Science.gov

Sample records for andoh hideo ikeda

  1. HiDEOS release notes. HiDEOS control system

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    HIDEOS is a software package designed to be used for development of communicating tasks in an embedded systems application environment. The initial target for this development is the Motorola MVME162 board. The reason for this choice is because of the Industry Pack Bus available on the MVME162. The package contains a preemptive, multitasking kernel and an object oriented task model with message passing support. The board support is also object oriented with classes to easily manage the Industry Pack bus. HiDEOS comes with several drivers for serial, adc, and gpib Industry Packs. A VME backplane driver is included for communications with other processors along with an interface library for other software packages to communicate with HiDEOS. An important attribute of this package is the ability to run the MVME162 without an additional operating system, and communicate with other boards in a VME crate. The goal of HiDEOS is to make it simple to create communicating processes which run on a stand alone processor. The processes can be strictly algorithmic, such as running a high level communications protocol, or device drivers, where they communicate with a specific piece or hardware. In order to accomplish this goal, all HiDEOS tasks are created by deriving from a class which knows all about interprocess communications and operating system resources. The primary interprocess communication method is message passing; HiDEOS contains tools for defining messages to the system and base class methods for sending them from process to process. The HiDEOS build tree contains an easy to understand makefile structure for making HiDEOS executables. The tree imposes structure on the creation of messages and tasks, making it simple for the user to incorporate new programs into the system.

  2. Deoxygenation of Lake Ikeda, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, R.; Hasegawa, N.

    2010-12-01

    Lake Ikeda (Kagoshima prefecture, Japan) is a deep lake with a maximum depth of 233 m. Monitoring data of lake Ikeda exist since 1975. We have analyzed the long-term variability in the water conditions of Lake Ikeda. Recently, Lake Ikeda has exhibited the phenomenon of incomplete overturning because of climate warming. The concentrations of DO (dissolved oxygen) in the deepest parts of the lake have reduced. This phenomenon was observed to have started in the 1980s, and gradually, the deepest parts of the lake became anoxic. Later, the anoxic layer became thicker. Currently, winter mixing in Lake Ikeda reaches to depths of only 100 m. According to our simple estimation, the total volume of oxygen in Lake Ikeda will reduce from approximately 70% in the mid-1980s to 40% by the end of 2010. In addition to this phenomenon, the oxygen concentration appears to vary with several years oscillations. The depths to which mixing occurs depends on the severity of the winter, such as the air temperature during the winter season. The mixing period generally occurs in February; hence, the limnological year is considered to start in February. During our analysis period, the total DO mass showed high values in 1996, 2001, and 2003. Air temperature data obtained for regions near Lake Ikeda (the station name is Ibusuki) are used to clarify the cause of the high DO mass values in the three abovementioned years. During the period prior to the occurrence of the high DO mass in February 1996, i.e., in December 1995 and January 1996, the air temperature was low. Similarly, in 2001 and 2003, the air temperature was low in January (one month before the high DO mass was observed). In January 2001 and 2003, the AO (Atlantic Oscillation) index was negative. When the AO index is negative, there tends to be a greater movement of cold polar air into mid-latitudinal regions including Japan (Yamakawa, 2005). This movement induced a low air temperature in Ibusuki, and consequently, a high DO mass

  3. Daisaku Ikeda and the Culture of Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebert, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Although not functionally multilingual or a translator himself, Daisaku Ikeda has been deeply involved in translation processes, both as a reader and as someone who has produced texts for translation into various languages. This article examines two sources of influence shaping Ikeda's attitude toward translation culture: the flourishing culture…

  4. Berkeley-Madonna implementation of Ikeda's model.

    PubMed

    Fontecave-Jallon, J; Baconnier, P

    2007-01-01

    Starting from one model, we check the possibility of using Berkeley-Madonna software to transpose and simulate some existing biological integrated models. The considered model is the one of Ikeda et al., proposed in 1979, which treats of fluid regulation and which is very well described mathematically in the original paper. Despite a few mistakes or bugs, the model has been easily and successfully implemented under Berkeley-Madonna. We recover the same simulation results as Ikeda and new simulations can now easily be carried out, thanks to the user-friendly qualities of Berkeley-Madonna.

  5. Daisaku Ikeda's Educational Philosophy in the Context of English Education Policy in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatano, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author considers Daisaku Ikeda's (1928-) educational philosophy in the context of English education policies in Japan. The author begins by explicating Ikeda's concepts of wisdom versus knowledge and "society for education" (e.g., Ikeda, 2000; Sadovnichy & Ikeda, 2002). He then suggests consideration of these…

  6. Lessons from Afar: A Review of www.daisakuikeda.org, Official Website of Daisaku Ikeda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arauz, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Daisaku Ikeda (1928- ) is a Buddhist leader, peace builder, school founder, and poet. His own biography and lifework provide a model for how one can transform adversity into alternative opportunities for some of the most disenfranchised students. Scrutinizing Ikeda's official website (www.daisakuikeda.org) reveals an extensive collection of his…

  7. Realizing Daisaku Ikeda's Educational Philosophy through Language Learning and Study Abroad: A Critical Instrumental Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulah, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses in two ways on Daisaku Ikeda (b. 1928) and language and culture education. First, the author excerpts Ikeda's translated and lesser-known Japanese speeches to explicate his view of world language learning and cultural exchange as curricular components of a broader educational philosophy for becoming "fully human." Second, the…

  8. Ikeda Research in China and Taiwan: Critical Analysis of the Chinese Language Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inukai, Nozomi

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first attempt to conduct a critical analysis of the research on Ikeda's educational philosophy published in mainland China and Taiwan. The study employed a combination of archival research and responses to an online questionnaire by professors and doctorate students studying Ikeda's educational philosophy. The study analyzed the…

  9. Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulah, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928- ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue--what I call "value-creative dialogue"--as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach…

  10. Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Peace, Education Proposals, and Soka Education: Convergences and Divergences in Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulah, Jason; Urbain, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce and explicate Daisaku Ikeda's contributions to peace education. Ikeda is a Buddhist leader, peacebuilder, school founder, and prolific author whose six decades of contributions to peace education have had a global impact in practice but have remained unexamined in the extant, particularly Anglophone,…

  11. Daisaku Ikeda's Curriculum of Soka Education: Creating Value through Dialogue, Global Citizenship, and "Human Education" in the Mentor-Disciple Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulah, Jason; Ito, Takao

    2012-01-01

    This essay review focuses on Daisaku Ikeda (b. 1928) and his curriculum of Soka, or value-creating, education present in two works: "Choose Life: A Dialogue" (Toynbee & Ikeda, 1976) and "Thoughts on Education for Global Citizenship" (Ikeda, 1996b). In reviewing these works, the authors trace the biographical roots of Ikeda's educational philosophy…

  12. Daisaku Ikeda's Philosophy of Soka Education in Practice: A Narrative Analysis of Culturally Specific Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagashima, Julie T.

    2012-01-01

    The author analyzes two teachers' narratives of their understanding and practice of Daisaku Ikeda's (1928-) philosophy of Soka (value-creating) education in relation to narratives of their experiences as students at the Soka schools he founded. These narratives both triangulate an implicit though culturally specific language used to articulate…

  13. Ikeda-like chaos on a dynamically filtered supercontinuum light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Jacquot, Maxime; Dudley, John M.; Larger, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate temporal chaos in a color-selection mechanism from the visible spectrum of a supercontinuum light source. The color-selection mechanism is governed by an acousto-optoelectronic nonlinear delayed-feedback scheme modeled by an Ikeda-like equation. Initially motivated by the design of a broad audience live demonstrator in the framework of the International Year of Light 2015, the setup also provides a different experimental tool to investigate the dynamical complexity of delayed-feedback dynamics. Deterministic hyperchaos is analyzed here from the experimental time series. A projection method identifies the delay parameter, for which the chaotic strange attractor originally evolving in an infinite-dimensional phase space can be revealed in a two-dimensional subspace.

  14. DNA barcoding and morphological analyses revealed validity of Diadema clarki Ikeda, 1939 (Echinodermata, Echinoidea, Diadematidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Seinen; Konishi, Kooichi; Mekuchi, Miyuki; Tamaki, Yasuji; Nohara, Kenji; Takagi, Motohiro; Niwa, Kentaro; Teramoto, Wataru; Manabe, Hisaya; Kurogi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Shigenori; Ando, Daisuke; Tadao Jinbo; Kiyomoto, Masato; Hirose, Mamiko; Shimomura, Michitaka; Kurashima, Akira; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Kiyomoto, Setuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A long-spined sea urchin Diadema-sp reported from Japanese waters was genetically distinct from all known Diadema species, but it remained undescribed. Extensive field surveys in Japan with molecular identification performed in the present study determined five phenotypes (I to V) in Diadema-sp according to the presence and/or shape of a white streak and blue iridophore lines in the naked space of the interambulacral area. All phenotypes were distinct from Diadema setosum (Leske, 1778) and Diadema savignyi (Audouin, 1829), of which a major type (I) corresponded to Diadema clarki Ikeda, 1939 that was questioned and synonymized with Diadema setosum by Mortensen (1940). The holotype of Diadema clarki has not been found, but three unlabeled dried tests of Diadema were found among Ikeda’s original collection held in the Kitakyushu Museum of Natural History and Human History, Fukuoka, Japan. A short mtDNA COI fragment (ca. 350bp) was amplified from one of the tests, and the nucleotide sequence determined (275bp) was nearly identical with that of Diadema-sp. Arrangements of the primary tubercles on the coronal plates in Diadema-sp and the museum specimen also conformed with Diadema clarki, indicating that Diadema-sp is identical to Diadema clarki and a valid species. Narrow latitudinal distribution (31°N to 35°N) of Diadema clarki in Japan was observed, where it co-existed with abundant Diadema setosum and rare Diadema savignyi. No Diadema clarki was found in the southern islands in Japan, such as Satsunan Islands to Ryukyu Islands and Ogasawara Island, where Diadema setosum and Diadema savignyi were commonly observed. PMID:27199601

  15. A new species of the genus Arhynchite (Annelida, Echiura) from sandy flats of Japan, previously referred to as Thalassema owstoni Ikeda, 1904

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masaatsu; Nishikawa, Teruaki

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new echiuran, Arhynchite hayaoi sp. n., is described from newly collected specimens from sandy flats of the Seto Inland Sea, Japan, together with many museum specimens, including those once identified as Thalassema owstoni Ikeda, 1904 or Arhynchite arhynchite (Ikeda, 1924). The new species is clearly distinguishable from its congeners by the smooth margin of gonostomal lips and lack of rectal caecum. Brief references are also made to the morphological distinction between the new species and Thalassema owstoni, originally described from the deep bottom on the Japanese Pacific coast. PMID:23825445

  16. Interaction between Liénard and Ikeda dynamics in a nonlinear electro-optical oscillator with delayed bandpass feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Bicky A.; Larger, Laurent; Brunner, Daniel; Chembo, Yanne K.; Jacquot, Maxime

    2016-12-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical analysis of the complex dynamics generated by a nonlinear time-delayed electro-optic bandpass oscillator. We investigate the interaction between the slow- and fast-scale dynamics of autonomous oscillations in the breather regime. We analyze in detail the coupling between the fast-scale behavior associated to a characteristic low-pass Ikeda behavior and the slow-scale dynamics associated to a Liénard limit-cycle. Finally, we show that when projected onto a two-dimensional phase space, the attractors corresponding to periodic and chaotic breathers display a spiral-like pattern, which strongly depends on the shape of the nonlinear function.

  17. Interaction between Liénard and Ikeda dynamics in a nonlinear electro-optical oscillator with delayed bandpass feedback.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Bicky A; Larger, Laurent; Brunner, Daniel; Chembo, Yanne K; Jacquot, Maxime

    2016-12-01

    We report on experimental and theoretical analysis of the complex dynamics generated by a nonlinear time-delayed electro-optic bandpass oscillator. We investigate the interaction between the slow- and fast-scale dynamics of autonomous oscillations in the breather regime. We analyze in detail the coupling between the fast-scale behavior associated to a characteristic low-pass Ikeda behavior and the slow-scale dynamics associated to a Liénard limit-cycle. Finally, we show that when projected onto a two-dimensional phase space, the attractors corresponding to periodic and chaotic breathers display a spiral-like pattern, which strongly depends on the shape of the nonlinear function.

  18. Introduction and evaluation of a newly established holiday work system in the pharmacy ward at Municipal Ikeda Hospital.

    PubMed

    Myotoku, Michiaki; Iwamoto, Chiaki; Tomida, Yumi; Murayama, Yoko; Irishio, Keiko; Nakanishi, Akiko; Shimomura, Kazunori; Ihara, Yuki; Shioishi, Tomoko; Inui, Toshiko; Yohiro, Chika; Miyamoto, Emi; Suemura, Natsuko; Kawaguchi, Syunichi

    2006-10-01

    At the Municipal Ikeda Hospital, a system in which pharmacists stationed in one ward pharmacy dispense drugs to be administered by injection and injectable preparations delivered to patients' bedsides was introduced in April 2000. This system was aimed at minimizing risks related to injections. Initially, however, on holidays, nurses played the roles of pharmacists in terms of the injections, and there were concerns over a possible rise in the incidence of errors (adverse events/near-misses) related to injections on these days compared with weekdays. Later, when planning to introduce a new holiday work system in the ward pharmacy, we took into account such factors as the number of pharmacists needed on holidays, their duties on holidays and the influence on weekday pharmacy activity of compensatory days-off taken by such pharmacists. In May 2004, the new holiday work system was introduced in the ward pharmacy. Under the new system, 5 pharmacists work at the ward pharmacy on holidays. After this system was put into operation, the number of injections dispensed at the ward pharmacy averaged 230 per day, and 177 per holiday. To evaluate the validity of this system, we recently conducted a questionnaire survey of nurses at our hospital. The survey involved 139 nurses. Of these nurses, 69.1% responded that the number of incidents (adverse events/near-misses) related to dispensing injections on holidays had decreased. Furthermore, 65.4% of the nurses reported a decrease in incidents related to the delivery and administration of injectable preparations. More than half of the nurses answered that the new system had made it easier for them to collect information on medicines and helped them provide better nursing services. When the nurses were asked to make a general assessment of the new system, 90% rated the system as "good." The results of this survey indicate that keeping the ward pharmacy open on holidays contributes to the promotion of the proper use of medicines

  19. Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Ikeda Ankyrin Repeat-Containing Proteins Recruit SCF1 Ubiquitin Ligase Machinery via Poxvirus-Like F-Box Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andrea R.; VieBrock, Lauren; Rodino, Kyle G.; Miller, Daniel P.; Tegels, Brittney K.; Marconi, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rising theme among intracellular microbes is the delivery of ankyrin repeat-containing effectors (Anks) that interact with target proteins to co-opt host cell functions. Orientia tsutsugamushi, an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of scrub typhus, encodes one of the largest Ank repertoires of any sequenced microorganism. They have been previously identified as type 1 secretion system substrates. Here, in silico and manual sequence analyses revealed that a large proportion of O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks bear a eukaryotic/poxvirus-like F-box motif, which is known to recruit host cell SCF1 ubiquitin ligase machinery. We assessed the Anks for the ability to serve as F-box proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that F-box-containing Anks interact with overexpressed and/or endogenous SCF1 components. When coexpressed with FLAG-Ank4_01 or FLAG-Ank9, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged version of the SCF1 component SKP1 localized to subcellular sites of FLAG-Ank accumulation. The abilities of recombinant Anks to interact and colocalize with SKP1 were F-box dependent. GST-SKP1 precipitated O. tsutsugamushi-derived Ank9 from infected host cells, verifying both that the pathogen expresses Ank9 during infection and the protein's capability to bind SKP1. Aligning O. tsutsugamushi, poxviral, and eukaryotic F-box sequences delineated three F-box residues that are highly conserved and likely to be functionally important. Substitution of these residues ablated the ability of GFP-Ank9 to interact with GST-SKP1. These results demonstrate that O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks can co-opt host cell polyubiquitination machinery, provide the first evidence that an O. tsutsugamushi Ank does so during infection, and advance overall understanding of microbial F-box proteins. IMPORTANCE Ankyrin repeat-containing proteins (Anks) are important virulence factors of intracellular bacteria that mediate protein-protein interactions with

  20. Development of Peltier Current Lead for DC cable Hideo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugane; Hikichi, Yasuo; Minowa, Masahiro; Kawahara, Toshio; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Hamabe, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Sataro

    The widespread expectation is that superconducting technologies will be one of the effective technologies to decrease energy loss and improve efficiency in energy grids. Especially, in recent circumstances, applications connecting with renewable energy receive attention. Yamaguchi et al successfully developed 200 m-class superconducting direct current transmission and distribution system (CASER-2) in Chubu University and carried out the demonstration of this system. On this demonstration, "Peltier Current Lead (PCL)" was employed, wherein Peltier device was used for the purpose of pumping up the heat through the down-leads, It was observed that PCL reduced heat leak into cryostat as compared to usual Cu current leads on this demonstration, but some issues to be solved remained, such as heat-cycle performance etc.. In this paper, we designed a prototype PCL for the purpose of improvement of the mechanical strength and the durability for the heat cycle, and evaluated the performance.

  1. A Statement of Values for Our Research on Music in Peacebuilding: A Synthesis of Galtung and Ikeda's Peace Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbain, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in research linking musicking and peacebuilding, and the establishment of the Min-On Music Research Institute (MOMRI) in 2014 in Tokyo follows this trend. Its mission statement is: "To pursue a multidisciplinary investigation of the potential application of music in peacebuilding activities," in…

  2. Genomic Sequencing of Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Karp, an Assembly Comparable to the Genome Size of the Strain Ikeda

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Chao, Chien-Chung; Lei, Haiyan; Li, Bingjie; Tsai, Shien; Hung, Guo-Chiuan

    2016-01-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi, an intracellular bacterium, belongs to the family Rickettsiaceae. This study presents the draft genome sequence of strain Karp, with 2.0 Mb as the size of the completed genome. This nearly finished draft genome sequence was annotated with the RAST server and the contents compared to those of the other strains. PMID:27540052

  3. Platelet-Associated CD40/CD154 Mediates Remote Tissue Damage After Mesenteric Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    contribute to the severity of the disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus patients [10]. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis platelets...plasmacytoid dendritic cells in systemic lupus erythematosus . Sci Transl Med 2: 47ra63. 11. Andoh A, Yoshida T, Yagi Y, Bamba S, Hata K, et al. (2006...captured using Nikon Eclipse 80i microscope and adjusted using the adjustment feature in the RGB channel using Adobe Photoshop CS2 (Adobe Systems , San

  4. CTD and Bottle Data from Leg 1: 20 December 1986 - 18 January 1987. Leg 2: 17 July - 15 August 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    650, Japan Biblioteca, Centro de Investigacion Cientifca y Educacion Superior de Prof. Hideo Kawai Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732 Kyoto University...Science Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography University of Miami TIC 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway f ELECTE Miami, Florida 33149 S SEP2Z 1989D and

  5. 76 FR 58277 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ..., Richard Ikeda, Christine Jones, Melanie M. Keller, Gia Lee, Nancy C. Lee, Eric N. Lindblom, Michael W. Mc.... Stade, Christian J. Stenrud, Bridgett E. Taylor, Brian G. Trent, James E. Tyler Jr., Stephen J....

  6. Developments of Innovative DNA Photonic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-07

    Chem. Mater., 13, 1273-1281, 2001. 2. J. Yoshida, L. Wang, S. Kobayashi, G. Zhang, H. Ikeda and N. Ogata: “Optical properties of photochromic ...Watanuki, J. Yoshida, S. Kobayashi, H. Ikeda and N. Ogata: “Optical and photochromic properties of spiropyran-doped marine-biopolymer DNA-lipid...switching application based on the photochromism of spiropyran-doped marine-biopolymer DNA-lipid complex films”, Tech. Digest, 10th Optoelectronics

  7. Stability Improvements of DNA Photonic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-20

    optical characteristics, such as refractive indices, absorbance and fluorescence intensity, and photochromic properties, of spiropyran-doped DNA...1281, 2001. [2] J. Yoshida, L. Wang, S. Kobayashi, G. Zhang, H. Ikeda and N. Ogata: “Optical properties of photochromic -compound derived from dye...Watanuki, J. Yoshida, S. Kobayashi, H. Ikeda and N. Ogata: “Optical and photochromic properties of spiropyran-doped marine-biopolymer DNA-lipid

  8. Time-Delay Systems with Band-Limited Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    1998] and theoretically [Ikeda, 1979; Nardone , 1986; Ikeda, 1987; Hale, 1996; Giannakopoulos, 1999; Nizette, 2004; Erneux, 2004], starting in 1979 with...large delays (τ τl) [ Nardone , 1986; Erneux, 2004]. Since high-pass filter- ing, in contrast, results in a stability boundary where the mode at...Lett., 78, pp. 1496-1498. Nardone , P. Mandel, P. and Kapral, R. (1986) Analysis of a delay-differential equation in optical bistability, Phys. Rev. A, 33

  9. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-22

    inch-diagonal TFT ( thin film transistor ) -LCD module with high resolution for use as an indicator in aircraft cockpits. The new module features...inch air transport indicator" (3ATI). The TFT -LCD is a liquid display in which a thin film transistor as an active element for a switch is set in each...JITSUYOKA E NO TENBO, 17Jan90].....................................76 Superconducting Thin Film Technology [Hideo Itozaki; KO ON CHODENDOTAI NO

  10. Sub-Saharan Africa Report No. 2831.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    vice minister of secondary and higher education and dean of the University of Angola. The donation reflects the bonds of friendship and cooperation...between the Angolan university and the university of Humboldt, in Berlin. [Text] [Luanda JORNAL DE ANGOLA in Portuguese 8 Jul 83 p 2] 6362... University at the time of the official visit by the deputy minister of foreign affairs, Hideo Tsuji, in July 1982. The equipment was turned over to the

  11. Control and Dynamic Approach to Robust Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    information, quantum error correction 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT UNCLASSIFIED NSN 7540-01-280-5500 Hideo Mabuchi California Institute of...stabilization of conditional quantum state preparation, and began work on a second, quantum error correction via continuous syndrome measurement. Below we...obtain. Quantum error correction : Our successes in the state-preparation problem led us to ask whether real-time feedback analysis could also be used for

  12. Fundamental Principles of Coherent-Feedback Quantum Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-08

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0009 FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF COHERENT- FEEDBACK QUANTUM CONTROL Hideo Mabuchi LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report 12/08...foundations and potential applications of coherent- feedback quantum control. We have focused on potential applications in quantum-enhanced metrology and...picture of how coherent feedback can provide a kind of circuit/network theory for quantum engineering, enabling rigorous analysis and numerical simulation

  13. Significance of Theileria orientalis types in individual affected beef herds in New South Wales based on clinical, smear and PCR findings.

    PubMed

    Eamens, Graeme J; Bailey, Graham; Jenkins, Cheryl; Gonsalves, Jocelyn R

    2013-09-01

    Cattle within seven NSW herds with a history or risk of clinical Theileria orientalis disease associated with introductions of cattle were examined clinically and by haematological and PCR testing at sequential bleeds or at single sampling of different risk subgroups. The T. orientalis Ikeda type was detected in all herds and Chitose type was detected in six. Pale and jaundiced mucosal surfaces were associated with clinically affected groups of cattle, and herds containing cattle with ≥ 1% theilerias in erythrocytes were associated with high prevalence of Ikeda type, with or without Chitose type. In clinically normal cattle within these Ikeda-affected herds, over half of the smear negative animals were detected as infected with Ikeda type, while 90% of smear positive cases were positive for Ikeda type. Infection with Ikeda and Chitose organisms was detected in calves as young as 1-2 weeks, rapidly increased in prevalence within one month and was maintained until 4.5 months of age. In these calves Ikeda prevalence increased at a faster rate than the other MPSP types, particularly Buffeli which is generally considered to be avirulent, and suggests either an increased growth rate or rate of transmission of the Ikeda type or failure of the host immune system to clear this type. Particularly high T. orientalis prevalence rates were detected (in blood samples from a single time point) in adults that had been in direct contact with weaner cattle introduced from coastal areas; however, the lack of direct contact with affected cattle did not prevent infection with Ikeda type in some cases. Spread within previously naïve herds was variable, and results also depended on the sampling time point. In contrast, groups in which infection was already established gave repeatedly similar results at multiple samplings taken at one month intervals. Our results confirm that a large reservoir of infected but clinically normal animals exists within T. orientalis-affected cattle herds

  14. Mössbauer spectroscopy of 151 europium dicarboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, C. I.; Ryan, D. H.; Trichtchenko, Olga; Voyer, C. J.; Brown, D. E.; Sobel, S. G.; Haigney, A. L.; May, Leopold; Hillery, B. R.; Gajbhiye, N. S.

