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Sample records for anderson localization excited

  1. Anderson Localization of Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Mueller, Cord A.; Delande, Dominique

    2009-11-20

    At low temperature, a quasi-one-dimensional ensemble of atoms with an attractive interaction forms a bright soliton. When exposed to a weak and smooth external potential, the shape of the soliton is hardly modified, but its center-of-mass motion is affected. We show that in a spatially correlated disordered potential, the quantum motion of a bright soliton displays Anderson localization. The localization length can be much larger than the soliton size and could be observed experimentally.

  2. Anderson localization in metallic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Mai, Zhijie; Lin, Fang; Pang, Wei; Xu, Haitao; Tan, Suiyan; Fu, Shenhe; Li, Yongyao

    2016-06-13

    Anderson localization has been observed in various types of waves, such as matter waves, optical waves and acoustic waves. Here we reveal that the effect of Anderson localization can be also induced in metallic nonlinear nanoparticle arrays excited by a random electrically driving field. We find that the dipole-induced nonlinearity results in ballistic expansion of dipole intensity during evolution; while the randomness of the external driving field can suppress such an expansion. Increasing the strength of randomness above the threshold value, a localized pattern of dipole intensity can be generated in the metallic nanoparticle arrays. By means of statistics, the mean intensity distribution of the dipoles reveals the formation of Anderson localization. We further show that the generated Anderson localization is highly confined, with its size down to the scale of incident wavelength. The reported results might facilitate the manipulations of electromagnetic fields in the scale of wavelength. PMID:27410338

  3. Hybrid Bloch-Anderson localization of light.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Simon; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Konotop, Vladimir V; Nolte, Stefan; Torner, Lluis; Szameit, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the interplay of Bloch oscillations and Anderson localization in optics. Gradual washing out of Bloch oscillations and the formation of nearly stationary averaged intensity distributions, which are symmetric for narrow and strongly asymmetric for broad input excitations, are observed experimentally in laser-written waveguide arrays. At large disorder levels Bloch oscillations are completely destroyed and both narrow and wide excitations lead to symmetric stationary averaged intensity distributions with exponentially decaying tails.

  4. Anderson localization in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Delande, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    In analogy with the usual Anderson localization taking place in time-independent disordered quantum systems where the disorder acts in configuration space, systems exposed to temporally disordered potentials can display Anderson localization in the time domain. We demonstrate this phenomenon with one-dimensional examples where a temporally disordered potential induces localization during the quantum evolution of wave packets, in contrast with a fully delocalized classical dynamics. This is an example of a time crystal phenomenon, i.e., a crystalline behavior in the time domain.

  5. Low shear viscosity due to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Giannakis, Ioannis; Hou Defu; Ren Haicang; Li Jiarong

    2008-01-15

    We study the Anderson localization effect on the shear viscosity in a system with random medium by Kubo formula. We show that this effect can suppress nonperturbatively the shear viscosity and other transport coefficients. The possible relevancy of such a suppression to the near perfect fluid behavior of the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  6. Resonant Anderson localization in segmented wires.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, Cristian; Serra, Llorenç

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a model of random segmented wire, with linear segments of two-dimensional wires joined by circular bends. The joining vertices act as scatterers on the propagating electron waves. The model leads to resonant Anderson localization when all segments are of similar length. The resonant behavior is present with one and also with several propagating modes. The probability distributions evolve from diffusive to localized regimes when increasing the number of segments in a similar way for long and short localization lengths. As a function of the energy, a finite segmented wire typically evolves from localized to diffusive to ballistic behavior in each conductance plateau.

  7. Anderson localization from the replica formalism.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Kamenev, Alex; Tian, Chushun

    2005-11-11

    We study Anderson localization in quasi-one-dimensional disordered wires within the framework of the replica sigma model. Applying a semiclassical approach (geodesic action plus Gaussian fluctuations) recently introduced within the context of supersymmetry by Lamacraft, Simons, and Zirnbauer, we compute the exact density of transmission matrix eigenvalues of superconducting wires (of symmetry class CI.) For the unitary class of metallic systems (class A) we are able to obtain the density function, save for its large transmission tail.

  8. Heavy adatoms and Anderson localization in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Aguilar, Jose H.; Uchoa, Bruno; Covaci, Lucian; Rappoport, Tatiana G.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze electronic localization in a graphene layer doped with adatoms sitting in the center of the honeycomb hexagon, as happens with the heaviest adatoms. In this configuration, the hybridization between the adatom orbitals and its neighboring carbon atoms mediate hopping processes that connect all six vertices of the honeycomb hexagon around the impurity. The amplitudes of the hopping depend on the symmetry of the orbital that hybridizes with graphene, leading to an orbital-dependent ``plaquette disorder''. To capture the physics of localization, we propose an effective graphene-only Hamiltonian that preserves the associated orbital symmetries and conduct a scaling analysis of the local density of states (LDOS) for large system sizes. We show that adatoms that form a zero-energy resonant state lead to Anderson localization in the vicinity of the Dirac point. Among those, we show that there is a symmetry class of adatoms for which Anderson localization is suppressed, leading to an exotic quantum critical metallic state with large charge puddles, that localizes only at the Dirac point.

  9. Distribution of critical temperature at Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammag, Rayda; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2016-05-01

    Based on a local mean-field theory approach at Anderson localization, we find a distribution function of critical temperature from that of disorder. An essential point of this local mean-field theory approach is that the information of the wave-function multifractality is introduced. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature (TK) shows a power-law tail in the limit of TK→0 regardless of the Kondo coupling constant. We also find that the distribution function of the ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc) gives a power-law behavior in the limit of Tc→0 when an interaction parameter for ferromagnetic instability lies below a critical value. However, the Tc distribution function stops the power-law increasing behavior in the Tc→0 limit and vanishes beyond the critical interaction parameter inside the ferromagnetic phase. These results imply that the typical Kondo temperature given by a geometric average always vanishes due to finite density of the distribution function in the TK→0 limit while the typical ferromagnetic transition temperature shows a phase transition at the critical interaction parameter. We propose that the typical transition temperature serves a criterion for quantum Griffiths phenomena vs smeared transitions: Quantum Griffiths phenomena occur above the typical value of the critical temperature while smeared phase transitions result at low temperatures below the typical transition temperature. We speculate that the ferromagnetic transition at Anderson localization shows the evolution from quantum Griffiths phenomena to smeared transitions around the critical interaction parameter at low temperatures.

  10. Random nanolasing in the Anderson localized regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Garcia, P. D.; Ek, S.; Gregersen, N.; Suhr, T.; Schubert, M.; Mørk, J.; Stobbe, S.; Lodahl, P.

    2014-04-01

    The development of nanoscale optical devices for classical and quantum photonics is affected by unavoidable fabrication imperfections that often impose performance limitations. However, disorder may also enable new functionalities, for example in random lasers, where lasing relies on random multiple scattering. The applicability of random lasers has been limited due to multidirectional emission, lack of tunability, and strong mode competition with chaotic fluctuations due to a weak mode confinement. The regime of Anderson localization of light has been proposed for obtaining stable multimode random lasing, and initial work concerned macroscopic one-dimensional layered media. Here, we demonstrate on-chip random nanolasers where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder. The strong confinement achieved by Anderson localization reduces the spatial overlap between lasing modes, thus preventing mode competition and improving stability. This enables highly efficient, stable and broadband wavelength-controlled lasers with very small mode volumes. Furthermore, the complex interplay between gain, dispersion-controlled slow light, and disorder is demonstrated experimentally for a non-conservative random medium. The statistical analysis shows a way towards optimizing random-lasing performance by reducing the localization length, a universal parameter.

  11. Exciting Molecules Close to the Rotational Quantum Resonance: Anderson Wall and Rotational Bloch Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2016-05-19

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under conditions close to the quantum resonance. The quantum resonance effect causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that a disturbance of the quantum resonance, either by the centrifugal distortion of the rotating molecules or a controlled detuning of the pulse train period from the so-called rotational revival time, eventually halts the growth by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum, the Anderson wall. Below the wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

  12. Anderson Localization in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, Tamas G.; Pittler, Ferenc

    2010-11-05

    At low temperature the low end of the QCD Dirac spectrum is well described by chiral random matrix theory. In contrast, at high temperature there is no similar statistical description of the spectrum. We show that at high temperature the lowest part of the spectrum consists of a band of statistically uncorrelated eigenvalues obeying essentially Poisson statistics and the corresponding eigenvectors are extremely localized. Going up in the spectrum the spectral density rapidly increases and the eigenvectors become more and more delocalized. At the same time the spectral statistics gradually crosses over to the bulk statistics expected from the corresponding random matrix ensemble. This phenomenon is reminiscent of Anderson localization in disordered conductors. Our findings are based on staggered Dirac spectra in quenched lattice simulations with the SU(2) gauge group.

  13. Transport and Anderson localization in disordered two-dimensional photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tal; Bartal, Guy; Fishman, Shmuel; Segev, Mordechai

    2007-03-01

    One of the most interesting phenomena in solid-state physics is Anderson localization, which predicts that an electron may become immobile when placed in a disordered lattice. The origin of localization is interference between multiple scatterings of the electron by random defects in the potential, altering the eigenmodes from being extended (Bloch waves) to exponentially localized. As a result, the material is transformed from a conductor to an insulator. Anderson's work dates back to 1958, yet strong localization has never been observed in atomic crystals, because localization occurs only if the potential (the periodic lattice and the fluctuations superimposed on it) is time-independent. However, in atomic crystals important deviations from the Anderson model always occur, because of thermally excited phonons and electron-electron interactions. Realizing that Anderson localization is a wave phenomenon relying on interference, these concepts were extended to optics. Indeed, both weak and strong localization effects were experimentally demonstrated, traditionally by studying the transmission properties of randomly distributed optical scatterers (typically suspensions or powders of dielectric materials). However, in these studies the potential was fully random, rather than being 'frozen' fluctuations on a periodic potential, as the Anderson model assumes. Here we report the experimental observation of Anderson localization in a perturbed periodic potential: the transverse localization of light caused by random fluctuations on a two-dimensional photonic lattice. We demonstrate how ballistic transport becomes diffusive in the presence of disorder, and that crossover to Anderson localization occurs at a higher level of disorder. Finally, we study how nonlinearities affect Anderson localization. As Anderson localization is a universal phenomenon, the ideas presented here could also be implemented in other systems (for example, matter waves), thereby making it feasible

  14. Strong Anderson localization in cold atom quantum quenches.

    PubMed

    Micklitz, T; Müller, C A; Altland, A

    2014-03-21

    Signatures of Anderson localization in the momentum distribution of a cold atom cloud after a quantum quench are studied. We consider a quasi-one-dimensional cloud initially prepared in a well-defined momentum state, and expanding for some time in a disorder speckle potential. Quantum interference generates a peak in the forward scattering amplitude which, unlike the common weak localization backscattering peak, is a signature of strong Anderson localization. We present a nonperturbative, and fully time resolved description of the phenomenon, covering the entire diffusion-to-localization crossover. Our results should be observable by present day experiments.

  15. Polaronic conduction and Anderson localization in reduced strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandeneau, Christopher S.; Yang, YiHsun; Olmstead, Marjorie A.; Bordia, Rajendra K.; Ohuchi, Fumio S.

    2015-12-01

    Electron transport mechanisms in reduced Sr0.5Ba0.5Nb2O6 (SBN50) are investigated from ˜100 to 955 K through an analysis of the electrical conductivity (σ) and the Seebeck coefficient (S) with respect to temperature (T). Notably, experimental evidence is presented that supports a scenario of Anderson localization below 600 K and carrier excitation across a mobility edge at higher temperature. As a relaxor ferroelectric, stoichiometric SBN has intrinsic disorder associated with both the distribution of Sr/Ba vacancies and the formation of polarized nanoregions. The removal of oxygen through reduction generates conduction electrons in SBN. At the lowest temperatures measured (100-155 K), the electrical conductivity exhibits a temperature dependence characteristic of variable range hopping, followed by a transition to small polaron hopping at intermediate temperatures (250-545 K). In both the variable range and small polaron hopping regimes, a semiconductor-like temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity (dσ/dT > 0) was observed. However, above 615 K, dσ/dT decreases dramatically and eventually becomes metal-like (dσ/dT < 0). Concomitantly, the Seebeck coefficient exhibits a linear dependence on lnT from 615 to 955 K with the same slope (˜104 μ V/K) for both polycrystalline SBN50 and single crystalline SBN61 (both reduced), indicating a similar, constant density of states near the Fermi level for both compositions. The application of Seebeck coefficient theory to this inherently disordered material reveals that the excitation of carriers across a mobility edge is likely responsible for the change in dσ/dT at high temperature. Such findings may have a significant impact in the field of conductive ferroelectrics.

  16. On the Anderson localization conjecture in Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Constanze; Busse, Kyle; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In 1958, Anderson suggested that sufficiently large impurities in a semi-conductor could lead to spatial localization of electrons. This idea unfolded into the field of Anderson Localization, one of the most fascinating phenomena in solid-state physics as it plays a major role in the conductive properties of imperfectly ordered materials. The Anderson Localization Conjecture claims that random disorder of any strength causes localization of electrons in the medium. The problem has proven to be highly non-trivial. Over the years the community has argued whether spatial localization occurs in 2D for small impurities. From a mathematical standpoint, the conjecture is still considered an open question. In 2013, Liaw challenged the commonly held assumption that localization holds in 2D by introducing a new mathematically more rigorous method to test for extended states, and applying it to the discrete random Schrödinger operator. One of the advantages of the underlying method is its versatility. It can be applied to any ordered system such as colloids, crystals, and atomic lattices. In a cross-disciplinary effort we merge this method with a numerical code used to simulate 2D physics systems, in preparation for experimentally testing the theory against complex plasma crystals.

  17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with Anderson-localized modes.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Luca; Thyrrestrup, Henri; Stobbe, Søren; Garcia, Pedro David; Smolka, Stephan; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-03-12

    A major challenge in quantum optics and quantum information technology is to enhance the interaction between single photons and single quantum emitters. This requires highly engineered optical cavities that are inherently sensitive to fabrication imperfections. We have demonstrated a fundamentally different approach in which disorder is used as a resource rather than a nuisance. We generated strongly confined Anderson-localized cavity modes by deliberately adding disorder to photonic crystal waveguides. The emission rate of a semiconductor quantum dot embedded in the waveguide was enhanced by a factor of 15 on resonance with the Anderson-localized mode, and 94% of the emitted single photons coupled to the mode. Disordered photonic media thus provide an efficient platform for quantum electrodynamics, offering an approach to inherently disorder-robust quantum information devices.

  18. Anderson localization and the theory of dirty superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapitulnik, A.; Kotliar, G.

    1985-01-01

    A study is made of the effect of Anderson localization in dirty superconductors. The scale dependence of the diffusion in the vicinity of the mobility edge results in a strong renormalization of the zero-temperature coherence length. This implies the breakdown of the Ginzburg criterion close to the metal-insulator transition and thus the importance of fluctuations in this regime. The upper critical field is calculated, and possible experiments are also discussed.

  19. Centrifugal Distortion Causes Anderson Localization in Laser Kicked Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floss, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2014-05-01

    The periodically kicked 2D rotor is a textbook model in nonlinear dynamics. The classical kicked rotor can exhibit truly chaotic motion, whilst in the quantum regime this chaotic motion is suppressed by a mechanism similar to Anderson Localization. Up to now, these effects have been mainly observed in an atom optics analogue of a quantum rotor: cold atoms in a standing light wave. We demonstrate that common linear molecules (like N2, O2, CO2, ...), kicked by a train of short linearly polarized laser pulses, can exhibit a new mechanism for dynamical Anderson Localization due to their non-rigidity. When the pulses are separated by the rotational revival time trev = πℏ / B , the angular momentum J grows ballistically (Quantum Resonance). We show that, due to the centrifugal distortion of fast spinning molecules, above some critical value J =Jcr the Quantum Resonance is suppressed via the mechanism of Anderson Localization. This leads to a non-sinusoidal oscillation of the angular momentum distribution, which may be experimentally observed even at ambient conditions by using current techniques for laser molecular alignment.

  20. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-01

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. We answer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precise sense, motivate our construction. We note that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order. We show that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized. We also study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry-Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant. We formulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry-Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Finally, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.

  1. Three-dimensional Anderson localization in variable scale disorder.

    PubMed

    McGehee, W R; Kondov, S S; Xu, W; Zirbel, J J; DeMarco, B

    2013-10-01

    We report on the impact of variable-scale disorder on 3D Anderson localization of a noninteracting ultracold atomic gas. A spin-polarized gas of fermionic atoms is localized by allowing it to expand in an optical speckle potential. Using a sudden quench of the localized density distribution, we verify that the density profile is representative of the underlying single-particle localized states. The geometric mean of the disordering potential correlation lengths is varied by a factor of 4 via adjusting the aperture of the speckle focusing lens. We observe that the root-mean-square size of the localized gas increases approximately linearly with the speckle correlation length, in qualitative agreement with the scaling predicted by weak scattering theory.

  2. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  3. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  4. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  5. Anderson Localization in Quantum Chaos: Scaling and Universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, A. M.; Wang, J.

    2007-10-01

    The one-parameter scaling theory is a powerful tool to investigate Anderson localization effects in disordered systems. In this paper we show that this theory can be adapted to the context of quantum chaos provided that the classical phase space is homogeneous, not mixed. The localization problem in this case is defined in momentum, not in real space. We then employ the one-parameter scaling theory to: (a) propose a precise characterization of the type of classical dynamics related to the Wigner-Dyson and Poisson statistics which also predicts in which situations Anderson localization corrections invalidate the relation between classical chaos and random matrix theory encoded in the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture, (b) to identify the universality class associated with the metal-insulator transition in quantum chaos. In low dimensions it is characterized by classical superdiffusion, in higher dimensions it has in general a quantum origin as in the case of disordered systems. We illustrate these two cases by studying 1d kicked rotors with non-analytical potentials and a 3d kicked rotor with a smooth potential.

  6. Integrals of motion for one-dimensional Anderson localized systems

    DOE PAGES

    Modak, Ranjan; Mukerjee, Subroto; Yuzbashyan, Emil A.; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2016-03-02

    Anderson localization is known to be inevitable in one-dimension for generic disordered models. Since localization leads to Poissonian energy level statistics, we ask if localized systems possess ‘additional’ integrals of motion as well, so as to enhance the analogy with quantum integrable systems. Weanswer this in the affirmative in the present work. We construct a set of nontrivial integrals of motion for Anderson localized models, in terms of the original creation and annihilation operators. These are found as a power series in the hopping parameter. The recently found Type-1 Hamiltonians, which are known to be quantum integrable in a precisemore » sense, motivate our construction.Wenote that these models can be viewed as disordered electron models with infinite-range hopping, where a similar series truncates at the linear order.Weshow that despite the infinite range hopping, all states but one are localized.Wealso study the conservation laws for the disorder free Aubry–Andre model, where the states are either localized or extended, depending on the strength of a coupling constant.Weformulate a specific procedure for averaging over disorder, in order to examine the convergence of the power series. Using this procedure in the Aubry–Andre model, we show that integrals of motion given by our construction are well-defined in localized phase, but not so in the extended phase. Lastly, we also obtain the integrals of motion for a model with interactions to lowest order in the interaction.« less

  7. Anderson Localization, Non-linearity and Stable Genetic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Charles L.

    2006-07-01

    In many models of genotypic evolution, the vector of genotype populations satisfies a system of linear ordinary differential equations. This system of equations models a competition between differential replication rates (fitness) and mutation. Mutation operates as a generalized diffusion process on genotype space. In the large time asymptotics, the replication term tends to produce a single dominant quasi-species, unless the mutation rate is too high, in which case the asymptotic population becomes de-localized. We introduce a more macroscopic picture of genotypic evolution wherein a random fitness term in the linear model produces features analogous to Anderson localization. When coupled with density dependent non-linearities, which limit the population of any given genotype, we obtain a model whose large time asymptotics display stable genotypic diversity.

  8. Permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization in magnetophotonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi-Ghaleh, R.; Namdar, A.

    2016-11-01

    This theoretical study was carried out to investigate the permittivity disorder induced Anderson localization of light in one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals. It was shown that the disorder create the resonant transmittance modes associated with enhanced Faraday rotations inside the photonic band gap. The average localization length of the right- and left-handed circular polarizations (RCP and LCP), the total transmittance together with the ensemble average of the RCP and LCP phases, and the Faraday rotation of the structure were also investigated. For this purpose, the off-diagonal elements of the permittivity tensor were varied for various wavelengths of incident light. The obtained results revealed the nonreciprocal property of circular eigen modes. This study can potentially open up a new aspect for utilizing the disorder magnetophotonic structures in nonreciprocal systems such as isolators and circulators.

  9. Anderson localization of matter waves in quantum-chaos theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-06-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to three-dimensional optical speckles by analyzing the statistics of the energy-level spacings. This method allows us to consider realistic models of the speckle patterns, taking into account the strongly anisotropic correlations which are realized in concrete experimental configurations. We first compute the mobility edge Ec of a speckle pattern created using a single laser beam. We find that Ec drifts when we vary the anisotropy of the speckle grains, going from higher values when the speckles are squeezed along the beam propagation axis to lower values when they are elongated. We also consider the case where two speckle patterns are superimposed, forming interference fringes, and we find that Ec is increased compared to the case of idealized isotropic disorder. We discuss the important implications of our findings for cold-atom experiments.

  10. Ferrimagnetism and single-particle excitations in a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiro; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Zhang, Qinfang; Li, Tao; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    By using the variationalcluster approximation and cluster perturbation theory, we investigate the magnetism and single-particle excitations of a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice as an effective model for the single-side hydrogenated graphene, namely, graphone. We calculate the magnetic moment as a function of U (Coulomb interaction on impurity sites) with showing that the ground state is ferrimagneticfor any U > 0. We then calculate the single-particle excitations and show that the single-particle excitations are gapless and exhibit quadratic dispersion relation near the Fermi energy.

  11. Information Transmission and Anderson Localization in two-dimensional networks of firing-rate neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Joseph; Hentschel, George

    Firing-rate networks offer a coarse model of signal propagation in the brain. Here we analyze sparse, 2D planar firing-rate networks with no synapses beyond a certain cutoff distance. Additionally, we impose Dale's Principle to ensure that each neuron makes only or inhibitory outgoing connections. Using spectral methods, we find that the number of neurons participating in excitations of the network becomes insignificant whenever the connectivity cutoff is tuned to a value near or below the average interneuron separation. Further, neural activations exceeding a certain threshold stay confined to a small region of space. This behavior is an instance of Anderson localization, a disorder-induced phase transition by which an information channel is rendered unable to transmit signals. We discuss several potential implications of localization for both local and long-range computation in the brain. This work was supported in part by Grants JSMF/ 220020321 and NSF/IOS/1208126.

  12. Anderson localization in optical lattices with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, E.; Pilati, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the Anderson localization of atomic gases exposed to simple-cubic optical lattices with a superimposed disordered speckle pattern. The two mobility edges in the first band and the corresponding critical filling factors are determined as a function of the disorder strength, ranging from vanishing disorder up to the critical disorder intensity where the two mobility edges merge and the whole band becomes localized. Our theoretical analysis is based both on continuous-space models that take into account the details of the spatial correlation of the speckle pattern, and also on a simplified tight-binding model with an uncorrelated distribution of the on-site energies. The mobility edges are computed via the analysis of the energy-level statistics, and we determine the universal value of the ratio between consecutive level spacings at the mobility edge. We analyze the role of the spatial correlation of the disorder, and we also discuss a qualitative comparison with available experimental data for interacting atomic Fermi gases obtained in the moderate interaction regime.

  13. Routes Towards Anderson-Like Localization of Bose-Einstein Condensates in Disordered Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, T.; Drenkelforth, S.; Kruse, J.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J.; Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-10-21

    We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, possible routes towards Anderson-like localization of Bose-Einstein condensates in disordered potentials. The dependence of this quantum interference effect on the nonlinear interactions and the shape of the disorder potential is investigated. Experiments with an optical lattice and a superimposed disordered potential reveal the lack of Anderson localization. A theoretical analysis shows that this absence is due to the large length scale of the disorder potential as well as its screening by the nonlinear interactions. Further analysis shows that incommensurable superlattices should allow for the observation of the crossover from the nonlinear screening regime to the Anderson localized case within realistic experimental parameters.

  14. Anderson localization to enhance light-matter interaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Pedro David

    2016-04-01

    Deliberately introducing disorder in low-dimensional nanostructures like photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) [1] or photonic crystals (PCs) [2] leads to Anderson localization where light is efficiently trapped by random multiple scattering with the lattice imperfections. These disorder-induced optical modes hace been demonstrated to be very promising for cavity-quantum electrodynamics (QED) experiments where the radiative emission rate of single quantum emitters can be controlled when tuned through resonance with one of these random cavities. Our statistical analysis of the emission dynamics from single quantum dots embeded in disordered PCWs [3] provides detailed insigth about the statistical properties of QED in these complex nanostructures. In addition, using internal light sources reveals new physics in the form of nonuniversal intensity correlations between the different scattered paths within the structure which imprint the local QED properties deep inside the complex structure onto the far-field intensity pattern [2]. Finally, increasing the optical gain in PCWs allows on-chip random nanolasing where the cavity feedback is provided by the intrinsic disorder which enables highly efficient, stable, and broadband tunable lasers with very small mode volumes [4]. The figure of merit of these disorder-induced cavities is their localization length which determines to a large degree the coupling efficiency of a quantum emitter to a disorder-induced cavity as well as the efficiency of random lasing and reveals a strongly dispersive behavior and a non-trivial dependence on disorder in PCWs [5]. [1] L. Sapienza, H. Thyrrestrup, S. Stobbe, P.D. Garcia, S. Smolka, and P. Lodahl, Science 327, 1352 (2010). [2] P. D. García, S. Stobbe, I. Soellner and P. Lodahl, Physical Review Letters 109, 253902 (2012). [3] A. Javadi, S. Maibom, L. Sapienza, H. Thyrrestrup, P.D. Garcia, and P. Lodahl, Opt. Express 22, 30992 (2014). [4] J. Liu, P. D. Garcia, S. Ek, N. Gregersen, T. Suhr, M

  15. Mean-field theory and ɛ expansion for Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.; Lubensky, T. C.

    1981-03-01

    A general field-theoretic formulation of the Anderson model for the localization of wave functions in a random potential is given in terms of n-component replicated fields in the limit n-->0, and is analyzed primarily for spatial dimension d>=4. Lengths ξ1 and ξ2 associated with the spatial decay of correlations in the single-particle and two-particle Green's functions, respectively, are introduced. Two different regimes, the weak coupling and strong coupling, are distinguished depending on whether ξ-11 or ξ-12, respectively, vanishes as the mobility energy, Ec, is approached. The weak-coupling regime vanishes as d-->4+. Mean-field theory is developed from the uniform minimum of the Lagrangian for both the strong- and weak-coupling cases. For the strong-coupling case it gives the exponents va=14, γa=βa=12, η=0, and μ=1, where βa is the exponent associated with the density of extended states and μ is that associated with the conductivity. Simple heuristic arguments are used to verify the correctness of these unusual mean-field values. Infrared divergences in perturbation theory for the strong-coupling case occur for d<8, and an ɛ expansion (ɛ=8-d) is developed which is found to be identical to that previously analyzed for the statistics of lattice animals and which gives βa=12-ɛ12, η=-ɛ9, va=14+ɛ36, and μ=1-5ɛ36. The results are consistent with the Ward identity, which in combination with scaling arguments requires that βa+γa=1. The treatment takes account of the fact that the average of the on-site Green's function [G(x-->,x-->E)]av is nonzero and is predicated on this quantity being real, i.e., on the density of states vanishing at the mobility edge. We also show that localized states emerge naturally from local minima of finite action in the Lagrangian. These instanton solutions are analyzed on a lattice where the cutoff produced by the lattice constant leads to lattice instantons which exist for all d, in contrast to the case for the

  16. Wegner estimates, Lifshitz tails, and Anderson localization for Gaussian random magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Naomasa

    2016-07-01

    The Wegner estimate for the Hamiltonian of the Anderson model for the special Gaussian random magnetic field is extended to more general magnetic fields. The Lifshitz tail upper bounds of the integrated density of states as analyzed by Nakamura are reviewed and extended so that Gaussian random magnetic fields can be treated. By these and multiscale analysis, the Anderson localization at low energies is proven.

  17. Anderson attractors in active arrays

    PubMed Central

    Laptyeva, Tetyana V.; Tikhomirov, Andrey A.; Kanakov, Oleg I.; Ivanchenko, Mikhail V.

    2015-01-01

    In dissipationless linear media, spatial disorder induces Anderson localization of matter, light, and sound waves. The addition of nonlinearity causes interaction between the eigenmodes, which results in a slow wave diffusion. We go beyond the dissipationless limit of Anderson arrays and consider nonlinear disordered systems that are subjected to the dissipative losses and energy pumping. We show that the Anderson modes of the disordered Ginsburg-Landau lattice possess specific excitation thresholds with respect to the pumping strength. When pumping is increased above the threshold for the band-edge modes, the lattice dynamics yields an attractor in the form of a stable multi-peak pattern. The Anderson attractor is the result of a joint action by the pumping-induced mode excitation, nonlinearity-induced mode interactions, and dissipative stabilization. The regimes of Anderson attractors can be potentially realized with polariton condensates lattices, active waveguide or cavity-QED arrays. PMID:26304462

  18. Beyond Anderson localization in 1D: anomalous localization of microwaves in random waveguides.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Marín, A A; Méndez-Bermúdez, J A; Carbonell, J; Cervera, F; Sánchez-Dehesa, J; Gopar, V A

    2014-12-01

    Experimental evidence demonstrating that anomalous localization of waves can be induced in a controllable manner is reported. A microwave waveguide with dielectric slabs randomly placed is used to confirm the presence of anomalous localization. If the random spacing between slabs follows a distribution with a power-law tail (Lévy-type distribution), unconventional properties in the microwave-transmission fluctuations take place revealing the presence of anomalous localization. We study both theoretically and experimentally the complete distribution of the transmission through random waveguides characterized by α=1/2 ("Lévy waveguides") and α=3/4, α being the exponent of the power-law tail of the Lévy-type distribution. As we show, the transmission distributions are determined by only two parameters, both of them experimentally accessible. Effects of anomalous localization on the transmission are compared with those from the standard Anderson localization.

  19. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-29

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization. PMID:27517785

  20. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization.

  1. Anderson localization in one-dimension with Levy-type disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Conrad; Ekuma, Chinedu; Terletska, Hanna; Meng, Ziyang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Abstract: Quantum transport through disordered systems has been the subject of extensive research since Anderson's seminal theory of localization. Motivated by experimental realizations of light transport across media exhibiting Levy-type fluctuations, we study the one-dimensional Anderson model where the random site energies are governed by a probability distribution with a broad tail, otherwise known as Levy-type. We numerically compute the Lyapunov exponent and its variance. This exponent is a self-averaging quantity whose inverse in certain cases can be used to define the localization length. Furthermore, we check for the validity of single parameter scaling (SPS), and its dependence on the Levy index.

  2. Non-perturbative Anderson localization in heavy-tailed potentials via large deviations moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2016-09-01

    We study a class of Anderson Hamiltonians with heavy-tailed independent and identically distributed random potential on graphs with sub-exponential growth of the balls and of the number of self-avoiding paths connecting pairs of points. We show that for a class of marginal distributions, Anderson localization occurs non-perturbatively, i.e., for any nonzero amplitude of the potential, like in one-dimensional systems. The proof is based on the moment analysis of the Green functions via large deviations estimates.

  3. Anderson localization in optical lattices with speckle disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Sucu, Serpil; Aktas, Saban; Okan, S. Erol; Akdeniz, Zehra; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2011-12-15

    We study the localization properties of noninteracting waves propagating in a speckle-like potential superposed on a one-dimensional lattice. Using a combined decimation-renormalization procedure, we estimate the localization length for a tight-binding Hamiltonian where site energies are square-sinc-correlated random variables. By decreasing the width of the correlation function, the disorder patterns approach a {delta}-correlated disorder, and the localization length becomes almost energy independent in the strong disorder limit. We show that this regime can be reached for a size of the speckle grains on the order of (lower than) four lattice steps.

  4. Snapshots of Anderson localization beyond the ensemble average

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dardiry, Ramy G. S.; Faez, Sanli; Lagendijk, Ad

    2012-09-01

    We study (1+1)D transverse localization of electromagnetic radiation at microwave frequencies directly by two-dimensional spatial scans. Since the longitudinal direction can be mapped onto time, our experiments provide unique snapshots of the buildup of localized waves. The evolution of the wave functions is compared with semianalytical calculations. Studies beyond ensemble averages reveal counterintuitive surprises. Oscillations of the wave functions are observed in space and explained in terms of a beating between the eigenstates.

  5. Observation of Anderson localization in ultrathin films of three-dimensional topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Xiao; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Chaojing; Yang, Wenmin; Wu, Kehui; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Li, Yongqing

    2015-05-29

    Anderson localization, the absence of diffusive transport in disordered systems, has been manifested as hopping transport in numerous electronic systems, whereas in recently discovered topological insulators it has not been directly observed. Here, we report experimental demonstration of a crossover from diffusive transport in the weak antilocalization regime to variable range hopping transport in the Anderson localization regime with ultrathin (Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x})_{2}Te_{3} films. As disorder becomes stronger, negative magnetoconductivity due to the weak antilocalization is gradually suppressed, and eventually, positive magnetoconductivity emerges when the electron system becomes strongly localized. This work reveals the critical role of disorder in the quantum transport properties of ultrathin topological insulator films, in which theories have predicted rich physics related to topological phase transitions.

  6. Quantum thermalization and many-body Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huse, David

    2016-05-01

    The out-of-equilibrium dynamics of closed quantum many-body systems can now be explored in a variety of laboratories using a variety of different physical systems, and as a consequence have received a lot of recent theoretical attention. When such systems do go to thermal equilibrium under their own unitary time evolution, this is what is called thermalization. Thermalization is what happens at long times in many large interacting and closed quantum systems, and one way of understanding part of how this happens is via the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). The main generic exception to thermalization is many-body localization (MBL), where the system fails to act as a bath to thermalize itself, in spite of being strongly interacting. Instead, the quantum state of a MBL system remains localized near its initial state. MBL is now understood as a new type of quantum integrability, with localized conserved operators. There is a new type of quantum phase transition between MBL and thermalization as one decreases the static randomness in the system; this phase transition remains poorly understood.

  7. Anderson Localization of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a 3D Random Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Minguzzi, A.; Tiggelen, B. A. van; Shapiro, B.

    2008-04-25

    We study the effect of Anderson localization on the expansion of a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a harmonic trap, in a 3D random potential. We use scaling arguments and the self-consistent theory of localization to show that the long-time behavior of the condensate density is controlled by a single parameter equal to the ratio of the mobility edge and the chemical potential of the condensate. We find that the two critical exponents of the localization transition determine the evolution of the condensate density in time and space.

  8. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: Li (x) Fe(7)Se(8).

    PubMed

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of Li x Fe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that Li x Fe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  9. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: LixFe7Se8

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of LixFe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that LixFe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  10. Eigenmodal analysis of Anderson localization: Applications to photonic lattices and Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Guanwen; Kouzaev, Guennadi

    2016-10-01

    We present the eigenmodal analysis techniques enhanced towards calculations of optical and non-interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) modes formed by random potentials and localized by Anderson effect. The results are compared with the published measurements and verified additionally by the convergence criterion. In 2-D BECs captured in circular areas, the randomness shows edge localization of the high-order Tamm-modes. To avoid strong diffusive effect, which is typical for BECs trapped by speckle potentials, a 3-D-lattice potential with increased step magnitudes is proposed, and the BECs in these lattices are simulated and plotted.

  11. Scaling analysis of transverse Anderson localization in a disordered optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaie, Behnam; Mafi, Arash

    2016-08-01

    The intention of this paper is twofold. First, the mode-width probability density function (PDF) is introduced as a powerful statistical tool to study and compare the transverse Anderson localization properties of a disordered quasi-one-dimensional optical waveguide. Second, by analyzing the scaling properties of the mode-width PDF with the transverse size of the waveguide, it is shown that the mode-width PDF gradually converges to a terminal configuration. Therefore, it may not be necessary to study a real-sized disordered structure in order to obtain its statistical localization properties and the same PDF can be obtained for a substantially smaller structure. This observation is important because it can reduce the often demanding computational effort that is required to study the statistical properties of Anderson localization in disordered waveguides. Using the mode-width PDF, substantial information about the impact of the waveguide parameters on its localization properties is extracted. This information is generally obscured when disordered waveguides are analyzed using other techniques such as the beam propagation method. As an example of the utility of the mode-width PDF, it is shown that the cladding refractive index can be used to quench the number of extended modes, hence improving the contrast in image transport properties of disordered waveguides.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of disordered polymer optical fibers for transverse Anderson localization of light.

    PubMed

    Karbasi, Salman; Frazier, Ryan J; Mirr, Craig R; Koch, Karl W; Mafi, Arash

    2013-07-29

    We develop and characterize a disordered polymer optical fiber that uses transverse Anderson localization as a novel waveguiding mechanism. The developed polymer optical fiber is composed of 80,000 strands of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) that are randomly mixed and drawn into a square cross section optical fiber with a side width of 250 μm. Initially, each strand is 200 μm in diameter and 8-inches long. During the mixing process of the original fiber strands, the fibers cross over each other; however, a large draw ratio guarantees that the refractive index profile is invariant along the length of the fiber for several tens of centimeters. The large refractive index difference of 0.1 between the disordered sites results in a small localized beam radius that is comparable to the beam radius of conventional optical fibers. The input light is launched from a standard single mode optical fiber using the butt-coupling method and the near-field output beam from the disordered fiber is imaged using a 40X objective and a CCD camera. The output beam diameter agrees well with the expected results from the numerical simulations. The disordered optical fiber presented in this work is the first device-level implementation of 2D Anderson localization, and can potentially be used for image transport and short-haul optical communication systems.

  13. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  14. Anderson localization with second quantized fields in a coupled array of waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Clinton; Vemuri, Gautam; Agarwal, G. S.

    2010-11-15

    We report a theoretical study of Anderson localization of nonclassical light in an array of waveguides in which neighboring waveguides are evanescently coupled and in which the disorder can be added in a controlled manner. We use squeezed light at the input to investigate the effects of nonclassicality and compare the results with those obtained by using conventional classical fields, such as a coherent field and a Gaussian field. Our results show that there is an enhancement in fluctuations of localized light due to the medium's disorder. We find superbunching of the localized light, which may be useful for enhancing the interaction between radiation and matter. Another important consequence of sub-Poissonian statistics of the incoming light is to quench the total fluctuations at the output. Finally, we show that as a result of the multiplicative noise in the problem, the output field is far from Gaussian even if the input is a coherent field.

  15. Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons: Crossover from diffusive transport to Anderson localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, Kengo; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2014-03-03

    Conductance fluctuation of edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons (ED-GNRs) is examined using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique combined with the extended Hückel approximation. The mean free path λ and the localization length ξ of the ED-GNRs are determined to classify the quantum transport regimes. In the diffusive regime where the length L{sub c} of the ED-GNRs is much longer than λ and much shorter than ξ, the conductance histogram is given by a Gaussian distribution function with universal conductance fluctuation. In the localization regime where L{sub c}≫ξ, the histogram is no longer the universal Gaussian distribution but a lognormal distribution that characterizes Anderson localization.

  16. Metallic Transport and Anderson Localization on In Atomic Layers on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shiro; Hosomura, Yoshikazu; Matsuda, Iwao; Hobara, Rei; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2008-03-01

    Metallic temperature dependence of electrical resistance have not been observed except extremely limited number of examples[1] below 100K in atomic-scale low-dimensional metal systems due to Anderson localization. Si(111)-√7 x√3 -In surface reconstruction consist of 1.2 ML In atoms. According to ARPES study, the surface is 2D metal with the large Fermi wave number (kF=14nm-1) and the large electron density (4.6x10^14eV-1cm-2), leading to a low resistance [2]. By using variable-temperature micro-four-point probe method [3], low resistance and metallic transport was found down to 10 K. It is quantitatively explained by the ARPES result by using Boltzmann equation R2D=4π^2λm^*e^2kF^2 kBT. By introducing defect, it shows semiconducting temperature dependence of variable range hopping due to Anderson localization. [1]K. Lee, et al. , Nature 441, 65 (2006). [2]E. Rotenberg, et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 246404 (2003). [3]T. Tanikawa, et al. , e-J. Surf. Sci. Nanotech. 1, 50 (2003)

  17. Investigation of Anderson localization in disordered heterostructures irradiated by a Gaussian beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour

    2016-02-01

    The propagation of a Gaussian beam through a one-dimensional disordered media is studied. By employing the transfer matrix method, the localization length as a function of frequency is calculated for different values of transverse coordinate r. It is demonstrated that the localization length significantly depends on r in different frequency ranges. This result is in contrast to those reported for a plane wave incident on disordered structures in which the localization length is transversely constant. For some frequency regions, the peak of localization length is red-shifted and becomes smaller with increasing the transverse coordinate. At some frequencies, the system is in the localized state for particular values of r, while at other r values the system is in the extend regime at the same frequencies. It is observed that the quality of localization at each frequency depends on r. To quantify the localization behavior of the whole Gaussian beam, a modified localization length is defined in terms of the input and output powers of the Gaussian beam where the dependence of Anderson localization on the transverse coordinate is considered. It is suggested that this modified localization length is used in experiments performed for study of wave propagation in one-dimensional random media under illumination of laser beams.

  18. Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in randomly-stratified magnetodielectric media with uniform impedance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihong

    2015-06-01

    The propagation and the Anderson localization of electromagnetic waves in a randomly-stratified slab, where both the dielectric permittivity and the magnetic permeability depend on one spatial coordinate in a random manner, is theoretically studied. The case where the wave impedance is uniform, while the refractive index is random, is considered in detail. The localization length and the disorder-averaged transmittance of s and p waves incident obliquely on the slab are calculated as a function of the incident angle θ and the strength of randomness in a numerically precise manner, using the invariant imbedding method. It is found that the waves incident perpendicularly on the slab are delocalized, while those incident obliquely are localized. As the incident angle increases from zero, the localization length decreases from infinity monotonically to some finite value. The localization length is found to depend on the incident angle as θ-4 and a simple analytical formula, which works quite well for weak disorder and small incident angles, is derived. The localization length does not depend on the wave polarization, but the disorder-averaged transmittance generally does.

  19. Tunable Anderson Localization in Hydrogenated Graphene Based on the Electric Field Effect: First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-03-01

    We present a mechanism for reversible switching of the Anderson localization (AL) of electrons in hydrogenated graphene through modulation of the H coverage on graphene by external electric fields. The main idea is to exploit the unique acid-base chemistry (i.e., proton transfer reaction) between NH3 gas and hydrogenated graphene, which can be controlled by applying perpendicular electric fields. The proposed field-induced control of disorder in hydrogenated graphene not only has scientific merits in a systematic study of AL of electrons in grapheme but can also lead to new insight into the development of a new type of transistor based on reversible on/off switching of AL. Furthermore, the reversible and effective tuning of the H coverage on graphene should be useful for tailoring material properties of weakly hydrogenated graphene. This work was funded by the NREL LDRD program (DE-AC36-08GO28308).

  20. One-dimensional Anderson Localization: distribution of wavefunction amplitude and phase at the band center

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V. E.; Yudson, V. I.

    2009-05-14

    The statistics of normalized wavefunctions in the one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model of localization is considered. It is shown that at any energy that corresponds to a rational filling factor f = (p/q) there is a statistical anomaly which is seen in expansion of the generating function (GF) to the order q-2 in the disorder parameter. We study in detail the principle anomaly at f = (1/2) that appears in the leading order. The transfer-matrix equation of the Fokker-Planck type with a two-dimensional internal space is derived for GF. It is shown that the zero-mode variant of this equation is integrable and a solution for the generating function is found in the thermodynamic limit.

  1. Commensurability effects in one-dimensional Anderson localization: Anomalies in eigenfunction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, V.E.; Yudson, V.I.

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Statistics of normalized eigenfunctions in one-dimensional Anderson localization at E = 0 is studied. > Moments of inverse participation ratio are calculated. > Equation for generating function is derived at E = 0. > An exact solution for generating function at E = 0 is obtained. > Relation of the generating function to the phase distribution function is established. - Abstract: The one-dimensional (1d) Anderson model (AM), i.e. a tight-binding chain with random uncorrelated on-site energies, has statistical anomalies at any rational point f=(2a)/({lambda}{sub E}) , where a is the lattice constant and {lambda}{sub E} is the de Broglie wavelength. We develop a regular approach to anomalous statistics of normalized eigenfunctions {psi}(r) at such commensurability points. The approach is based on an exact integral transfer-matrix equation for a generating function {Phi}{sub r}(u, {phi}) (u and {phi} have a meaning of the squared amplitude and phase of eigenfunctions, r is the position of the observation point). This generating function can be used to compute local statistics of eigenfunctions of 1d AM at any disorder and to address the problem of higher-order anomalies at f=p/q with q > 2. The descender of the generating function P{sub r}({phi}){identical_to}{Phi}{sub r}(u=0,{phi}) is shown to be the distribution function of phase which determines the Lyapunov exponent and the local density of states. In the leading order in the small disorder we derived a second-order partial differential equation for the r-independent ('zero-mode') component {Phi}(u, {phi}) at the E = 0 (f=1/2 ) anomaly. This equation is nonseparable in variables u and {phi}. Yet, we show that due to a hidden symmetry, it is integrable and we construct an exact solution for {Phi}(u, {phi}) explicitly in quadratures. Using this solution we computed moments I{sub m} = N< vertical bar {psi} vertical bar {sup 2m}> (m {>=} 1) for a chain of the length N {yields} {infinity} and found an

  2. Non-conventional Anderson localization in a matched quarter stack with metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Herrera, E. J.; Izrailev, F. M.; Makarov, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    We study the problem of non-conventional Anderson localization emerging in bilayer periodic-on-average structures with alternating layers of materials, with positive and negative refraction indices na and nb. Attention is paid to the model of the so-called quarter stack with perfectly matched layers (the same unperturbed by disorder impedances, Za = Zb, and optical path lengths, nada = |nb|db, with da and db being the thicknesses of basic layers). As was recently numerically discovered, in such structures with weak fluctuations of refractive indices (compositional disorder), the localization length Lloc is enormously large in comparison to the conventional localization occurring in the structures with positive refraction indices only. In this paper we develop a new approach, which allows us to derive the expression for Lloc for weak disorder and any wave frequency ω. In the limit ω → 0 one gets a quite specific dependence, L-1loc∝σ4ω8, which is obtained within the fourth order of perturbation theory. We also analyze the interplay between two types of disorder, when in addition to the fluctuations of na and nb, the thicknesses da and db slightly fluctuate as well (positional disorder). We show how conventional localization recovers with the addition of positional disorder.

