town Highway 10 crossing the Mettawee River, Dorset, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Taconic section of the New England physiographic province in southwestern Vermont. The 9.5-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest on the upstream left overbank and the upstream and downstream right overbanks. The downstream left overbank is pasture and brushland. In the study area, the Mettawee River has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 66 ft and an average bank height of 8 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to boulders with a median grain size (D50) of 79.0 mm (0.259 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 10 crossing of the Mettawee River is a 26-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of a 24-ft steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, September 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.1 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. At the

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 144 (ROCHVT01000144) on State Route 100, crossing the White River, Rochester, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure ROCHVT01000144 on State Route 100 crossing the White River, Rochester, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 68.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture with forest on the valley walls. In the study area, the White River has a meandering channel with a slope of approximately 0.003 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 119 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel and cobbles with a median grain size (D50) of 72.5 mm (0.238 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 22, 1996, indicated that the reach was laterally unstable due to a cut-bank present on the upstream left bank and wide point bars upstream and downstream in the vicinity of this site. The State Route 100 crossing of the White Riveris a 103-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 101-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 8, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutment walls with spill-through embankments in front of each abutment wall and no wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-toroadway is

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 33 (WWINTH00300033) on Town Highway 30, crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Flynn, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WWINTH00300033 on Town Highway 30 crossing Mill Brook, West Windsor, Vermont (Figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east-central Vermont. The 24.9-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture upstream of the bridge while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. Downstream of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.004 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 65.7 mm (0.215 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 5, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 30 crossing of the Mill Brook is a 46-ft-long, one-lane covered bridge consisting of a 40-foot wood-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 23, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 36.3 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete capped laid-up stone abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is zero degrees. The only scour protection measure at

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 21 (MONKTH00340021) on Town Highway 34, crossing Little Otter Creek, Monkton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure MONKTH00340021 on Town Highway 34 crossing Little Otter Creek, Monkton, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix D of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix C. The site is in the Champlain section of the Saint Lawrence Valley physiographic province in northwestern Vermont. The 34.1-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin with pasture in the valleys. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover consists of pasture. The most significant tree cover is immediately adjacent to the channel on the right bank downstream. In the study area, Little Otter Creek has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.008 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 92 feet and an average bank height of 6 feet. The predominant channel bed materials are silt and clay. Sieve analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the sample is silt and clay and thus a median grain size by use of sieve analysis was indeterminate. Therefore, the median grain size was assumed to be medium silt with a size (D50) of 0.0310 mm (0.000102 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 19 and June 20, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 34 crossing of Little Otter Creek is a 50-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 26-foot concrete span and three “boiler tube” smooth metal pipe culverts through the left road approach (Vermont Agency of

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 51 (BRIDTH00460051) on Town Highway 46, crossing Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00460051 on town highway 46 crossing the Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 103-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the immediate left and right banks are covered by trees and brush with residences beyond. In the study area, the Ottauquechee River has a straight channel with a slope of approximately 0.008 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 150 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 81.8 mm (0.268 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 24, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 46 crossing of the Ottauquechee Riveris a 135-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of two 66-ft steel-beam spans, supported by vertical, concrete abutments with upstream wingwalls and one concrete pier (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 24, 1994). Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) has been placed along the left abutment and both upstream wingwalls. The upstream side of both road embankments are also protected by type-2 stone fill. Abutments of a previous bridge still exist at the downstream side of the present structure’s abutments. The channel is

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 29 (BRIDTH00360029) on Town Highway 36, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00360029 on town highway 36 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 27.1-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left and right banks are covered by pasture and (or) fields with the immediate stream banks covered by woody vegetation. The left bank of North Branch Ottauquechee River is adjacent to Bridgewater town highway 001. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.008 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 73 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 61.0 mm (0.200 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 26, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 36 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 46-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 43-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 (less than 36 inches) stone fill protects the upstream and downstream wingwalls. Sparse type-2 stone fill was also observed along the right abutment. The channel

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (BRIDTH00050037) on Town Highway 5, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BRIDTH00050037 on town highway 5 crossing the North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic province of central Vermont in the town of Bridgewater. The 10.5-mi2 drainage area is a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the left and right banks are forested. Town highway 5 runs parallel to the upstream left and downstream right banks. In the study area, the North Branch Ottauquechee River has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.013 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 50 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 79.3 mm or 0.260 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 2, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 5 crossing of the North Branch Ottauquechee Riveris a 38-ft-long, onelane bridge consisting of one 35-foot steel beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, stone abutments with wingwalls. The right abutment has settled due to scour. Type-3 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) provides protection to the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall and the base of the downstream right wingwall. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 20 degrees

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 54 (RANDTH00BR0054) on Brook Street, crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure RANDTH00BR0054 on Brook Street crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). A Level I study is included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I study provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge available from VTAOT files was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and can be found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain physiographic division of central Vermont in the town of Randolph. The 5.39-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the immediate banks are forested. In the study area, Thayer Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 60 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 42.4 mm or 0.139 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visits on August 3, 1994 and December 5, 1994, indicated that the reach was vertically and laterally unstable. This assessment was due to the extreme channel misalignment with the bridge opening and the presence of a drop structure downstream of the bridge protecting against channel degradation. The Brook Street crossing of Thayer Brook is a 34-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Streamflow attacks the upstream right wingwall and has undermined the upstream end of the right abutment. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) exists only on the upstream and downstream sides of the left

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (TOPSTH00570038) on Town Highway 57, crossing Waits River, Topsham, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striker, Lora K.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOPSTH00570038 on Town Highway 57 crossing the Waits River, Topsham, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in east central Vermont. The 37.3-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly pasture while the left bank upstream is suburban. In the study area, the Waits River has a sinuous locally anabranched channel with a slope of approximately 0.01 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 76 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 57.2 mm (0.188 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 28, 1995, indicated that the reach was considered laterally unstable due to cut-banks upstream, mid-channel bars and lateral migration of the channel towards the left abutment. The Town Highway 34 crossing of the Waits River is a 34-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 31-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 30.4 ft. The bridge is supported by a vertical, stone abutment with concrete facing and wingwalls on the right and by a vertical, concrete

  1. Severity and prognosis of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning are indicated by C-reactive protein and copeptin levels and APACHE II score

    PubMed Central

    WU, XINKUAN; XIE, WEI; CHENG, YUELEI; GUAN, QINGLONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and copeptin, in addition to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, in patients with acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (AOPP). A total of 100 patients with AOPP were included and divided into mild, moderate and severe groups according to AOPP diagnosis and classification standards. Blood samples were collected from all patients on days 1, 3 and 7 following AOPP. The concentrations of CRP and copeptin in the plasma were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All AOPP patients underwent APACHE II scoring and the diagnostic value of these scores was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs). On days 1, 3 and 7 after AOPP, the levels of CRP and copeptin were increased in correlation with the increase in AOPP severity, and were significantly higher compared with the control groups. Furthermore, elevated CRP and copeptin plasma levels were detected in patients with severe AOPP on day 7, whereas these levels were reduced in patients with mild or moderate AOPP. APACHE II scores, blood lactate level, acetylcholine esterase level, twitch disappearance time, reactivating agent dose and inability to raise the head were the high-risk factors that affected the prognosis of AOPP. Patients with plasma CRP and copeptin levels higher than median values had worse prognoses. The areas under curve for ROCs were 0.89, 0.75 and 0.72 for CRP levels, copeptin levels and APACHE II scores, respectively. In addition, the plasma contents of CRP and copeptin are increased according to the severity of AOPP. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that CRP and copeptin levels and APACHE II scores may be used for the determination of AOPP severity and the prediction of AOPP prognosis. PMID:26997996

  2. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments.

    PubMed

    Anetor, John I; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z; Ayita, Emmanuel B; Adedapo, Solomon K; Adeleye, Jokotade O; Anetor, Gloria O; Akinlade, Sola K

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = -0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  3. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments

    PubMed Central

    Anetor, John I.; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z.; Ayita, Emmanuel B.; Adedapo, Solomon K.; Adeleye, Jokotade O.; Anetor, Gloria O.; Akinlade, Sola K.