    2008-07-01

    We have previously reported the stability of europium oxalate compared to ammonium europium bis-salen and europium benzoate. We now extend the dicoarboxylic acid chain of the oxalate by introducing additional-CH2-groups in the dicarboxylate ligands by using malonate, succinate, glutarate and adipate. Additionally, we have examined the effect of alterations in the succinate dianion by introducing functional groups such as [C = C]in the case of the maleide and-OH group in the case of the malide. This study is an attempt to further characterize these compounds. Infrared spectra were used to characterize bridging and chelating dicarboxylates while Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements were used to gain better insight into the structure of heterocyclic “cages” containing two Eu3 + ions and two dianions.

  15. Propagation of Chaos and the McKean-Vlasov Equation in Duals of Nuclear Spaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    hydrodynamical equation for one-dimensional Ginzburg -Landau model, IMA Repring Series No. 328, University of Minnesota. [5] Ikeda, N. and Watanabe, S. (1981...Cambanis and E. Masry. Trapezoidal stratified Monte Carlo integration, Mar. 90. 287. M. Marques and S. Cambanis, Dichotomies for certain product

  16. Community-Based Research: Learning about Attitudes towards the Criminal Justice System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marche, Tammy A.; Briere, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Research points to the pedagogical value of an engaged and community service-learning approach to developing understanding of course content (Astin, Vogelgesang, Ikeda, & Yee, 2000). To help students achieve a better understanding of how the discipline of psychology contributes to the discipline of law, some students in a second year…

  17. Cluster synchronization of starlike networks with normalized Laplacian coupling: master stability function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Pavel V.; Kuptsova, Anna V.

    2016-04-01

    A generalized model of star-like network is suggested that takes into account non-additive coupling and nonlinear transformation of coupling variables. For this model a method of analysis of synchronized cluster stability is developed. Using this method three star-like networks based on Ikeda, predator-prey and Hénon maps are studied.

  18. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  19. A Dynamic Analysis of Piezoelectric Strained Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    of Piezoelectricity , Oxford Univ.Press, Oxford (1990). E38] T.C.Ting, "Dynamic response of composites", Appl. Mechs.Rev., vol. 33, no.12, Dp.1629-16...Plenum Press, New York (1969). 276 [36] J.Zelenka, Piezoelectric Resonators and their Applications, Elsevier, Amsterdam (1986). [37] T.Ikeda, Fundamentals

  20. 75 FR 28853 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... United States citizenship (within the meaning of section 877(a) or 877A) with respect to whom the... MARGARET DEUCHER FIONA CLARINA DEUCHER ANNINA XENIA CONCHITA DEVOURDY CHRISTINE DODDS BARRY A DUDLEY SON...-MERZBACHER JESSICA HENTSCH NIKOLAI HO EUNICE YUK LING HOTTINGER PETER A HUANG YU-CHING IKEDA MAKIKO...

  1. Using Decision Analysis to Select Facility Maintenance Management Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...Systems and Engineering Management Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air...increased (Garg & Deshmukh, 2006). According to Teicholz and Ikeda (1995), the support for technology -based maintenance systems began during the

  2. USMC Relocation to Guam: Political Pressure and Poor Plam1ing to Blame for an Ill-Postured U.S. Military in the Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-19

    1996, by Minister of Foreign Affairs Ikeda, Minister of State for Defense Kyuma, Secretary of Defense Perry, and Ambassador Mondale . Tokyo, Japan...Minister of State for Defense Kyuma, Secretary of Defense Peny, and Ambassador Mondale . Tokyo, Japan: Security Consultative Committee (SCC), 1996

  3. A Moral Cosmopolitan Perspective on Language Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obelleiro, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, scholars have turned to cosmopolitanism as a framework for thinking through issues of language and citizenship. In this article, I present Daisaku Ikeda's philosophy of cosmopolitan education and compare it with others' in the extant literature. I examine, from a philosophical perspective, its roots in the Mahayana tradition of…

  4. Markers of Ovarian Cancer Using a Glycoprotein/Antibody Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    has been reported that both the expression and activity of fucosyltransferases are increased in ovarian cancers.33−35 Several fucosylated proteins...2 (1), 34−45. (33) Takahashi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Miyoshi, E.; Yaginuma, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Taniguchi, N. Alpha-1,6- fucosyltransferase is highly and...K. L. Elevated serum alpha(1→3)-L- fucosyltransferase activity with synthetic low molecular weight acceptor in human ovarian cancer. Cancer Lett. 1986

  5. Depth of Cure of New Flowable Composite Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-30

    Flowable composites were introduced to the dental community in the late 1990’s (Ikeda, 2009; Bayne, 1998). The advantage of flowable composite-based...Depth of Cure of New Flowable Composite Resins A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The Air Force Postgraduate Dental School...SCIENCE In Oral Biology By Inaam A. Pedalino, BS, DDS Dunn Dental Clinic Lackland AFB, TX 30 March 2012 Depth of Cure of New

  6. Leukodepletion Filters for Prevention of Transfusion Transmission Of Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    intracellularly within white blood cells (16, 17, 18, 19), and have been used to prevent transmission of the intracellular organisms HTLV -I (20), and the...Passelecq A, Jacob S: Cutaneous leishmaniasis, cutaneous glandular leishmaniasis and transfusional kala-azar. Trop Dis Bull 1958; 55:379-81 5...642 20 Kobayashi M, Yano M, Kwon KW, Takahashi TA, Ikeda H, Sekiguchi S: Leukocyte depletion of HTLV -I carrier red cell concentrates by filters

  7. Overwintering Strategies of the Calanoid Copepod Calanus plumchrus in a Periodically Anoxic British Columbia Fjord.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    carbohydrate and 5.4% ash (Ikeda, 1972). The very high proportion of storage lipids (wax esters and triglycerides ), the relatively low proportion of these...discovered that over- wintering C. finmarchicus and C. helgolandicus have a much reduced mid- gut epithelium, low digestive enzyme activities, very low... hydrolysis of the chlorophyll (Strickland and Parsons, 1968). Filters were stored on ice in blackened Jars containing silica gel and then frozen at -20 C

  8. Prediction of Ship Roll Damping. A State of the Art

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    oscillation. The drag of the bilge keel can be expressed by the following formula, which was obtained by Ikeda et al. [ 351 (including the case of an...bilge keel (m) XBKI ; SS number of aft end of bilie keel XBK2 ; SS number of fore end of bilge keel 7) OGD,T,THETA 3F10.0 CGD ; =OG/d T ; roll period

  9. Frequency comb generation beyond the Lugiato-Lefever equation: multi-stability and super cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The generation of optical frequency combs in microresonators is considered without resorting to the mean-field approximation. New dynamical regimes are found to appear for high intracavity power that cannot be modeled using the Lugiato-Lefever equation. Using the Ikeda map we show the existence of multi-valued stationary states and analyse their stability. Period doubled patterns are considered and a novel type of super cavity soliton associated with the multi-stable states is predicted.

  10. Microarray Analysis of Transposon Insertion Mutants in Bacillus Anthracis: Global Identification of Genes Required for Sporulation and Germination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Gilois, M. Rose, and D. Lereclus. 2001. Oligopep- tide permease is required for expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis plcR regulon and for...non- toxin gene expression in Bacillus anthracis. Infect. Immun. 65:3091–3099. 10. Ikeda, R. A., C. M. Ligman, and S. Warshamana. 1992. T7 promoter con...nontoxi- genic Bacillus anthracis spore vaccines based on strains expressing mutant vari- ants of lethal toxin components. Vaccine 23:5688–5697. 17. Read

  11. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, Douglas L; Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  12. Using neural networks to model chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Two types of neural networks -- backpropagation and radial basis function -- are presented for modeling dynamical systems. They were trained to model the Henon, Ikeda and Tinkerbell dynamical systems by providing a set of points randomly chosen from orbits under the functions. After training, the networks were used to simulate the functions to determine the extent to which they could generate the chaotic attractors associated with these systems.

  13. ONR (Office of Naval Research) Far East Scientific Bulletin. Volume 10, Number 2, April to June 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    development of a welding data base; cold cracking of HYS0; diffusion bounding of tool steels and ceramics; seam tracking and fracture toughness of...suppliers of welding consumables in Japan. In addition, JAERI will be conducting fatigue crack growth studies during 1985 to verify that the new steels have... cracking T. Kaneko, A. Ikeda, of low alloyed steels on environmental and T. Moroishi. factors and materials Sumitomo Metal Industries The corrosion

  14. Attenuated Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling as a Therapeutic for Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    upregulates VEGF expression only. Circulation 1994;90:649-52. 4. Igarashi A, Okochi H , Bradham DM, Grotendorst GR. Regulation of connective tissue growth...2005;65:8887-95. 10. Uhl M, Aulwurm S, Wischhusen J, et al. SD-208, a novel transforming growth factor beta receptor I kinase inhibitor, inhibits growth...cancer. Endocr Relat Cancer 2005;12:805-22. 18. Kawada M, Inoue H , Masuda T, Ikeda D. Insulin-like growth factor I secreted from prostate stromal

  15. Implementation of a model of bodily fluids regulation.

    PubMed

    Fontecave-Jallon, Julie; Thomas, S Randall

    2015-09-01

    The classic model of blood pressure regulation by Guyton et al. (Annu Rev Physiol 34:13-46, 1972a; Ann Biomed Eng 1:254-281, 1972b) set a new standard for quantitative exploration of physiological function and led to important new insights, some of which still remain the focus of debate, such as whether the kidney plays the primary role in the genesis of hypertension (Montani et al. in Exp Physiol 24:41-54, 2009a; Exp Physiol 94:382-388, 2009b; Osborn et al. in Exp Physiol 94:389-396, 2009a; Exp Physiol 94:388-389, 2009b). Key to the success of this model was the fact that the authors made the computer code (in FORTRAN) freely available and eventually provided a convivial user interface for exploration of model behavior on early microcomputers (Montani et al. in Int J Bio-med Comput 24:41-54, 1989). Ikeda et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 7:135-166, 1979) developed an offshoot of the Guyton model targeting especially the regulation of body fluids and acid-base balance; their model provides extended renal and respiratory functions and would be a good basis for further extensions. In the interest of providing a simple, useable version of Ikeda et al.'s model and to facilitate further such extensions, we present a practical implementation of the model of Ikeda et al. (Ann Biomed Eng 7:135-166, 1979), using the ODE solver Berkeley Madonna.

  16. STS-95 crew participate in a SPACEHAB familiarization exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 crew members (from left) Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (with camera) representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), and Pilot Steven Lindsey listen to Hideo Ishikawa of NASDA, who explains some of the flight equipment at SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility, Cape Canaveral, Fla. The STS-95 crew is at KSC to look at the SPACEHAB module and the equipment that will fly with them on the Space Shuttle Endeavor, scheduled to launch Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar- observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  17. STS-95 crew participate in a SPACEHAB familiarization exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 crew members (from left) Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski, Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, representing the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), and Pilot Steven W. Lindsey look over equipment that Hideo Ishikawa of NASDA has presented at SPACEHAB Payload Processing Facility, Cape Canaveral, Fla. The STS-95 crew is at KSC to look at the SPACEHAB module and the equipment that will fly with them on the Space Shuttle Discovery, scheduled to launch Oct. 29, 1998. The mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process.

  18. Diffusional and vibrational dynamics of water in NaA zeolites by neutron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.; Venuti, V.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports the most recent results of a detailed spectroscopic analysis of water confined in NaA zeolitic matrix, performed, as a function of temperature and hydration level, by means of the simultaneous use of incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering (IQENS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption. The diffusive process reveals a rather wide distribution of relaxation times. Furthermore, we observed a Q-dependence of the mean relaxation time \\langle \\tau \\rangle which does not disagree with the mode coupling theory for associated liquids. As far as vibrational dynamics is concerned, the spectral substructure of the H2O bending (1500-1800 cm-1) andO-H stretching (3000-3800 cm-1) bands has been interpreted in the framework of actual theories for associated liquids and on the basis of previous measurements performed, by Raman scattering, on water confined in a controlled silica glass (GelSil). From a comparison of the results in these two cases, the 'structure-maker' role on confined water, played by the NaA zeolite, and the 'structure-breaker' role, played by the GelSil, have been clearly shown.

  19. Analysis of gene mutation in plant cell wall by dielectric relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Frédéric; Dantras, Eric; Grima-Pettenatti, Jacqueline; Lacabanne, Colette

    2012-07-01

    Arabidopsis Thaliana is a plant composed mainly of cellulose and lignin. Geneticists need techniques able to make differences at the molecular level between modified plants (DML6, CAD C/D) and non-modified ones. Thermo-stimulated current (TSC) analysis is a promising route to identify gene mutations. For the non-modified plant, at low temperatures, TSC thermograms highlight three dielectric relaxation modes. From -150 to -110 °C, γCellulose is attributed to CH2OH and-OH groups of cellulose. Between -110 and -80 °C, βLignin is detected. From -80 to -40 °C, βCellulose is characteristic of the molecular mobility of glycosidic linkages. For the CAD C/D modified plants, only γCellulose and βLignin are observed; due to analogous enthalpy values, those modes have the same molecular origin as in the non-modified plant. So, the βLignin mode is associated with the molecular mobility of the lignin-OH groups. The CAD C/D gene mutation changes the chemical structure of lignin, which promotes hydrogen bonds in the network and inhibits molecular mobility of glucosidic rings. It is also interesting to note that the DML6 gene mutation induces a higher cooperativity of this βCellulose relaxation than in wild vegetal composites. In fact, this mutation promotes molecular mobility of glycosidic rings thanks to β1-4 glycosidic linkages.

  20. Emergence of oriental theileriosis in cattle and its transmission through Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Kakati, Parikshit; Sarmah, Prabhat Chandra; Ray, Debdatta; Bhattacharjee, Kanta; Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Barkalita, Luit Moni; Sarma, Dipak Kumar; Baishya, Bhaben Chandra; Borah, Pranjal; Stanley, Bobitha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of Theileria in blood samples of crossbred and indigenous adult cows raised under unorganized small scale farming system in a Babesia and Anaplasma endemic geographical area from Assam, India and to see its transmission through Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks. Materials and Methods: For the present study, 57 clinical cases of cattle suspected to be of hemoparasitic infections were taken into consideration. The parasites were identified based on morphology in giemsa stained blood smear followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sera samples were tested for T. annulata antibodies in plate and Dot-ELISA. PCR was also conducted in eggs of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick collected from a Theileria orientalis positive animal. Results: PCR amplified 1124, 776, and 160 bp DNA fragments of B. bigemina (64.91%), T. orientalis (21.05%) and A. marginale (14.03%), respectively. This assay further conducted in 12 T. orientalis positive blood samples with primers of Buffeli, Chitose, and Ikeda variants of T. orientalis showed 3 samples positive to Ikeda type and none for Buffeli and Chitose. Babesia bovis and Theileria annulata specific primers also did not amplify any fragment during the PCR assay of the blood samples. Further, all sera samples tested negative to T. annulata antibodies in Plate and Dot-ELISA. PCR conducted in eggs of R (B).microplus tick collected from a T. orientalis positive animal revealed presence of the parasite DNA. Gradual improvement in physical condition leading to complete recovery in 10 out of 12 T. orientalis infected clinical cases treated with buparvaquone(at 2.5mg/kg.b.wt I/M) was the feedback obtained from field veterinarians and the cattle owners. Conclusion: The present investigation represents the first report of occurrence of T. orientalis in cattle of Assam with involvement of pathogenic Ikeda strain in clinical outbreaks and its possible natural

  1. Studies in Intelligence. Volume 52, Number 4, December 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    the years of the Cold War in various components of the military and CIA.3 Chiyoki “Chick” Ikeda, who earned a star on the CIA Memorial Wall, is one...also our tradition on Memorial Day to recognize the addition of a new star to the Memorial Wall. The star was engraved last October 15. It belongs...surface, his semi- autobiographical novel, An Ordinary Spy, is a satisfactory spy story but, when looked at closely, turns out to be a nasty and

  2. Draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, a moderately halophilic bacterium that produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2012-05-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Halomonas sp. strain KM-1, which was isolated in Ikeda City, Osaka, Japan, and which produces the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate). The total length of the assembled genome is 4,992,811 bp, and 4,220 coding sequences were predicted within the genome. Genes encoding proteins that are involved in the production and depolymerization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) were identified. The identification of these genes might be of use in the production of the bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate.

  3. Electroactive Polymers as Antistatic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-07

    Ikeda, ’’Simultaneous Polymerization and Formation of Polyacetylene Film on the Surface of Concentrated Soluble Ziegler -Type Catalyst Solution’’, 3...by coating the substrate film on one side with an appropriate catalyst and then adding the *i acetylene. Chemical doping with iodine was performed by...and 0. A binding energy (BE) for 0 at 530 eV is indicative of iron oxide (8) and at 532-533 eV of organic C-bonded 0 such as carbonyls, alcohols or

  4. Quantifying uncertainty in state and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Parlitz, Ulrich; Schumann-Bischoff, Jan; Luther, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Observability of state variables and parameters of a dynamical system from an observed time series is analyzed and quantified by means of the Jacobian matrix of the delay coordinates map. For each state variable and each parameter to be estimated, a measure of uncertainty is introduced depending on the current state and parameter values, which allows us to identify regions in state and parameter space where the specific unknown quantity can(not) be estimated from a given time series. The method is demonstrated using the Ikeda map and the Hindmarsh-Rose model.

  5. Markovian Shock Models, Deterioration Processes, Stratified Markov Processes and Replacement Policies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-05

    1 ):: ). "-e i,<ti a_) ’’-s ro 0 so it{ rv s,’, ve ’ i;, . ’. n,’] T of" :’ ’y’ i 𔃼 1 ’. ,,th , w th K nic ker bor rk,. r , . Fluid .’rch. , 15 1 1...1984) In this Letter we show that the fixed points of the Ikeda map are more unstable to perturbations with a short- scale transverse structure than to...solutions of the plane-wave map (1) are type. This instability changes the whole character of more unstable to perturbations with a short- scale the

  6. A Biomedical Review of the U.S. Navy Submarine Escape System: 1996.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    navies conducting ascent training in preparation for actual escape STTe- \\a fdy °f thC JapanCSe MaritÜne Self-Defense Force traming, Ikeda and Oiwa...a. Each man hold his nose shut through the hood fabric. b. On the leader’s signal take a deep breath and hold it. c. Inflate the hoods instantly...d. Open the trunk BLOW rapidly and fully. e. Start continuous deep breaths while the trunk is being pressurized. f. Attempt to equalize at each

  7. Bibliography of Germfree Research 1885-1963. 1979 Supplement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    78. Hames, B. D. and Hodson, B. A. Accumulation of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase by axenically grown amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum. Biochem. J...concentration of zinc and iron in tissues of vitamin B6-deficient germ-free rats. J. Nutr. Sci Vitaminol. (Tokyo). 25(3):151-158, 1979. 93. Ikeda, M...immunoglobulin classes of milk antibodies after oral- intranasal inoculation of sows with a live low cell culture-passaged virus. Am. J. Vet. Res. 40(l):115-117

  8. The Fourier Transform Microwave (ftmw) Spectra of Cyclohexene Oxide and its Argon Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohman, Daniel J.; Novick, Stewart E.; Pringle, Wallace C.

    2012-06-01

    The microwave spectrum of cyclohexene oxide and its isotopologues have been observed and assigned, improving upon previous rotational studies of this molecule. Additionally, the 17O isotopomer of cyclohexene oxide and the Ar complex of the normal isotopologue of cyclohexene oxide have been fit for the first time. Fits for the 13C-cyclohexene oxide Ar complexes will also be presented. Tatsuya Ikeda, Roger Kewley, and R. F. Curl, Jr. J. Mol. Spectrosc., 4} (1972), 459-469. Raquel Sánchez, Susana Blanco, Juan C. López, and José L. Alonso. J. Mol. Struct., 780-781 (2006), 57-64.

  9. Discriminating additive from dynamical noise for chaotic time series.

    PubMed

    Strumik, Marek; Macek, Wiesław M; Redaelli, Stefano

    2005-09-01

    We consider the dynamics of the Hénon and Ikeda maps in the presence of additive and dynamical noise. We show that, from the point of view of computations of some statistical quantities, dynamical noise corrupting these deterministic systems can be considered effectively as an additive "pseudonoise" with the Cauchy distribution. In the case of the Hénon and Ikeda maps, this effect occurs only for one variable of the system, while the noise corrupting the second variable is still Gaussian distributed independent of distribution of dynamical noise. Based on these results and using scaling properties of the correlation entropy, we propose a simple method of discriminating additive from dynamical noise. This approach is also useful for estimation of noise level for chaotic time series. We show that the proposed method works well in a wide range of noise levels, providing that one kind of noise predominates and we analyze the variable of the system for which the contamination follows Cauchy-like distribution in the presence of dynamical noise.

  10. Paradoxical activity of beta-lactam antibiotics against Proteus vulgaris in experimental infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Fukuoka, Y; Motomura, K; Yasuda, T; Nishino, T

    1990-01-01

    In previous papers (Y. Ikeda and T. Nishino, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1073-1077, 1988; Y. Ikeda, T. Nishino, and T. Tanino, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 31:865-869, 1987), we reported that many of the 7-aminothiazolyl cephalosporins, such as cefmenoxime, showed paradoxically reduced activity against Proteus vulgaris at higher concentrations, whereas these paradoxical effects were not observed for other types of cephalosporins, such as cefbuperazone and cefoperazone. In this study, we compare the therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime with that of cefbuperazone and explore the in vivo paradoxical effect of cefmenoxime by using an experimental infection model in mice. In an intraperitoneal infection with P. vulgaris 11, the survival rate with cefmenoxime was increased to 43% at 3.13 mg/kg but was lower at higher doses. On the other hand, cefbuperazone did not show such a paradoxical therapeutic effect. In mice infected with P. vulgaris 11, cefmenoxime levels in both serum and peritoneal washings were rapidly reduced and beta-lactamase activities in the peritoneal cavity were increased at higher cefmenoxime doses. These findings suggested that high levels of cefmenoxime at the infection site induced increased production of beta-lactamase, which then rapidly inactivated the antibiotic. We conclude that the paradoxical therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime against P. vulgaris occurs by the same mechanisms as the in vitro effect and that the high beta-lactamase inducibility and low beta-lactamase stability may account for the paradoxical therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime against P. vulgaris.

  11. History of glutamate production.

    PubMed

    Sano, Chiaki

    2009-09-01

    In 1907 Kikunae Ikeda, a professor at the Tokyo Imperial University, began his research to identify the umami component in kelp. Within a year, he had succeeded in isolating, purifying, and identifying the principal component of umami and quickly obtained a production patent. In 1909 Saburosuke Suzuki, an entrepreneur, and Ikeda began the industrial production of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG). The first industrial production process was an extraction method in which vegetable proteins were treated with hydrochloric acid to disrupt peptide bonds. l-Glutamic acid hydrochloride was then isolated from this material and purified as MSG. Initial production of MSG was limited because of the technical drawbacks of this method. Better methods did not emerge until the 1950s. One of these was direct chemical synthesis, which was used from 1962 to 1973. In this procedure, acrylonitrile was the starting material, and optical resolution of dl-glutamic acid was achieved by preferential crystallization. In 1956 a direct fermentation method to produce glutamate was introduced. The advantages of the fermentation method (eg, reduction of production costs and environmental load) were large enough to cause all glutamate manufacturers to shift to fermentation. Today, total world production of MSG by fermentation is estimated to be 2 million tons/y (2 billion kg/y). However, future production growth will likely require further innovation.

