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Sample records for androgen production function

  1. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity. PMID:25416742

  2. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J

    2016-02-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity.

  3. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system. PMID:27168746

  4. Androgens induce sebaceous differentiation in sebocyte cells expressing a stable functional androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Barrault, Christine; Garnier, Julien; Pedretti, Nathalie; Cordier-Dirikoc, Sevda; Ratineau, Emeline; Deguercy, Alain; Bernard, François-Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Androgens act through non-genomic and androgen receptor (AR)-dependent genomic mechanisms. AR is expressed in the sebaceous gland and the importance of androgens in the sebaceous function is well established. However, the in vitro models used to date have failed to evidence a clear genomic effect (e.g., modification of gene expression profile) of androgens on human sebocyte cells. In order to study the impact of active androgens in sebocytes, we constructed a stable human sebocyte cell line derived from SEBO662 [17] constitutively expressing a fully functional AR. In these SEBO662 AR+ cells, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced AR nuclear translocation and the strong modulation of a set of transcripts (RASD1, GREB1...) known to be androgen-sensitive in other androgenic cells and tissues. Moreover, we observed that DHT precociously down-regulated markers for immature follicular cells (KRT15, TNC) and for hair lineage (KRT75, FST) and up-regulated the expression of genes potentially related to sebocyte differentiation (MUC1/EMA, AQP3, FADS2). These effects were fully confirmed at the protein level. In addition, DHT-stimulated SEBO662 AR+, cultured in a low-calcium defined keratinocyte medium without serum or any complement, neosynthesize lipids, including sebum lipids, and store increased amounts of triglycerides in lipid droplets. DHT also induces morphological changes, increases cell size, and treatments over 7 days lead to a time-dependent increase in the population of apoptotic DNA-fragmented cells. Taken together, these results show for the first time that active androgens alone can engage immature sebocytes in a clear lipogenic differentiation process (Graphical abstract). These effects depend on the expression of a functional AR in these cells. This model should be of interest for revisiting the mechanisms of the sebaceous function in vitro and for the design of relevant pharmacological models for drug or compound testing.

  5. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  6. C601S mutation in the androgen receptor results in partial loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajender; Singh, Pooja; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2010-11-01

    The present study was undertaken on a case of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome to look at the etiology of the disorder. The patient exhibited a female phenotype despite 46,XY chromosome complement. Direct DNA sequencing of coding region of the androgen receptor gene in this case revealed a 2329G>C substitution (cDNA sequence reference) in exon 3 of the gene. The substitution resulted in replacement of Cys with Ser at codon 601 of the ligand-binding domain of the protein. Analyses on 200 control samples revealed absence of this substitution(s). In vitro assays were done using COS-1 cells. The mutation resulted in partial (∼40%) loss of ligand-binding and significant (∼70%) loss of downstream transactivation function. The mutation was absent in the controls. The findings are particularly interesting since another substitution at the same codon (TGC-TTC) has been reported in association with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

  7. Gonadotropin regulation of in vitro androgen production by reptilian testes.

    PubMed

    Wo Tsui, H; Licht, P

    1977-04-01

    The hormonal regulation of in vitro androgen production by minced testes from 7 species of reptiles representing the 3 major orders was studied using purified follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from tetrapod species. Androgen content was measured by radioimmunoassay. All 7 species showed a dose-dependent response to all preparations of FSH and LH tested. However, variations were found depending on the species tested and the source of the hormone. All snake hormones were particularly inactive in turtles. Some of the variation in relative potencies of hormone reflect phylogenetic specificity in the testes. Synergism between FSH and LH was tested in the sea turtle. While subliminal doses of FSH and LH produced a small stimulation of androgen production, each alone was ineffective. Both gonadotropins have intrinsic activity with regard to the stimulation of steroidogenesis.

  8. Apolipoprotein D (APOD) is a putative biomarker of androgen receptor function in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Appari, Mahesh; Werner, Ralf; Wünsch, Lutz; Cario, Gunnar; Demeter, Janos; Hiort, Olaf; Riepe, Felix; Brooks, James D; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2009-06-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the most common cause of disorders of sex development usually caused by mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. AIS is characterized by a poor genotype-phenotype correlation, and many patients with clinically presumed AIS do not seem to have mutations in the AR gene. We therefore aimed at identifying a biomarker enabling the assessment of the cellular function of the AR as a transcriptional activator. In the first step, we used complementary DNA (cDNA) microarrays for a genome-wide screen for androgen-regulated genes in two normal male primary scrotal skin fibroblast strains compared to two labia majora fibroblast strains from 46,XY females with complete AIS (CAIS). Apolipoprotein D (APOD) and two further transcripts were significantly upregulated by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in scrotum fibroblasts, while CAIS labia majora cells were unresponsive. Microarray data were well correlated with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR; R = 0.93). Subsequently, we used qRT-PCR in independent new cell cultures and confirmed the significant DHT-dependent upregulation of APOD in five normal scrotum strains [13.5 +/- 8.2 (SD)-fold] compared with three CAIS strains (1.2 +/- 0.7-fold, p = 0.028; t test) and six partial androgen insensitivity syndrome strains (2 +/- 1.3-fold, p = 0.034; t test). Moreover, two different 17ss-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase III deficiency labia majora strains showed APOD induction in the range of normal scrotum (9.96 +/- 1.4-fold), supporting AR specificity. Therefore, qRT-PCR of APOD messenger RNA transcription in primary cultures of labioscrotal skin fibroblasts is a promising tool for assessing AR function, potentially allowing a function-based diagnostic evaluation of AIS in the future.