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = −0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  4. Cadmium Level, Glycemic Control, and Indices of Renal Function in Treated Type II Diabetics: Implications for Polluted Environments.

    PubMed

    Anetor, John I; Uche, Chukwuemelie Z; Ayita, Emmanuel B; Adedapo, Solomon K; Adeleye, Jokotade O; Anetor, Gloria O; Akinlade, Sola K

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has recently emerged as a major concern not only in environmental toxicology but also in metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and its complications. Conflicting data aside, these studies have not been examined in a clinical population undergoing management as well as possible modulation by the prominent metabolic antagonist of Cd such as zinc (Zn). This study examined the relationship between cadmium levels, glycemic control, and renal pathology in established type II diabetic patients with focus on populations exposed to modern environmental health hazards (MEHHs). Sixty-five participants, consisting of 45 type-2 diabetics and 20 non-diabetics were enrolled for the study, mean age 61.51 ± 5.27 years. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was used to classify them into three sub-groups: (A) good glycemic control (44.4%), (B) fair glycemic control (24.4%), and (C) poor glycemic control (31.1%). Plasma levels of glucose, Cd, Zn, HbA1c, creatinine, urinary creatinine, microalbuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined in all participants using standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose was higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics (p = 0.000) as well as Zn level, though not significantly. Interestingly, Cd level, Cd/Zn ratio, and urinary creatinine were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics. The group with poor glycemic control (C) had significantly higher Cd level compared to the one with good glycemic control (group A). The renal function revealed that microalbuminuria and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetics, while eGFR was found to be similar in both diabetics and non-diabetics. UACR inversely correlated with Cd level, while plasma creatinine level positively correlated with Cd but not significantly. Correlation between Cd and HbA1c revealed non-significant inverse correlation (r = -0.007; p > 0.05), while Zn showed a

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 41 (WODSTH00750041) on Town Highway 75, crossing Happy Valley Brook, Woodstock, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODSTH00750041 on town highway 75 crossing Happy Valley Brook, Woodstock, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province of east-central Vermont. The 3.45-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is brush with scattered trees. In the study area, Happy Valley Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 23 ft and an average channel depth of 5 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 82.8 mm (0.272 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level II site visits on September 13, 1994 and December 14, 1994, indicated that the reach was degrading. Five logs are embedded across the channel under the bridge in an attempt to prevent further degradation (see Figures 5 and 6). The town highway 75 crossing of Happy Valley Brook is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span. The clear span is 17 ft. (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 3, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, stone abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 40 degrees to the opening and the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 40 degrees. Additional

  6. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  7. Adolescent Identities and Sexual Behavior: An Examination of Anderson's Player Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Northcutt, Miriam J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the social and behavioral characteristics of male adolescents who self-identify as players, focusing particularly on Anderson's claim that this social role is inextricably linked with poverty and minority status. Results indicate that black respondents, those affiliated with liberal peers and young men who initially report a…

  8. Nonperturbative spectral-density function for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Using a nonperturbative self-energy solution for the nondegenerate Anderson model, the temperature-dependent spectral-density function is calculated in the symmetric limit. The function is found to give reliable results for all values of the parameter u and inverse temperature beta.

  9. Anderson v. University of Wisconsin: Handicap and Race Discrimination in Readmission Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth R.

    1989-01-01

    "Anderson v. University of Wisconsin" gives important guidance to universities by detailing the components of race and handicap discrimination claims, and illustrating how these claims can succeed. Readmission procedures that could reduce the likelihood of charges of discrimination are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  10. Community of Inquiry in e-Learning: A Critical Analysis of the Garrison and Anderson Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jezegou, Annie

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a constructively critical analysis of the "community of inquiry" model developed by Garrison and Anderson (2003) as part of their "e-learning" research. The authors claim that certain collaborative interactions create "distant presence" fostering the emergence of a "community of inquiry" which has a positive influence on…

  11. The effect of angiotensin II microinjection into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis on serum lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    Kafami, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Overactivity of renin-angiotensin system is involved in the pathophysiology of renal and cardiovascular diseases. It is suggested that endothelial cells can release nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species in response to angiotensin II (Ang II). Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor of Ang II has been found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). BST is involved in autonomic function. This study was performed to find the role of central Ang II in serum lipid peroxidation product and in releasing NO into circulation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one catheterized rats were placed in stereotaxic instrument. A hole was drilled above BST. In the control group, saline 0.9% (100 nl) was microinjected into the BST. In the second group, Ang II (100 μM, 100–150 nl) was microinjected into the BST. In the third group losartan (an AT1 antagonist) was microinjected (100 μM, 200 nl) before Ang II into the BST. Systolic blood pressure was recorded. The NO metabolite (nitrite) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in the rat's serum. Results: The data indicated that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response (P < 0.0001). It also increased MDA and nitrite levels of the serum significantly (P < 0.001, P < 0.0001). Pretreatment with losartan before Ang II microinjection attenuated serum's levels of MDA and nitrite (P < 0.001, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that central effect of Ang II on blood pressure is accompanied with increased levels of MDA and nitrite in the circulation. PMID:27376045

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (JAY-TH00400022) on Town Highway 40, crossing Jay Branch, Jay, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northern Vermont. The 2.15-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is primarily pasture on the upstream and downstream left overbank while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The downstream right overbank of the bridge is forested. In the study area, Jay Branch Tributary has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 26 ft and an average bank height of 3 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 40.5 mm (0.133 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 40 crossing of Jay Branch Tributary is a 27-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 25-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 6, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 23.5 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel skew and the opening-skew-to-roadway are zero degrees. The scour counter-measures at the site included type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the left and right abutments, at the upstream right wingwall, and at the downstream left

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 38 (BETHTH00070038) on Town Highway 007, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (BRIDTH00440028) on Town Highway 044 crossing Plymouth Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    The town highway 5 crossing of the Black River is a 70-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 65-foot clear span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. There is also a retaining wall along the upstream side of the road embankments. The channel is skewed approximately 20 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 3.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the right abutment. The scour hole was 27 feet long, 15 feet wide, and was 2.5 feet below the abutment footing at the time of the Level I assessment. This right abutment had numerous cracks and had settled. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 19 (SHEFTH00440019) on Town Highway 44, crossing Trout Brook, Sheffield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wild, Emily C.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure SHEFTH00440019 on Town Highway 44 crossing Trout Brook, Sheffield, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 3.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is grass on the upstream and downstream right overbanks, while the immediate banks have dense woody vegetation. The surface cover of the upstream and downstream left overbanks is shrub and brushland. In the study area, Trout Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.03 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 45 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 116 mm (0.381 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on July 31, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 44 crossing of Trout Brook is a 24-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of a 22-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 28, 1994). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 19.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening

  16. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  17. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  18. GIS based Cadastral level Forest Information System using World View-II data in Bir Hisar (Haryana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothi Kumar, K. E.; Singh, S.; Attri, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Sarika; Hooda, R. S.; Sapra, R. K.; Garg, V.; Kumar, V.; Nivedita

    2014-11-01

    Identification and demarcation of Forest lands on the ground remains a major challenge in Forest administration and management. Cadastral forest mapping deals with forestlands boundary delineation and their associated characterization (forest/non forest). The present study is an application of high resolution World View-II data for digitization of Protected Forest boundary at cadastral level with integration of Records of Right (ROR) data. Cadastral vector data was generated by digitization of spatial data using scanned mussavies in ArcGIS environment. Ortho-images were created from World View-II digital stereo data with Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system with WGS 84 datum. Cadastral vector data of Bir Hisar (Hisar district, Haryana) and adjacent villages was spatially adjusted over ortho-image using ArcGIS software. Edge matching of village boundaries was done with respect to khasra boundaries of individual village. The notified forest grids were identified on ortho-image and grid vector data was extracted from georeferenced cadastral data. Cadastral forest boundary vectors were digitized from ortho-images. Accuracy of cadastral data was checked by comparison of randomly selected geo-coordinates points, tie lines and boundary measurements of randomly selected parcels generated from image data set with that of actual field measurements. Area comparison was done between cadastral map area, the image map area and RoR area. The area covered under Protected Forest was compared with ROR data and within an accuracy of less than 1 % from ROR area was accepted. The methodology presented in this paper is useful to update the cadastral forest maps. The produced GIS databases and large-scale Forest Maps may serve as a data foundation towards a land register of forests. The study introduces the use of very high resolution satellite data to develop a method for cadastral surveying through on - screen digitization in a less time as compared to the old fashioned