  12. Unraveling a 70-year-old taxonomic puzzle: redefining the genus ikedosoma (annelida: echiura) on the basis of morphological and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaatsu; Kon, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Teruaki

    2014-12-01

    After a long-standing taxonomic confusion, the echiurid genus Ikedosoma Bock, 1942 , endemic to Japan and surroundings, is redefined on the basis of morphological and molecular analyses of many new Japanese materials and some museum specimens. The re-examination of a syntype of I. elegans ( Ikeda, 1904 ), the type species of the genus, first revealed that its oblique muscle layer is continuous throughout and never fasciculate between longitudinal muscle bands, unlike those described in the definitions that have prevailed for ca. 70 years, making this genus indistinguishable from Listriolobus Spengel, 1912 . Two Japanese species of Ikedosoma, I. elegans and I. gogoshimense (Ikeda, 1904), which were thus redefined, had also been poorly defined in the past to the point of being nearly indistinguishable from each other, largely due to incomplete descriptions and poor collections. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA, histone H3, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) genes clearly confirmed the distinction between these two species, their monophyletic origin, and their distinction from L. sorbillans (Lampert, 1883). The genus Ikedosoma thus validated is morphologically distinguishable from Listriolobus by the absence of a rectal caecum. Ikedosoma elegans and I. gogoshimense also differ in the disposition of gonoduct pairs. The third known species, I. qingdaoense Li, Wang and Zhou, 1994 , from Qingdao, North China, lacks information on oblique muscle layers, which makes even its generic affiliation uncertain.

  13. Excision and duplication of su3+-transducing fragments carried by bacteriophage phi 80. I. Novel structure of phi 80sus2psu3+ DNA molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, H; Inokuchi, H; Ozeki, H

    1976-01-01

    DNA molecules of phi 80sus2psu3+ and phi 80dsu3+ isolated by Andoh and Ozeki (1968) were studied by the electron microscope heteroduplex method. The phi 80sus2psu3+ and phi 80dsu3+ DNA lengths were found to be 108.7 and 103.3% of the phi 80 DNA, respectively. The phi 80sus2psu3+/phi 80 heteroduplex shows an insertion loop of 8.7% of the phi 80 DNA which migrates from 7.7 to 9.7%, as measured relative to the left (0%) and right (100%) termini of the mature phi 80 DNA molecule. The region of loop migration occupies the central region of the phi 80 head gene cluster. The presence of su3+-containing Escherichia coli DNA of 6.7% phi 80 unit flanked by two homologous regions of phage DNA of 2.0% of phi 80 unit gives rise to a movable insertion loop. In phi 80dsu3+, from which phi 80sus2psu3+ was derived, 50.5% of the phi 80 DNA at the left arm was replaced by E. coli DNA containing the su3+ gene, equivalent to about 53.8% phi 80 unit in length. The phi 80sus2psu3+/phi 80dsu3+ heteroduplex appears as a double-stranded molecule that bifurcates into two clearly visible single-stranded regions, rejoins, bifurcates, and rejoins again. The middle double-stranded stretches of 6.7% phi 80 unit correspond to the E. coli DNA inserted in phi 80sus2psu3+. Therefore the transducing fragment carried by phi 80sus2psu3+ originates from the inside region of the transducing fragment of defective phage phi 80dsu3+ by at least two illegitimate recombination events. Images PMID:1271527

  14. Antioxidant Enzymes Regulate Reactive Oxygen Species during Pod Elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.− and.OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of.OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.− was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.− decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of.OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells. PMID:24503564

  15. Nova in Scorpius (V1311 Sco = N Sco 2010 No. 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2010-05-01

    Announcement is made of the independent discovery of N Sco 2010 No. 2 = V1311 Sco by four teams of observers: Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan) on 2010 Apr. 25.788 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.6; Hideo Nishimura (Miyawaki, Kakegawa, Shizuoka-ken, Japan) on Apr. 25.763 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.3; Tadashi Kojima (Tsumagoi, Agatsuma-gun, Gunma-ken, Japan) on Apr. 25.738 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.8; and Yukio Sakurai (Mito, Ibaraki-ken, Japan) on Apr. 25.734 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.8. Low-resolution spectra taken by H. Koberger (Vilaflor, Tenerife) and W. Vollmann (Vienna, Austria) on Apr. 27.199, and by H. Maehara (Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, Japan) on Apr. 29.704 UT, confirm a classical nova. A low-resolution spectrum by K. Kinugasa, H. Takahashi, and O. Hashimoto (Gunma Astronomical Observatory, China) suggests a He/N nova in decline. Initially announced in CBET 2262 (D. W. E. Green, ed.) and AAVSO Special Notice #207 (Waagen), with additional information in CBET 2265 (Green) and IAU Circular 9142 (Green). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details, observations, and links to images.

  16. Nova Sagittarii 2015 = PNV J18142514-2554343

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2015-02-01

    AAVSO Alert Notice 509 announces the discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2015 = PNV J18142514-2554343 [V5667 Sgr]. Independent discoveries were made as follows: Hideo Nishimura (Shizuoka-ken, Japan) on 2015 February 12.840 UT at DSLR magnitude 11.2, using 200-mm f/3.2 lens + digital camera; Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan) on 2015 February 12.87837 UT at unfiltered CCD magnitude 10.9, using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens (+SBIG STL6303E camera). Coordinates: R.A. 18 14 25.14 Dec. -25 54 34.3 (2000.0). Echelle spectra by Frederick Walter (Stony Brook University) taken on the night of 2015 February 15/16 UT near maximum light indicate that N Sgr 2015 is a classical Fe II nova. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  17. Coming of Age With Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    1. Letters to David Baker; 2. Letters to Howard Baker; 3. Letters to Howard Barnum; 4. Letters to Paul Benioff; 5. Letters to Charlie Bennett; 6. Letters to Herb Bernstein; 7. Letters to Doug Bilodeau; 8. Letters to Gilles Brassard; 9. Letters to Jeffrey Bub; 10. Letters to Carlton Caves; 11. Letters to Greg Comer; 12. Letters to Charles Enz; 13. Letters to Henry Folse; 14. Letters to Bob Griffiths; 15. Letters to Adrian Kent; 16. Letters to Rolf Landauer; 17. Letters to Hideo Mabuchi; 18. Letters to David Mermin; 19. Letters to David Meyer; 20. Letters to Jeff Nicholson; 21. Letters to Michael Nielsen; 22. Letters to Asher Peres; 23. Diary of a carefully worded paper: more letters to Asher Peres; 24. Letters to John Preskill; 25. Letters to Joseph Renes; 26. Letters to Mary Beth Ruskai; 27. Letters to Rüdiger Schack; 28. Letters to Robert Schumann; 29. Letters to Abner Shimony; 30. Letters to Jon Waskan; 31. Letters to Bill Wootters; 32. Letters to Anton Zeilinger; 33. Other letters; Index.

  18. [Development of Spiritual Care in Cancer Treatment in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimazono, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Spiritual care started worldwide in the late 1960s with the development of the hospice movement and death studies. Why did spiritual care start duringthis time in history ? In some Christian societies, of that time,"pastoral care" evolved into an interfaith "spiritual care" where in the caretaker was the main agent instead of the caregiver. On the other hand, the importance of palliative care for cancer patients was gradually acknowledged. In addition, this progress was accompanied by the academic development of "death studies" which is called "death and life studies" in Japan. The Japanese hospice care and death studies movement started in the late 1970s. In the precedingperiod, the spiritual quest of cancer patients facingdeath was already gaining public attention. A scholar of religious studies, Hideo Kishimoto of the University of Tokyo, was diagnosed with cancer in 1954; he survived many operations until his death in 1964. Duringthose years, he wrote about his personal experience of acceptinghis approachingdeath. Although he did not believe in any specific faith, he had studied various religious teachings. It is important to understand his perception of his own death. His book, On Facing Death, was published immediately after his death. Therefore, it provided a prominent discourse on copingwith spiritual pain of approachingdeath even before the growth of spiritual care in Japan.

  19. Gone Fission... Diverse consequences of cardiac Drp1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins are highly expressed in myocardium. However, mitochondrial fission and fusion are rare, and mitochondrial networks are absent, in adult cardiomyocytes, obviating a need for morphometric mitochondrial remodeling. The critical role of mitochondrial dynamics factors in hearts therefore remains to be determined. In this issue of Circulation Research Ikeda et al describe a central function for the mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp-1), in macroautophagy and mitochondrial autophagy. Together with two other recent reports that cardiac-specific deletion of Drp1 perturbs mitophagy, these findings point to modulation of targeted mitochondrial elimination as a major quality control function for Drp1, and possible other mitochondrial dynamism factors, in the heart. PMID:25593271

  20. An adaptive way for improving noise reduction using local geometric projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontitsis, Alexandros; Bountis, Tassos; Pagge, Jenny

    2004-03-01

    We propose an adaptive way to improve noise reduction by local geometric projection. From the neighborhood of each candidate point in phase space, we identify the best subspace that the point will be orthogonally projected to. The signal subspace is formed by the most significant eigendirections of the neighborhood, while the less significant ones define the noise subspace. We provide a simple criterion to separate the most significant eigendirections from the less significant ones. This criterion is based on the maximum logarithmic difference between the neighborhood eigendirection lengths, and the assumption that there is at least one eigendirection that corresponds to the noise subspace. In this way, we take into account the special characteristics of each neighborhood and introduce a more successful noise reduction technique. Results are presented for a chaotic time series of the Hénon map and Ikeda map, as well as on the Nasdaq Composite index.

  1. Kaonic atoms and in-medium K-N amplitudes II: Interplay between theory and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2013-02-01

    A microscopic kaonic-atom optical potential VK-(1) is constructed, using the Ikeda-Hyodo-Weise NLO chiral K-N subthreshold scattering amplitudes constrained by the kaonic hydrogen SIDDHARTA measurement, and incorporating Pauli correlations within the Waas-Rho-Weise generalization of the Ericson-Ericson multiple-scattering approach. Good fits to kaonic atom data over the entire periodic table require additionally sizable K-NN-motivated absorptive and dispersive phenomenological terms, in agreement with our former analysis based on a post-SIDDHARTA in-medium chirally-inspired NLO separable model by Cieplý and Smejkal. Such terms are included by introducing a phenomenological potential VK-(2) and coupling it self-consistently to VK-(1). Properties of resulting kaonic atom potentials are discussed with special attention paid to the role of K--nuclear absorption and to the extraction of density-dependent amplitudes representing K- multi-nucleon processes.

  2. Chaotic scattering in solitary wave interactions: A singular iterated-map description

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Roy H.

    2008-06-15

    We derive a family of singular iterated maps--closely related to Poincare maps--that describe chaotic interactions between colliding solitary waves. The chaotic behavior of such solitary-wave collisions depends on the transfer of energy to a secondary mode of oscillation, often an internal mode of the pulse. This map allows us to go beyond previous analyses and to understand the interactions in the case when this mode is excited prior to the first collision. The map is derived using Melnikov integrals and matched asymptotic expansions and generalizes a ''multipulse'' Melnikov integral. It allows one to find not only multipulse heteroclinic orbits, but exotic periodic orbits. The maps exhibit singular behavior, including regions of infinite winding. These maps are shown to be singular versions of the conservative Ikeda map from laser physics and connections are made with problems from celestial mechanics and fluid mechanics.

  3. Chaotic scattering in solitary wave interactions: a singular iterated-map description.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Roy H

    2008-06-01

    We derive a family of singular iterated maps--closely related to Poincare maps--that describe chaotic interactions between colliding solitary waves. The chaotic behavior of such solitary-wave collisions depends on the transfer of energy to a secondary mode of oscillation, often an internal mode of the pulse. This map allows us to go beyond previous analyses and to understand the interactions in the case when this mode is excited prior to the first collision. The map is derived using Melnikov integrals and matched asymptotic expansions and generalizes a "multipulse" Melnikov integral. It allows one to find not only multipulse heteroclinic orbits, but exotic periodic orbits. The maps exhibit singular behavior, including regions of infinite winding. These maps are shown to be singular versions of the conservative Ikeda map from laser physics and connections are made with problems from celestial mechanics and fluid mechanics.

  4. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, T.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from {sup 90}Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the {beta}{sub -} and the {beta}{sub +} channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L= 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  5. Description of the 2{nu}{nu}{beta}{beta} decay within a fully renormalized proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation approach with a restored gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Raduta, C. M.; Raduta, A. A.

    2010-12-15

    A many-body Hamiltonian involving the mean field for a projected spherical single-particle basis, the pairing interactions for alike nucleons, and the dipole-dipole proton-neutron interactions in the particle-hole (ph) channel and the ph dipole pairing potential is treated by the projected gauge fully renormalized proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation approach. The resulting wave functions and energies for the mother and daughter nuclei are used to calculate the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay rate and the process half-life. For illustration, the formalism is applied for the decay {sup 100}Mo{yields}{sup 100}Ru. The calculated half-life is in agreement with the corresponding experimental data. The Ikeda sum rule is obeyed.

  6. On the connection among three classical mechanical problems via the hypercomplex KS-transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivarelli, Maria D.

    In expanding the twofold hypercomplex description of rotational kinematics developed by the author (1984), it is shown that Kustaanheimo-Steifel (KS) theory and rotation theory are linked. Based on the connection, a relationship between three classical mechanical problems is developed which connects one-body pure elliptical Kepler motion, the R3 spherical rotator, and the 4D isotropic harmonic oscillator problems. The KS regularizing transformation is incorporated as the projection map in the Hopf fibering of the contact 3-sphere, and the Euler-Rodrigues parameters are used in a Lagrangian description of the rotational kinematics. A unit vector 'a' is also introduced to characterize both the attitude frame of the rotator and the direction of the major axis of the Kepler orbit. The quantistic mathematical connection of Ikeda and Miyachi (1970) is examined to demonstrate that the resulting Euler angles do not have to be rewritten.

  7. Consistency in experiments on multistable driven delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Neus; Larger, Laurent; Fischer, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the consistency properties in the responses of a nonlinear delay optoelectronic intensity oscillator subject to different drives, in particular, harmonic and self-generated waveforms. This system, an implementation of the Ikeda oscillator, is operating in a closed-loop configuration, exhibiting its autonomous dynamics while the drive signals are additionally introduced. Applying the same drive multiple times, we compare the dynamical responses of the optoelectronic oscillator and quantify the degree of consistency among them via their correlation. Our results show that consistency is not restricted to conditions close to the first Hopf bifurcation but can be found in a broad range of dynamical regimes, even in the presence of multistability. Finally, we discuss the dependence of consistency on the nature of the drive signal.

  8. Role of momentum transfer in the quenching of the Gamow-Teller strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marketin, T.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-01

    A recent analysis of (p,n) and (n,p) reaction data from 90Zr was performed recently, where a significant amount of Gamow-Teller strength was found above the resonance, an energy region previously unreachable by experimental setups. The extracted strengths in the β- and the β+ channel indicate that approximately 10% of the total strength necessary to satisfy the model independent Ikeda sum rule is missing. One possible source of this discrepancy is the treatment of the isovector spin monopole (IVSM) mode of excitation which has been found to occurr at high excitation energies. Employing the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model and the protonneutron relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) to calculate the nuclear response, we explore the contribution of the IVSM mode to the total L = 0 strength and apply our results to the available data.

  9. Limitations of the number self-consistent random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Alejandro; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2000-05-01

    The quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) equations are solved taking into account the Pauli principle at the expectation value level, and allowing changes in the mean field occupation numbers to minimize the energy while having the correct number of particles in the correlated vacuum. The study of Fermi pn excitations in 76Ge using a realistic Hilbert space shows that the pairing energy gaps in the modified mean field are diminished up to one half of the experimental value when strong proton-neutron correlations are present. Additionally, the Ikeda sum rule for Fermi transitions is violated due to the lack of scattering terms in the phonon operators. These results call for a critical revision of the double β decay half-lives estimated using the QRPA extensions when standard QRPA calculations collapse.

  10. First records of Lithodes longispina Sakai, 1971 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura: Lithodidae) from southwestern Taiwan, including a site in the vicinity of a cold seep.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng-Wei; Ahyong, Shane T; Chan, Tin-Yam

    2016-01-14

    Lithodid crabs (Lithodidae Samouelle, 1819), commonly known as king crabs, are frequent targets of commercial fishing worldwide with most of them living in deep water (Sakai 1971; Ahyong et al. 2010). Lithodes Latreille, 1806, is the second largest genus of lithodid crabs, currently including 29 species worldwide (Ahyong 2010). In Taiwanese waters, however, only two species, L. turritus Ortmann, 1892, and L. formosae Ahyong & Chan, 2010, have been reported (Wu et al. 1998; Ahyong & Chan 2010; Ahyong et al. 2010). We report herein the discovery of L. longispina Sakai, 1971, previously known reliably only from Japan (Sakai 1971; Ikeda 1998; Ahyong 2010), from off southwestern Taiwan, including a specimen collected in the vicinity of a cold seep.

  11. Shape-retainment control using an antagonistic shape memory alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, T.; Sawamura, K.; Senba, A.; Tamayama, M.

    2015-04-01

    Since shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators can generate large force per unit weight, they are expected as one of the next generation actuators for aircraft. To keep a position of conventional control surfaces or morphing wings with SMA actuators, the SMA actuators must keep being heated, and the heating energy is not small. To save the energy, a new control method proposed for piezoelectric actuators utilizing hysteresis in deformation [Ikeda and Takahashi, Proc. SPIE 8689 (2013), 86890C] is applied to an antagonistic SMA system. By using the control method any position can be an equilibrium point within hysteresis of stress-strain diagrams. To confirm a feasibility of the control method, a fundamental experiment is performed. The SMA wires are heated by applying electric current to the wires. When a pulsed current is applied to the two SMA wires alternately, the equilibrium position changes between two positions alternately, and when a series of pulse whose amplitude increases gradually is applied to one SMA wire, the equilibrium position changes like a staircase. However, just after the pulse the position returns slightly, that is, overshoot takes place. To investigate such a behavior of the system, numerical simulation is also performed. The one-dimensional phase transformation model [Ikeda, Proc. SPIE 5757 (2005), 344-352] is used for a constitutive model of the SMA wires. The simulated result agrees with the experiment qualitatively, including the overshoot. By examining volume fraction of each phase, it is found that the overshoot is caused by that austenite phase transforms into stress-induced martensite phase during the cooling process after the pulse.

  12. Development and Validation of a Quantitative PCR Assay Using Multiplexed Hydrolysis Probes for Detection and Quantification of Theileria orientalis Isolates and Differentiation of Clinically Relevant Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bogema, D. R.; Deutscher, A. T.; Fell, S.; Collins, D.; Eamens, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Theileria orientalis is an emerging pathogen of cattle in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. This organism is a vector-borne hemoprotozoan that causes clinical disease characterized by anemia, abortion, and death, as well as persistent subclinical infections. Molecular methods of diagnosis are preferred due to their sensitivity and utility in differentiating between pathogenic and apathogenic genotypes. Conventional PCR (cPCR) assays for T. orientalis detection and typing are laborious and do not provide an estimate of parasite load. Current real-time PCR assays cannot differentiate between clinically relevant and benign genotypes or are only semiquantitative without a defined clinical threshold. Here, we developed and validated a hydrolysis probe quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay which universally detects and quantifies T. orientalis and identifies the clinically associated Ikeda and Chitose genotypes (UIC assay). Comparison of the UIC assay results with previously validated universal and genotype-specific cPCR results demonstrated that qPCR detects and differentiates T. orientalis with high sensitivity and specificiy. Comparison of quantitative results based on percent parasitemia, determined via blood film analysis and packed cell volume (PCV) revealed significant positive and negative correlations, respectively. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that blood samples from animals with clinical signs of disease contained statistically higher concentrations of T. orientalis DNA than animals with subclinical infections. We propose clinical thresholds to assist in classifying high-, moderate-, and low-level infections and describe how parasite load and the presence of the Ikeda and Chitose genotypes relate to disease. PMID:25588653

  13. River meander modeling and confronting uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, Ari J.

    2011-05-01

    This study examines the meandering phenomenon as it occurs in media throughout terrestrial, glacial, atmospheric, and aquatic environments. Analysis of the minimum energy principle, along with theories of Coriolis forces (and random walks to explain the meandering phenomenon) found that these theories apply at different temporal and spatial scales. Coriolis forces might induce topological changes resulting in meandering planforms. The minimum energy principle might explain how these forces combine to limit the sinuosity to depth and width ratios that are common throughout various media. The study then compares the first order analytical solutions for flow field by Ikeda, et al. (1981) and Johannesson and Parker (1989b). Ikeda's et al. linear bank erosion model was implemented to predict the rate of bank erosion in which the bank erosion coefficient is treated as a stochastic variable that varies with physical properties of the bank (e.g., cohesiveness, stratigraphy, or vegetation density). The developed model was used to predict the evolution of meandering planforms. Then, the modeling results were analyzed and compared to the observed data. Since the migration of a meandering channel consists of downstream translation, lateral expansion, and downstream or upstream rotations several measures are formulated in order to determine which of the resulting planforms is closest to the experimental measured one. Results from the deterministic model highly depend on the calibrated erosion coefficient. Since field measurements are always limited, the stochastic model yielded more realistic predictions of meandering planform evolutions. Due to the random nature of bank erosion coefficient, the meandering planform evolution is a stochastic process that can only be accurately predicted by a stochastic model.