  9. Androgens induce prolactin production by human endometrial stromal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, S; Kanzaki, H; Inoue, T; Imai, K; Higuchi, T; Hatayama, H; Kariya, M; Mori, T

    1994-01-01

    Although there is a significant quantity of androgens in the endometrium, the function of these hormones has not been clarified, except for being estrogen precursors. Human endometrial stromal cells (ESC) were cultured in the presence of testosterone (T) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Following culture, prolactin (PRL), a biochemical marker of stromal cell differentiation (decidualization) which is produced by ESC, was examined. T induced PRL production in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as reported previously for progesterone (P) stimulation. In addition, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, which cannot be converted to estrogens, similarly induced PRL production. T in combination with P enhanced PRL production in cultured ESC significantly more than either P or T stimulation alone. A specific androgen receptor blocker, flutamide, when added to cultures containing T, inhibited PRL production in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect the production of PRL induced by P. These results indicate that in vitro PRL production by human ESC is induced not only by P, but also by androgens through specific receptors and further suggest that androgens play an important role in human endometrial differentiation.

  10. Androgen therapy in women.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2006-01-01

    Androgens in women either derive from direct ovarian production or from peripheral conversion of the adrenal sex steroid precursor, dehydroepiandrosterone, towards active androgens. Therefore, loss of adrenal or ovarian function, caused by Addison's disease or consequent to bilateral oophorectomy, results in severe androgen deficiency, clinically often associated with a loss of libido and energy. Importantly, physiological menopause does not necessarily lead to androgen deficiency, as androgen synthesis in the ovaries may persist despite the decline in estrogen production. However, the definition of female androgen deficiency, as recently provided by the Princeton consensus statement, is not precise enough and may lead to over-diagnosis due to the high prevalence of its diagnostic criteria: androgen levels below or within the lower quartile of the normal range and concurrent sexual dysfunction. Importantly, physiological menopause is not necessarily associated with androgen deficiency and therefore does not routinely require androgen therapy. Current replacement options include transdermal testosterone administration or dehydroepiandrosterone treatment, both of which have been shown to result in significant improvements, in particular in libido and mood, while effects on body composition and muscular function are not well documented. It is important to keep in mind that the number of randomized controlled trials is still limited and that currently none of the available preparations is officially approved for use in women. Currently, androgen replacement should be reserved for women with severe androgen deficiency due to an established cause and matching clinical signs and symptoms.

  11. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  12. Androgen receptor functions in castration-resistant prostate cancer and mechanisms of resistance to new agents targeting the androgen axis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, X; Cai, C; Chen, S; Chen, S; Yu, Z; Balk, SP

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic functions of androgen receptor (AR) in normal prostate are circumvented in prostate cancer (PCa) to drive tumor growth, and the AR also can acquire new growth-promoting functions during PCa development and progression through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, surgical or medical castration) is the standard treatment for metastatic PCa, but patients invariably relapse despite castrate androgen levels (castration-resistant PCa, CRPC). Early studies from many groups had shown that AR was highly expressed and transcriptionally active in CRPC, and indicated that steroids from the adrenal glands were contributing to this AR activity. More recent studies showed that CRPC cells had increased expression of enzymes mediating androgen synthesis from adrenal steroids, and could synthesize androgens de novo from cholesterol. Phase III clinical trials showing a survival advantage in CRPC for treatment with abiraterone (inhibitor of the enzyme CYP17A1 required for androgen synthesis that markedly reduces androgens and precursor steroids) and for enzalutamide (new AR antagonist) have now confirmed that AR activity driven by residual androgens makes a major contribution to CRPC, and led to the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of both agents. Unfortunately, patients treated with these agents for advanced CRPC generally relapse within a year and AR appears to be active in the relapsed tumors, but the molecular mechanisms mediating intrinsic or acquired resistance to these AR-targeted therapies remain to be defined. This review outlines AR functions that contribute to PCa development and progression, the roles of intratumoral androgen synthesis and AR structural alterations in driving AR activity in CRPC, mechanisms of action for abiraterone and enzalutamide, and possible mechanisms of resistance to these agents. PMID:23752196