  19. Selective solid-phase extraction and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) Ions in wastewater using diethylenetriamine-functionalized carbon nanotubes dispersed in graphene oxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Yuemei; Chang, Xijun; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) were dispersed in graphene oxide (GO) colloids to be further functionalized with diethylenetriamine (DETA), resulting in GO-MCNTs-DETA nanocomposites for the solid-phase extraction and analysis of Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions at the trace levels in wastewater. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) indicates that this new solid-phase sorbent could facilitate the maximum static adsorption capacities of 5.4, 13.8, 6.6 and 9.5 mg g(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, showing the adsorption capacity up to 95% within about 30 min. Moreover, the detection limits of the GO-MCNTs-DETA-based analysis method were found to be 0.16, 0.50, 0.24 and 0.38 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, with the relative standard deviation of lower than 3.0% (n=5). Importantly, common coexisting ions showed no significant interference on the separation and pre-concentration of these heavy metal ions at pH 4.0. Subsequently, the GO-MCNTs-DETA sorbent was successfully employed for the separation and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions in wastewater samples yielding 75-folds concentration factors. PMID:26695275

  20. Effect of donor chimerism to reduce the level of glycosaminoglycans following bone marrow transplantation in a murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type II.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Kazumasa; Kaneshiro, Eiko; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Masaharu; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Ohashi, Toya; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient activity of the iduronate-2-sulfatase. This leads to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the lysosomes of various cells. Although it has been proposed that bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may have a beneficial effect for patients with MPS II, the requirement for donor-cell chimerism to reduce GAG levels is unknown. To address this issue, we transplanted various ratios of normal and MPS II bone marrow cells in a mouse model of MPS II and analyzed GAG accumulation in various tissues. Chimerism of whole leukocytes and each lineage of BMT recipients' peripheral blood was similar to infusion ratios. GAGs were significantly reduced in the liver, spleen, and heart of recipients. The level of GAG reduction in these tissues depends on the percentage of normal-cell chimerism. In contrast to these tissues, a reduction in GAGs was not observed in the kidney and brain, even if 100 % donor chimerism was achieved. These observations suggest that a high degree of chimerism is necessary to achieve the maximum effect of BMT, and donor lymphocyte infusion or enzyme replacement therapy might be considered options in cases of low-level chimerism in MPS II patients.

  1. Adenovirus E1A-induced apoptosis elicits a steep decrease in the topoisomerase II alpha level during the latent phase.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Ohi, N; Arai, T; Nozaki, N; Kikuchi, A; Oda, K

    1995-02-16

    The human KB derivative cell line MA1, established by introduction of the adenovirus E1A 12S cDNA linked to the hormone-inducible promoter, elicits apoptosis upon treatment with dexamethasone. The cell lines partially refractory to apoptosis were established by introducing the expression plasmid for the adenovirus E1B 19k protein to MA1 cells. After induction of E1A in MA1 cells by dexamethasone, the level of p53 increased to about 10-fold within 24 h, and morphological changes characteristics of apoptosis began to be observed within 48 h. Most of cells were killed at 72 h releasing apoptotic bodies. The level of topoisomerase II alpha began to decrease steeply within 36 h, preceding the onset of DNA degradation while its mRNA level unchanged throughout the apoptotic process. E1B 19k protected the decrease in topoisomerase II alpha as well as DNA fragmentation depending on its expression levels. Topoisomerase II alpha is induced specifically at G2/M, and computer search revealed the presence of cyclin B type destruction box in topoisomerase II alpha. These results strongly suggest that E1A or E1A stabilized p53 induces apoptosis by targeting topoisomerase II alpha to the ubiquitination pathway and E1B 19k alleviates its action. PMID:7862442

  2. Anderson's disease/chylomicron retention disease in a Japanese patient with uniparental disomy 7 and a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anderson's Disease (AD)/Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary hypocholesterolemic disorder characterized by a malabsorption syndrome with steatorrhea, failure to thrive and the absence of chylomicrons and apolipoprotein B48 post-prandially. All patients studied to date exhibit a mutation in the SAR1B gene, which codes for an essential component of the vesicular coat protein complex II (COPII) necessary for endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. We describe here a patient with AD/CMRD, a normal SAR1B gene protein coding sequence and maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). Methods and Results The patient, one of two siblings of a Japanese family, had diarrhea and steatorrhea beginning at five months of age. There was a white duodenal mucosa upon endoscopy. Light and electron microscopy showed that the intestinal villi were normal but that they had lipid laden enterocytes containing accumulations of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm and lipoprotein-size particles in membrane bound structures. Although there were decreased amounts in plasma of total- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoproteins AI and B and vitamin E levels, the triglycerides were normal, typical of AD/CMRD. The presence of low density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein B in the plasma, although in decreased amounts, ruled out abetalipoproteinemia. The parents were asymptomatic with normal plasma cholesterol levels suggesting a recessive disorder and ruling out familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Sequencing of genomic DNA showed that the 8 exons of the SAR1B gene were normal. Whole genome SNP analysis and karyotyping revealed matUPD7 with a normal karyotype. In contrast to other cases of AD/CMRD which have shown catch-up growth following vitamin supplementation and a fat restricted diet, our patient exhibits continued growth delay and other aspects of the matUPD7 and Silver-Russell Syndrome phenotypes. Conclusions This patient with AD/CMRD has a

  3. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-il; Moon, Minho

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  4. Impaired Memory in OT-II Transgenic Mice Is Associated with Decreased Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis Possibly Induced by Alteration in Th2 Cytokine Levels.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong Gak; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Chung, Hyunju; Choi, Junghyun; Song, Eun Ji; Han, Seung-Yun; Oh, Myung Sook; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Il; Moon, Minho

    2016-08-31

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have focused on the effects of CD4+ T cell on cognitive function. However, the changes of Th2 cytokines in restricted CD4+ T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire model and their effects on the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether and how the mice with restricted CD4+ repertoire TCR exhibit learning and memory impairment by using OT-II mice. OT-II mice showed decreased adult neurogenesis in hippocampus and short- and long- term memory impairment. Moreover, Th2 cytokines in OT-II mice are significantly increased in peripheral organs and IL-4 is significantly increased in brain. Finally, IL-4 treatment significantly inhibited the proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells. Taken together, abnormal level of Th2 cytokines can lead memory dysfunction via impaired adult neurogenesis in OT-II transgenic. PMID:27432189

  5. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 42 (RANDVT00120042) on State Highway 12, crossing Third Branch White River, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of four concrete spans. The maximum span length is 57 ft. (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., July 29, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments and three concrete piers. The toe of the left abutment is at the channel edge. The toe of the right abutment is set back on the right over-bank. The roadway centerline on the structure has a slight horizontal curve; however, the main channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 34 (BRIDTH00050034) on Town Highway 005, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    The town highway 31 crossing of Lilliesville Brook is a 41-ft-long, one-lane bridge consisting of one 39-foot steel-beam span with a timber deck (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 24, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 0 degrees. Scour protection measures in place at the site were type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream left wingwall, left abutment, and upstream and downstream sides of the left road embankment. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure 8.

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 28 (MNTGTH00190028) on Town Highway 19, crossing Wade Brook, Montgomery, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have dense woody vegetation coverage. In the study area, Wade Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.0253 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 58 ft and an average channel depth of 4 ft. The predominant channel bed material is gravel and cobbles (D50 is 81.8 mm or 0.269 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on November 9, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 19 crossing of Wade Brook is a 24-ft-wide corrugated steel, multi-plate pipe-arch (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 3, 1994). The culvert is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 26 degrees. There was no localized scour evident during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures at the site were type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on all of the roadway embankments, the upstream left bank, and each wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.5 to 1.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.6 to 16

  9. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (HUNTTH00010012) on Town Highway 001, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    frequency data contained in the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Huntington (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1978). The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 9.19-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have some woody vegetation. In the study area, the Brush Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 100.0 mm (0.328 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Brush Brook is a 64-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 62-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 6 degrees. Channel scour 2.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right bank and along the base of the spill-through protection for the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measured at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left and right banks and in front of all four wingwalls. In front of the abutments, there was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) forming a spill-through slope. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others

  10. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (HUNTTH00010012) on Town Highway 001, crossing Brush Brook, Huntington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Wild, Emily C.