  14. Vibrational modes and thermal transformation of purified single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Un Jeong

    Vibrational modes of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphitic nanoribbons (GNRs) were studied using Raman scattering and/or Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopies, Variations in a three-step purification scheme to remove amorphous carbon and residual catalyst were studied: (step 1) Oxidation, (step 2) Acid Reflux, and (step 3) Thermal Annealing were found to remove most amorphous carbon (oxidation step) and residual metal catalyst (acid reflux step) which were the major impurity phases. By combining IR and Raman, we found considerable wall damage and functional groups (e.g.-COOH and-OH) could be introduced via H2O2 and HNO3 reflux. Surprisingly, vacuum annealing at ˜1100°C for a few hours was found to remove most wall damage and functional groups. Methods to break up large (purified) bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to individual tubes were also investigated. Amide solvents with ultrasound were found to be very effective in debundling; initial purification treatment strongly impacted the outcome. SWNT material decorated with functional groups (e.g., -COOH) tended to produce higher yields of single tubes. Length and diameter distributions of individual tubes were measured using Atomic Force Microscopy. Aggressive chemical debundling processes were found to lead to more functionalization, higher degree of debundling and shorter tubes. The IR-active modes of SWNTs was observed for the first time by transmission method, some ten years after the discovery of the Raman-active modes. In concert with theoretical calculations, we were able to assign much of the sharp structure in the IR with anticipated one- and two-phonon lattice mode bands. Thermal evolution of bundled SWNT materials produced in the electric arc (ARC) and by CVD in CO gas (HiPCO) was also investigated. Although both ARC and HiPCO evolved thermally to multi-walled tubes (MWNTs), we found using electron microscopy that for T>2000°C ARC SWNTs (with significantly narrower

  15. UV light induced insulator-metal transition in ultra-thin ZnO/TiOx stacked layer grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, D.; Misra, P.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, atomic layer deposition has been used to grow a series of Ti incorporated ZnO thin films by vertically stacking different numbers (n = 1-7) of ZnO/TiOx layers on (0001) sapphire substrates. The effects of defect states mediated chemisorption of O2 and/OH groups on the electrical properties of these films have been investigated by illuminating the samples under UV light inside a high vacuum optical cryostat. The ultra-thin film having one stacked layer (n = 1) did not show any change in its electrical resistance upon UV light exposure. On the contrary, marginal drop in the electrical resistivity was measured for the samples with n ≥ 3. Most surprisingly, the sample with n = 2 (thickness ˜ 12 nm) showed an insulator to metal transition upon UV light exposure. The temperature dependent electrical resistivity measurement on the as grown film (n = 2) showed insulating behaviour, i.e., diverging resistivity on extrapolation to T→ 0 K. However, upon UV light exposure, it transformed to a metallic state, i.e., finite resistivity at T → 0 K. Such an insulator-metal transition plausibly arises due to the de-trapping of conduction electrons from the surface defect sites which resulted in an upward shift of the Fermi level above the mobility edge. The low-temperature electron transport properties on the insulating film (n = 2) were investigated by a combined study of zero field electrical resistivity ρ(T) and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. The observed negative MR was found to be in good agreement with the magnetic field induced suppression of quantum interference between forward-going paths of tunnelling electrons. Both ρ(T) and MR measurements provided strong evidence for the Efros-Shklovskii type variable range hopping conduction in the low-temperature (≤40 K) regime. Such studies on electron transport in ultra-thin n-type doped ZnO films are crucial to achieve optimum functionality with long term reliability of ZnO based transparent

  16. Air fractionation in plate-like inclusions within the EPICA-DML deep ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, A.; Faria, S. H.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Schmidt, B.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2009-04-01

    On ice samples from the ice core recovered in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica at the deep drilling site in Dronning Maud Land (75°00S; 00°04E) micro-Raman spectrochemical analysis was applied to typical relaxation features appearing after the extraction of an ice core. Essentially, these relaxation microinclusions are little planar polygonal cavities possessing hexagonal symmetry i.e. thin negative crystals lying on the basal plane of the hosting ice crystallite. Usually named plate-like inclusions, PLIs, they tend to change their aspect ratio becoming in general rounder, thicker or thinner depending on the equilibrium established between the structure-composition of the ice and the minute environmental temperature-pressure conditions around a specific PLI, but still preserving a very large aspect ratio (typically 20:1). Muguruma and others (1966) and Mae (1968) have reported studies on plate hexagonal voids, i.e. PLIs, produced (only) in tensile deformation tests of natural and artificial single ice crystals while the first report of PLIs in Antarctic ice cores was presented by Gow (1971). In spite of these early studies and the abundance of PLIs in stored ice core samples, extended investigations of these relaxation features are scarce. We present the results of the first successful study of the chemical composition of PLIs using microfocus Raman spectroscopy (Nedelcu and others, in press). We observe that the relaxation features contain mainly O2 and N2 in their interior, with N2/O2 ratios smaller than 3.7 (the nowadays atmospheric air N2/O2 ratio), indicating a general oxygen enrichment that is not so different from O2 enrichments reported in other investigations on polar ice samples (Nakahara and others, 1988, Ikeda and others, 1999). These results seem to lend support to the current hypothesis that O2 diffuses faster than N2 through the ice matrix (Ikeda-Fukazawa and others, 2001, 2005; Severinghaus and Battle, 2006). More

  17. Solar Success Story at Moanalua Terrace

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    Solar systems prove to be the environmentally and economically sound choice for heating water in U.S. Navy housing at Moanalua Terrace in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hawaii is a perfect environment for solar water heating,'' according to Alan Ikeda, a Housing Management Specialist with the Pacific Naval Facility Engineering Command Housing Department in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ''The sun shines most of the time, we don't have to worry about freezing, the state offers a 35% solar tax credit, and our local utility supports the purchase and installation of solar systems with generous rebates.'' The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction helped persuade the Navy to take advantage of Hawaii's solar resource and install solar water heaters on family housing units. At Moanalua Terrace, the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which they are rebuilding in four phases. Designers decided to use the opportunity to give the solar systems a try. When the 100 homes in Phase I were built, money was not available for solar water heaters. However, Ikeda subsequently secured a $130,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to retrofit the Phase I homes with solar systems. In retrofit applications, HECO rebates $800 per unit ($80,000 total) on approved equipment, and Pearl Harbor Family Housing will pay the difference of the estimated $340,000 total cost, or about $130,000. The 136 units built during Phase II of the Moanalua Terrace project included solar systems in their specifications, so the Navy was able to take advantage of the $1,500 per system HECO rebate for approved solar water heaters in new construction. The Navy chose direct (open-loop) active systems that circulate potable water through flat-plate collectors coated with a black chrome selective surface. Each system consists of a 4-foot by 8-foot (1.2-m by 2.4-m) collector made by American

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of benign Theileria species based on major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) genes from ticks of grazing cattle in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Won; Nguyen, Lien Thi Kim; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Kweon, Chang Hee; Choe, Se Eun

    2012-10-26

    Complete major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene sequences of benign Theileria parasites were isolated from ticks of grazing cattle in Korea. A total of 556 tick samples were collected in five provinces: Chungbuk, Jeonbuk, Jeonnam, Gyeongbuk, and Jeju during 2010-2011. Fifteen samples from Chungbuk and Jeonnam were positive for the Theileria MPSP gene by PCR amplification using a specific primer set. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the amplified gene sequences and 26 additional sequences published in GenBank. The benign Theileria parasites were classified into eight types, those isolated from Korean cattle ticks belonged to Types 1 (Ikeda), 2 (Chitose), 4, and 8. Types 2 and 4 were the most common types, with the rate of 40%, followed by Types 1 and 8 (with the rate of 13% and 7%, respectively). Nucleotide sequence identities of 23 theilerial MPSP sequences (15 MPSP gene sequences amplified and 8 sequences published) ranged from 67.3 to 99.8%. Multiple alignments of the deduced amino acid sequences also showed that each type was characterized by specific amino acids: 7 for Type 1, 9 for Type 2, 4 for Type 4, and 3 for Type 8.

  19. Epidemiological survey of Theileria orientalis infection in grazing cattle in the eastern part of Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ota, Naomi; Mizuno, Daisuke; Kuboki, Noritaka; Igarashi, Ikuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Yamashina, Hidenari; Hanzaike, Teruko; Fujii, Kei; Onoe, Sadao; Hata, Hiroshi; Kondo, Seiji; Matsui, Shirou; Koga, Masao; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2009-07-01

    Theileria orientalis is one of the benign species of Theileria that is widely distributed in Japan and is sometimes responsible for serious economic losses in the livestock industry. In the present study, we surveyed the current status of T. orientalis infection in grazing cattle in the eastern areas of Hokkaido (Taiki, Otofuke, Shintoku, and Shin-Hidaka districts) using molecular methods, as well as traditional methods, of diagnosis. The genes encoding the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) and p23 of T. orientalis were identified using highly detectable polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results of the MPSP-PCR assay indicated that grazing cattle in these districts, after about 1.5 months pasturage, showed high rates of infection, ranging from 10.0-64.8%. Although the main MPSP and p23 genotypes detected were the Ikeda- or Chitose-types, an MPSP gene closely relating to that found in Okinawa prefecture, and a p23 gene closely relating to the Australian (Warwick) Buffeli-type gene, were found in the cattle in Shintoku and Shin-Hidaka districts. The present survey indicated that there were at least five types of T. orientalis classified by their MPSP genes in Hokkaido, Japan, and that T. orientalis infection rates are still high in this region.

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of Aurantimonas and Methylobacterium strains from stems of hypernodulated soybeans.

    PubMed

    Anda, Mizue; Ikeda, Seishi; Eda, Shima; Okubo, Takashi; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to isolate Aurantimonas and Methylobacterium strains that responded to soybean nodulation phenotypes and nitrogen fertilization rates in a previous culture-independent analysis (Ikeda et al. ISME J. 4:315-326, 2010). Two strategies were adopted for isolation from enriched bacterial cells prepared from stems of field-grown, hypernodulated soybeans: PCR-assisted isolation for Aurantimonas and selective cultivation for Methylobacterium. Thirteen of 768 isolates cultivated on Nutrient Agar medium were identified as Aurantimonas by colony PCR specific for Aurantimonas and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Meanwhile, among 187 isolates on methanol-containing agar media, 126 were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequences as Methylobacterium. A clustering analysis (>99% identity) of the 16S rRNA gene sequences for the combined datasets of the present and previous studies revealed 4 and 8 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for Aurantimonas and Methylobacterium, respectively, and showed the successful isolation of target bacteria for these two groups. ERIC- and BOX-PCR showed the genomic uniformity of the target isolates. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of Aurantimonas revealed a phyllosphere-specific cluster in the genus. The isolates obtained in the present study will be useful for revealing unknown legume-microbe interactions in relation to the autoregulation of nodulation.

  1. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  2. Characterization of a second member of the subfamily of calcium-binding mitochondrial carriers expressed in human non-excitable tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Del Arco, A; Agudo, M; Satrústegui, J

    2000-01-01

    We have recently identified a subfamily of mitochondrial carriers that bind calcium, and cloned ARALAR1, a member of this subfamily expressed in human muscle and brain. We have now cloned a second human ARALAR gene (ARALAR2) coding for a protein 78.3% identical to Aralar1, but expressed in liver and non-excitable tissues. Aralar2 is identical to citrin, the product of the gene mutated in type-II citrullinaemia [Kobayashi, Sinasac, Iijima, Boright, Begum, Lee, Yasuda, Ikeda, Hirano, Terazono et al. (1999) Nat. Genet. 22, 159-163]. A related protein, DmAralar, 69% identical to Aralar1, was found in Drosophila melanogaster, the DMARALAR locus lying on the right arm of the third chromosome, band 99F. The N-terminal half of Aralar2/citrin is able to bind calcium and this requires the presence of the two most distal EF-hands. The localization of Aralar2/citrin expressed in human cell lines is mitochondrial, the C-terminal half containing sufficient information for import and assembly into mitochondria. The C-terminal half of Aralar proteins is related to the yeast YPR020c gene, with a very high sequence conservation (54.3% identity), suggesting that these proteins play an important role. Thus Aralar proteins are probably expressed in all tissues in an isoform-specific fashion, where they function as calcium-regulated metabolite (possibly anionic) carriers. PMID:10642534

  3. On the Kontsevich ★-product associativity mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buring, R.; Kiselev, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    The deformation quantization by Kontsevich is a way to construct an associative noncommutative star-product \\star = × + \\hbar {,_P} + \\overline o ( \\hbar ) in the algebra of formal power series in h on a given finite-dimensional affine Poisson manifold: here × is the usual multiplication, {,} P ≠ 0 is the Poisson bracket, and h is the deformation parameter. The product ★ is assembled at all powers h k ≥ 0 via summation over a certain set of weighted graphs with k + 2 vertices; for each k > 0, every such graph connects the two co-multiples of ★ using k copies of {,} P . Cattaneo and Felder interpreted these topological portraits as genuine Feynman diagrams in the Ikeda-Izawa model for quantum gravity. By expanding the star-product up to \\bar o( {{\\hbar ^3}} ), i.e., with respect to graphs with at most five vertices but possibly containing loops, we illustrate the mechanism Assoc = ≦ (Poisson) that converts the Jacobi identity for the bracket {,} P into the associativity of ★.

  4. Prototapirella ciliates from wild habituated Virunga mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in Rwanda with the descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Eckardt, Winnie; Stoinski, Tara S; Gillespie, Thomas R; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2016-06-01

    The morphology of Prototapirella fosseyi n. sp., P. rwanda n. sp. and P. gorillaeImai, Ikeda, Collet, and Bonhomme, 1991 in the Entodiniomorphida were described from the mountain gorillas, Gorilla beringei beringei, in Rwanda. The ciliates have a retractable adoral ciliary zone, four non-retractable ciliary tufts in four caudalia, and one broad skeletal plate beneath the body surface. P. rwanda has a dorsal lobe and ventral lobes in two rows whereas P. fosseyi has no lobes. These two new species have an elongated body, a flat tail flap leaning to the ventral, a macronucleus with a tapering anterior end, a round posterior end and a shallow depression on the dorsal side, a micronucleus lying near the anterior end of macronucleus, a thin left region of the skeletal plate, a distinct skeletal rod plate, and four contractile vacuoles. P. gorillae has some variations in the nuclei and the skeletal plate. The infraciliary bands of three Prototapirella species were the same as some Triplumaria species; a C-shaped adoral polybrachykinety, a slender perivestibular polybrachykinety, and paralabial kineties in their retractable adoral ciliary zone and short lateral polybrachykineties in their four caudalia. The perivestibular polybrachykinety is joined only to the right end of adoral polybrachykinety.

  5. Global conformational change associated with the two-step reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli lipoate-protein ligase A.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kazuko; Maita, Nobuo; Hosaka, Harumi; Okamura-Ikeda, Kazuko; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Hisaaki

    2010-03-26

    Lipoate-protein ligase A (LplA) catalyzes the attachment of lipoic acid to lipoate-dependent enzymes by a two-step reaction: first the lipoate adenylation reaction and, second, the lipoate transfer reaction. We previously determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli LplA in its unliganded form and a binary complex with lipoic acid (Fujiwara, K., Toma, S., Okamura-Ikeda, K., Motokawa, Y., Nakagawa, A., and Taniguchi, H. (2005) J Biol. Chem. 280, 33645-33651). Here, we report two new LplA structures, LplA.lipoyl-5'-AMP and LplA.octyl-5'-AMP.apoH-protein complexes, which represent the post-lipoate adenylation intermediate state and the pre-lipoate transfer intermediate state, respectively. These structures demonstrate three large scale conformational changes upon completion of the lipoate adenylation reaction: movements of the adenylate-binding and lipoate-binding loops to maintain the lipoyl-5'-AMP reaction intermediate and rotation of the C-terminal domain by about 180 degrees . These changes are prerequisites for LplA to accommodate apoprotein for the second reaction. The Lys(133) residue plays essential roles in both lipoate adenylation and lipoate transfer reactions. Based on structural and kinetic data, we propose a reaction mechanism driven by conformational changes.

  6. Ultrafast all-optical switching using signal flow graph for PANDA resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2013-04-20

    In this paper, the bifurcation behavior of light in the PANDA ring resonator is investigated using the signal flow graph (SFG) method, where the optical transfer function for the through and drop ports of the PANDA Vernier system are derived. The optical nonlinear phenomena, such as bistability, Ikeda instability, and dynamics of light in the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) PANDA ring resonator with four couplers are studied. The transmission curves for bistability and instability as a function of the resonant mode numbers and coupling coefficients for the coupler are derived by the SFG method and simulated. The proposed system has an advantage as no optical pumping component is required. Simulated results show that closed-loop bistable switching can be generated and achieved by varying mode resonant numbers in the SOI-PANDA Vernier resonator, where a smooth and closed-loop bistable switching with low relative output/input power can be obtained and realized. The minimum through-port switching time of 1.1 ps for resonant mode numbers of 5;4;4 and minimum drop port switching time of 1.96 ps for resonant mode numbers of 9;7;7 of the PANDA Vernier resonator are achieved, which makes the PANDA Vernier resonator an operative component for optical applications, such as optical signal processing and a fast switching key in photonics integrated circuits.

  7. Astronomical large Ge immersion grating by Canon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukegawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kitamura, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Immersion grating is a powerful optical device for thee infrared high-resolution spectroscope. Germanium (GGe) is the best material for a mid-infrared immersion grating because of Ge has very large reflective index (n=4.0). On the other hands, there is no practical Ge immersion grating under 5umm use. It was very difficult for a fragile IR crystal to manufacture a diffraction grating precisely. Our original free-forming machine has accuracy of a few nano-meter in positioning and stability. We already fabricated the large CdZnTe immersion grating. (Sukegawa et al. (2012), Ikeda et al. (2015)) Wee are developing Ge immersion grating that can be a good solution for high-resolution infrared spectroscopy with the large ground-based/space telescopes. We succeeded practical Ge immersion grating with the grooved area off 75mm (ruled direction) x 119mm (grove width) and the blaze angle of 75 degrees. Our astronomical large Ge immersion grating has the grooved area of 155mm (ruled direction) x 41mmm (groove width) and groove pitch off 91.74um. We also report optical performance of astronomical large Ge immersion grating with a metal coating on the diffraction surface.

  8. Anderson localized state as a predissipative state: irreversible emission of thermalized quanta from a dynamically delocalized state.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Kensuke S

    2002-04-01

    It was shown that localization in one-dimensional disordered (quantum) electronic system is destroyed against coherent harmonic perturbations and the delocalized electron exhibits an unlimited diffusive motion [Yamada and Ikeda, Phys. Rev. E 59, 5214 (1999)]. The appearance of diffusion implies that the system has potential for irreversibility and dissipation. In the present paper, we investigate dissipative property of the dynamically delocalized state, and we show that an irreversible quasistationary energy flow indeed appears in the form of a "heat" flow when we couple the system with another dynamical degree of freedom. In the concrete we numerically investigate dissipative properties of a one-dimensional tight-binding electronic system perturbed by time-dependent harmonic forces, by coupling it with a quantum harmonic oscillator or a quantum anharmonic oscillator. It is demonstrated that if the on-site potential is spatially irregular an irreversible energy transfer from the scattered electron to the test oscillator occurs. Moreover, the test oscillator promptly approaches a thermalized state characterized by a well-defined time-dependent temperature. On the contrary, such a relaxation process cannot be observed at all for periodic potential systems. Our system is one of the minimal quantum systems in which a distinct nonequilibrium statistical behavior is self-induced.

  9. Bayesian data assimilation provides rapid decision support for vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Chris P; Brown, Richard G

    2015-07-06

    Predicting the spread of vector-borne diseases in response to incursions requires knowledge of both host and vector demographics in advance of an outbreak. Although host population data are typically available, for novel disease introductions there is a high chance of the pathogen using a vector for which data are unavailable. This presents a barrier to estimating the parameters of dynamical models representing host-vector-pathogen interaction, and hence limits their ability to provide quantitative risk forecasts. The Theileria orientalis (Ikeda) outbreak in New Zealand cattle demonstrates this problem: even though the vector has received extensive laboratory study, a high degree of uncertainty persists over its national demographic distribution. Addressing this, we develop a Bayesian data assimilation approach whereby indirect observations of vector activity inform a seasonal spatio-temporal risk surface within a stochastic epidemic model. We provide quantitative predictions for the future spread of the epidemic, quantifying uncertainty in the model parameters, case infection times and the disease status of undetected infections. Importantly, we demonstrate how our model learns sequentially as the epidemic unfolds and provide evidence for changing epidemic dynamics through time. Our approach therefore provides a significant advance in rapid decision support for novel vector-borne disease outbreaks.

  10. Sequence polymorphism in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers differs among Theileria species.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Münir; Bendele, Kylie G; Altay, Kürsat; Dumanli, Nazir; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Holman, Patricia J

    2007-07-20

    The genomic region spanning the two ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene was cloned and sequenced from sixteen Theileria isolates. Each Theileria species possessed ITS1 and ITS2 of unique size(s) and species specific nucleotide sequences. Varying degrees of ITS1 and ITS2 intra- and inter-species sequence polymorphism were found among ruminant Theileria species. The spacers were most polymorphic in the agent of tropical theileriosis, Theileria annulata, and were more conserved in two benign species, Theileria buffeli and Theileria sergenti Chitose. Phylogenetic analysis of the rDNA ITS1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS2 region clearly separated each taxon, placing them in three clusters. One held T. annulata, Theileria parva, and Theileria mutans, with the latter two most closely related. The second held T. sergenti Ikeda, T. sergenti Chitose, and T. buffeli, with the latter two most closely related. The third cluster held the Theileria ovis isolates.

  11. Effects of Changes in Meteorological Conditions on Lake Evaporation, Water Temperature, and Heat Budget in a Deep Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuji; Momii, Kazuro

    To reveal effects of changes in meteorological conditions on lake evaporation, water temperature, and heat budget in a deep lake, sensitivity analyses have been performed for Lake Ikeda, Kagoshima prefecture. In the study, the sensitivities of three aspects to the 10%-increased solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed were estimated based on numerical calculations for 1981-2005 with the verified one-dimensional mathematical model that computes thermal transfer in the lake. The results demonstrated that the meteorological component which gives the largest evaporation-promoting effect was solar radiation and the component which brings the largest lake-heating was air temperature. When solar radiation was increased, the vapor pressure difference between lake-surface and atmosphere was increased and the atmospheric stability was decreased, which present the desirable condition for evaporation. Air temperature being higher, the lake-surface was intensively heated by increased atmospheric radiation. As for the humidity case, lake evaporation was decreased in any season due to decrease in vapor pressure difference. Although rise in water temperature was caused by decrease in latent heat, it was inhibited with cooling by sensible heat. Wind being up, water temperature was fallen at the lake-surface and risen around the 20 m depth by vertical thermal mixing effect. The mixing effect prevented from releasing heat to atmosphere, resulting in the secondary large lake-heating but smaller than air temperature case.

  12. Study of torus structure of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, T.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the nature of the torus structure of eight low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; NGC 1566, NGC 2655, NGC 3718, NGC 3998, NGC 4138, NGC 4941, NGC 5273 and NGC 5643) based on the broad band X-ray spectra (0.5-200 keV) obtained with Suzaku and Swift/BAT. Their X-ray luminosities are smaller than 1e 42 erg/s, while the Eddington ratios span a range from 1e-4 to 1e-2. No significant iron- Kalpha line is detected in the spectra of two LLAGNs with the lowest Eddington ratios (<3e-4) in our sample (NGC 3718 and NGC 3998), suggesting that their tori are little developed. The others show the iron-Kalpha equivalent widths larger than 100 eV. For these six LLAGNs, we utilize the Monte-Carlo based simulation code by Ikeda 09 to constrain the torus parameters by assuming a nearly spherical geometry. The torus solid- angles in three sources (NGC 2655, NGC 4138, and NGC 4941) are constrained to be Omega/2pi > 0.34, and the rest are found to have torus column-densities of logNrmH > 22.7. These results suggest that there are two types of LLAGNs, (1) those where the torus is very small and little mass accretion takes place, and (2) those where the torus is moderately developed and a sufficient amount of gas is supplied to the black hole.

  13. Characterization of Peptides from Capsicum annuum Hybrid Seeds with Inhibitory Activity Against α-Amylase, Serine Proteinases and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Rodrigues, Rosana; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, André O; Fernandes, Katia Valevski S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2015-04-01

    Over the last several years, the activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), isolated from plant species, against different microorganisms has been demonstrated. More recently, some of these AMPs have been described as potent inhibitors of α-amylases and serine proteinases from insects and mammals. The aim of this work was to obtain AMPs from protein extracts of a hybrid Capsicum (Ikeda × UENF 1381) seeds and to evaluate their microbial and enzyme inhibitory activities. Initially, proteins were extracted from the Capsicum hybrid seeds in buffer (sodium phosphate pH 5.4,) and precipitated with ammonium sulfate (90% saturated). Extract of hybrid seeds was subjected to size exclusion chromatography, and three fractions were obtained: S1, S2 and S3. The amino acid sequence, obtained by mass spectrometry, of the 6 kDa peptide from the S3 fraction, named HyPep, showed 100% identity with PSI-1.2, a serine protease inhibitor isolated from C. annuum seeds, however the bifunctionality of this inhibitor against two enzymes is being shown for the first time in this work. The S3 fraction showed the highest antifungal activity, inhibiting all the yeast strains tested, and it also exhibited inhibitory activity against human salivary and Callosobruchus maculatus α-amylases as well as serine proteinases.