  13. In-vitro characterization of androgen receptor mutations associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome reveals distinct functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Werner, R; Zhan, J; Gesing, J; Struve, D; Hiort, O

    2008-01-01

    Adequate androgen receptor (AR) function is crucial for male sex development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics. Mutations in the AR lead to androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) characterized by an end-organ resistance to androgens. The clinical appearance of individuals with 46,XY karyotype and an AR mutation varies widely from normal male to the ultimate completely female phenotype of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). We have analyzed the androgen receptor missense mutations P723S, P904S, and H917R, clinically associated with CAIS, which were described to have a normal maximum androgen binding (Bmax) but elevated equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd's) and compared their properties with the F916X deletion mutant, leading to the loss of the last four amino acids of the AR. Functional analysis allowed a quantitative and qualitative discrimination of these mutants in transactivation, amino-terminal/carboxy-terminal (N/C)-interaction, and coactivation capacity, varying widely with each distinct mutation. We conclude that mutations in the AR have to be characterized meticulously, not only to prove any quantitative functional deficit as a proof of consequence, but also to gain knowledge on qualitative functional properties. This is necessary as a possible link to genotype-phenotype correlation in AIS, but also with respect to medical decision making in CAIS.

  14. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  15. Androgens and Female Sexual Function and Dysfunction--Findings From the Fourth International Consultation of Sexual Medicine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Susan R; Worsley, Roisin; Miller, Karen K; Parish, Sharon J; Santoro, Nanette

    2016-02-01

    Androgens have been implicated as important for female sexual function and dysfunction. To review the role of androgens in the physiology and pathophysiology of female sexual functioning and the evidence for efficacy of androgen therapy for female sexual dysfunction (FSD). We searched the literature using online databases for studies pertaining to androgens and female sexual function. Major reviews were included and their findings were summarized to avoid replicating their content. Quality of data published in the literature and recommendations were based on the GRADES system. The literature supports an important role for androgens in female sexual function. There is no blood androgen level below which women can be classified as having androgen deficiency. Clinical trials have consistently demonstrated that transdermal testosterone (T) therapy improves sexual function and sexual satisfaction in women who have been assessed as having hypoactive sexual desire disorder. The use of T therapy is limited by the lack of approved formulations for women and long-term safety data. Most studies do not support the use of systemic dehydroepiandrosterone therapy for the treatment of FSD in women with normally functioning adrenals or adrenal insufficiency. Studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of vaginal testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone for the treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy are ongoing. Available data support an important role of androgens in female sexual function and dysfunction and efficacy of transdermal T therapy for the treatment of some women with FSD. Approved T formulations for women are generally unavailable. In consequence, the prescribing of T mostly involves off-label use of T products formulated for men and individually compounded T formulations. Long-term studies to determine the safety of T therapy for women and possible benefits beyond that of sexual function are greatly needed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  17. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases.

  18. Androgen resistance.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  19. Androgens and Male Sexual Function: A Review of Human Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiavi, Raul C.; White, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    The scope of this article is a review and brief discussion of recently gathered information on androgens and sexual behavior in men. Current pharmacological research does not furnish specific evidence that administration of androgens or preprations that stimulate the secretion of endogenous androgens have beneficial effects on functional…

  20. Androgens and Male Sexual Function: A Review of Human Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiavi, Raul C.; White, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    The scope of this article is a review and brief discussion of recently gathered information on androgens and sexual behavior in men. Current pharmacological research does not furnish specific evidence that administration of androgens or preprations that stimulate the secretion of endogenous androgens have beneficial effects on functional…

  1. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction.

  2. Prenatal androgen exposure modulates cellular and humoral immune function of black-headed gull chicks.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wendt; Groothuis, Ton G G; Kasprzik, Alice; Dijkstra, Cor; Alatalo, Rauno V; Siitari, Heli

    2005-09-22

    Avian eggs contain considerable amounts of maternal yolk androgens, which have been shown to beneficially influence the physiology and behaviour of the chick. As androgens may suppress immune functions, they may also entail costs for the chick. This is particularly relevant for colonial species, such as the black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus), in which the aggregation of large numbers of birds during the breeding season enhances the risk of infectious diseases for the hatching chick. To test the effect of maternal yolk androgens on the chick's immune function, we experimentally manipulated, in a field study, yolk androgen levels within the physiological range by in ovo injection of either androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) or sesame oil (control) into freshly laid eggs. We determined cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and humoral immunity of the chicks at the beginning of the nestling period to evaluate early modulatory effects of yolk androgens on immune function. Embryonic exposure to elevated levels of androgens negatively affected both CMI and humoral immunity in nestling gull chicks. Consequently, maternal yolk androgens not only entail benefits of enhanced competitiveness and growth as previously shown, but also costs in terms of immunosuppression. The outcome of embryonic yolk androgen exposure thus likely depends on the post-hatching circumstances for the developing offspring such as parasite exposure and degree of sibling competition.