    1997-01-01

    frequency data contained in the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Huntington (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1978). The site is in the Green Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in central Vermont. The 9.19-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is pasture while the immediate banks have some woody vegetation. In the study area, the Brush Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.02 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 62 ft and an average bank height of 5 ft. The channel bed material ranges from gravel to cobble with a median grain size (D50) of 100.0 mm (0.328 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on June 25, 1996, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 1 crossing of Brush Brook is a 64-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 62-foot steel-stringer span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, November 30, 1995). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 6 degrees. Channel scour 2.2 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the upstream right bank and along the base of the spill-through protection for the right abutment during the Level I assessment. Scour protection measured at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left and right banks and in front of all four wingwalls. In front of the abutments, there was type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) forming a spill-through slope. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (BARTTH00080037) on Town Highway 8, crossing Willoughby River, Barton, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1996-01-01

    of north-central Vermont in the town of Barton. The 60.4-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the banks have sparse to moderate woody vegetation coverage. In the study area, the Willoughby River is probably incised, has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.009 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 108 ft and an average channel depth of 6 ft. The predominant channel bed material is cobble (D50 is 95.1 mm or 0.312 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 20, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 8 crossing of the Willoughby River is a 96-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 94-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 15 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. No scour was reported in the channel or along abutments or wingwalls during the Level I assessment. Type-2 stone fill (less than 24 inches diameter) was reported at each abutment and all four wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. Data in appendix D (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 4, 1994) indicate that the right abutment may be founded on or near marble bedrock which may limit scour depths. Bedrock was not detected by borings in the vicinity of the left abutment. The scour analysis results are presented in tables 1 and 2 and a graph of the scour depths is presented in figure

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 43 (BETHTH00070043) on Town Highway 07, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on October 19, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The town highway 7 crossing of Gilead Brook is a 31-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 27-foot concrete slab type superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 24, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 15 degrees. A scour hole 0.5 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed at the right side of the downstream bridge face during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site were type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the right abutment and both downstream banks, type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on all of the road approach embankments, both upstream banks, and along the entire base length of the wingwalls. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharges. Abutment scour ranged from 6.6 to 11.0 ft. with the worst-case scenario

  13. Observation of Anderson localization in ultrathin films of three-dimensional topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Xiao; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Chaojing; Yang, Wenmin; Wu, Kehui; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Li, Yongqing

    2015-05-29

    Anderson localization, the absence of diffusive transport in disordered systems, has been manifested as hopping transport in numerous electronic systems, whereas in recently discovered topological insulators it has not been directly observed. Here, we report experimental demonstration of a crossover from diffusive transport in the weak antilocalization regime to variable range hopping transport in the Anderson localization regime with ultrathin (Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x})_{2}Te_{3} films. As disorder becomes stronger, negative magnetoconductivity due to the weak antilocalization is gradually suppressed, and eventually, positive magnetoconductivity emerges when the electron system becomes strongly localized. This work reveals the critical role of disorder in the quantum transport properties of ultrathin topological insulator films, in which theories have predicted rich physics related to topological phase transitions.

  14. Increased Glycated Hemoglobin Level is Associated With SYNTAX Score II in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Rencüzoğulları, İbrahim; Karabağ, Yavuz; Altıntaş, Bernas; Topçu, Selim; Lazoğlu, Zakir; Tanboğa, İbrahim Halil; Sevimli, Serdar

    2016-04-01

    SYNTAX score II (SS II) uses 2 anatomical and 6 clinical variables for the prediction of mortality after coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), and SYNTAX Score (SS) and SS II in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease (CAD). We enrolled 215 consecutive diabetic patients with stable angina pectoris who underwent coronary angiography. The SS II was calculated using a nomogram that was based on the findings of a previous study. There was a moderate correlation between HbA1c and SS (r = .396, P < .001), but there was a good correlation between HbA1c and SS II (r = .535, P < .001). There was also a weak correlation between FBG (r = .270, P = .001), PPG (r = .177, P = .027), and SS, but there was a weak-moderate correlation between FBG (r = .341, P < .001), PPG (r = .256, P = .001), and SS II. A better correlation has been detected between HbA1c and SS II compared to the correlation between HbA1c and SS.

  15. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  16. Performance/Design Requirements and Detailed Technical Description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem for Integration into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, A. K.; And Others

    The performance/design requirements and a detailed technical description for a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem to be integrated into the Air Force Phase II Base Level System are described. The subsystem may be used for computer-assisted lesson construction and has presentation capability for on-the-job training for data automation, staff, and…

  17. Homemaking--Family Living. Curriculum Planning Guidelines. Level I-II. Middle School, Grades 5-8. Reprint 1978. Home Economics Education, [No. 1].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational Education Curriculum Development.

    This curriculum guide for Levels I and II home economics teachers in New York State provides guidelines for developing instructional program content for grades 5-8. An introductory section describes the design of the homemaking-family living curriculum; presents procedures for utilizing modules in planning instruction with an example of plans for…

  18. Role of King Abdullah II Fitness Award in Improving the Physical Level of the Tenth Grade from the Point of View of Teachers in the Northern Governorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doum, Hamed Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the role of King Abdullah II fitness award in improving the physical level to the tenth grade from the point of view of teachers in the of Northern region governates. The researcher used the descriptive survey method for its suitability to the objectives of the study, the researcher built a questionnaire that consisted…

  19. Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition

  20. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaña Neto, Frederico Carlos; de Paula Canal, Marina; Alves, Bernardo Aurélio Fonseca; Ferreira, Pablício Martins; Ayres, Jefferson Castro; Alves, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo–Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. Methods This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive); presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) index; mortality rate; and infection rate. Results 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%). Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75%) and IIIB (25%) predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. Conclusion The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions. PMID:27069881

  1. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 36 (BRIDTH00050036) on Town Highway 5, crossing Bridgewater Hollow Brook, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Boehmler, Erick M.

    1996-01-01

    Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. There was no contraction scour for all modelled flows. Abutment scour ranged from 4.9 to 7.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  3. Cranial location of level II lymph nodes in laryngeal cancer: Implications for elective nodal target volume delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Terhaard, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the cranial distribution of level II lymph nodes in patients with laryngeal cancer to optimize the elective radiation nodal target volume delineation. Methods and Materials: The most cranially located metastatic lymph node was delineated in 67 diagnostic CT data sets. The minimum distance from the base of the skull (BOS) to the lymph node was determined. Results: A total of 98 lymph nodes were delineated including 62 ipsilateral and 36 contralateral lymph nodes. The mean ipsilateral and contralateral distance from the top of the most cranial metastatic lymph node to the BOS was 36 mm (range, -9-120; standard deviation [SD], 17.9) and 35 mm (range, 14-78; SD 15.0), respectively. Only 5% and 12% of the ipsilateral and 3% and 9% of the contralateral metastatic lymph nodes were located within 15 mm and 20 mm below the BOS, respectively. No significant differences were found between patients with only ipsilateral metastatic lymph nodes and patients with bilateral metastatic lymph nodes. Between tumors that do cross the midline and those that do not, no significant difference was found in the distance of the most cranial lymph node to the BOS and the occurrence ipsilateral or contralateral. Conclusions: Setting the cranial border of the nodal target volume 1.5 cm below the base of the skull covers 95% of the lymph nodes and should be considered in elective nodal irradiation for laryngeal cancer. Bilateral neck irradiation is mandatory, including patients with unilateral laryngeal cancer, when elective irradiation is advised.