  14. Nodal structure and quantum critical point beneath the superconducting dome of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yuji

    2012-02-01

    Among BaFe2As2 based materials , the isovalent pnictogen substituted system BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 appears to be the most suitable system to discuss many physical properties, because BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 can be grown with very clean and homogeneous, as evidenced by the quantum oscillations observed over a wide doping range even in the superconducting dome giving detailed knowledge on the electronic structure. We investigate the structure of the superconducting order parameter in BaFe2(As0.67P0.33)2 (Tc=31,) with line nodes by the angle-resolved thermal conductivity measurements in magnetic field. The experimental results are most consistent with the closed nodal loops located at the flat part of the electron Fermi surface with high Fermi velocity. The doping evolution of the penetration depth indicates that nodal loop is robust against P-doping. Moreover, the magnitude of the zero temperature penetration depth exhibits a sharp peak at x=0.3, indicating the presence of a quantum phase transition deep inside the superconducting dome.[4pt] This work has been done in collaboration with T. Shibauchi, K. Hashimoto, S. Kasahara, M. Yamashita, T. Terashima, H. Ikeda (Kyoto), A. Carrington (Bristol), K. Cho, R. Prozorov, M. Tanatar (Ames), A.B. Vorontsov (Montana) and I.Vekhter (Louisiana).

  15. Symmetry Breaking in the Hidden-Order Phase of URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibauchi, Takasada

    2013-03-01

    In the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2, the hidden-order transition occurs at 17.5 K, whose nature has posed a long-standing mystery. A second-order phase transition is characterized by spontaneous symmetry breaking, and thus the nature of the hidden order cannot be determined without understanding which symmetry is being broken. Our magnetic torque measurements in small pure crystals reveal the emergence of an in-plane anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility below the transition temperature, indicating the spontaneous breaking of four-fold rotational symmetry of the tetragonal URu2Si2. In addition, our recent observation of cyclotron resonance allows the full determination of the electron-mass structure of the main Fermi-surface sheets, which implies an anomalous in-plane mass anisotropy consistent with the rotational symmetry breaking. These results impose strong constraints on the symmetry of the hidden order parameter. This work has been done in collaboration with R. Okazaki, S. Tonegawa, K. Hashimoto, K. Ikada, Y. H. Lin, H. Shishido, H. J. Shi, Y. Haga, T. D. Matsuda, E. Yamamoto, Y. Onuki, H. Ikeda, and Y. Matsuda.

  16. A new species of the snapping shrimp genus Alpheus (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Alpheidae) from Japan, associated with the innkeeper worm Ikedosoma elegans (Annelida: Echiura: Echiuridae).

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-15

    A new species of the snapping shrimp genus Alpheus Fabricius, 1798, Alpheus ikedosoma, is described and illustrated on the basis of material from Boso Peninsula and Ariake Sea, Japan. All examined specimens were extracted with the help of a bait suction pump from burrows of innkeeper worm (Annelida: Echiura), constructed on easily accessible intertidal sand beaches or sand flats. The host worm from Boso Peninsula was identified as Ikedosoma elegans (Ikeda, 1904) (Echiuridae). The new species is tentatively referred to the A. brevirostris (Olivier, 1811) species group, but it is characteristic in having several unusual features for the group, such as the very short rostrum without dorsal ridge, the absence of adrostral grooves on the carapace, the strongly reduced dorsolateral spines on the telson, the unarmed antennal basicerite, the non-elongate, almost glabrous major chela, and the lack of movable spines or spinules on ventromesial margin of each cheliped merus. The new species represents the sixth species of Alpheus associated with echiuran burrows.

  17. Magnetic microtraps for cavity QED, Bose-Einstein condensates, and atom optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    creating devices such as a SQUID-like system for neutral atoms. This thesis describes the fabrication and employment of these atoms chips in experiments at both Caltech---in Professor Hideo Mabuchi's group---and Munich, the latter in collaboration with Professors Theodore Hansch and Jakob Reichel at the Max Plank Institute for Quantum Optics.

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    represent two-photon power spectra of arbitrarily and adaptively shaped broadband laser pulses M A Montgomery and N H Damrauer Accurate and efficient implementation of the von Neumann representation for laser pulses with discrete and finite spectra Frank Dimler, Susanne Fechner, Alexander Rodenberg, Tobias Brixner and David J Tannor Coherent strong-field control of multiple states by a single chirped femtosecond laser pulse M Krug, T Bayer, M Wollenhaupt, C Sarpe-Tudoran, T Baumert, S S Ivanov and N V Vitanov Quantum-state measurement of ionic Rydberg wavepackets X Zhang and R R Jones On the paradigm of coherent control: the phase-dependent light-matter interaction in the shaping window Tiago Buckup, Jurgen Hauer and Marcus Motzkus Use of the spatial phase of a focused laser beam to yield mechanistic information about photo-induced chemical reactions V J Barge, Z Hu and R J Gordon Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection S D McGrane, R J Scharff, M Greenfield and D S Moore Mode selectivity with polarization shaping in the mid-IR David B Strasfeld, Chris T Middleton and Martin T Zanni Laser-guided relativistic quantum dynamics Chengpu Liu, Markus C Kohler, Karen Z Hatsagortsyan, Carsten Muller and Christoph H Keitel Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control Hideo Mabuchi Quantum filter reduction for measurement-feedback control via unsupervised manifold learning Anne E B Nielsen, Asa S Hopkins and Hideo Mabuchi Control of the temporal profile of the local electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures Ilya Grigorenko and Anatoly Efimov Laser-assisted molecular orientation in gaseous media: new possibilities and applications Dmitry V Zhdanov and Victor N Zadkov Optimization of laser field-free orientation of a state-selected NO molecular sample Arnaud Rouzee, Arjan Gijsbertsen, Omair Ghafur, Ofer M Shir, Thomas Back, Steven Stolte and Marc J J Vrakking Controlling the sense of molecular rotation Sharly Fleischer

  19. Modeling depression: social dominance-submission gene expression patterns in rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Kroes, R A; Panksepp, J; Burgdorf, J; Otto, N J; Moskal, J R

    2006-01-01

    protein 27, beta3-tubulin, ribosome-associated membrane protein 4 in subordinate animals. Interleukin-18 has been found to be over-expressed in human depression and panic disorder as well as other physiological stress paradigms [Takeuchi M, Okura T, Mori T, Akita K, Ohta T, Ikeda M, Ikegami H, Kurimoto M (1999) Intracellular production of interleukin-18 in human epithelial-like cell lines is enhanced by hyperosmotic stress in vitro. Cell Tissue Res 297(3):467-473] and heat shock proteins have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders [Iwamoto K, Kakiuchi C, Bundo M, Ikeda K, Kato T (2004) Molecular characterization of bipolar disorder by comparing gene expression profiles of postmortem brains of major mental disorders. Mol Psychiatry 9(4):406-416; Pongrac JL, Middleton FA, Peng L, Lewis DA, Levitt P, Mirnics K (2004) Heat shock protein 12A shows reduced expression in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. Biol Psychiatry 56(12):943-950]. Thus, the gene expression changes that we have observed here are consistent with and extend the observations found in the clinical literature and link them to the animal model used here thereby reinforcing its use to better understand the genesis of depression and identify novel therapeutic targets for its treatment.

  20. Predicting the potential environmental suitability for Theileria orientalis transmission in New Zealand cattle using maximum entropy niche modelling.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, K E; Summers, S R; Heath, A C G; McFadden, A M J; Pulford, D J; Pomroy, W E

    2016-07-15

    The tick-borne haemoparasite Theileria orientalis is the most important infectious cause of anaemia in New Zealand cattle. Since 2012 a previously unrecorded type, T. orientalis type 2 (Ikeda), has been associated with disease outbreaks of anaemia, lethargy, jaundice and deaths on over 1000 New Zealand cattle farms, with most of the affected farms found in the upper North Island. The aim of this study was to model the relative environmental suitability for T. orientalis transmission throughout New Zealand, to predict the proportion of cattle farms potentially suitable for active T. orientalis infection by region, island and the whole of New Zealand and to estimate the average relative environmental suitability per farm by region, island and the whole of New Zealand. The relative environmental suitability for T. orientalis transmission was estimated using the Maxent (maximum entropy) modelling program. The Maxent model predicted that 99% of North Island cattle farms (n=36,257), 64% South Island cattle farms (n=15,542) and 89% of New Zealand cattle farms overall (n=51,799) could potentially be suitable for T. orientalis transmission. The average relative environmental suitability of T. orientalis transmission at the farm level was 0.34 in the North Island, 0.02 in the South Island and 0.24 overall. The study showed that the potential spatial distribution of T. orientalis environmental suitability was much greater than presumed in the early part of the Theileria associated bovine anaemia (TABA) epidemic. Maximum entropy offers a computer efficient method of modelling the probability of habitat suitability for an arthropod vectored disease. This model could help estimate the boundaries of the endemically stable and endemically unstable areas for T. orientalis transmission within New Zealand and be of considerable value in informing practitioner and farmer biosecurity decisions in these respective areas.

  1. Expression cloning of a human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor: a structural mosaic of hematopoietin receptor, immunoglobulin, and fibronectin domains

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We report the isolation from a placental library, of two cDNAs that can encode high affinity receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) when expressed in COS-7 cells. The cDNAs are predicted to encode integral membrane proteins of 759 and 812 amino acids in length. The predicted extracellular and membrane spanning sequences of the two clones are identical, as are the first 96 amino acids of their respective cytoplasmic regions. Different COOH termini of 34 or 87 residues are predicted for the two cDNAs, due apparently to alternate splicing. The receptor with the longer cytoplasmic domain is the closest human homologue of the murine G-CSF receptor recently described by Fukunaga et al. (Fukunaga, R., E. Ishizaka-Ikeda, Y. Seto, and S. Nagata. 1990. Cell. 61:341). A hybridization probe derived from the placental G-CSF receptor cDNA detects a approximately 3-kb transcript in RNAs isolated from placenta and a number of lymphoid and myeloid cells. The extracellular region of the G-CSF receptors is composed of four distinct types of structural domains, previously recognized in other cell surface proteins. In addition to the two domains of the HP receptor family-defining region (Patthy, L. 1990. Cell. 61:13) it incorporates one NH2-terminal Ig-like domain, and three additional repeats of fibronectin type III-like domains. The presence of both an NH2-terminal Ig-like domain and multiple membrane-proximal FN3-like domains suggests that the G-CSF receptor may be derived from an ancestral NCAM-like molecule and that the G-CSF receptor may function in some adhesion or recognition events at the cell surface in addition to the binding of G-CSF. PMID:2147944

  2. Novel triterpenoids inhibit both DNA polymerase and DNA topoisomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Mizushina, Y; Iida, A; Ohta, K; Sugawara, F; Sakaguchi, K

    2000-01-01

    As described previously, we found that new triterpenoid compounds, designated fomitellic acids A and B, which selectively inhibit the activities of mammalian DNA polymerases alpha and beta [Mizushina, Tanaka, Kitamura, Tamai, Ikeda, Takemura, Sugawara, Arai, Matsukage, Yoshida and Sakaguchi (1998) Biochem. J. 330, 1325-1332; Tanaka, Kitamura, Mizushina, Sugawara and Sakaguchi (1998) J. Nat. Prod. 61, 193-197] and that a known triterpenoid, ursolic acid, is an inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerases I and II (A. Iida, Y. Mizushina and K. Sakaguchi, unpublished work). Here we report that all of these triterpenoids are potent inhibitors of calf DNA polymerase alpha, rat DNA polymerase beta and human DNA topoisomerases I and II, and show moderate inhibitory effects on plant DNA polymerase II and human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase. However, these compounds did not influence the activities of prokaryotic DNA polymerases such as Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I or other DNA metabolic enzymes such as human telomerase, T7 RNA polymerase and bovine deoxyribonuclease I. These triterpenoids were not only mammalian DNA polymerase inhibitors but also inhibitors of DNA topoisomerases I and II even though the enzymic characteristics of DNA polymerases and DNA topoisomerases, including their modes of action, amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures, differed markedly. These triterpenoids did not bind to DNA, suggesting that they act directly on these enzymes. Because the three-dimensional structures of fomitellic acids were shown by computer simulation to be very similar to that of ursolic acid, the DNA-binding sites of both enzymes, which compete for the inhibitors, might be very similar. Fomitellic acid A and ursolic acid prevented the growth of NUGC cancer cells, with LD(50) values of 38 and 30 microM respectively. PMID:10970789

  3. A 3.7 kb Fragment of the Mouse Scn10a Gene Promoter Directs Neural Crest But Not Placodal Lineage EGFP Expression in a Transgenic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Van B.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 is expressed almost exclusively in primary sensory neurons. The mechanism restricting Nav1.8 expression is not entirely clear, but we have previously described a 3.7 kb fragment of the Scn10a promoter capable of recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of Nav1.8 in transfected neurons and cell lines (Puhl and Ikeda, 2008). To validate these studies in vivo, a transgenic mouse encoding EGFP under the control of this putative sensory neuron specific promoter was generated and characterized in this study. Approximately 45% of dorsal root ganglion neurons of transgenic mice were EGFP-positive (mean diameter = 26.5 μm). The majority of EGFP-positive neurons bound isolectin B4, although a small percentage (∼10%) colabeled with markers of A-fiber neurons. EGFP expression correlated well with the presence of Nav1.8 transcript (95%), Nav1.8-immunoreactivity (70%), and TTX-R INa (100%), although not all Nav1.8-expressing neurons expressed EGFP. Several cranial sensory ganglia originating from neurogenic placodes, such as the nodose ganglion, failed to express EGFP, suggesting that additional regulatory elements dictate Scn10a expression in placodal-derived sensory neurons. EGFP was also detected in discrete brain regions of transgenic mice. Quantitative PCR and Nav1.8-immunoreactivity confirmed Nav1.8 expression in the amygdala, brainstem, globus pallidus, lateral and paraventricular hypothalamus, and olfactory tubercle. TTX-R INa recorded from EGFP-positive hypothalamic neurons demonstrate the usefulness of this transgenic line to study novel roles of Nav1.8 beyond sensory neurons. Overall, Scn10a-EGFP transgenic mice recapitulate the majority of the Nav1.8 expression pattern in neural crest-derived sensory neurons. PMID:25995484

  4. Study of Swift/Bat Selected Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Tazaki, Fumie; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard

    2016-11-01

    We systematically analyze the broadband (0.5-200 keV) X-ray spectra of hard X-ray (>10 keV) selected local low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) observed with Suzaku and Swift/BAT. The sample consists of 10 LLAGNs detected with Swift/BAT with intrinsic 14-195 keV luminosities smaller than 1042 erg s-1 available in the Suzaku archive, covering a wide range of the Eddington ratio from 10-5 to 10-2. The overall spectra can be reproduced with an absorbed cut-off power law, often accompanied by reflection components from distant cold matter, and/or optically thin thermal emission from the host galaxy. In all of the objects, relativistic reflection components from the innermost disk are not required. Eight objects show a significant narrow iron-Kα emission line. Comparing their observed equivalent widths with the predictions from the Monte-Carlo-based torus model by Ikeda et al. (2009), we constrain the column density in the equatorial plane to be {log} {N}{{H}}{{eq}}\\gt 22.7, or the torus half-opening angle θ oa < 70°. We infer that the Eddington ratio (λ Edd) is a key parameter that determines the torus structure of LLAGNs: the torus becomes large at λ Edd ≳ 2 × 10-4, whereas at lower accretion rates it is little developed. The luminosity correlation between the hard X-ray and mid-infrared (MIR) bands of the LLAGNs follows the same correlation as for more luminous AGNs. This implies that mechanisms other than AGN-heated dust are responsible for the MIR emission in low Eddington ratio LLAGNs.

  5. Isolation of a novel Orientia species (O. chuto sp. nov.) from a patient infected in Dubai.

    PubMed

    Izzard, Leonard; Fuller, Andrew; Blacksell, Stuart D; Paris, Daniel H; Richards, Allen L; Aukkanit, Nuntipa; Nguyen, Chelsea; Jiang, Ju; Fenwick, Stan; Day, Nicholas P J; Graves, Stephen; Stenos, John

    2010-12-01

    In July 2006, an Australian tourist returning from Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), developed acute scrub typhus. Her signs and symptoms included fever, myalgia, headache, rash, and eschar. Orientia tsutsugamushi serology demonstrated a 4-fold rise in antibody titers in paired serum collections (1:512 to 1:8,192), with the sera reacting strongest against the Gilliam strain antigen. An Orientia species was isolated by the in vitro culture of the patient's acute blood taken prior to antibiotic treatment. The gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs), partial 56-kDa gene, and the full open reading frame 47-kDa gene was performed, and comparisons of this new Orientia sp. isolate to previously characterized strains demonstrated significant sequence diversity. The closest homology to the rrs sequence of the new Orientia sp. isolate was with three strains of O. tsutsugamushi (Ikeda, Kato, and Karp), with a nucleotide sequence similarity of 98.5%. The closest homology to the 47-kDa gene sequence was with O. tsutsugamushi strain Gilliam, with a nucleotide similarity of 82.3%, while the closest homology to the 56-kDa gene sequence was with O. tsutsugamushi strain TA686, with a nucleotide similarity of 53.1%. The molecular divergence and geographically unique origin lead us to believe that this organism should be considered a novel species. Therefore, we have proposed the name "Orientia chuto," and the prototype strain of this species is strain Dubai, named after the location in which the patient was infected.

  6. General circulation and thermal structure simulated by a Venus AGCM with a two-stream radiative code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Ikeda, Kohei; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding Venus climate and atmospheric dynamics. At the present stage, however, the full-physics model is under development. Ikeda (2011) developed a two-stream radiative transfer code, which covers the solar to infrared radiative processes due to the gases and aerosol particles. The radiative code was applied to Venus AGCM (T21L52) at Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, Univ. Tokyo. We analyzed the results in a few Venus days simulation that was restarted after nudging zonal wind to a super-rotating state until the equilibrium. The simulated thermal structure has low-stability layer around 105 Pa at low latitudes, and the neutral stability extends from ˜105 Pa to the lower atmosphere at high latitudes. At the equatorial cloud top, the temperature lowers in the region between noon and evening terminator. For zonal and meridional winds, we can see difference between the zonal and day-side means. As was indicated in previous works, the day-side mean meridional wind speed mostly corresponds to the poleward component of the thermal tide and is much higher than the zonal mean. Toward understanding dynamical roles of waves in UV cloud tracking and brightness, we calculated the eddy heat and momentum fluxes averaged over the day-side hemisphere. The eddy heat and momentum fluxes are poleward in the poleward flank of the jet. In contrast, the fluxes are relatively weak and equatorward at low latitudes. The eddy momentum flux becomes equatorward in the dynamical situation that the simulated equatorial wind is weaker than the midlatitude jet. The sensitivity to the zonal flow used for the nudging will be also discussed in the model validation.

  7. A 3.7 kb fragment of the mouse Scn10a gene promoter directs neural crest but not placodal lineage EGFP expression in a transgenic animal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R; Puhl, Henry L

    2015-05-20

    Under physiological conditions, the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 is expressed almost exclusively in primary sensory neurons. The mechanism restricting Nav1.8 expression is not entirely clear, but we have previously described a 3.7 kb fragment of the Scn10a promoter capable of recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of Nav1.8 in transfected neurons and cell lines (Puhl and Ikeda, 2008). To validate these studies in vivo, a transgenic mouse encoding EGFP under the control of this putative sensory neuron specific promoter was generated and characterized in this study. Approximately 45% of dorsal root ganglion neurons of transgenic mice were EGFP-positive (mean diameter = 26.5 μm). The majority of EGFP-positive neurons bound isolectin B4, although a small percentage (∼10%) colabeled with markers of A-fiber neurons. EGFP expression correlated well with the presence of Nav1.8 transcript (95%), Nav1.8-immunoreactivity (70%), and TTX-R INa (100%), although not all Nav1.8-expressing neurons expressed EGFP. Several cranial sensory ganglia originating from neurogenic placodes, such as the nodose ganglion, failed to express EGFP, suggesting that additional regulatory elements dictate Scn10a expression in placodal-derived sensory neurons. EGFP was also detected in discrete brain regions of transgenic mice. Quantitative PCR and Nav1.8-immunoreactivity confirmed Nav1.8 expression in the amygdala, brainstem, globus pallidus, lateral and paraventricular hypothalamus, and olfactory tubercle. TTX-R INa recorded from EGFP-positive hypothalamic neurons demonstrate the usefulness of this transgenic line to study novel roles of Nav1.8 beyond sensory neurons. Overall, Scn10a-EGFP transgenic mice recapitulate the majority of the Nav1.8 expression pattern in neural crest-derived sensory neurons.

  8. Effects of Acutely Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure on Running Economy and Physical Performance in Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Kilding, Andrew E; Dobson, Bryan P; Ikeda, Erika

    2016-07-01

    Kilding, AE, Dobson, BP, and Ikeda, E. Effects of acutely intermittent hypoxic exposure on running economy and physical performance in basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2033-2042, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short duration intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) on physical performance in basketball players. Using a single-blind placebo-controlled group design, 14 trained basketball players were subjected to 15 days of passive short duration IHE (n = 7), or normoxic control (CON, n = 7), using a biofeedback nitrogen dilution device. A range of physiological, performance, and hematological variables were measured at baseline, and 10 days after IHE. After intervention, the IHE group, relative to the CON group, exhibited improvements in the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 (+4.8 ± 1.6%; effect size [ES]: 1.0 ± 0.4) and repeated high-intensity exercise test performance (-3.5 ± 1.6%; ES: -0.4 ± 0.2). Changes in hematological parameters were minimal, although soluble transferrin receptor increased after IHE (+9.2 ± 10.1%; ES: 0.3 ± 0.3). Running economy at 11 km·h (-9.0 ± 9.7%; ES: -0.7 ± 0.7) and 13 km·h was improved (-8.2 ± 6.9%; ES: -0.7 ± 0.5), but changes to V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, HRpeak, and lactate were unclear. In summary, acutely IHE resulted in worthwhile changes in physical performance tests among competitive basketball players. However, physiological measures explaining the performance enhancement were in most part unclear.