  3. Statistical measurements of quantum emitters coupled to Anderson-localized modes in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Alisa; Maibom, Sebastian; Sapienza, Luca; Thyrrestrup, Henri; García, Pedro D; Lodahl, Peter

    2014-12-15

    We present a statistical study of the Purcell enhancement of the light emission from quantum dots coupled to Anderson-localized cavities formed in disordered photonic-crystal waveguides. We measure the time-resolved light emission from both single quantum emitters coupled to Anderson-localized cavities and directly from the cavities that are fed by multiple quantum dots. Strongly inhibited and enhanced decay rates are observed relative to the rate of spontaneous emission in a homogeneous medium. From a statistical analysis, we report an average Purcell factor of 4.5 ± 0.4 without applying any spectral tuning. By spectrally tuning individual quantum dots into resonance with Anderson-localized modes, a maximum Purcell factor of 23.8 ± 1.5 is recorded, which is at the onset of the strong-coupling regime. Our data quantify the potential of Anderson-localized cavities for controlling and enhancing the light-matter interaction strength in a photonic-crystal waveguide, which is of relevance for cavity quantum-electrodynamics experiments, efficient energy harvesting and random lasing.

  4. Level repulsion exponent β for many-body localization transitions and for Anderson localization transitions via Dyson Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    The generalization of the Dyson Brownian motion approach of random matrices to Anderson localization (AL) models (Chalker et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 554) and to many-body localization (MBL) Hamiltonians (Serbyn and Moore 2015 arXiv:1508.07293) is revisited to extract the level repulsion exponent β, where β =1 in the delocalized phase governed by the Wigner-Dyson statistics, β =0 , in the localized phase governed by the Poisson statistics, and 0<{βc}<1 at the critical point. The idea is that the Gaussian disorder variables h i are promoted to Gaussian stationary processes h i (t) in order to sample the disorder stationary distribution with some time correlation τ. The statistics of energy levels can then be studied via Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations. For the MBL quantum spin Hamiltonian with random fields h i , we obtain β =2qn,n+1\\text{EA}(N)/qn,n\\text{EA}(N) in terms of the Edwards-Anderson matrix qnm\\text{EA}(N)\\equiv \\frac{1}{N}{\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|σ iz|{φm}> {{|}2} for the same eigenstate m  =  n and for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1. For the Anderson localization tight-binding Hamiltonian with random on-site energies h i , we find β =2{{Y}n,n+1}(N)/≤ft({{Y}n,n}(N)-{{Y}n,n+1}(N)\\right) in terms of the density correlation matrix {{Y}nm}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}2}|< i|{φm}> {{|}2} for consecutive eigenstates m  =  n  +  1, while the diagonal element m  =  n corresponds to the inverse participation ratio {{Y}nn}(N)\\equiv {\\sum}i=1N|< {φn}|i> {{|}4} of the eigenstate |{φn}> .

  5. Local Optical Excitations in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Laurence Kay Doon

    Core spectra of p('6) (--->) p('5)s excitations of rare gas, halogen, and alkali impurities located on the surface and in the bulk of host alkali and Mg metals are presented. The data were obtained by means of differential reflectance spectroscopy in the energy range 5-20 eV using synchrotron radiation. In striking contrast to the absorption profiles of the pure alkalis, linear redshifted profiles are observed at dilution for rare gas adsorbates on alkali surfaces, for Cs adsorbed on Mg, and for Cs dispersed in bulk Na as an alloy. When Cs is dispersed in bulk K the sharp edge characteristic of the pure alkalis is observed. The spectra of Cs and Rb adsorbates on alkali surfaces mirror these same trends, but retain a distinct atomic character. A central result of the present research is that the linear profile may be associated with strong coupling of the excitation to the conduction electrons. A criterion for strong coupling is given which depends on the degree to which the excited impurity level mixes with the host conduction band. There is not at present any theory which can explain these observations. Spectra of halogen adsorbates on alkali and Mg surfaces are also presented; it is found that the ground configuration of isolated halogen atoms on these surfaces is ionic. All the impurity-metal complexes are studied at high concentration when impurity-impurity interactions are important.

  6. Itinerant-Localized Transitions in Magnetic Phases of the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Katsunori

    To clarify the characteristics of Fermi-surface reconstruction, called Lifshitz transitions, in magnetic phases of f-electron materials, we investigate magnetically ordered states of the periodic Anderson model by applying the variational Monte Carlo method. As variational wavefunctions, we use the Gutzwiller wavefunctions for the paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and ferromagnetic states. Around half-filling, we find an antiferromagnetic phase, and far away from half-filling, we find a ferromagnetic phase as the ground state. Inside both magnetic phases, Lifshitz transitions take place. At the Lifshitz transitions, the sizes of the ordered moments change. In order to understand the Lifshitz transitions further, we also analyze the f -electron contribution to the Fermi surface by evaluating the jump in the momentum distribution function at the Fermi momentum. Then, we find that, in the large ordered-moment states, the f -electron contribution to the Fermi surface becomes small. This observation clearly shows that these Lifshitz transitions are itinerant-localized transitions of the f electrons.

  7. Anderson Localization for Schrödinger Operators on with Strongly Mixing Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgain, Jean; Schlag, Wilhelm

    In this paper we show that for a.e. x∈[ 0,2 π) the operators defined on as and with Dirichlet condition ψ- 1= 0, have pure point spectrum in with exponentially decaying eigenfunctions where δ > 0 and are small. As it is a simple consequence of known techniques that for small λ one has [- 2 +δ, 2-δ]⊂ spectrum (H(x)) for a.e.x∈[ 0, 2 π), we thus established Anderson localization on the spectrum up to the edges and the center. More general potentials than cosine can be treated, but only those energies with nonzero spectral density are allowed. Finally, we prove the same result for operators on the whole line with potential , where A:?2-->?2 is a hyperbolic toral automorphism, F∈C1(?2), ∫F= 0, and λ small. The basis for our analysis is an asymptotic formula for the Lyapunov exponent for λ--> 0 by Figotin-Pastur, and generalized by Chulaevski-Spencer. We combine this asymptotic expansion with certain martingale large deviation estimates in order to apply the methods developed by Bourgain and Goldstein in the quasi-periodic case.

  8. Forward approximation as a mean-field approximation for the Anderson and many-body localization transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietracaprina, Francesca; Ros, Valentina; Scardicchio, Antonello

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we analyze the predictions of the forward approximation in some models which exhibit an Anderson (single-body) or many-body localized phase. This approximation, which consists of summing over the amplitudes of only the shortest paths in the locator expansion, is known to overestimate the critical value of the disorder which determines the onset of the localized phase. Nevertheless, the results provided by the approximation become more and more accurate as the local coordination (dimensionality) of the graph, defined by the hopping matrix, is made larger. In this sense, the forward approximation can be regarded as a mean-field theory for the Anderson transition in infinite dimensions. The sum can be efficiently computed using transfer matrix techniques, and the results are compared with the most precise exact diagonalization results available. For the Anderson problem, we find a critical value of the disorder which is 0.9 % off the most precise available numerical value already in 5 spatial dimensions, while for the many-body localized phase of the Heisenberg model with random fields the critical disorder hc=4.0 ±0.3 is strikingly close to the most recent results obtained by exact diagonalization. In both cases we obtain a critical exponent ν =1 . In the Anderson case, the latter does not show dependence on the dimensionality, as it is common within mean-field approximations. We discuss the relevance of the correlations between the shortest paths for both the single- and many-body problems, and comment on the connections of our results with the problem of directed polymers in random medium.

  9. Laser cooling via excitation of localized electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    2007-07-01

    Under appropriate conditions, absorption of light by a solid can initiate a process by which it is cooled. In particular, energy is extracted from a material when its absorption of a photon is followed by emission of a photon of higher energy. This up-conversion requires some of the solid’s electrons to garner energy from atomic vibrations. Here, two schemes for laser cooling via localized electronic states are addressed. The first scheme utilizes the ground state and an excited state of a localized center. In this two-level scheme, the cooling process is initiated with photon absorption in the extreme low-energy tail of a localized state’s vibrationally broadened absorption spectrum. The subsequent atomic relaxation transfers energy of especially large vibratory atomic strains into electrical energy that is then extracted via photon emission. The second scheme involves the ground state and two excited states of a localized center. Cooling is facilitated when (i) the photoexcitation of an electron from its ground state to the lower excited level is followed by (ii) electron-phonon-induced promotion to the uppermost level and the subsequent (iii) return of the electron to its ground state with emission of a photon of higher energy than that of the absorbed photon. However, competing relaxation processes contribute to heating. The net cooling power per unit volume is maximized for both schemes, thereby determining characteristics of localized electronic systems that foster optical cooling. The cooling power per unit volume is greatest at high temperatures and falls rapidly as the thermal energy is reduced below each system’s luminescence Stokes shift. Moreover, cooling via the three-level scheme is most effective when (i) the energy separation between excited states is smaller than the thermal energy and (ii) the degeneracy of the highest-lying excited state is much larger than that of the center’s middle level. These restrictive conditions appear to be

  10. Numerical renormalization group study of probability distributions for local fluctuations in the Anderson-Holstein and Holstein-Hubbard models.

    PubMed

    Hewson, Alex C; Bauer, Johannes

    2010-03-24

    We show that information on the probability density of local fluctuations can be obtained from a numerical renormalization group calculation of a reduced density matrix. We apply this approach to the Anderson-Holstein impurity model to calculate the ground state probability density ρ(x) for the displacement x of the local oscillator. From this density we can deduce an effective local potential for the oscillator and compare its form with that obtained from a semiclassical approximation as a function of the coupling strength. The method is extended to the infinite dimensional Holstein-Hubbard model using dynamical mean field theory. We use this approach to compare the probability densities for the displacement of the local oscillator in the normal, antiferromagnetic and charge ordered phases.

  11. Giant Fluctuations of Local Magnetoresistance of Organic Spin Valves and the Non-Hermitian 1D Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Nemirovsky, D.; Kagalovsky, V.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, where the tunnel magnetoresitance (TMR) of a spin valve was measured locally, we theoretically study the distribution of TMR along the surface of magnetized electrodes. We show that, even in the absence of interfacial effects (like hybridization due to donor and acceptor molecules), this distribution is very broad, and the portion of area with negative TMR is appreciable even if on average the TMR is positive. The origin of the local sign reversal is quantum interference of subsequent spin-rotation amplitudes in the course of incoherent transport of carriers between the source and the drain. We find the distribution of local TMR exactly by drawing upon formal similarity between evolution of spinors in time and of the reflection coefficient along a 1D chain in the Anderson model. The results obtained are confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  12. Giant fluctuations of local magnetoresistance of organic spin valves and the non-Hermitian 1D Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Roundy, R C; Nemirovsky, D; Kagalovsky, V; Raikh, M E

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, where the tunnel magnetoresitance (TMR) of a spin valve was measured locally, we theoretically study the distribution of TMR along the surface of magnetized electrodes. We show that, even in the absence of interfacial effects (like hybridization due to donor and acceptor molecules), this distribution is very broad, and the portion of area with negative TMR is appreciable even if on average the TMR is positive. The origin of the local sign reversal is quantum interference of subsequent spin-rotation amplitudes in the course of incoherent transport of carriers between the source and the drain. We find the distribution of local TMR exactly by drawing upon formal similarity between evolution of spinors in time and of the reflection coefficient along a 1D chain in the Anderson model. The results obtained are confirmed by the numerical simulations. PMID:24949781

  13. Localization in one-dimensional lattices with non-nearest-neighbor hopping: Generalized Anderson and Aubry-André models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, J.; Priour, D. J., Jr.; Wang, B.; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-02-01

    We study the quantum localization phenomena of noninteracting particles in one-dimensional lattices based on tight-binding models with various forms of hopping terms beyond the nearest neighbor, which are generalizations of the famous Aubry-André and noninteracting Anderson models. For the case with deterministic disordered potential induced by a secondary incommensurate lattice (i.e., the Aubry-André model), we identify a class of self-dual models, for which the boundary between localized and extended eigenstates are determined analytically by employing a generalized Aubry-André transformation. We also numerically investigate the localization properties of nondual models with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, Gaussian, and power-law decay hopping terms. We find that even for these nondual models, the numerically obtained mobility edges can be well approximated by the analytically obtained condition for localization transition in the self-dual models, as long as the decay of the hopping rate with respect to distance is sufficiently fast. For the disordered potential with genuinely random character, we examine scenarios with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, exponential, Gaussian, and power-law decay hopping terms numerically. We find that the higher-order hopping terms can remove the symmetry in the localization length about the energy band center compared to the Anderson model. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that for the power-law decay case, there exists a critical exponent below which mobility edges can be found. Our theoretical results could, in principle, be directly tested in shallow atomic optical lattice systems enabling non-nearest-neighbor hopping.

  14. Breakdown of Anderson localization in the transport of Bose-Einstein condensates through one-dimensional disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, Julien; Engl, Thomas; Schlagheck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study the transport of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate through a 1D correlated disorder potential. We use for this purpose the truncated Wigner method, which is, as we show, corresponding to the diagonal approximation of a semiclassical van Vleck-Gutzwiller representation of this many-body transport process. We also argue that semiclassical corrections beyond this diagonal approximation are vanishing under disorder average, thus confirming the validity of the truncated Wigner method in this context. Numerical calculations show that, while for weak atom-atom interaction strengths Anderson localization is preserved with a slight modification of the localization length, for larger interaction strengths a crossover to a delocalized regime exists due to inelastic scattering. In this case, the transport is fully incoherent.

  15. Microwave conductance in random waveguides in the cross-over to Anderson localization and single-parameter scaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhou; Wang, Jing; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-02-25

    The nature of transport of electrons and classical waves in disordered systems depends upon the proximity to the Anderson localization transition between freely diffusing and localized waves. The suppression of average transport and the enhancement of relative fluctuations in conductance in one-dimensional samples with lengths greatly exceeding the localization length, L>ξ, are related in the single-parameter scaling (SPS) theory of localization. However, the difficulty of producing an ensemble of statistically equivalent samples in which the electron wave function is temporally coherent has so-far precluded the experimental demonstration of SPS. Here we demonstrate SPS in random multichannel systems for the transmittance T of microwave radiation, which is the analog of the dimensionless conductance. We show that for L∼4ξ, a single eigenvalue of the transmission matrix (TM) dominates transmission, and the distribution of the T is Gaussian with a variance equal to the average of −ln T, as conjectured by SPS. For samples in the cross-over to localization, L∼ξ, we find a one-sided distribution for T. This anomalous distribution is explained in terms of a charge model for the eigenvalues of the TM τ in which the Coulomb interaction between charges mimics the repulsion between the eigenvalues of TM. We show in the localization limit that the joint distribution of T and the effective number of transmission eigenvalues determines the probability distributions of intensity and total transmission for a single-incident channel.

  16. Anderson localization and layered superconductor 2H-NbSe[sub 2-x]S[sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Ken; Yokota, Kazuhide; Takemoto, Jiro; Tanokura, Yoshiko; Sekine, Tomoyuki )

    1993-04-01

    The zero-field critical temperature and the coherence length in the layered superconductor 2H-NbSe[sub 2-x]S[sub x] (x=0-2.0) were investigated. The zero-field critical temperature decreases with increasing the residual resistivity. This result can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional Anderson localization with the mobility edge below the Fermi level. The coherence length as a function of x can be explained by the theory of the anisotropic three-dimensional dirty superconductor. However it shows anomalous behavior when x-0.6. This may be relevant to the change of the crystal structure or the disappearance of the CDW. The effective mass ratio does not depend on x when x[le]0.4.

  17. Z2 topological term, the global anomaly, and the two-dimensional symplectic symmetry class of Anderson localization.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shinsei; Mudry, Christopher; Obuse, Hideaki; Furusaki, Akira

    2007-09-14

    We discuss, for a two-dimensional Dirac Hamiltonian with a random scalar potential, the presence of a Z2 topological term in the nonlinear sigma model encoding the physics of Anderson localization in the symplectic symmetry class. The Z2 topological term realizes the sign of the Pfaffian of a family of Dirac operators. We compute the corresponding global anomaly, i.e., the change in the sign of the Pfaffian by studying a spectral flow numerically. This Z2 topological effect can be relevant to graphene when the impurity potential is long ranged and, also, to the two-dimensional boundaries of a three-dimensional lattice model of Z2 topological insulators in the symplectic symmetry class.

  18. Anderson wall and BLOCH oscillations in molecular rotation.

    PubMed

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2014-07-25

    We describe a universal behavior of linear molecules excited by a periodic train of short laser pulses under quantum resonance conditions. In a rigid rotor, the resonance causes an unlimited ballistic growth of the angular momentum. We show that the centrifugal distortion of rotating molecules eventually halts the growth, by causing Anderson localization beyond a critical value of the angular momentum--the Anderson wall. Its position solely depends on the molecular rotational constants and lies in the range of a few tens of ℏ. Below the wall, rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. We suggest optical experiments capable of observing the rotational Anderson wall and Bloch oscillations at near-ambient conditions with the help of existing laser technology.

  19. Anderson localization of light in a colloidal suspension (TiO2@silica).

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Villar, Ernesto; da Silva, Iran F; Mestre, Valdeci; de Oliveira, Paulo C; Faustino, Wagner M; de Sá, Gilberto F

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been dramatic progress in the photonics field in disordered media, ranging from applications in solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasing, and other novel photonic functions, to investigations into fundamental topics, such as light confinement and other phenomena involving photon interactions. This paper reports several pieces of experimental evidence of localization transition in a strongly disordered scattering medium composed of a colloidal suspension of core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2@silica) in ethanol solution. We demonstrate the crossover from a diffusive transport to a localization transition regime as the nanoparticle concentration is increased, and that an enhanced absorption effect arises at localization transition.

  20. Anderson localization of light in a colloidal suspension (TiO2@silica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Villar, Ernesto; da Silva, Iran F.; Mestre, Valdeci; de Oliveira, Paulo C.; Faustino, Wagner M.; de Sá, Gilberto F.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been dramatic progress in the photonics field in disordered media, ranging from applications in solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasing, and other novel photonic functions, to investigations into fundamental topics, such as light confinement and other phenomena involving photon interactions. This paper reports several pieces of experimental evidence of localization transition in a strongly disordered scattering medium composed of a colloidal suspension of core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2@silica) in ethanol solution. We demonstrate the crossover from a diffusive transport to a localization transition regime as the nanoparticle concentration is increased, and that an enhanced absorption effect arises at localization transition.In recent years, there has been dramatic progress in the photonics field in disordered media, ranging from applications in solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasing, and other novel photonic functions, to investigations into fundamental topics, such as light confinement and other phenomena involving photon interactions. This paper reports several pieces of experimental evidence of localization transition in a strongly disordered scattering medium composed of a colloidal suspension of core-shell nanoparticles (TiO2@silica) in ethanol solution. We demonstrate the crossover from a diffusive transport to a localization transition regime as the nanoparticle concentration is increased, and that an enhanced absorption effect arises at localization transition. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07540h

  1. Matter wave transport and Anderson localization in anisotropic three-dimensional disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraud, Marie; Pezzé, Luca; Sanchez-Palencia, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    We study quantum transport of matter waves in anisotropic three-dimensional disorder. First, we show that structured correlations can induce rich effects, such as anisotropic suppression of the white-noise limit and inversion of the transport anisotropy. Second, we show that the localization threshold (mobility edge) is strongly affected by a disorder-induced shift of the energy states, which we calculate. Our work is directly relevant to ultracold-matter waves in optical disorder, and implications on recent experiments are discussed. It also offers scope for further studies of anisotropy effects in other systems with controlled disorder, where counterparts of the discussed effects can be expected.

  2. Anderson Localization of Ballooning Modes, Quantum Chaos and the Stability of Compact Quasiaxially Symmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; J.L. Johnson; S. Klasky; J. Canik; R.L. Dewar; W.A. Cooper

    2001-10-31

    The radially local magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability of a compact, quasiaxially symmetric stellarator (QAS), is examined just above the ballooning beta limit with a method that can lead to estimates of global stability. Here MHD stability is analyzed through the calculation and examination of the ballooning mode eigenvalue isosurfaces in the 3-space [s, alpha, theta(subscript ''k'')]; s is the edge normalized toroidal flux, alpha is the field line variable, and q(subscript ''k'') is the perpendicular wave vector or ballooning parameter. Broken symmetry, i.e., deviations from axisymmetry, in the stellarator magnetic field geometry causes localization of the ballooning mode eigenfunction, and gives rise to new types of nonsymmetric eigenvalue isosurfaces in both the stable and unstable spectrum. For eigenvalues far above the marginal point, isosurfaces are topologically spherical, indicative of strong ''quantum chaos.'' The complexity of QAS marginal isosurfaces suggests that finite Larmor radius stabilization estimates will be difficult and that fully three-dimensional, high-n MHD computations are required to predict the beta limit.

  3. Weak chaos in the disordered nonlinear Schroedinger chain: Destruction of Anderson localization by Arnold diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Basko, D.M.

    2011-07-15

    Research Highlights: > In a one-dimensional disordered chain of oscillators all normal modes are localized. > Nonlinearity leads to chaotic dynamics. > Chaos is concentrated on rare chaotic spots. > Chaotic spots drive energy exchange between oscillators. > Macroscopic transport coefficients are obtained. - Abstract: The subject of this study is the long-time equilibration dynamics of a strongly disordered one-dimensional chain of coupled weakly anharmonic classical oscillators. It is shown that chaos in this system has a very particular spatial structure: it can be viewed as a dilute gas of chaotic spots. Each chaotic spot corresponds to a stochastic pump which drives the Arnold diffusion of the oscillators surrounding it, thus leading to their relaxation and thermalization. The most important mechanism of equilibration at long distances is provided by random migration of the chaotic spots along the chain, which bears analogy with variable-range hopping of electrons in strongly disordered solids. The corresponding macroscopic transport equations are obtained.

  4. Coexistence of Anderson localization and small polarons in the normal phase of La 2-xSr xCuO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Jun

    1993-09-01

    The feature of the electrical resistivity in the normal phase of La 2- xSr xCuO 4 is explained by the coexistence model of Anderson localization and small polarons. The estimated concentration of the small polarons from this model attains a maximum at the optimum concentration, where the superconducting transition temperature attains its maximum. The variation of the activation energy of the hopping conduction with x is explained by taking into account the transfer mechanism accompanied with a change of states between Anderson localization and a small polaron state. From this analysis the Bose condensation of bipolarons is considered to be valid as the origin of superconductivity in this material.

  5. The Anderson Current Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1994-01-01

    Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

  6. Localized excitations in hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D. M.; Krumhansl, J. A.

    1986-05-01

    Localized excitations analogous to the small Holstein polaron, to localized modes in alkali halides, and to localized excitonic states, are postulated for a set of internal vibrational modes in crystalline acetanilide. The theoretical framework in which one can describe the characteristics of the ir and Raman spectroscopy peaks associated with these localized states is adequately provided by the Davydov model (formally equivalent to the Holstein polaron model). The possible low-lying excitations arising from this model are determined using a variational approach. Hence, the contribution to the spectral function due to each type of excitation can be calculated. The internal modes of chief concern here are the amide-I (CO stretch) and the N-H stretch modes for which we demonstrate consistency of the theoretical model with the available ir data. Past theoretical approaches will be discussed and reasons why one should prefer one description over another will be examined.

  7. Locally excitable Cdc42 signals steer cells during chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils and other amoeboid cells chemotax by steering their front towards chemoattractant. While Ras, Rac, Cdc42, and RhoA small GTPases all regulate chemotaxis, it has been unclear how they spatiotemporally control polarization and steering. Using fluorescence biosensors in neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells and photorelease of chemoattractant, we show that local Cdc42 signals, but not those of Rac, RhoA or Ras, precede cell turning during chemotaxis. Furthermore, preexisting local Cdc42 signals in morphologically unpolarized cells predict the future direction of movement upon uniform stimulation. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerization uncovers recurring local Cdc42 activity pulses, suggesting that Cdc42 has the excitable characteristic of the compass activity proposed in models of chemotaxis. Globally, Cdc42 antagonizes RhoA, and maintains a steep spatial activity gradient during migration, while Ras and Rac form shallow gradients. Thus, chemotactic steering and de novo polarization are both directed by locally excitable Cdc42 signals. PMID:26689677

  8. Causal evolutions of bulk local excitations from CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kanato; Miyaji, Masamichi; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    Bulk localized excited states in an AdS spacetime can be constructed from Ishibashi states with respect to the global conformal symmetry in the dual CFT. We study boundary two point functions of primary operators in the presence of bulk localized excitations in two dimensional CFTs. From two point functions in holographic CFTs, we observe causal propagations of radiations when the mass of dual bulk scalar field is close to the BF bound. This behavior for holographic CFTs is consistent with the locality and causality in classical gravity duals. We also show that this cannot be seen in free fermion CFTs. Moreover, we find that the short distance behavior of two point functions is universal and obeys the relation which generalizes the first law of entanglement entropy.

  9. Excitation of local magnetic moments by tunneling electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás; Novaes, Frederico Dutilh

    2012-05-01

    The advent of milli-kelvin scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) with inbuilt magnetic fields has opened access to the study of magnetic phenomena with atomic resolution at surfaces. In the case of single atoms adsorbed on a surface, the existence of different magnetic energy levels localized on the adsorbate is due to the breaking of the rotational invariance of the adsorbate spin by the interaction with its environment, leading to energy terms in the meV range. These structures were revealed by STM experiments in IBM Almaden in the early 2000s for atomic adsorbates on CuN surfaces. The experiments consisted in the study of the changes in conductance caused by inelastic tunneling of electrons (IETS, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy). Manganese and Iron adatoms were shown to have different magnetic anisotropies induced by the substrate. More experiments by other groups followed up, showing that magnetic excitations could be detected in a variety of systems: e.g. complex organic molecules showed that their magnetic anisotropy was dependent on the molecular environment, piles of magnetic molecules showed that they interact via intermolecular exchange interaction, spin waves were excited on ferromagnetic surfaces and in Mn chains, and magnetic impurities have been analyzed on semiconductors. These experiments brought up some intriguing questions: the efficiency of magnetic excitations was very high, the excitations could or could not involve spin flip of the exciting electron and singular-like behavior was sometimes found at the excitation thresholds. These facts called for extended theoretical analysis; perturbation theories, sudden-approximation approaches and a strong coupling scheme successfully explained most of the magnetic inelastic processes. In addition, many-body approaches were also used to decipher the interplay between inelastic processes and the Kondo effect. Spin torque transfer has been shown to be effective in changing spin orientations of an

  10. Energy transport in the Anderson insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, D. B.; Protopopov, I. V.; Burin, A. L.; Gornyi, I. V.; Santos, R. A.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the heat conductivity in Anderson insulators in the presence of a power-law interaction. Particle-hole excitations built on localized electron states are viewed as two-level systems randomly distributed in space and energy and coupled due to electron-electron interaction. A small fraction of these states form resonant pairs that in turn build a complex network allowing for energy propagation. We identify the character of energy transport through this network and evaluate the thermal conductivity. For physically relevant cases of two-dimensional and three-dimensional spin systems with 1 /r3 dipole-dipole interaction (originating from the conventional 1 /r Coulomb interaction between electrons), the found thermal conductivity κ scales with temperature as κ ∝T3 and κ ∝T4 /3 , respectively. Our results may be of relevance also to other realizations of random spin Hamiltonians with long-range interactions.

  11. Energy dependence of localization with interactions and disorder: The generalized inverse participation ratio of an ensemble of two-site Anderson-Hubbard systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortis, Rachel; Perera, Jayanayana

    2015-03-01

    We explore the effect of interactions on novel features found in non-interacting disordered systems. Johri and Bhatt [PRL 109 076402 (2012), PRB 86 125140 (2012)] showed that for non-interacting particles moving in a disordered potential Lifshitz states lead to a decrease in localization at the band edges. This is reflected in an abrupt decline in the inverse participation ratio following a sharp peak. We consider an ensemble of two-site Anderson-Hubbard systems and study a generalization of the inverse participation ratio applicable to interacting systems. With on-site Coulomb repulsion U, two types of resonances can occur: As in the non-interacting case, the potentials at the two sites may be similar. In addition, the potential at one site may differ from its neighbor by U. We demonstrate that these two types of resonance and the diversity of transitions in the interacting case result in much more varied dependence of localization on energy, with multiple local minima, including a strong suppression and more structure near the Fermi level. Opportunities for experimental observation are considered. NSERC of Canada.

  12. Local excitation and collection in polymeric fluorescent microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique, Franciele Renata; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-04-01

    Integrated photonics has gained attention in recent years due to its wide range of applications which span from biology to optical communications. The use of polymer-based platforms for photonic devices is of great interest because organic compounds can be easily incorporated to polymers, enabling modifications to the system physical properties. The two-photon polymerization technique has emerged as an interesting tool for the production of three-dimensional polymeric microstructures. However, for their further incorporation in photonic devices it is necessary to develop methods to perform optical excitation and signal collection on such microstructures. With such purpose, we demonstrate approaches to perform local excitation and collection in polymeric microstructures doped with fluorescent dyes, employing tapered fibers. The obtained results indicate that fiber tapers are suitable to couple light in and out of fluorescent polymeric microstructures, paving the way for their incorporation in photonic devices. We also show that microstructures doped with more than one dye can be used as built-in broadband light sources to photonic circuits and their emission spectrum can be tuned by the right choice of the excitation position.

  13. Unusual magneto-optical behavior induced by local dielectric variations under localized surface plasmon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, Juan B.; García-Martín, Antonio; Armelles Reig, Gaspar

    2011-06-01

    We study the effect of global and local dielectric variations on the polarization conversion r ps response of ordered nickel nanowires embedded in an alumina matrix. When considering local changes, we observe a non-monotonous behavior of the r ps, its intensity unusually modified far beyond to what it is expected for a monotonous change of the whole refractive index of the embedding medium. This is related to the local redistribution of the electromagnetic field when a localized surface plasmon is excited. This finding may be employed to develop and improve new biosensing magnetoplasmonic devices.

  14. Unusual magneto-optical behavior induced by local dielectric variations under localized surface plasmon excitations.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Juan B; García-Martín, Antonio; Reig, Gaspar Armelles

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of global and local dielectric variations on the polarization conversion rps response of ordered nickel nanowires embedded in an alumina matrix. When considering local changes, we observe a non-monotonous behavior of the rps, its intensity unusually modified far beyond to what it is expected for a monotonous change of the whole refractive index of the embedding medium. This is related to the local redistribution of the electromagnetic field when a localized surface plasmon is excited. This finding may be employed to develop and improve new biosensing magnetoplasmonic devices.

  15. Probing the Locality of Excited States with Linear Algebra.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Thibaud

    2015-04-14

    This article reports a novel theoretical approach related to the analysis of molecular excited states. The strategy introduced here involves gathering two pieces of physical information, coming from Hilbert and direct space operations, into a general, unique quantum mechanical descriptor of electronic transitions' locality. Moreover, the projection of Hilbert and direct space-derived indices in an Argand plane delivers a straightforward way to visually probe the ability of a dye to undergo a long- or short-range charge-transfer. This information can be applied, for instance, to the analysis of the electronic response of families of dyes to light absorption by unveiling the trend of a given push-pull chromophore to increase the electronic cloud polarization magnitude of its main transition with respect to the size extension of its conjugated spacer. We finally demonstrate that all the quantities reported in this article can be reliably approximated by a linear algebraic derivation, based on the contraction of detachment/attachment density matrices from canonical to atomic space. This alternative derivation has the remarkable advantage of a very low computational cost with respect to the previously used numerical integrations, making fast and accurate characterization of large molecular systems' excited states easily affordable. PMID:26574379

  16. Probing the Locality of Excited States with Linear Algebra.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Thibaud

    2015-04-14

    This article reports a novel theoretical approach related to the analysis of molecular excited states. The strategy introduced here involves gathering two pieces of physical information, coming from Hilbert and direct space operations, into a general, unique quantum mechanical descriptor of electronic transitions' locality. Moreover, the projection of Hilbert and direct space-derived indices in an Argand plane delivers a straightforward way to visually probe the ability of a dye to undergo a long- or short-range charge-transfer. This information can be applied, for instance, to the analysis of the electronic response of families of dyes to light absorption by unveiling the trend of a given push-pull chromophore to increase the electronic cloud polarization magnitude of its main transition with respect to the size extension of its conjugated spacer. We finally demonstrate that all the quantities reported in this article can be reliably approximated by a linear algebraic derivation, based on the contraction of detachment/attachment density matrices from canonical to atomic space. This alternative derivation has the remarkable advantage of a very low computational cost with respect to the previously used numerical integrations, making fast and accurate characterization of large molecular systems' excited states easily affordable.

  17. Parametric excitation of multiple resonant radiations from localized wavepackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano; Mussot, Arnaud; Kudlinski, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental physical phenomena such as laser-induced ionization, driven quantum tunneling, Faraday waves, Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, and the control of new states of matter rely on time-periodic driving of the system. A remarkable property of such driving is that it can induce the localized (bound) states to resonantly couple to the continuum. Therefore experiments that allow for enlightening and controlling the mechanisms underlying such coupling are of paramount importance. We implement such an experiment in a special optical fiber characterized by a dispersion oscillating along the propagation coordinate, which mimics ``time''. The quasi-momentum associated with such periodic perturbation is responsible for the efficient coupling of energy from the localized wave-packets (solitons in anomalous dispersion and shock fronts in normal dispersion) sustained by the fiber nonlinearity, into free-running linear dispersive waves (continuum) at multiple resonant frequencies. Remarkably, the observed resonances can be explained by means of a unified approach, regardless of the fact that the localized state is a soliton-like pulse or a shock front.

  18. Optical Excitation of Carbon Nanotubes Drives Localized Diazonium Reactions.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lyndsey R; Piao, Yanmei; Wang, YuHuang

    2016-09-15

    Covalent chemistries have been widely used to modify carbon nanomaterials; however, they typically lack the precision and efficiency required to directly engineer their optical and electronic properties. Here, we show, for the first time, that visible light which is tuned into resonance with carbon nanotubes can be used to drive their functionalization by aryldiazonium salts. The optical excitation accelerates the reaction rate 154-fold (±13) and makes it possible to significantly improve the efficiency of covalent bonding to the sp(2) carbon lattice. Control experiments suggest that the reaction is dominated by a localized photothermal effect. This light-driven reaction paves the way for precise nanochemistry that can directly tailor carbon nanomaterials at the optical and electronic levels. PMID:27588432

  19. Optical Excitation of Carbon Nanotubes Drives Localized Diazonium Reactions.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lyndsey R; Piao, Yanmei; Wang, YuHuang

    2016-09-15

    Covalent chemistries have been widely used to modify carbon nanomaterials; however, they typically lack the precision and efficiency required to directly engineer their optical and electronic properties. Here, we show, for the first time, that visible light which is tuned into resonance with carbon nanotubes can be used to drive their functionalization by aryldiazonium salts. The optical excitation accelerates the reaction rate 154-fold (±13) and makes it possible to significantly improve the efficiency of covalent bonding to the sp(2) carbon lattice. Control experiments suggest that the reaction is dominated by a localized photothermal effect. This light-driven reaction paves the way for precise nanochemistry that can directly tailor carbon nanomaterials at the optical and electronic levels.

  20. Proposed signature of Anderson localization and correlation-induced delocalization in an N-leg optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakyan, T. A.; Kestner, J. P.; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-11-15

    We propose a realization of the one-dimensional random dimer model and certain N-leg generalizations using cold atoms in an optical lattice. We show that these models exhibit multiple delocalization energies that depend strongly on the symmetry properties of the corresponding Hamiltonian, and we provide analytical and numerical results for the localization length as a function of energy. We demonstrate that the N-leg systems possess similarities with their one-dimensional ancestors but are demonstrably distinct. The existence of critical delocalization energies leads to dips in the momentum distribution that serve as a clear signal of the localization-delocalization transition. These momentum distributions are different for models with different group symmetries and are identical for those with the same symmetry.

  1. Controlling the localization and migration of optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.; Bradshaw, David S.

    2012-09-01

    possibilities for technical application is emerging. For example, applications can be envisaged for new forms of all-optical switching and transistor action. There is also interest in engaging with the interplay of optical excitation and local nanoscale force, exploiting local responses to changes in dispersion forces, accompanying molecular energy transfer.

  2. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  3. Jamming Criticality Revealed by Removing Localized Buckling Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Patrick; Corwin, Eric I.; Parisi, Giorgio; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    Recent theoretical advances offer an exact, first-principles theory of jamming criticality in infinite dimension as well as universal scaling relations between critical exponents in all dimensions. For packings of frictionless spheres near the jamming transition, these advances predict that nontrivial power-law exponents characterize the critical distribution of (i) small interparticle gaps and (ii) weak contact forces, both of which are crucial for mechanical stability. The scaling of the interparticle gaps is known to be constant in all spatial dimensions d —including the physically relevant d =2 and 3, but the value of the weak force exponent remains the object of debate and confusion. Here, we resolve this ambiguity by numerical simulations. We construct isostatic jammed packings with extremely high accuracy, and introduce a simple criterion to separate the contribution of particles that give rise to localized buckling excitations, i.e., bucklers, from the others. This analysis reveals the remarkable dimensional robustness of mean-field marginality and its associated criticality.

  4. Localization of atomic excitation beyond the diffraction limit using electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. A.; Das, Diptaranjan; Simmons, Z. J.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the localization of excitation between hyperfine ground states of 87Rb atoms to as small as λ /13 -wide spatial regions. We use ultracold atoms trapped in a dipole trap and utilize electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for the atomic excitation. The localization is achieved by combining a spatially varying coupling laser (standing wave) with the intensity dependence of EIT. The excitation is fast (150 ns laser pulses) and the dark-state fidelity can be made higher than 94% throughout the standing wave. Because the width of the localized regions is much smaller than the wavelength of the driving light, traditional optical imaging techniques cannot resolve the localized features. Therefore, to measure the excitation profile, we use an autocorrelation-like method where we perform two EIT sequences separated by a time delay, during which we move the standing wave.

  5. Anderson and Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    The legacy of P. W. Anderson, perhaps the most fertile and influential condensed matter physicist of the second half of the twentieth century, is briefly mentioned here. I note three pervasive values. They are: emergence with its constant tendency to surprise us and to stretch our imagination, the Baconian emphasis on the experimental moorings of modern science, and mechanism as the explanatory core. Out of his work, which is spread over more than six decades and in many ways has charted modern condensed matter physics, nearly a dozen seminal contributions, chosen idiosyncratically, are mentioned at the risk of leaving out many which may also have started subfields. Some of these are: antiferromagnestism and broken symmetry, superexchange and strong electron correlations, localization in disordered systems, gauge invariance and mass, and the resonating valence bond in magnetic systems as well as in high-temperature superconductivity...

  6. Self-organization of synchronous activity propagation in neuronal networks driven by local excitation.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Mehdi; Valizadeh, Alireza; Abbassian, Abdolhossein; Cheng, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the reliable propagation of synchronous neural activity is crucial for neural information processing. The propagation of synchronous firing activity in so-called synfire chains has been studied extensively in feed-forward networks of spiking neurons. However, it remains unclear how such neural activity could emerge in recurrent neuronal networks through synaptic plasticity. In this study, we investigate whether local excitation, i.e., neurons that fire at a higher frequency than the other, spontaneously active neurons in the network, can shape a network to allow for synchronous activity propagation. We use two-dimensional, locally connected and heterogeneous neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). We find that, in our model, local excitation drives profound network changes within seconds. In the emergent network, neural activity propagates synchronously through the network. This activity originates from the site of the local excitation and propagates through the network. The synchronous activity propagation persists, even when the local excitation is removed, since it derives from the synaptic weight matrix. Importantly, once this connectivity is established it remains stable even in the presence of spontaneous activity. Our results suggest that synfire-chain-like activity can emerge in a relatively simple way in realistic neural networks by locally exciting the desired origin of the neuronal sequence.

  7. Global and short-range entanglement properties in excited, many-body localized spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Colin; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    Many-body localization is a manifestation of the violation of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis. As one of many characteristic features, eigenstates in a many-body localized regime have been observed to obey an area law in the scaling of the entanglement entropy. Consequently, such states can be efficiently represented by matrix product states (MPS). Here, we use the SIMPS algorithm proposed by Yu, Pekker, and Clark to numerically access these excited states in spin chains with disorder, and study them from the perspective of their global and short range entanglement properties, as well as through other local observables. We compare the behavior across excited states as the strength of disorder varies.

  8. Local and Distant Input Controlling Excitation in Layer II of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Elke C; Neitz, Angela; Pinna, Roberta; Melzer, Sarah; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Layer II (LII) of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) comprises grid cells that support spatial navigation. The firing pattern of grid cells might be explained by attractor dynamics in a network, which requires either direct excitatory connectivity between phase-specific grid cells or indirect coupling via interneurons. However, knowledge regarding local networks that support in vivo activity is incomplete. Here we identified essential components of LII networks in the MEC. We distinguished four types of excitatory neurons that exhibit cell-type-specific local excitatory and inhibitory connectivity. Furthermore, we found that LII neurons contribute to the excitation of contralateral neurons in the corresponding layer. Finally, we demonstrated that the medial septum controls excitation in the MEC via two subpopulations of long-range GABAergic neurons that target distinct interneurons in LII, thereby disinhibiting local circuits. We thus identified local connections that could support attractor dynamics and external inputs that likely govern excitation in LII. PMID:26711115

  9. Multiple-Resonance Local Wave Functions for Accurate Excited States in Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow-Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to the bonding patterns of the different Lewis resonance structures of the molecule. We capitalize on the concept of orbital domains of local coupled-cluster methods, which is here applied to the active space to select the orbitals to correlate and construct the important transitions. The excitations are further grouped into classes, which are ordered in importance and can be systematically included in the Jastrow-Slater wave function to ensure a balanced description of all states of interest. We assess the performance of the proposed wave function in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and excited-state geometry optimization of retinal models whose π → π* state has a strong intramolecular charge-transfer character. We find that our multiresonance wave functions recover the reference values of the total energies of the ground and excited states with only a small number of excitations and that the same expansion can be flexibly used at very different geometries. Furthermore, significant computational saving can also be gained in the orbital optimization step by selectively mixing occupied and virtual orbitals based on spatial considerations without loss of accuracy on the excitation energy. Our multiresonance wave functions are therefore compact, accurate, and very promising for the calculation of multiple excited states of different character in large molecules.

  10. Excitation Localization/Delocalization Isomerism in a Strongly Coupled Covalent Dimer of 1,3-Diphenylisobenzofuran.

    PubMed

    Schrauben, Joel N; Akdag, Akin; Wen, Jin; Havlas, Zdenek; Ryerson, Joseph L; Smith, Millie B; Michl, Josef; Johnson, Justin C

    2016-05-26

    Two isomers of both the lowest excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) states of the directly para, para'-connected covalent dimer of the singlet-fission chromophore 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran have been observed. In one isomer, excitation is delocalized over both halves of the dimer, and in the other, it is localized on one or the other half. For a covalent dimer in solution, such "excitation isomerism" is extremely rare. The vibrationally relaxed isomers do not interconvert, and their photophysical properties, including singlet fission, differ significantly.

  11. Role of Geometric Distortion and Polarization in Localizing Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Iffat H; Batista, Enrique R; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L; Martin, Richard L

    2013-02-12

    Five different Density Functional Theory (DFT) models (ranging from pure GGA to long-range-corrected hybrid functionals) were used to study computationally the nature of the self-trapped electronic states in oligophenylene vinylenes. The electronic excitations in question include the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1(†)) excitons (calculated using Time Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method), positive (P(+)) and negative (P(-)) polarons, and the lowest triplet (T1) states (computed with the Self-Consistent Field (SCF) scheme). The polaron formation (spatial localization of excitations) is observed only with the use of range-corrected hybrid DFT models including long-range electronic exchange interactions. The extent of localization for all studied excitations is found to be invariant with respect to the size of the oligomer chain in their corresponding optimal geometries. We have analyzed the interdependence between the extent of the geometrical distortion and the localization of the orbital and spin density, and have observed that the localization of the P(+) and P(-) charged species is quite sensitive to solvent polarization effects and the character of the DFT functional used, rather than the structural deformations. In contrast, the localization of neutral states, S1 and T1(†), is found to follow the structural distortions. Notably, T1 excitation obtained with the mean field SCF approach is always strongly localized in range-corrected hybrid DFT models. The molecular orbital energetics of these excitations was further investigated to identify the relationship between state localization and the corresponding orbital structure. A characteristic stabilization (destabilization) of occupied (virtual) orbitals is observed in hybrid DFT models, compared to tight-binding model-like orbital filling in semilocal GGA functionals. The molecular and natural orbital representation allows visualization of the spatial extent of the underlying electronic states. In terms of

  12. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Structural Heterogeneity in the Localized Excited States of Poly(3-hexylthiophene).

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjian; Magnanelli, Timothy J; Zhou, Jiawang; Bragg, Arthur E

    2016-06-01

    Transient hole-burning and resonantly enhanced Raman spectroscopies are used to probe heterogeneities among localized singlet excitons of poly(3-hexylthiophene) in solution. Transient hole-burning spectroscopy facilitated by population dumping through wavelength-selective stimulated emission exposes inhomogeneous broadening of the exciton absorption band in the near-infrared, as reflected by correlations between stimulated emission and excited-state absorption transition energies. Dump-induced spectral diffusion of the exciton absorption band reflects structural fluctuations in the locally excited polymer. This diffusion is observed to occur slightly faster or slower than the nonequilibrium relaxation that follows direct excitation of the polymer (8-9 ps), with the time scale for diffusion varying with subpopulation: dumping across small vs large band gaps results in diffusion over 5 vs 35 ps, respectively. Furthermore, incomplete spectral relaxation of transient holes reflects that subsets of locally excited structural motifs prepared through photoexcitation cannot interchange through structural fluctuations that occur over the singlet-exciton lifetime. Raman spectra of the C═C/C-C stretching region collected in resonance at energies across the exciton absorption band exhibit frequency and intensity trends (Raman "dispersion") ascribed to variation in the local effective conjugation length. Together, results explicitly reveal heterogeneities among excitonic states associated with variations and fluctuations in local conformational order. PMID:27167593

  14. Plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Hassan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Optical localized heating in the nanoscale has recently attracted great attention due to its unique small hot spot size with high energy. However, the hot spot size is conventionally constrained by the diffraction limit. Plasmonic localized heating can provide solutions to this limitation in nanoscale patterning, cancer treatment, and data storage. Plasmonic approaches to overcome the diffraction limit in hot spot size have mainly utilized the excitation of surface plasmon or localized surface plasmon resonance. However, achieving plasmonic localized heating by the excitation of magnetic polariton has not been researched extensively yet. In this work, we numerically investigated the optical response of a nanoscale metamaterial composed of a gold nanowire array and a gold film separated by an ultrathin polymer spacer using ANSYS High Frequency Structural Simulator. A strong absorption peak at the wavelength of 760 nm was exhibited, and the underlying physical mechanism for the strong absorption was verified via the local electromagnetic field distribution to be magnetic resonance excitation. An inductor-capacitor circuit model was used to predict the magnetic resonance wavelength and compare with the numerical results for varied geometrical parameters. Volume loss density due to the strong local optical energy confinement was transferred as heat generation to an ANSYS thermal solver to obtain the local temperature profile. The steady state temperature profile shows an average temperature of 145 °C confined in a local area as small as 33 nm within the spacer, with a full-width at half-maximum of 50 nm along the x-direction. Moreover, the temperature rise from ambient drops to half its maximum value at a distance of 5 nm from the top of the spacer along the z-direction. This clearly demonstrates plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation. Furthermore, the transient temperature profile shows that the system reached

  15. Competition between antiferromagnetic order and spin-liquid behavior in the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model at half filling

    SciTech Connect

    Vekic, M.; Cannon, J.W.; Scalapino, D.J.; Scalettar, R.T.; Sugar, R.L. Physics Department, Centenary College, 2911 Centenary Boulevard, Shreveport, Louisiana 71104 Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 )

    1995-03-20

    We study the two-dimensional periodic Anderson model at half filling using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques. The ground state undergoes a magnetic order-disorder transition as a function of the effective exchange coupling between the conduction and localized bands. Low-lying spin and charge excitations are determined using the maximum entropy method to analytically continue the QMC data. At finite temperature we find a competition between the Kondo effect and antiferromagnetic order which develops in the localized band through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions.