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BRNATH00800016) on Town Highway 80, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 3.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient-overtopping discharge, which was between the 100- and 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 17.5 to 23.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 1 (BLOOTH00020001) on Town Highway 2, crossing Mill Brook, Bloomfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Medalie, Laura

    1996-01-01

    Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term aggradation or degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to reduction in flow area caused by a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute scour depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0 to 1.0 feet and the worst-case contraction scour occurred at the incipient overtopping discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 7.3 to 10.1 feet and the worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results of the hydraulic analyses. Therefore, scour depths adopted by VTAOT may differ from the computed values documented herein.

  6. Unprecedented χ isomers of single-side triol-functionalized Anderson polyoxometalates and their proton-controlled isomer transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Huang, Yichao; zhang, Jin; Hao, Jian; Wei, Yongge

    2015-06-01

    The μ2-O atom in Anderson polyoxometalates was regioselectively activated by the introduction of protons, which, upon functionalization with triol ligands, could afford a series of unique χ isomers of the organically-derived Anderson cluster {[RCC(CH2O)3]MMo6O18(OH)3}(3-). Herein proton-controlled isomer transformation between the δ and χ isomer was observed by using the fingerprint region in the IR spectra and (13)C NMR spectra.

  7. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 39 (LOWETH00080039) on Town Highway 8, crossing Potter Brook, Lowell, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    A scour hole 2.0 feet deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left abutment during the Level I assessment. There were no scour protection measures evident at the site. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.3 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 1.8 to 5.5 feet. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and

  8. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 45 (CHELTH00440045) on Town Highway 44, crossing first Branch White River, Chelsea, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hammond, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of one 27-foot clear-span concrete-encased steel beam deck superstructure (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 25, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 10 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 5 degrees. Both abutment footings were reported as exposed and the left abutment was reported to be undermined by 0.5 ft at the time of the Level I assessment. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment which was reported as failed. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.4 to 5.1 ft. with the worst-case occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 9.9 to 20.3 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a

  9. Type I Vs. Type II Cytokine Levels as a Function of SOD1 G93A Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeyachandran, Amilia; Mertens, Benjamin; McKissick, Eric A.; Mitchell, Cassie S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motoneuron disease that is characterized by the degradation of neurons throughout the central nervous system. Inflammation have been cited a key contributor to ALS neurodegeneration, but the timeline of cytokine upregulation remains unresolved. The goal of this study was to temporally examine the correlation between the varying levels of pro-inflammatory type I cytokines (IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-12, TNF-α, and GFAP) and anti-inflammatory type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) throughout the progression of ALS in the SOD1 G93A mouse model. Cytokine level data from high copy SOD1 G93A transgenic mice was collected from 66 peer-reviewed studies. For each corresponding experimental time point, the ratio of transgenic to wild type (TG/WT) cytokine was calculated. One-way ANOVA and t-tests with Bonferonni correction were used to analyze the data. Meta-analysis was performed for four discrete stages: early, pre-onset, post-onset, and end stage. A significant increase in TG cytokine levels was found when compared to WT cytokine levels across the entire SOD1 G93A lifespan for majority of the cytokines. The rates of change of the individual cytokines, and type I and type II were not significantly different; however, the mean fold change of type I was expressed at significantly higher levels than type II levels across all stages with the difference between the means becoming more pronounced at the end stage. An overexpression of cytokines occurred both before and after the onset of ALS symptoms. The trend between pro-inflammatory type I and type II cytokine mean levels indicate a progressive instability of the dynamic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as anti-inflammatory cytokines fail to mediate the pronounced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines. Very early immunoregulatory treatment is necessary to successfully interrupt ALS-induced neuroinflammation. PMID:26648846

  10. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    PubMed

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites.

  11. Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths for Ultraviolet Transitions Involving 6s26d 2D and 6s6p3 2D Levels in Pb II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, Steven Robert; Heidarian, Negar; Irving, Richard; Ritchey, Adam M.; Ellis, David; Cheng, Song; Curtis, Larry; Furman, Walter

    2016-06-01

    We conducted beam-foil measurements on levels producing Pb II lines at 1203.6 and 1433.9 Å. These were supplemented by archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) covering the Pb II transitions. The oscillator strengths derived from our experimental lifetimes are generally consistent with recent large-scale theoretical results, as well as our own relativistic calculations. Our analysis of the HST spectra confirms the relative strengths of the two lines. However, the oscillator strength obtained for the line at 1433 Å is significantly smaller than earlier theoretical values used to derive the interstellar lead abundance, leading to an increase of 0.43 dex in this quantity. We will present our results for Pb II and compare them with others from the literature.

  12. NX-PVKA levels before and after hepatectomy of hepatocellular carcinoma as predictors of patient survival: a preliminary evaluation of an improved assay for PIVKA-II.

    PubMed

    Nanashima, Atsushi; Abo, Takafumi; Taura, Naota; Shibata, Hideki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Takagi, Katsunori; Arai, Junichi; Oyama, Shousaburou; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Although the protein-induced vitamin K absence or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II) is used as a prognostic marker in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a newly-improved assay, NX-PVKA (PIVKA-II measured using P-11 and P-16 antibodies) and NX-PVKA-R (ratio of PIVKA-II and NX-PVKA), are more accurate markers of PIVKA-II. We conducted a prospectively preliminary analysis of the relationship between NX-PVKA-R and clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in 22 patients with HCC who underwent hepatectomy and measured changes of this marker's levels after treatment. Median value of PIVKA-II (80 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA (60 mAU/ml), NX-PVKA-R (1.5) and NX-PVKA-D (difference of markers, 15 mAU/ml) were determined. Tumor relapse was observed in six patients, and the one year relapse-free survival rate was 88%. Correlation between PIVKA-II or alpha-fetoprotein levels and NX-PVKA, NX-PVKA-R or -D levels was significant (p<0.001). NX-PVKA-R was significantly correlated with tumor size (p<0.05). In patients who underwent pre-treatment before hepatectomy, PIVKA-II, NX-PVKA and NX-PVKA-R tended to be higher than in patients without pre-treatment, but this difference was not significant (p>0.10). For macroscopic findings, NX-PVKA-R for the confluent-nodular type was significantly higher than that for the simple-nodular type (p<0.05). The tumor-free survival rate in the group with a high NX-PVKA-R was significantly lower than that in the group with a low NX-PVKA-R group (p<0.05). In patients with tumor recurrence, postoperative NX-PVKA-R increased again. We conclude that a high value of NX-PVKA-R after hepatectomy for HCC reflects malignant potential and predicts early recurrence in patients with HCC.

  13. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  14. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 30 (NEWFVT00300013) on Vermont Highway 30, crossing Smith Brook, Newfane, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    roadway is 55 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site were type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the upstream right bank. There was also type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank. A stone wall extends to 72 feet upstream from the end of the upstream left wingwall. There is another stone wall along the upstream right bank. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 0.8 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 14.4 to 18.2 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are

  15. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 53 (WILMVT01000053) on State Route 100, crossing Cold Brook, Wilmington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.

    1997-01-01

    to-roadway also is zero degrees. The scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) on the upstream banks, the upstream wingwalls, and the downstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.6 to 2.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.8 to 10.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the left abutment for the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing

  16. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 10 (WFIETH00170010) on Town Highway 17, crossing Taft Brook, Westfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the ends of each wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 0.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour at the left abutment ranged from 6.1 to 7.7 ft. Abutment scour at the right abutment ranged from 4.3 to 5.4 ft.The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge for both abutments. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection measures, and the results

  17. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 4 (ARLITH00010004) on Town Highway 1, crossing Warm Brook, Arlington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    channel in the upstream reach within 30 ft of the bridge. The only scour protection measure at the site was type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the upstream left bank approach to the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.7 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.3 to 11.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited to) historical performance during flood events, the geomorphic stability assessment, existing scour protection

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 46 (BRIDTH00050046) on Town Highway 05, crossing North Branch Ottauquechee River, Bridgewater, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    bridge consisting of a 34-ft steel-beam span, supported by vertical abutments with no wingwalls (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, August 25, 1994). The left abutment is stone; the right abutment is log cribwork with type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along its base. Type-2 stone fill has also been placed on the upstream and downstream sides of the road embankments, except the upstream left which has type-3 (less than 48 inches diameter). The channel is skewed approximately 60 degrees; the opening-skew-to-roadway is 30 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of these computed results follow. Contraction scour for all modelled flows was 0.0 ft. Abutment scour ranged from 5.7 ft to 7.7 ft. with the worst-case abutment scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the computed scour at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths

  19. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 35 (BETHTH00190035) on Town Highway 19, crossing Gilead Brook, Bethel, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Song, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 5 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 10 degrees. The scour protection measures at the site included type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) at the downstream wingwalls, left abutment, and upstream right road embankment; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is at the upstream right wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.1 to 2.1 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.9 to 9.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1993, p. 48). Many factors, including historical

  20. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 12 (FFIETH00030012) on Town Highway 3, crossing the Fairfield River, Fairfield, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Degnan, James R.