  9. [Health examination in future at the era of low tuberculosis incidence--from contacts examination toward active epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideo; Shirai, Chika

    2013-03-01

    test in Tokyo: Hideo MAEDA (Bureau of Social Welfare and Public Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Government). 2. Contact investigation of a tuberculosis outbreak: Kenichi MIYAMOTO (Takaido Community Health Center). We have experienced a TB outbreak in integrated junior and senior high school in Tokyo. Index patient was a student with persistent respiratory symptoms for six months before diagnosis of sputum smear-positive TB. Public health center started contact investigation immediately. QFT-positive rates were high in close contacts, especially in classmates. Additionally, a student outside of contact investigation was diagnosed as TB and considered to be infected from the first patient by VNTR analysis. Therefore, public health center expanded QFT-tests to all students and teachers in this school. Finally, 9 students and 2 teachers in this school were diagnosed as sputum smear-negative TB by contact investigation. 3. Utilization of molecular epidemiological procedure in contact investigation in Kyoto City: Masahiro ITO (Public Health Center of Kyoto City) Molecular epidemiological procedure using VNTR analysis has been used for contact investigation of tuberculosis since January 2011 in Kyoto City. One hundred forty four strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients with tuberculosis were investigated and 130 strains were fully analyzed. Fourteen clusters were found and the number of strains included in the cluster was ranged from two to 11. Epidemiological relationship between patients in one cluster was found, however, significant relationship in another clusters was not demonstrated. It was suggested that VNTR analysis is useful for molecular epidemiological analysis of tuberculosis. 4. The population based molecular epidemiological studies and QFT test in a contact examination: Riyo FUJIYAMA, Keisuke MATSUBAYASHI, Setsuko MIZUSHIRI, Junko HIGUCHIL Chika SHIRAI, Yuko KATAGAMI, Mieko CHIHARA, Akihiro IJICHI (Kobe City Public Health Center), Kentaro ARIKAWA, Noriko

  10. Diagnostic Accuracy of the FIGO and the 5-Tier Fetal Heart Rate Classification Systems in the Detection of Neonatal Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Martí Gamboa, Sabina; Giménez, Olga Redrado; Mancho, Jara Pascual; Moros, María Lapresta; Sada, Julia Ruiz; Mateo, Sergio Castan

    2016-10-25

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine ability to detect neonatal acidemia and interobserver agreement with the FIGO 3-tier and 5-tier fetal heart rate (FHR) classification systems. Design This was a case-control study. Setting This study was set at the University Medical Center. Population A total of 202 FHR tracings of 102 women who delivered an acidemic fetus (umbilical arterial cord gas pH ≤ 7.10 and BE < - 8) and 100 who delivered a nonacidemic fetus (umbilical arterial cord gas pH > 7.10) were assessed. A subanalysis was performed for those fetuses who suffered severe metabolic acidemia (pH ≤ 7.0 and BE < - 12). Methods Two reviewers blind to clinical and outcome data classified tracings according to the new 3-tier system proposed by the FIGO and the 5-tier system proposed by Parer and Ikeda. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity and specificity for detecting neonatal acidemia and interobserver agreement in classifying FHR tracings into categories of both systems were studied. Results The 3-tier system showed a greater sensitivity and lower specificity to detect neonatal acidemia (43.6% sensitivity, 82.5% specificity) and severe metabolic acidemia (71.4% sensitivity, 74.0% specificity) compared with the 5-tier system (36.3% sensitivity, 88% specificity and 61.9% sensitivity, 80.1% specificity, respectively). Both systems were compared by area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, with comparable predictive ability for detecting neonatal acidemia (FIGO-area under the curve [AUC]: 0.63 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.68] and Parer-AUC: 0.62 [95% CI: 0.56-0.67]). Interobserver agreement was moderate for both systems, but performance at each specific category showed a better agreement for the 5-tier system identifying a pathological tracing (orange or red, κ: 0.625 vs. pathological category, κ: 0.538). Conclusion Both systems presented a comparable ability to predict neonatal acidemia, although the

  11. Sterylglucoside catabolism in Cryptococcus neoformans with endoglycoceramidase-related protein 2 (EGCrP2), the first steryl-β-glucosidase identified in fungi.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Ito, Tomoharu; Goda, Hatsumi M; Ishibashi, Yohei; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2015-01-09

    Cryptococcosis is an infectious disease caused by pathogenic fungi, such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. The ceramide structure (methyl-d18:2/h18:0) of C. neoformans glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is characteristic and strongly related to its pathogenicity. We recently identified endoglycoceramidase-related protein 1 (EGCrP1) as a glucocerebrosidase in C. neoformans and showed that it was involved in the quality control of GlcCer by eliminating immature GlcCer during the synthesis of GlcCer (Ishibashi, Y., Ikeda, K., Sakaguchi, K., Okino, N., Taguchi, R., and Ito, M. (2012) Quality control of fungus-specific glucosylceramide in Cryptococcus neoformans by endoglycoceramidase-related protein 1 (EGCrP1). J. Biol. Chem. 287, 368-381). We herein identified and characterized EGCrP2, a homologue of EGCrP1, as the enzyme responsible for sterylglucoside catabolism in C. neoformans. In contrast to EGCrP1, which is specific to GlcCer, EGCrP2 hydrolyzed various β-glucosides, including GlcCer, cholesteryl-β-glucoside, ergosteryl-β-glucoside, sitosteryl-β-glucoside, and para-nitrophenyl-β-glucoside, but not α-glucosides or β-galactosides, under acidic conditions. Disruption of the EGCrP2 gene (egcrp2) resulted in the accumulation of a glycolipid, the structure of which was determined following purification to ergosteryl-3β-glucoside, a major sterylglucoside in fungi, by mass spectrometric and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. This glycolipid accumulated in vacuoles and EGCrP2 was detected in vacuole-enriched fraction. These results indicated that EGCrP2 was involved in the catabolism of ergosteryl-β-glucoside in the vacuoles of C. neoformans. Distinct growth arrest, a dysfunction in cell budding, and an abnormal vacuole morphology were detected in the egcrp2-disrupted mutants, suggesting that EGCrP2 may be a promising target for anti-cryptococcal drugs. EGCrP2, classified into glycohydrolase family 5, is the first steryl

  12. Metabolic Engineering of an ATP-Neutral Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas Pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Growth Restoration by an Adaptive Point Mutation in NADH Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Komati Reddy, Gajendar; Lindner, Steffen N.

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway of glycolysis and gains 2 mol of ATP per mol of glucose by substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). To engineer glycolysis without net ATP formation by SLP, endogenous phosphorylating NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was replaced by nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which irreversibly converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) without generating ATP. As shown recently (S. Takeno, R. Murata, R. Kobayashi, S. Mitsuhashi, and M. Ikeda, Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7154–7160, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01464-10), this ATP-neutral, NADPH-generating glycolytic pathway did not allow for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum with glucose as the sole carbon source unless hitherto unknown suppressor mutations occurred; however, these mutations were not disclosed. In the present study, a suppressor mutation was identified, and it was shown that heterologous expression of udhA encoding soluble transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli partly restored growth, suggesting that growth was inhibited by NADPH accumulation. Moreover, genome sequence analysis of second-site suppressor mutants that were able to grow faster with glucose revealed a single point mutation in the gene of non-proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-II) leading to the amino acid change D213G, which was shared by these suppressor mutants. Since related NDH-II enzymes accepting NADPH as the substrate possess asparagine or glutamine residues at this position, D213G, D213N, and D213Q variants of C. glutamicum NDH-II were constructed and were shown to oxidize NADPH in addition to NADH. Taking these findings together, ATP-neutral glycolysis by the replacement of endogenous NAD-dependent GAPDH with NADP-dependent GapN became possible via oxidation of NADPH formed in this pathway by mutant NADPH

  13. Computer simulations of channel meandering and the formation of point bars: Linking channel dynamics to the preserved stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Covault, J. A.; Pyrcz, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Meandering rivers are probably one of the most recognizable geomorphic features on earth. As they meander across alluvial and delta plains, channels migrate laterally and develop point bars, splays, levees and other geomorphic and sedimentary features that compose substantial portions of the fill within many sedimentary basins. These basins can include hydrocarbon producing fields. Therefore, a good understanding of the processes of meandering channels and their associated deposits is critical for exploiting these reservoirs in the subsurface. In the past couple of decades, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the morphodynamics of channel meandering. Basic fluid dynamics and sediment transport (Ikeda and Parker, 1981; Howard, 1992) has shown that many characteristic features of meandering rivers, such as the meandering wavelength, growth rate and downstream migration rate, can be predicted quantitatively. As a result, a number of variations and improvement of the theory have emerged (e.g., Blondeaux and Seminara, 1985; Parker and Andrews, 1985, 1986; and Sun et al., 2001a, b).The main improvements include the recognition of so called "bar-bend" interactions, where the development of bars on the channel bed and their interactions with the channel bend is recognized as a primary cause for meandering channels to develop greater complexity than the classic goose-neck meander bend shapes, such as compound bend. Recently, Sun and others have shown that the spatial patterns of width variations in meandering channels can be explained by an extrinsic periodic flow variations coupled with the intrinsic bend instability dynamics. In contrast to the significant improvement of our understanding of channel meandering, little work has been done to link the geomorphic features of meandering channels to the geometry and heterogeneity of the deposits they form and ultimately preserves. A computer simulation model based on the work of Sun and others (1996, 2001

  14. Regulation of glucose transporters in LLC-PK1 cells: effects of D-glucose and monosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, T; Isselbacher, K J; Rhoads, D B

    1990-01-01

    Regulation of D-glucose transport in the porcine kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 was examined. To identify the sodium-coupled glucose transporter (SGLT), we cloned and sequenced several partial cDNAs homologous to SGLT1 from rabbit small intestine (M. A. Hediger, M. J. Coady, T. S. Ikeda, and E. M. Wright, Nature (London) 330:379-381, 1987). The extensive homology of the two sequences leads us to suggest that the high-affinity SGLT expressed by LLC-PK1 cells is SGLT1. SGLT1 mRNA levels were highest when the D-glucose concentration in the culture medium was 5 to 10 mM. Addition of D-mannose or D-fructose, but not D-galactose, in the presence of 5 mM D-glucose suppressed SGLT1 mRNA levels. SGLT1 activity, measured by methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside uptake, paralleled message levels except in cultures containing D-galactose. Therefore, SGLT1 gene expression may respond either to the cellular energy status or to the concentration of a hexose metabolite(s). By isolating several cDNAs homologous to rat GLUT-1, we identified the facilitated glucose transporter in LLC-PK1 cells as the erythroid/brain type GLUT-1. High-stringency hybridization of a single mRNA transcript to the rat GLUT-1 cDNA probe and failure to observe additional transcripts hybridizing either to GLUT-1 or to GLUT-2 probes at low stringency provide evidence that GLUT-1 is the major facilitated glucose transporter in this cell line. LLC-PK1 GLUT-1 mRNAs were highest at medium D-glucose concentrations of less than or equal to 2 mM. D-Fructose, D-mannose, and to a lesser extent D-galactose all suppressed GLUT-1 mRNA levels. Since the pattern of SGLT1 and GLUT-1 expression differed, particularly in low D-glucose or in the presence of D-galactose, we suggest that the two transporters are regulated independently. Images PMID:2247068

  15. Stopped-flow kinetic studies of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyan; Ge, Zhishen; Jiang, Xiaoze; Hassan, P A; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-12-15

    The kinetics and mechanism of sphere-to-rod transitions of sodium alkyl sulfate micelles induced by hydrotropic salt, p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC), were investigated by stopped-flow with light scattering detection. Spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles transform into short ellipsoidal shapes at low salt concentrations ([PTHC]/[SDS], chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.4). Upon stopped-flow mixing aqueous solutions of spherical SDS micelles with PTHC, the scattered light intensity gradually increases with time. Single exponential fitting of the dynamic traces leads to characteristic relaxation time, tau(g), for the growth process from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles, and it increases with increasing SDS concentrations. This suggests that ellipsoidal micelles might be produced by successive insertion of unimers into spherical micelles, similar to the case of formation of spherical micelles as suggested by Aniansson-Wall (A-W) theory. At chi(PTHC) > or = 0.5, rod-like micelles with much higher axial ratio form. The scattered light intensity exhibits an initially abrupt increase and then levels off. The dynamic curves can be well fitted with single exponential functions, and the obtained tau(g) decreases with increasing SDS concentration. Thus, the growth from spherical to rod-like micelles might proceed via fusion of spherical micelles, in agreement with mechanism proposed by Ikeda et al. At chi(PTHC)=0.3 and 0.6, the apparent activation energies obtained from temperature dependent kinetic studies for the micellar growth are 40.4 and 3.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The large differences between activation energies for the growth from spherical to ellipsoidal micelles at low chi(PTHC) and the sphere-to-rod transition at high chi(PTHC) further indicate that they should follow different mechanisms. Moreover, the sphere-to-rod transition kinetics of sodium alkyl sulfate with varying hydrophobic chain lengths (n=10, 12, 14, and 16) are also studied. The longer the carbon chain

  16. Orbital-scale changes in the global silicate weathering intensity: the Mesozoic bedded chert sequence in Japan as its potential measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Tada, R.; Olsen, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    Silicate weathering is one of the most important regulators of the Earth system dynamics through nutrient supply and consumption of atmospheric CO2. However, its changes in the geologic past using geologic records have been controversial due to the lack of appropriate method to quantitatively reconstruct the past global silicate weathering intensity. One way for its measurement would be an estimation of the pelagic biogenic silica burial rate, because the silicate weathering and pelagic biogenic silica burial are the major source and major sink of dissolved silica in the present ocean, respectively (e.g. Treguer et al., 1995). During the Mesozoic, the pelagic bedded chert is the potential major sink of the biogenic silica in the ocean. We therefore first estimate the biogenic silica burial rate for the Inuyama bedded chert in Japan based on the major elements chemical analysis of individual chert and shale beds on the continuous sequence with bed-by-bed resolution. The rhythmically alternation of chert and shale beds were reflected by the precession cycle (Ikeda et al., 2010). By using the chert-shale couplet as time scale, we reconstructed the variation in the biogenic silica burial rate for the Inuyama bedded chert from the Early Triassic to Early Jurassic. Together with paleogeographic distribution of bedded chert compiled from previous studies, the biogenic silica burial rate in the low latitude Panthalassa ocean in the form of bedded chert was several times higher than the biogenic silica burial rate in the modern global ocean (DeMaster, 2002). This result suggests that bedded chert was the major sink of the dissolved silica in the ocean at least during the early Mesozoic. Therefore, the variations in the biogenic silica burial rate for bedded chert should be proportional to the variations in the dissolved silica input to the ocean in time-scales longer than its residence time in the ocean (15 kyr; Treguer et al., 1995). The variation in 87Sr/86Sr isotopic

  17. [Research on endemic diseases and Japanese colonial rule: focusing on the emetine poisoning accident in Yeongheung and Haenam counties in 1927].

    PubMed

    Sihn, Kyu-Hwan

    2009-12-01

    This paper aims to examine the spread of paragonimiasis and the Japanese colonial government's response to it. To consolidate colonial rule, the Japanese colonial government needed medications to cure paragonimiasis. When Dr. Ikeda Masakata invented acid emetine to cure paragonimiasis in Manchuria in 1915, emetine treatment carried the risk of emetine poisoning such as fatigue, inappetence, heart failure, and death. Nonetheless, Japanese authorities forced clinical trials on human patients in colonial Korea during the 1910s and 1920s. The emetine poisoning accident in Yeongheung and Haenam counties in 1927 occurred in this context. The Japanese government concentrated on terminating an intermediary host instead of injecting emetine to repress endemic disease in Japan. However, the Japanese colonial government pushed ahead with emetine injections for healthy men through the Preliminary Bureau of Land Research in colonial Korea in 1917. This clinical trial simultaneously presented the effects and the side effects of emetine injection. Because of the danger emetine injections posed, the colonial government investigated only the actual condition of paragonimiasis, delaying the use of emetine injection. Kobayashi Harujiro(1884-1969), a leading zoologist and researcher of endemic disease for three decades in the Government General Hospital and Keijo Imperial University in colonial Korea, had used emetine while researching paragonimiasis, but he did not play a leading role in clinical trials with emetine injections, perhaps because he mainly researched the intermediary host. Government General Hospital and Keijo Imperial University therefore faced limitations that kept them from leading the research on endemic disease. As the health administration shifted the central colonial government to local colonial government, the local colonial government pressed ahead with emetine injections for Korean patients. Emetine poisoning had something to do with medical power

  18. SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. V. TORUS STRUCTURE OF TWO LUMINOUS RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI (3C 206 AND PKS 0707-35)

    SciTech Connect

    Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco

    2013-07-20

    We present the results from broadband X-ray spectral analysis of 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35 with Suzaku and Swift/BAT, two of the most luminous unobscured and obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with hard X-ray luminosities of 10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1} and 10{sup 44.9} erg s{sup -1} (14-195 keV), respectively. Based on the radio core luminosity, we estimate that the X-ray spectrum of 3C 206 contains a significant ({approx}60% in the 14-195 keV band) contribution from the jet, while it is negligible in PKS 0707-35. We can successfully model the spectra with the jet component (for 3C 206), the transmitted emission, and two reflection components from the torus and the accretion disk. The reflection strengths from the torus are found to be R{sub torus}({identical_to} {Omega}/2{pi}) = 0.29 {+-} 0.18 and 0.41 {+-} 0.18 for 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35, respectively, which are smaller than those in typical Seyfert galaxies. Utilizing the torus model by Ikeda et al., we quantify the relation between the half-opening angle of a torus ({theta}{sub oa}) and the equivalent width of an iron-K line. The observed equivalent width of 3C 206, < 71 eV, constrains the column density in the equatorial plane to N{sub H}{sup eq} <10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, or the half-opening angle to {theta}{sub oa} > 80 Degree-Sign if N{sub H}{sup eq} =10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} is assumed. That of PKS 0707-35, 72 {+-} 36 eV, is consistent with N{sub H}{sup eq} {approx}10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. Our results suggest that the tori in luminous radio-loud AGNs are only poorly developed. The trend is similar to that seen in radio-quiet AGNs, implying that the torus structure is not different between AGNs with jets and without jets.

  19. Conditional nonlinear optimal perturbations based on the particle swarm optimization and their applications to the predictability problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qin; Yang, Zubin; Sha, Jianxin; Yan, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In predictability problem research, the conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) describes the initial perturbation that satisfies a certain constraint condition and causes the largest prediction error at the prediction time. The CNOP has been successfully applied in estimation of the lower bound of maximum predictable time (LBMPT). Generally, CNOPs are calculated by a gradient descent algorithm based on the adjoint model, which is called ADJ-CNOP. This study, through the two-dimensional Ikeda model, investigates the impacts of the nonlinearity on ADJ-CNOP and the corresponding precision problems when using ADJ-CNOP to estimate the LBMPT. Our conclusions are that (1) when the initial perturbation is large or the prediction time is long, the strong nonlinearity of the dynamical model in the prediction variable will lead to failure of the ADJ-CNOP method, and (2) when the objective function has multiple extreme values, ADJ-CNOP has a large probability of producing local CNOPs, hence making a false estimation of the LBMPT. Furthermore, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, one kind of intelligent algorithm, is introduced to solve this problem. The method using PSO to compute CNOP is called PSO-CNOP. The results of numerical experiments show that even with a large initial perturbation and long prediction time, or when the objective function has multiple extreme values, PSO-CNOP can always obtain the global CNOP. Since the PSO algorithm is a heuristic search algorithm based on the population, it can overcome the impact of nonlinearity and the disturbance from multiple extremes of the objective function. In addition, to check the estimation accuracy of the LBMPT presented by PSO-CNOP and ADJ-CNOP, we partition the constraint domain of initial perturbations into sufficiently fine grid meshes and take the LBMPT obtained by the filtering method as a benchmark. The result shows that the estimation presented by PSO-CNOP is closer to the true value than the

  20. Analytic view at alpha clustering in even-even heavy nuclei near magic numbers 82 and 126

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Saad M. Saleh; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Radiman, Shahidan; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin

    2015-02-01

    -cluster, core-cluster1-cluster2, and core-alpha-alpha structures. The cluster states deduced from the formation probability can be used in future studies to extend the Ikeda diagram to the heavy nuclei.

  1. Thz Spectroscopy of 13C Isotopic Species of a "weed": Acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the isotopic species of 13C and D isotopologues of methyl formate (HCOOCH_3), have allowed the detection of more than 600 lines in Orion. This confirms that many observed U-lines are coming from isotopic species of one of the most abundant molecules in space. Since its first detection in 1976 in SgrB2 and in Orion A, acetaldehyde (CH_3CHO) was detected in many other numerous objects. If its deuterated species (CD_3CHO and CH_3CDO) have been previously studied in the millimeterwave range, the data concerning the 13C species are limited to few lines measured in 1957 up to 40 GHz. In this context we decided to study the 13C species of acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde molecule displays a large amplitude motion: the hindered rotation of the methyl group with respect to the rest of the molecule. The analysis is performed with the Rho Axis Method. Recent versions of the codes include high orders term in order to reproduce the observed frequencies for large quantum numbers values as J-values as high as 70a,b,. Measurements and analysis of the rotational spectra of 13C isotopic species are in progress in Lille with a solid-state submillimetre-wave spectrometer (50-950 GHz), the first results will be presented. This work is supported by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054 and by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS). Carvajal, M.; Margulès, L.; Tercero, B.; et al.A&A 500, (2009) 1109 Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.; Demaison J.; et al.,ApJ 714, (2010) 1120. Ikeda, M.; Ohishi, M.; Nummelin, A.; et al., ApJ, 560, (2001) 792 Kleiner, I.; Lopez, J.-C.; Blanco, S.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197, (1999) 275 Elkeurti M.; Coudert, L. H.; Medvedev, I. R.; et al.J. Mol. Spectrosc. 263, (2010) 145 Kilb, R.W.; Lin, C.C.; and Wilson, E.B.J. Chem. Phys. 26, (1957) 1695 Kleiner, I. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 260, (2010) 1 Ilyushin, V.V.; Kryvda, A; and Alekseev, E;J. Mol. Spectrosc. 255, (2009) 32

  2. Suzaku View of the Swift/BAT Active Galactic Nuclei. V. Torus Structure of Two Luminous Radio-Loud Active Galactic Nuclei (3C 206 and PKS 0707-35)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We present the results from broadband X-ray spectral analysis of 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35 with Suzaku and Swift/BAT, two of the most luminous unobscured and obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with hard X-ray luminosities of 10(sup 45.5) erg per second and 10(sup 44.9) erg per second (14-195 keV), respectively. Based on the radio core luminosity, we estimate that the X-ray spectrum of 3C 206 contains a significant (60% in the 14-195 keV band) contribution from the jet, while it is negligible in PKS 0707-35.We can successfully model the spectra with the jet component (for 3C 206), the transmitted emission, and two reflection components from the torus and the accretion disk. The reflection strengths from the torus are found to be R(sub torus)(=Omega/2pi) = 0.29 +/- 0.18 and 0.41 +/- 0.18 for 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35, respectively, which are smaller than those in typical Seyfert galaxies. Utilizing the torus model by Ikeda et al., we quantify the relation between the half-opening angle of a torus (theta(sub oa)) and the equivalent width of an iron-K line. The observed equivalent width of 3C 206, less than 71 eV, constrains the column density in the equatorial plane to N(sup eq)(sub H) lesst han 10(sup 23) per square centimeter, or the half-opening angle to theta(sub oa) greater than 80 deg. if N(sup eq)(sub H) = 10(sup 24) per square centimeter is assumed. That of PKS 0707-35, 72 +/- 36 eV, is consistent with N(sup eq)(sub H) 10(sup 23) per square centimeter. Our results suggest that the tori in luminous radio-loud AGNs are only poorly developed. The trend is similar to that seen in radio-quiet AGNs, implying that the torus structure is not different between AGNs with jets and without jets.