  16. Excitation by Axon Terminal GABA Spillover in a Sound Localization Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Catherine J.C.; Rubio, Maria E.; Givens, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Synapses from neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) onto neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem are glycinergic in maturity, but also GABAergic and glutamatergic in development. The role for this neurotransmitter cotransmission is poorly understood. Here we use electrophysiological recordings in brainstem slices from P3-P21 mice to demonstrate that GABA release evoked from MNTB axons can spill over to neighboring MNTB axons and cause excitation by activating GABAAR. This spillover excitation generates patterns of staggered neurotransmitter release from different MNTB axons resulting in characteristic “doublet” postsynaptic currents in LSO neurons. Postembedding immunogold labeling and electron microscopy provide evidence that GABAARs are localized at MNTB axon terminals. Photolytic uncaging of p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) GABA demonstrates backpropagation of GABAAR-mediated depolarizations from MNTB axon terminals to the soma, some hundreds of microns away. These somatic depolarizations enhanced somatic excitability by increasing the probability of action potential generation. GABA spillover excitation between MNTB axon terminals may entrain neighboring MNTB neurons, which may play a role in the developmental refinement of the MNTB-LSO pathway. Axonal spillover excitation persisted beyond the second postnatal week, suggesting that this mechanism may play a role in sound localization, by providing new avenues of communication between MNTB neurons via their distal axonal projections. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, a new mechanism of neuronal communication between auditory synapses in the mammalian sound localization pathway is described. Evidence is provided that the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can spill over between axon terminals to cause excitation of nearby synapses to further stimulate neurotransmitter release. Excitatory GABA spillover between inhibitory axon terminals may have important

  17. Excitation of unsteady Görtler vortices by localized surface nonuniformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, A. V.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kachanov, Yu. S.; Mischenko, D. A.; Nechepurenko, Yu. M.

    2016-08-01

    A combined theoretical and numerical analysis of an experiment devoted to the excitation of Görtler vortices by localized stationary or vibrating surface nonuniformities in a boundary layer over a concave surface is performed. A numerical model of generation of small-amplitude disturbances and their downstream propagation based on parabolic equations is developed. In the framework of this model, the optimal and the modal parts of excited disturbance are defined as solutions of initial-value problems with initial values being, respectively, the optimal disturbance and the leading local mode at the location of the source. It is shown that a representation of excited disturbance as a sum of the optimal part and a remainder makes it possible to describe its generation and downstream propagation, as well as to predict satisfactorily the corresponding receptivity coefficient. In contrast, the representation based on the modal part provides only coarse information about excitation and propagation of disturbance in the range of parameters under investigation. However, it is found that the receptivity coefficients estimated using the modal parts can be reinterpreted to preserve their practical significance. A corresponding procedure was developed. The theoretical and experimental receptivity coefficients are estimated and compared. It is found that the receptivity magnitudes grow significantly with the disturbance frequency. Variation of the span-wise scale of the nonuniformities affects weakly the receptivity characteristics at zero frequency. However, at high frequencies, the efficiency of excitation of Görtler vortices depends substantially on the span-wise scale.

  18. Dynamics of Energy Transfer in a Conjugated Dendrimer Driven by Ultrafast Localization of Excitations.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Johan F; Atas, Evrim; Altan, Aysun; Kuroda, Daniel G; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei; Roitberg, Adrian E; Kleiman, Valeria D

    2015-09-16

    Solar energy conversion starts with the harvest of light, and its efficacy depends on the spatial transfer of the light energy to where it can be transduced into other forms of energy. Harnessing solar power as a clean energy source requires the continuous development of new synthetic materials that can harvest photon energy and transport it without significant losses. With chemically-controlled branched architectures, dendrimers are ideally suited for these initial steps, since they consist of arrays of chromophores with relative positioning and orientations to create energy gradients and to spatially focus excitation energies. The spatial localization of the energy delimits its efficacy and has been a point of intense research for synthetic light harvesters. We present the results of a combined theoretical experimental study elucidating ultrafast, unidirectional, electronic energy transfer on a complex molecule designed to spatially focus the initial excitation onto an energy sink. The study explores the complex interplay between atomic motions, excited-state populations, and localization/delocalization of excitations. Our findings show that the electronic energy-transfer mechanism involves the ultrafast collapse of the photoexcited wave function due to nonadiabatic electronic transitions. The localization of the wave function is driven by the efficient coupling to high-frequency vibrational modes leading to ultrafast excited-state dynamics and unidirectional efficient energy funneling. This work provides a long-awaited consistent experiment-theoretical description of excited-state dynamics in organic conjugated dendrimers with atomistic resolution, a phenomenon expected to universally appear in a variety of synthetic conjugated materials.

  19. Dynamics of Energy Transfer in a Conjugated Dendrimer Driven by Ultrafast Localization of Excitations.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Johan F; Atas, Evrim; Altan, Aysun; Kuroda, Daniel G; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei; Roitberg, Adrian E; Kleiman, Valeria D

    2015-09-16

    Solar energy conversion starts with the harvest of light, and its efficacy depends on the spatial transfer of the light energy to where it can be transduced into other forms of energy. Harnessing solar power as a clean energy source requires the continuous development of new synthetic materials that can harvest photon energy and transport it without significant losses. With chemically-controlled branched architectures, dendrimers are ideally suited for these initial steps, since they consist of arrays of chromophores with relative positioning and orientations to create energy gradients and to spatially focus excitation energies. The spatial localization of the energy delimits its efficacy and has been a point of intense research for synthetic light harvesters. We present the results of a combined theoretical experimental study elucidating ultrafast, unidirectional, electronic energy transfer on a complex molecule designed to spatially focus the initial excitation onto an energy sink. The study explores the complex interplay between atomic motions, excited-state populations, and localization/delocalization of excitations. Our findings show that the electronic energy-transfer mechanism involves the ultrafast collapse of the photoexcited wave function due to nonadiabatic electronic transitions. The localization of the wave function is driven by the efficient coupling to high-frequency vibrational modes leading to ultrafast excited-state dynamics and unidirectional efficient energy funneling. This work provides a long-awaited consistent experiment-theoretical description of excited-state dynamics in organic conjugated dendrimers with atomistic resolution, a phenomenon expected to universally appear in a variety of synthetic conjugated materials. PMID:26122872

  20. Local probing of magnetic films by optical excitation of magnetostatic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A. I.; Kozhaev, M. A.; Vetoshko, P. M.; Dodonov, D. V.; Prokopov, A. R.; Shumilov, A. G.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Berzhanskii, V. N.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    Excitation of volume and surface magnetostatic spin waves in ferrite garnet films by circularly polarized laser pulses utilizing to the inverse magnetooptical Faraday effect has been studied experimentally. The region of excitation of the magnetostatic spin waves is determined by the diameter of the laser beam (˜10 μm). At the same time, the characteristic propagation length of the modes is 30 μm. A method of finding the local characteristics of a magnetic film, in particular, the cubic and uniaxial anisotropy constants, based on the analysis of the azimuthal-angle dependence of the spectrum of the magnetostatic spin waves has been proposed.

  1. Polarons in π-Conjugated Polymers: Anderson or Landau?

    PubMed

    Barford, William; Marcus, Max; Tozer, Oliver Robert

    2016-02-01

    Using both analytical expressions and the density matrix renormalization group method, we study the fully quantized disordered Holstein model to investigate the localization of charges and excitons by vibrational or torsional modes-i.e., the formation of polarons-in conformationally disordered π-conjugated polymers. We identify two distinct mechanisms for polaron formation, namely Anderson localization via disorder (causing the formation of Anderson polarons) and self-localization by self-trapping via normal modes (causing the formation of Landau polarons). We identify the regimes where either description is more valid. The key distinction between Anderson and Landau polarons is that for the latter the particle wave function is a strong function of the normal coordinates, and hence the "vertical" and "relaxed" wave functions are different. This has theoretical and experimental consequences for Landau polarons. Theoretically, it means that the Condon approximation is not valid, and so care needs to be taken when evaluating transition rates. Experimentally, it means that the self-localization of the particle as a consequence of its coupling to the normal coordinates may lead to experimental observables, e.g., ultrafast fluorescence depolarization. We apply these ideas to poly(p-phenylenevinylene). We show that the high frequency C-C bond oscillation only causes Landau polarons for a very narrow parameter regime; generally we expect disorder to dominate and Anderson polarons to be a more applicable description. Similarly, for the low frequency torsional fluctuations we show that Anderson polarons are expected for realistic parameters.

  2. Polarization of excitation light influences molecule counting in single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Lin, Han; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J; Clayton, Andrew H; Gu, Min; Russell, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy has been widely applied to count the number of biological molecules within a certain structure. The percentage of molecules that are detected significantly affects the interpretation of data. Among many factors that affect this percentage, the polarization state of the excitation light is often neglected or at least unstated in publications. We demonstrate by simulation and experiment that the number of molecules detected can be different from -40 up to 100% when using circularly or linearly polarized excitation light. This is determined mainly by the number of photons emitted by single fluorescent molecule, namely the choice of fluorescence proteins, and the background noise in the system, namely the illumination scheme. This difference can be further exaggerated or mitigated by various fixation methods, magnification, and camera settings We conclude that the final choice between circularly or linearly polarized excitation light should be made experimentally, based on the signal to noise ratio of the system.

  3. Phil Anderson's Magnetic Ideas in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Piers

    In Philip W. Anderson's research, magnetism has always played a special role, providing a prism through which other more complex forms of collective behavior and broken symmetry could be examined. I discuss his work on magnetism from the 1950s, where his early work on antiferromagnetism led to the pseudospin treatment of superconductivity -- to the 1970s and 1980s, highlighting his contribution to the physics of local magnetic moments. Phil's interest in the mechanism of moment formation, and screening evolved into the modern theory of the Kondo effect and heavy fermions.

  4. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, WanZhen E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.

  5. Density matrix renormalization group study in energy space for a single-impurity Anderson model and an impurity quantum phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    The density matrix renormalization group method is introduced in energy space to study Anderson impurity models. The method allows for calculations in the thermodynamic limit and is advantageous for studying not only the dynamical properties, but also the quantum entanglement of the ground state at the vicinity of an impurity quantum phase transition. This method is applied to obtain numerically exactly the ground-state phase diagram of the single-impurity Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice at half-filling. The calculation of local static quantities shows that the phase diagram contains two distinct phases, the local moment (LM) phase and the asymmetric strong coupling (ASC) phase, but no Kondo screening phase. These results are supported by the local spin and charge excitation spectra, which exhibit qualitatively different behavior in these two phases and also reveal the existence of the valence fluctuating point at the phase boundary. For comparison, we also study the low-energy effective pseudogap Anderson model using the method introduced here. Although the high-energy excitations are obviously different, we find that the ground-state phase diagram and the asymptotically low-energy excitations are in good quantitative agreement with those for the single-impurity Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice, thus providing a quantitative justification for the previous studies based on low-energy approximate approaches. Furthermore, we find that the lowest entanglement level is doubly degenerate for the LM phase, whereas it is singlet for the ASC phase and is accidentally threefold degenerate at the valence fluctuating point. This should be contrasted with the degeneracy of the energy spectrum because the ground state is found to be always singlet. Our results therefore clearly demonstrate that the low-lying entanglement spectrum can be used to determine with high accuracy the phase boundary of the impurity quantum phase transition.

  6. LES of a Jet Excited by the Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of a high-speed jet are governed by the instability waves that form in the free-shear boundary layer of the jet. Jet excitation manipulates the growth and saturation of particular instability waves to control the unsteady flow structures that characterize the energy cascade in the jet.The results may include jet noise mitigation or a reduction in the infrared signature of the jet. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA) have demonstrated the ability to excite a high-speed jets in laboratory experiments. Extending and optimizing this excitation technology, however, is a complex process that will require many tests and trials. Computational simulations can play an important role in understanding and optimizing this actuator technology for real-world applications. Previous research has focused on developing a suitable actuator model and coupling it with the appropriate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods using two-dimensional spatial flow approximations. This work is now extended to three-dimensions (3-D) in space. The actuator model is adapted to a series of discrete actuators and a 3-D LES simulation of an excited jet is run. The results are used to study the fluid dynamics near the actuator and in the jet plume.

  7. Effects of multiple scattering and Anderson localization of photons in light pulse reflection from a 1D disordered medium with low concentration of impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, V. Ya.; Grigorishin, K. I.; Ogievetsky, E. I.; Agranovich, V. M.

    1992-10-01

    The theory of light pulse reflection from a one-dimensional(1D) disordered scattering medium exemplifying application of the supersymmetry to the solid state physics is developed. It is shown that multiple scattering processes and localization effects lead to a peculiar trapping of light in the medium and, as a result, to a peculiar time evolution of the reflected beam intensity. An addition of guest molecules with a narrow absorption line at low concentrations suppresses the contribution of long trajectories of photons resonating with impurities and, consequently, leads to the appearance of a narrow dip in the spectral decomposition of the reflected light in the long-time asymptotic regime.

  8. Localization of nonlinear damage using state-space-based predictions under stochastic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael; Huang, Zongming

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a study on localizing damage under stochastic excitation by state-space-based methods, where the damaged response contains some nonlinearity. Two state-space-based modeling algorithms, namely auto- and cross-predictions, are employed in this paper, and the greatest prediction error will be achieved at the sensor pair closest to the actual damage, in terms of localization. To quantify the distinction of prediction error distributions obtained at different sensor locations, the Bhattacharyya distance is adopted as the quantification metric. There are two lab-scale test-beds adopted as validation platforms, including a two-story plane steel frame with bolt loosening damage and a three-story benchmark aluminum frame with a simulated tunable crack. Band-limited Gaussian noise is applied through an electrodynamic shaker to the systems. Testing results indicate that the damage detection capability of the state-space-based method depends on the nonlinearity-induced high frequency responses. Since those high frequency components attenuate quickly in time and space, the results show great capability for damage localization, i.e., the highest deviation of Bhattacharyya distance is coincident with the sensors close to the physical damage location. This work extends the state-space-based damage detection method for localizing damage to a stochastically excited scenario, which provides the advantage of compatibility with ambient excitations. Moreover, results from both experiments indicate that the state-space-based method is only sensitive to nonlinearity-induced damage, thus it can be utilized in parallel with linear classifiers or normalization strategies to insulate the operational and environmental variability, which often affects the system response in a linear fashion.

  9. Critical excitation spectrum of a quantum chain with a local three-spin coupling

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, John F.; Wydro, Tomasz

    2011-09-15

    Using the phenomenological renormalization group (PRG), we evaluate the low-energy excitation spectrum along the critical line of a quantum spin chain having a local interaction between three Ising spins and longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields, i.e., a Turban model. The low-energy excitation spectrum found with the PRG agrees with the spectrum predicted for the (D{sub 4},A{sub 4}) conformal minimal model under a nontrivial correspondence between translations at the critical line and discrete lattice translations. Under this correspondence, the measurements confirm a prediction that the critical line of this quantum spin chain and the critical point of the two-dimensional three-state Potts model are in the same universality class.

  10. Regular and irregular patterns of self-localized excitation in arrays of coupled phase oscillators.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Matthias; Omel'chenko, Oleh E; Sieber, Jan

    2015-05-01

    We study a system of phase oscillators with nonlocal coupling in a ring that supports self-organized patterns of coherence and incoherence, called chimera states. Introducing a global feedback loop, connecting the phase lag to the order parameter, we can observe chimera states also for systems with a small number of oscillators. Numerical simulations show a huge variety of regular and irregular patterns composed of localized phase slipping events of single oscillators. Using methods of classical finite dimensional chaos and bifurcation theory, we can identify the emergence of chaotic chimera states as a result of transitions to chaos via period doubling cascades, torus breakup, and intermittency. We can explain the observed phenomena by a mechanism of self-modulated excitability in a discrete excitable medium.

  11. Regular and irregular patterns of self-localized excitation in arrays of coupled phase oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, Matthias; Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Sieber, Jan

    2015-05-15

    We study a system of phase oscillators with nonlocal coupling in a ring that supports self-organized patterns of coherence and incoherence, called chimera states. Introducing a global feedback loop, connecting the phase lag to the order parameter, we can observe chimera states also for systems with a small number of oscillators. Numerical simulations show a huge variety of regular and irregular patterns composed of localized phase slipping events of single oscillators. Using methods of classical finite dimensional chaos and bifurcation theory, we can identify the emergence of chaotic chimera states as a result of transitions to chaos via period doubling cascades, torus breakup, and intermittency. We can explain the observed phenomena by a mechanism of self-modulated excitability in a discrete excitable medium.

  12. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  13. Evidence for Cation-Controlled Excited-State Localization in a Ruthenium Polypyridyl Compound.

    PubMed

    Beauvilliers, Evan E; Meyer, Gerald J

    2016-08-01

    The visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the four neutral ruthenium diimine compounds [Ru(bpy)2(dcb)] (B2B), [Ru(dtb)2(dcb)] (D2B), [Ru(bpy)2(dcbq)] (B2Q), and [Ru(dtb)2(dcbq)] (D2Q), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, dcb is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-bpy, dtb is 4,4'-(tert-butyl)2-bpy, and dcbq is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-2,2'-biquinoline, are reported in the presence of Lewis acidic cations present in fluid solutions at room temperature. In methanol solutions, the measured spectra were insensitive to the presence of these cations, while in acetonitrile a significant red shift in the PL spectra (≤1400 cm(-1)) was observed consistent with stabilization of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state through Lewis acid-base adduct formation. No significant spectral changes were observed in control experiments with the tetrabutylammonium cation. Titration data with Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+), Y(3+), and La(3+) showed that the extent of stabilization saturated at high cation concentration with magnitudes that scaled roughly with the cation charge-to-size ratio. The visible absorption spectra of D2Q was particularly informative due to the presence of two well-resolved MLCT absorption bands: (1) Ru → bpy, λmax ≈ 450 nm; and (2) Ru → dcbq, λmax ≈ 540 nm. The higher-energy band blue-shifted and the lower-energy band red-shifted upon cation addition. The PL intensity and lifetime of the excited state of B2B first increased with cation addition without significant shifts in the measured spectra, behavior attributed to a cation-induced change in the localization of the emissive excited state from bpy to dcb. The importance of excited-state localization and stabilization for solar energy conversion is discussed.

  14. Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities in arbitrary conduction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Tong, Ning-Hua; Cao, Zhan; Sun, Qing-Feng; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities is a key quantity in understanding the physics of Kondo screening. Traditional numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation of the impurity contribution χimp to susceptibility, defined originally by Wilson in a flat wide band, has been generalized before to structured conduction bands. The results brought about non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic Kondo behaviors in χimp, even when the bands are not gapped at the Fermi energy. Here, we use the full density-matrix (FDM) NRG to present high-quality data for the local susceptibility χloc and to compare them with χimp obtained by the traditional NRG. Our results indicate that those exotic behaviors observed in χimp are unphysical. Instead, the low-energy excitations of the impurity in arbitrary bands only without gap at the Fermi energy are still a Fermi liquid and paramagnetic. We also demonstrate that unlike the traditional NRG yielding χloc less accurate than χimp, the FDM method allows a high-precision dynamical calculation of χloc at much reduced computational cost, with an accuracy at least one order higher than χimp. Moreover, artifacts in the FDM algorithm to χimp and origins of the spurious non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic features are clarified. Our work provides an efficient high-precision algorithm to calculate the spin susceptibility of impurity for arbitrary structured bands, while negating the applicability of Wilson's definition to such cases.

  15. Tuning a material's properties through the excitation of localized defect modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra Garcia, Marc; Lydon, Joseph; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    Technological applications such as acoustic super-lenses and vibration mitigation devices require materials with extreme mechanical properties (Very high, zero, or negative stiffness). These properties can be achieved through buckling instabilities, local resonances and phase transitions, mechanisms that are limited to particular frequencies, strains or temperatures. In this talk I will present an alternative mechanism to tune the stiffness of a lattice. The mechanism is based on the excitation of a nonlinear localized defect mode. The oscillation of the defect mode affects the bulk properties of the lattice. This is due to the thermal expansion of the defect mode and the nonlinear coupling between the mode amplitude and the strain of the lattice. Due to the singular properties of nonlinear systems near bifurcation points, the lattice can achieve an arbitrarily large stiffness. It is possible to select point of the force-displacement relation that is being tuned by selecting the defect's excitation frequency and amplitude. Depending on the nonlinear interaction potential at the defect site, the stiffness can be tuned to extremely positive or extremely negative values. While our theoretical and experimental results have been obtained in a granular crystal, the analysis suggests that an equivalent effect should be present in other lattices with localized modes and nonlinearity.

  16. Intrinsic excitability state of local neuronal population modulates signal propagation in feed-forward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Han, Ruixue; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xilei; Qin, Yingmei; Wang, Haixu

    2015-04-01

    Reliable signal propagation across distributed brain areas is an essential requirement for cognitive function, and it has been investigated extensively in computational studies where feed-forward network (FFN) is taken as a generic model. But it is still unclear how distinct local network states, which are intrinsically generated by synaptic interactions within each layer, would affect the ability of FFN to transmit information. Here we investigate the impact of such network states on propagating transient synchrony (synfire) and firing rate by a combination of numerical simulations and analytical approach. Specifically, local network dynamics is attributed to the competition between excitatory and inhibitory neurons within each layer. Our results show that concomitant with different local network states, the performance of signal propagation differs dramatically. For both synfire propagation and firing rate propagation, there exists an optimal local excitability state, respectively, that optimizes the performance of signal propagation. Furthermore, we find that long-range connections strongly change the dependence of spiking activity propagation on local network state and propose that these two factors work jointly to determine information transmission across distributed networks. Finally, a simple mean field approach that bridges response properties of long-range connectivity and local subnetworks is utilized to reveal the underlying mechanism.

  17. Intrinsic excitability state of local neuronal population modulates signal propagation in feed-forward neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ruixue; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xilei; Qin, Yingmei; Wang, Haixu

    2015-04-01

    Reliable signal propagation across distributed brain areas is an essential requirement for cognitive function, and it has been investigated extensively in computational studies where feed-forward network (FFN) is taken as a generic model. But it is still unclear how distinct local network states, which are intrinsically generated by synaptic interactions within each layer, would affect the ability of FFN to transmit information. Here we investigate the impact of such network states on propagating transient synchrony (synfire) and firing rate by a combination of numerical simulations and analytical approach. Specifically, local network dynamics is attributed to the competition between excitatory and inhibitory neurons within each layer. Our results show that concomitant with different local network states, the performance of signal propagation differs dramatically. For both synfire propagation and firing rate propagation, there exists an optimal local excitability state, respectively, that optimizes the performance of signal propagation. Furthermore, we find that long-range connections strongly change the dependence of spiking activity propagation on local network state and propose that these two factors work jointly to determine information transmission across distributed networks. Finally, a simple mean field approach that bridges response properties of long-range connectivity and local subnetworks is utilized to reveal the underlying mechanism.

  18. Spectral correlations in finite-size Anderson insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklitz, T.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate spectral correlations in quasi-one-dimensional Anderson insulators with broken time-reversal symmetry. While energy levels are uncorrelated in the thermodynamic limit of infinite wire length, some correlations remain in finite-size Anderson insulators. Asymptotic behaviors of level-level correlations in these systems are known in the large- and small-frequency limits, corresponding to the regime of classical diffusive dynamics and the deep quantum regime of strong Anderson localization. Employing nonperturbative methods and a mapping to the Coulomb-scattering problem, recently introduced by M. A. Skvortsov and P. M. Ostrovsky [JETP Lett. 85, 72 (2007), 10.1134/S0021364007010158], we derive a closed analytical expression for the spectral statistics in the classical-to-quantum region bridging the known asymptotic behaviors. We further discuss how Poisson statistics at large energies develop into Wigner-Dyson statistics as the wire-length decreases.

  19. Field theory of Anderson transition of the kicked rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    We present a microscopic theory of Anderson transition in the quantum kicked rotor. The behavior of the system is shown to depend sensitively on the value of the effective Planck constant, \\tilde h . For the periodically kicked rotor, we obtain quantitative results for the time-dependent behavior of the rotor's energy that characterizes the system's localization/resonance properties. For the quasiperiodically kicked rotor, we find that for irrational values of \\tilde h/(4\\pi ) , the quantum phase transition exhibited in this system falls into the universality class of Anderson (metal-insulator) transition in disordered electronic systems; for rational values, the rotor-Anderson insulator turns into a ‘supermetal’ (i.e. the static conductivity diverges) and the system exhibits metal-supermetal transition.

  20. The optical theorem for local source excitation of a particle near a plane interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Based on classic Maxwell's theory and the Gauss Theorem we extended the Optical Theorem to the case of a penetrable particle excited by a local source deposited near a plane interface. We demonstrate that the derived Extinction Cross-Section involves the total point source radiating cross-section and some definite integrals responsible for the scattering by the interface. The derived extinction cross-section can be employed to estimate the quantum yield and the optical antenna efficiency without computation of the absorption cross-section.

  1. Core localization and {sigma}* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kivimaeki, Antti; Sorensen, Stacey L.; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO{sub 2} molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking {sigma}* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the {sigma}* valence orbital.

  2. Core localization and sigma* delocalization in the O 1s core-excited sulfur dioxide molecule.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Andreas; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; Kivimäki, Antti; Burmeister, Florian; Naves de Brito, Arnaldo; Sorensen, Stacey L

    2008-03-21

    Electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements of sulfur dioxide at discrete resonances near the O 1s ionization edge are reported. The spectra are analyzed using a model based upon molecular symmetry and on the geometry of the molecule. We find clear evidence for molecular alignment that can be ascribed to symmetry properties of the ground and core-excited states. Configuration interaction (CI) calculations indicate geometry changes in accord with the measured spectra. For the SO(2) molecule, however, we find that the localized core hole does not produce measurable evidence for valence localization, since the transition dipole moment is not parallel to a breaking sigma* O-S bond, in contrast to the case of ozone. The dissociation behavior based upon the CI calculations using symmetry-broken orbitals while fixing a localized core-hole site is found to be nearly equivalent to that using symmetry-adapted orbitals. This implies that the core-localization effect is not strong enough to localize the sigma* valence orbital. PMID:18361575

  3. Localization of bleomycin in a single living cell using three-photon excitation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Anil T.; Brautigan, David L.; Hecht, Sidney M.; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the clinic as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of several neoplasms, including non-Hodgkins lymphomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and testicular tumors. The effectiveness of bleomycin is believed to be derived from its ability to bind and oxidatively cleave DNA in the presence of a iron cofactor in vivo. A substantial amount of data on BLM has been collected, there is little information concerning the effects of bleomycin in living cells. In order to obtain data pertinent to the effects of BLM in intact cells, we have exploited the intrinsic fluorescence property of bleomycin to monitor the uptake of the drug in mammalian cells. We employed two light microscopy techniques, a wide-field and three-photon excitation (760 nm) fluorescence microscopy. Treatment of HeLa cells with bleomycin resulted in rapid to localization within the cells. In addition data collected from the wide field experiments, three-photon excitation of BLM which considerably reduced the phototoxic effect compared with UV light excitation in the wide-field microscopy indicated co-localization of the drug to regions of the cytoplasm occupied by the endoplasmic reticulum probe, DiOC5. The data clearly indicates that the cellular uptake of bleomycin after one minute includes the nucleus as well as in cytoplasm. Contrary to previous studies, which indicate chromosomal DNA as the target of bleomycin, the current findings suggest that the drug is distributed to many areas within the cell, including the endoplasmic reticulum, an organelle that is known to contain ribonucleic acids.

  4. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, H A S; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, M E; Acosta, C; Carneiro, A A O; Konofagou, E E

    2015-10-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5–1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were mm3, mm3and mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were V.s, V.s and V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:26394091

  5. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  6. General variable separation solution and new localized excitations for the (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Cheng-Lin; Hu, Hai-Quan; Wang, Wen-Jun; Zhao, Hong

    2006-12-01

    By applying a special Backlund transformation, a general variable separation Solution for the (2 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation is derived. In addition to some types of the usual localized excitations, Such as dromions, lumps, ring solitons, oscillated dromions, and breathers, soliton structures can be easily constructed by selecting arbitrary functions appropriately. A new class of localized excitations, like fractal-dromions, fractal-lumps, peakons, compactors, and folded excitations of this system is found by selecting appropriate functions. Some interesting novel features of these structures are revealed.

  7. Evidence for Cation-Controlled Excited-State Localization in a Ruthenium Polypyridyl Compound.

    PubMed

    Beauvilliers, Evan E; Meyer, Gerald J

    2016-08-01

    The visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the four neutral ruthenium diimine compounds [Ru(bpy)2(dcb)] (B2B), [Ru(dtb)2(dcb)] (D2B), [Ru(bpy)2(dcbq)] (B2Q), and [Ru(dtb)2(dcbq)] (D2Q), where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, dcb is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-bpy, dtb is 4,4'-(tert-butyl)2-bpy, and dcbq is 4,4'-(CO2(-))2-2,2'-biquinoline, are reported in the presence of Lewis acidic cations present in fluid solutions at room temperature. In methanol solutions, the measured spectra were insensitive to the presence of these cations, while in acetonitrile a significant red shift in the PL spectra (≤1400 cm(-1)) was observed consistent with stabilization of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state through Lewis acid-base adduct formation. No significant spectral changes were observed in control experiments with the tetrabutylammonium cation. Titration data with Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Al(3+), Y(3+), and La(3+) showed that the extent of stabilization saturated at high cation concentration with magnitudes that scaled roughly with the cation charge-to-size ratio. The visible absorption spectra of D2Q was particularly informative due to the presence of two well-resolved MLCT absorption bands: (1) Ru → bpy, λmax ≈ 450 nm; and (2) Ru → dcbq, λmax ≈ 540 nm. The higher-energy band blue-shifted and the lower-energy band red-shifted upon cation addition. The PL intensity and lifetime of the excited state of B2B first increased with cation addition without significant shifts in the measured spectra, behavior attributed to a cation-induced change in the localization of the emissive excited state from bpy to dcb. The importance of excited-state localization and stabilization for solar energy conversion is discussed. PMID:27391279

  8. Quantum Localization in Laser-Driven Molecular Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbukh, Ilya

    2016-05-01

    Recently we predicted that several celebrated solid state quantum localization phenomena - Anderson localization, Bloch oscillations, and Tamm-Shockley surface states - may manifest themselves in the rotational dynamics of laser-kicked molecules. In this talk, I will present these new rotational effects in a gas of linear molecules subject to a moderately long periodic train of femtosecond laser pulses. A small detuning of the train period from the rotational revival time causes Anderson localization in the angular momentum space above some critical value of J - the Anderson wall. This wall marks an impenetrable border stopping any further rotational excitation. Below the Anderson wall, the rotational excitation oscillates with the number of pulses due to a mechanism similar to Bloch oscillations in crystalline solids. I will present the results of the first experimental observation of the laser-induced rotational Bloch oscillations in molecular nitrogen at ambient conditions (Stanford & Weizmann, 2015). We will also discuss the prospects of observing the rotational analogues of the Tamm surface states in a similar experimental setup. Our results offer laser-driven molecular rotation as a new platform for studies on the localization phenomena in quantum transport. These effects are important for many processes involving highly excited rotational states, including coherent optical manipulations in molecular mixtures, and propagation of powerful laser pulses in atmosphere.

  9. Ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenbecler, R.; Fulco, J. R.; Gill, W.; Scalapino, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The ground-state energy, hybridization matrix element, local moment, and spin-density correlations of a one-dimensional, finite-chain, periodic, symmetric Anderson model are obtained by numerical simulations and compared with perturbation theory and strong-coupling results. It is found that the local f-electron spins are compensated by correlation with other f-electrons as well as band electrons leading to a nonmagnetic ground state.

  10. Localization of magnetic and electronic excitations in nanotubes with line defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, P. G.; Cottam, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    A matrix Green's function formalism is employed to study the excitations in long nanotubes where the dynamics are governed by nearest-neighbor interactions between atoms. Examples of the excitations, which can be characterized in terms of the tube circumference and a one-dimensional wave number along the length, include ferromagnetic spin waves in a Heisenberg exchange model and electronic modes in a tight-binding model with hopping. It is assumed that the system is a single-walled nanotube of negligible thickness and that the atoms are arranged on a simple square lattice. Defects in the form of substitutional impurity atoms are introduced to study localized modes as well as the propagating modes of the pure (host) material. The impurities have the form of one or more line defects parallel to the nanotube axis. The derived Green's functions provide a description of the frequencies of the discrete modes of the system and their spectral intensities. Numerical examples are presented for different mode types (magnetic and electronic), nanotube diameters and arrangements of impurity lines.

  11. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore » dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  12. Local excitation of the 5-bromouracil chromophore in DNA. Computational and UV spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Storoniak, Piotr; Rak, Janusz; Polska, Katarzyna; Blancafort, Lluís

    2011-04-21

    The UV electronic transition energies and their oscillator strengths for two stacked dimers having B-DNA geometries and consisting of 5-bromouracil ((Br)U) and a purine base were studied at the MS-CASPT2/6-311G(d) level with an active space of 12 orbitals and 12 electrons. The calculated energy of the first vertical (π,π*) transitions for the studied dimers remain in fair agreement with the maxima in the difference spectra measured for duplexes with the 5'-A(Br)U-3' or 5'-G(Br)U-3' sequences. Our MS-CASPT2 results show that the charge transfer (CT) states in which an electron is transferred from A/G to (Br)U are located at much higher energies than the first (π,π*) transitions, which involve local excitation (LE) of (Br)U. Moreover, CT transitions are characterized by small oscillator strengths, which implies that they could not be excited directly. The results of the current studies suggest that the formation of the reactive uracil-5-yl radical in DNA is preceded by the formation of the highly oxidative LE state of (Br)U, which is followed by electron transfer, presumably from guanine.

  13. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  14. From global to local: exploring the relationship between parameters and behaviors in models of electrical excitability.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Patrick; Bertram, Richard; Tabak, Joel

    2016-06-01

    Models of electrical activity in excitable cells involve nonlinear interactions between many ionic currents. Changing parameters in these models can produce a variety of activity patterns with sometimes unexpected effects. Further more, introducing new currents will have different effects depending on the initial parameter set. In this study we combined global sampling of parameter space and local analysis of representative parameter sets in a pituitary cell model to understand the effects of adding K (+) conductances, which mediate some effects of hormone action on these cells. Global sampling ensured that the effects of introducing K (+) conductances were captured across a wide variety of contexts of model parameters. For each type of K (+) conductance we determined the types of behavioral transition that it evoked. Some transitions were counterintuitive, and may have been missed without the use of global sampling. In general, the wide range of transitions that occurred when the same current was applied to the model cell at different locations in parameter space highlight the challenge of making accurate model predictions in light of cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Finally, we used bifurcation analysis and fast/slow analysis to investigate why specific transitions occur in representative individual models. This approach relies on the use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to quickly map parameter space to model behavior and identify parameter sets for further analysis. Acceleration with modern low-cost GPUs is particularly well suited to exploring the moderate-sized (5-20) parameter spaces of excitable cell and signaling models.

  15. New Theoretical Developments in Exploring Electronically Excited States: Including Localized Configuration Interaction Singles and Application to Large Helium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closser, Kristina Danielle

    superpositions of atomic states with surface states appearing close to the atomic excitation energies and interior states being blue shifted by up to ≈2 eV. The dynamics resulting from excitation of He_7 were subsequently explored using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). These simulations were performed with classical adiabatic dynamics coupled to a new state-following algorithm on CIS potential energy surfaces. Most clusters were found to completely dissociate and resulted in a single excited atomic state (90%), however, some trajectories formed bound, He*2 (3%), and a few yielded excited trimers (<0.5%). Comparisons were made with available experimental information on much larger clusters. Various applications of this state following algorithm are also presented. In addition to AIMD, these include excited-state geometry optimization and minimal energy path finding via the growing string method. When using state following we demonstrate that more physical results can be obtained with AIMD calculations. Also, the optimized geometries of three excited states of cytosine, two of which were not found without state following, and the minimal energy path between the lowest two singlet excited states of protonated formaldimine are offered as example applications. Finally, to address large clusters, a local variation of CIS was developed. This method exploits the properties of absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) to limit the total number of excitations to scaling only linearly with cluster size, which results in formal scaling with the third power of the system size. The derivation of the equations and design of the algorithm are discussed in detail, and computational timings as well as a pilot application to the size dependence of the helium cluster spectrum are presented.

  16. Localization of the electronic excitations in single-walled carbon nanotubes with embedded line impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, P. G.; Cottam, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    A matrix operator formalism is used to study the excitations in long, single-walled carbon nanotubes with the dynamic electronic properties described by a tight-binding model where the interactions between atoms take place via nearest-neighbour hopping. Defects in the form of substitutional impurity atoms are introduced to study the localized electronic modes of the nanotube as well as the propagating modes of the pure (host) material. The impurities are assumed to have the form of one or more line defects parallel to the nanotube axis. Two geometric configurations are investigated corresponding to the longitudinal axis of the nanotube being parallel to either a zigzag or an armchair direction of the graphene lattice. A tridiagonal matrix technique is employed to solve the electronic operator equations that provide a description of the frequencies of the discrete modes of the system and their spatial amplitudes. Numerical examples are presented for different nanotube diameters and spatial configurations of the impurity lines.

  17. Attraction of spiral waves by localized inhomogeneities with small-world connections in excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaonan; Lu, Ying; Jiang, Minxi; Ouyang, Qi

    2004-05-01

    Trapping and untrapping of spiral tips in a two-dimensional homogeneous excitable medium with local small-world connections are studied by numerical simulation. In a homogeneous medium which can be simulated with a lattice of regular neighborhood connections, the spiral wave is in the meandering regime. When changing the topology of a small region from regular connections to small-world connections, the tip of the spiral waves is attracted by the small-world region, where the average path length declines with the introduction of long distant connections. The “trapped” phenomenon also occurs in regular lattices where the diffusion coefficient of the small region is increased. The above results can be explained by the eikonal equation, the Luther equation, and the relation between the core radius and the diffusion coefficient.

  18. Entanglement scaling of excited states in large one-dimensional many-body localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennes, D. M.; Karrasch, C.

    2016-06-01

    We study the properties of excited states in one-dimensional many-body localized (MBL) systems using a matrix product state algorithm. First, the method is tested for a large disordered noninteracting system, where for comparison we compute a quasiexact reference solution via a Monte Carlo sampling of the single-particle levels. Thereafter, we present extensive data obtained for large interacting systems of L ˜100 sites and large bond dimensions χ ˜1700 , which allows us to quantitatively analyze the scaling behavior of the entanglement S in the system. The MBL phase is characterized by a logarithmic growth S (L )˜log(L ) over a large scale separating the regimes where volume and area laws hold. We check the validity of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis. Our results are consistent with the existence of a mobility edge.

  19. Shear-flow excitation mechanisms of recessed localized arc-filament plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, R. R.; Bodony, D. J.; Freund, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    Localized arc-filament plasma actuators, placed near the nozzle lip of a laboratory jet, have recently been demonstrated to have sufficient control authority to significantly excite the jet downstream [M. Samimy et al., J. Fluid Mech. 578, 305 (2007)]. This class of plasma actuator, which in this application is recessed in a small cavity near the nozzle lip, causes intense local heating. This heating is thought to be the root mechanism of its influence on the flow, but how this principally entropic thermal source couples with the vortical jet shear layer turbulence downstream is unclear. We investigate this using direct numerical simulations, which match the flow conditions of the corresponding experiment, including Reynolds number, but are two-dimensional to ease computational expense. Despite this obvious modeling approximation, the simulations include the key features of the laboratory system: a thin boundary layer, a plasma-like thermal source in a small recessed cavity, a nozzle lip, and a downstream free shear layer. Results are shown to match the temperature and near-field pressure measured in the laboratory actuators. It is found that the cavity, which was initially included to shield the actuator plasma from the flow, is essential for its action. Thermal expansion within the cavity leads to an ejection of fluid from it, which perturbs the boundary layer and the downstream mixing layer. There is a finite baroclinic torque, but its effects are relatively minor. An alternate actuator designed to mimic the pressure effects of the full actuator, without its concomitant thermal heating, is nearly as effective at exciting the shear layer. An actuator model without the cavity recess does not provide effective actuation. These results suggest that there is significant potential to optimize the actuation authority through design of cavity recesses that augment its effect.

  20. Excitation of XPS spectra from nanoscaled particles by local generation of x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallinson, Christopher F.; Castle, James E.

    2015-09-15

    In preliminary work, the authors have shown that use of an aluminum substrate to support a distribution of copper particles enables their characteristic photoelectrons to be observed within the Auger electron spectrum generated by an incident electron beam. This observation raises the possibility of the use of chemical shifts and the corresponding Auger parameter to identify the chemical states present on the surface of individual submicrometer particles within a mixture. In this context, the technique has an advantage in that, unlike conventional Auger electron spectroscopy, the electron beam does not dwell on the particle but on the substrate adjacent to it. Given the importance, for both medical and toxicological reasons, of the surface composition of such particles, the authors have continued to explore the potential of this development. In this contribution, the authors show that proximal excitation of x-rays is equally successful with magnesium substrates. In some regions of the x-ray photoelectron spectrum, the much larger Auger peaks generated by the electron beam can cause inconvenient clustering of Auger and photoelectron peaks. As in conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the ability to switch between Al and Mg sources is useful in such situations. In this context, the authors have extended the studies to iron particles where the authors show that use of Al or Mg substrates, as necessary, can make a contribution to clear identification of individual components in the Fe 2p peaks. For this development in electron spectroscopy to achieve its full potential, it is necessary to optimize the beam conditions used to generate the local x-ray to give good selectivity of a given particle. Measurements made in support of this will be given. Of greater concern is a possible problem of local heating associated with x-ray generation. The authors continue to explore this problem and report some progress in minimizing heating of the particle while maintaining

  1. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Wang, S.; Wu, S.-Y.; Karakatsani, M. E.; Acosta, C.; Carneiro, A. A. O.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38+/- 5.71 mm3, 8.91+/- 3.91 mm3and 35.47+/- 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40+/- 28.43 V.s, 63.87+/- 29.97 V.s and 356.52+/- 257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue.

  2. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, HAS; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, ME; Acosta, C; Carneiro, AAO; Konofagou, EE

    2015-01-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n=15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38±5.71 mm3, 8.91±3.91 mm3 and 35.47 ± 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40±28.43 V.s, 63.87±29.97 V.s and 356.52±257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:26394091

  3. An Anderson-like model of the QCD chiral transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Kovács, Tamás G.; Pittler, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    We study the problems of chiral symmetry breaking and eigenmode localisation in finite-temperature QCD by looking at the lattice Dirac operator as a random Hamiltonian. We recast the staggered Dirac operator into an unconventional three-dimensional Anderson Hamiltonian ("Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian") carrying internal degrees of freedom, with disorder provided by the fluctuations of the gauge links. In this framework, we identify the features relevant to chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low-lying Dirac eigenmodes in the ordering of the local Polyakov lines, and in the related correlation between spatial links across time slices, thus tying the two phenomena to the deconfinement transition. We then build a toy model based on QCD and on the Dirac-Anderson approach, replacing the Polyakov lines with spin variables and simplifying the dynamics of the spatial gauge links, but preserving the above-mentioned relevant dynamical features. Our toy model successfully reproduces the main features of the QCD spectrum and of the Dirac eigenmodes concerning chiral symmetry breaking and localisation, both in the ordered (deconfined) and disordered (confined) phases. Moreover, it allows us to study separately the roles played in the two phenomena by the diagonal and the off-diagonal terms of the Dirac-Anderson Hamiltonian. Our results support our expectation that chiral symmetry restoration and localisation of the low modes are closely related, and that both are triggered by the deconfinement transition.

  4. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach.

    PubMed

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S L

    2016-06-17

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods. PMID:27367405

  5. The Anderson model for electron localisation non-linear σ model, asymptotic gauge invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruisken, Adrianus M. M.; Schäfer, Lothar

    1982-01-01

    The Anderson model for localisation problems is treated with field theory, employing the replica trick. We show that no valid perturbation theory results out of the usual ( S2) 2 formalism due to mishandling of symmetries. The problem is reformulated in terms of matrix fields. It is shown that the Anderson model asymptotically exhibits an exact local gauge symmetry. Elimination of massive longitudinal components leads to a non-compact σ model, obtained earlier for the description of electronic disorder. We thus establish that the Anderson model is in the same universality class as Wegner's gauge invariant real matrix model.

  6. Encoding the structure of many-body localization with matrix product operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Clark, Bryan K.

    2015-03-01

    Anderson insulators are non-interacting disordered systems which have localized single particle eigenstates. The interacting analogue of Anderson insulators are the Many-Body Localized (MBL) phases. The natural language for representing the spectrum of the Anderson insulator is that of product states over the single-particle modes. We show that product states over Matrix Product Operators of small bond dimension is the corresponding natural language for describing the MBL phases. In this language all of the many-body eigenstates are encode by Matrix Product States (i.e. DMRG wave function) consisting of only two sets of low bond-dimension matrices per site: the Gi matrix corresponding to the local ground state on site i and the Ei matrix corresponding to the local excited state. All 2 n eigenstates can be generated from all possible combinations of these matrices.

  7. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Logan, David E; Galpin, Martin R; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-11-16

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger's theorem to the Mott insulator.

  8. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David E.; Galpin, Martin R.; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger’s theorem to the Mott insulator.

  9. Mott transitions in the periodic Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Logan, David E; Galpin, Martin R; Mannouch, Jonathan

    2016-11-16

    The periodic Anderson model (PAM) is studied within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory, with particular emphasis on the interaction-driven Mott transition it contains, and on resultant Mott insulators of both Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer type. The form of the PAM phase diagram is first deduced on general grounds using two exact results, over the full range of model parameters and including metallic, Mott, Kondo and band insulator phases. The effective low-energy model which describes the PAM in the vicinity of a Mott transition is then shown to be a one-band Hubbard model, with effective hoppings that are not in general solely nearest neighbour, but decay exponentially with distance. This mapping is shown to have a range of implications for the physics of the problem, from phase boundaries to single-particle dynamics; all of which are confirmed and supplemented by NRG calculations. Finally we consider the locally degenerate, non-Fermi liquid Mott insulator, to describe which requires a two-self-energy description. This is shown to yield a number of exact results for the associated local moment, charge, and interaction-renormalised levels, together with a generalisation of Luttinger's theorem to the Mott insulator. PMID:27618214

  10. Local CC2 response method based on the Laplace transform: orbital-relaxed first-order properties for excited states.

    PubMed

    Ledermüller, Katrin; Kats, Daniel; Schütz, Martin

    2013-08-28

    A multistate local CC2 response method for the calculation of orbital-relaxed first order properties is presented for ground and electronically excited states. It enables the treatment of excited state properties including orbital relaxation for extended molecular systems and is a major step on the way towards analytic gradients with respect to nuclear displacements. The Laplace transform method is employed to partition the eigenvalue problem and the lambda equations, i.e., the doubles parts of these equations are inverted on-the-fly, leaving only the corresponding effective singles equations to be solved iteratively. Furthermore, the state specific local approximations are adaptive. Density-fitting is utilized to decompose the electron-repulsion integrals. The accuracy of the local approximation is tested and the efficiency of the new code is demonstrated on the example of an organic sensitizer for solar-cell applications, which consists of about 100 atoms.