    1997-01-01

    downstream left bank. The type-2 stone fill on the left bank downstream changes to type-1 about 55 feet downstream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.6 to 3.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 ft. at the left abutment and 9.7 to 11.7 feet at the right abutment. The worst-case left abutment scour occurred at the incipient over-topping discharge, which was less than the 100-year discharge. The worst-case right abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not

  1. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 49 (BENNCYHUNT0049) on Hunt Street, crossing the Walloomsac River, Bennington, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    2 stone fill also protects the channel banks upstream and downstream of the bridge for a minimum distance of 17 feet from the respective bridge faces. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and recommended rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour computed for all modelled flows ranged from 0.9 to 5.0 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed left abutment scour ranged from 15.3 to 16.5 ft. with the worst-case scour occurring at the incipient roadway-overtopping discharge. Computed right abutment scour ranged from 6.0 to 8.7 ft. with the worst-case scour occurring at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a homogeneous particle-size distribution. It is generally accepted that the Froehlich equation (abutment scour) gives “excessively conservative estimates of scour depths” (Richardson and others, 1995, p. 47). Usually, computed scour depths are evaluated in combination with other information including (but not limited

  2. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 9 (BARRUSO3020009) on U.S. Route 302, crossing Jail Branch, Barre, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    skew-to-roadway. There is evidence of channel scour along the right bank from 190 feet upstream of the bridge and extending through the bridge along the right abutment. Under the bridge, the scour depth is approximately 0.5 feet below the mean thalweg depth. Scour protection measures at the site include type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) along the right bank extending from the bridge to 192 feet upstream. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) is along the right abutment and the right downstream bank to 205 feet downtream of the bridge. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1995). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 4.3 to 7.5 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Computed scour for the 100-year event does not go below the abutment footings. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1 and 2. A cross-section of the scour computed at the bridge is presented in figure 8. Scour depths were calculated assuming an infinite depth of erosive material and a

  3. Theoretical lifetimes and Land{acute e} g values of CsthinspII 5p{sup 5}thinsp6p levels

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    Lifetimes of CsthinspII 5p{sup 5}thinsp6p levels, oscillator strengths to the lower 5p{sup 5}thinsp5d and 5p{sup 5}thinsp6s levels, Land{acute e} g factors and LS compositions of all these levels are presented. Results are in very good agreement with most available experiment. Large correlation effects are associated with those 5p{sup 5}thinsp5d and 5p{sup 5}thinsp6s states, which strongly interact. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 25 (BRNAVT00120025) on State Highway 12, crossing Locust Creek, Barnard, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Weber, Matthew A.

    1996-01-01

    abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 30 degrees to the opening while the opening-skew-to-roadway is 45 degrees. A scour hole 1 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along a bedrock outcrop near the upstream left wingwall during the Level I assessment. The scour protection measures in place at the site are type-1 stone fill (less than 12 inches diameter) along the left abutment, upstream right bank, and both downstream banks; type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) at the downstream side of the right road approach and upstream left bank; type-3 stone fill (less than 48 inches diameter) at the upstream end of the upstream right wingwall and downstream end of downstream left wingwall; type-5 (wall/ artificial levee) at the upstream end of the upstream left wingwall. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary and Appendices D and E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 0.0 to 1.4 ft. The worst-case contraction scour occurred at the 100-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 8.5 to 20.9 ft. The worst-case abutment scour occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in

  5. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 51 (RANDTH00SC0051) on School Street, crossing Thayer Brook, Randolph, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Scott A.

    1996-01-01

    ft, an average channel top width of 36 ft and an average channel depth of 3 ft. The predominant channel bed materials are gravel and cobble (D50 is 58.2 mm or 0.191 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I site visits on August 4, 1994 and December 8, 1994, indicated that the reach was stable. The School Street crossing of Thayer Brook is a 39-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 35-foot concrete span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written commun., August 2, 1994). The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. Type-2 stone fill (less than 36 inches diameter) along the downstream left bank was the only existing protection. The approach channel is skewed approximately 45 degrees to the bridge face; the opening-skew-to-roadway is also 45 degrees. Additional details describing conditions at the site are included in the Level II Summary, Appendix D, and Appendix E. Scour depths and rock rip-rap sizes were computed using the general guidelines described in Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 (Richardson and others, 1993). Total scour at a highway crossing is comprised of three components: 1) long-term streambed degradation; 2) contraction scour (due to accelerated flow caused by a reduction in flow area at a bridge) and; 3) local scour (caused by accelerated flow around piers and abutments). Total scour is the sum of the three components. Equations are available to compute depths for contraction and local scour and a summary of the results of these computations follows. Contraction scour for all modelled flows ranged from 1.0 to 2.2 ft. with the worst-case scenario occurring at the 500-year discharge. Abutment scour ranged from 6.2 to 12.0 ft. The worst-case abutment scour also occurred at the 500-year discharge. Additional information on scour depths and depths to armoring are included in the section titled “Scour Results”. Scoured-streambed elevations, based on the calculated scour depths, are presented in tables 1

  6. Femtomole level photoelectrochemical aptasensing for mercury ions using quercetin-copper(II) complex as the DNA intercalator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Xue, Yan; Wang, Wei

    2014-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor for mercury ions was first fabricated based on perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid/graphene oxide (PTCA/GO) heterojunction using quercetin-copper(II) complex intercalated into the poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes. Both the PTCA/GO heterojunction and the quercetin-copper(II) complex are in favor of the sensitivity for the fabricated PEC aptasensor due to band alignment and strong reduction capability, respectively. And they efficiently promote the separation of photoexcited carriers and enhance the photocurrent. The formation of thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine coordination chemistry resulted in the dehybridization of poly(dT)-poly(dA) duplexes and then the intercalator quercetin-copper(II) complex broke away from the surface of the PEC aptasensor. As the concentration of mercury ions increased, the photocurrent gradually decreased. The electrode response for mercury ions detection was in the linear range from 0.01 pmol L(-1) to 1.00 pmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 3.33 fmol L(-1). The label-free PEC aptasensor has excellent performances with ultrasensitivity and good selectivity besides the advantage of economic and facile fabrication. The strategy of quercetin-copper(II) complex as a novel DNA intercalator paves a new way to improve the performances for PEC sensors. PMID:24291750

  7. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-70-35-5245 crossing Big Walnut Creek in Putnam County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sedimenttransport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-70-35-5245 on Interstate 70 crossing Big Walnut Creek in Pumam.County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Manhattan in the southwestern part of Putnam County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 17.0 feet for the modeled discharge of 29,200 cubic feet per second and approximately 30.9 feet for the modeled discharge of 49,600 cubic feet per second.

  8. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-69-87-4781 crossing Wabash River in Huntington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-69-87-4781 on Interstate 69 crossing Wabash River in Huntington County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Markle in the eastern part of Huntington County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 13.1 feet for the modeled discharge of 10,600 cubic feet per second and approximately 14.6 feet for the modeled discharge of 17,000 cubic feet per second.

  9. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-69-76-4775 crossing Salamonie River in Huntington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-69-76-4775 on Interstate 69 crossing Salamonie River in Huntington County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Warren in the southeastern part of Huntington County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 13.7 feet for the modeled discharge of 15,800 cubic feet per second and approximately 20.9 feet for the modeled discharge of 26,900 cubic feet per second.