  3. Clustering effects and decay analysis of the light-mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems formed in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, BirBikram; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the clustering effects in light mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems *20Ne, *28Si, *40Ca and Ne,22*21, *39K, respectively, formed in low-energy heavy ion reactions at different excitation energies, within the collective clusterization approach of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and collaborators based on quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT). Considering quadrupole deformed and compact orientated nuclei, a comparative decay analysis of these systems has been undertaken for the emission of different intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) or clusters, specifically the IMFs having Z =3 , 4, and 5 (or Z =7 , 6, and 5 complimentary fragments from the *20Ne and Ne,22*21 composite systems) which are having the experimental data available for their Z distribution. Quite interestingly, the QMFT supports clustering in N =Z (*20Ne and *28Si) and N ≠Z (*21Ne and *22Ne) nuclear systems at excitation energies corresponding to their respective decay threshold or resonant-state energies for the 4 α , 16O cluster and non-α cluster 14C (more so in *22NeN ≠Z composite system), supported by the Ikeda diagrams, taking into account the proper pairing strength in the temperature-dependent liquid drop energies. Within the DCM, we notice that at higher excitation energies in addition to x α -type (where x is an integer) clusters from N =Z composite systems and x n -x α -type clusters from N ≠Z composite systems, n p -x α -type clusters are relatively quite dominant, with larger preformation probability due to the decreased pairing strength at higher temperatures in the liquid drop energies. Also, the study reveals the presence of competing reaction mechanisms of compound nucleus (fusion-fission, FF) and of noncompound nucleus origin (deep inelastic orbiting, DIO) in the decay of very-light-mass composite systems *20,21,22Ne and *28Si at different excitation energies. The DIO contribution in the IMF cross section σIMF is extracted for these

  4. Multiscale plant wakes, turbulence and non linear scaling flexible effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Teresa; Redondo, Jose M.; Velasco, David

    2010-05-01

    We present velocity ADV measurements and flow visualization of the turbulent wakes behind plant arrays, as these are often fractal in nature, we compare the multifractal spectra and the turbulence structure behind the wakes. Both statistical measures allowing to calculate integral lengthscales and their profiles modified by the plant cannopies [1,2] as well as intermittency and spectral behaviour are also measured [3,4]. We distinguish several momentum transfer mechanisms between the cannopy and the flow, an internal one where lateral turbulent tensions are dominant, and another one just above the plant average height dominated by vertical Reynolds stresses. Visualization of flow over individual plant models show the role of coherent vortices triggered by plant elasticity. The deformation rate of the plants and their Youngs modulus may be correlated with overal plant drag and geometry. This is modified strongly in fractal canopies. Large turbulent integral scales are linked to rugosity and the scaling of the waves.[5,6] Pearlescence experiments where local shear is visualized and numerical simulations of Fractal grids are compared following [7]. [1] Nepf,H.M. Drag, turbulence and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation. Water Resources Res. 35(2)(1999) [2] Ben Mahjoub,O., Redondo J.M. and Babiano A. Jour.Structure functions in complex flows. Flow Turbulence and Combustion 59, 299-313. [3] El-Hakim, O. Salama, M. Velocity distribution inside and above branched flexible roughness. ASCE Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Vol. 118, No 6, (November/December 1992) 914-927. [4] Finnigan,J. Turbulence in plant canopies. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 2000 , Vol. 32: 519-571. [5] Ikeda, S., Kanazawa, M. Three- dimensional organized vortices above flexible water plants. ASCE Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, Vol. 122, No 11, (1996) 634-640. [6] Velasco, D.,Bateman A.,Redondo J.M and Medina V. An open channel flow experimental and theorical study of resistance and

  5. Development of a cryogenic FTIR system for measuring very small attenuation coefficients of infrared materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, Sayumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Arasaki, Takayuki; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-07-01

    We have been working on a long-term project for developing a variety of infrared immersion gratings for near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The transmittance of material is essential to realize high-efficiency immersion gratings for astronomical applications. For a typical grating, the attenuation coefficient αatt must be <0.01 cm-1 for the absolute diffraction efficiency of >70%. However, as there are few reports of αatt < 0.01 cm-1 for infrared optical materials in the literatures, we performed high-accuracy measurements of αatt for a variety of infrared materials applicable to immersion gratings. We have already reported αatt at room temperature for single-crystal Si, single-crystal Ge, CVD-ZnS, CVDZnSe, and high-resistivity single-crystal CdZnTe (Ikeda et al. 2009[7], Kaji et al. 2014[10], and Sarugaku et al. 2016[9]). Next, we proceeded with the measurements of αatt at cryogenic temperatures of 20-80 K range, which is the typical operational temperatures of infrared instruments, and for which the shifts of the band gap and/or the sharpness of the lattice absorption lines from the corresponding room temperature values are expected. Thus, we developed a new cryogenic FTIR system that enables high-accuracy measurements at cryogenic temperatures. The system has a mechanism with which two sample cells and a reference cell can be easily and quickly switched without any vacuum leak or temperature change. Our preliminary measurement of Ge using this cryogenic FTIR system found that both the cut-on and cut-off wavelengths shift to the shorter (from 2.0 to 1.7 μm) and longer (from 10.6 to 10.9 μm) wavelengths, respectively, when the temperature is decreased from room temperature to the cryogenic temperature (<28 K). We plan to complete cryogenic measurements for a variety of infrared materials by the end of 2016.

  6. A backwards-in-time Lagrangian framework for extraction of meander bend dynamics: use in meander classification, process diagnostics, and model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, J.; Lanzoni, S.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Physically based river meander migration models have grown in popularity and complexity since the pioneering work of Ikeda, Parker, and Saswe in 1981. Numerical meander models have proven valuable for understanding river meander dynamics by providing highly resolved temporal and spatial series of physiographic and morphodynamic properties that are difficult or impossible to observe from real meandering rivers. Analyses of such model outputs typically focus on either reachwide (e.g. sinuosity) or pointwise (e.g. local migration rates) measures. We propose here a framework that bridges the gap between holistic and reductionist approaches to river meandering. This research introduces a new method for identifying and tracking individual meanders ('atoms') from cutoff to inception. An atom is a river reach that evolves in time and eventually intersects itself to become an oxbow lake. Typically individual meander extractions use inflection points to demarcate meander end-points, but automated inflection detection is susceptible to spurious flexes along the centerline. We propose a different approach based on tracking cutoff nodes backwards in time thereby avoiding detection problems and making an atom's dynamics easily accessible. A classification scheme is developed that separates extracted atoms into three types of increasing complexity. Type I atoms are simple, single-loop meander bends; type II atoms contain complex, single-loop bends; and type III atoms consist of compound or multiple meanders. The distinct dynamic behavior of each atom type is explored through individual and ensemble dynamics, e.g. average growth rate, average migration rate, or statistics of local curvature series. Analyses reveal new insights that relate process and form and explore the effect of local versus non-local influences on meander growth. The utilized river migration model represents the most basic physical processes that drive river migration--i.e., channel cutoff and channel migration

  7. Advances in the evaluation of wind-induced undercatch using CFD-based simulations of snow gauge performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca; Rasmussen, Roy; Thériault, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Hydrometeorol., 17(1), pages 231-243. Colli, M., Lanza, L.G., Rasmussen, R.M. and J.M. Thèriault (2016b). The collection efficiency of shielded and unshielded precipitation gauges. Part II: modelling particle trajectories. J. of Hydrometeorol., 17(1), 245-255. Thériault, J. M., R. Rasmussen, K. Ikeda, and S. Landolt, (2012). Dependence of snow gauge collection efficiency on snowflake characteristics. J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol., 51, 745-762.

  8. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulation of Venus' Cloud-level Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, K. I.; Nakajima, K.; Odaka, M.; Imamura, T.; Hayashi, Y. Y.; Ishiwatari, M.; Kawabata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Although some observational evidences have suggested the occurrence of convection in the lower part of Venus' cloud layer, its structure remains to be clarified. To date, a few numerical studies have examined the structure of convective motion (Baker et al., 1998, 2000; Imamura et al., 2014), but the model they utilized is two-dimensional. Here we report on the results of our numerical calculations performed in order to investigate possible three-dimensional structure of the convection. We use a convection resolving model developed by Sugiyama et al. (2009), which is used in the simulations of the atmospheric convection of Jupiter (Sugiyama et al., 2011,2014) and Mars (Yamashita et al., submitted). We perform two experiments. The first one, which we call Ext.B, is based on Baker et al. (1998). A constant turbulent mixing coefficient is used in the whole domain, and a constant thermal flux is given at the upper and lower boundaries as a substitute for infrared heating. The second one, which we call Exp.I, is based on Imamura et al. (2014). The sub-grid turbulence process is implemented by Klemp and Wilhelmson (1989), and an infrared heating profile obtained in a radiative-convective equilibrium calculation (Ikeda, 2011) is used. In both experiments, the averaged solar heating profile is used. The spatial resolution is 200 m in the horizontal direction and 125 m in the vertical direction. The domain covers 128km x 128km horizontally and altitudes from 40 km to 60 km. Obtained structures of convection moderately differ in the two experiments. Although the depth of convection layer is almost the same, the horizontal cell size of Exp.B is larger than that of Exp.I; the cell sizes in Exp.B and Exp.I are about 40 km and 25 km, respectively. The vertical motion in Exp.B is asymmetric; updrafts are widespread and weak (~3m/s), whereas downdrafts are narrow and strong (~10m/s). On the other hand, the vertical motion in Exp.I is nearly symmetric and weaker (~2m/s) compared

  9. A Survey of Dense Cores in the Orion B Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Sunada, Kazuyoshi

    2009-02-01

    We have carried out an H13CO+(J = 1 - 0) core survey in a large area of 1 deg2, covering most of the dense region in the Orion B molecular cloud, using the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope with the 25-BEam Array Receiver System. We cataloged 151 dense cores using the clumpfind method. The cores have mean radius, velocity width, and mass of 0.10 ± 0.02 pc, 0.53 ± 0.15 km s-1, and 8.1 ± 6.4 M sun, respectively, which are very similar to those in the Orion A cloud. We examined the spatial relation between our H13CO+ cores and the 850 μm cores observed by Johnstone and colleagues in 2001 and 2006, and found that there are two types of spatial relationships: H13CO+ cores with and without the 850 μm cores. Since the mean density of the 850 μm cores is higher than that of the H13CO+ cores, we can interpret the H13CO+ cores with 850 μm cores as being more centrally concentrated and hence more evolved, compared with those without. Considering the relationship between the masses of the H13CO+ and 850 μm cores, we estimate the 850 μm core mass function (CMF) using the H13CO+ CMF through the generalization of the confusion model proposed by Ikeda and colleagues in 2007. Our predicted 850 μm CMF is found to be quite consistent with that directly derived by Johnstone and colleagues. Furthermore, we predict the initial mass function (IMF) by the generalized confusion model assuming a star formation efficiency of 40% for the H13CO+ cores, and found that our predicted IMF is consistent with the Galactic field-averaged IMF within uncertainties. This agreement may indicate that the origin of the IMF goes back to the cloud structures with densities of less than 104 cm-3.

  10. EDITORIAL: Fluctuations and noise in photonics and quantum optics: a special issue in memory of Hermann Haus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Derek; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2004-08-01

    dedicated this Special Issue to him. The first item is an obituary reflecting on his life and work. The first technical paper in this issue represents Hermann’s last sole author publication; a special thanks is due to A P Flitney for organizing this manuscript into publishable form. We thank the members of the International Programme Committee, listed below, and all those who contributed to making the event such a success. At this point we take the opportunity to express our gratitude to both the authors and reviewers, for their unfailing efforts in preparing and ensuring the high quality of the papers in this Special Issue. International Programme Committee David A Cardimona Air Force Research Laboratory, USA Howard Carmichael University of Auckland, New Zealand Carlton M Caves University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA Peter D Drummond University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia Paul J Edwards University of Canberra, Australia Luca Gammaitoni Università degli Studi di Perugia, Italy Brage Golding Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA Gabriela Gonzalez Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA Guangcan Guo University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China Salman Habib Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA Murray Hamilton University of Adelaide, Australia Bei-Lok Hu University of Maryland/College Park, USA Daniel K Johnstone Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA Franz X Kärtner Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA Prem Kumar Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA Zachary Lemnios DARPA, Arlington, VA, USA Gerd Leuchs Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen--Nürnberg, Germany Hideo Mabuchi California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA Peter W Milonni Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, USA Adrian C Ottewill University College Dublin, Ireland Martin B Plenio Imperial College, London, UK Rajeev J Ram Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA Farhan Rana Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

  11. Magma mixing and mingling processes inferred from the ejecta in the Shinmoedake 2011 eruption: Its implications for the transient behavior of eruption styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshide, T.; Toramaru, A.; Miyamoto, T.; Iriyama, Y.; Ikehata, K.; Matsushima, T.

    2012-04-01

    (Ishibashi and Ikeda, 2005) to rims of two pyroxenes from white pumices. From the temperature, rim composition of phenocrystic plagioclase and matrix bulk composition of white pumices, ca. 5 wt% H2O in melt (at 1-2 kbar) was estimated (Lange et al., 2009). This value is higher than the H2O solubility in rhyolitic melt at 3 km depth and comparable to that at 6 km depth (Newman & Lowenstern, 2002). This suggests that dacitic magma has migrated upward from more than 6 km depth. On the other hand, the time during elemental diffusion between dacitic magma and mixed magma is estimated to be a few days from the line traverse of glass composition across the white-gray boundary in a pumice grain. This suggests that the mingling between dacitic magma and mixed magma occurred only a few days before the sub-plinian eruption on 26th Jan.

  12. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, M.; Watanabe, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Takayasu, H.

    2010-04-01

    become interested in such datasets, conducting empirical investigations about various aspects of economic activities. Specifically, they have searched for regularities and 'laws' akin to the ones in natural science, successfully producing fascinating results, as shown in the papers contained in this volume. Each paper submitted for publication in this volume has gone through the refereeing process, and has been revised on the basis of comments and discussion at the conference as well as comments from the anonymous referees. Finally, 19 papers were accepted for publication. The editors are very grateful to the colleagues involved in the refereeing process for their rapid and careful reviewing of the papers. We thank Takayuki Mizuno, Koji Sakai, Hiwon Yoon and Hiroki Matsui for their support for the conference. We appreciate the administrative assistance provided by Yayoi Hatano of Hitotsubashi University, and Masahiko Ozaki, Masato Yamada and Tomoko Kase of RIETI. We are most grateful to the authors for their contributions, as well as to the participants, all of whom made this conference stimulating and enjoyable. Misako Takayasu Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan Tsutomu Watanabe Hitotsubashi University, Japan RIETI, Japan Yuichi Ikeda Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd, Japan Hideki Takayasu Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc, Japan

  13. Amphibole in Martian Meteorites: Composition and Implication for Volatile Content of Parental Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. B.; Sonzogni, Y.; Treiman, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    uncertainty to OH estimations based on microprobe analyses [6, 11, 12]. Shock effects on the reactions that control OH- and O2- content also complicate water content estimation from measured amphibole compositions, particularly in meteorites [13]. The amphiboles in both meteorites have low fluorine and chlorine abundances (F < 0.4 wt.%, Cl < 0.03 wt.%) suggesting a high OH- proportion in the O(3) sites. Calculation from stoichiometry implies 1.6-1.8 wt.% H2O in the amphiboles. These estimates will aid in determining the volatile content of the melts from which the amphiboles crystallized, and ultimately the volatile content of the martian mantle. Future work will seek to model the crystallization of these meteorites in order to better constrain the volatile contents of the parental magmas. [1] Floran et al. (1978) GCA, 42, 1213-1229. [2] Johnson and Rutherford (1989) Geology, 17(9), 837-841. [3] Treiman et al. (2007) J. Geophys. Res. 112, E04002. [4] Treiman (1983) Meteoritics, 18, 409. [5] Treiman (1985) Meteoritics, 20, 229-243. [6] Watson et al. (1994) Science, 265, 86-90. [7] Hale et al. (1999) GCA, 63(9), 1459-1470. [8] Treiman (1997) MAPS, 32, A129-A130. [9] Treiman (1998) MAPS, 33, A156. [10] Ikeda (2005) Ant. Met. Res. 18, 409. [11] Popp et al. (1995) Am. Min. 80, 534-548. [12] Popp et al. (1995) Am. Min. 80, 1347-1350. [13] Minitti et al. (2008) EAPS, 266(1-2), 46-60.

  14. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  15. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  16. Geological Structure of the Itoigawa - Shizuoka Tectonic Line, Northern Fossa Magna, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Iwasaki, T.

    2009-12-01

    Geological structure of two different natures is recognized in the Northern Fossa Magna (NFM). NFM is situated near the zone where the central Japan Island bent geographically and a graben zone formed between the North Alps and the Kanto highland. NFM is characterized by thick Neogene deposits and with active tilting of the crustal blocks and active folding bloc. At the present the sedimentary basin is the Saigawa hill due to the active faulting and folding in the Fossa Magna. Active fault system of Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) is an eastward - dip of reverse fault which strikes N-S along the western margin of the NFM. The vertical displacement rate of ISTL is estimated to be maximum 9 mm/yr from the offset amount and the formation age of flexure scarp which appeared in the fluvial terrace [ex. Ikeda et al., (2002)]. Besides, the last event and the reccurrence interval are presumed to be about about 1,500 years aga and 2,000 years, respectively [Okumura (2001)]. In addition the western margin fault of the Nagano basin (NBF) strikes NNE-SSW along the east edge of NFM. The NBF is an eastward-dip of reverse fault, and the Zenkoji earthquake (M7.4) in 1847 was occurred. The purpose of present study is to discuss the geometry of ISTL and geological process of NFM based on the geomorphological and geological survey using the geological dip and strike already obtained at the more than 1,500 data points. Based on these geological data, the geological structure provinceis divided into two types those are a tilt block and a folding belt at west and east sides, respectively. The Western tilting block and an Eastern folding belt trend NS strike and NNE-SSW strike, respectively. As a result of the geomorphic decipherment in alignment with ISTL using the air photograph, flexure scarp of east side upheaval is formed in the fluvial terrace side and it is difficult for the terrace riser which crosses flexure scarp and a valley to observe lateral offset. The tilt block,

  17. Mesoscale eddies in the Gulf of Aden and their impact on the spreading of Red Sea Outflow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Amy S.; Furey, Heather H.

    2012-04-01

    anticyclonic eddies are added to the previously identified Gulf of Aden Eddy (GAE; Prasad and Ikeda, 2001) and Somali Current Ring (SCR; Fratantoni et al., 2006). These are the Summer Eddy (SE) and the Lee Eddy (LE), both of which form at the beginning of the summer monsoon when strong southwest winds blowing through Socotra Passage effectively split the GAE into two smaller eddies. The SE strengthens as it propagates westward deeper in the GOA, while the Lee Eddy remains stationary in the lee of Socotra Island. Both eddies are strengthened or sustained by Ekman convergence associated with negative wind stress curl patches caused by wind jets through or around high orography. The annual cycle in the appearance, propagation and demise of these new eddies and those described in earlier work is documented to provide a comprehensive view of the most energetic circulation features in the GOA. The observations contain little evidence of features that have been shown previously to be important in the spreading of Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) in the North Atlantic, namely a wall-bounded subsurface jet (the Mediterranean Undercurrent) and submesoscale coherent lenses containing a core of MOW (‘meddies’). This is attributed to the fact that the RSOW enters the open ocean on a western boundary. High background eddy kinetic energy typical of western boundary regimes will tend to shear apart submesoscale eddies and boundary undercurrents. Even if a submesoscale lens of RSOW did form in the GOA, westward self-propagation would transport the eddy and its cargo of outflow water back toward, rather than away from, its source.

  18. Origin of Chondrules and Matrix in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Ikeda, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Al between chondrules and matrix can be virtually excluded. Therefore, the complementary relationship in the distribution of Ca and Al between matrix and chondrules must be of nebular origin and must reflect conditions of formation of chondrules and matrix. Early condensation and separation of spinel may be responsible for the high Ca/Al in Y-86751 chondrules. The early separated spinel grains were later collected with the matrix and are responsible for the low Ca/Al ratio in Y-86751 matrix [3,4]. A different evolution, where chondrules incorporated less Ca than Al, must have occurred for Allende. Perhaps conditions were more oxidizing and some Ca remained as Ca(OH)(sub)2 in the gas before matrix was formed, as suggested by Hashimoto [6]. Allende dark inclusions representing matrix have excess Ca while all other refractory elements occur in CI proportions, suggesting a unique behavior of Ca [7]. A different nebular history for two members of the same group (CV) would indicate strong local differences in formation conditions for chondrules and matrix from two identical nebular reservoirs. In addition, if both meteorites come from the same parent body there could only be limited mixing on the parent body to retain the different signatures. References: [1] Palme H. et al. (1992) LPS XXIII, 1021-1022. [2] Palme H. (1992) 17th Symp. Antarc. Met., Tokyo, 71-1-3. [3] Murakami T. et al. (1992) 17th Symp. Antarc. Met., Tokyo, 11-1-2. [4] Murakami T. and Ikeda Y. (1993) in preparation. [5] Weinbruch S. et al. (1990) Meteoritics, 25, 115-125. [6] Hashimoto A. (1992) GCA, 56, 511-532. [7] Palme H. et al. (1989) Z. Naturforsch., 44a, 1005-1014.

  19. Meander applications at landslides in alluvium valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, L.

    2012-04-01

    For calculation of bed variation in alluvial channels important bed configurations include meso-scale bed configurations, such as alternating bars (pools and riffles) and braided bars. It is important in river management to be able to predict water surface elevation, scour, and fill in alluvial channels under given flow conditions. Mathematical and physical models can be used in designing or planning for improvement of river channels and hydraulic structures. Several studies have been made to evaluate flow and bed variation in meandering channels (Engelund, 1974; Odgaard, 1986; Ikeda et al., 1987; Falcon and Kennedy, 1983; Kishi et al., 1983, Struiksma, 1985, and Struiksma et al., 1985). The bed variation at meandering channels is calculated by the continuity equation for bed load transport. Typical bed configurations and flows with alternating bars and braided bars are produced in straight channels, and thus the formation and migration of bars are predicted quantitatively. The results of model applications were carried out for the same situations as the mathematical model at the Technical University of Berlin, Institute Wasserbau and Wasserwirtschaft (Yilmaz, 1990), started with flat bed, continued until dz/ dt=0. Then the beds were solidified, and precise measurements of the bed configuration and the velocity were performed. Plan geometries of runs consist of a sine-generated curve and an asymmetrical meander loop, respectively. The latter is derived by a Fourier series analysis on several typical bends. The meso-scale bed configuration in alluvial streams is highly dependent on the width-depth ratio of the channel. The velocity measurements were made with small mechanical current meters fixed to a 1m high frame that rested on the bottom while measuring the lower points on the profile. The frame was suspended at different levels above the bottom to collect the data represented by the higher points. Velocity profiles are plotted semi-logarithmically with the dots

  20. A Simple Model for the Vertical Crustal Movement Associated with the Earthquake Cycle Along the Pacific Coast of Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiya, T.