  11. Local CC2 response method based on the Laplace transform: Orbital-relaxed first-order properties for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermüller, Katrin; Kats, Daniel; Schütz, Martin

    2013-08-01

    A multistate local CC2 response method for the calculation of orbital-relaxed first order properties is presented for ground and electronically excited states. It enables the treatment of excited state properties including orbital relaxation for extended molecular systems and is a major step on the way towards analytic gradients with respect to nuclear displacements. The Laplace transform method is employed to partition the eigenvalue problem and the lambda equations, i.e., the doubles parts of these equations are inverted on-the-fly, leaving only the corresponding effective singles equations to be solved iteratively. Furthermore, the state specific local approximations are adaptive. Density-fitting is utilized to decompose the electron-repulsion integrals. The accuracy of the local approximation is tested and the efficiency of the new code is demonstrated on the example of an organic sensitizer for solar-cell applications, which consists of about 100 atoms.

  12. Effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence excitation spectrum of α-fetoprotein: Local environment dependent fluorescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, A.-qing; Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Jun-wu

    2011-01-01

    The effect of colloid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence excitation spectrum of α-fetoprotein (AFP) has been investigated experimentally. The excitation spectral peaks of AFP with low concentration from 0.01 ng ml -1 to 12 ng ml -1 increase monotonically with increasing of AFP concentration. When some gold colloids were added to the AFP solution, the excitation peak at 285 nm decreases distinctly. By comparing the excitation peak intensity of AFP solution with gold colloids and without gold colloids at different AFP concentrations, the quenching effect from gold nanoparticle was more effective at lower AFP concentration. So the range of concentration from 0.01 ng ml -1 to 0.09 ng ml -1 will be the potential range of applications because of the higher sensitivity. The physical origin based on local field effect was investigated to illuminate this local environment dependent fluorescence quenching. The changing extent of quenching with different AFP concentrations can be attributed to the nonlinear decreasing of the local field factor of gold nanoparticles as a function of environmental dielectric constant.

  13. Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Milovanov, Alexander V; Iomin, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t→+∞. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ∝ t^{α}, with the exponent α=1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the

  14. Topological approximation of the nonlinear Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.; Iomin, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    We study the phenomena of Anderson localization in the presence of nonlinear interaction on a lattice. A class of nonlinear Schrödinger models with arbitrary power nonlinearity is analyzed. We conceive the various regimes of behavior, depending on the topology of resonance overlap in phase space, ranging from a fully developed chaos involving Lévy flights to pseudochaotic dynamics at the onset of delocalization. It is demonstrated that the quadratic nonlinearity plays a dynamically very distinguished role in that it is the only type of power nonlinearity permitting an abrupt localization-delocalization transition with unlimited spreading already at the delocalization border. We describe this localization-delocalization transition as a percolation transition on the infinite Cayley tree (Bethe lattice). It is found in the vicinity of the criticality that the spreading of the wave field is subdiffusive in the limit t →+∞. The second moment of the associated probability distribution grows with time as a power law ∝ tα, with the exponent α =1/3 exactly. Also we find for superquadratic nonlinearity that the analog pseudochaotic regime at the edge of chaos is self-controlling in that it has feedback on the topology of the structure on which the transport processes concentrate. Then the system automatically (without tuning of parameters) develops its percolation point. We classify this type of behavior in terms of self-organized criticality dynamics in Hilbert space. For subquadratic nonlinearities, the behavior is shown to be sensitive to the details of definition of the nonlinear term. A transport model is proposed based on modified nonlinearity, using the idea of "stripes" propagating the wave process to large distances. Theoretical investigations, presented here, are the basis for consistency analysis of the different localization-delocalization patterns in systems with many coupled degrees of freedom in association with the asymptotic properties of the

  15. Astronaut Anderson Works in SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia STS-107 mission launched January 16, 2003. STS-107 is strictly a multidiscipline microgravity and Earth science research mission involving 80-plus International experiments to be performed during 16-days, many of which will be managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of the research will be conducted in the Shuttle's mid deck, the area directly under the cockpit, and in the new SPACEHAB Research Double Module. This is the first flight for that module, which doubles the volume available for experiments and significantly increases the amount and complexity of research from the last dedicated Shuttle science mission, STS-95, flown in 1998 with a single SPACEHAB module. The pressurized module is carried in Columbia's payload bay and is accessible to the crew via a turnel from the Shuttle's mid deck. Pictured is an interesting view, looking through the adjoining tunnel, of astronaut Michael P. Anderson, mission specialist, performing work in SPACEHAB. The first shuttle mission in 2003, the STS-107 mission marks the 113th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program, and the 28th flight of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Columbia.

  16. Taking on Titan: Meet Carrie Anderson

    NASA Video Gallery

    When she was a little girl, Carrie Anderson dreamed of becoming an astronomer. Now, as a space scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Carrie studies the atmosphere on Titan: one of Saturn's...

  17. A new type of localized fast moving electronic excitations in molecular chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunova, A. N.; Lakhno, V. D.

    2014-06-01

    It is shown that in a Holstein molecular chain placed in a strong longitudinal electric field some new types of excitations can arise. These excitations can transfer a charge over large distance (more than 1000 nucleotide pairs) along the chain retaining approximately their shapes. Excitations are formed only when a strong electric field either exists or quickly arises under especially preassigned conditions. These excitations transfer a charge even in the case when Holstein polarons are practically immobile. The results obtained are applied to synthetic homogeneous PolyG/PolyC DNA duplexes. They can also be provide the basis for explanation of famous H.W. Fink and C. Schönenberger experiment on long-range charge transfer in DNA.

  18. Dynamics of electronic excitations relaxation in hydrophilic colloidal CdS quantum dots in gelatin with involvement of localized states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M. S.; Buganov, O. V.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Perepelitsa, A. S.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Katsaba, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Dynamics of the 1Se-1S3/2 exciton in colloidal CdS quantum dots with diameter of 3.1 ÷ 4.5 nm in gelatin with involvement of localized states was studied by means of femtosecond photoinduced absorption spectroscopy (pump-probe), thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) observed under permanently excited luminescence. It was found that the bleaching band occurs in the energy region of exciton ground state under excitation by femtosecond laser pulses. The complex dynamics of bleaching recovery is caused by the capture of electron on localized states, found using TSL. The stochastic model describing the dynamics of bleaching recovery is discussed. It is shown that the low efficiency of exciton luminescence is caused by the rapid capture of holes by luminescence centers.

  19. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in many-body systems with infinite-range interaction: Localization, dynamics, and bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Lea F.; Távora, Marco; Pérez-Bernal, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Excited-state quantum phase transitions (ESQPTs) are generalizations of quantum phase transitions to excited levels. They are associated with local divergences in the density of states. Here, we investigate how the presence of an ESQPT can be detected from the analysis of the structure of the Hamiltonian matrix, the level of localization of the eigenstates, the onset of bifurcation, and the speed of the system evolution. Our findings are illustrated for a Hamiltonian with infinite-range Ising interaction in a transverse field. This is a version of the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model and the limiting case of the one-dimensional spin-1/2 system with tunable interactions realized with ion traps. From our studies for the dynamics, we uncover similarities between the LMG and the noninteracting XX models.

  20. Describing excited state relaxation and localization in TiO2 nanoparticles using TD-DFT

    DOE PAGES

    Berardo, Enrico; Hu, Han -Shi; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Shevlin, Stephen A.; Woodley, Scott M.; Kowalski, Karol; Zwijnenburg, Martijn A.

    2014-02-26

    We have investigated the description of excited state relaxation in naked and hydrated TiO2 nanoparticles using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) with three common hybrid exchange-correlation (XC) potentials; B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and BHLYP. Use of TD-CAM-B3LYP and TD-BHLYP yields qualitatively similar results for all structures, which are also consistent with predictions of coupled cluster theory for small particles. TD-B3LYP, in contrast, is found to make rather different predictions; including apparent conical intersections for certain particles that are not observed with TD-CAM-B3LYP nor with TD-BHLYP. In line with our previous observations for vertical excitations, the issue with TD-B3LYP appears to be themore » inherent tendency of TD-B3LYP, and other XC potentials with no or a low percentage of Hartree-Fock Like Exchange, to spuriously stabilize the energy of charge-transfer (CT) states. Even in the case of hydrated particles, for which vertical excitations are generally well described with all XC potentials, the use of TD-B3LYP appears to result in CT-problems for certain particles. We hypothesize that the spurious stabilization of CT-states by TD-B3LYP even may drive the excited state optimizations to different excited state geometries than those obtained using TD-CAM-B3LYP or TD-BHLYP. In conclusion, focusing on the TD-CAM-B3LYP and TD-BHLYP results, excited state relaxation in naked and hydrated TiO2 nanoparticles is predicted to be associated with a large Stokes’ shift.« less

  1. Correlation effects in EOM-CCSD for the excited states: evaluated by AIM localization index (LI) and delocalization index (DI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Gui; Wiberg, Kenneth B; Werstiuk, Nick H

    2007-05-10

    We have extended the evaluation and interpretation of QTAIM (quantum theory of atoms in molecules) localization and delocalization indices lambda (LI) and delta (DI) to electronic excited states by studying ground states (at HF and CCSD levels) and excited states (at CIS and EOM-CCSD) of H2C=CH2, HCCH, H2C=O, H2C=S, CO2, CS2, and SO2. These molecules undergo extensive geometrical changes upon the excitation to the valence adiabatic excited singlet state. The importance of Coulomb correlation effects was demonstrated by comparing the LIs and DIs at none-correlated levels (HF and CIS) and those at correlated levels (CCSD and EOM-CCSD). In interpreting the changes in the magnitudes of the LIs and DIs, we made use of simple molecular orbital and Walsh-diagram analyses. Coulomb correlation is important in determining the magnitude of the LIs and DIs and obtaining geometries that are close to experiment.

  2. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical andmore » electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.« less

  3. Probing local bias-induced transitions using photothermal excitation contact resonance atomic force microscopy and voltage spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qian; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Collins, Liam; Yu, Pu; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balke, Nina

    2015-01-05

    In this paper, nanomechanical properties are closely related to the states of matter, including chemical composition, crystal structure, mesoscopic domain configuration, etc. Investigation of these properties at the nanoscale requires not only static imaging methods, e.g., contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM), but also spectroscopic methods capable of revealing their dependence on various external stimuli. Here we demonstrate the voltage spectroscopy of CR-AFM, which was realized by combining photothermal excitation (as opposed to the conventional piezoacoustic excitation method) with the band excitation technique. We applied this spectroscopy to explore local bias-induced phenomena ranging from purely physical to surface electromechanical and electrochemical processes. Our measurements show that the changes in the surface properties associated with these bias-induced transitions can be accurately assessed in a fast and dynamic manner, using resonance frequency as a signature. Finally, with many of the advantages offered by photothermal excitation, contact resonance voltage spectroscopy not only is expected to find applications in a broader field of nanoscience but also will provide a basis for future development of other nanoscale elastic spectroscopies.

  4. Local Inflammation in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Alters Excitability and Ion Currents in Small Diameter Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Gang; Strong, Judith A.; Xie, Wenrui; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain conditions may result from peripheral nerve injury, chronic peripheral inflammation, or sensory ganglia inflammation. However, inflammatory processes may also contribute to peripheral nerve injury responses. To isolate the contribution of local inflammation of sensory ganglia to chronic pain states, we previously developed a rat model in which long lasting pain is induced by inflaming sensory ganglia without injuring the neurons. This results in prolonged mechanical pain, local increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines, increased neuronal hyperexcitability and abnormal spontaneous activity. Methods: We used whole-cell patch clamp in acutely isolated small diameter neurons to determine how localized inflammation (3 – 5 days) of L4 and L5 ganglia altered voltage-gated K+ and Na+ currents. Results: Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na+ currents increased 2 to 3-fold in neurons from inflamed ganglia. TTX-resistant Na+ currents increased over 2-fold, but only in cells that bound IB4. These increases occurred without shifts in voltage dependence of activation and inactivation. The similar results are seen in models of peripheral inflammation, except for the large magnitudes. Unlike most pain models, localized inflammation increased rather than decreased voltage-gated K+ currents, due to increased amplitudes of the sustained (delayed rectifier) and fast-inactivating transient components. The overall effect in current-clamp experiments was an increase in excitability as indicated by decreased rheobase and lower action potential threshold. Conclusions: Neuronal inflammation per se, in the absence of nerve injury, causes large increases in Na channel density and enhanced excitability. The unusual finding of increased K+ current may reflect regulation of excitability in the face of such large increases in Na+ current. PMID:17667578

  5. Local excitation and interference of surface phonon polaritons studied by near-field infrared microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huber, A J; Ocelic, N; Hillenbrand, R

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate that mid-infrared surface phonon polariton excitation, propagation and interference can be studied by scattering-type near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). In our experiments we image surface phonon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on flat SiC crystals. They are excited by weakly focused illumination of single or closely spaced metal disks we fabricated on the SiC surface by conventional photolithography. SPP imaging is performed by pseudo-heterodyne interferometric detection of infrared light scattered by the metal tip of our s-SNOM. The pseudo-heterodyne technique simultaneously yields optical amplitude and phase images which allows us to measure the SPP wave vector--including its sign--and the propagation length and further to study SPP interference. High resolution imaging of SPPs could be applied to investigate for example SPP focusing or heat transfer by SPPs in low dimensional nanostructures.

  6. Theory of the Anderson transition in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander; Garst, Markus

    2011-08-12

    We present the first microscopic theory of transport in quasiperiodically driven environments ("kicked rotors"), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of a dimensionless Planck constant h: for irrational values of h/(4π) they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we describe the corresponding localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a "supermetal." We discuss the ensuing possibility of a metal-supermetal quantum phase transition.

  7. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  8. Theory of the Anderson transition in the quasiperiodic kicked rotor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chushun; Altland, Alexander; Garst, Markus

    2011-08-12

    We present the first microscopic theory of transport in quasiperiodically driven environments ("kicked rotors"), as realized in recent atom optic experiments. We find that the behavior of these systems depends sensitively on the value of a dimensionless Planck constant h: for irrational values of h/(4π) they fall into the universality class of disordered electronic systems and we describe the corresponding localization phenomena. In contrast, for rational values the rotor-Anderson insulator acquires an infinite (static) conductivity and turns into a "supermetal." We discuss the ensuing possibility of a metal-supermetal quantum phase transition. PMID:21902396

  9. Grating-coupled Otto configuration for hybridized surface phonon polariton excitation for local refractive index sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Zheng, Gaige; Shen, Hong; Lei, Dang Yuan; Somekh, Michael G

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate numerically through rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) that replacing the prism in the Otto configuration with gratings enables us to excite and control different modes and field patterns of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) through the incident wavelength and height of the Otto spacing layer. This modified Otto configuration provides us the following multiple modes, namely, SPhP mode, Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity resonance, dielectric waveguide grating resonance (DWGR) and hybridized between different combinations of the above mentioned modes. We show that this modified grating-coupled Otto configuration has a highly confined field pattern within the structure, making it more sensitive to local refractive index changes on the SiC surface. The hybridized surface phonon polariton modes also provide a stronger field enhancement compared to conventional pure mode excitation. PMID:27557229

  10. Grating-coupled Otto configuration for hybridized surface phonon polariton excitation for local refractive index sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Zheng, Gaige; Shen, Hong; Lei, Dang Yuan; Somekh, Michael G

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate numerically through rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) that replacing the prism in the Otto configuration with gratings enables us to excite and control different modes and field patterns of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) through the incident wavelength and height of the Otto spacing layer. This modified Otto configuration provides us the following multiple modes, namely, SPhP mode, Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity resonance, dielectric waveguide grating resonance (DWGR) and hybridized between different combinations of the above mentioned modes. We show that this modified grating-coupled Otto configuration has a highly confined field pattern within the structure, making it more sensitive to local refractive index changes on the SiC surface. The hybridized surface phonon polariton modes also provide a stronger field enhancement compared to conventional pure mode excitation.

  11. Phase relaxed localized excitation pulses for inner volume fast spin echo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To design multidimensional spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses for inner volume imaging (IVI) with three‐dimensional (3D) fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. Enhanced background suppression is achieved by exploiting particular signal properties of FSE sequences. Theory and Methods The CPMG condition dictates that echo amplitudes will rapidly decrease if a 90° phase difference between excitation and refocusing pulses is not present, and refocusing flip angles are not precisely 180°. This mechanism is proposed as a means for generating additional background suppression for spatially selective excitation, by biasing residual excitation errors toward violating the CPMG condition. 3D RF pulses were designed using this method with a 3D spherical spiral trajectory, under‐sampled by factor 5.6 for an eight‐channel PTx system, at 3 Tesla. Results 3D‐FSE IVI with pulse durations of approximately 12 ms was demonstrated in phantoms and for T2‐weighted brain imaging in vivo. Good image quality was obtained, with mean background suppression factors of 103 and 82 ± 6 in phantoms and in vivo, respectively. Conclusion Inner Volume Imaging with 3D‐FSE has been demonstrated in vivo with tailored 3D‐RF pulses. The proposed design methods are also applicable to 2D pulses. Magn Reson Med 76:848–861, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine PMID:26451691

  12. Local CC2 response method based on the Laplace transform: analytic energy gradients for ground and excited states.

    PubMed

    Ledermüller, Katrin; Schütz, Martin

    2014-04-28

    A multistate local CC2 response method for the calculation of analytic energy gradients with respect to nuclear displacements is presented for ground and electronically excited states. The gradient enables the search for equilibrium geometries of extended molecular systems. Laplace transform is used to partition the eigenvalue problem in order to obtain an effective singles eigenvalue problem and adaptive, state-specific local approximations. This leads to an approximation in the energy Lagrangian, which however is shown (by comparison with the corresponding gradient method without Laplace transform) to be of no concern for geometry optimizations. The accuracy of the local approximation is tested and the efficiency of the new code is demonstrated by application calculations devoted to a photocatalytic decarboxylation process of present interest.

  13. Local administration of resveratrol inhibits excitability of nociceptive wide-dynamic range neurons in rat trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Yoshihito; Shibuya, Eri; Takehana, Shiori; Sekiguchi, Kenta; Oshima, Katsuo; Kamata, Hiroaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Although we recently reported that intravenous administration of resveratrol suppresses trigeminal nociception, the precise peripheral effect of resveratrol on nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation-induced trigeminal neuron activity in vivo remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol attenuates mechanical stimulation-induced excitability of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neuron activity in rats, in vivo. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made of SpVc wide-dynamic range (WDR) neuron activity in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Neurons responded to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimulation applied to the orofacial skin. Local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol (1-10mM) into the orofacial skin dose dependently and significantly reduced the mean number of SpVc WDR neurons firing in response to both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli, with the maximal inhibition of discharge frequency in response to both stimuli being seen within 5min. These inhibitory effects were no longer evident after approximately 20min. The mean magnitude of inhibition by resveratrol (10mM) of SpVc neuron discharge frequency was almost equal to that of the local anesthetic 1% lidocaine (37mM). These results suggest that local injection of resveratrol into the peripheral receptive field suppresses the excitability of SpVc neurons, possibly via inhibition of Na(+) channels in the nociceptive nerve terminals of trigeminal ganglion neurons. Therefore, local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol may provide relief of trigeminal nociceptive pain, without side effects, thus contributing to the suite of complementary and alternative medicines used as local anesthetic agents. PMID:27288246

  14. Local administration of resveratrol inhibits excitability of nociceptive wide-dynamic range neurons in rat trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Yoshihito; Shibuya, Eri; Takehana, Shiori; Sekiguchi, Kenta; Oshima, Katsuo; Kamata, Hiroaki; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Although we recently reported that intravenous administration of resveratrol suppresses trigeminal nociception, the precise peripheral effect of resveratrol on nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanical stimulation-induced trigeminal neuron activity in vivo remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol attenuates mechanical stimulation-induced excitability of trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (SpVc) neuron activity in rats, in vivo. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made of SpVc wide-dynamic range (WDR) neuron activity in response to orofacial mechanical stimulation in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Neurons responded to non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimulation applied to the orofacial skin. Local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol (1-10mM) into the orofacial skin dose dependently and significantly reduced the mean number of SpVc WDR neurons firing in response to both non-noxious and noxious mechanical stimuli, with the maximal inhibition of discharge frequency in response to both stimuli being seen within 5min. These inhibitory effects were no longer evident after approximately 20min. The mean magnitude of inhibition by resveratrol (10mM) of SpVc neuron discharge frequency was almost equal to that of the local anesthetic 1% lidocaine (37mM). These results suggest that local injection of resveratrol into the peripheral receptive field suppresses the excitability of SpVc neurons, possibly via inhibition of Na(+) channels in the nociceptive nerve terminals of trigeminal ganglion neurons. Therefore, local subcutaneous administration of resveratrol may provide relief of trigeminal nociceptive pain, without side effects, thus contributing to the suite of complementary and alternative medicines used as local anesthetic agents.

  15. Extreme rotational excitation with long sequences of intense femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, Martin; Milner, Valery

    2015-05-01

    We present an experimental approach to rotational excitation of molecules capable of creating ultra-broad rotational wave packets inaccessible with other methods, including the technique of an optical centrifuge. Our approach is based on an impulsive excitation by a long sequence of more than 20 laser pulses with peak intensities within each pulse exceeding 1013 W/cm2. The method overcomes the three obstacles on the way towards extreme rotational excitation: (i) the strong-field effects associated with a single-pulse scheme, (ii) the centrifugal distortion and Anderson localization in a multi-pulse approach, and (iii) the bandwidth limitation of an optical centrifuge. In oxygen, we demonstrate the ability to populate rotational states with an angular momentum N ~ 250 ℏ , more than twice higher than previously achieved with the centrifuge. Precise timing of the pulses and their spectral broadening due to molecular phase modulation, essential to this technique, are demonstrated and discussed.

  16. Spin excitations in systems with hopping electron transport and strong position disorder in a large magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shumilin, A V

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the spin excitations in systems with hopping electron conduction and strong position disorder. We focus on the problem in a strong magnetic field when the spin Hamiltonian can be reduced to the effective single-particle Hamiltonian and treated with conventional numerical technics. It is shown that in a 3D system with Heisenberg exchange interaction the spin excitations have a delocalized part of the spectrum even in the limit of strong disorder, thus leading to the possibility of the coherent spin transport. The spin transport provided by the delocalized excitations can be described by a diffusion coefficient. Non-homogenous magnetic fields lead to the Anderson localization of spin excitations while anisotropy of the exchange interaction results in the Lifshitz localization of excitations. We discuss the possible effect of the additional exchange-driven spin diffusion on the organic spin-valve devices. PMID:27484892

  17. Spin excitations in systems with hopping electron transport and strong position disorder in a large magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the spin excitations in systems with hopping electron conduction and strong position disorder. We focus on the problem in a strong magnetic field when the spin Hamiltonian can be reduced to the effective single-particle Hamiltonian and treated with conventional numerical technics. It is shown that in a 3D system with Heisenberg exchange interaction the spin excitations have a delocalized part of the spectrum even in the limit of strong disorder, thus leading to the possibility of the coherent spin transport. The spin transport provided by the delocalized excitations can be described by a diffusion coefficient. Non-homogenous magnetic fields lead to the Anderson localization of spin excitations while anisotropy of the exchange interaction results in the Lifshitz localization of excitations. We discuss the possible effect of the additional exchange-driven spin diffusion on the organic spin-valve devices.

  18. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  19. Dynamic Localization of Electronic Excitation in Photosynthetic Complexes Revealed with Chiral Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging due to the small signal and large achiral background. Here, we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic state following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability due to the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  20. Spatial dispersion effects upon local excitation of extrinsic plasmons in a graphene micro-disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencarelli, D.; Bellucci, S.; Sindona, A.; Pierantoni, L.

    2015-11-01

    Excitation of surface plasmon waves in extrinsic graphene is studied using a full-wave electromagnetic field solver as analysis engine. Particular emphasis is placed on the role played by spatial dispersion due to the finite size of the two-dimensional material at the micro-scale. A simple instructive set up is considered where the near field of a wire antenna is held at sub-micrometric distance from a disk-shaped graphene patch. The key-input of the simulation is the graphene conductivity tensor at terahertz frequencies, being modeled by the Boltzmann transport equation for the valence and conduction electrons at the Dirac points (where a linear wave-vector dependence of the band energies is assumed). The conductivity equation is worked out in different levels of approximations, based on the relaxation time ansatz with an additional constraint for particle number conservation. Both drift and diffusion currents are shown to significantly contribute to the spatially dispersive anisotropic features of micro-scale graphene. More generally, spatial dispersion effects are predicted to influence not only plasmon propagation free of external sources, but also typical scanning probe microscopy configurations. The paper sets the focus on plasmon excitation phenomena induced by near field probes, being a central issue for the design of optical devices and photonic circuits.

  1. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  2. Localization of Spinons in Random Majumdar-Ghosh Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavarélo, Arthur; Roux, Guillaume

    2013-02-01

    We study the effect of disorder on frustrated dimerized spin-1/2 chains at the Majumdar-Ghosh point. Using variational methods and density-matrix renormalization group approaches, we identify two localization mechanisms for spinons which are the deconfined fractional elementary excitations of these chains. The first one belongs to the Anderson localization class and dominates at the random Majumdar-Ghosh point. There, spinons remain gapped and localize in Lifshitz states whose localization length is analytically obtained. The other mechanism is a random confinement mechanism which induces an effective interaction between spinons and brings the chain into a gapless and partially polarized phase for arbitrarily small disorder.

  3. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  4. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  5. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  6. 27 CFR 9.86 - Anderson Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anderson Valley. 9.86 Section 9.86 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... straight line to Benchmark (BM) 680 in Section 30, T.13N., R.13W., located in the northeast portion of...

  7. Predicting Accurate Electronic Excitation Transfer Rates via Marcus Theory with Boys or Edmiston-Ruedenberg Localized Diabatization

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Vura-Weis, Josh; Sodt, Alex J.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-05-06

    We model the triplet-triplet energy-transfer experiments from the Closs group [Closs, G. L.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988, 110, 2652.] using a combination of Marcus theory and either Boys or Edmiston-Ruedenberg localized diabatization, and we show that relative and absolute rates of electronic excitation transfer may be computed successfully. For the case where both the donor and acceptor occupy equatorial positions on a rigid cyclohexane bridge, we find βcalc = 2.8 per C-C bond, compared with the experimental value βexp = 2.6. This work highlights the power of using localized diabatization methods as a tool for modeling nonequilibrium processes.

  8. Near-unity broadband absorption designs for semiconducting nanowire arrays via localized radial mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Fountaine, Katherine T; Kendall, Christian G; Atwater, Harry A

    2014-05-01

    We report design methods for achieving near-unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays, illustrated by results for visible absorption in GaAs nanowires on Si substrates. Sparse (<5% fill fraction) nanowire arrays achieve near unity absorption at wire resonant wavelengths due to coupling into 'leaky' radial waveguide modes of individual wires and wire-wire scattering processes. From a detailed conceptual development of radial mode resonant absorption, we demonstrate two specific geometric design approaches to achieve near unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays: (i) introducing multiple wire radii within a small unit cell array to increase the number of resonant wavelengths, yielding a 15% absorption enhancement relative to a uniform nanowire array and (ii) tapering of nanowires to introduce a continuum of diameters and thus resonant wavelengths excited within a single wire, yielding an 18% absorption enhancement over a uniform nanowire array.

  9. Proteomic profiling of neuromas reveals alterations in protein composition and local protein synthesis in hyper-excitable nerves.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-Lei; Cendan, Cruz-Miguel; Roza, Carolina; Okuse, Kenji; Cramer, Rainer; Timms, John F; Wood, John N

    2008-01-01

    Neuropathic pain may arise following peripheral nerve injury though the molecular mechanisms associated with this are unclear. We used proteomic profiling to examine changes in protein expression associated with the formation of hyper-excitable neuromas derived from rodent saphenous nerves. A two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) profiling strategy was employed to examine protein expression changes between developing neuromas and normal nerves in whole tissue lysates. We found around 200 proteins which displayed a >1.75-fold change in expression between neuroma and normal nerve and identified 55 of these proteins using mass spectrometry. We also used immunoblotting to examine the expression of low-abundance ion channels Nav1.3, Nav1.8 and calcium channel alpha2delta-1 subunit in this model, since they have previously been implicated in neuronal hyperexcitability associated with neuropathic pain. Finally, S35methionine in vitro labelling of neuroma and control samples was used to demonstrate local protein synthesis of neuron-specific genes. A number of cytoskeletal proteins, enzymes and proteins associated with oxidative stress were up-regulated in neuromas, whilst overall levels of voltage-gated ion channel proteins were unaffected. We conclude that altered mRNA levels reported in the somata of damaged DRG neurons do not necessarily reflect levels of altered proteins in hyper-excitable damaged nerve endings. An altered repertoire of protein expression, local protein synthesis and topological re-arrangements of ion channels may all play important roles in neuroma hyper-excitability. PMID:18700027

  10. Transport of localized and extended excitations in chains embedded with randomly distributed linear and nonlinear n -mers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-González, Dany; Molina, Mario I.

    2016-03-01

    We examine the transport of extended and localized excitations in one-dimensional linear chains populated by linear and nonlinear symmetric identical n -mers (with n =3 , 4, 5, and 6), randomly distributed. First, we examine the transmission of plane waves across a single linear n -mer, paying attention to its resonances, and looking for parameters that allow resonances to merge. Within this parameter regime we examine the transmission of plane waves through a disordered and nonlinear segment composed by n -mers randomly placed inside a linear chain. It is observed that nonlinearity tends to inhibit the transmission, which decays as a power law at long segment lengths. This behavior still holds when the n -mer parameters do not obey the resonance condition. On the other hand, the mean square displacement exponent of an initially localized excitation does not depend on nonlinearity at long propagation distances z , and shows a superdiffusive behavior ˜z1.8 for all n -mers, when parameters obey the resonance merging condition; otherwise the exponent reverts back to the random dimer model value ˜z1.5 .

  11. Superdiffusive transport and energy localization in disordered granular crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, Alejandro J.; Kevrekidis, Panagiotis G.; Porter, Mason A.

    2016-02-12

    We study the spreading of initially localized excitations in one-dimensional disordered granular crystals. We thereby investigate localization phenomena in strongly nonlinear systems, which we demonstrate to be fundamentally different from localization in linear and weakly nonlinear systems. We conduct a thorough comparison of wave dynamics in chains with three different types of disorder: an uncorrelated (Anderson-like) disorder and two types of correlated disorders (which are produced by random dimer arrangements), and for two families of initial conditions: displacement perturbations and velocity perturbations. We find for strongly precompressed (i.e., weakly nonlinear) chains that the dynamics strongly depends on the initial condition.more » Furthermore, for displacement perturbations, the long-time asymptotic behavior of the second moment m~2 has oscillations that depend on the type of disorder, with a complex trend that is markedly different from a power law and which is particularly evident for an Anderson-like disorder.« less

  12. Entanglement Area Law in Disordered Free Fermion Anderson Model in One, Two, and Three Dimensions

    DOE PAGES

    Pouranvari, Mohammad; Zhang, Yuhui; Yang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We calculate numerically the entanglement entropy of free fermion ground states in one-, two-, and three-dimensional Anderson models and find that it obeys the area law as long as the linear size of the subsystem is sufficiently larger than the mean free path. This result holds in the metallic phase of the three-dimensional Anderson model, where the mean free path is finite although the localization length is infinite. Relation between the present results and earlier ones on area law violation in special one-dimensional models that support metallic phases is discussed.

  13. Direct picosecond time resolution of unimolecular reactions initiated by local mode excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, N. F.; Doany, F. E.; Zewail, A. H.; Perry, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the first results of direct, picosec measurements of the Delta-nu(OH) 5 local mode transition of H2O2. These time-resolved studies yield a direct measure of the unimolecular dissociation rate, and furnish a lower limit for the rate of energy redistribution from the OH stretch to the O-O reaction coordinate. The data thus determined may be used to ascertain the domain of validity for statistical unimolecular reaction rate theories.

  14. Spectroscopic manifestations of local crystal distortions in excited 4f states in crystals of huntite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Gnatchenko, S. L.; Kachur, I. S.; Piryatinskaya, V. G.; Sukhachev, A. L.; Sokolov, A. E.; Strokova, A. Ya.; Kartashev, A. V.; Temerov, V. L.

    2013-01-15

    Optical absorption spectra of YbAl{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4}, TmAl{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} and TbFe{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} trigonal crystals have been studied in temperature range 2-300 K. Temperature behavior of absorption lines parameters has shown, that during some f-f transitions the local environment of rare earth ions undergo distortions, which are absent in the ground state.

  15. Nonlinear excitation of low-n harmonics in reduced magnetohydrodynamic simulations of edge-localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, I.; Hölzl, M.; Lackner, K.; Günter, S.

    2013-08-15

    Nonlinear simulations of the early edge-localized mode (ELM) phase based on a typical type-I ELMy ASDEX Upgrade discharge have been carried out using the reduced MHD code JOREK. The analysis is focused on the evolution of the toroidal Fourier spectrum. It is found that during the nonlinear evolution, linearly subdominant low-n Fourier components, in particular the n = 1, grow to energies comparable with linearly dominant harmonics. A simple model is developed, based on the idea that energy is transferred among the toroidal harmonics via second order nonlinear interaction. The simple model reproduces and explains very well the early nonlinear evolution of the toroidal spectrum in the JOREK simulations. Furthermore, it is shown for the n = 1 harmonic, that its spatial structure changes significantly during the transition from linear to nonlinearly driven growth. The rigidly growing structure of the linearly barely unstable n = 1 reaches far into the plasma core. In contrast, the nonlinearly driven n= 1 has a rigidly growing structure localized at the plasma edge, where the dominant toroidal harmonics driving the n = 1 are maximal and in phase. The presented quadratic coupling model might explain the recent experimental observation of strong low-n components in magnetic measurements [Wenninger et al., “Non-linear magnetic perturbations during edge localized modes in TCV dominated by low n mode components,” Nucl. Fusion (submitted)].

  16. Topology, delocalization via average symmetry and the symplectic Anderson transition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Kane, C L

    2012-12-14

    A field theory of the Anderson transition in two-dimensional disordered systems with spin-orbit interactions and time-reversal symmetry is developed, in which the proliferation of vortexlike topological defects is essential for localization. The sign of vortex fugacity determines the Z(2) topological class of the localized phase. There are two distinct fixed points with the same critical exponents, corresponding to transitions from a metal to an insulator and a topological insulator, respectively. The critical conductivity and correlation length exponent of these transitions are computed in an N=1-[symbol: see text] expansion in the number of replicas, where for small [symbol: see text] the critical points are perturbatively connected to the Kosterlitz-Thouless critical point. Delocalized states, which arise at the surface of weak topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators, occur because vortex proliferation is forbidden due to the presence of symmetries that are violated by disorder, but are restored by disorder averaging.

  17. A rational reduction of CI expansions: combining localized molecular orbitals and selected charge excitations.

    PubMed

    Krah, Tim; Ben Amor, Nadia; Maynau, Daniel; Berger, J A; Robert, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Based on localized molecular orbitals, the proposed method reduces large configuration interaction (CI) spaces while maintaining agreement with reference values. Our strategy concentrates the numerical effort on physically pertinent CI-contributions and is to be considered as a tool to tackle large systems including numerous open-shells. To show the efficiency of our method we consider two 4-electron parent systems. First, we illustrate our approach by describing the van der Waals interactions in the (H2)2 system. By systematically including local correlation, dispersion and charge transfer mechanisms, we show that 90% of the reference full CI dissociation energy of the H2 dimer is reproduced using only 3% of the full CI space. Second, the conformational cis/trans rotation barrier of the butadiene molecule is remarkably reproduced (97% of the reference value) with less than 1% of the reference space. This work paves the way to numerical strategies which afford the electronic structure determination of large open-shell systems avoiding the exponential limitation. At the same time, a physical analysis of the contents of the wave function is offered.

  18. Generalized local-frame-transformation theory for excited species in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakeas, P.; Greene, Chris H.; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theoretical framework is developed for a generalized local-frame-transformation theory (GLFT). The GLFT is applicable to the following systems: Rydberg atoms or molecules in an electric field and negative ions in any combination of electric and/or magnetic fields. A first test application to the photoionization spectra of Rydberg atoms in an external electric field demonstrates dramatic improvement over the first version of the local-frame-transformation theory developed initially by U. Fano [Phys. Rev. A 24, 619 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevA.24.619] and D. A. Harmin [Phys. Rev. A 26, 2656 (1982), 10.1103/PhysRevA.26.2656]. This revised GLFT theory yields nontrivial corrections because it now includes the full on-shell Hilbert space without adopting the truncations in the original theory. Comparisons of the semianalytical GLFT Stark spectra with ab initio numerical simulations yield errors in the range of a few tens of MHz, an improvement over the original Fano-Harmin theory, whose errors are 10-100 times larger. Our analysis provides a systematic pathway to precisely describe the corresponding photoabsorption spectra that should be accurate enough to meet most modern experimental standards.

  19. Exponential Orthogonality Catastrophe at the Anderson Metal-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the orthogonality catastrophe at the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). The typical overlap F between the ground state of a Fermi liquid and the one of the same system with an added potential impurity is found to decay at the AMIT exponentially with system size L as F ˜exp (-c Lη) , where η is the power of multifractal intensity correlations. Thus, strong disorder typically increases the sensitivity of a system to an added impurity exponentially. We recover, on the metallic side of the transition, Anderson's result that the fidelity F decays with a power law F ˜L-q (EF) with system size L . Its power increases as the Fermi energy EF approaches the mobility edge EM as q (EF)˜[(EF-EM )/EM]-ν η , where ν is the critical exponent of the correlation length ξc. On the insulating side of the transition, F is constant for system sizes exceeding the localization length ξ . While these results are obtained for the typical fidelity F , we find that log F is widely, log normally, distributed with a width diverging at the AMIT. As a consequence, the mean value of the fidelity F converges to one at the AMIT, in strong contrast to its typical value which converges to zero exponentially fast with system size L . This counterintuitive behavior is explained as a manifestation of multifractality at the AMIT.

  20. Local response to light excitation in the charge-ordered phase of (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servol, Marina; Moisan, Nicolas; Collet, Eric; Cailleau, Hervé; Kaszub, Wawrzyniec; Toupet, Loïc; Boschetto, Davide; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Moréac, Alain; Koshihara, Shinya; Maesato, Mitsuhiko; Uruichi, Mikio; Shao, Xiangfeng; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lorenc, Maciej

    2015-07-01

    The family of materials (EDO-TTF ) 2X F6 represents quasi-one-dimensional quarter filled systems exhibiting insulator-to-metal (I-M) phase transition at thermal equilibrium. (EDO-TTF ) 2P F6 is known to undergo a photoinduced I-M conversion with cooperative response to light excitation. Here we use femtosecond pump-probe experiments to study the photoresponse of (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6 made of a larger counteranion Sb F6 compared to the well studied (EDO-TTF ) 2P F6 . In the early stage of the photoinduced process, we reveal a multicomponent coherent oscillating feature. The evolution of this feature with excitation density and temperature points to the local nature of the photoswitching in (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6 . At longer time scale, we did not detect the features associated with the transformation to the M phase, albeit observed in the P F6 derivative. We propose a scenario whereby the bigger size of the counteranion in (EDO-TTF ) 2Sb F6 hinders the establishment of this transformation at macroscopic scale.

  1. Influence of an amorphous wall on the distribution of localized excitations in a colloidal glass-forming liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Shreyas; Hima Nagamanasa, K.; Sood, A. K.; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Elucidating the nature of the glass transition has been the holy grail of condensed matter physics and statistical mechanics for several decades. A phenomenological aspect that makes glass formation a conceptually formidable problem is that structural and dynamic correlations in glass-forming liquids are too subtle to be captured at the level of conventional two-point functions. As a consequence, a host of theoretical techniques, such as quenched amorphous configurations of particles, have been devised and employed in simulations and colloid experiments to gain insights into the mechanisms responsible for these elusive correlations. Very often, though, the analysis of spatio-temporal correlations is performed in the context of a single theoretical framework, and critical comparisons of microscopic predictions of competing theories are thereby lacking. Here, we address this issue by analysing the distribution of localized excitations, which are building blocks of relaxation as per the dynamical facilitation (DF) theory, in the presence of an amorphous wall, a construct motivated by the random first-order transition theory (RFOT). We observe that spatial profiles of the concentration of excitations exhibit complex features such as non-monotonicity and oscillations. Moreover, the smoothly varying part of the concentration profile yields a length scale {ξc} , which we compare with a previously computed length scale {ξ\\text{dyn}} . Our results suggest a method to assess the role of dynamical facilitation in governing structural relaxation in glass-forming liquids.

  2. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-01-01

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state. PMID:26123864

  3. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  4. Hybridization and de-hybridization between the locally-excited (LE) state and the charge-transfer (CT) state: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Zhang, Shitong; Pan, Yuyu; Yao, Liang; Liu, Haichao; Guo, Yachen; Gu, Qiang; Yang, Bing; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-09-21

    Excited state properties play a key role in the photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) performance of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) materials. The solvatochromic effects were observed in a series of triphenylamine (TPA)-phenanthroimidazole (PI) derivatives with the increase of solvent polarity, accompanied by the transformation of an excited state character from the locally-excited (LE) state to the charge-transfer (CT) state in the emission spectra. The excited state properties were systematically investigated in these donor-acceptor systems using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The hybridization and de-hybridization processes between LE and CT states were resolved with an increasing number of phenyls along horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. We provide a novel insight into the fine modulation of the excited-state characters and compositions in the donor-acceptor system for the new-generation, low-cost and high-efficiency fluorescent OLED materials. PMID:27255342

  5. Hybridization and de-hybridization between the locally-excited (LE) state and the charge-transfer (CT) state: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Zhang, Shitong; Pan, Yuyu; Yao, Liang; Liu, Haichao; Guo, Yachen; Gu, Qiang; Yang, Bing; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-09-21

    Excited state properties play a key role in the photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) performance of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) materials. The solvatochromic effects were observed in a series of triphenylamine (TPA)-phenanthroimidazole (PI) derivatives with the increase of solvent polarity, accompanied by the transformation of an excited state character from the locally-excited (LE) state to the charge-transfer (CT) state in the emission spectra. The excited state properties were systematically investigated in these donor-acceptor systems using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The hybridization and de-hybridization processes between LE and CT states were resolved with an increasing number of phenyls along horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. We provide a novel insight into the fine modulation of the excited-state characters and compositions in the donor-acceptor system for the new-generation, low-cost and high-efficiency fluorescent OLED materials.

  6. Statistics of excitations in the electron glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palassini, Matteo

    2011-03-01

    We study the statistics of elementary excitations in the classical electron glass model of localized electrons interacting via the unscreened Coulomb interaction in the presence of disorder. We reconsider the long-standing puzzle of the exponential suppression of the single-particle density of states near the Fermi level, by measuring accurately the density of states of charged and electron-hole pair excitations via finite temperature Monte Carlo simulation and zero-temperature relaxation. We also investigate the statistics of large charge rearrangements after a perturbation of the system, which may shed some light on the slow relaxation and glassy phenomena recently observed in a variety of Anderson insulators. In collaboration with Martin Goethe.

  7. X-slave boson approach to the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.; Foglio, M. E.

    2001-05-01

    The periodic anderson model (PAM) in the limit U=∞, can be studied by employing the Hubbard X operators to project out the unwanted states. In a previous work, we have studied the cumulant expansion of this Hamiltonian employing the hybridization as a perturbation, but probability conservation of the local states (completeness) is not usually satisfied when partial expansions like the "chain approximation (CHA)" are employed. To consider this problem, we use a technique similar to the one employed by Coleman to treat the same problem with slave-bosons in the mean-field approximation. Assuming a particular renormalization for hybridization, we obtain a description that avoids an unwanted phase transition that appears in the mean-field slave-boson method at intermediate temperatures.

  8. X-boson cumulant approach to the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.; Foglio, M. E.

    2002-07-01

    The periodic Anderson model can be studied in the limit U=∞ by employing the Hubbard X operators to project out the unwanted states. We had already studied this problem by employing the cumulant expansion with the hybridization as perturbation, but the probability conservation of the local states (completeness) is not usually satisfied when partial expansions like the ``chain approximation'' (CHA) are employed. To rectify this situation, we modify the CHA by employing a procedure that was used in the mean-field approximation of Coleman's slave-boson method. Our technique reproduces the features of that method in its region of validity, but avoids the unwanted phase transition that appears in the same method both when μ>>Ef at low T and for all values of the parameters at intermediate temperatures. Our method also has a dynamic character that is absent from the mean-field slave-boson method.

  9. Lifshitz Transitions in Magnetic Phases of the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the reconstruction of a Fermi surface, which is called a Lifshitz transition, in magnetically ordered phases of the periodic Anderson model on a square lattice with a finite Coulomb interaction between f electrons. We apply the variational Monte Carlo method to the model by using the Gutzwiller wavefunctions for the paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and charge-density-wave states. We find that an antiferromagnetic phase is realized around half-filling and a ferromagnetic phase is realized when the system is far away from half-filling. In both magnetic phases, Lifshitz transitions take place. By analyzing the electronic states, we conclude that the Lifshitz transitions to large ordered-moment states can be regarded as itinerant-localized transitions of the f electrons.

  10. Topological Anderson insulators in systems without time-reversal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Avishai, Y.; Wang, X. R.

    2016-06-01

    Occurrence of the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in a HgTe quantum well suggests that when time-reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained, the pertinent topological phase transition, marked by re-entrant 2 e2/h quantized conductance contributed by helical edge states, is driven by disorder. Here we show that when TRS is broken, the physics of the TAI becomes even richer. The pattern of longitudinal conductance and nonequilibrium local current distribution displays novel TAI phases characterized by nonzero Chern numbers, indicating the occurrence of multiple chiral edge modes. Tuning either disorder or Fermi energy (in both topologically trivial and nontrivial phases), drives transitions between these distinct TAI phases, characterized by jumps of the quantized conductance from 0 to e2/h and from e2/h to 2 e2/h . An effective medium theory based on the Born approximation yields an accurate description of different TAI phases in parameter space.

  11. The atomic approach to the Anderson model for the finite U case: application to a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Lobo, T; Figueira, M S; Foglio, M E

    2010-07-01

    In the present work we apply the atomic approach to the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM). A general formulation of this approach, that can be applied both to the impurity and to the lattice Anderson Hamiltonian, was developed in a previous work (Foglio et al 2009 arxiv: 0903.0139v2 [cond-mat.str-el]). The method starts from the cumulant expansion of the periodic Anderson model, employing the hybridization as a perturbation. The atomic Anderson limit is analytically solved and its sixteen eigenenergies and eigenstates are obtained. This atomic Anderson solution, which we call the AAS, has all the fundamental excitations that generate the Kondo effect, and in the atomic approach is employed as a 'seed' to generate the approximate solutions for finite U. The width of the conduction band is reduced to zero in the AAS, and we choose its position such that the Friedel sum rule is satisfied, close to the chemical potential mu. We perform a complete study of the density of states of the SIAM over the whole relevant range of parameters: the empty dot, intermediate valence, Kondo and magnetic regimes. In the Kondo regime we obtain a density of states that characterizes well the structure of the Kondo peak. To show the usefulness of the method we have calculated the conductance of a quantum dot, side-coupled to a conduction band.