  3. Diphenyl ethers as androgen receptor antagonists for the topical suppression of sebum production.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna H; Hu, Lain-Yen; Nguyen, Maria; Fakhoury, Stephen; Smith, Yvonne; Iula, Donna; Kostlan, Catherine; Carroll, Matthew; Dettling, Danielle; Du, Daniel; Pocalyko, David; Wade, Kimberly; Lefker, Bruce

    2009-04-15

    A series of diphenyl ethers was prepared and evaluated for androgen receptor antagonist activity in human androgen receptor binding and cellular functional assays. Analogs with potent in vitro activities were evaluated for topical in vivo efficacy in the Golden Syrian Hamster ear model. Several compounds showed reduction in wax esters in this validated animal model.

  4. Androgen Effects on Adipose Tissue Architecture and Function in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Varlamov, Oleg; White, Ashley E.; Carroll, Julie M.; Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala; Slayden, Ov; O'Rourke, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The differential association of hypoandrogenism in men and hyperandrogenism in women with insulin resistance and obesity suggests that androgens may exert sex-specific effects on adipose and other tissues, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Moreover, recent studies also suggest that rodents and humans may respond differently to androgen imbalance. To achieve better insight into clinically relevant sex-specific mechanisms of androgen action, we used nonhuman primates to investigate the direct effects of gonadectomy and hormone replacement on white adipose tissue. We also employed a novel ex vivo approach that provides a convenient framework for understanding of adipose tissue physiology under a controlled tissue culture environment. In vivo androgen deprivation of males did not result in overt obesity or insulin resistance but did induce the appearance of very small, multilocular white adipocytes. Testosterone replacement restored normal cell size and a unilocular phenotype and stimulated adipogenic gene transcription and improved insulin sensitivity of male adipose tissue. Ex vivo studies demonstrated sex-specific effects of androgens on adipocyte function. Female adipose tissue treated with androgens displayed elevated basal but reduced insulin-dependent fatty acid uptake. Androgen-stimulated basal uptake was greater in adipose tissue of ovariectomized females than in adipose tissue of intact females and ovariectomized females replaced with estrogen and progesterone in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that androgens are essential for normal adipogenesis in males and can impair essential adipocyte functions in females, thus strengthening the experimental basis for sex-specific effects of androgens in adipose tissue. PMID:22547568

  5. Androgen effects on adipose tissue architecture and function in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Varlamov, Oleg; White, Ashley E; Carroll, Julie M; Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala; Slayden, Ov; O'Rourke, Robert W; Roberts, Charles T

    2012-07-01

    The differential association of hypoandrogenism in men and hyperandrogenism in women with insulin resistance and obesity suggests that androgens may exert sex-specific effects on adipose and other tissues, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Moreover, recent studies also suggest that rodents and humans may respond differently to androgen imbalance. To achieve better insight into clinically relevant sex-specific mechanisms of androgen action, we used nonhuman primates to investigate the direct effects of gonadectomy and hormone replacement on white adipose tissue. We also employed a novel ex vivo approach that provides a convenient framework for understanding of adipose tissue physiology under a controlled tissue culture environment. In vivo androgen deprivation of males did not result in overt obesity or insulin resistance but did induce the appearance of very small, multilocular white adipocytes. Testosterone replacement restored normal cell size and a unilocular phenotype and stimulated adipogenic gene transcription and improved insulin sensitivity of male adipose tissue. Ex vivo studies demonstrated sex-specific effects of androgens on adipocyte function. Female adipose tissue treated with androgens displayed elevated basal but reduced insulin-dependent fatty acid uptake. Androgen-stimulated basal uptake was greater in adipose tissue of ovariectomized females than in adipose tissue of intact females and ovariectomized females replaced with estrogen and progesterone in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that androgens are essential for normal adipogenesis in males and can impair essential adipocyte functions in females, thus strengthening the experimental basis for sex-specific effects of androgens in adipose tissue.