    2013-12-01

    Before the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake, rapid subsidence more than 5mm/yr has been observed along the Pacific coast of the Tohoku area by leveling, tide gauges, and GPS (Kato, 1979, Kato and Tsumura, 1979, El-Fiky and Kato, 1999). On the other hand, Stage 5e (~125 ka) marine terraces are widely recognized along the same area, implying the area is uplifting in a long-term. Ikeda (1999) hypothesized that these deformation signals reflect accumulation of elastic strain at the plate interface and there is a possibility of a giant earthquake causing a coastal uplift. However, the coastal area subsided as large as 1m during the 2011 main shock. Though we observe significant postseismic uplift, it is not certain if the preseismic as well as coseismic subsidence will be recovered. We construct a simple model of earthquake deformation cycle to interpret the vertical movement along the Pacific coast of northeast Japan. The model consists of a 40 km thick elastic lithosphere overlying a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenospher with a viscosity of 10^19 Pa s. Plate boundary is modeled as two rectangular faults located in the lithosphere and connected each other. As for the kinematic conditions of these faults, we represent the temporal evolution of fault slip as a sum of the steady term and the perturbation term following Savage and Prescott (1978). The first steady term corresponds to the long-term plate subduction, which contributes to long-term geomorphic evolution such as the marine terraces (Hashimoto et al., 2004). The second perturbation term represent earthquake cycle effects. We evaluate this effect under assumptions that earthquake occurrence is perfectly periodic, plate interface is fully coupled during interseismic periods, and the slip deficit is fully released by earthquakes. If the earthquake recurrence interval is shorter than the relaxation time of the structure, interseismic movement is in the opposite direction to the coseismic ones and changes almost linearly

  1. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  2. An Initial Event in Insect Innate Immune Response: Structural and Biological Studies of Interactions between β-1,3-glucan and the N-terminal Domain of β-1,3-glucan Recognition Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Huaien; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; VanderVelde, David; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Kanost, Michael R.; Krishnamoorthi, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    In response to invading microorganisms, insect β-1,3-glucan recognition protein (βGRP), a soluble receptor in the hemolymph, binds to the surfaces of bacteria and fungi and activates serine protease cascades that promote destruction of pathogens by means of melanization or expression of antimicrobial peptides. Here we report on the NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain of βGRP (N-βGRP) from Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella), which is sufficient to activate the prophenoloxidase (proPO) pathway resulting in melanin formation. NMR and isothermal calorimetric titrations of N-βGRP with laminarihexaose, a glucose hexamer containing β-1,3 links, suggest a weak binding of the ligand. However, addition of laminarin, a glucose polysaccharide (~ 6 kDa) containing β-1,3 and β-1,6 links that activates the proPO pathway, to N-βGRP results in the loss of NMR cross-peaks from the backbone 15N-1H groups of the protein, suggesting the formation of a large complex. Analytical ultra centrifugation (AUC) studies of formation of N-βGRP:laminarin complex show that ligand-binding induces self-association of the protein:carbohydrate complex into a macro structure, likely containing six protein and three laminarin molecules (~ 102 kDa). The macro complex is quite stable, as it does not undergo dissociation upon dilution to sub-micromolar concentrations. The structural model thus derived from the present studies for N-βGRP:laminarin complex in solution differs from the one in which a single N-βGRP molecule has been proposed to bind to a triple helical form of laminarin on the basis of an X-ray crystallographic structure of N-βGRP:laminarihexaose complex [Kanagawa, M., Satoh, T., Ikeda, A., Adachi, Y., Ohno, N., and Yamaguchi, Y. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 29158–29165]. AUC studies and phenoloxidase activation measurements carried out with the designed mutants of N-βGRP indicate that electrostatic interactions involving Asp45, Arg54, and Asp68 between the

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on Iron-Based Superconductors FOCUS ON IRON-BASED SUPERCONDUCTORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Ren, Zhi-An

    2009-02-01

    Elastic theory for the vortex-lattice melting in iron-based high-Tc superconductors Q-H Chen, Q-M Nie, J-P Lv and T-C Au Yeung Electronic properties of LaO1-xFxFeAs in the normal state probed by NMR/NQR H-J Grafe, G Lang, F Hammerath, D Paar, K Manthey, K Koch, H Rosner, N J Curro, G Behr, J Werner, N Leps, R Klingeler, H-H Klauss, F J Litterst and B Büchner AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu) and SrFe2-xTMxAs2 (TM = Mn, Co, Ni): crystal structure, charge doping, magnetism and superconductivity Deepa Kasinathan, Alim Ormeci, Katrin Koch, Ulrich Burkhardt, Walter Schnelle, Andreas Leithe-Jasper and Helge Rosner Impurity states in a family of antiferromagnetic iron arsenides Qiang Han and Z D Wang Coherence-incoherence crossover in the normal state of iron oxypnictides and importance of Hund's rule coupling K Haule and G Kotliar Electronic structure of heavily electron-doped BaFe1.7Co0.3As2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission Y Sekiba, T Sato, K Nakayama, K Terashima, P Richard, J H Bowen, H Ding, Y-M Xu, L J Li, G H Cao, Z-A Xu and T Takahashi Absorption and photoemission spectroscopy of rare-earth oxypnictides T Kroll, F Roth, A Koitzsch, R Kraus, D R Batchelor, J Werner, G Behr, B Büchner and M Knupfer Superconductivity in LnFePO (Ln = La, Pr and Nd) single crystals R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, L Shu, D A Zocco, N M Crisosto and M B Maple Unconventional pairing originating from disconnected Fermi surfaces in the iron-based superconductor Kazuhiko Kuroki, Seiichiro Onari, Ryotaro Arita, Hidetomo Usui, Yukio Tanaka, Hiroshi Kontani and Hideo Aoki Near-degeneracy of several pairing channels in multiorbital models for the Fe pnictides S Graser, T A Maier, P J Hirschfeld and D J Scalapino Investigation of superconducting gap structure in TbFeAsO0.9F0.1 using point contact Andreev reflection K A Yates, K Morrison, J A Rodgers, G B S Penny, J-W G Bos, J P Attfield and L F Cohen Competition of magnetism and superconductivity in underdoped (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 Marianne Rotter, Marcus

  4. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    spin-transfer torque threshold current density in coupled vortex domain wallsS Lepadatu, A P Mihai, J S Claydon, F Maccherozzi, S S Dhesi, C J Kinane, S Langridge and C H Marrows Large RF susceptibility of transverse domain wallsO Rousseau, S Petit-Watelot and M Viret Expansion and relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in a Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Pt multilayer with antiferromagnetic interlayer couplingP J Metaxas, R L Stamps, J-P Jamet, J Ferré, V Baltz and B Rodmacq Current-induced domain wall motion and magnetization dynamics in CoFeB/Cu/Co nanostripesV Uhlíř, J Vogel, N Rougemaille, O Fruchart, Z Ishaque, V Cros, J Camarero, J C Cezar, F Sirotti and S Pizzini Roles of the magnetic field and electric current in thermally activated domain wall motion in a submicrometer magnetic strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropySatoru Emori and Geoffrey S D Beach Electrical domain morphologies in compositionally graded ferroelectric filmsM B Okatan, A L Roytburd, V Nagarajan and S P Alpay Domain-wall pinning by local control of anisotropy in Pt/Co/Pt strips J H Franken, M Hoeijmakers, R Lavrijsen and H J M Swagten Experimental detection of domain wall propagation above the Walker field Kouta Kondou, Norikazu Ohshima, Daichi Chiba, Shinya Kasai, Kensuke Kobayashi and Teruo Ono Enhanced functionality in magnonics by domain walls and inhomogeneous spin configurationsG Duerr, R Huber and D Grundler Domain wall motion in perpendicular anisotropy nanowires with edge roughness Maximilian Albert, Matteo Franchin, Thomas Fischbacher, Guido Meier and Hans Fangohr Determination of the spin torque non-adiabaticity in perpendicularly magnetized nanowiresJ Heinen, D Hinzke, O Boulle, G Malinowski, H J M Swagten, B Koopmans, C Ulysse, G Faini, B Ocker, J Wrona and M Kläui Domain wall dynamics driven by spin transfer torque and the spin-orbit field Masamitsu Hayashi, Yoshinobu Nakatani, Shunsuke Fukami, Michihiko Yamanouchi, Seiji Mitani and Hideo Ohno Dynamic propagation and nucleation in domain

  5. PREFACE: The Sixth International Conference on Gravitation & Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, Ghanashyam; Souradeep, Tarun

    2008-07-01

    (Chennai), RRI (Bangalore), SINP (Kolkata) and IUCAA. The conference banquet was sponsored by Hewlett-Packard and the reception dinner was sponsored by the Bank of Baroda. We thank them all. It is a pleasure to thank Professor Naresh Dadhich, Director, IUCAA, members of the IAGRG council, members of the SOC and members of the LOC for their pivotal role in the organization of the conference, and the speakers, the participants, and the IUCAA staff for their efforts which made the sixth ICGC a very successful meeting. Ghanashyam Date Institute for Mathematical Science, Chennai Tarun Souradeep Inter-University Centre for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Pune Scientific Organizing Committee Ghanashyam Date (Chairman, SOC, IMSc, India) Abhay Ashtekar (Pennsylvania State Univ., US) Bhuvnesh Jain (Univ. of Pennsylvania, US) Carlo Rovelli (CPT, Marseille, France) Clifford M. Will (Washington Univ., US) Gabriela Gonza'lez (Lousiana State Univ., US) Hideo Kodama (Kyoto Univ. Japan) John Ellis (CERN, Switzerland) Luc Blanchet (IAP, France) Madhavan Varadarajan (RRI, India) Masaru Shibata (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan) Narayan Banerjee (Jadavpur Univ. India) Parthasarathi Mitra (SINP, India) Rajesh Gopakumar (HRI, India) Sanjeev Dhurandhar (IUCAA, India) Somnath Bharadwaj (IITKGP, India) Subhendra Mohanty (PRL, India) Subir Sarkar (Univ. of Oxford, UK) Tarun Souradeep (IUCAA, India) T. P. Singh (TIFR, India) Local Organizing Committee Tarun Souradeep (Chairman, LOC) Biswajit Pandey Gaurang Mahajan Manjiri Mahabal Maulik Parikh Minu Joy Moumita Aich Niranjan Abhyankar Nirupama Bawdekar Ratna Rao Saugata Chatterjee Savita Dalvi Sharanya Sur Snehlata Shankar Subharthi Ray Sudhanshu Barway Tuhin Ghosh Plenary Speakers and Talks The Plenary Talks are available at http://meghnad.iucaa.ernet.in/~icgc07/ Gary Hinshaw Status of WMAP Data Andrew Jaffe The Future of CMB Studies Subir Sarkar Cosmology beyond the Standard Model HongSheng Zhao Dark Matter and Dark Energy: Puzzles and an Alternative Solution

  6. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, Z. A.; Holt, J. B.

    1997-04-01

    KEYNOTE ADDRESS. Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis: Twenty Years of Search and Findings (A. Merzhanov). SOLID-STATE COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS. Recent Progress in Combustion Synthesis of High-Performance Materials in Japan (M. Koizumi & Y. Miyamoto). Modeling and Numerical Computation of a Nonsteady SHS Process (A. Bayliss & B. Matkowsky). New Models of Quasiperiodic Burning in Combustion Synthesis (S. Margolis, et al.). Modeling of SHS Operations (V. Hlavacek, et al.). Combustion Theory for Sandwiches of Alloyable Materials (R. Armstrong & M. Koszykowski). Observations on the Combustion Reaction Between Thin Foils of Ni and Al (U. Anselmi-Tamburini & Z. Munir). Combustion Synthesis of Intermetallic Compounds (Y. Kaieda, et al.). Combustion Synthesis of Nickel Aluminides (B. Rabin, et al.). Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of NiTi Intermetallics (H. Yi & J. Moore). Shock-Induced Chemical Synthesis of Intermetallic Compounds (S. Work, et al.). Advanced Ceramics Via SHS (T. DeAngelis & D. Weiss). In-Situ Formation of SiC and SiC-C Blocked Solids by Self-Combustion Synthesis (S. Ikeda, et al.). Powder Purity and Morphology Effects in Combustion-Synthesis Reactions (L. Kecskes, et al.). Simultaneous Synthesis and Densification of Ceramic Components Under Gas Pressure by SHS (Y. Miyamoto & M. Koizumi). The Use of Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of High-Density Titanium Diboride (P. Zavitsanos, et al.). Metal--Ceramic Composite Pipes Produced by a Centrifugal-Thermit Process (O. Odawara). Simultaneous Combustion Synthesis and Densification of AIN (S. Dunmead, et al.). Fabrication of a Functionally Gradient Material by Using a Self-Propagating Reaction Process (N. Sata, et al.). Combustion Synthesis of Oxide-Carbide Composites (L. Wang, et al.). Heterogeneous Reaction Mechanisms in the Si-C System Under Conditions of Solid Combustion (R. Pampuch, et al.). Experimental Modeling of Particle-Particle Interactions During SHS of TiB2 -Al2O3 (K. Logan

  7. PREFACE: Tenth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio; Suzuki, Atsuto; Mitsui, Tadao

    2008-07-01

    The tenth meeting of the TAUP Workshop Series, TAUP 2007, was organized by the Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University. In TAUP 2007 all the various aspects of Astroparticle Physics have been covered, from Cosmology and Dark Constituents, to Gravitational Waves, to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, to High Energy Astrophysics, to Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays Astronomy. New and important scientific results were presented and debated in the plenary review talks and in a very large number of contributions in topical parallel sessions. As editors of these proceedings, we hope that this volume, which contains most of the talks and contributions presented at TAUP 2007, will provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of Astroparticle Physics. We thank all the invited speakers, conveners, and contributors who made this possible. Full coverage of the transparencies presented at the conference can be found on the website http://www.awa.tohoku.ac.jp/taup2007. The TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee thanks IUPAP/PaNAGIC, Sendai Tourism and Convention Bureau, COE program: Exploring New Science by Bridging Particle-Matter Hierarchy, SEIKO EG&G, and REPIC corporation for sponsoring the Conference, and Sendai Civic Auditorium, where the meeting was held, for their hospitality. We wish to thank Alessandro Bottino, Junpei Shirai, Fumihiko Suekane, David Sinclair, Takaaki Kajita, Takeo Moroi, Masaki Mori, Masahiro Kawasaki, Yoshihito Gando, Sei Yoshida, Kyoko Tamae, Sanshiro Enomoto, Alexandre Kozlov, Yasuhiro Kishimoto, Itaru Shimizu, Kengo Nakamura, Haruo Ikeda, and Kyo Nakajima for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. The Organizing Committee is grateful to the members of the International Advisory Committee and of the TAUP Steering Committee for assistance and advice on the scientific program. Very special thanks are due to Ms Rika Bizen, Mr Fujio Miura, Ms Akemi

  8. Role of strain relaxation in exciton resonance energies of ZnO epitaxial layers grown on SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almamun Ashrafi, Abm

    2004-03-01

    exciton bandgap energy quenching is also reflected in the strain relaxation of ZnO layers as a function of layer thickness. The bandgap energies of A and D0X excitons are increased linearly as a function of strain along the c-axis. Their slopes are estimated to be 10.4 and 14.4 meV for the A and D0X excitons, respectively. The slope of A exciton for GaN, however, is far away from the ZnO by 16 meV grown on Al2O3 substrate5. This indicates that the strain effect in ZnO layer grown on SiC is rather lower than that of the GaN grown on Al2O3. These realizations are the results of superior crystalline quality in ZnO epilayers which can be attributed to the smaller lattice mismatch between the ZnO epilayer and SiC substrate which in principle should be less than the of the Al2O3 substrate. Reference [1] H. D. Shun, T. Makino, Y. Segawa, M. Kawasaki, and H. Koinuma, J. Appl. Phys. 91 (2002) 1993 [2] Y. R. Ryu, T. S. Lee, J. H. Leem, H. W. White, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83 (2003) 4032 [3] B. P. Zhang etal, The 64th Japan Society of Applied Physics Conference 2003, 31p-B-11, pp. 259 [4] A. B. M. A. Ashrafi, N. T. Binh, B. P. Zhang, and Y. Segawa, Appl. Phys. Lett. (submitted) [5] K. Funato, S. Hashimoto, K. Yanashima, F. Nakamura, and M. Ikeda, Appl. Phys. Lett. 75 (1999) 1137

  9. Post-fire changes in sediment transport connectivity from pedon to watershed scale. The Navalón wildfire in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Bodí, Merche B.; González, Óscar; Mataix Solera, Jorge; Doerr, Stefan Helmut

    2015-04-01

    ., Sheridan, G. J., Smith, H. G., Lane, P. N. J. (2012). Surface runoff and erosion after prescribed burning and the effect of different fire regimes in forests and shrublands: a review. International Journal of Wildland Fire, 21(7), 857-872. Cerdà, A., Lasanta, A. 2005. Long-term erosional responses after fire in the Central Spanish Pyrenees: 1. Water and sediment yield. Catena, 60, 59-80. Doerr, S., Cerdà, A. 2005. Fire effects on soil system functioning: new insights and future challenges International Journal of Wildland Fire Preface. International Journal of Wildland Fire 14(4) 339-342 Guénon, R., Vennetier, M., Dupuy, N., Roussos, S., Pailler, A., Gros, R. 2013. Trends in recovery of Mediterranean soil chemical properties and microbial activities after infrequent and frequent wildfires. Land Degradation & Development, 24: 115- 128. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1109 Kaiho, K., Yatsu, S., Oba, M., Gorjan, P., Casier, J. G., Ikeda, M. (2013). A forest fire and soil erosion event during the Late Devonian mass extinction. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 392, 272-280. Lasanta, A., Cerdà, A. 2005. Long-term erosional responses after fire in the Central Spanish Pyrenees: 2. Solute release. Catena, 60, 80-101. Pérez-Cabello, F., Cerdà, A., de la Riva, J., Echeverría, M.T., García-Martín, A., Ibarra, P., Lasanta, T., Montorio, R., Palacios, V. 2012. Micro-scale post-fire surface cover changes monitored using high spatial resolution photography in a semiarid environment: A useful tool in the study of post-fire soil erosion processes, Journal of Arid Environments, 76: 88-96. 10.1016/j.jaridenv.2011.08.007 Prats, S.A., Malvar, M.C., Simões-Vieira, D.C., MacDonald, L., Keizer, J.J. 2015. Effectiveness of hydro- mulching to reduce runoff and erosion in a recently burnt pine plantation in central Portugal. Land Degradation & Development, DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2236.

  10. Secondary Mineralization of Components in CV3 Chondrites: Nebular and Asteroidal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1995-09-01

    vaporization after >1000-fold dust/gas enrichment [11]. Fe-rich olivine will not condense until most Mg has condensed into forsterite [11]. The steep compositional gradients between adjacent fayalite and forsterite limit the duration of fayalite condensation to a period of several hours [2]. There are several inconsistencies in this late-stage evaporation-condensation model. Fayalitic rims occur inside chondrules and formed by alteration, not by condensation. Forsterite and enstatite grains that supposedly condensed from the nebula are absent on chondrule rims and in chondrites. Magnetite, Ni-rich metal and sulfides are present inside matrix olivine, inconsistent with equilibrium calculations. I-Xe data suggest that sodalite formation in Allende lasted for about 10 Myr, which is inconsistent with a nebular origin [12]. Asteroidal alteration is favored for magnetite [3] and required for most phyllosilicates [4]. Asteroidal formation of fayalite [13] was rejected [2], partly because hydrous minerals are absent in Allende. We suggest that Allende-like CV3 chondrites may have formed in an asteroid by aqueous alteration and dehydration; see Krot et al. [this volume] for details. Higher Na and K concentrations in oxidized CV3 chondrites are not inconsistent with asteroidal alteration, as CM2 chondrites show similar heterogeneities. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by NASA grants NAGW-3281 (K. Keil) and 152-11-40-23 (M.E.Z.). References: [1] Peck J. A. and Wood J. A. (1987) GCA, 51, 1503-1510. [2] Hua X. et al. (1988) GCA, 52, 1389-1408. [3] Blum J. D. et al. (1989) GCA, 53, 543-556. [4] Keller L. P. et al. (1994) GCA, 58, 5589-5598. [5] Hashimoto A. and Grosman L. (1987) GCA, 51, 1685-1704. [6] Kimura M. and Ikeda Y. (1992) Proc. Symp. Antarc. Meteorites, 17, 31-33. [7] Peck J. A. (1983) LPS XIV, 373-374. [8] McSween H. Y. (1977) GCA, 41, 1777-1790. [9] Weinbruch S. et al. (1993) GCA, 57, 2649-2661. [10] Palme et al. (1991) Meteoritics, 25, 383. [11] Palme H. and Fegley B

  11. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    ]C([symbol], n)[symbol]O by the transfer reaction [symbol]C([symbol]Li, t)[symbol]O / F. Hammache et al. -- SPIRAL2 at GANIL: a world of leading ISOL facility for the physics of exotic nuclei / S. Gales -- Magnetic properties of light neutron-rich nuclei and shell evolution / T. Suzuki, T. Otsuka -- Multiple scattering effects in elastic and quasi free proton scattering from halo nuclei / R. Crespo et al. -- The dipole response of neutron halos and skins / T. Aumann -- Giant and pygmy resonances within axially-symmetric-deformed QRPA with the Gogny force / S. Péru, H. Goutte -- Soft K[symbol] = O+ modes unique to deformed neutron-rich unstable nuclei / K. Yoshida et al. -- Synthesis, decay properties, and identification of superheavy nuclei produced in [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / Yu. Ts. Oganessian et al. -- Highlights of the Brazilian RIB facility and its first results and hindrance of fusion cross section induced by [symbol]He / P. R. S. Gomes et al. -- Search for long fission times of super-heavy elements with Z = 114 / M. Morjean et al. -- Microscopic dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena around [symbol]Se and [symbol]Kr / N. Hinohara et al. -- [symbol]-cluster states and 4[symbol]-particle condensation in [symbol]O / Y. Funaki et al. -- Evolution of the N = 28 shell closure far from stability / O. Sorlin et al. -- Continuum QRPA approach and the surface di-neutron modes in nuclei near the neutron drip-line / M. Matsuo et al. -- Deformed relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model for exotic nuclei / S. G. Zhou et al. -- Two- and three-body correlations in three-body resonances and continuum states / K. Katō, K. Ikeda -- Pion- and Rho-Meson effects in relativistic Hartree-Fock and RPA / N. V. Giai et al. -- Study of the structure of neutron rich nuclei by using [symbol]-delayed neutron and gamma emission method / Y. Ye et al. -- Production of secondary radioactive [symbol] Na beam for the study of [symbol]Na([symbol], p)[symbol]Mg stellar reaction / D. N. Binh et al

  12. EDITORIAL: Cluster issue on Heusler compounds and devices Cluster issue on Heusler compounds and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felser, Claudia; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2009-04-01

    ] Sakuraba Y, Hattori M, Oogane M, Ando Y, Kato H, Sakuma A, Miyazaki T and Kubota H 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 192508 [11] Inomata K, Okamura S, Miyazaki A, Kikuchi M, Tezuka N, Wojcik M and Jedryka E 2006 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 816 [12] Fecher G H and Felser C 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 1582 [13] Tezuka N, Ikeda N, Miyazaki A, Sugimoto S, Kikuchi M and Inomata K 2006 Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 112514 [14] Kallmayer M, Schneider H, Jakob G, Elmers H J, Balke B and Cramm S 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 1552 [15] Cinchetti M, Wüstenberg J P, Sánchez Albaneda M, Steeb F, Conca A, Jourdan M and Aeschlimann M 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 1544 [16] Fecher G H, Balke B, Ouardi S, Felser C, Schonhense G, Ikenaga E, Kim J J, Ueda S and Kobayashi K 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 1576 [17] Chioncel L, Sakuraba Y, Arrigoni E, Katsnelson M I, Oogane M, Ando Y, Miyazaki T, Burzo E and Lichtenstein A I 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 086402 [18] Hamrle J, Blomeier S, Gaier O, Hillebrands B, Schneider H, Jakob G, Postava K and Felser C 2007 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 40 1563 [19] Furubayashi T, Kodama K, Sukegawa H, Takahashi Y K, Inomata K and Hono K 2008 Appl. Phys. Lett. 93 122507 [20] Balke B, Fecher G H, Winterlik J and Felser C 2007 Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 152504 [21] Wurmehl S, Kandpal H C, Fecher G H and Felser C 2006 J. Phys.: Cond. Mat. 18 6171 [22] Entel P, Bucheinikov V D, Khovailo V V, Zayak A T, Adeagbo W A, Gruner M E, Herper H C and Wassermann E F 2006 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39 865

  13. EDITORIAL: New materials with high spin polarization: half-metallic Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felser, Claudia; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2007-03-01

    resolution measurements of the valence band close to the Fermi energy indicate the existence of the gap in the minority states for all investigated Co2Fe1 - xMnxSi compounds. Other Co2 Heusler compounds are also possible candidates for magneto-electronic devices. Miura et al [21] have found that the disorder between Co and Y atoms correlates with the total valence electron charges around Y atom and have predicted that Ti-based compounds are better than Cr-, Mn- and Fe-based compounds in preventing the atomic disorder between Co and Y atoms. Kandpal et al have therefore investigated the electronic structure and disordering effects in Co2TiSn using local probes, 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy and 59Co nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. They found that the sample possesses up to 10% of antisite (Co/Ti) disordering, a disorder that does not destroy the half-metallic character of this material. We hope that this Cluster of papers will help to stimulate and push forward the research of materials with high spin polarization. References [1] Sakuraba Y, Hattori M, Oogane M, Ando Y, Kato H, Sakuma A, Miyazaki T and Kubota H 2006 Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in Co2MnSi/Al-O/Co2MnSi magnetic tunnel junctions Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 192508 [2] S Wurmehl, Fecher G H, Kandpal H C, Ksenofontov V, Felser C, and Lin H-J 2006 Investigation of Co2FeSi: the Heusler compound with highest Curie temperature and magnetic moment Appl. Phys. Lett. 88 032503 [3] Tezuka N, Ikeda N, Sugimoto S and Inomata K 2006 175% TMR at room temperature and high thermal stability using Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 full-Heusler alloy electrodes Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 252508 [4] Block T, Felser C, Jakob G, Ensling J, Mühling B, Gütlich P, Cava R J 2003 Large negative magnetoresistance effects in Co2Cr0.6Fe0.4Al J. Solid State Chem. 176 646 [5] Marukame T, Ishikawa T, Matsuda K I, Uemura T and Yamamoto M 2006 High tunnel magnetoresistance in fully epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions with a full-Heusler alloy Co2Cr0.6Fe0.4Al