  12. Astronaut Clay Anderson Speaks With S.C. Students

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, NASA astronaut Clay Anderson participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at Crayton Middle School, Columbia,...

  13. A new class of N-H excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) molecules bearing localized zwitterionic tautomers.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, Anton J; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Chi-Lin; Wu, Pei-Jhen; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-09-21

    A series of new amino (NH)-type intramolecular hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) compounds have been strategically designed and synthesized. These molecules comprise a 2-(imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)aniline moiety, in which one of the amino hydrogens was replaced with substituents of different electronic properties. This, together with the versatile capability for modifying the parent moiety, makes feasible comprehensive spectroscopy and dynamics studies of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) as a function of N-H acidity. Different from other (NH)-type ESIPT systems where the ESIPT rate and exergonicity increase with an increase in the N-H acidity and hence the H-bonding strength, the results reveal an irregular relationship among ESIPT dynamics, thermodynamics and H-bond strength. This discrepancy may be rationalized by the localized zwitterionic nature of 2-(imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)aniline in the proton-transfer tautomer form, which is different from the π-delocalized tautomer form in other (NH)-type ESIPT systems. PMID:27537476

  14. Damage detection of metro tunnel structure through transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis using local excitation and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lei; Yi, Xiaohua; Zhu, Dapeng; Xie, Xiongyao; Wang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    In a modern metropolis, metro rail systems have become a dominant mode for mass transportation. The structural health of a metro tunnel is closely related to public safety. Many vibration-based techniques for detecting and locating structural damage have been developed in the past several decades. However, most damage detection techniques and validation tests are focused on bridge and building structures; very few studies have been reported on tunnel structures. Among these techniques, transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are two well-known diagnostic approaches. The former operates in frequency domain and the latter in time domain. Both approaches can be applied to detect and locate damage through acceleration data obtained from sensor arrays. Furthermore, the two approaches can directly utilize structural response data without requiring excitation measurement, which offers advantages in field testing on a large structure. In this research, a numerical finite element model of a metro tunnel is built and different types of structural defects are introduced at multiple locations of the tunnel. Transmissibility function and cross correlation analysis are applied to perform structural damage detection and localization, based on simulated structural vibration data. Numerical results demonstrate that the introduced defects can be successfully identified and located. The sensitivity and feasibility of the two approaches have been verified when sufficient distribution of measurement locations is available. Damage detection results of the two different approaches are compared and discussed.

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone reduces pain behaviors in vivo and decreases excitability in small diameter sensory neurons from local inflamed dorsal root ganglia in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fei; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) may contribute to low back pain, postherpetic neuralgia, and neuropathic pain. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) plays a pro-inflammatory role in many non-renal tissues, but its role in peripheral pain at the DRG level is not well studied. Methods Local inflammation of the L5 DRG with the immune activator zymosan rapidly leads to mechanical hypersensitivity and increased excitability of sensory neurons. Using this pain model, we applied the MR antagonist eplerenone locally to the inflamed DRG. Excitability of small diameter sensory neurons was examined in acute primary culture, using patch clamp techniques. Results Local eplerenone significantly reduced the mechanical hypersensitivity and shortened its duration. The same dose was ineffective systemically. Immunohistochemical studies showed the MR was present in most neurons, and rapidly translocated to the nucleus 1 day after local DRG inflammation. Activation of satellite glia (defined by expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein) in the inflamed DRG was also reduced by local eplerenone. Increased excitability of small diameter sensory neurons 1 day after inflammation could be observed in vitro. Eplerenone applied in vitro (8 – 12 hours) could reverse this increased excitability. Eplerenone had no effect in neurons isolated from normal, uninflamed DRG. The MR agonist aldosterone (10 nM) applied in vitro increased excitability of neurons isolated from normal DRG. Conclusions The MR may have a pro-nociceptive role in the DRG. Some of its effects may be mediated by neuronal MR. The MR may represent a novel therapeutic target in some pain syndromes. PMID:23023156

  16. Theory of Anderson pseudospin resonance with Higgs mode in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    A superconductor illuminated by an ac electric field with frequency Ω is theoretically found to generate a collective precession of Anderson's pseudospins, and hence a coherent amplitude oscillation of the order parameter, with a doubled frequency 2 Ω through a nonlinear light-matter coupling. We provide a fundamental theory, based on the mean-field formalism, to show that the induced pseudospin precession resonates with the Higgs amplitude mode of the superconductor at 2 Ω =2 Δ with 2 Δ being the superconducting gap. The resonant precession is accompanied by a divergent enhancement of the third-harmonic generation (THG). By decomposing the THG susceptibility into the bare one and vertex correction, we find that the enhancement of the THG cannot be explained by individual quasiparticle excitations (pair breaking), so that the THG serves as a smoking gun for an identification of the collective Higgs mode. We further explore the effect of electron-electron scattering on the pseudospin resonance by applying the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory to the attractive Hubbard model driven by ac electric fields. The result indicates that the pseudospin resonance is robust against electron correlations, although the resonance width is broadened due to electron scattering, which determines the lifetime of the Higgs mode.

  17. Ground- and excited-state diatomic bond lengths, vibrational levels, and potential-energy curves from conventional and localized Hartree-Fock-based density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teale, Andrew M.; Tozer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state diatomic bond lengths, vibrational levels, and potential-energy curves are determined using conventional and localized Hartree-Fock (LHF)-based density-functional theory. Exchange only and hybrid functionals (with various fractions of exchange) are considered, together with a standard generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Ground-state bond lengths and vibrational wave numbers are relatively insensitive to whether orbital exchange is treated using the conventional or LHF approach. Excited-state calculations are much more sensitive. For a standard fraction of orbital exchange, N2 and CO vertical excitation energies at experimental bond lengths are accurately described by both conventional and LHF-based approaches, providing an asymptotic correction is present. Excited-state bond lengths and vibrational levels are more accurate with the conventional approach. The best quality, however, is obtained with an asymptotically corrected GGA functional. For the ground and lowest four singlet excited states, the GGA mean absolute errors in bond lengths are 0.006 Å (0.5%) and 0.011 Å (0.8%) for N2 and CO, respectively. Mean absolute errors in fundamental vibrational wavenumbers are 49 cm-1 (2.7%) and 68 cm-1 (5.0%), respectively. The GGA potential-energy curves are compared with near-exact Rydberg-Klein-Rees curves. Agreement is very good for the ground and first excited state, but deteriorates for the higher states.

  18. The Anderson Reservoir seismic gap - Induced aseismicity?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bufe, C.G.

    1976-01-01

    A persistent 10-km seismicity gap along the Calaveras fault appears to be related to the presence of the Leroy Anderson Reservoir in the Calaveras-Silver Creek fault zones southeast of San Jose, California. A magnitude-4.7 earthquake occurred at a depth of 5 km in the centre of the gap on October 3, 1973. The sequence of immediate aftershocks usually accompanying shallow earthquakes of this magnitude in central California did not occur. A bridge crossing the reservoir near its southeast end has been severely deformed, apparently the result of tectonic creep on the Calaveras fault. The occurrence of creep and absence of small earthquakes along the Calaveras in the vicinity of the reservoir suggest a transition from stick slip to stable sliding, possibly brought about by increased pore pressure. ?? 1976.

  19. Slow Relaxation in Anderson Critical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soonwon; Yao, Norman; Choi, Joonhee; Kucsko, Georg; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    We study the single particle dynamics in disordered systems with long range hopping, focusing on the critical cases, i.e., the hopping amplitude decays as 1 /rd in d-dimension. We show that with strong on-site potential disorder, the return probability of the particle decays as power-law in time. As on-site potential disorder decreases, the temporal profile smoothly changes from a simple power-law to the sum of multiple power-laws with exponents ranged from 0 to νmax. We analytically compute the decay exponents using a simple resonance counting argument, which quantitatively agrees with exact numerical results. Our result implies that the dynamics in Anderson Critical systems are dominated by resonances. Harvard-MIT CUA, Kwanjeong Educational Fellowship, AFOSR MURI, Samsung Scholarship.

  20. Theory of the topological anderson insulator.

    PubMed

    Groth, C W; Wimmer, M; Akhmerov, A R; Tworzydło, J; Beenakker, C W J

    2009-11-01

    We present an effective medium theory that explains the disorder-induced transition into a phase of quantized conductance, discovered in computer simulations of HgTe quantum wells. It is the combination of a random potential and quadratic corrections proportional to p2 sigma(z) to the Dirac Hamiltonian that can drive an ordinary band insulator into a topological insulator (having an inverted band gap). We calculate the location of the phase boundary at weak disorder and show that it corresponds to the crossing of a band edge rather than a mobility edge. Our mechanism for the formation of a topological Anderson insulator is generic, and would apply as well to three-dimensional semiconductors with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  1. The Role of Contrast in the Perception of Achromatic Transparency: Comment on Singh and Anderson (2002) and Anderson (2003)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Marc K.

    2008-01-01

    M. Singh and B. L. Anderson proposed a perceptual theory of achromatic transparency in which the perceived transmittance of a perceived transparent filter is determined by the ratio of the Michelson contrast seen in the region of transparency to that of the background seen directly. Subsequently, B. L. Anderson, M. Singh, and J. Meng proposed that…

  2. Passive control of buckling deformation via Anderson Localization Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, Isaac; Li, Y. W.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Buckling problems of two types of multi-span elastic plates with transverse stiffeners are considered using a method based on the finite difference calculus. The discreteness of the stiffeners is accounted for. It is found that the torsional rigidity of the stiffener plays an important role in the buckling mode pattern. When the torsional rigidity is properly adjusted, the stiffener can act as an isolator of deformation for the structure at buckling so that the deflection is only limited to a small area.

  3. Impurity-induced antiferromagnetic domains in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, A.; Bai, Z. J.; Curro, N. J.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2016-08-01

    A central feature of the periodic Anderson model is the competition between antiferromagnetism, mediated by the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction at small conduction electron-local electron hybridization V , and singlet formation at large V . At zero temperature, and in dimension d >1 , these two phases are separated by a quantum critical point Vc. We use quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations to explore the effect of impurities which have a local hybridization V*Vc . We measure the suppression of singlet correlations and the antiferromagnetic correlations which form around the impurity, as well as the size of the resulting domain. Exact diagonalization calculations for linear chains allow us to verify that the qualitative features obtained at intermediate coupling and finite T persist to strong coupling and T =0 , regimes which are difficult to access with QMC. Our calculations agree qualitatively with NMR measurements in CeCoIn5 -xCdx .

  4. Tunable Dirac-point resonance induced by a STM-coupled Anderson impurity on a topological insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction effect between the surface states of a topological insulator (TI) and a STM-coupled Anderson impurity is studied by using equations of motion of the Green’s functions. Remarkably, we show that when a coupling between the Anderson impurity and the STM tip is included, the tunneling resonance and the Kondo peak can be tuned to be exactly at the Dirac point, by adjusting the impurity level and Fermi energy, such that the local density of states at the Dirac point is significantly enhanced. This is in contrast to the case of a STM-decoupled Anderson impurity, where both resonances are always fully suppressed at the Dirac point. Our finding suggests a pathway to experimentally control the fundamental properties of the electrons on a TI surface.

  5. Localized excitation of magnetostatic surface spin waves in yttrium iron garnet by shorted coaxial probe detected via spin pumping and rectification effect

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, Wee Tee Ong, C. K.; Peng, Bin

    2015-04-21

    We demonstrate the localized excitation and dc electrical detection of magnetostatic surface spin waves (MSSWs) in yttrium iron garnet (YIG) by a shorted coaxial probe. Thin films of NiFe and Pt are patterned at different regions onto a common bulk YIG substrate. A shorted coaxial probe is used to excite spin precession locally near various patterned regions. The dc voltages across the corresponding regions are recorded. For excitation of the Pt regions, the dc voltage spectra are dominated by the spin pumping of MSSWs from YIG, where various modes can be clearly distinguished. For the NiFe region, it is also found that spin pumping from MSSWs generated in YIG dominated the spectra, indicating that the spin pumped currents are dissipated into charge currents via the inverse Spin Hall effect (ISHE) in NiFe. For all regions, dc signals from YIG MSSWs are observed to be much stronger than the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) uniform mode, likely due to the nature of the microwave excitation. The results indicate the potential of this probe for microwave imaging via dc detection of spin dynamics in continuous and patterned films.

  6. Comparison of simulated parallel transmit body arrays at 3 T using excitation uniformity, global SAR, local SAR and power efficiency metrics

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Bastien; Gebhardt, Matthias; Serano, Peter; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Hamm, Michael; Pfeuffer, Josef; Nistler, Juergen; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We compare the performance of 8 parallel transmit (pTx) body arrays with up to 32 channels and a standard birdcage design. Excitation uniformity, local SAR, global SAR and power metrics are analyzed in the torso at 3 T for RF-shimming and 2-spoke excitations. Methods We used a fast co-simulation strategy for field calculation in the presence of coupling between transmit channels. We designed spoke pulses using magnitude least squares (MLS) optimization with explicit constraint of SAR and power and compared the performance of the different pTx coils using the L-curve method. Results PTx arrays outperformed the conventional birdcage coil in all metrics except peak and average power efficiency. The presence of coupling exacerbated this power efficiency problem. At constant excitation fidelity, the pTx array with 24 channels arranged in 3 z-rows could decrease local SAR more than 4-fold (2-fold) for RF-shimming (2-spoke) compared to the birdcage coil for pulses of equal duration. Multi-row pTx coils had a marked performance advantage compared to single row designs, especially for coronal imaging. Conclusion PTx coils can simultaneously improve the excitation uniformity and reduce SAR compared to a birdcage coil when SAR metrics are explicitly constrained in the pulse design. PMID:24752979

  7. Control of Electron Excitation and Localization in the Dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} and Its Isotopes Using Two Sequential Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    He Feng; Ruiz, Camilo; Becker, Andreas

    2007-08-24

    We study the control of dissociation of the hydrogen molecular ion and its isotopes exposed to two ultrashort laser pulses by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. While the first ultraviolet pulse is used to excite the electron wave packet on the dissociative 2p{sigma}{sub u} state, a second time-delayed near-infrared pulse steers the electron between the nuclei. Our results show that by adjusting the time delay between the pulses and the carrier-envelope phase of the near-infrared pulse, a high degree of control over the electron localization on one of the dissociating nuclei can be achieved (in about 85% of all fragmentation events). The results demonstrate that current (sub-)femtosecond technology can provide a control over both electron excitation and localization in the fragmentation of molecules.

  8. Describing excited state relaxation and localization in TiO2 nanoparticles using TD-DFT

    SciTech Connect

    Berardo, Enrico; Hu, Han -Shi; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Shevlin, Stephen A.; Woodley, Scott M.; Kowalski, Karol; Zwijnenburg, Martijn A.

    2014-02-26

    We have investigated the description of excited state relaxation in naked and hydrated TiO2 nanoparticles using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) with three common hybrid exchange-correlation (XC) potentials; B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and BHLYP. Use of TD-CAM-B3LYP and TD-BHLYP yields qualitatively similar results for all structures, which are also consistent with predictions of coupled cluster theory for small particles. TD-B3LYP, in contrast, is found to make rather different predictions; including apparent conical intersections for certain particles that are not observed with TD-CAM-B3LYP nor with TD-BHLYP. In line with our previous observations for vertical excitations, the issue with TD-B3LYP appears to be the inherent tendency of TD-B3LYP, and other XC potentials with no or a low percentage of Hartree-Fock Like Exchange, to spuriously stabilize the energy of charge-transfer (CT) states. Even in the case of hydrated particles, for which vertical excitations are generally well described with all XC potentials, the use of TD-B3LYP appears to result in CT-problems for certain particles. We hypothesize that the spurious stabilization of CT-states by TD-B3LYP even may drive the excited state optimizations to different excited state geometries than those obtained using TD-CAM-B3LYP or TD-BHLYP. In conclusion, focusing on the TD-CAM-B3LYP and TD-BHLYP results, excited state relaxation in naked and hydrated TiO2 nanoparticles is predicted to be associated with a large Stokes’ shift.

  9. H{sub 2} EXCITATION STRUCTURE ON THE SIGHTLINES TO {delta} SCORPII AND {zeta} OPHIUCI: FIRST RESULTS FROM THE SUB-ORBITAL LOCAL INTERSTELLAR CLOUD EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kane, Robert; Green, James C.; Burgh, Eric B.

    2013-07-20

    We present the first science results from the Sub-orbital Local Interstellar Cloud Experiment (SLICE): moderate resolution 1020-1070 A spectroscopy of four sightlines through the local interstellar medium. High signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of {eta} Uma, {alpha} Vir, {delta} Sco, and {zeta} Oph were obtained during a 2013 April 21 rocket flight. The SLICE observations constrain the density, molecular photoexcitation rates, and physical conditions present in the interstellar material toward {delta} Sco and {zeta} Oph. Our spectra indicate a factor of two lower total N(H{sub 2}) than previously reported for {delta} Sco, which we attribute to higher S/N and better scattered light control in the new SLICE observations. We find N(H{sub 2}) = 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} on the {delta} Sco sightline, with kinetic and excitation temperatures of 67 and 529 K, respectively, and a cloud density of n{sub H} = 56 cm{sup -3}. Our observations of the bulk of the molecular sightline toward {zeta} Oph are consistent with previous measurements (N(H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} at T{sub 01}(H{sub 2}) = 66 K and T{sub exc} = 350 K). However, we detect significantly more rotationally excited H{sub 2} toward {zeta} Oph than previously observed. We infer a cloud density in the rotationally excited component of n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7600 cm{sup -3} and suggest that the increased column densities of excited H{sub 2} are a result of the ongoing interaction between {zeta} Oph and its environment; also manifest as the prominent mid-IR bowshock observed by WISE and the presence of vibrationally excited H{sub 2} molecules observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

  10. Geology of the Anderson Mesa quadrangle, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.; Withington, C.F.

    1953-01-01

    The Anderson Mesa quadrangle is one of the eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of the southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteenth quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quarternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-tending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive slat and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing many thousands of tons. The ore consists of largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  11. Anderson localisation in spin chains for perfect state transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronke, Rebecca; Estarellas, Marta P.; D'Amico, Irene; Spiller, Timothy P.; Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-09-01

    Anderson localisation is an important phenomenon arising in many areas of physics, and here we explore it in the context of quantum information devices. Finite dimensional spin chains have been demonstrated to be important devices for quantum information transport, and in particular can be engineered to allow for "perfect state transfer" (PST). Here we present extensive investigations of disordered PST spin chains, demonstrating spatial localisation and transport retardation effects, and relate these effects to conventional Anderson localisation. We provide thresholds for Anderson localisation in these finite quantum information systems for both the spatial and the transport domains. Finally, we consider the effect of disorder on the eigenstates and energy spectrum of our Hamiltonian, where results support our conclusions on the presence of Anderson localisation.

  12. STS-107 M.S Michael Anderson at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At SPACEHAB, STS-107 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson (gloved, in center) gets hands-on experience with equipment. Identified as a research mission, STS-107 is scheduled for launch July 19, 2001

  13. Anderson metal-insulator transitions with classical magnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Daniel; Kettemann, Stefan

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of classical magnetic impurities on the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT) numerically. In particular we find that while a finite concentration of Ising impurities lowers the critical value of the site-diagonal disorder amplitude W{sub c}, in the presence of Heisenberg impurities, W{sub c} is first increased with increasing exchange coupling strength J due to time-reversal symmetry breaking. The resulting scaling with J is compared to analytical predictions by Wegner [1]. The results are obtained numerically, based on a finite-size scaling procedure for the typical density of states [2], which is the geometric average of the local density of states. The latter can efficiently be calculated using the kernel polynomial method [3]. Although still suffering from methodical shortcomings, our method proves to deliver results close to established results for the orthogonal symmetry class [4]. We extend previous approaches [5] by combining the KPM with a finite-size scaling analysis. We also discuss the relevance of our findings for systems like phosphor-doped silicon (Si:P), which are known to exhibit a quantum phase transition from metal to insulator driven by the interplay of both interaction and disorder, accompanied by the presence of a finite concentration of magnetic moments [6].

  14. Evidence of excited state localization and static disorder in LH2 investigated by 2D-polarization single-molecule imaging at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tubasum, Sumera; Camacho, Rafael; Meyer, Matthias; Yadav, Dheerendra; Cogdell, Richard J; Pullerits, Tõnu; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional polarization fluorescence imaging of single light harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) of Rps. acidophila was carried out to investigate the polarization properties of excitation and fluorescence emission simultaneously, at room temperature. In two separate experiments we excited LH2 with a spectrally narrow laser line matched to the absorption bands of the two chromophore rings, B800 and B850, thereby indirectly and directly triggering fluorescence of the B850 exciton state. A correlation analysis of the polarization modulation depths in excitation and emission for a large number of single complexes was performed. Our results show, in comparison to B800, that the B850 ring is a more isotropic absorber due to the excitonic nature of its excited states. At the same time, we observed a strong tendency for LH2 to emit with dipolar character, from which preferential localization of the emissive exciton, stable for minutes, is inferred. We argue that the observed effects can consistently be explained by static energetic disorder and/or deformation of the complex, with possible involvement of exciton self-trapping.

  15. The magnetocaloric effect with critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer.

    PubMed

    Ding, L J; Zhong, Y; Fan, S W; Zhu, L Y

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetocaloric effect and the critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer using Green's function theory, in which the localized f orbitals hybridize with the conduction orbitals at even sites. The field-induced metal-insulator transitions with the magnetic Grüneisen parameter showing |Γh|∼T(-1) power-law critical behaviour are revealed, which provides a new thermodynamic means for probing quantum phase transitions. It is found that the competition of up-spin and down-spin hole excitations is responsible for the double peak structure of magnetic entropy change (-ΔS) for the dominant Kondo coupling case, implying a double magnetic cooling process via demagnetization, which follows a power law dependence of the magnetic field h: -ΔS∼h(n). The local exponent n tends to 1 and 2 below and above TC, while has a minimum of 0.648 at TC, which is in accordance with the experimental observation of perovskite manganites Pr0.55Sr0.45MnO3 and Nd0.55Sr0.45MnO3 (J. Y. Fan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 2011, 98, 072508; Europhys. Lett., 2015, 112, 17005) corresponding to the conventional ferromagnets within the mean field theory -ΔS∼h(2/3). At TC, the -ΔS∼h curves with a convex curvature superpose each other for small V values, which are separated by the large V case, distinguishing the RKKY interaction and Kondo coupling explicitly. Furthermore, the critical scaling law n(TC) = 1 + (β- 1)/(β + γ) = 1 + 1/δ(1 - 1/β) is related to the critical exponents (β, γ, and δ) extracted from the Arrott-Noakes equation of state and the Kouvel-Fisher method, which fulfill the Widom scaling relation δ = 1 + γβ(-1), indicating the self-consistency and reliability of the obtained results. In addition, based on the scaling hypothesis through checking the scaling analysis of magnetization, the M-T-h curves collapse into two independent universal branches below and above TC.

  16. The magnetocaloric effect with critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer.

    PubMed

    Ding, L J; Zhong, Y; Fan, S W; Zhu, L Y

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetocaloric effect and the critical behavior of a periodic Anderson-like organic polymer using Green's function theory, in which the localized f orbitals hybridize with the conduction orbitals at even sites. The field-induced metal-insulator transitions with the magnetic Grüneisen parameter showing |Γh|∼T(-1) power-law critical behaviour are revealed, which provides a new thermodynamic means for probing quantum phase transitions. It is found that the competition of up-spin and down-spin hole excitations is responsible for the double peak structure of magnetic entropy change (-ΔS) for the dominant Kondo coupling case, implying a double magnetic cooling process via demagnetization, which follows a power law dependence of the magnetic field h: -ΔS∼h(n). The local exponent n tends to 1 and 2 below and above TC, while has a minimum of 0.648 at TC, which is in accordance with the experimental observation of perovskite manganites Pr0.55Sr0.45MnO3 and Nd0.55Sr0.45MnO3 (J. Y. Fan et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 2011, 98, 072508; Europhys. Lett., 2015, 112, 17005) corresponding to the conventional ferromagnets within the mean field theory -ΔS∼h(2/3). At TC, the -ΔS∼h curves with a convex curvature superpose each other for small V values, which are separated by the large V case, distinguishing the RKKY interaction and Kondo coupling explicitly. Furthermore, the critical scaling law n(TC) = 1 + (β- 1)/(β + γ) = 1 + 1/δ(1 - 1/β) is related to the critical exponents (β, γ, and δ) extracted from the Arrott-Noakes equation of state and the Kouvel-Fisher method, which fulfill the Widom scaling relation δ = 1 + γβ(-1), indicating the self-consistency and reliability of the obtained results. In addition, based on the scaling hypothesis through checking the scaling analysis of magnetization, the M-T-h curves collapse into two independent universal branches below and above TC. PMID:26617276

  17. Superdiffusive transport and energy localization in disordered granular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Alejandro J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Porter, Mason A.

    2016-02-01

    We study the spreading of initially localized excitations in one-dimensional disordered granular crystals. We thereby investigate localization phenomena in strongly nonlinear systems, which we demonstrate to differ fundamentally from localization in linear and weakly nonlinear systems. We conduct a thorough comparison of wave dynamics in chains with three different types of disorder—an uncorrelated (Anderson-like) disorder and two types of correlated disorders (which are produced by random dimer arrangements)—and for two types of initial conditions (displacement excitations and velocity excitations). We find for strongly precompressed (i.e., weakly nonlinear) chains that the dynamics depend strongly on the type of initial condition. In particular, for displacement excitations, the long-time asymptotic behavior of the second moment m˜2 of the energy has oscillations that depend on the type of disorder, with a complex trend that differs markedly from a power law and which is particularly evident for an Anderson-like disorder. By contrast, for velocity excitations, we find that a standard scaling m˜2˜tγ (for some constant γ ) applies for all three types of disorder. For weakly precompressed (i.e., strongly nonlinear) chains, m˜2 and the inverse participation ratio P-1 satisfy scaling relations m˜2˜tγ and P-1˜t-η , and the dynamics is superdiffusive for all of the cases that we consider. Additionally, when precompression is strong, the inverse participation ratio decreases slowly (with η <0.1 ) for all three types of disorder, and the dynamics leads to a partial localization around the core and the leading edge of a propagating wave packet. For an Anderson-like disorder, displacement perturbations lead to localization of energy primarily in the core, and velocity perturbations cause the energy to be divided between the core and the leading edge. This localization phenomenon does not occur in the sonic-vacuum regime, which yields the surprising result

  18. Systematics and the origin of species from the viewpoint of a botanist: edgar anderson prepares the 1941 jesup lectures with ernst mayr.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The correspondence between Edgar Anderson and Ernst Mayr leading into their 1941 Jesup Lectures on "Systematics and the Origin of Species" addressed population thinking, the nature of species, the relationship of microevolution to macroevolution, and the evolutionary dynamics of plants and animals, all central issues in what came to be known as the Evolutionary Synthesis. On some points, they found ready agreement; for others they forged only a short term consensus. They brought two different working styles to this project reflecting their different appreciations of what was possible at this point in evolutionary studies. For Mayr, it was a focused project with definitive short term conclusions imminent while Anderson viewed it as an episode in an ongoing historical process that, while exciting and suggestive, remained openended. Thus, Mayr and Anderson represent two distinct perspectives on the Evolutionary Synthesis in formation; by understanding both of their points of view, we can grasp more fully the state of evolutionary theory at this key moment.

  19. Modified Anderson Model——Dynamics of Brittle Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson's model has been a basic theory of fault mechanical analysis in one century. However, because of the assumptions, there are some major limitations in Anderson model, and it does not account for frequently observed oblique slips, complicated fault cases in nature and the slips occurring on pre-existing planes of weakness. On the basis of Reactivation Tendency Analysis theory proposed by Tong and Yin (2011), we proposed Modified Anderson model and extended Anderson model from 1) homogeneous media to Inhomogeneous media with pre-existing weakness(es); 2) Andersonian stress state to arbitrary stress state; 3) transient activity trend analysis to fault formation and evolution, and verified with sandbox experiments and natural cases. With Modified Anderson model, we can predict 1) the sequence of fault formation; 2) fault orientations and distribution; 3) slip directions (dip slip, oblique-dip slip, oblique slip, oblique strike slip and strike sip) of different fault when the directions of principal stress, orientations and mechanical properties (cohesion and frictional coefficient) of pre-existing weakness(es) are given. The origin of the complicated fault systems in nature can be explained reasonably. There will be a wide applications for oil and gas exploration and development, coal mining, earthquake risk evaluation, etc.

  20. Efficient evaluation of dielectric response functions and calculations of ground and excited state properties beyond local Density Functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Viet Nguyen, H.; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    A recently developed technique to diagonalize iteratively dielectric matrices [1], is used to carry out efficient, ab-initio calculations of dispersion interactions, and excited state properties of nanostructures. In particular, we present results for the binding energies of weakly bonded molecular crystals [2], obtained at the EXX/RPA level of theory, and for absorption spectra of semiconducting clusters, obtained by an iterative solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equations [3]. We show that the ability to obtain the eigenmodes of dielectric matrices from Density Functional perturbation theory, without computing single particle excited states, greatly improves the efficiency of both EXX/RPA and many body perturbation theory [3,4] calculations and opens the way to large scale computations. [1] H. Wilson, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B , 78, 113303, 2008; and H. Wilson, D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B, 79, 245106, 2009. [2] D. Lu, Y. Li, D. Rocca and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett, 102, 206411, 2009; and Y. Li, D. Lu, V. Nguyen and G. Galli, J. Phys. Chem. C (submitted) [3] D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, submitted. [4] D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 147601, 2008. Work was funded by DOE/Scidac DE-FC02-06ER25794 and DOE/BES DE-FG02-06ER46262.

  1. Localization of Spinons in Random Majumdar-Ghosh Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Guillaume; Lavarelo, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    We study the effect of disorder on frustrated dimerized spin-1/2 chains at the Majumdar-Ghosh point. Using variational methods and density-matrix renormalization group approaches, we identify two localization mechanisms for spinons which are the deconfined fractional elementary excitations of these chains. The first one belongs to the Anderson localization class and dominates at the random Majumdar-Ghosh point. There, spinons remain gapped and localize in Lifshitz states whose localization length is analytically obtained. The other mechanism is a random confinement mechanism which induces an effective interaction between spinons and brings the initially gapped antiferromagnetic chain into a gapless and partially polarized phase for arbitrarily small disorder. This Imry-Ma mechanism induces domains which statistics is analyzed. Last, the connection to the real-space renormalization group method suited for the strong disorder limit is discussed.

  2. The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy

  3. STS-89 M.S. Michael Anderson suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson smiles as he completes the donning of his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. A major in the U.S. Air Force, Anderson has a master of science degree in physics from Creighton University. He and six fellow crew members will soon depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour will lift off during a launch window that opens at 9:43 p.m. EST, Jan. 22. STS-89 is the eighth of nine planned missions to dock the Space Shuttle with Russia's Mir space station.

  4. Wet Interface of Benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium Chloride Reverse Micelle Revealed by Excited State Proton Transfer of a Localized Probe.

    PubMed

    Phukon, Aparajita; Barman, Nabajeet; Sahu, Kalyanasis

    2015-11-24

    Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of an anionic photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS or pyranine) has been studied inside a cationic reverse micelle (RM), water/benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC)/benzene, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The observed ESPT behavior is found to be remarkably different from the known ESPT trend of HPTS inside anionic AOT and cationic CTAB RMs; the ESPT dynamics approaches that of bulk water at higher w0 (≥10) inside AOT RM while no ESPT was observed for CTAB reverse micelle [ Sedgwick J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012 , 134 , 11904 - 11907 ]. The ESPT dynamics inside BHDC RM is remarkably slower compared to that of water at all w0 (= [water]/[surfactant]) values and relatively much less sensitive to w0 variation compared to AOT RM. 2D NOESY and fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal that the probe (HPTS) is embedded inside the positive interface of BHDC RM. Despite its trapped location, HPTS is able to undergo ESPT due to significant penetration of water molecules into the interface. Furthermore, facile ESPT at higher w0 is consistent with higher degree of interface hydration as predicted by a recent MD simulation [ Agazzi Langmuir 2014 , 30 , 9643 - 9653 ]. The study shows that ESPT dynamics inside RM varies not only with the interface charge but also on the nature of the headgroup and solvation.

  5. Analytic Flow Equations for the Fermi Liquid Parameters of the Anderson Impurity Model.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C

    2015-08-14

    The low temperature behavior of a Fermi liquid can be described in terms of quasiparticle excitations that are in 1-1 correspondence with those of the noninteracting system. Because of adiabatic continuity, the Landau parameters, which describe the interactions between the quasiparticles, must evolve continuously as the interactions are turned on and be described by a set of flow equations. For strongly correlated electron systems it is not possible to follow this flow in perturbation theory when the interactions become strong. We explore the idea here of overcoming this problem by renormalizing the quasiparticles in this flow using a renormalized perturbation theory. This approach is tested in the case of a single impurity Anderson model. Analytic flow equations are derived which give excellent results for the Landau parameters in the strong correlation regime.

  6. Interpolation Processes in Object Perception: Reply to Anderson (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Philip J.; Garrigan, Patrick; Shipley, Thomas F.; Keane, Brian P.

    2007-01-01

    P. J. Kellman, P. Garrigan, & T. F. Shipley presented a theory of 3-D interpolation in object perception. Along with results from many researchers, this work supports an emerging picture of how the visual system connects separate visible fragments to form objects. In his commentary, B. L. Anderson challenges parts of that view, especially the idea…

  7. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy: prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Putko, Brendan N; Wen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard B; Mullen, John; Shanks, Miriam; Yogasundaram, Haran; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-03-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by the inappropriate accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in tissues due to a deficiency in the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is characterized by structural, valvular, vascular and conduction abnormalities, and is now the most common cause of mortality in patients with AFD. Large-scale metabolic and genetic screening studies have revealed AFD to be prevalent in populations of diverse ethnic origins, and the variant form of AFD represents an unrecognized health burden. Anderson-Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder, and genetic testing is critical for the diagnosis of AFD in women. Echocardiography with strain imaging and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using late enhancement and T1 mapping are important imaging tools. The current therapy for AFD is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which can reverse or prevent AFD progression, while gene therapy and the use of molecular chaperones represent promising novel therapies for AFD. Anderson-Fabry cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially reversible cause of heart failure that involves LVH, increased susceptibility to arrhythmias and valvular regurgitation. Genetic testing and cardiac MRI are important diagnostic tools, and AFD cardiomyopathy is treatable if ERT is introduced early.

  8. 10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF SITE B FROM WEST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING NORTHEAST (BUILDINGS 131, 130, 129, and 128 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  9. 6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY NEAR BUILDING 132, FACING SOUTHEAST (BUILDINGS 124, 122, 120, and 118 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  10. 9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SITE B FROM EAST END OF ANDERSON WAY, FACING WEST (BUILDINGS 126, 128, 129, 130, and 131 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  11. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    SciTech Connect

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-06-24

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  12. Local magnetic properties of multiferroic Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 in the excited states of Nd3+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Gnatchenko, S. L.; Kachur, I. S.; Piryatinskaya, V. G.; Sukhachev, A. L.; Temerov, V. L.

    2015-02-01

    Polarized absorption spectra of single-crystal Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 were studied in the region of the transition 4I9/2→(4G5/2+2G7/2) in Nd3+ ion as a function of temperature (2-34 K) and magnetic field (0-65 kOe). The spectra of natural circular dichroism were measured in the range of 5-40 K. It was found out that the local magnetic properties in the vicinity of the excited ion substantially depended on its state. In particular, a weak ferromagnetic moment appears in some excited states. It was found out that the selection rules for electron transitions in the magnetically ordered state substantially deviated from those in the paramagnetic state of the crystal. They are different for different transitions and they are very sensitive to the orientation of the sublattice magnetic moment relative to the light polarization. In the spectrum of the natural circular dichroism, the transition is revealed which is not observed in the absorption spectrum.

  13. Louisa Garrett Anderson (1873-1943), surgeon and suffragette.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Jennian F

    2008-11-01

    Louisa Garrett Anderson, daughter of Britain's first woman doctor, has been largely forgotten today despite the fact that her contribution to the women's movement was as great as that of her mother. Recognized by her contemporaries as an important figure in the suffrage campaign, Anderson chose to lend her support through high-profile action, being one of the few women doctors in her generation who risked their professional as well as their personal reputation in the fight for women's rights by becoming a suffragette - in her case, even going so far as to spend a month in prison for breaking a window on a demonstration. On the outbreak of war, with only the clinical experience she had gained as outpatient surgeon in a women's hospital, Anderson established a series of women-run military hospitals where she was a Chief Surgeon. The most successful was the Endell Street Military Hospital in London, funded by the Royal Army Medical Corps and the only army hospital ever to be run and staffed entirely by women. Believing that a doctor had an obligation to take a lead in public affairs, Anderson continued campaigning for women's issues in the unlikely setting of Endell Street, ensuring that their activities remained in the public eye through constant press coverage. Anderson's achievement was that her work played no small part in expunging the stigma of the militant years in the eyes of the public and - more importantly - was largely instrumental in putting women doctors on equal terms with their male colleagues. PMID:18952990

  14. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is invoked to study the effect of solar-wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type-III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type-III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar-flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir-wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Riegel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations {approximately}1%. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action-principle approach is used to develop a theory of nonlinear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability.

  15. Detection of Influenza Virus with Specific Subtype by Using Localized Surface Plasmons Excited on a Flat Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jun; Nagata, Kotaro; Ainai, Akira; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kano, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    We report on a method to determine subtype of influenza viruses by using surface plasmons localized in microscopic region on a flat metal surface. In this method, refractive index variation arisen from interactions between viruses and their monoclonal antibodies is measured. The developed sensor shows stability of refractive index in the order of 10-4 against sample exchange. In our experiment, A/H1N1 viruses are distinguished from A/H3N2 viruses by using monoclonal antibodies immobilized on the metal surface. Since the measurement probe has the volume of ˜6 al, the method has potential to handle multiple subtypes in the measurement of a sample with ultra small volume.

  16. Modified Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics if excitations are localized on an intermediate length scale: applications to non-Debye specific heat.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Ralph V; Davis, Bryce F

    2013-10-01

    Disordered systems show deviations from the standard Debye theory of specific heat at low temperatures. These deviations are often attributed to two-level systems of uncertain origin. We find that a source of excess specific heat comes from correlations between quanta of energy if excitations are localized on an intermediate length scale. We use simulations of a simplified Creutz model for a system of Ising-like spins coupled to a thermal bath of Einstein-like oscillators. One feature of this model is that energy is quantized in both the system and its bath, ensuring conservation of energy at every step. Another feature is that the exact entropies of both the system and its bath are known at every step, so that their temperatures can be determined independently. We find that there is a mismatch in canonical temperature between the system and its bath. In addition to the usual finite-size effects in the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, if excitations in the heat bath are localized on an intermediate length scale, this mismatch is independent of system size up to at least 10(6) particles. We use a model for correlations between quanta of energy to adjust the statistical distributions and yield a thermodynamically consistent temperature. The model includes a chemical potential for units of energy, as is often used for other types of particles that are quantized and conserved. Experimental evidence for this model comes from its ability to characterize the excess specific heat of imperfect crystals at low temperatures.

  17. Time-dependent Mott transition in the periodic Anderson model with nonlocal hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Felix; Potthoff, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent Mott transition in a periodic Anderson model with off-site, nearest-neighbor hybridization is studied within the framework of nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Using the two-site dynamical-impurity approximation, we compute the real-time dynamics of the optimal variational parameter and of different observables initiated by sudden quenches of the Hubbard-U and identify the critical interaction. The time-dependent transition is orbital selective, i.e., in the final state, reached in the long-time limit after the quench to the critical interaction, the Mott gap opens in the spectral function of the localized orbitals only. We discuss the dependence of the critical interaction and of the final-state effective temperature on the hybridization strength and point out the various similarities between the nonequilibrium and the equilibrium Mott transition. It is shown that these can also be smoothly connected to each other by increasing the duration of a U-ramp from a sudden quench to a quasi-static process. The physics found for the model with off-site hybridization is compared with the dynamical Mott transition in the single-orbital Hubbard model and with the dynamical crossover found for the real-time dynamics of the conventional Anderson lattice with on-site hybridization.

  18. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  19. Comment on 'Mapping of localized spin-wave excitations by near-field Brillouin light scattering' [Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 152502 (2010)].

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, L.; Montoncello, F.; Nizzoli, F.; Vavassori, P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2011-11-04

    The authors reported in their letter some outstanding experimental results of spin excitations in nano-particles investigated by near-field Brillouin scattering. They conclude from their observations that existing theories -- in particular micromagnetic simulations -- do not correctly describe the behavior of the spin modes. Since excellent agreement has been reported between spin-wave mode frequencies obtained from Brillouin scattering experiments and those obtained from micromagnetic-based simulations, it is somewhat surprising that the simulations should fail for the particles investigated in Ref. 1. In the literature, there is also evidence of various kinds and degrees of mode localization when exchange competes with dipolar interactions. When dipolar long-range interactions are taken into account, the eigenmodes can be seen as the superposition of plane waves, leading to different localizations and in particular to the appearence of bulk-dead modes. We have simulated the normal modes of the particles used in Ref. 1, with the dynamical matrix method; the results are shown in Fig. 1 for different values of the applied field. In addition to the lowest frequency non-localized mode (1-BA), several localized modes are present. Large particles exhibit modes with oscillations along the field direction;8 for such modes, we use the label n-BA-loc, with n the number of nodes. While the profile of the pure end-mode, i.e., 0-BA-loc, has its maximum at the edge with the amplitude monotonously decreasing toward the interior of the ellipse, as correctly described by the authors, the localized modes with n > 0, not considered by them, do not have this characteristic: see inset of Fig. 1. Based on Fig. 1, we believe that the assumption that the mode they observe is 'the' localized spin mode is not correct. Instead, we believe that the mode detected in the experiment at H > 700 Oe is a combinations (due to non-linear excitation conditions of the experiment) of several n

  20. Cryogenic exciter

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, James William; Garces, Luis Jose

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  1. Perturbative Interpretation of Adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer Free Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Muneki; Takahashi, Chako; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In conventional well-known derivation methods for the adaptive Thouless-Anderson-Palmer (TAP) free energy, special assumptions that are difficult to mathematically justify except in some mean-field models, must be made. Here, we present a new adaptive TAP free energy derivation method. Using this derivation technique, without any special assumptions, the adaptive TAP free energy can be simply obtained as a high-temperature expansion of the Gibbs free energy.

  2. Solar hot water system installed at Anderson, South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the solar energy hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., at Anderson, South Carolina. The building is a low-rise, two-story 114-room motel. The solar system was designed to provide 40 percent of the total hot water demand. The collector is a flat plate, liquid with an area of 750 square feet. Operation of this system was begun in November 1977, and has performed flawlessly for one year.

  3. Categorization of nocturnal drainage flows in the Anderson Creek valley

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Walton, J.J.

    1981-06-01

    A network of eight meteorological towers was operated over about a one-year period within the Anderson Creek valley in the Geysers Geothermal Area of northern California. The purpose was to define the noctural wind and temperature structure along the valley's sloped surfaces for use in evaluating the frequency of drainage flows throughout the year and to assess the representativeness of the flows observed during the few nights that intensive studies were undertaken. (ACR)

  4. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson completes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  5. Markovian Anderson Model: Bounds for the Rate of Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcheremchantsev, Serguei

    We consider the Anderson model in with potentials whose values at any site of the lattice are Markovian independent random functions of time. For solutions to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we show under some conditions that with probability 1 where for d=1,2 and for .

  6. A Suitable Option for Gustilo and Anderson Grade III Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Zhijun; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Yuhuan; Xu, Lusheng; Yu, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury remains difficult, particularly due to the incidence of wound infections, delayed fracture union, and traumatic extremity amputation. However, little data is available on delayed skin graft or flap reconstructions of Gustilo grade III injury, especially using new technologies of wound coverage, such as vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with limited internal and/or external fixation. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and May 2013, we performed the VSD technique combined with limited internal and/or external fixation on 38 patients (22 males and 16 females, with a mean age of 36.5 years) with Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. VSD was regularly changed and delayed skin grafts or flaps were used to cover the defect. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 36 were available for evaluation. The complications, wound healing, infections, and bony union were assessed for a mean duration of 2.5 years (range, 1–4 years). Results Complications were seen in 5 of the 36 cases: 2 cases had infection alone, 1 case had delayed union or nonunion, 1 case had infection and delayed union, and 1 case had wound necrosis, infection, and nonunion. VSD was regularly changed 2–6 times. Morphological appearance and functional recovery were satisfactory in all cases. Conclusions Using VSD before skin grafts or flaps coverage, combined with limited internal and/or external fixation, is a suitable option for Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. PMID:27564219

  7. Topological Anderson insulator induced by inter-cell hopping disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Shu-Hui; Song, Juntao Li, Yu-Xian

    2013-11-14

    We have studied in detail the influence of same-orbit and different-orbit hopping disorders in HgTe/CdTe quantum wells. Intriguingly, similar to the behavior of the on-site Anderson disorder, a phase transition from a topologically trivial phase to a topological phase is induced at a proper strength of the same-orbit hopping disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, however, the phase transition does not occur. The results have been analytically verified by using effective medium theory. A consistent conclusion can be obtained by comparing phase diagrams, conductance, and conductance fluctuations. In addition, the influence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) on the system has been studied for different types of disorder, and the RSOI shows different influence on topological phase at different disorders. The topological phase induced by same-orbit hopping disorder is more robust against the RSOI than that induced by on-site Anderson disorder. For different-orbit hopping disorder, no matter whether the RSOI is included or not, the phase transition does not occur. The results indicate, whether or not the topological Anderson insulator can be observed depends on a competition between the different types of the disorder as well as the strength of the RSOI in a system.

  8. A Suitable Option for Gustilo and Anderson Grade III Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Zhijun; Huang, Wenzhu; Zhao, Yuhuan; Xu, Lusheng; Yu, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury remains difficult, particularly due to the incidence of wound infections, delayed fracture union, and traumatic extremity amputation. However, little data is available on delayed skin graft or flap reconstructions of Gustilo grade III injury, especially using new technologies of wound coverage, such as vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) combined with limited internal and/or external fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS Between June 2008 and May 2013, we performed the VSD technique combined with limited internal and/or external fixation on 38 patients (22 males and 16 females, with a mean age of 36.5 years) with Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. VSD was regularly changed and delayed skin grafts or flaps were used to cover the defect. Two patients were lost to follow-up, and the remaining 36 were available for evaluation. The complications, wound healing, infections, and bony union were assessed for a mean duration of 2.5 years (range, 1-4 years). RESULTS Complications were seen in 5 of the 36 cases: 2 cases had infection alone, 1 case had delayed union or nonunion, 1 case had infection and delayed union, and 1 case had wound necrosis, infection, and nonunion. VSD was regularly changed 2-6 times. Morphological appearance and functional recovery were satisfactory in all cases. CONCLUSIONS Using VSD before skin grafts or flaps coverage, combined with limited internal and/or external fixation, is a suitable option for Gustilo and Anderson grade III injury. PMID:27564219

  9. Full density-matrix numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity susceptibility and specific heat of the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, L.; Weichselbaum, A.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    Recent developments in the numerical renormalization group (NRG) allow the construction of the full density matrix (FDM) of quantum impurity models [see A. Weichselbaum and J. von Delft, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.99.076402 99, 076402 (2007)] by using the completeness of the eliminated states introduced by F. B. Anders and A. Schiller [F. B. Anders and A. Schiller, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.196801 95, 196801 (2005)]. While these developments prove particularly useful in the calculation of transient response and finite-temperature Green's functions of quantum impurity models, they may also be used to calculate thermodynamic properties. In this paper, we assess the FDM approach to thermodynamic properties by applying it to the Anderson impurity model. We compare the results for the susceptibility and specific heat to both the conventional approach within NRG and to exact Bethe ansatz results. We also point out a subtlety in the calculation of the susceptibility (in a uniform field) within the FDM approach. Finally, we show numerically that for the Anderson model, the susceptibilities in response to a local and a uniform magnetic field coincide in the wide-band limit, in accordance with the Clogston-Anderson compensation theorem.