  6. Effects of feminizing microsporidia on the masculinizing function of the androgenic gland in Gammarus duebeni.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Martin; Smith, Judith E; Dubuffet, Aurore; Dunn, Alison M

    2013-02-01

    Feminizing parasites enhance their vertical transmission to the host offspring by converting genetic male hosts into phenotypic females. Crustacea are the only invertebrates where sexual differentiation is controlled by a specialised endocrine organ, the androgenic gland, rather than by the gonads. We showed that a feminizing microsporidian Microsporidium sp. inhibits androgenic gland differentiation. We investigated the effect of Microsporidium sp. and a second feminizing microsporidium, Nosema granulosis, on the masculinizing function of the androgenic gland in Gammarus duebeni. Androgenic gland implants had a masculinizing effect on the sexual characteristics and sexual behaviour of recipient female hosts, reflecting the masculinizing function of the androgenic gland. Individuals that had received androgenic glands showed changed morphology in comparison with controls; they were bigger overall, they lost their oostegite marginal setae, developed calceoli and acquired a male-like behaviour. This effect was observed in uninfected females, as well as in females infected with the Microsporidium sp. The masculinizing effect of androgenic gland implants was smaller in N. granulosis infected individuals. N. granulosis and Microsporidium sp. fall into distinct clades of the Microspora. It appears that these divergent parasites both act by inhibiting the development of the androgenic gland. However, they differ in their ability to inhibit the host's response to the hormone that controls male sexual differentiation.

  7. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) as Function Promoting Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Jasuja, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The last decade has witnessed unprecedented discovery effort to develop selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that improve physical function and bone health without adversely affecting the prostate and cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the historical evolution, the rationale for SARM development, and the mechanisms of testosterone action and SARM selectivity. Recent Findings While steroidal SARMs have been around since the 1940s, a number of nonsteroidal SARMs that do not serve as substrates for CYP19 aromatase or 5α-reductase, act as full agonists in muscle and bone and as partial agonists in prostate are in development. The differing interactions of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds with AR contribute to their unique pharmacologic actions. Ligand binding induces specific conformational changes in the ligand binding domain, which could modulate surface topology and protein-protein interactions between AR and coregulators, resulting in tissue-specific gene regulation. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of SARMs to increase muscle and bone mass in preclinical rodent models with varying degree of prostate sparing. Phase I trials of SARMs in humans have reported modest increments in fat-free mass. Summary SARMs hold promise as a new class of function promoting anabolic therapies for a number of clinical indications, including functional limitations associated with aging and chronic disease, frailty, cancer cachexia, and osteoporosis. PMID:19357508

  8. Functional analysis of a novel androgen receptor mutation, Q902K, in an individual with partial androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Umar, Arzu; Berrevoets, Cor A; Van, N Mai; van Leeuwen, Marije; Verbiest, Michael; Kleijer, Wim J; Dooijes, Dennis; Grootegoed, J Anton; Drop, Stenvert L S; Brinkmann, Albert O

    2005-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is caused by defects in the androgen receptor (AR) that render the AR partially or completely inactive. As a result, embryonic sex differentiation is impaired. Here, we describe a novel mutation in the AR found in a patient with partial AIS. The mutation results in a substitution of a glutamine (Q) by a lysine (K) residue at position 902, Q902K. The AR Q902K mutation was investigated in vitro with respect to its functional properties. The equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)s) of AR Q902K in the presence of either the synthetic androgen R1881 or the natural ligand DHT were slightly elevated. The R1881 dissociation rate (t(1/2)) was increased 3-fold for AR Q902K compared with wild type. Transcriptional activity was decreased to 85% of wild type, and the dose-response curve revealed that the sensitivity to hormone was decreased due to the mutation. Furthermore, the 114-kDa androgen-induced phosphorylated AR protein band was not detectable in genital skin fibroblasts. However, it could be detected in transfected CHO cells expressing the mutant receptor in the presence of 10 and 100 nm R1881. Functional interaction assays and a GST pull-down assay showed that the interaction between the NH2 and COOH terminus of AR Q902K was reduced to 50% of wild type. Furthermore, the transactivation by the coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor 2) was decreased 2- to 3-fold. The half-maximal response in both assays was shifted to a higher hormone concentration compared with wild type. These results indicate that residue Q902 is involved in TIF2 and NH2/COOH interaction and that the Q to K mutation results in a mild impairment of AR function, which can explain the partial AIS phenotype of the patient.

  9. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  10. Evaluation of Androgen Receptor Function in Prostate Cancer Prognosis and Therapeutic Stratification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    encompassing major biological functions regulated by AR in the human prostate. Expression levels of the selected genes were determined in radical...functions regulated by AR in the human prostate. The primers and probes have been obtained, and tested by using cDNA from VCaP prostate cancer cell line...monitoring potential dysfunctions of the androgen receptor by measuring the expression of a panel of genes directly regulated by androgen receptor. We

  11. Production of androgens by microbial transformation of progesterone in vitro: a model for androgen production in rivers.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Ronald L; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Angus, Robert A; Howell, W Mike; Kirk, Marion; Moore, Ray; Nance, Marione; Brown, Amber

    2004-11-01

    We have previously documented the presence of progesterone and androstenedione in the water column and bottom sediments of the Fenholloway River, Taylor County, Florida. This river receives paper mill effluent and contains masculinized female mosquitofish. We hypothesized that plant sterols (e.g., ss-sitosterol) derived from the pulping of pine trees are transformed by bacteria into progesterone and subsequently into 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, and other androgens. In this study, we demonstrate that these same androgens can be produced in vitro from the bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis. In a second part to this study, we reextracted and reanalyzed the sediment from the Fenholloway River and verified the presence of androstadienedione, a delta1 steroid with androgen activity.