  10. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-74-32-4946 crossing Sugar Creek in Montgomery County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.L.; Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sedient-transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Levell II analysis for structure I-74-32-4946 on Interstate 74 crossing Sugar Creek in Montgomery County, Indiana are presented. The site is near the town of Crawfordsville in the central part of Montgomery County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 13.0 feet for the modeled discharge of 3,000  cubic feet per second and approximately 15.1 feet for the modeled discharge of 41,900 cubic feet per second.

  11. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-65-85-5527 crossing Sugar Creek in Johnson County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-65-85-5527 on Interstate 65 crossing Sugar Creek in Johnson County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Amity in the southeastern part of Johnson County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 26.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 26,000 cubic feet per second and approximately 30.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 34,100 cubic feet per second

  12. Modified level II streambed-scour analysis for structure I-70-60-5180 crossing Branch of McCracken Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, B.A.; Voelker, D.C.; Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Level II scour evaluations follow a process in which hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport data are evaluated to calculate the depth of scour that may result when a given discharge is routed through a bridge opening. The results of the modified Level II analysis for structure 1-70-60-5180 on Interstate 70 crossing Branch of McCracken Creek in Hendricks County, Indiana, are presented. The site is near the town of Center Valley in the south-central part of Hendricks County. Scour depths were computed with the Water Surface PROfile model, version V050196, which incorporates the scour-calculation procedures outlined in Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18. Total scour depths at the piers were approximately 12.4 feet for the modeled discharge of 1,200 cubic feet per second and approximately 24.8 feet for the modeled discharge of 2,040 cubic feet per second.

  13. Critical level statistics for weakly disordered graphene.

    PubMed

    Amanatidis, E; Kleftogiannis, I; Katsanos, D E; Evangelou, S N

    2014-04-16

    In two dimensions chaotic level statistics with the Wigner spacing distribution P(S) is expected for massless fermions in the Dirac region. The obtained P(S) for weakly disordered finite graphene samples with zigzag edges turns out, however, to be neither chaotic (Wigner) nor localized (Poisson). It is similar to the intermediate statistics at the critical point of the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The quantum transport of finite graphene for weak disorder, with critical level statistics can occur via edge states as in topological insulators, and for strong disorder, graphene behaves as an ordinary Anderson insulator with Poisson statistics.

  14. Time courses of PIVKA-II and AFP levels after hepatic artery embolization and hepatic artery infusion against hepatocellular carcinoma: relation between the time course and tumor necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kishi, K; Sonomura, T; Mitsuzane, K; Nishida, N; Kimura, M; Satoh, M; Yamada, R; Kodama, N; Kinoshita, M; Tanaka, H

    1992-01-01

    We examined 35 untreated patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma who exhibited positivity for both plasma PIVKA-II and serum AFP, and studied the weekly course of these markers from the pre-TAE or -HAI period to the third week of treatment. We correlated changes in these markers with the tumor necrosis rate and the time course on X-ray CT images. One week after TAE, the tumor necrosis rate and the time course of PIVKA-II showed a significant correlation (r = 0.7), while the correlation was between the time course of AFP and the tumor necrosis rate was insignificant (r = 0.2). At two and three weeks after TAE, both the time course of AFP and PIVKA-II showed significant correlations with the tumor necrosis rate. In 16 patients with tumor necrosis rates of not less than 90%, the mean of the actual half-life (AHL) of PIVKA-II was 3.2 days, the shortest was 1.83 days, and 75% of all AHLs clustered from two days to four days, while the mean and shortest AHLs of AFP were six days and 2.98 days, respectively, exhibiting a broader distribution. On the other hand, in three out of the nine cases of hepatocellular carcinoma complicated with portal tumor thrombi, PIVKA-II increased after HAI in spite of a reduction in tumor size. It was suggested that the PIVKA-II level requires careful interpretation in cases of portal vein obstruction after intensive hepatic arterial infusion of anticancer agents.

  15. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault."

  16. Hydrothermal assembly and luminescence property of lanthanide-containing Anderson polyoxometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ying; Liu Shuxia Cao Ruige; Ji Hongmei; Zhang Shiwei; Ren Yuanhang

    2008-09-15

    Two compounds, {l_brace}[Sm(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub 2}(TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}){r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (1) and {l_brace}[Eu(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}]{sub 2} (TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}){r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (2) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 represents the first example of a 2D layer architecture constructed from Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and rare-earth ions Ln{sup 3+}. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure built up of alternating Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and rare-earth ions Eu{sup 3+} along the c-axis. Luminescence measurement of 2 exhibits typical red fluorescent emission of the Eu{sup 3+} ion at room temperature. Furthermore, the emission is intense enough to be observed macroscopically under UV irradiation (365 nm). - Graphical abstract: Two compounds based on Anderson-type polyoxoanion building blocks and rare-earth ions have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1 exhibits a 2D layer architecture constructed from [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} anions and rare-earth ions Ln{sup 3+}. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure and possesses the intense luminescence property.

  17. Anderson Localization of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a 3D Random Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Minguzzi, A.; Tiggelen, B. A. van; Shapiro, B.

    2008-04-25

    We study the effect of Anderson localization on the expansion of a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a harmonic trap, in a 3D random potential. We use scaling arguments and the self-consistent theory of localization to show that the long-time behavior of the condensate density is controlled by a single parameter equal to the ratio of the mobility edge and the chemical potential of the condensate. We find that the two critical exponents of the localization transition determine the evolution of the condensate density in time and space.

  18. Conserving Many Body Approach to the Infinite-U Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebanon, Eran; Rech, Jerome; Coleman, P.; Parcollet, Olivier

    2006-09-01

    Using a Luttinger-Ward scheme for interacting gauge particles, we present a conserving many body treatment of a family of fully screened infinite-U Anderson models that has a smooth crossover into the Fermi-liquid state, with a finite scattering phase shift at zero temperature and a Wilson ratio greater than 1. We illustrate our method, computing the temperature dependence of the thermodynamics, resistivity, and electron dephasing rate and discuss its future application to nonequilibrium quantum dots and quantum critical mixed valent systems.

  19. Magnetic Response and Valence Fluctuations in the Extended Anderson Lattice Model with Quasiperiodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinzaki, Ryu; Nasu, Joji; Koga, Akihisa

    2016-11-01

    We study the magnetic response and valence fluctuations in the extended Anderson model on a two-dimensional Penrose lattice using real-space dynamical mean-field theory combined with the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. Calculating the f-electron number, c-f spin correlations, and magnetic susceptibility at each site, we find site-dependent formation of the singlet state and valence distributions at low temperatures, which are reflected by the quasiperiodic lattice structure. The bulk magnetic susceptibility is also addressed.

  20. [Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman, 2000); the change in classification within the genus Varroa (Oudemans, 1904)].

    PubMed

    Topolska, G

    2001-01-01

    Varroa jacobsoni was noted for the first time in 1904, in the nest ofApis cerana. In Apis mellifera nests the first Varroa mites were probably found in Korea (1950), next in Japan (1958). In the following years they have spread all over the world. All the time they were regarded as V. jacobsoni. Recently Anderson and Trueman have proved that Varroa jacobsoni is more than one species. They gave the new name Varroa destructor n. sp. to the group of six haplotypes. Mites, which became pests ofA. mellifera worldwide, belong to V. destructor.

  1. Large thermoelectric figure of merit for three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators via line dislocation engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Ar.; Murakami, Shuichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2010-08-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties of three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators with line dislocations. We show that at high densities of dislocations the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT can be dominated by one-dimensional topologically protected conducting states channeled through the lattice screw dislocations in the topological insulator materials with a nonzero time-reversal-invariant momentum such as Bi0.9Sb0.1. When the chemical potential does not exceed much the mobility edge the ZT at room temperatures can reach large values, much higher than unity for reasonable parameters, hence making this system a strong candidate for applications in heat management of nanodevices.

  2. STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

  3. Anisotropic behavior of quantum transport in graphene superlattices: Coexistence of ballistic conduction with Anderson insulating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    We report on the possibility to generate highly anisotropic quantum conductivity in disordered graphene-based superlattices. Our quantum simulations, based on an efficient real-space implementation of the Kubo-Greenwood formula, show that in disordered graphene superlattices the strength of multiple scattering phenomena can strongly depend on the transport measurement geometry. This eventually yields the coexistence of a ballistic waveguide and a highly resistive channel (Anderson insulator) in the same two-dimensional platform, evidenced by a σyy/σxx ratio varying over several orders of magnitude, and suggesting the possibility of building graphene electronic circuits based on the unique properties of chiral massless Dirac fermions in graphene.