  10. Changes of the local magnetic properties of the optically excited Nd3+ ions and their manifestation in the near IR spectra of the Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Gnatchenko, S. L.; Kachur, I. S.; Piryatinskaya, V. G.; Temerov, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    Polarized absorption spectra of f-f transitions 4I9/2 → 4F3/2 and (2H9/2 + 4F5/2) in the Nd3+ ion in the Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 single crystal were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 2-40 K and as a function of magnetic field in the range of 0-65 kOe at 2 K. It was found out that the selection rules for f-f electron transitions substantially changed in the magnetically ordered state of the crystal, and they strongly depended on the orientation of the Fe and Nd ions magnetic moments relative to the light polarization. The splitting of the ground and excited states of the Nd3+ ion in the exchange field of the Fe sublattice were determined. It was revealed that the value of the exchange splitting (the exchange interaction) in the excited states did not correlate with the theoretical Landé factors. The Landé factors of the excited states were experimentally found. In general, the local magnetic properties in the vicinity of the excited ion depend substantially on its electron state. In particular: (1) in one of the excited states a weak ferromagnetic moment appears, (2) the changes of type of the local magnetic anisotropy take place in some excited states, and (3) in some excited states the energetically favorable orientation of the Nd3+ ion magnetic moment is opposite to that in the ground state. In some excited states the nonequivalent Nd3+ centers were found out.

  11. Effects of cyclosis on chloroplast-cytoplasm interactions revealed with localized lighting in Characean cells at rest and after electrical excitation.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Dodonova, Svetlana O

    2011-09-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Characean internodes enables rapid intracellular transport and facilitates interactions between spatially remote cell regions. Cyclosis-mediated distant interactions might be particularly noticeable under nonuniform illumination, in the vicinity of light-shade borders where metabolites are transported between functionally distinct cell regions. In support of this notion, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters assessed on a microscopic area of Chara corallina internodal cells (area of inspection, AOI) responded to illumination of nearby regions in asymmetric manner depending on the vector of cytoplasmic streaming. When a beam of white light was applied through a 400-μm optic fiber upstream of AOI with regard to the direction of cytoplasmic streaming, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) developed after a lag period in AOI exposed to moderate intensity light. Conversely, no NPQ was induced in the same cell area when the beam position was shifted to an equal distance downstream of AOI. Light-response curves for the efficiency of photosystem II electron transport in chloroplasts differed markedly depending on the illumination pattern (whole-cell versus small area illumination) but these differences were eliminated after the inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming with cytochalasin B. Localized illumination promoted chloroplast fluorescence responses to electrical plasmalemma excitation at high light intensities, which contrasts to the requirement of low to moderate irradiances for observation of the stimulus-response coupling under whole-cell illumination. The results indicate that different photosynthetic capacities of chloroplasts under general and localized illumination are related to lateral transport of nonevenly distributed cytoplasmic components between the cell parts with dominant photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism.

  12. Localized Etching of a Polyimide Film by an Atmospheric-Pressure Radio Frequency Microplasma Excited by a 100-µm-φ Metal Pipe Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiki, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure He and Ar microplasmas (µ-plasmas) have been generated by a 14 MHz radio-frequency (RF) discharge using a metal narrow pipe electrode with an outer diameter of 100 µm. The metal pipe acts as both a powered electrode and a gas nozzle. The discharge mode changed from a corona discharge to a glow discharge and finally to a thermal spot arc discharge with decreasing discharge gap between the pipe electrode and the grounded plate as well as with increasing RF power. The Ar glow µ-plasma was applied to the localized etching of a polyimide film with a thickness of 0.025 mm in air ambient. The etched spot showed an isotropic profile having a gradual slope with a full width at half maximum of approximately 170 µm. The etching rate was approximately 3 µm/s at an RF power of 1.5 W. The optical emission spectrum exhibited second-positive N2 molecular bands and atomic oxygen lines (777 and 845 nm) as well as many Ar atomic lines. It appears that the energetic N2 molecules and UV photons radiated from the excitation states of N2 broke C-C and C-H bonds and then O radicals reacted with the hydrocarbon fragments to produce CO2 and H2O. Consequently, isotropic chemical etching was achieved.

  13. Interpretation of high-dimensional numerical results for the Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2014-12-15

    The existence of the upper critical dimension d{sub c2} = 4 for the Anderson transition is a rigorous consequence of the Bogoliubov theorem on renormalizability of φ{sup 4} theory. For d ≥ 4 dimensions, one-parameter scaling does not hold and all existent numerical data should be reinterpreted. These data are exhausted by the results for d = 4, 5 from scaling in quasi-one-dimensional systems and the results for d = 4, 5, 6 from level statistics. All these data are compatible with the theoretical scaling dependences obtained from Vollhardt and Wolfle’s self-consistent theory of localization. The widespread viewpoint that d{sub c2} = ∞ is critically discussed.

  14. Decoherence-induced conductivity in the one-dimensional Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Stegmann, Thomas; Wolf, Dietrich E.; Ujsághy, Orsolya

    2014-08-20

    We study the effect of decoherence on the electron transport in the one-dimensional Anderson model by means of a statistical model [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. In this model decoherence bonds are randomly distributed within the system, at which the electron phase is randomized completely. Afterwards, the transport quantity of interest (e.g. resistance or conductance) is ensemble averaged over the decoherence configurations. Averaging the resistance of the sample, the calculation can be performed analytically. In the thermodynamic limit, we find a decoherence-driven transition from the quantum-coherent localized regime to the Ohmic regime at a critical decoherence density, which is determined by the second-order generalized Lyapunov exponent (GLE) [4].

  15. Note: Work function change measurement via improved Anderson method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabik, A. Gołek, F.; Antczak, G.

    2015-05-15

    We propose the modification to the Anderson method of work function change (Δϕ) measurements. In this technique, the kinetic energy of the probing electrons is already low enough for non-destructive investigation of delicate molecular systems. However, in our implementation, all electrodes including filament of the electron gun are polarized positively. As a consequence, electron bombardment of any elements of experimental system is eliminated. Our modification improves cleanliness of the ultra-high vacuum system. As an illustration of the solution capabilities, we present Δϕ of the Ag(100) surface induced by cobalt phthalocyanine layers.

  16. STS-118 Astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clay Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 astronaut and mission specialist Rick Mastracchio was anchored on the foot restraint of the Canadarm2 as he participated in the third session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) for the mission. Assisting Mastracchio was Expedition 15 flight engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame). During the 5 hour, 28 minute space walk, the two relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) truss to the Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1 and retrieved the P6 transponder.

  17. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  18. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson suits up for TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson smiles as he undergoes suit check prior to Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include a simulated launch countdown at the pad. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. .

  19. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment at SPACEHAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson checks equipment during training at SPACEHAB. STS-107 is a research mission. The primary payload is the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM). The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences (many rats). Also part of the payload is the Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research (FREESTAR) that incorporates eight high priority secondary attached shuttle experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

  20. Paleontological analysis of a lacustrine carbonaceous uranium deposit at the Anderson mine, Date Creek basin, west-central Arizona (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, J.K.; Bradbury, J.P.; Forester, R.M.; Hanley, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Tertiary sedimentary sequence of the Date Creek basin area of Arizona is composed principally of intertonguing alluvial-fan and lacustrine deposits. The lacustrine rocks contain large intermediate- to, locally, high-grade uranium deposits that form one of the largest uranium resources in the United States (an estimated 670,000 tons of U3O8 at an average grade of 0.023% is indicated by drilling to date). At the Anderson mine, about 50,000 tons of U3O8 occurs in lacustrine carbonaceous siltstones and mudstones (using a cutoff grade of 0.01%). The Anderson mine constitutes a new class of ore deposit, a lacustrine carbonaceous uranium deposit. Floral and faunal remains at the Anderson mine played a critical role in creating and documenting conditions necessary for uranium mineralization. Organic-rich, uraniferous rocks at the Anderson mine contain plant remains and ostracodes having remarkably detailed preservation of internal features because of infilling by opaline silica. This preservation suggests that the alkaline lake waters in the mine area contained high concentrations of dissolved silica and that silicification occurred rapidly, before compaction or cementation of the enclosing sediment. Uranium coprecipitated with the silica. Thinly laminated, dark-colored, siliceous beds contain centric diatoms preserved with carbonaceous material suggesting that lake waters at the mine were locally deep and anoxic. These alkaline, silica-charged waters and a stagnant, anoxic environment in parts of the lake were necessary conditions for the precipitation of large amounts of uranium in the lake-bottom sediments. Sediments at the Anderson mine contain plant remains and pollen that were derived from diverse vegetative zones suggesting about 1500 m of relief in the area at the time of deposition. The pollen suggests that the valley floor was semiarid and subtropical, whereas nearby mountains supported temperate deciduous forests. ?? 1990.

  1. Block Lanczos density-matrix renormalization group method for general Anderson impurity models: Application to magnetic impurity problems in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a block Lanczos (BL) recursive technique to construct quasi-one-dimensional models, suitable for density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations, from single- as well as multiple-impurity Anderson models in any spatial dimensions. This new scheme, named BL-DMRG method, allows us to calculate not only local but also spatially dependent static and dynamical quantities of the ground state for general Anderson impurity models without losing elaborate geometrical information of the lattice. We show that the BL-DMRG method can be easily extended to treat a multiorbital Anderson impurity model where not only inter- and intraorbital Coulomb interactions but also Hund's coupling and pair hopping interactions are included. We also show that the symmetry adapted BL bases can be utilized, when it is appropriate, to reduce the computational cost. As a demonstration, we apply the BL-DMRG method to three different models for graphene with a structural defect and with a single hydrogen or fluorine absorbed, where a single Anderson impurity is coupled to conduction electrons in the honeycomb lattice. These models include (i) a single adatom on the honeycomb lattice, (ii) a substitutional impurity in the honeycomb lattice, and (iii) an effective model for a single carbon vacancy in graphene. Our analysis of the local dynamical magnetic susceptibility and the local density of states at the impurity site reveals that, for the particle-hole symmetric case at half-filling of electron density, the ground state of model (i) behaves as an isolated magnetic impurity with no Kondo screening, while the ground state of the other two models forms a spin-singlet state where the impurity moment is screened by the conduction electrons. We also calculate the real-space dependence of the spin-spin correlation functions between the impurity site and the conduction sites for these three models. Our results clearly show that, reflecting the presence or absence of unscreened

  2. Reply. [to the comment by Anderson et al. (1993)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegg, Dean A.; Ferek, Ronald G.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1994-01-01

    While Hegg et al. (1993) accepts the criticism of Anderson et al. (1994) in principle, this involves the adoption of an aerosol composition model and the model that they propose to reconcile these observations with the assertion of Charlson et al. (1992) does not agree with many observations, particularly those made over the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the use of a gain factor (i.e. the partial derivative of aerosol mass with respect to the sulfate ion), proposed by Anderson et al., may be valid for particular cases where a proposed composition model really reflects the actual aerosol composition, this procedure is considered questionable in general. The use of sulfate as a tracer for nonsulfate aerosol mass is questionable, because in the present authors' data set, sulfate averaged only about 26% of the dry aerosol mass. The ammonium mass associated with sulfate mass is not analogous to that betwen the oxygen mass and sulfur mass in the sulfate ion. Strong chemical bonds are present between sulfur and oxygen in sulfate, whereas ammonium and sulfate in haze droplets are ions in solution that may or may not be associated with one another. Thus, there is no reason to assume that sulfate will act as a reliable tracer of ammonium mass. Hegg et al. expresses the view that their approach used for estimating sulfate light scattering efficiency is appropriate for the current level of understanding of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. Effects of correlated hybridization in the single-impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Líbero, Valter; Veiga, Rodrigo

    2013-03-01

    The development of new materials often dependents on the theoretical foundations which study the microscopic matter, i.e., the way atoms interact and create distinct configurations. Among the interesting materials, those with partially filled d or f orbitals immersed in nonmagnetic metals have been described by the Anderson model, which takes into account Coulomb correlation (U) when a local level (energy Ed) is doubled occupied, and an electronic hybridization between local levels and conduction band states. In addition, here we include a correlated hybridization term, which depends on the local-level occupation number involved. This term breaks particle-hole symmetry (even when U + 2Ed = 0), enhances charge fluctuations on local levels and as a consequence strongly modifies the crossover between the Hamiltonian fixed-points, even suppressing one or other. We exemplify these behaviors showing data obtained from the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG) computation for the impurity temperature-dependent specific heat, entropy and magnetic susceptibility. The interleaving procedure is used to recover the continuum spectrum after the NRG-logarithmic discretization of the conduction band. Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP.

  4. The influence of local heating by nonlinear pulsed laser excitation on the transmission characteristics of a ZnO nanowire waveguide.

    PubMed

    Voss, Tobias; Svacha, Geoffry T; Mazur, Eric; Müller, Sven; Ronning, Carsten

    2009-03-01

    We perform a transmission experiment on a ZnO nanowire waveguide to study its transmission characteristics under nonlinear femtosecond-pulse excitation. We find that both the second harmonic and the photoluminescence couple into low-order waveguide modes of the nanowires but with distinctly different efficiencies. We measure the transmission spectrum of a single ZnO nanowire waveguide for near-UV light generated by interband recombination processes. The transmission spectrum allows us to determine the absorption edge of the excited nanowire and to study the temperature profile of the nanowire under femtosecond-pulse excitation.

  5. Low-energy fixed points of the σ-τ and the O(3) symmetric Anderson models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, R.; Hewson, A. C.; Zhang, G.-M.

    1997-11-01

    We study the single-channel (compactified) models, the σ-τ model, and the O(3) symmetric Anderson model, which were introduced by Coleman et al., and Coleman and Schofield, as a simplified way to understand the low-energy behavior of the isotropic and anisotropic two-channel Kondo systems. These models display both Fermi-liquid and marginal-Fermi-liquid behavior and an understanding of the nature of their low-energy fixed points may give some general insights into the low-energy behavior of other strongly correlated systems. We calculate the excitation spectrum at the non-Fermi-liquid fixed point of the σ-τ model using conformal field theory, and show that the results are in agreement with those obtained in recent numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculations. For the O(3) Anderson model we find further logarithmic corrections in the weak-coupling perturbation expansion to those obtained in earlier calculations, such that the renormalized interaction term now becomes marginally stable rather than marginally unstable. We derive a Ward identity and a renormalized form of the perturbation theory that encompasses both the weak- and strong-coupling regimes and show that the χ/γ ratio is 8/3 (χ is the total susceptibility, spin plus isospin), independent of the interaction U and in agreement with the NRG calculations.

  6. Excitation-dependent variation in local symmetry in Ba2Mg(BO3)2 evidenced by Eu3+ luminescent structural probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakiruba, S.; Kumar, Gautam; Lakshminarasimhan, N.

    2016-05-01

    Eu3+ luminescence was studied in Ba2Mg(BO3)2 by selectively substituting at Mg site. The parent host Ba2Mg(BO3)2 and Ba2Mg0.9Eu0.05Li0.05(BO3)2 were synthesized by conventional solid state reaction method. Their isostructural nature was confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction technique. The photoluminescence excitation spectrum of Eu3+ exhibited a broad Eu3+sbnd O2- charge transfer band with a maximum at 253 nm along with other excitation transitions. The emission characteristics of Eu3+ were found to be excitation wavelength-dependent. The equally intense magnetic and electric dipole transitions for excitation under longer wavelengths showed the presence of Eu3+ at a site with non-inversion symmetry. Excitation using 253 nm resulted in the predominant magnetic dipole transition revealing Eu3+ at a site with inversion symmetry. The difference in the relative intensities of magnetic and electric dipole transitions originates from the change in symmetry around Eu3+ in Ba2Mg(BO3)2 under different excitations.

  7. Excitation-dependent variation in local symmetry in Ba2Mg(BO3)2 evidenced by Eu3+ luminescent structural probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakiruba, S.; Kumar, Gautam; Lakshminarasimhan, N.

    2016-05-01

    Eu3+ luminescence was studied in Ba2Mg(BO3)2 by selectively substituting at Mg site. The parent host Ba2Mg(BO3)2 and Ba2Mg0.9Eu0.05Li0.05(BO3)2 were synthesized by conventional solid state reaction method. Their isostructural nature was confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction technique. The photoluminescence excitation spectrum of Eu3+ exhibited a broad Eu3+sbnd O2- charge transfer band with a maximum at 253 nm along with other excitation transitions. The emission characteristics of Eu3+ were found to be excitation wavelength-dependent. The equally intense magnetic and electric dipole transitions for excitation under longer wavelengths showed the presence of Eu3+ at a site with non-inversion symmetry. Excitation using 253 nm resulted in the predominant magnetic dipole transition revealing Eu3+ at a site with inversion symmetry. The difference in the relative intensities of magnetic and electric dipole transitions originates from the change in symmetry around Eu3+ in Ba2Mg(BO3)2 under different excitations.

  8. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Adam K. Anderson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Adam K. Anderson, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for his outstanding contribution to understanding the representation of emotion and its influence on cognition. By combining psychological and neuroscience techniques with rigorous and creative experimental designs, Anderson has…

  9. 78 FR 41835 - Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... made the initial changes to the Price-Anderson Act amounts on October 27, 2005 (70 FR 61885), and the... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... 3150-AJ25 Inflation Adjustments to the Price-Anderson Act Financial Protection Regulations...

  10. 77 FR 67057 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Anderson County, TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board CSX Transportation, Inc.--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Anderson... the track in Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tenn. The line traverses United States Postal Service...

  11. Absorption and emission in quantum dots: Fermi surface effects of Anderson excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmes, R. W.; Sindel, M.; Borda, L.; von Delft, J.

    2005-09-01

    Recent experiments measuring the emission of exciton recombination in a self-organized single quantum dot (QD) have revealed that different effects occur when the wetting layer surrounding the QD becomes filled with electrons because the resulting Fermi sea can hybridize with the local electron levels on the dot. Motivated by these experiments, we study an extended Anderson model, which describes a local conduction band level coupled to a Fermi sea, but also includes a local valence band level. We are interested, in particular, in how many-body correlations resulting from the presence of the Fermi sea affect the absorption and emission spectra. Using Wilson’s numerical renormalization group method, we calculate the zero-temperature absorption (emission) spectrum of a QD, which starts from (ends up in) a strongly correlated Kondo ground state. We predict two features: First, we find that the spectrum shows a power-law divergence close to the threshold, with an exponent that can be understood by analogy to the well-known x-ray edge absorption problem. Second, the threshold energy ω0 —below which no photon is absorbed (above which no photon is emitted)—shows a marked, monotonic shift as a function of the exciton binding energy Uexc .

  12. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model.

    PubMed

    Orth, Christoph P; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L

    2016-04-05

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase.

  13. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model.

    PubMed

    Orth, Christoph P; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase. PMID:27045779

  14. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase. PMID:27045779

  15. The topological Anderson insulator phase in the Kane-Mele model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Christoph P.; Sekera, Tibor; Bruder, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that adding disorder to a topologically trivial mercury telluride/cadmium telluride (HgTe/CdTe) quantum well can induce a transition to a topologically nontrivial state. The resulting state was termed topological Anderson insulator and was found in computer simulations of the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang model. Here, we show that the topological Anderson insulator is a more universal phenomenon and also appears in the Kane-Mele model of topological insulators on a honeycomb lattice. We numerically investigate the interplay of the relevant parameters, and establish the parameter range in which the topological Anderson insulator exists. A staggered sublattice potential turns out to be a necessary condition for the transition to the topological Anderson insulator. For weak enough disorder, a calculation based on the lowest-order Born approximation reproduces quantitatively the numerical data. Our results thus considerably increase the number of candidate materials for the topological Anderson insulator phase.

  16. 78 FR 11626 - Foreign-Trade Zone 176-Rockford, IL, Authorization of Production Activity, AndersonBrecon Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... public comment (77 FR 64311, 10-19-2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the..., AndersonBrecon Inc. (Medical Device Kitting), Rockford, IL On October 12, 2012, AndersonBrecon...

  17. Limb salvage talectomy for 3C Gustilo–Anderson fracture

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Hasan Raza; Pillai, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Foot fractures vary in severity with complex midfoot fractures having poor morbidity rates and high amputation rates. Complex midfoot fractures are rarely reported since they are uncommon and only treated in specialist centres. Given the important role of the midfoot in foot function, reconstruction is preferable. Soft tissue management on the dorsal aspect of the foot poses further challenges to reconstructive surgeons. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who sustained an open 3C Gustilo–Anderson fracture that was initially treated with open reduction internal fixation and free flap. She subsequently developed flap and internal fixation failure with osteomyelitis of the talus. We report a good outcome using primary limb shortening with a talectomy, tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis using external fixation and a combination of vancomycin-loaded calcium sulphate and intravenous antibiotics in our patient. PMID:27173882

  18. Price-Anderson Nuclear Safety Enforcement Program. 1997 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes activities in the Department of Energy's Price-Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA) Enforcement Program in calendar year 1997 and highlights improvements planned for 1998. The DOE Enforcement Program involves the Office of Enforcement and Investigation in the DOE Headquarters Office of Environment, Safety and Health, as well as numerous PAAA Coordinators and technical advisors in DOE Field and Program Offices. The DOE Enforcement Program issued 13 Notices of Violation (NOV`s) in 1997 for cases involving significant or potentially significant nuclear safety violations. Six of these included civil penalties totaling $440,000. Highlights of these actions include: (1) Brookhaven National Laboratory Radiological Control Violations / Associated Universities, Inc.; (2) Bioassay Program Violations at Mound / EG and G, Inc.; (3) Savannah River Crane Operator Uptake / Westinghouse Savannah River Company; (4) Waste Calciner Worker Uptake / Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company; and (5) Reactor Scram and Records Destruction at Sandia / Sandia Corporation (Lockheed-Martin).

  19. Fluorescent Ag nanoclusters prepared in aqueous poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) solutions: a spectroscopic study of their excited state dynamics, size and local environment.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Manika; Mandal, Debabrata

    2016-01-28

    Stable, fluorescent Ag nanoclusters were prepared in aqueous solutions of Na(+) salt of the carboxylate-rich polymer poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) under brief spells of UV irradiation. The nanoclusters were nearly spherical, with diameters within 1.90 ± 0.50 nm, but displayed a prominent red edge excitation shift (REES) of fluorescence upon exciting within the visible absorption band, indicating heterogeneity of energy level distributions. Spectroscopic studies revealed that irrespective of whether the nanoclusters are excited in their UV or visible absorption bands, their fluorescence always ensues from the same manifold of emissive states, with a broad range of fluorescence lifetimes from ∼150 fs to 1 ns. PMID:26700465

  20. Random Walks in Anderson's Garden: A Journey from Cuprates to Cooper Pair Insulators and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    Anderson's Garden is a drawing presented to Philip W. Anderson on the eve of his 60th birthday celebration, in 1983, by a colleague (author unknown). This cartoon (Fig. 1) succinctly depicts some of Anderson's pre-1983 works. As an avid reader of Anderson's papers, a random walk in Anderson's garden had become a part of my routine since graduate school days. This was of immense help and prepared me for a wonderful collaboration with Anderson on the theory of high-Tc cuprates and quantum spin liquids at Princeton. Here I narrate this story, ending with a brief summary of my ongoing theoretical efforts to extend Anderson's RVB theory for superconductivity to encompass the recently observed high-temperature (Tc ~ 203K) superconductivity in solid H2S at pressure ~200GPa. In H2S molecule, four valence electrons form two saturated covalent bonds, H-S-H. These bond singlets are confined Cooper pairs close to chemical potential. Solid H2S is a Cooper pair insulator. Pressure changes the structure and not the number of valence electrons. Bond singlet pairing tendency continues and new S-S and H-H bonds are formed. S-S bonds are mostly saturated. However, hydrogen sublattice has unsaturated H-H bonds. It prepares ground for a RVB superconducting state.

  1. Verification of Anderson Superexchange in MnO via Magnetic Pair Distribution Function Analysis and ab initio Theory.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Benjamin A; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J; Staunton, Julie B; Billinge, Simon J L

    2016-05-13

    We present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ∼1  nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominated by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. The Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory. PMID:27232042

  2. Verification of Anderson Superexchange in MnO via Magnetic Pair Distribution Function Analysis and ab initio Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Staunton, Julie B.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ˜1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominated by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. The Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory.

  3. Verification of Anderson superexchange in MnO via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    DOE PAGES

    Benjamin A. Frandsen; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Staunton, Julie B.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-05-11

    Here, we present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominatedmore » by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. Furthermore, the Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory.« less

  4. Scaling of Von Neumann Entropy at the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip

    Extensive body of work has shown that for the model of a non-interacting electron in a random potential there is a quantum critical point for dimensions greater than two — a metal-insulator transition. This model also plays an important role in the plateau-to-plateu transition in the integer quantum Hall effect, which is also correctly captured by a scaling theory. Yet, in neither of these cases the ground state energy shows any non-analyticity as a function of a suitable tuning parameter, typically considered to be a hallmark of a quantum phase transition, similar to the non-analyticity of the free energy in a classical phase transition. Here we show that von Neumann entropy (entanglement entropy) is non-analytic at these phase transitions and can track the fundamental changes in the internal correlations of the ground state wave function. In particular, it summarizes the spatially wildly fluctuating intensities of the wave function close to the criticality of the Anderson transition. It is likely that all quantum phase transitions can be similarly described.

  5. Kondo hole route to incoherence in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of disorder and interactions in strongly correlated electronic systems is a subject of perennial interest. In this work, we have investigated the effect of Kondo-hole type disorder on the dynamics and transport properties of heavy fermion systems. We employ the periodic Anderson model within the framework of coherent potential approximation and dynamical mean field theory. The crossover from lattice coherent behaviour to an incoherent single-impurity behaviour is reflected in all aspects: a highly frequency (ω)-dependent hybridization becomes almost flat, the coherence peak in resistivity (per impurity) gives way to a Hammann form that saturates at low temperature (T); the Drude peak and the mid-infrared peak in the optical conductivity vanish almost completely. The zero temperature resistivity can be captured in a closed form expression, and we show how the Nordheim's rule gets strongly modified in these systems. The thermopower exhibits a characteristic peak, which changes sign with increasing disorder, and its location is shown to correspond to the low energy scale of the system (ωL). In fact, the thermopower appears to be much more sensitive to disorder variations than the resistivity. A comparison to experiments yields quantitative agreement. JNCASR and CSIR

  6. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  7. Breast reconstruction at the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peirong

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in the 1970s marks the beginning of modern breast reconstruction although implants were available even earlier mainly for breast augmentation. Mastectomy techniques have evolved from the early Halsted radical mastectomy to the modern skin sparing mastectomy. The latter made possible using implants for breast reconstruction. Although prosthetic reconstruction provides a simpler procedure with quick recovery, autologous reconstruction offers more natural and long-lasting results especially in the setting of radiotherapy. Both forms have been extensively used at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) while microsurgical breast reconstruction has been the hallmark of the MDACC experience. One of the most challenging areas of breast reconstruction is how to achieve good results without compromising adjuvant therapy when post-mastectomy radiotherapy is required. Managing upper extremity lymphedema following breast cancer treatment is another difficult issue which has gained great attention in recent years. This article highlights the important work in various aspects of breast reconstruction that has been done at the MDACC. PMID:27563563

  8. 75 FR 34170 - Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Automotive Exteriors, LLC, working out of Troy, Michigan. The workers provided office, engineering and sales... Employment and Training Administration Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Anderson, SC; Plastic Omnium Automotive Exteriors, LLC, Troy, MI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for...

  9. Modified Anderson orthogonality catastrophe power law in the presence of shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Swarnali; Hentschel, Martina

    2011-01-01

    We study Anderson orthogonality catastrophe (AOC) for parabolic quantum dots and focus on the effects of degeneracies, realized through the inherent shell structure of their energy levels that can be lifted through an external magnetic field, on the Anderson overlap. We find rich and interesting behaviors as a function of the strength and position of the perturbation, the system size, and the applied magnetic field. In particular, even for weak perturbations, we observe a pronounced AOC that is related to the degeneracy of energy levels. Most importantly, the power-law decay of the Anderson overlap as a function of the number of particles is modified in comparison to the metallic case due to the rearrangement of the energy-level shell structure. We support our analytical results by numerical calculations and also study the distribution of Anderson overlaps.

  10. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph. D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-10-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  11. Excited Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Asia; Ahern, Terence L.; Henderson, Sean O.

    2011-01-01

    Excited (or agitated) delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. PMID:21691475

  12. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  13. A new dataset of Wood Anderson magnitude from the Trieste (Italy) seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandron, Denis; Gentile, G. Francesco; Gentili, Stefania; Rebez, Alessandro; Santulin, Marco; Slejko, Dario

    2014-05-01

    The standard torsion Wood Anderson (WA) seismograph owes its fame to the fact that historically it has been used for the definition of the magnitude of an earthquake (Richter, 1935). With the progress of the technology, digital broadband (BB) seismographs replaced it. However, for historical consistency and homogeneity with the old seismic catalogues, it is still important continuing to compute the so called Wood Anderson magnitude. In order to evaluate WA magnitude, the synthetic seismograms WA equivalent are simulated convolving the waveforms recorded by a BB instrument with a suitable transfer function. The value of static magnification that should be applied in order to simulate correctly the WA instrument is debated. The original WA instrument in Trieste operated from 1971 to 1992 and the WA magnitude (MAW) estimates were regularly reported in the seismic station bulletins. The calculation of the local magnitude was performed following the Richter's formula (Richter, 1935), using the table of corrections factor unmodified from those calibrated for California and without station correction applied (Finetti, 1972). However, the WA amplitudes were computed as vector sum rather than arithmetic average of the horizontal components, resulting in a systematic overestimation of approximately 0.25, depending on the azimuth. In this work, we have retrieved the E-W and N-S components of the original recordings and re-computed MAW according to the original Richter (1935) formula. In 1992, the WA recording were stopped, due to the long time required for the daily development of the photographic paper, the costs of the photographic paper and the progress of the technology. After a decade of interruption, the WA was recovered and modernized by replacing the recording on photographic paper with an electronic device and it continues presently to record earthquakes. The E-W and N-S components records were memorized, but not published till now. Since 2004, next to the WA (few

  14. Electronic Raman scattering with excitation between localized states observed in the zinc M{sub 2,3} soft x-ray spectra of ZnS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L.; Callcott, T.A.; Jia, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    Zn M{sub 2,3} soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectra of ZnS and ZnS{sub .5}Se{sub .5} excited near threshold show strong inelastic scattering effects that can be explained using a simple model and an inelastic scattering theory based on second order perturbation theory. This scattering is often called electronic resonance Raman scattering. Tulkki and Aberg have developed this theory in detail for atomic systems, but their treatment can be applied to solid systems by utilizing electronic states characteristic of solids rather than of atomic systems.

  15. Parabolic Anderson Model in a Dynamic Random Environment: Random Conductances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, D.; den Hollander, F.; Maillard, G.

    2016-06-01

    The parabolic Anderson model is defined as the partial differential equation ∂ u( x, t)/ ∂ t = κ Δ u( x, t) + ξ( x, t) u( x, t), x ∈ ℤ d , t ≥ 0, where κ ∈ [0, ∞) is the diffusion constant, Δ is the discrete Laplacian, and ξ is a dynamic random environment that drives the equation. The initial condition u( x, 0) = u 0( x), x ∈ ℤ d , is typically taken to be non-negative and bounded. The solution of the parabolic Anderson equation describes the evolution of a field of particles performing independent simple random walks with binary branching: particles jump at rate 2 d κ, split into two at rate ξ ∨ 0, and die at rate (- ξ) ∨ 0. In earlier work we looked at the Lyapunov exponents λ p(κ ) = limlimits _{tto ∞} 1/t log {E} ([u(0,t)]p)^{1/p}, quad p in {N} , qquad λ 0(κ ) = limlimits _{tto ∞} 1/2 log u(0,t). For the former we derived quantitative results on the κ-dependence for four choices of ξ : space-time white noise, independent simple random walks, the exclusion process and the voter model. For the latter we obtained qualitative results under certain space-time mixing conditions on ξ. In the present paper we investigate what happens when κΔ is replaced by Δ𝓚, where 𝓚 = {𝓚( x, y) : x, y ∈ ℤ d , x ˜ y} is a collection of random conductances between neighbouring sites replacing the constant conductances κ in the homogeneous model. We show that the associated annealed Lyapunov exponents λ p (𝓚), p ∈ ℕ, are given by the formula λ p({K} ) = {sup} {λ p(κ ) : κ in {Supp} ({K} )}, where, for a fixed realisation of 𝓚, Supp(𝓚) is the set of values taken by the 𝓚-field. We also show that for the associated quenched Lyapunov exponent λ 0(𝓚) this formula only provides a lower bound, and we conjecture that an upper bound holds when Supp(𝓚) is replaced by its convex hull. Our proof is valid for three classes of reversible ξ, and for all 𝓚

  16. Attractive Hubbard model with disorder and the generalized Anderson theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, E. Z. Kuleeva, N. A. Sadovskii, M. V.

    2015-06-15

    Using the generalized DMFT+Σ approach, we study the influence of disorder on single-particle properties of the normal phase and the superconducting transition temperature in the attractive Hubbard model. A wide range of attractive potentials U is studied, from the weak coupling region, where both the instability of the normal phase and superconductivity are well described by the BCS model, to the strong-coupling region, where the superconducting transition is due to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of compact Cooper pairs, formed at temperatures much higher than the superconducting transition temperature. We study two typical models of the conduction band with semi-elliptic and flat densities of states, respectively appropriate for three-dimensional and two-dimensional systems. For the semi-elliptic density of states, the disorder influence on all single-particle properties (e.g., density of states) is universal for an arbitrary strength of electronic correlations and disorder and is due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band. In the case of a flat density of states, universality is absent in the general case, but still the disorder influence is mainly due to band widening, and the universal behavior is restored for large enough disorder. Using the combination of DMFT+Σ and Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink approximations, we study the disorder influence on the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} for a range of characteristic values of U and disorder, including the BCS-BEC crossover region and the limit of strong-coupling. Disorder can either suppress T{sub c} (in the weak-coupling region) or significantly increase T{sub c} (in the strong-coupling region). However, in all cases, the generalized Anderson theorem is valid and all changes of the superconducting critical temperature are essentially due to only the general disorder widening of the conduction band.

  17. On the local relaxation of solid neon upon Rydberg excitation of a NO impurity: the role of the NO(A)-Ne interaction potential and zero-point quantum delocalization.

    PubMed

    Pajón-Suárez, Pedro; Rojas-Lorenzo, Germán A; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesús; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón; Larrégaray, Pascal

    2009-12-31

    The local relaxation of solid neon subsequent to the impulsive excitation of the NO chromophore to its A(3s sigma) Ryberg state is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. This study makes use of empirical NO(X,A)-Ne isotropic pair potentials as well as a recently developed ab initio triatomic potential energy surface for the excited state. The role of these interaction potentials is analyzed, including many-body effects. In particular, empirical potentials, designed to reproduce correctly both the NO X-A steady-state absorption and emission bands, are shown to lead to a good description of the subpicosecond relaxation dynamics. The 600 fs expansion of the electronic bubble fairly agrees with experimental data. This relatively long time scale with respect to solid Argon, which was previously attributed to the range of the NO(A)-Ne interaction, is presumably related to the quantum nature of the medium. The time-resolved local relaxation of the Ne solid is understandably intermediate between that of classical solids (e.g., Ar) and that of quantum solids (e.g., H(2)).

  18. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  19. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  20. Multi-Stepped Optogenetics: A Novel Strategy to Analyze Neural Network Formation and Animal Behaviors by Photo-Regulation of Local Gene Expression, Fluorescent Color and Neural Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Kohei; Nakajima, Yohei; Isoda, Erika; Itoh, Mariko; Yamamoto, Tamami

    The brain is one of the most complicated structures in nature. Zebrafish is a useful model to study development of vertebrate brain, because it is transparent at early embryonic stage and it develops rapidly outside of the body. We made a series of transgenic zebrafish expressing green-fluorescent protein related molecules, for example, Kaede and KikGR, whose green fluorescence can be irreversibly converted to red upon irradiation with ultra-violet (UV) or violet light, and Dronpa, whose green fluorescence is eliminated with strong blue light but can be reactivated upon irradiation with UV or violet-light. We have recently shown that infrared laser evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) which causes a focused heat shock could locally induce these fluorescent proteins and the other genes. Neural cell migration and axonal pattern formation in living brain could be visualized by this technique. We also can express channel rhodopsine 2 (ChR2), a photoactivatable cation channel, or Natronomonas pharaonis halorhodopsin (NpHR), a photoactivatable chloride ion pump, locally in the nervous system by IR. Then, behaviors of these animals can be controlled by activating or silencing the local neurons by light. This novel strategy is useful in discovering neurons and circuits responsible for a wide variety of animal behaviors. We proposed to call this method ‘multi-stepped optogenetics’.

  1. John Anderson's development of (situational) realism and its bearing on psychology today.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Fiona J

    2009-10-01

    In 1927, the Scottish philosopher John Anderson arrived in Australia to take up the chair of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. By the late 1930s, the "macrostructure" of his realist system was in place. It includes a theory of process and a substantial metaphysics, one that opposes positivism, linguistic philosophy and all forms of idealism. However, beyond Australia it remains largely unknown, despite its bearing on a number of current issues in psychology and the social sciences generally. This article outlines Anderson's transition from Hegelian idealism to realism, describes aspects of his ontology and epistemology, compares some of Anderson's ideas with Dewey's pragmatism and explains their relevance to present-day psychology. PMID:20027696

  2. Anderson Localization in Degenerate Spin-Orbit Coupled Fermi Gas with Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Xiang-Fa; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Competition between superconductivity and disorder plays an essential role in understanding the metal-insulator transition. Based on the Bogoliubov-de Gennes framework, we studied an 2D s-wave fermionic optical lattice system with both spin- orbit coupling and disorder are presented. We find that, with the increase of the strength of disorder, the mean superconducting order parameter will vanish while the energy gap will persist, which indicates that the system undergoes a transition from a superconducting state to a gapped insulating state. This can be confirmed by calculating the inverse participation ratio. We also find that, if the strength of disorder is small, the superconducting order parameter and the energy gap will decrease if we increase the strength of spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field. In the large disorder limits, the increase of the strength of spin- orbit coupling will increase the mean superconducting order parameter. This phenomenon shows that the system is more insensitive to disorder if the spin-orbit coupling is presented. Numerical computing also shows that the whole system breaks up into several superconducting islands instead of being superconductive. PMID:26936539

  3. Anderson Localization in Degenerate Spin-Orbit Coupled Fermi Gas with Disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Zhou, Xiang-Fa; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Competition between superconductivity and disorder plays an essential role in understanding the metal-insulator transition. Based on the Bogoliubov-de Gennes framework, we studied an 2D s-wave fermionic optical lattice system with both spin- orbit coupling and disorder are presented. We find that, with the increase of the strength of disorder, the mean superconducting order parameter will vanish while the energy gap will persist, which indicates that the system undergoes a transition from a superconducting state to a gapped insulating state. This can be confirmed by calculating the inverse participation ratio. We also find that, if the strength of disorder is small, the superconducting order parameter and the energy gap will decrease if we increase the strength of spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman field. In the large disorder limits, the increase of the strength of spin- orbit coupling will increase the mean superconducting order parameter. This phenomenon shows that the system is more insensitive to disorder if the spin-orbit coupling is presented. Numerical computing also shows that the whole system breaks up into several superconducting islands instead of being superconductive. PMID:26936539

  4. Multifractality to Photonic Crystal & Self-Organization to Metamaterials through Anderson Localizations & Group/Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Widastra

    2015-04-01

    Arthur Cayley at least investigate by creating the theory of permutation group[F:∖∖Group_theory.htm] where in cell elements addressing of the lattice Qmf used a Cayley tree, the self-afine object Qmf is described by the combination of the finite groups of rotation & inversion and the infinite groups of translation & dilation[G Corso & LS Lacena: ``Multifractal lattice and group theory'', Physica A: Statistical Mechanics &Its Applications, 2005, v 357, issue I, h 64-70; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/articel/pii/S0378437105005005 ] hence multifractal can be related to group theory. Many grateful Thanks to HE. Mr. Drs. P. SWANTORO & HE. Mr. Ir. SARWONO KUSUMAATMADJA.

  5. beta-Function of Anderson localization transition in three dimensions at unitary symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra

    In recent years, with the advances in experimental techniques, the characteristic length scales of the materials synthesized, are becoming increasingly small. Many of these microscopic structures found their places in important commercial applications. However, the thermal loads imposed on these devices and structures create a major obstacle toward their applicability. This challenge is driving a renewed interest among researchers from various disciplines, toward the topic of thermal management. The interest in the topic of thermal transport in small scale structures, served as the motivation for the work performed in this dissertation. More specifically, the following topics were investigated: • Transport in One-Dimensional Nonlinear Systems: Thermal transport in materials can be explained in terms of the diffusive motion of the heat carriers at the microscopic level. An important and surprising situation emerges in some low dimensional model systems; the thermal conductivity diverges with system size. It was shown (Toda, 1979) that nonlinearity has an important effect on the heat transport in low dimensional systems. We investigate the transport of energy in a nonlinear one-dimensional chain. We show that solitons are spontaneous generated when we apply forcing functions at the end of the chain. We investigate the different characteristics of these solitons generated in the chain. • Transport in Fluids --- Study of Pair Distribution Function: Thermal transport in fluids depends on the distribution of particles in the fluid. It is well known that the two-particle distribution function can describe most of the thermodynamic properties for classical fluids in thermal equilibrium. We review the approximate integral equation theories (Percus-Yevick, Hypernetted chain approximation) to obtain the pair distribution functions of classical fluids. We find that these methods are highly dependent on the choice of the thermodynamic parameters of the fluid. We solve several Lennard-Jones fluid systems with different density and temperature values and prepare a density-temperature compressibility diagram. This diagram shows the region of applicability of these theories and helps us obtain the pair distribution function for a Lennard-Jones fluid with known thermodynamic parameters. We also suggest a modification of the integral-equation theories to obtain the pair distribution functions of quantum fluids. • Thermal Transport Across Interfaces: When thermal energy is transported from one material to another, there is a discontinuity in temperature at the interface between them. This thermal boundary resistance is known as Kapitza resistance. The scattering of phonons at interfaces is one of the main reasons behind the presence of thermal boundary resistance. We explore the scattering of acoustic waves at several solid-solid interfaces using lattice dynamical methods. We derive matrix equations to obtain the reflection and transmission coefficients for an acoustic wave incident on the interface. These coefficients can reproduce the familiar expressions in the continuum limit and are consistent with the conservation relations. We discuss a method to obtain the thermal boundary resistance for neutral solid-fluid interfaces. The acoustic mismatch theory works poorly for solid-fluid interfaces. One reason is that this theory only includes the long wavelength acoustic phonons. Our theory includes all the phonon modes in the solid and all the sound modes in the fluid, in the calculation of the thermal boundary resistance. We provide an application of this method to obtain the thermal boundary resistance at the interface between solid Argon and liquid Neon. Our method yields the value for Kapitza conductance for solid Argon-fluid Neon interface as 0.0374GW/Km2.

  6. Wildlife Impact Assessment: Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1986-05-01

    This report presents an analysis of impacts on wildlife and their habitats as a result of construction and operation of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects in Idaho. The objectives were to: (1) determine the probable impacts of development and operation of the Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon, and Boise Diversion Projects to wildlife and their habitats; (2) determine the wildlife and habitat impacts directly attributable to hydroelectric development and operation; (3) briefly identify the current major concerns for wildlife in the vicinities of the hydroelectric projects; and (4) provide for consultation and coordination with interested agencies, tribes, and other entities expressing interest in the project.

  7. Financial protection against nuclear hazards: thirty years' experience under the Price-Anderson Act

    SciTech Connect

    Rockett, L.R.; Hayn, I.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the operation of the Price-Anderson Act in the light of the last 10 years' experience and the changes that have occurred during that period both in the law and regulations and in the nuclear and insurance industries, and to provide an independent analysis of various proposals to extend or amend the Act prior to its 1987 expiration. The report does not analyze the impact of the Silkwood v. Kerr McGee Corp. decision. The five chapters cover historical background, financial protection under the Price-Anderson Act and in the absence of the Act, fundamental policy issues, and alternative proposals.

  8. 77 FR 72906 - Chessie Logistics Co., LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Surface Transportation Board Chessie Logistics Co., LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- J. Emil... exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from J. Emil Anderson & Son, Inc. (Anderson) and to operate 1.006... it. See Mannheim Armitage Ry.--Acquis. & Operation Exemption--Certain Trackage Rights of J....

  9. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after spinal nerve ligation, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before spinal nerve ligation. This isoform can mediate high frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by spinal nerve ligation, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a

  10. The Anderson-Condon-Shortley Site in X-ray Spectroscopies of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delley, Bernard; Uldry, Anne-Christine

    2014-03-01

    Electronic structures of compounds involving open d- and f- shell are studied frequently by X-ray and electron spectroscopies. The excitation, especially core excitation, is localized on a single site makes this the problem of impurity site states interacting with the continuum of bands. on the other hande, the electron-electron interaction whithin the d- or f- shell leads to a multiplet problem as addressed long ago for isolated atoms. Building on our easy to use program multiX (*), which treats an atom in a general crystal field environment without symmetry analysis, we now address the interaction of this atomic entity with the band continuum. The crossover from atomic to bandlike spectra is the focus of interest. We discuss experimental examples where available and accessible to our methods. Swiss SNF grant 200021-129970 is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Melissa L. Anderson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association/American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology. The 2012 winner is Melissa L. Anderson for her ongoing commitment to understanding, treating, and preventing domestic violence in Deaf women…

  12. Adolescent Identities and Sexual Behavior: An Examination of Anderson's Player Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.; Manning, Wendy D.; Northcutt, Miriam J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the social and behavioral characteristics of male adolescents who self-identify as players, focusing particularly on Anderson's claim that this social role is inextricably linked with poverty and minority status. Results indicate that black respondents, those affiliated with liberal peers and young men who initially report a…

  13. Nonperturbative spectral-density function for the Anderson model at arbitrary temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Using a nonperturbative self-energy solution for the nondegenerate Anderson model, the temperature-dependent spectral-density function is calculated in the symmetric limit. The function is found to give reliable results for all values of the parameter u and inverse temperature beta.