  12. Androgen production in pediatric adrenocortical tumors may occur via both the classic and/or the alternative backdoor pathway.

    PubMed

    Marti, Nesa; Malikova, Jana; Galván, José A; Aebischer, Maude; Janner, Marco; Sumnik, Zdenek; Obermannova, Barbora; Escher, Genevieve; Perren, Aurel; Flück, Christa E

    2017-09-05

    Children with adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) often present with virilization due to high tumoral androgen production, with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as most potent androgen. Recent work revealed two pathways for DHT biosynthesis, the classic and the backdoor pathway. Usage of alternate routes for DHT production has been reported in castration-resistant prostate cancer, CAH and PCOS. To assess whether the backdoor pathway may contribute to the virilization of pediatric ACTs, we investigated seven children suffering from androgen producing tumors using steroid profiling and immunohistochemical expression studies. All cases produced large amounts of androgens of the classic and/or backdoor pathway. Variable expression of steroid enzymes was observed in carcinomas and adenomas. We found no discriminative pattern. This suggests that enhanced androgen production in pediatric ACTs is the result of deregulated steroidogenesis through multiple steroid pathways. Thus future treatments of ACTs targeting androgen overproduction should consider these novel steroid production pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting Androgen Receptor Function by MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Girish C. Shukla, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Cleveland Clinic Foundation...Targeting Androgen Receptor Function by MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0191 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...antagonists results in higher levels of AR which is one of the causative factors of the development of androgen-independent prostate cancer . We proposed

  14. Androgen maintenance of erectile function in the rat penis.

    PubMed

    Mills, T M; Wiedmeier, V T; Stopper, V S

    1992-03-01

    Previous research has shown that the frequency and duration of penile erection is diminished after castration and that replacement with testosterone will restore the process. Using rats, the present study was designed to confirm that erection is androgen-dependent and to determine whether castration and androgen replacement affect the penile vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to vasoactive drugs. Blood pressure in the corpus cavernosum was measured directly during erections induced by electrical stimulation of the autonomic innervation of the penis. Maximal cavernosal pressure was markedly reduced after castration but was returned to normal levels if the castrated animals were treated with testosterone. Infusion of nitroglycerin (vasodilator) or phenylephrine (vasoconstrictor) resulted in a decline in cavernosal pressure in androgen-treated animals but not in castrated animals, even though the mean arterial blood pressure was strongly affected in all treatment groups by these drugs. When an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis was infused, cavernosal pressure was decreased in all groups, indicating that this substance is involved in penile erection. Taken together, these results show that androgens maintain the erectile process and may act specifically to support the responsiveness of the vascular smooth muscle to vasoactive drugs.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS- Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to investigate chlorinated by-products of a selected number of steroids representing both estrogens and androgens. Highly controlled reaction conditions were used to ascertain product distribution. Bench-scale studies were conducted to identify...

  16. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS- Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to investigate chlorinated by-products of a selected number of steroids representing both estrogens and androgens. Highly controlled reaction conditions were used to ascertain product distribution. Bench-scale studies were conducted to identify...

  17. Regional difference in sebum production by androgen susceptibility in human facial skin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Joon; Li, Zheng Jun; Choi, Dae Kyoung; Sohn, Kyung Cheol; Kim, Hyeong Rae; Lee, Young; Kim, Chang Deok; Lee, Young Ho; Shi, Ge; Lee, Jeung Hoon; Im, Myung

    2014-01-01

    Androgens are important hormones that influence sebum production from the sebaceous glands. Human facial skin can be categorized as T- and U-zones, which are areas with high and low levels of sebum secretion, respectively. This study was performed to investigate whether there are topographical differences in androgen receptor (AR) expression related to regional variations in facial sebum secretion. The results of in vivo analysis indicated a statistically significant increase in AR expression in the sebaceous gland T-zones compared with the U-zones. In vitro experiments using human primary sebocytes also yielded similar results, with higher levels of AR protein and mRNA expression in T-zones. The results of this study suggested that differences in androgen susceptibility may be an important factor influencing regional differences in sebum production in human facial skin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Aberrant AR Signaling as a Function of Declining Androgen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    and G. A. Coetzee. 2004. Androgen receptor signaling: mechanism of interleukin-6 inhibition. Cancer Res. 64:2619–2626. 19. Jia, L., and G. A. Coetzee...the prostate specific antigen locus: steroidal and non-steroidal mechanisms . Mol. Cancer Res. 1:385–392. 21. Johnstone, R. W. 2002. Histone...human prostate cancer cells CWR22 cells in nude mice. We were amazed that all groups of mice grew tumors at similar rates irrespective of the titrated