  4. Variational Monte Carlo study of magnetic states in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Katsunori

    2015-03-01

    We study the magnetic states of the periodic Anderson model with a finite Coulomb interaction between f electrons on a square lattice by applying variational Monte Carlo method. We consider Gutzwiller wavefunctions for the paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and charge density wave states. We find an antiferromagnetic phase around half-filling. There is a phase transition accompanying change in the Fermi-surface topology in this antiferromagnetic phase. We also study a case away from half-filling, and find a ferromagnetic state as the ground state there.

  5. Correlation-driven d -wave superconductivity in Anderson lattice model: Two gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokiński, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spałek, Józef

    2016-07-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion systems has an unconventional nature and is considered to originate from the universal features of the electronic structure. Here, the Anderson lattice model is studied by means of the full variational Gutzwiller wave function incorporating nonlocal effects of the on-site interaction. We show that the d -wave superconducting ground state can be driven solely by interelectronic correlations. The proposed microscopic mechanism leads to a multigap superconductivity with the dominant contribution due to f electrons and in the dx2-y2-wave channel. Our results rationalize several important observations for CeCoIn5.

  6. Numerical study of the periodic Anderson model with a quarter-filled conduction band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Using the dynamical cluster approximation with continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo as the cluster solver and the recently introduced dual-fermion method, we study the underlying physics of the periodic Anderson model where the conduction band is near quarter-filling while the f-band electron band is half filled. For these parameters, the RKKY coupling changes its nature from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic, yielding an interesting phase-diagram. Especially, we find the charge ordering of the conduction band is strongly enhanced, which could be due to the proximity to a quantum critical point.

  7. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  8. Richard G.W. Anderson (1940–2011) and the birth of receptor-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    On March 19, 2011, the discipline of cell biology lost a creative force with the passing of Richard G.W. Anderson, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. An unabashed chauvinist for cell biology, Dick served for many years on the editorial board of The Journal of Cell Biology and the Council of the American Society for Cell Biology. He died of glioblastoma multiforme six days before his 71st birthday. PMID:21576388

  9. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson during TCDT M113 training activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson takes a break during training on the operation of an M113 armored personnel carrier during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia.

  10. STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his flight suit in the white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39A before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour for launch. The STS- 89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS- 89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m.

  11. Eigenmodal analysis of Anderson localization: Applications to photonic lattices and Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Guanwen; Kouzaev, Guennadi

    2016-10-01

    We present the eigenmodal analysis techniques enhanced towards calculations of optical and non-interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) modes formed by random potentials and localized by Anderson effect. The results are compared with the published measurements and verified additionally by the convergence criterion. In 2-D BECs captured in circular areas, the randomness shows edge localization of the high-order Tamm-modes. To avoid strong diffusive effect, which is typical for BECs trapped by speckle potentials, a 3-D-lattice potential with increased step magnitudes is proposed, and the BECs in these lattices are simulated and plotted.

  12. Ferrimagnetism and single-particle excitations in a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiro; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Zhang, Qinfang; Li, Tao; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    By using the variationalcluster approximation and cluster perturbation theory, we investigate the magnetism and single-particle excitations of a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice as an effective model for the single-side hydrogenated graphene, namely, graphone. We calculate the magnetic moment as a function of U (Coulomb interaction on impurity sites) with showing that the ground state is ferrimagneticfor any U > 0. We then calculate the single-particle excitations and show that the single-particle excitations are gapless and exhibit quadratic dispersion relation near the Fermi energy.

  13. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/−), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (−) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (−) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1α levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (−) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  14. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring

  15. The atomic approach to the Anderson model for the finite U case: application to a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Lobo, T; Figueira, M S; Foglio, M E

    2010-07-01

    In the present work we apply the atomic approach to the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). A general formulation of this approach, that can be applied both to the impurity and to the lattice Anderson Hamiltonian, was developed in a previous work (Foglio et al 2009 arxiv: 0903.0139v2 [cond-mat.str-el]). The method starts from the cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model, employing the hybridization as a perturbation. The atomic Anderson limit is analytically solved and its sixteen eigenenergies and eigenstates are obtained. This atomic Anderson solution, which we call the AAS, has all the fundamental excitations that generate the Kondo effect, and in the atomic approach is employed as a 'seed' to generate the approximate solutions for finite U. The width of the conduction band is reduced to zero in the AAS, and we choose its position such that the Friedel sum rule is satisfied, close to the chemical potential mu. We perform a complete study of the density of states of the SIAM over the whole relevant range of parameters: the empty dot, intermediate valence, Kondo and magnetic regimes. In the Kondo regime we obtain a density of states that characterizes well the structure of the Kondo peak. To show the usefulness of the method we have calculated the conductance of a quantum dot, side-coupled to a conduction band.

  16. The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

  17. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    PubMed

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain.

  18. Analysis of Anderson Acceleration on a Simplified Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics System

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Slattery, Stuart R; Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, R. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A standard method for solving coupled multiphysics problems in light water reactors is Picard iteration, which sequentially alternates between solving single physics applications. This solution approach is appealing due to simplicity of implementation and the ability to leverage existing software packages to accurately solve single physics applications. However, there are several drawbacks in the convergence behavior of this method; namely slow convergence and the necessity of heuristically chosen damping factors to achieve convergence in many cases. Anderson acceleration is a method that has been seen to be more robust and fast converging than Picard iteration for many problems, without significantly higher cost per iteration or complexity of implementation, though its effectiveness in the context of multiphysics coupling is not well explored. In this work, we develop a one-dimensional model simulating the coupling between the neutron distribution and fuel and coolant properties in a single fuel pin. We show that this model generally captures the convergence issues noted in Picard iterations which couple high-fidelity physics codes. We then use this model to gauge potential improvements with regard to rate of convergence and robustness from utilizing Anderson acceleration as an alternative to Picard iteration.

  19. Metallic Transport and Anderson Localization on In Atomic Layers on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shiro; Hosomura, Yoshikazu; Matsuda, Iwao; Hobara, Rei; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2008-03-01

    Metallic temperature dependence of electrical resistance have not been observed except extremely limited number of examples[1] below 100K in atomic-scale low-dimensional metal systems due to Anderson localization. Si(111)-√7 x√3 -In surface reconstruction consist of 1.2 ML In atoms. According to ARPES study, the surface is 2D metal with the large Fermi wave number (kF=14nm-1) and the large electron density (4.6x10^14eV-1cm-2), leading to a low resistance [2]. By using variable-temperature micro-four-point probe method [3], low resistance and metallic transport was found down to 10 K. It is quantitatively explained by the ARPES result by using Boltzmann equation R2D=4π^2λm^*e^2kF^2 kBT. By introducing defect, it shows semiconducting temperature dependence of variable range hopping due to Anderson localization. [1]K. Lee, et al. , Nature 441, 65 (2006). [2]E. Rotenberg, et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 246404 (2003). [3]T. Tanikawa, et al. , e-J. Surf. Sci. Nanotech. 1, 50 (2003)

  20. Hydrothermal assembly and luminescence property of lanthanide-containing Anderson polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Shu-Xia; Cao, Rui-Ge; Ji, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Shi-Wei; Ren, Yuan-Hang

    2008-09-01

    Two compounds, {[Sm(H 2O) 5] 2(TeMo 6O 24)}·6H 2O ( 1) and {[Eu(H 2O) 7] 2 (TeMo 6O 24)}·5H 2O ( 2) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 represents the first example of a 2D layer architecture constructed from Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo 6O 24] 6- and rare-earth ions Ln 3+. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure built up of alternating Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo 6O 24] 6- and rare-earth ions Eu 3+ along the c-axis. Luminescence measurement of 2 exhibits typical red fluorescent emission of the Eu 3+ ion at room temperature. Furthermore, the emission is intense enough to be observed macroscopically under UV irradiation (365 nm).