  14. Anderson v. University of Wisconsin: Handicap and Race Discrimination in Readmission Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth R.

    1989-01-01

    "Anderson v. University of Wisconsin" gives important guidance to universities by detailing the components of race and handicap discrimination claims, and illustrating how these claims can succeed. Readmission procedures that could reduce the likelihood of charges of discrimination are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  15. Community of Inquiry in e-Learning: A Critical Analysis of the Garrison and Anderson Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jezegou, Annie

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a constructively critical analysis of the "community of inquiry" model developed by Garrison and Anderson (2003) as part of their "e-learning" research. The authors claim that certain collaborative interactions create "distant presence" fostering the emergence of a "community of inquiry" which has a positive influence on…

  16. 4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SITE A FROM ANDERSON WAY, FACING SOUTH/SOUTHWEST. (BUILDINGS 126, 124, 122, 120, and 114 ARE VISIBLE.) - Fort McPherson, World War II Station Hospital, Structures, Bordered by Hardee & Thorne Avenues & Howe Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levedahl, William Kirk

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  18. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plans, Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Meuleman, G. Allyn

    1987-06-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho to mitigate the impacts to wildlife habitat and production due to the development and operation of the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facilities (i.e., dam, power plant, and reservoir areas). The Anderson Ranch Facility covered about 4812 acres of wildlife habitat while the Black Canyon Facility covered about 1115 acres. These acreages include dam and power plant staging areas. A separate mitigation plan has been developed for each facility. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the mitigation plans to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost at each facility as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering the needs of wildlife in the areas. Totals of 9619 and 2238 target species HU's were estimated to be lost in the Anderson Ranch and Black Canyon Facility areas, respectively. Through a series of projects, the mitigation plans will provide benefits of 9620 target species HU's to replace Anderson Ranch wildlife impacts and benefits of 2195 target species HU's to replace Black Canyon wildlife impacts. Target species to be benefited by the Anderson Ranch and/or Black Canyon mitigation plans include the mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, mule deer, blue grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, and peregrine falcon.

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  20. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov

    2015-03-09

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  1. Anderson transition in ultracold atoms: Signatures and experimental feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Garcia, Antonio M.; Wang Jiao

    2006-12-15

    Kicked rotators with certain nonanalytic potentials avoid dynamical localization and undergo a metal-insulator transition. We show that typical properties of this transition are still present as the nonanalyticity is progressively smoothed out provided that the smoothing is less than a certain limiting value. We have identified a smoothing-dependent time scale such that full dynamical localization is absent and the quantum momentum distribution develops power-law tails with anomalous decay exponents as in the case of a conductor at the metal-insulator transition. We discuss under what conditions these findings may be verified experimentally by using ultracold atom techniques. It is found that ultracold atoms can indeed be utilized for the experimental investigation of the metal-insulator transition.

  2. Transient phases and dynamical transitions in the post-quench evolution of the generalized Bose-Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichinadze, Dmitry V.; Ribeiro, Pedro; Shchadilova, Yulia E.; Rubtsov, Alexey N.

    2016-08-01

    The exact description of the time evolution of open correlated quantum systems remains one of the major challenges of condensed matter theory, especially for asymptotic long times where most numerical methods fail. Here, the post-quench dynamics of the N -component Bose-Anderson impurity model is studied in the N →∞ limit. The equilibrium phase diagram is similar to that of the Bose-Hubbard model in that it contains local versions of Mott and Bose phases. Using a numerically exact procedure, we are able to study the real-time evolution including asymptotic long-time regimes. The formation of long-lived transient phases is observed for quench paths crossing foreign phases. For quenches inside the local Bose condensed phase, a dynamical phase transition is reported that separates the evolution towards a new equilibrium state and a regime characterized at large times by a persistent phase rotation of the order parameter. We explain how such nondecaying modes can exist in the presence of a dissipative bath. We discuss the extension of our results to the experimental relevant finite-N case and their implication for the existence of nondecaying modes in generic quantum systems in the presence of a bath.

  3. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  4. Emergent Weyl excitations in systems of polar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, Sergey; Wall, Michael; Zhu, Bihui; Gurarie, Victor; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    Systems with Weyl quasiparticle dispersion have been predicted to display a plethora of novel fascinating phenomena: chiral anomaly, topologically protected Fermi arcs on the surfaces, non-Anderson disorder-driven transitions, etc. Over the last several years enormous research efforts have been directed at finding new Weyl semimetals in solid-state systems and ways to realise them in ultracold atomic gases. We demonstrate that excitations with Weyl dispersion generically exist in three-dimensional systems of polar particles in the presence of magnetic field. They emerge due to the dipolar-interaction-induced transitions between the J = 0 and J = 1 angular-momentum states of the particles. Also, we calculate the quasiparticle spectra microscopically for systems of alkaline-earth atoms that can be realised experimentally and suggest a Ramsey-spectroscopy protocol for observing Weyl excitations in them.

  5. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  6. Abrupt physical and chemical changes during 1992-1999, Anderson Springs, SE Geyser Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, Cathy J.; Goff, Fraser; Walter, Stephen R.; Sorey, Michael L.; Counce, Dale; Colvard, Elizabeth M.

    2000-01-01

    The Anderson Springs area is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. Patrons drank a variety of cool to hot mineral waters from improved springs, swam in various baths and pools, and hiked in the rugged hills flanking Anderson Creek and its tributaries. In the bluffs to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. By the early 1970s, the higher ridges south and west of Anderson Springs became part of the southeast sector of the greater Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric power plants are built on these ridges, producing energy from a vapor-dominated 240 °C reservoir. Only the main hot spring at Anderson Springs has maintained a recognizable identity since the 1930s. The hot spring is actually a cluster of seeps and springs that issue from a small fault in a ravine southwest of Anderson Creek. Published and unpublished records show that the maximum temperature (Tm) of this cluster fell gradually from 63°C in 1889 to 48°C in 1992. However, Tm of the cluster climbed to 77°C in 1995 and neared boiling (98°C) in 1998. A new cluster of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm = 99.3°C) formed in 1998 about 30 m north of the old spring cluster. Several evergreen trees on steep slopes immediately above these vents apparently were killed by the new activity. Thermal waters at Anderson Hot Springs are mostly composed of near-surface ground waters with some added gases and condensed steam from The Geysers geothermal system. Compared to gas samples from Southeast Geysers wells, the hot spring gases are higher in CO2 and lower in H2S and NH3. As the springs increased in temperature, however, the gas composition became more like the mean composition

  7. Analysis of the characteristics of patients with open tibial fractures of Gustilo and Anderson type III☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaña Neto, Frederico Carlos; de Paula Canal, Marina; Alves, Bernardo Aurélio Fonseca; Ferreira, Pablício Martins; Ayres, Jefferson Castro; Alves, Robson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients with Gustilo–Anderson Type III open tibial fractures treated at a tertiary care hospital in São Paulo between January 2013 and August 2014. Methods This was a cross-sectional retrospective study. The following data were gathered from the electronic medical records: age; gender; diagnosis; trauma mechanism; comorbidities; associated fractures; Gustilo and Anderson, Tscherne and AO classifications; treatment (initial and definitive); presence of compartment syndrome; primary and secondary amputations; MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) index; mortality rate; and infection rate. Results 116 patients were included: 81% with fracture type IIIA, 12% IIIB and 7% IIIC; 85% males; mean age 32.3 years; and 57% victims of motorcycle accidents. Tibial shaft fractures were significantly more prevalent (67%). Eight patients were subjected to amputation: one primary case and seven secondary cases. Types IIIC (75%) and IIIB (25%) predominated among the patients subjected to secondary amputation. The MESS index was greater than 7 in 88% of the amputees and in 5% of the limb salvage group. Conclusion The profile of patients with open tibial fracture of Gustilo and Anderson Type III mainly involved young male individuals who were victims of motorcycle accidents. The tibial shaft was the segment most affected. Only 7% of the patients underwent amputation. Given the current controversy in the literature about amputation or salvage of severely injured lower limbs, it becomes necessary to carry out prospective studies to support clinical decisions. PMID:27069881

  8. Electronic structure of vitamin B12 within the framework of the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2015-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine C63H88CoN14O14P) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. Here, our purpose is to understand the many-body effects originating from the transition-metal impurity. In this approach, the cobalt 3 d orbitals are treated as the impurity states placed in a semiconductor host which consists of the rest of the molecule. The parameters of the resulting effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock approximation for the electronic structure of the molecule. The quantum Monte Carlo technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective Haldane-Anderson model for vitamin B12. We find that new states form inside the semiconductor gap due to the on-site Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3 d orbitals and that these states become the highest occupied molecular orbitals. In addition, we present results on the charge distribution and spin correlations around the Co atom. We compare the results of this approach with those obtained by the density-functional theory calculations.

  9. Unprecedented χ isomers of single-side triol-functionalized Anderson polyoxometalates and their proton-controlled isomer transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangwei; Liu, Zhenhua; Huang, Yichao; zhang, Jin; Hao, Jian; Wei, Yongge

    2015-06-01

    The μ2-O atom in Anderson polyoxometalates was regioselectively activated by the introduction of protons, which, upon functionalization with triol ligands, could afford a series of unique χ isomers of the organically-derived Anderson cluster {[RCC(CH2O)3]MMo6O18(OH)3}(3-). Herein proton-controlled isomer transformation between the δ and χ isomer was observed by using the fingerprint region in the IR spectra and (13)C NMR spectra.

  10. On the possibility of many-body localization in a doped Mott insulator

    PubMed Central

    He, Rong-Qiang; Weng, Zheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Many-body localization (MBL) is currently a hot issue of interacting systems, in which quantum mechanics overcomes thermalization of statistical mechanics. Like Anderson localization of non-interacting electrons, disorders are usually crucial in engineering the quantum interference in MBL. For translation invariant systems, however, the breakdown of eigenstate thermalization hypothesis due to a pure many-body quantum effect is still unclear. Here we demonstrate a possible MBL phenomenon without disorder, which emerges in a lightly doped Hubbard model with very strong interaction. By means of density matrix renormalization group numerical calculation on a two-leg ladder, we show that whereas a single hole can induce a very heavy Nagaoka polaron, two or more holes will form bound pair/droplets which are all localized excitations with flat bands at low energy densities. Consequently, MBL eigenstates of finite energy density can be constructed as composed of these localized droplets spatially separated. We further identify the underlying mechanism for this MBL as due to a novel ‘Berry phase’ of the doped Mott insulator, and show that by turning off this Berry phase either by increasing the anisotropy of the model or by hand, an eigenstate transition from the MBL to a conventional quasiparticle phase can be realized. PMID:27752064

  11. Double expansion with respect to U and 1 /(N - 1) for an SU(N) impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Akira; Awane, Miyuki

    2014-03-01

    We apply a new large- N scheme for an SU(N) impurity Anderson model to the Green's function for finite frequency ω and finite Coulomb interaction U. This approach is essentially different from the conventional large- N theories, such as the non-crossing approximation and its extensions which are based on a perturbation expansion in the hybridization strength V. Our expansion scheme, which uses 1 /(N - 1) and the scaled interaction u ≡(N - 1) U as a set of two independent variables, gives the Hartree-Fock (HF) results at zeroth order. Then, to leading order in 1 /(N - 1) it describes the Hartree-Fock random phase approximation (HF-RPA). The higher-order corrections systematically describe the fluctuations beyond the HF-RPA. It was shown that the renormalized local-Fermi-liquid parameters, calculated up to order 1 /(N - 1) 2 , agree closely with the exact NRG results at N = 4 where the degeneracy is still not so large. We discuss the ω dependence of the Green's function to clarify both the low- and high-energy features.

  12. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor–acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene–perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  13. Ensemble density functional theory method correctly describes bond dissociation, excited state electron transfer, and double excitations.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Burghardt, Irene

    2015-05-14

    State-averaged (SA) variants of the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham (REKS) method, SA-REKS and state-interaction (SI)-SA-REKS, implement ensemble density functional theory for variationally obtaining excitation energies of molecular systems. In this work, the currently existing version of the SA-REKS method, which included only one excited state into the ensemble averaging, is extended by adding more excited states to the averaged energy functional. A general strategy for extension of the REKS-type methods to larger ensembles of ground and excited states is outlined and implemented in extended versions of the SA-REKS and SI-SA-REKS methods. The newly developed methods are tested in the calculation of several excited states of ground-state multi-reference systems, such as dissociating hydrogen molecule, and excited states of donor-acceptor molecular systems. For hydrogen molecule, the new method correctly reproduces the distance dependence of the lowest excited state energies and describes an avoided crossing between the doubly excited and singly excited states. For bithiophene-perylenediimide stacked complex, the SI-SA-REKS method correctly describes crossing between the locally excited state and the charge transfer excited state and yields vertical excitation energies in good agreement with the ab initio wavefunction methods.

  14. Chain of excitation spot generation by aperture engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2010-04-01

    An optical technique is proposed for obtaining multiple excitation spots. Phase-matched counter propagating extended depth-of-focus fields were superimposed along the optical axis for generating multiple localized excitation spots. Moreover, the filtering effect due to the optical mask increases the lateral resolution. Proposed technique introduces the concept of simultaneous multiplane excitation and improves three-dimensional resolution.

  15. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  16. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  17. Causation's nuclear future: applying proportional liability to the Price-Anderson Act.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, William D

    2014-11-01

    For more than a quarter century, public discourse has pushed the nuclear-power industry in the direction of heavier regulation and greater scrutiny, effectively halting construction of new reactors. By focusing on contemporary fear of significant accidents, such discourse begs the question of what the nation's court system would actually do should a major nuclear incident cause radiation-induced cancers. Congress's attempt to answer that question is the Price-Anderson Act, a broad statute addressing claims by the victims of a major nuclear accident. Lower courts interpreting the Act have repeatedly encountered a major stumbling block: it declares that judges must apply the antediluvian preponderance-of-the-evidence logic of state tort law, even though radiation science insists that the causes of radiation-induced cancers are more complex. After a major nuclear accident, the Act's paradoxically outdated rules for adjudicating "causation" would make post-incident compensation unworkable. This Note urges that nuclear-power-plant liability should not turn on eighteenth-century tort law. Drawing on modern scientific conclusions regarding the invariably "statistical" nature of cancer, this Note suggests a unitary federal standard for the Price-Anderson Act--that a defendant be deemed to have "caused" a plaintiff's injury in direct proportion to the increased risk of harm the defendant has imposed. This "proportional liability" rule would not only fairly evaluate the costs borne by injured plaintiffs and protect a reawakening nuclear industry from the prospect of bank-breaking litigation, but would prove workable with only minor changes to the Price-Anderson Act's standards of "injury" and "fault."

  18. Hydrothermal assembly and luminescence property of lanthanide-containing Anderson polyoxometalates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ying; Liu Shuxia Cao Ruige; Ji Hongmei; Zhang Shiwei; Ren Yuanhang

    2008-09-15

    Two compounds, {l_brace}[Sm(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub 2}(TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}){r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (1) and {l_brace}[Eu(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}]{sub 2} (TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}){r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (2) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 represents the first example of a 2D layer architecture constructed from Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and rare-earth ions Ln{sup 3+}. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure built up of alternating Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} and rare-earth ions Eu{sup 3+} along the c-axis. Luminescence measurement of 2 exhibits typical red fluorescent emission of the Eu{sup 3+} ion at room temperature. Furthermore, the emission is intense enough to be observed macroscopically under UV irradiation (365 nm). - Graphical abstract: Two compounds based on Anderson-type polyoxoanion building blocks and rare-earth ions have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1 exhibits a 2D layer architecture constructed from [TeMo{sub 6}O{sub 24}]{sup 6-} anions and rare-earth ions Ln{sup 3+}. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure and possesses the intense luminescence property.

  19. Conserving Many Body Approach to the Infinite-U Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebanon, Eran; Rech, Jerome; Coleman, P.; Parcollet, Olivier

    2006-09-01

    Using a Luttinger-Ward scheme for interacting gauge particles, we present a conserving many body treatment of a family of fully screened infinite-U Anderson models that has a smooth crossover into the Fermi-liquid state, with a finite scattering phase shift at zero temperature and a Wilson ratio greater than 1. We illustrate our method, computing the temperature dependence of the thermodynamics, resistivity, and electron dephasing rate and discuss its future application to nonequilibrium quantum dots and quantum critical mixed valent systems.

  20. Anderson transition in low-dimensional disordered systems driven by long-range nonrandom hopping.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Malyshev, V A; Sierra, G; Martín-Delgado, M A; Rodríguez-Laguna, J; Domínguez-Adame, F

    2003-01-17

    The single-parameter scaling hypothesis predicts the absence of delocalized states for noninteracting quasiparticles in low-dimensional disordered systems. We show analytically, using a supersymmetric method combined with a renormalization group analysis, as well as numerically that extended states may occur in the one- and two-dimensional Anderson model with a nonrandom hopping falling off as some power of the distance between sites. The different size scaling of the bare level spacing and the renormalized magnitude of the disorder seen by the quasiparticles finally results in the delocalization of states at one of the band edges of the quasiparticle energy spectrum.

  1. Magnetic Response and Valence Fluctuations in the Extended Anderson Lattice Model with Quasiperiodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinzaki, Ryu; Nasu, Joji; Koga, Akihisa

    2016-11-01

    We study the magnetic response and valence fluctuations in the extended Anderson model on a two-dimensional Penrose lattice using real-space dynamical mean-field theory combined with the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. Calculating the f-electron number, c-f spin correlations, and magnetic susceptibility at each site, we find site-dependent formation of the singlet state and valence distributions at low temperatures, which are reflected by the quasiperiodic lattice structure. The bulk magnetic susceptibility is also addressed.

  2. [Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman, 2000); the change in classification within the genus Varroa (Oudemans, 1904)].

    PubMed

    Topolska, G

    2001-01-01

    Varroa jacobsoni was noted for the first time in 1904, in the nest ofApis cerana. In Apis mellifera nests the first Varroa mites were probably found in Korea (1950), next in Japan (1958). In the following years they have spread all over the world. All the time they were regarded as V. jacobsoni. Recently Anderson and Trueman have proved that Varroa jacobsoni is more than one species. They gave the new name Varroa destructor n. sp. to the group of six haplotypes. Mites, which became pests ofA. mellifera worldwide, belong to V. destructor.

  3. Large thermoelectric figure of merit for three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators via line dislocation engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Ar.; Murakami, Shuichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2010-08-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties of three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators with line dislocations. We show that at high densities of dislocations the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT can be dominated by one-dimensional topologically protected conducting states channeled through the lattice screw dislocations in the topological insulator materials with a nonzero time-reversal-invariant momentum such as Bi0.9Sb0.1. When the chemical potential does not exceed much the mobility edge the ZT at room temperatures can reach large values, much higher than unity for reasonable parameters, hence making this system a strong candidate for applications in heat management of nanodevices.

  4. STS-118 Astronaut Williams and Expedition 15 Engineer Anderson Perform EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    As the construction continued on the International Space Station (ISS), STS-118 Astronaut Dave Williams, representing the Canadian Space Agency, participated in the fourth and final session of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). During the 5 hour space walk, Williams and Expedition 15 engineer Clay Anderson (out of frame) installed the External Wireless Instrumentation System Antenna, attached a stand for the shuttle robotic arm extension boom, and retrieved the two Materials International Space Station Experiments (MISSE) for return to Earth. MISSE collects information on how different materials weather in the environment of space.

  5. Anisotropic behavior of quantum transport in graphene superlattices: Coexistence of ballistic conduction with Anderson insulating regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Cummings, Aron W.; Roche, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    We report on the possibility to generate highly anisotropic quantum conductivity in disordered graphene-based superlattices. Our quantum simulations, based on an efficient real-space implementation of the Kubo-Greenwood formula, show that in disordered graphene superlattices the strength of multiple scattering phenomena can strongly depend on the transport measurement geometry. This eventually yields the coexistence of a ballistic waveguide and a highly resistive channel (Anderson insulator) in the same two-dimensional platform, evidenced by a σyy/σxx ratio varying over several orders of magnitude, and suggesting the possibility of building graphene electronic circuits based on the unique properties of chiral massless Dirac fermions in graphene.

  6. Variational Monte Carlo study of magnetic states in the periodic Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Katsunori

    2015-03-01

    We study the magnetic states of the periodic Anderson model with a finite Coulomb interaction between f electrons on a square lattice by applying variational Monte Carlo method. We consider Gutzwiller wavefunctions for the paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and charge density wave states. We find an antiferromagnetic phase around half-filling. There is a phase transition accompanying change in the Fermi-surface topology in this antiferromagnetic phase. We also study a case away from half-filling, and find a ferromagnetic state as the ground state there.

  7. Correlation-driven d -wave superconductivity in Anderson lattice model: Two gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokiński, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spałek, Józef

    2016-07-01

    Superconductivity in heavy-fermion systems has an unconventional nature and is considered to originate from the universal features of the electronic structure. Here, the Anderson lattice model is studied by means of the full variational Gutzwiller wave function incorporating nonlocal effects of the on-site interaction. We show that the d -wave superconducting ground state can be driven solely by interelectronic correlations. The proposed microscopic mechanism leads to a multigap superconductivity with the dominant contribution due to f electrons and in the dx2-y2-wave channel. Our results rationalize several important observations for CeCoIn5.

  8. Numerical study of the periodic Anderson model with a quarter-filled conduction band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuxiang; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Using the dynamical cluster approximation with continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo as the cluster solver and the recently introduced dual-fermion method, we study the underlying physics of the periodic Anderson model where the conduction band is near quarter-filling while the f-band electron band is half filled. For these parameters, the RKKY coupling changes its nature from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic, yielding an interesting phase-diagram. Especially, we find the charge ordering of the conduction band is strongly enhanced, which could be due to the proximity to a quantum critical point.

  9. Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

  10. Richard G.W. Anderson (1940–2011) and the birth of receptor-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    On March 19, 2011, the discipline of cell biology lost a creative force with the passing of Richard G.W. Anderson, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. An unabashed chauvinist for cell biology, Dick served for many years on the editorial board of The Journal of Cell Biology and the Council of the American Society for Cell Biology. He died of glioblastoma multiforme six days before his 71st birthday. PMID:21576388

  11. STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson during TCDT M113 training activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- -- STS-107 Payload Commander Michael Anderson takes a break during training on the operation of an M113 armored personnel carrier during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, a standard part of launch preparations. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia.

  12. STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his flight suit in the white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Mission Specialist Michael Anderson is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39A before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour for launch. The STS- 89 mission will be the eighth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas will live and work on Mir until June. STS- 89 is scheduled for a Jan. 22 liftoff at 9:48 p.m.

  13. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring

  14. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    PubMed

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  15. The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

  16. Analysis of Anderson Acceleration on a Simplified Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics System

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Slattery, Stuart R; Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, R. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A standard method for solving coupled multiphysics problems in light water reactors is Picard iteration, which sequentially alternates between solving single physics applications. This solution approach is appealing due to simplicity of implementation and the ability to leverage existing software packages to accurately solve single physics applications. However, there are several drawbacks in the convergence behavior of this method; namely slow convergence and the necessity of heuristically chosen damping factors to achieve convergence in many cases. Anderson acceleration is a method that has been seen to be more robust and fast converging than Picard iteration for many problems, without significantly higher cost per iteration or complexity of implementation, though its effectiveness in the context of multiphysics coupling is not well explored. In this work, we develop a one-dimensional model simulating the coupling between the neutron distribution and fuel and coolant properties in a single fuel pin. We show that this model generally captures the convergence issues noted in Picard iterations which couple high-fidelity physics codes. We then use this model to gauge potential improvements with regard to rate of convergence and robustness from utilizing Anderson acceleration as an alternative to Picard iteration.

  17. Hydrothermal assembly and luminescence property of lanthanide-containing Anderson polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Shu-Xia; Cao, Rui-Ge; Ji, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Shi-Wei; Ren, Yuan-Hang

    2008-09-01

    Two compounds, {[Sm(H 2O) 5] 2(TeMo 6O 24)}·6H 2O ( 1) and {[Eu(H 2O) 7] 2 (TeMo 6O 24)}·5H 2O ( 2) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, thermal stability analyses, X-ray powder diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 represents the first example of a 2D layer architecture constructed from Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo 6O 24] 6- and rare-earth ions Ln 3+. Compound 2 displays a 1D chain structure built up of alternating Anderson-type polyoxoanions [TeMo 6O 24] 6- and rare-earth ions Eu 3+ along the c-axis. Luminescence measurement of 2 exhibits typical red fluorescent emission of the Eu 3+ ion at room temperature. Furthermore, the emission is intense enough to be observed macroscopically under UV irradiation (365 nm).

  18. Nutritional influences on early white matter development: response to Anderson and Burggren.

    PubMed

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Walker, Lindsay; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

    2014-10-15

    Does breastfeeding alter early brain development? In a recent retrospective study, our group examined the cross-sectional relationship between early infant feeding practice and white matter maturation and cognitive development. In groups matched for child and mother age, gestation duration, birth weight, gender distribution, and socio-economic status; we observed that children who were breastfed exclusively for at least 3 months showed, on average, increased white matter myelin development compared to children who either were exclusively formula-fed, or received a mixture of breast milk and formula. In secondary analysis on sub-sets of these children, again matched for important confounding variables, we found improved cognitive test scores of receptive language in the exclusively breast-fed children compared to formula or formula+breast-fed children; and that prolonged breastfeeding was associated with increased motor, language, and visual functioning in exclusively breast-fed children. In response to this work, Anderson and Burggren have questioned our methodology and, by association, our findings. Further, they use their critique as a platform for advancing an alternative interpretation of our findings: that observed results were not associated with prolonged breast-feeding, but rather delayed the introduction of cow's milk. In this response, we address and clarify some of the misconceptions presented by Anderson and Burggren.

  19. Electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 studied within the Haldane-Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Zafer; Mayda, Selma; Bulut, Nejat

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic structure and correlations of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamine) by using the framework of the multi-orbital single-impurity Haldane-Anderson model of a transition-metal impurity in a semiconductor host. The parameters of the effective Haldane-Anderson model are obtained within the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) technique is then used to calculate the one-electron and magnetic correlation functions of this effective model. We observe that new states form inside the semiconductor gap found by HF due to the intra-orbital Coulomb interaction at the impurity 3d orbitals. In particular, the lowest unoccupied states correspond to an impurity bound state, which consists of states from mainly the CN axial ligand and the corrin ring as well as the Co eg-like orbitals. We also observe that the Co (3d) orbitals can develop antiferromagnetic correlations with the surrounding atoms depending on the filling of the impurity bound states. In addition, we make comparisons of the HF+QMC data with the density functional theory calculations. We also discuss the photoabsorption spectrum of cyanocobalamine.

  20. Anderson-Mott transition in arrays of a few dopant atoms in a silicon transistor.

    PubMed

    Prati, Enrico; Hori, Masahiro; Guagliardo, Filippo; Ferrari, Giorgio; Shinada, Takahiro

    2012-07-01

    Dopant atoms are used to control the properties of semiconductors in most electronic devices. Recent advances such as single-ion implantation have allowed the precise positioning of single dopants in semiconductors as well as the fabrication of single-atom transistors, representing steps forward in the realization of quantum circuits. However, the interactions between dopant atoms have only been studied in systems containing large numbers of dopants, so it has not been possible to explore fundamental phenomena such as the Anderson-Mott transition between conduction by sequential tunnelling through isolated dopant atoms, and conduction through thermally activated impurity Hubbard bands. Here, we observe the Anderson-Mott transition at low temperatures in silicon transistors containing arrays of two, four or six arsenic dopant atoms that have been deterministically implanted along the channel of the device. The transition is induced by controlling the spacing between dopant atoms. Furthermore, at the critical density between tunnelling and band transport regimes, we are able to change the phase of the electron system from a frozen Wigner-like phase to a Fermi glass by increasing the temperature. Our results open up new approaches for the investigation of coherent transport, band engineering and strongly correlated systems in condensed-matter physics.

  1. Ischemic stroke in patients with gliomas at The University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Rodriguez, Yvo A; Garciarena, Pedro; Rodarte, Elsa M; Tremont-Lukats, Ivo W

    2015-10-01

    Patients with gliomas are at risk of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) with potential consequences on survival, function, and local tumor control. Our objective was to provide information about CVA in patients with gliomas and to estimate survival in this group. We reviewed all adult glioma patients with ischemic CVA at the University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 2003 through 2014. We extracted demographic, clinical, imaging, treatment and outcome data. We used descriptive summary data and estimated or compared survival rates where appropriate. 60 of 6500 patients (0.1%) with high-grade (HGG, n = 47) or low-grade glioma (LGG, n = 13) had ischemic CVA Thirty-two (53%) patients had postoperative strokes, and 20 (33%) had CVA after 2 weeks of surgery. Forty-one patients (68%) had gross total resection. For HGG and CVA, the poststroke median overall survival was 17 months versus 61 months in LGG and CVA (P = 0.03; hazard ratio (HR): 2.8; 95% CI 1.07-4.60). Survival stratified by modified Rankin Scale grade was significant (X(2) = 9.8, P = 0.007). Five patients received bevacizumab before stroke onset; none responded to antiangiogenic therapy. There was no stroke-related death. At our institution for 10 years, ischemic CVA in glioma patients was a rare complication, clearly associated in half of cases to surgery, and with a variable negative impact on performance status and neurologic function. In this group, patients with more neurological deficits lived less. The survival difference between and within subgroups was most likely due to tumor grade. More research is necessary to improve prevention of postoperative stroke in glioma patients.

  2. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  3. Patriot Games: Yes, Indeed, the British Are Coming! But M. T. Anderson's Revolutionary War Novel Is Unlike Anything You've Ever Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horning, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with 38-year-old writer Matthew Tobin Anderson. In the interview, Anderson talks about his experiences, passion for writing, teenage interests, and his relation to the distinguished writer Mark Twain. He also states the importance of liberty and what it takes to be a patriot and a loyalist. Furthermore, Matthew…

  4. Low-energy excitations in α- and γ-Ce observed by photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patthey, F.; Delley, B.; Schneider, W.-D.; Baer, Y.

    1985-09-01

    uv-photoemission spectra of the α- and γ-phases of Ce have been measured with an unprecedented resolution (20 meV). A detailed many-body calculation based on the Anderson impurity model and including the 4f1 spin-orbit splitting has been performed. It accounts perfectly for the fine structures observed in the spectra. Within the energy range corresponding to the ground-state lowering by the f-d hybridization, the f contribution to the spectra reveals the density of low-energy excitations culminating at EF.

  5. Low-lying excitations in a strongly interacting Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale, Christopher; Hoinka, Sascha; Dyke, Paul; Lingham, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the low-lying excitation spectrum of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover using Bragg spectroscopy. By focussing the Bragg lasers onto the central volume of the cloud we can probe atoms at near-uniform density allowing measurement of the homogeneous density-density response function. The Bragg wavevector is set to be approximately half of the Fermi wavevector to probe the collective response. Below the superfluid transition temperature the Bragg spectra dominated by the Bogoliubov-Anderson phonon mode. Single particle excitations become visible at energies greater than twice the pairing gap. As interactions are tuned from the BCS to BEC regime the phonon and single particle modes separate apart and both the pairing gap and speed of sound can be directly read off in certain regions of the crossover. Single particle pair-breaking excitations become heavily suppressed as interactions are tuned from the BCS to BEC regimes.

  6. The aeronomy of vibrationally excited ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Allen, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations show that above 80 km in the earth's atmosphere the production of vibrationally excited ozone by chemical processes leads to number densities which are usually larger than those expected for local thermodynamic equilibrium. Quenching of highly excited molecules produced in O+O2+M, O3+M provided a significant source of the lower lying states above the mesopause while the 9.6 microns emission of O3 (0,0,1) was a major sink. Analysis of available laboratory results implied that reactions involving excited ozone play a significant role in the global ozone balance despite the relatively small abundance of the molecule. However, this effect is implicit in many of the rate coefficients currently used in stratospheric calculations. In the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, where the excited state populations differ from those for thermal equilibrium, published reaction rate data are not necessarily applicable to aeronomic calculations.

  7. Localization transition in media with anisotropic diagonal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Weige; Sheng, Ping; Chu, Qian-Jin; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    1989-12-01

    Localization behavior of the Anderson model with anisotropic diagonal disorder is both simulated numerically and calculated diagrammatically. As a function of the anisotropy parameter θ that interpolates between a one-dimensional randomly layered system and three-dimensional isotropic randomness, our results indicate the existence of a critical θc below which the wave function is localized even for infinitesimal values of randomness. Implications for observing the mobility edge in random superlattices are discussed.

  8. 16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. EXCITERS, AND SYNCHROSCOPE GAUGE ON WALL. ACTIVE ELECTRIC EXCITER AT REAR; UNUSED WATER-DRIVEN EXCITER IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  9. Measuring service quality at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions, across all four clinics the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients' expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm's evaluation of its service quality. PMID:10162922

  10. Classical mapping for Hubbard operators: application to the double-Anderson model.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Miller, William H; Levy, Tal J; Rabani, Eran

    2014-05-28

    A classical Cartesian mapping for Hubbard operators is developed to describe the nonequilibrium transport of an open quantum system with many electrons. The mapping of the Hubbard operators representing the many-body Hamiltonian is derived by using analogies from classical mappings of boson creation and annihilation operators vis-à-vis a coherent state representation. The approach provides qualitative results for a double quantum dot array (double Anderson impurity model) coupled to fermionic leads for a range of bias voltages, Coulomb couplings, and hopping terms. While the width and height of the conduction peaks show deviations from the master equation approach considered to be accurate in the limit of weak system-leads couplings and high temperatures, the Hubbard mapping captures all transport channels involving transition between many electron states, some of which are not captured by approximate nonequilibrium Green function closures.

  11. Anderson-Holstein model in two flavors of the noncrossing approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Cohen, Guy; Millis, Andrew J.; Reichman, David R.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical interplay between electron-electron interactions and electron-phonon coupling is investigated within the Anderson-Holstein model, a minimal model for open quantum systems that embody these effects. The influence of phonons on spectral and transport properties is explored in equilibrium, for nonequilibrium steady state and for transient dynamics after a quench. Both the particle-hole symmetric and the more generic particle-hole asymmetric cases are studied. The treatment is based on two complementary noncrossing approximations, the first of which is constructed around the weak-coupling limit and the second around the polaron limit. In general, the two methods disagree in nontrivial ways, indicating that more reliable approaches to the problem are needed. The frameworks used here can form the starting point for numerically exact methods based on bold-line continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithms capable of treating open systems simultaneously coupled to multiple fermionic and bosonic baths.

  12. Multichannel Numerical Renormalization Group study of the Anderson Hamiltonian with multiple impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, James; Konik, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Using the Numerical Renormalization Group (NRG), the low energy sector of the Anderson Hamiltonian with two impurities in parallel has been previously argued to be consistent with an underscreened spin-1 Kondo effect (R. Zitko and J. Bonca, Phys. Rev. B 76, 241305 (2007); Logan et al., Phys. Rev. B 80, 125117 (2009)). Bethe Ansatz and slave boson calculations have given the ground state as a singlet (M. Kulkarni and R. M. Konik, Phys. Rev. B 83, 245121 (2011)). As an attempt to understand these differences, we have developed a modified NRG routine that takes into account the multiple channels arising from the logarithmic discretization of the Fermi sea. This could conceivably allow for more complicated screening processes suggested by the Bethe ansatz computations. Results of studies using this code for various numbers of impurities and channels will be presented and discussed in relationship to these conflicting views.

  13. Multifractality at non-Anderson disorder-driven transitions in Weyl semimetals and other systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syzranov, S. V.; Gurarie, V.; Radzihovsky, L.

    2016-10-01

    Systems with the power-law quasiparticle dispersion ɛk ∝kα exhibit non-Anderson disorder-driven transitions in dimensions d > 2 α, as exemplified by Weyl semimetals, 1D and 2D arrays of ultracold ions with long-range interactions, quantum kicked rotors, and semiconductor models in high dimensions. We study the wavefunction structure in such systems and demonstrate that at these transitions they exhibit fractal behaviour with an infinite set of multifractal exponents. The multifractality persists even when the wavefunction localisation is forbidden by symmetry or topology and occurs as a result of elastic scattering between all momentum states in the band on length scales shorter than the mean free path. We calculate explicitly the multifractal spectra in semiconductors and Weyl semimetals using one-loop and two-loop renormalisation-group approaches slightly above the marginal dimension d = 2 α.

  14. Large thermoelectric figure of merit for three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators via line dislocation engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Abanov, Artem; Murakami, Shuichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2011-03-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties of three-dimensional topological Anderson insulators with line dislocations. We show that at high densities of dislocations the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT can be dominated by one-dimensional topologically protected conducting states channeled through the lattice screw dislocations in the topological insulator materials with a nonzero time-reversal-invariant momentum such as Bi 0.9 Sb 0.1 . When the chemical potential does not exceed much the mobility edge the ZT at room temperatures can reach large values, much higher than unity for reasonable parameters, hence making this system a strong candidate for applications in heat management of nanodevices. This work was supported by NSF under Grant Nos. DMR-0547875 and 0757992, by the Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar Award, and by the Welch Foundation (A-1678).

  15. Measuring service quality at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the service quality of four clinics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center using a questionnaire methodology. The SERVQUAL instrument was administered to patients of the Medical Breast, Leukemia, Medical Gastroenterology and Bone Marrow Aspiration clinics. Results show that, according to the service gap methodology of comparing expectations and perceptions, across all four clinics the issues of billing accuracy and waiting times are deemed by patients as significant problems. In comparing the individual clinics, the Medical Gastroenterology and Leukemia clinics are best performers and the Medical Breast clinic is the worst. However, these differences in performance are due to differences in patients' expectations of service quality, rather than differences in perceptions. Concludes that customer expectations can have a strong impact on a firm's evaluation of its service quality.

  16. ARPES in strongly correlated 4f and 5f systems: Comparison to the Periodic Anderson Model

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Cox, L.E.

    1997-12-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow, nearly temperature independent bands (i.e., no spectral weight loss or transfer with temperature). A small dispersion of the f-bands above the Kondo temperature is easily measurable so that a Kondo resonance, as defined by NCA, is not evident. Preliminary results, however, indicate that the Periodic Anderson Model captures some of the essential physics. Angle-integrated resonant photoemission results on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow 5f feature at E{sub F}, similar in width to f-states in Ce and U compounds, but differing in that cross-section behavior of the near-E{sub F} feature suggests substantial 6D admixture.

  17. The Ce 4{ital f} surface shift: A test for the Anderson-impurity Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Duo, L.; De Rossi, S.; Vavassori, P.; Ciccacci, F.; Olcese, G.L.; Chiaia, G.; Lindau, I.

    1996-12-01

    Evidence is provided of the role of the different hybridization strengths between the surface and the bulk in determining the magnitude of the surface shift for the shallow Ce 4{ital f} levels, with respect to the deeper core levels. This was achieved by comparing the photoemission core levels for a weakly hybridized case (CeAl) to a case of intermediate hybridization ({gamma}-Ce). For CeAl a 4{ital f} surface shift of 0.45 eV was observed, similar to that for the 5{ital p} core level, whereas a smaller (if any) 4{ital f} surface shift was observed for {gamma}-Ce. Model calculations based on the Anderson impurity Hamiltonian are shown to give a correct evaluation of this effect, which can be exploited as a way of testing the results of such a description for the Ce {ital f} states. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Decay of a nonlinear impurity in a structured continuum from a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    The decay dynamics of a nonlinear impurity mode embedded in a linear structured continuum is theoretically investigated in the framework of a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. A gradient flow dynamics for the survival probability is derived in the Van Hove ({lambda}{sup 2}t) limit by a multiple-scale asymptotic analysis, and the role of nonlinearity on the decay law is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the existence of bound states embedded in the continuum acts as transient trapping states which slow down the decay. The dynamical behavior predicted in the {lambda}{sup 2}t limit is studied in detail for a simple tight-binding one-dimensional lattice model, which may describe electron or photon transport in condensed matter or photonic systems. Numerical simulations of the underlying equations confirm, in particular, the trapping effect in the decay process due to bound states embedded in the continuum.

  19. Financial protection against nuclear hazards: thirty years' experience under the Price-Anderson Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Supplementing earlier reports on ways to provide financial protection against the potential hazards involved in the production of nuclear energy by analyzing the issues raised in the Silkwood v. Kerr-McGee Corporation decision, the author explores the impact of the case on the availability of funds to compensate the public and any increased exposure of the nuclear industry or the federal government to public liability. She concludes that the decision will have a significant impact on the day-to-day administration of claims, and could lead to higher premiums. The court would have to determine the priority given to claims in the event of a catastrophic accident, in which case the only significant impact would be under amendments to the Price-Anderson Act which resulted in elimination of its coverage or a substantial increase in or elimination of the limitation on liability.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radio observations of Galactic WISE HII regions (Anderson+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Johnstone, B. M.; Bania, T. M.; Balser, D. S.; Wenger, T. V.; Cunningham, V.

    2016-01-01

    We draw our targets from the MIR objects in the WISE catalog of Anderson+, 2014, J/ApJS/212/1. We also include in our sample Sharpless H II regions (Sharpless 1959, VII/20). See section 2 for further details. Our observations were made with the GBT 100m telescope from 2012 July through 2014 August. There are seven radio recombination lines (RRLs) that can be cleanly observed simultaneously with the GBT in the X-band: H87α to H93α. We average these seven RRLs (each at two orthogonal polarizations) to create a single average RRL spectrum. We followed the same GBT observational procedure as in the original HRDS (Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS; Bania et al. 2010ApJ...718L.106B). (3 data files).

  1. High-order terms in the renormalized perturbation theory for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandis, Vassilis; Hewson, Alex C.

    2015-09-01

    We study the renormalized perturbation theory of the single-impurity Anderson model, particularly the high-order terms in the expansion of the self-energy in powers of the renormalized coupling U ˜. Though the presence of counterterms in the renormalized theory may appear to complicate the diagrammatics, we show how these can be seamlessly accommodated by carrying out the calculation order-by-order in terms of skeleton diagrams. We describe how the diagrams pertinent to the renormalized self-energy and four vertex can be automatically generated, translated into integrals, and numerically integrated. To maximize the efficiency of our approach we introduce a generalized k -particle/hole propagator, which is used to analytically simplify the resultant integrals and reduce the dimensionality of the integration. We present results for the self-energy and spectral density to fifth order in U ˜, for various values of the model asymmetry, and compare them to a numerical renormalization group calculation.

  2. Crossover from conventional to inverse indirect magnetic exchange in the depleted Anderson lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Maximilian W.; Titvinidze, Irakli; Potthoff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the finite-temperature properties of an Anderson lattice with regularly depleted impurities. The physics of this model is ruled by two different magnetic exchange mechanisms: conventional Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction at weak hybridization strength V and an inverse indirect magnetic exchange (IIME) at strong V , both favoring a ferromagnetic ground state. The stability of ferromagnetic order against thermal fluctuations is systematically studied by static mean-field theory for an effective low-energy spin-only model emerging perturbatively in the strong-coupling limit as well as by dynamical mean-field theory for the full model. The Curie temperature is found at a maximum for a half-filled conduction band and at intermediate hybridization strengths in the crossover regime between RKKY and IIME.

  3. Magnetic correlations in a periodic Anderson model with nonuniform conduction electron coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, N.; Chiu, W.-T.; Scalettar, R. T.

    2016-06-01

    The periodic Anderson model is widely studied to understand strong correlation physics and especially the competition of antiferromagnetism and singlet formation. In this paper we extend quantum Monte Carlo work on lattices with uniform numbers of neighbors to geometries in which the conduction electron sites can have variable coordination z . This situation is relevant both to recently discovered magnetic quasicrystals and also to magnetism in doped heavy fermion systems. Our key results are the presence of antiferromagnetic order at weak interorbital hybridization Vf d, and a delay in singlet formation to larger values of Vf d on sites with larger z . The staggered magnetization tends to be larger on sites with higher z , providing insight into the behavior to be expected in crown, dice, and CaVO lattices.

  4. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-15

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  5. Qualitative breakdown of the noncrossing approximation for the symmetric one-channel Anderson impurity model at all temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sposetti, C. N.; Manuel, L. O.; Roura-Bas, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Anderson impurity model is studied by means of the self-consistent hybridization expansions in its noncrossing (NCA) and one-crossing (OCA) approximations. We have found that for the one-channel spin-1 /2 particle-hole symmetric Anderson model, the NCA results are qualitatively wrong for any temperature, even when the approximation gives the exact threshold exponents of the ionic states. Actually, the NCA solution describes an overscreened Kondo effect, because it is the same as for the two-channel infinite-U single-level Anderson model. We explicitly show that the NCA is unable to distinguish between these two very different physical systems, independently of temperature. Using the impurity entropy as an example, we show that the low-temperature values of the NCA entropy for the symmetric case yield the limit Simp(T =0 ) →ln√{2 }, which corresponds to the zero temperature entropy of the overscreened Kondo model. Similar pathologies are predicted for any other thermodynamic property. On the other hand, we have found that the OCA approach lifts the artificial mapping between the models and restores correct properties of the ground state, for instance, a vanishing entropy at low enough temperatures Simp(T =0 ) →0 . Our results indicate that the very well known NCA should be used with caution close to the symmetric point of the Anderson model.

  6. Oblique Axis Body Fracture: An Unstable Subtype of Anderson Type III Odontoid Fractures-Apropos of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hirokazu; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen; Helwig, Peter; Knöller, Stefan; Südkamp, Norbert; Hauschild, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as "oblique type axis body fracture." Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic "oblique type" fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1-C3/4 posterior fusion and the course was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion for this injury and suggest early operative stabilization. PMID:27042372

  7. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS § 8.2... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor...

  8. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS § 8.2... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor...

  9. 10 CFR 8.2 - Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretation of Price-Anderson Act, section 170 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. 8.2 Section 8.2 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION INTERPRETATIONS § 8.2... in Nuclear Energy 75 (1959). In the testimony before the Joint Committee last year, Professor...

  10. Identification and Analysis of Learning Preferences of Mentally Ill Adults in Rehabilitative Psychosocial Therapy at the Anderson Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Michael K.

    A study identified and analyzed the learning preferences of 17 seriously and chronically mentally ill adults participating in the rehabilitative psychosocial therapy program at the Toxaway Church Site of the Anderson Mental Health Center. Staff perceived as boring and unfocused the traditional treatment approach that relied mainly upon…

  11. Oblique Axis Body Fracture: An Unstable Subtype of Anderson Type III Odontoid Fractures—Apropos of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen; Helwig, Peter; Knöller, Stefan; Südkamp, Norbert; Hauschild, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as “oblique type axis body fracture.” Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic “oblique type” fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1–C3/4 posterior fusion and the course was uneventful. Conclusions. Oblique type axis body fractures resemble a highly unstable subtype of Anderson type III fractures with the potential of severe secondary deformity following conservative treatment, irrespective of initial grade of displacement. The authors therefore warrant a high index of suspicion for this injury and suggest early operative stabilization. PMID:27042372

  12. Asymptotic wave propagation in excitable media.

    PubMed

    Bernus, Olivier; Vigmond, Edward

    2015-07-01

    Wave shape and velocity are important issues in reaction-diffusion systems, and are often the result of competition in media with heterogeneous conduction properties. Asymptotic wave front propagation at maximal conduction velocity has been previously reported in the context of anisotropic cardiac tissue, but it is unknown whether this is a universal property of excitable tissues where conduction velocity can be locally modulated by mechanisms other than anisotropy. Here, we investigate the impact of conduction heterogeneities and boundary effects on wave propagation in excitable media. Following a theoretical analysis, we find that wave-front cusps occur where local velocity is reduced and that asymptotic wave fronts propagate at the maximal translational conduction velocity. Simulations performed in different reaction-diffusion systems, including cardiac tissue, confirm our theoretical findings. We conclude that this property can be found in a wide range of reaction-diffusion systems with excitable dynamics and that asymptotic wave-front shapes can be predicted.