  19. Targeting Androgen Receptor Function by MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    0191 TITLE: Targeting Androgen Receptor Function by MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Girish C. Shukla, Ph.D...W81XWH-06-1-0191 Targeting androgen receptor function by miRNA in prostate cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC050287 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...translation is modulated by a naturally occurring hsa-mir- 183 microRNA ( miRNA ) and to validate that the 3’UTR of AR is a bona fide target of miRNA using

  20. Androgen deficiency during mid- and late pregnancy alters progesterone production and metabolism in the porcine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, Malgorzata; Knapczyk-Stwora, Katarzyna; Ciereszko, Renata E; Golas, Aniela; Wieciech, Iwona; Slomczynska, Maria

    2014-06-01

    We determined whether androgen deficiency induced by flutamide treatment during mid- and late pregnancy affects the functions of the porcine corpus luteum (CL). Pregnant gilts were injected with flutamide between days 43 and 49 (gestation day [GD] 50F), days 83 and 89 (GD90F), or days 101 and 107 (GD108F) of gestation. Antiandrogen treatment increased the luteal progesterone concentration in the GD50F group and decreased progesterone content in the GD90F and GD108F groups. Luteal levels of side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 (CYP11A1) mRNA and protein were significantly downregulated in the GD90F and GD108F groups as compared with the respective controls. The 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase (HSD3B) mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced only in the GD108F group as compared with the control. Decreased luteal 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C1) mRNA and protein levels were observed in the GD50F group. Thus, androgen deficiency during pregnancy in pigs led to CL dysfunction that is marked by decreased progesterone production. Furthermore, exposure to flutamide during late pregnancy downregulated steroidogenic enzymes (CYP11A1 and HSD3B) in pigs. We conclude that androgens are important regulators of CL function during pregnancy.

  1. Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changmeng; He, Housheng Hansen; Gao, Shuai; Chen, Sen; Yu, Ziyang; Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong; Chen, Mei Wei; Zhang, Jesse; Ahmed, Musaddeque; Wang, Yang; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles; Balk, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A) functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4), but has coactivator function on some genes through unclear mechanisms. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR) on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph), and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates. PMID:25482560

  2. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G.; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  3. Green tea polyphenol EGCG blunts androgen receptor function in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Asim, Mohammad; Hafeez, Bilal B.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Tarapore, Rohinton S.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the major treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, it is a temporary remission, and the patients almost inevitably develop hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). HRPC is almost incurable, although most HRPC cells still express androgen receptor (AR) and depend on the AR for growth, making AR a prime drug target. Here, we provide evidence that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea, is a direct antagonist of androgen action. In silico modeling and FRET-based competition assay showed that EGCG physically interacts with the ligand-binding domain of AR by replacing a high-affinity labeled ligand (IC50 0.4 μM). The functional consequence of this interaction was a decrease in AR-mediated transcriptional activation, which was due to EGCG mediated inhibition of interdomain N-C termini interaction of AR. Treatment with EGCG also repressed the transcriptional activation by a hotspot mutant AR (T877A) expressed ectopically as well as the endogenous AR mutant. As the physiological consequence of AR antagonism, EGCG repressed R1881-induced PCa cell growth. In a xenograft model, EGCG was found to inhibit AR nuclear translocation and protein expression. We also observed a significant down-regulation of androgen-regulated miRNA-21 and up-regulation of a tumor suppressor, miRNA-330, in tumors of mice treated with EGCG. Taken together, we provide evidence that EGCG functionally antagonizes androgen action at multiple levels, resulting in inhibition of PCa growth.—Siddiqui, I. A., Asim, M., Hafeez, B. B., Adhami, V. M., Tarapore, R. S., Mukhtar, H. Green tea polyphenol EGCG blunts androgen receptor function in prostate cancer. PMID:21177307

  4. Ca(2+)-Calmodulin regulation of testicular androgen production in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Martins, Rute S T; Fuentes, Juan; Almeida, Olinda; Power, Deborah M; Canario, Adelino V M