  13. Transport across an Anderson quantum dot in the intermediate coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Johannes; Grifoni, Milena

    2013-09-01

    We describe linear and nonlinear transport across a strongly interacting single impurity Anderson model quantum dot with intermediate coupling to the leads, i.e. with tunnel coupling Γ of the order of the thermal energy k B T. The coupling is large enough that sequential tunneling processes (second order in the tunneling Hamiltonian) alone do not suffice to properly describe the transport characteristics. Upon applying a density matrix approach, the current is expressed in terms of rates obtained by considering a very small class of diagrams which dress the sequential tunneling processes by charge fluctuations. We call this the "dressed second order" (DSO) approximation. One advantage of the DSO is that, still in the Coulomb blockade regime, it can describe the crossover from thermally broadened to tunneling broadened conductance peaks. When the temperature is decreased even further ( k B T < Γ), the DSO captures Kondesque behaviours of the Anderson quantum dot qualitatively: we find a zero bias anomaly of the differential conductance versus applied bias, an enhancement of the conductance with decreasing temperature as well as universality of the shape of the conductance as function of the temperature. We can without complications address the case of a spin degenerate level split energetically by a magnetic field. In case spin dependent chemical potentials are assumed and only one of the four chemical potentials is varied, the DSO yields in principle only one resonance. This seems to be in agreement with experiments with pseudo spin [U. Wilhelm, J. Schmid, J. Weis, K.V. Klitzing, Physica E 14, 385 (2002)]. Furthermore, we get qualitative agreement with experimental data showing a cross-over from the Kondo to the empty orbital regime.

  14. Volcanic ash dispersed in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Triplehorn, D.M.; Stanton, R.W.; Ruppert, L.F.; Crowley, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Minerals derived from air-fall volcanic ash were found in two zones in the upper Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal bed of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, and are the first reported evidence of such volcanic material in this thick (> 20 m) coal bed. The volcanic minerals occur in zones that are not visually obvious because they contain little or no clay. These zones were located by geophysical logs of the boreholes and X-ray radiography of the cores. The zones correspond to two of a series of incremental core samples of the coal bed that have anomalous concentrations of Zr, Ba, Nb, Sr, and P2O5. Two suites of minerals were found in both of the high-density zones. A primary suite (not authigenic) consists of silt-sized quartz grains, biotite, and minor zircon. A minor suite consists of authigenic minerals, including calcite, pyrite, kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and an alumino-phosphate (crandallite?). The original volcanic ash is inferred to have consisted of silica glass containing phenocrysts of quartz, biotite, zircon, and possibly, associated feldspars, pyroxenes, and amphiboles. The glass, as well as the less stable minerals, probably dissolved relatively quickly and contributed to the minor authigenic mineral suite or was removed from the peat as a result of the prevailing hydrologic conditions present in a raised peat formation. This type of volcanic ash suggests that suggests that volcanic material could have rained on the peat; this fallout may have also had a fertilizing effect on the peat by providing nutrients essential for plant growth thus contributing to the thick accumulations of the Wyodak-Anderson bed. Notwithstanding, the presence of these minerals provides evidence for the contribution by volcanic sources to the mineral content of coal, but not as tonsteins. ?? 1991.

  15. Quantum transport through disordered 1D wires: Conductance via localized and delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gopar, Víctor A.

    2014-01-14

    Coherent electronic transport through disordered systems, like quantum wires, is a topic of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, the exponential localization of electron wave functions-Anderson localization-due to the presence of disorder has been widely studied. In fact, Anderson localization, is not an phenomenon exclusive to electrons but it has been observed in microwave and acoustic experiments, photonic materials, cold atoms, etc. Nowadays, many properties of electronic transport of quantum wires have been successfully described within a scaling approach to Anderson localization. On the other hand, anomalous localization or delocalization is, in relation to the Anderson problem, a less studied phenomenon. Although one can find signatures of anomalous localization in very different systems in nature. In the problem of electronic transport, a source of delocalization may come from symmetries present in the system and particular disorder configurations, like the so-called Lévy-type disorder. We have developed a theoretical model to describe the statistical properties of transport when electron wave functions are delocalized. In particular, we show that only two physical parameters determine the complete conductance distribution.

  16. Supersolitons: Solitonic Excitations in Atomic Soliton Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, David; Michinel, Humberto; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.

    2008-10-03

    We show that, by tuning interactions in nonintegrable vector nonlinear Schroedinger equations modeling Bose-Einstein condensates and other relevant physical systems, it is possible to achieve a regime of elastic particlelike collisions between solitons. This would allow one to construct a Newton's cradle with solitons and supersolitons: localized collective excitations in solitary-wave chains.

  17. Optical Excitation and Probing of Bottle Microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, G. Senthil; Wilkinson, J. S.; Zervas, M. N.

    2010-11-01

    Fiber bottle microresonators supporting helical whispering gallery modes and exhibiting field maxima symmetrically located on either side of the neck of the bottle have been demonstrated. Channel dropping characteristics have been studied experimentally for the first time in this type of microresonator, using tapered excitation and probe fibers symmetrically placed on both sides of the bottle microresonator. Selective excitation on one side of the bottle microresonator leads to symmetrically located turning points and power localization on both sides of the bottle, leading to the potential to construct add-drop filters.

  18. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  19. Vacuum excitation by sudden appearance and disappearance of a Dirichlet wall in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tomohiro; Kinoshita, Shunichiro; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum excitation by time-varying boundary conditions is not only of fundamental importance but also has recently been confirmed in a laboratory experiment. In this paper, we study the vacuum excitation of a scalar field by the instantaneous appearance and disappearance of a two-sided Dirichlet wall in the middle of a one-dimensional cavity, as toy models of bifurcating and merging spacetimes, respectively. It is shown that the energy flux emitted positively diverges on the null lines emanating from the appearance and disappearance events, which is analogous to the result of Anderson and DeWitt. This result suggests that the semiclassical effect prevents the spacetime both from bifurcating and merging. In addition, we argue that the diverging flux in the disappearance case plays an interesting role to compensate for the low ambient energy density after the disappearance, which is lower than the zero-point level.

  20. Decoherence at constant excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. M.; Sadurní, E.; Seligman, T. H.

    2012-02-01

    We present a simple exactly solvable extension of the Jaynes-Cummings model by adding dissipation. This is done such that the total number of excitations is conserved. The Liouville operator in the resulting master equation can be reduced to blocks of 4×4 matrices.

  1. Excited states in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsky, S.

    1987-01-01

    In this brief review we first summarize some pertinent features of the photophysical properties of excited states of hydrocarbons and the mechanisms by which they transfer energy to solutes and then review their yields and their behavior under fast-electron irradiation conditions. 33 refs.

  2. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  3. Identification of Mott insulators and Anderson insulators in self-assembled gold nanoparticles thin films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Wei; Ni, I-Chih; Tzeng, Shien-Der; Wu, Cen-Shawn; Kuo, Watson

    2014-06-01

    How the interparticle tunnelling affects the charge conduction of self-assembled gold nanoparticles is studied by three means: tuning the tunnel barrier width by different molecule modification and by substrate bending, and tuning the barrier height by high-dose electron beam exposure. All approaches indicate that the metal-Mott insulator transition is governed predominantly by the interparticle coupling strength, which can be quantified by the room temperature sheet resistance. The Hubbard gap, following the prediction of quantum fluctuation theory, reduces to zero rapidly as the sheet resistance decreases to the quantum resistance. At very low temperature, the fate of devices near the Mott transition depends on the strength of disorder. The charge conduction is from nearest-neighbour hopping to co-tunnelling between nanoparticles in Mott insulators whereas it is from variable-range hopping through charge puddles in Anderson insulators. When the two-dimensional nanoparticle network is under a unidirectional strain, the interparticle coupling becomes anisotropic so the average sheet resistance is required to describe the charge conduction.

  4. Nonequilibrium transport in the Anderson-Holstein model with interfacial screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, Enrico; Stefanucci, Gianluca

    Image charge effects in nanoscale junctions with strong electron-phonon coupling open the way to unexplored physical scenarios. Here we present a comprehensive study of the transport properties of the Anderson-Holstein model in the presence of dot-lead repulsion. We propose an accurate many-body approach to deal with the simultaneous occurrence of the Franck-Condon blockade and the screening-induced enhancement of the polaron mobility. Remarkably, we find that a novel mechanism of negative differential conductance origins from the competition between the charge blocking due to the electron-phonon interaction and the charge deblocking due to the image charges. An experimental setup to observe this phenomenon is discussed. References [1]E. Perfetto, G. Stefanucci and M. Cini, Phys. Rev. B 85, 165437 (2012). [2] E. Perfetto and G. Stefanucci, Phys. Rev. B 88, 245437 (2013). [3] E. Perfetto and G. Stefanucci, Journal of Computational Electronics 14, 352 (2015). E.P. and G.S. acknowledge funding by MIUR FIRB Grant No. RBFR12SW0J.

  5. On one-step replica symmetry breaking in the Edwards–Anderson spin glass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ferraro, Gino; Wang, Chuang; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Aurell, Erik

    2016-07-01

    We consider a one-step replica symmetry breaking description of the Edwards–Anderson spin glass model in 2D. The ingredients of this description are a Kikuchi approximation to the free energy and a second-level statistical model built on the extremal points of the Kikuchi approximation, which are also fixed points of a generalized belief propagation (GBP) scheme. We show that a generalized free energy can be constructed where these extremal points are exponentially weighted by their Kikuchi free energy and a Parisi parameter y, and that the Kikuchi approximation of this generalized free energy leads to second-level, one-step replica symmetry breaking (1RSB), GBP equations. We then proceed analogously to the Bethe approximation case for tree-like graphs, where it has been shown that 1RSB belief propagation equations admit a survey propagation solution. We discuss when and how the one-step-replica symmetry breaking GBP equations that we obtain also allow a simpler class of solutions which can be interpreted as a class of generalized survey propagation equations for the single instance graph case.

  6. An inventory of wetlands in the East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    An inventory of wetlands within the floodplain of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee was conducted during October, 1991 through May, 1992 for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District. About 15 miles of EFPC channel and 500 acres of its floodplain are contaminated with mercury and other contaminants released from the Y-12 Plant on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. The wetland inventory will serve as baseline information for DOE`s remedial action planning and National Environmental Policy Act compliance efforts related to the contamination. In order to provide broad wetland determinations beyond which future wetland definitions are unlikely to expand, the 1989 Federal Manual for Identifying And Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands was utilized. Using the manual`s methodology in a contaminated system under the approved health and safety plan presented some unique problems, resulting in intrusive sampling for field indicators of hydric soils being accomplished separately from observation of other criteria. Beginning with wetland areas identified on National Wetland Inventory Maps, the entire floodplain was examined for presence of wetland criteria, and 17 wetlands were identified ranging from 0.01 to 2.81 acres in size. The majority of wetlands identified were sized under 1 acre. Some of the wetlands identified were not delineated on the National Wetland Inventory Maps, and much of the wetland area delineated on the maps did not meet the criteria under the 1989 manual.

  7. Quantum-Mechanical Variant of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer Equation for Error-Correcting Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, J.; Saika, Y.; Okada, M.

    Statistical mechanics of information has been applied to problems in various research topics of information science and technology [1],[2]. Among those research topics, error-correcting code is one of the most developed subjects. In the research field of error-correcting codes, Nicolas Sourlas showed that the so-called convolutional codes can be constructed by spin glass with infinite range p-body interactions and the decoded message should be corresponded to the ground state of the Hamiltonian [3]. Ruján pointed out that the bit error can be suppressed if one uses finite temperature equilibrium states as the decoding result, instead of the ground state [4], and the so-called Bayes-optimal decoding at some specific condition was proved by Nishimori [5] and Nishimori and Wong [6]. Kabashima and Saad succeeded in constructing more practical codes, namely low-density parity check (LDPC) codes by using the infinite range spin glass model with finite connectivities [7]. They used the so-called TAP (Thouless-Anderson-Palmer) equations to decode the original message for a given parity check.

  8. Initiating tumor banking for translational research: MD Anderson and Liverpool experience.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A; Pandey, A; Shaw, R

    2007-01-01

    The ultimate progress in the cancer diagnosis and therapy has only been possible with the ongoing translational research that is likely to play a very important role in future as well. Hence the importance of such translation from bedside to bench and vis versa cannot be over-emphasized. Accordingly it has become more important to collect tumor samples along with the clinical information in a systematic manner to perform a good basic science research in future. With a population of over a billion and a heavy burden of cancer, India has the 'biggest' potential to establish the 'largest' tumor bank across the globe. Establishing a tumor bank involves money and manpower that may not be feasible across most of the centers in India. Taking into the considering the model of tumor banking of the two leading institutions of the world (MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA and University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool UK), this article presents the salient tips for a center in India to get started with tumor banking with minimal investment. Furthermore a simplified form of ethical consent is presented for the centers to adapt unanimously. PMID:17401220

  9. Phase diagram and reentrance for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, V.; Saravia, G.; Vogel, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Data compressor techniques are used to study the phase diagram of the generalized Edwards-Anderson model in three dimensions covering the full range of mixture between ferromagnetic (concentration 1-x) and antiferromagnetic interactions (concentration x). The recently proposed data compressor wlzip is used to recognize criticality by the maximum information content in the files storing the simulation processes. The method allows not only the characterization of the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic (FP) transition (x<0.22, or x>0.78) but also it equally well yields the spin-glass to paramagnetic (SP) transition (0.22

  10. Basic Properties of Conductivity and Normal Hall Effect in the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-04-01

    Exact formulas of diagonal conductivity σxx and Hall conductivity σxy are derived from the Kubo formula in hybridized two-orbital systems with arbitrary band dispersions. On the basis of the theoretical framework for the Fermi liquid based on these formulas, the ground-state properties of the periodic Anderson model with electron correlation and weak impurity scattering are studied on the square lattice. It is shown that imbalance of the mass-renormalization factors causes remarkable increase in σxx and σxy in the valence-fluctuation regime as the f level increases while the cancellation of the renormalization factors causes slight increase in σxx and σxy in the Kondo regime. The Hall coefficient RH shows almost constant behavior in both the regimes. Near half filling, RH is expressed by the total hole density as R{H} = 1/(bar{n}{hole}e) while RH approaches zero near quarter filling, which reflects the curvature of the Fermi surface. These results hold as far as the damping rate for f electrons is less than about 10% of the renormalized hybridization gap. From these results we discuss pressure dependence of residual resistivity and normal Hall effect in Ce- and Yb-based heavy electron systems.

  11. Application of the S=1 underscreened Anderson lattice model to Kondo uranium and neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing the coexistence of the Kondo screening effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the Anderson lattice Hamiltonian with a two-fold degenerate f level in each site, corresponding to 5f2 electronic configuration with S=1 spins. A derivation of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation is presented and the resulting Hamiltonian has an effective f-band term, in addition to the regular exchange Kondo interaction between the S=1 f spins and the s=1/2 spins of the conduction electrons. The resulting effective Kondo lattice model can describe both the Kondo regime and a weak delocalization of the 5f electrons. Within this model we compute the Kondo and Curie temperatures as a function of model parameters, namely the Kondo exchange interaction constant JK, the magnetic intersite exchange interaction JH, and the effective f bandwidth. We deduce, therefore, a phase diagram of the model which yields the coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and also accounts for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of uranium compounds such as UTe.

  12. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Raheleh; Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-01

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron-electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current-voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron-electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U2 IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior.

  13. Modified Anderson procedure for correcting abnormal mixed head position in nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Yllanes, M E; Fonte-Vázquez, A; Pérez-Pérez, J F

    2002-01-01

    Background/aim: Treatment of nystagmus is controversial mainly in cases where it is combined with abnormal head position. This study was carried out to demonstrate that patients with abnormal head position in all three axes associated with nystagmus show improvement in the torsional and vertical components if only horizontal factors are addressed by surgical weakening of the horizontal muscles. Methods: 21 patients with horizontal nystagmus and abnormal head position were studied. All had an abnormal head position in all three axes with a predominant head turn. In all cases a modified Anderson procedure was performed—that is, 2 mm retroequatorial recessions of the horizontal yoke rectus muscles responsible for the blockage position, plus corrective surgery for strabismus when needed. Results: The three components of the abnormal head position were improved with surgery of horizontal yoke rectus muscles only (p=0.001). Conclusion: Large recessions of the horizontal yoke rectus muscles in nystagmus with blockage position, when the head turn predominates over the vertical and torsional components, are effective in diminishing the abnormal head position on all three axes. PMID:11864878

  14. Shear layer excitation, experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.; Stahl, B.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustical excitation of shear layers is investigated. Acoustical excitation causes the so-called orderly structures in shear layers and jets. Also, the deviations in the spreading rate between different shear layer experiments are due to the same excitation mechanism. Measurements in the linear interaction region close to the edge from which the shear layer is shed are examined. Two sets of experiments (Houston 1981 and Berlin 1983/84) are discussed. The measurements were carried out with shear layers in air using hot wire anemometers and microphones. The agreement between these measurements and the theory is good. Even details of the fluctuating flow field correspond to theoretical predictions, such as the local occurrence of negative phase speeds.

  15. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  16. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, JiYeon; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Donggyu; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Oh, Youngtek; Ryu, Seunghwa; Kuk, Young; Hwang, Sung Woo; Suh, Hwansoo

    2015-01-01

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realising graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron–phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunnelling. PMID:26109454

  17. Anderson-like alkoxo-polyoxovanadate clusters serving as unprecedented second building units to construct metal-organic polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Teng; Wang, Xin-Long; Li, Shuang-Bao; Gong, Ya-Ru; Song, Bai-Qiao; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-08-11

    Unprecedented Anderson-like alkoxo-polyoxovanadate [V6O6(OCH3)9(μ6-SO4)(COO)3](2-) polyanions can serve as 3-connected second building units (SBUs) that assemble with dicarboxylate or tricarboxylate ligands to form a new family of metal organic tetrahedrons of V4E6 and V4F4 type (V = vertex, E = edge, and F = face). To our knowledge, this alkoxo-polyoxovanadate-based SBU is the first ever reported. PMID:27363544

  18. [Heart involvement in Anderson-Fabry disease: Italian recommendations for diagnostic, follow-up and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    Pieruzzi, Federico; Pieroni, Maurizio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Marziliano, Nicola; Morrone, Amelia; Cecchi, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations of the GLA gene that encodes alpha-galactosidase A. It is characterized by a multisystemic involvement: the renal, neurological, heart, cochleovestibular and cutaneous systems are the most damaged. Morbidity and mortality of Anderson-Fabry disease depend on renal insufficiency, heart failure and nervous system involvement. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most common cardiac manifestation followed by conduction system disease, valve dysfunction, and arrhythmias. Mild to moderate left ventricular hypertrophy may simulate a non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Management of Anderson-Fabry disease starting from the diagnosis of cardiac involvement, the prevention of complications, the therapeutic aspects, up to appropriate clinical follow-up, requires a multidisciplinary approach. According to recent management guidelines, only few evidence-based data are available to guide the clinical and therapeutic approach to this rare disease. An Italian Board, composed by nephrologists, cardiologists, geneticists, pediatricians and neurologists has been established in order to approve by consensus a diagnostic and therapeutic management protocol. The authors report the results of this cardiologic management consensus. PMID:26571477

  19. Petrographic characteristics of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.; Stanton, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Six lithofacies of the thick ( > 30 m) Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal bed of the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming, can be delimited using megascopic and petrographic data. Previous lithofacies analysis of the rock types associated with the Wyodak-Anderson bed suggested that raised peat accumulated in restricted parts of an inland flood plain. The peat bodies were separated by deposits of contemporaneous, possibly anastomosed channels. In this study, megascopic descriptions from four mine highwalls of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed were found to be similar to facies defined by microscopic data from core and highwall samples. The data indicate that the upper and lower parts of the coal bed are rich in preserved wood remains (for instance, humotelinite), whereas the middle part of the bed contains comparatively larger amounts of material that resulted from degradation and comminution of the peat (e.g. eugelinite). The facies are interpreted to be the result of different chemical and biological environments at the time of peat formation. ?? 1988.

  20. Many-body-localization transition: strong multifractality spectrum for matrix elements of local operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    For short-ranged disordered quantum models in one dimension, the many-body-localization is analyzed via the adaptation to the many-body context (Serbyn et al 2015 Phys. Rev. X 5 041047) of the Thouless point of view on the Anderson transition: the question is whether a local interaction between two long chains is able to reshuffle completely the eigenstates (delocalized phase with a volume-law entanglement) or whether the hybridization between tensor states remains limited (many-body-localized phase with an area-law entanglement). The central object is thus the level of hybridization induced by the matrix elements of local operators, as compared with the difference of diagonal energies. The multifractal analysis of these matrix elements of local operators is used to analyze the corresponding statistics of resonances. Our main conclusion is that the critical point is characterized by the strong-multifractality spectrum f(0≤slant α ≤slant 2)=\\fracα{2} , well known in the context of Anderson localization in spaces of effective infinite dimensionality, where the size of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the volume. Finally, the possibility of a delocalized non-ergodic phase near criticality is discussed.

  1. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  2. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  3. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  4. On Planetary Evolution and the Evolution of Planetary Science During the Career of Don Anderson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2003-12-01

    The planets of our solar system have long been viewed by Don Anderson as laboratories for testing general aspects of planetary evolution and as points of comparison to the Earth. I was fortunate to have been a student 39 years ago in a course at Caltech that Don taught with Bob Kovach on the interiors of the Earth and the planets. At that time, Mariner 4 had not yet flown by Mars, the lunar Ranger program was still in progress, and it was permissible to entertain the hypothesis that all of the terrestrial planets were identical in bulk composition. In the last four decades spacecraft have visited every planet from Mercury to Neptune; samples from the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets reside in our laboratories; and more than 100 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars. More importantly, traditionally distinct fields have merged to the point where planetary scientists must be conversant with the findings and modes of thinking from astronomy and biology as well as the geosciences. A few examples illustrate this confluence. Theoretical models for the structure of the atmospheres of gas-giant planets led to the first astronomical detection of an extrasolar planetary atmosphere for the transiting planet HD209458b. Although the atmospheric models were based on those for solar-system gas giants, the 3.5-day orbital period means that this planet is 100 times closer to its star than Jupiter is to the Sun, its effective temperature is 1100 K, and the detected signature of the planetary atmosphere was absorption by neutral sodium. Sodium in Mercury's exosphere, detected astronomically from Earth, figures into the question of how the terrestrial planets came to have distinct bulk compositions. Hypotheses to account for Mercury's high uncompressed density, and by inference its high ratio of metal to silicate, range from chemical gradients in the early solar nebula to preferential removal of silicates from a differentiated protoplanet by nebular heating or giant impact

  5. The pioneer woman's view of migraine: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson's thesis "Sur la migraine".

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, M; Isler, H

    1999-01-01

    This is a presentation of a doctoral thesis of 1870. The author was English but the thesis and the examinations were in French. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, usually referred to as E.G.A., was the first woman in Britain to obtain the title of M.D., but not the first in Europe. Nadeshda Prokofevna Suslova, a Russian, received her M.D. in 1867 in Zurich, the most liberal university at that time, soon to be flooded by female students from Russia. E.G.A. had been applying to the few possible European universities but she settled for Paris after the Empress Eugenie had decided that she should be accepted there. This meant that she could succeed without having to be a Paris resident, just by writing a thesis and passing a series of examinations presided over by Paul Broca. This was important as she was already conducting private and dispensary practice, and could not find a locum (she insisted on a woman). E.G.A. had suffered many setbacks, for being a woman, as such being unacceptable in dissection rooms and operating theatres, and generally in a professional career where women were unheard of. She was finally permitted to receive her medical diploma from the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London. She wrote about her thesis: "I have chosen Headache as its subject. I had to find a subject which could be well studied without post-mortem observations, of which I can have but very few in either private or dispensary practice; and I wished also to take a large subject, one that demanded some insight into the harmony that exists between the main physiological functions." Marcia Wilkinson (M.W.), who worked in the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in London for 35 years, heard there of E.G.A.'s thesis on migraine and sent for it from Paris. In 1966 she translated it into English from the original French, being interested both in the subject and in the person of this resolute and lucid woman. When H. Isler found the French thesis in the British Library he intended to

  6. Organic-inorganic hybrids constructed by Anderson-type polyoxoanions and copper coordination complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Ruige; Liu Shuxia Liu Ying; Tang Qun; Wang Liang; Xie Linhua; Su Zhongmin

    2009-01-15

    Four organic-inorganic hybrid compounds based on Anderson-type polyoxoanions, namely, {l_brace}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub 2}[Cr(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]{r_brace}{l_brace}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O)Cl][Cu(2,2'-bpy) (H{sub 2}O)(NO{sub 3})][Cr(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]{r_brace}.18H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}Cl]{l_brace}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Cr(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]{r_brace}.4H{sub 2}O (2), (H{sub 3}O){l_brace}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{r_brace}[Cr(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]{sub 3}.36H{sub 2}O (3), and (H{sub 3}O){l_brace}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(2,2'-bpy)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{r_brace}[Al(OH){sub 6}Mo{sub 6}O{sub 18}]{sub 3}.33H{sub 2}O (4), were isolated by conventional solution method, and crystal structures have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Among them, compound 1 displays a discrete supramolecular structure, compound 2 shows a chainlike structure with chloro-copper complexes as counteranions, and compounds 3 and 4 are isomorphic and exhibit unique 3D open frameworks with lattice water molecules residing in the channels. The compounds 3 and 4 represent the first example of 3D organic-inorganic hybrid compounds in the TMs/2,2'-bpy/POMs system. Investigation of the reaction conditions reveals that the geometry and size of the anions together with its coordinating abilities to the metal centers have a decisive influence on both the composition and the dimensionality of the final compounds. - Graphical Abstract: Four organic-inorganic hybrids based on Anderson-type polyoxoanions have been synthesized. Compound 1 displays a discrete structure, 2 shows a chainlike structure, 3 and 4 are isomorphic and exhibit unique 3D open frameworks with lattice waters residing in the channels. The different structures suggest that the overall structures of the compounds are influenced by the nature of the acidic anions.

  7. Gutzwiller wave-function solution for Anderson lattice model: Emerging universal regimes of heavy quasiparticle states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokiński, Marcin M.; Kaczmarczyk, Jan; Spałek, Jozef

    2015-09-01

    The recently proposed diagrammatic expansion (DE) technique for the full Gutzwiller wave function (GWF) is applied to the Anderson lattice model. This approach allows for a systematic evaluation of the expectation values with full Gutzwiller wave function in finite-dimensional systems. It introduces results extending in an essential manner those obtained by means of the standard Gutzwiller approximation (GA), which is variationally exact only in infinite dimensions. Within the DE-GWF approach we discuss the principal paramagnetic properties and their relevance to heavy-fermion systems. We demonstrate the formation of an effective, narrow f band originating from atomic f -electron states and subsequently interpret this behavior as a direct itineracy of f electrons; it represents a combined effect of both the hybridization and the correlations induced by the Coulomb repulsive interaction. Such a feature is absent on the level of GA, which is equivalent to the zeroth order of our expansion. Formation of the hybridization- and electron-concentration-dependent narrow f band rationalizes the common assumption of such dispersion of f levels in the phenomenological modeling of the band structure of CeCoIn5. Moreover, it is shown that the emerging f -electron direct itineracy leads in a natural manner to three physically distinct regimes within a single model that are frequently discussed for 4 f - or 5 f -electron compounds as separate model situations. We identify these regimes as (i) the mixed-valence regime, (ii) Kondo/almost-Kondo insulating regime, and (iii) the Kondo-lattice limit when the f -electron occupancy is very close to the f -state half filling, →1 . The nonstandard features of the emerging correlated quantum liquid state are stressed.

  8. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; Cox, James; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John

    2003-08-26

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  9. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alfred; Newhauser, Wayne; Latinkic, Mitchell; Hay, Amy; McMaken, Bruce; Styles, John; Cox, James

    2003-08-01

    The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in partnership with Sanders Morris Harris Inc., a Texas-based investment banking firm, and The Styles Company, a developer and manager of hospitals and healthcare facilities, is building a proton therapy facility near the MDACC main complex at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas USA. The MDACC Proton Therapy Center will be a freestanding, investor-owned radiation oncology center offering state-of-the-art proton beam therapy. The facility will have four treatment rooms: three rooms will have rotating, isocentric gantries and the fourth treatment room will have capabilities for both large and small field (e.g. ocular melanoma) treatments using horizontal beam lines. There will be an additional horizontal beam room dedicated to physics research and development, radiation biology research, and outside users who wish to conduct experiments using proton beams. The first two gantries will each be initially equipped with a passive scattering nozzle while the third gantry will have a magnetically swept pencil beam scanning nozzle. The latter will include enhancements to the treatment control system that will allow for the delivery of proton intensity modulation treatments. The proton accelerator will be a 250 MeV zero-gradient synchrotron with a slow extraction system. The facility is expected to open for patient treatments in the autumn of 2005. It is anticipated that 675 patients will be treated during the first full year of operation, while full capacity, reached in the fifth year of operation, will be approximately 3,400 patients per year. Treatments will be given up to 2-shifts per day and 6 days per week.

  10. Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Shamim; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, Rena; Busaidy, Naifa L.; Hu, Mimi I.; Waguespack, Steven G.; Jimenez, Camilo; Ying, Anita K.; Cabanillas, Maria; Abbara, Maher; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2011-01-01

    Background Cushing's syndrome (CS) secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS) has been described in association with a variety of tumors. The current experience with this syndrome is based on a few case series and individual case reports. Limited data are available about the tumors associated with CS-EAS in cancer center setting. This report describes CS-EAS at MD Anderson Cancer Center to further enhance our understanding and management of this syndrome. Methods This is a retrospective review for 43 patients with CS-EAS who were diagnosed between 1979 and 2009 at our institution. Results Different neuroendocrine tumors were associated with CS-EAS. Twenty one patients (48.9%) had tumors located in the chest cavity with bronchial carcinoid and small cell lung cancer representing the two most common causes. The ACTH source remained occult in 4 patients (9.3 %) despite extensive work-up. Clinical presentation was variable and the classical features of CS were not evident in some patients. Death occurred in 27 patients (62.8%) and the median overall survival was 32.2 months. Major morbidities included new onset or worsening hyperglycemia (77%), symptomatic venous thromboembolism (14%) and infections (23%). Conclusions In CS-EAS cases seen at a comprehensive cancer center, tumors originating in the chest cavity were the leading tumors associated with this syndrome. We suspect that CS-EAS is underreported because of the atypical presentation in some cases. Thus, we suggest careful evaluation of patients with neuroendocrine tumors to avoid missing co-existing CS-EAS. PMID:21412758

  11. Localization on the landscape and eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Perry, Malcolm J.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the validity of the assertion that eternal inflation populates the landscape of string theory. We verify that bubble solutions do not satisfy the Klein-Gordon equation for the landscape potential. Solutions to the landscape potential within the formalism of quantum cosmology are Anderson localized wavefunctions. These are inconsistent with inflating bubble solutions. The physical reasons behind the failure of a relation between eternal inflation and the landscape are rooted in quantum phenomena such as interference between wavefunction concentrated around the various vacua in the landscape.

  12. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theophilou, Iris; Tassi, M.; Thanos, S.

    2014-04-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  13. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Theophilou, Iris; Tassi, M.; Thanos, S.

    2014-04-28

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  14. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  15. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  16. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  17. Broadband near-field enhancement in the macro-periodic and micro-random structure with a hybridized excitation of propagating Bloch-plasmonic and localized surface-plasmonic modes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haifei; Ren, Xingang; Sha, Wei E I; Ho, Ho-Pui; Choy, Wallace C H

    2015-10-28

    We demonstrate that the silver nanoplate-based macroscopically periodic (macro-periodic) and microscopically random (micro-random) structure has a broadband near-field enhancement as compared to conventional silver gratings. The specific field enhancement in a wide spectral range (from UV to near-infrared) originates from the abundance of localized surface-plasmonic (LSP) modes in the microscopically random distributed silver nanoplates and propagating Bloch-plasmonic (PBP) modes from the macroscopically periodic pattern. The characterization of polarization dependent spectral absorption, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), as well as theoretical simulation was conducted to comprehensively understand the features of the broadband spectrum and highly concentrated near-field. The reported macro-periodic and micro-random structure may offer a new route for the design of plasmonic systems for photonic and optoelectronic applications.

  18. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  19. Instability of insulating states in optical lattices due to collective phonon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Ziegler, K.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of collective phonon excitations on the properties of cold atoms in optical lattices is investigated. These phonon excitations are collective excitations, whose appearance is caused by intersite atomic interactions correlating the atoms, and they do not arise without such interactions. These collective excitations should not be confused with lattice vibrations produced by an external force. No such force is assumed. But the considered phonons are purely self-organized collective excitations, characterizing atomic oscillations around lattice sites, due to intersite atomic interactions. It is shown that these excitations can essentially influence the possibility of atoms' being localized. The states that would be insulating in the absence of phonon excitations can become delocalized when these excitations are taken into account. This concerns long-range as well as local atomic interactions. To characterize the region of stability, the Lindemann criterion is used.

  20. Non-equilibrium STLS approach to transport properties of single impurity Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, Raheleh Ebrahimi, Farshad

    2014-04-15

    In this work, using the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we study the effects of the electron–electron interaction and the electron-spin correlation on the non-equilibrium Kondo effect and the transport properties of the symmetric single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) at zero temperature by generalizing the self-consistent method of Singwi, Tosi, Land, and Sjolander (STLS) for a single-band tight-binding model with Hubbard type interaction to out of equilibrium steady-states. We at first determine in a self-consistent manner the non-equilibrium spin correlation function, the effective Hubbard interaction, and the double-occupancy at the impurity site. Then, using the non-equilibrium STLS spin polarization function in the non-equilibrium formalism of the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) of Yosida and Yamada, and Horvatic and Zlatic, we compute the spectral density, the current–voltage characteristics and the differential conductance as functions of the applied bias and the strength of on-site Hubbard interaction. We compare our spectral densities at zero bias with the results of numerical renormalization group (NRG) and depict the effects of the electron–electron interaction and electron-spin correlation at the impurity site on the aforementioned properties by comparing our numerical result with the order U{sup 2} IPT. Finally, we show that the obtained numerical results on the differential conductance have a quadratic universal scaling behavior and the resulting Kondo temperature shows an exponential behavior. -- Highlights: •We introduce for the first time the non-equilibrium method of STLS for Hubbard type models. •We determine the transport properties of SIAM using the non-equilibrium STLS method. •We compare our results with order-U2 IPT and NRG. •We show that non-equilibrium STLS, contrary to the GW and self-consistent RPA, produces the two Hubbard peaks in DOS. •We show that the method keeps the universal scaling behavior and correct

  1. Estimate of the Critical Exponent of the Anderson Transition in the Three and Four-Dimensional Unitary Universality Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slevin, Keith; Ohtsuki, Tomi

    2016-10-01

    Disordered non-interacting systems are classified into ten symmetry classes, with the unitary class being the most fundamental. The three and four-dimensional unitary universality classes are attracting renewed interest because of their relation to three-dimensional Weyl semi-metals and four-dimensional topological insulators. Determining the critical exponent of the correlation/localisation length for the Anderson transition in these classes is important both theoretically and experimentally. Using the transfer matrix technique, we report numerical estimations of the critical exponent in a U(1) model in three and four dimensions.

  2. Joint min-max distribution and Edwards-Anderson's order parameter of the circular 1/f-noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiangyu; Le Doussal, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the joint min-max distribution and the Edwards-Anderson's order parameter for the circular model of 1/f-noise. Both quantities, as well as generalisations, are obtained exactly by combining the freezing-duality conjecture and Jack-polynomial techniques. Numerical checks come with significantly improved control of finite-size effects in the glassy phase, and the results convincingly validate the freezing-duality conjecture. Application to diffusive dynamics is discussed. We also provide a formula for the pre-factor ratio of the joint/marginal Carpentier-Le Doussal tail for minimum/maximum which applies to any logarithmic random energy model.

  3. Bi-stability in single impurity Anderson model with strong electron-phonon interaction(polaron regime)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari-asl, Amir

    2016-09-01

    We consider a single impurity Anderson model (SIAM) in which the quantum dot(QD) is strongly coupled to a phonon bath in polaron regime. This coupling results in an effective e-e attraction. By computing the self energies using a current conserving approximation which is up to second order in this effective attraction, we show that if the interaction is strong enough, in non particle-hole (PH) symmetric case, the system would be bi-stable and we have hysteresis loop in the I-V characteristic. Moreover, the system shows negative differential conductance in some bias voltage intervals.

  4. Ferromagnetic ordering in Mn-doped quantum wells GaAs-AlGaAs resulting from the virtual Anderson transition

    SciTech Connect

    Agrinskaya, N. V.; Berezovets, V. A.; Bouravlev, A.; Kozub, V. I.

    2014-08-20

    We present our results obtained for Mn-doped GaAs quantum wells where the evidences of the ferromagnetic transition at relatively high temperatures were found at unusually small Mn concentrations. The observed values of hopping resistance at small temperatures evidenced that the samples are deep in the insulating regime. Thus the corresponding estimates of the overlapping integrals can hardly explain the large values of Curie temperatures T{sub c} ≃ 100 K. We develop a theoretical model qualitatively explaining the experimental results basing on the concept of virtual Anderson transition.

  5. Dynamics of nonlinear excitations of helically confined charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetaki, A. V.; Stockhofe, J.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-10-01

    We explore the long-time dynamics of a system of identical charged particles trapped on a closed helix. This system has recently been found to exhibit an unconventional deformation of the linear spectrum when tuning the helix radius. Here we show that the same geometrical parameter can affect significantly also the dynamical behavior of an initially broad excitation for long times. In particular, for small values of the radius, the excitation disperses into the whole crystal whereas within a specific narrow regime of larger radii the excitation self-focuses, assuming finally a localized form. Beyond this regime, the excitation defocuses and the dispersion gradually increases again. We analyze this geometrically controlled nonlinear behavior using an effective discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model, which allows us among others to identify a number of breatherlike excitations.

  6. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V. A.; Savinov, V.; Raybould, T. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  7. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    PubMed

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  8. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    PubMed

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information. PMID:26906961

  9. Elementary excitation and energy landscape in simple liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, T.

    2014-06-01

    The nature of excitations in liquids has been a subject of debate for a long time. In liquids, phonons are extremely short-lived and marginalized. Instead, recent research results indicate that local topological or configurational excitations (anankeons) are the elementary excitations in high temperature metallic liquids. Local topological excitations are those which locally alter the atomic connectivity network by cutting or forming atomic bonds, and are directly tied to the atomistic origin of viscosity in the liquid. The local potential energy landscape (PEL) of anankeons represents the probability weighted projection of the global PEL to a single atom. The original PEL is an insightful concept, but is highly multi-dimensional and difficult to characterize or even to visualize. A description in terms of the local PEL for anankeons appears to offer a simpler and more effective approach toward this complex problem. At the base of these advances, is the recognition that atomic discreteness and the topology of atomic connectivity are the most crucial features of the structure in liquids, which current nonlinear continuum theories cannot fully capture. These discoveries could open the way to the explanation of various complex phenomena in liquids, such as atomic transport, fragility, and the glass transition, in terms of these excitations.

  10. Disorder in Quantum Vacuum: Casimir-Induced Localization of Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G. A.; Messina, R.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.; Maia Neto, P. A.

    2010-11-19

    Disordered geometrical boundaries such as rough surfaces induce important modifications to the mode spectrum of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. In analogy to Anderson localization of waves induced by a random potential, here we show that the Casimir-Polder interaction between a cold atomic sample and a rough surface also produces localization phenomena. These effects, that represent a macroscopic manifestation of disorder in quantum vacuum, should be observable with Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in proximity of rough surfaces.

  11. Disorder in quantum vacuum: Casimir-induced localization of matter waves.

    PubMed

    Moreno, G A; Messina, R; Dalvit, D A R; Lambrecht, A; Maia Neto, P A; Reynaud, S

    2010-11-19

    Disordered geometrical boundaries such as rough surfaces induce important modifications to the mode spectrum of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. In analogy to Anderson localization of waves induced by a random potential, here we show that the Casimir-Polder interaction between a cold atomic sample and a rough surface also produces localization phenomena. These effects, that represent a macroscopic manifestation of disorder in quantum vacuum, should be observable with Bose-Einstein condensates expanding in proximity of rough surfaces.

  12. Fragment-based configuration interaction wave function to calculate environmental effect on excited states in proteins and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Jun-ya

    2013-05-01

    Solvatochromic effect in proteins and solutions was described by a configuration interaction singles (CIS) wave function with fragment-localized molecular orbitals. Coarse-grained analysis indicated that the CI wave function can be described by local excitations and charge-transfer (CT) excitations between the chromophore and the environment. We developed an atomic-orbital direct runcated CIS code and applied the excited states of retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin and MeOH environments, and those of s-trans-acrolein in water. Number of excitation operators was significantly reduced by eliminating the CT excitations between the environmental fragments. The truncated CIS wave functions reproduced the original excitation energies very well.

  13. Excitation of Resonant Helioseimic Modes by Solar Flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibacher, John W.; Baudin, Frédéric; Rabello Soares,, Maria Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Flares are known to excite propagating sound waves in the solar atmosphere, and Maurya et al. (2009), using a local analysis (ring diagrams) of the 2003 Halloween flare, showed that they excite resonant p-modes as well. We confirm and extend here these results by:-applying the same analysis to other locations on the Sun at the time of the Halloween flare-analyzing other events also showing a signature of p-mode excitation-looking in detail at the results of the ring diagrams analysis in terms of noise fitting and the center-to-limb variation of ring-diagram power.

  14. Excitation of Resonant Helioseimic Modes by Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibacher, John William; Baudin, Frédéric; Rabello Soares, Maria Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Flares are known to excite propagating sound waves in the solar atmosphere, and Maurya et al. (2009), using a local analysis (ring diagrams) of the 2003 Halloween flare, showed that they excite resonant p-modes as well. We confirm and extend here these results by: applying the same analysis to other locations on the Sun at the time of the Halloween flare, analyzing other events also showing a signature of p-mode excitation, looking in detail at the results of the ring diagrams analysis in terms of noise fitting and the center-to-limb variation of ring-diagram power.

  15. Can 3D light localization be reached in ‘white paint’?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, T.; Schertel, L.; Ackermann, M.; Aubry, G. J.; Aegerter, C. M.; Maret, G.

    2016-01-01

    When waves scatter multiple times in 3D random media, a disorder driven phase transition from diffusion to localization may occur (Anderson 1958 Phys. Rev. 109 1492-505 Abrahams et al 1979 Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 673-6). In ‘The question of classical localization: a theory of white paint?’ Anderson suggested the possibility to observe light localization in TiO2 samples (Anderson 1985 Phil. Mag. B 52 505-9). We recently claimed the observation of localization effects measuring photon time of flight (ToF) distributions (Störzer et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 063904) and evaluating transmission profiles (TPs) (Sperling et al 2013 Nat. Photonics 7 48-52) in such TiO2 samples. Here we present a careful study of the long time tail of ToF distributions and the long time behavior of the TP width for very thin samples and different turbidities that questions the localization interpretation. We further show new data that allow an alternative consistent explanation of these previous data by a fluorescence process. An adapted diffusion model including an appropriate exponential fluorescence decay accounts for the shape of the ToF distributions and the TP width. These observations question whether the strong localization regime can be reached with visible light scattering in polydisperse TiO2 samples, since the disorder parameter can hardly be increased any further in such a ‘white paint’ material.

  16. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  17. Neural Excitability and Singular Bifurcations.

    PubMed

    De Maesschalck, Peter; Wechselberger, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the notion of excitability in 2D slow/fast neural models from a geometric singular perturbation theory point of view. We focus on the inherent singular nature of slow/fast neural models and define excitability via singular bifurcations. In particular, we show that type I excitability is associated with a novel singular Bogdanov-Takens/SNIC bifurcation while type II excitability is associated with a singular Andronov-Hopf bifurcation. In both cases, canards play an important role in the understanding of the unfolding of these singular bifurcation structures. We also explain the transition between the two excitability types and highlight all bifurcations involved, thus providing a complete analysis of excitability based on geometric singular perturbation theory.

  18. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  19. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    We develop a semi-quantitative theory of electron pairing and resulting superconductivity in bulk 'poor conductors' in which Fermi energy E{sub F} is located in the region of localized states not so far from the Anderson mobility edge E{sub c}. We assume attractive interaction between electrons near the Fermi surface. We review the existing theories and experimental data and argue that a large class of disordered films is described by this model. Our theoretical analysis is based on analytical treatment of pairing correlations, described in the basis of the exact single-particle eigenstates of the 3D Anderson model, which we combine with numerical data on eigenfunction correlations. Fractal nature of critical wavefunction's correlations is shown to be crucial for the physics of these systems. We identify three distinct phases: 'critical' superconductive state formed at E{sub F} = E{sub c}, superconducting state with a strong pseudo-gap, realized due to pairing of weakly localized electrons and insulating state realized at E{sub F} still deeper inside a localized band. The 'critical' superconducting phase is characterized by the enhancement of the transition temperature with respect to BCS result, by the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of superconductive order parameter and local density of states. The major new feature of the pseudo-gapped state is the presence of two independent energy scales: superconducting gap {Delta}, that is due to many-body correlations and a new 'pseudo-gap' energy scale {Delta}{sub P} which characterizes typical binding energy of localized electron pairs and leads to the insulating behavior of the resistivity as a function of temperature above superconductive T{sub c}. Two gap nature of the pseudo-gapped superconductor is shown to lead to specific features seen in scanning tunneling spectroscopy and point-contact Andreev spectroscopy. We predict that pseudo-gapped superconducting state demonstrates anomalous behavior of the optical

  20. Quantum transparency of Anderson insulator junctions: Statistics of transmission eigenvalues, shot noise, and proximity conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Branislav K.; Dragomirova, Ralitsa L.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate quantum transport through strongly disordered barriers, made of a material with exceptionally high resistivity that behaves as an Anderson insulator or a “bad metal” in the bulk, by analyzing the distribution of Landauer transmission eigenvalues for a junction where such barrier is attached to two clean metallic leads. We find that scaling of the transmission eigenvalue distribution with the junction thickness (starting from the single interface limit) always predicts a nonzero probability to find high transmission channels even in relatively thick barriers. Using this distribution, we compute the zero frequency shot noise power (as well as its sample-to-sample fluctuations) and demonstrate how it provides a single number characterization of nontrivial transmission properties of different types of disordered barriers. The appearance of open conducting channels, whose transmission eigenvalue is close to one, and corresponding violent mesoscopic fluctuations of transport quantities explain at least some of the peculiar zero-bias anomalies in the Anderson-insulator/superconductor junctions observed in recent experiments [A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, and Z. Ovadyahu, Phys. Rev. B 61, 13037 (2000)]. Our findings are also relevant for the understanding of the role of defects that can undermine quality of thin tunnel barriers made of conventional band insulators.