    2009-06-01

    The Ca(2+)-Calmodulin (CaM) signaling pathway has previously been shown to be involved in the regulation of teleost fish ovarian steroidogenesis. However, a putative role of CaM in testicular steroidogenesis and potential targets has not been examined. To examine whether basal steroidogenesis is modulated by Ca(2+) and CaM levels in the testis of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) we have incubated testicular fragments in vitro under different conditions and analyzed steroid output. Calcium-free medium with or without EGTA did not affect testicular basal 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and testosterone (T) secretion. However, addition of 80microM the CaM inhibitor W7 significantly reduced basal 11-KT, T and androstenedione secretion. Interestingly, the decreased androgen production by 80microM of W7 was accompanied by increased 11-desoxicortisol output and by the activation of cortisol synthesis in the testis, the latter undetected in untreated tissues. However, production of 17,20alpha-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one was unaltered by W7. This suggests that C17,20 desmolase, 21-hydroxylase and possibly 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase are targets for CaM. In addition, androgen production was also found to be regulated by the level of cAMP since incubations with forskolin (FK) significantly increased 11-KT and T output. A cross-talk between the cAMP and Ca(2+)-CaM signaling pathways was detected since W7 administration also decreased FK stimulated androgen production. Altogether, these data show that both basal and cAMP stimulated androgen levels were modulated by intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent CaM and that possibly Ca(2+)-CaM determines the shift in steroidogenesis from C21 steroids to androgens.

  5. Androgen Receptor Signalling in Prostate Cancer: The Functional Consequences of Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Derek N.; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2011-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand activated transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone receptor (SHR) subfamily of nuclear receptors. In the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis, tumour growth is dependent on androgens, and AR directly mediates these effects by modulating gene expression. During transcriptional regulation, the AR recruits numerous cofactors with acetylation-modifying enzymatic activity, the best studied include p300/CBP and the p160/SRC family of coactivators. It is known that recruitment of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) is key in fine-tuning responses to androgens and is thus likely to play a role in prostate cancer progression. Further, these proteins can also modify the AR itself. The functional consequences of AR acetylation, the role of modifying enzymes in relation to AR transcriptional response, and prostate cancer will be discussed. PMID:21274273

  6. Targeting Androgen Receptor Function by MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Girish C. Shukla, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Cleveland Clinic Foundation...Androgen Receptor Function by MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0191 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...examine if androgen receptor (AR) translation is modulated by a naturally occurring hsa-mir- 183 microRNA ( miRNA ) and to validate that the 3’UTR of AR

  7. Androgens Modulate Structure and Function of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Brain Clock

    PubMed Central

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; Butler, Matthew P.; LeSauter, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gonadal hormones can modulate circadian rhythms in rodents and humans, and androgen receptors are highly localized within the core region of the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain clock. Although androgens are known to modulate neural plasticity in other CNS compartments, the role of androgens and their receptors on plasticity in the SCN is unexplored. In the present study, we ask whether androgens influence the structure and function of the mouse SCN by examining the effects of gonadectomy (GDX) on the structure of the SCN circuit and its responses to light, including induction of clock genes and behavioral phase shifting. We found that after GDX, glial fibrillary acidic protein increased with concomitant decreases in the expression of the synaptic proteins synaptophysin and postsynaptic density 95. We also found that GDX exerts effects on the molecular and behavioral responses to light that are phase dependent. In late night [circadian time (CT)21], GDX increased light-induced mPer1 but not mPer2 expression compared with intact (INT) controls. In contrast, in early night (CT13.5), GDX decreased light induced mPer2 but had no effect on mPer1. At CT13.5, GDX animals also showed larger phase delays than did INT. Treatment of GDX animals with the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone restored glial fibrillary acidic protein, postsynaptic density 95, and synaptophysin in the SCN and reinstated the INT pattern of molecular and behavioral responses to light. Together, the results reveal a role for androgens in regulating circuitry in the mouse SCN, with functional consequences for clock gene expression and behavioral responses to photic phase resetting stimuli. PMID:21363939

  8. Automated microscopy and image analysis for androgen receptor function.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Sean M; Newberg, Justin Y; Bolt, Michael J; Szafran, Adam T; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Systems-level approaches have emerged that rely on analytical, microscopy-based technology for the discovery of novel drug targets and the mechanisms driving AR signaling, transcriptional activity, and ligand independence. Single cell behavior can be quantified by high-throughput microscopy methods through analysis of endogenous protein levels and localization or creation of biosensor cell lines that can simultaneously detect both acute and latent responses to known and unknown androgenic stimuli. The cell imaging and analytical protocols can be automated to discover agonist/antagonist response windows for nuclear translocation, reporter gene activity, nuclear export, and subnuclear transcription events, facilitating access to a multiplex model system that is inherently unavailable through classic biochemical approaches. In this chapter, we highlight the key steps needed for developing, conducting, and analyzing high-throughput screens to identify effectors of AR signaling.

  9. Functional and structural changes in internal pudendal arteries underlie erectile dysfunction induced by androgen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Lopes, Rhéure; Neves, Karla B; Silva, Marcondes AB; Olivon, Vânia C; Ruginsk, Silvia G; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Ramalho, Leandra NZ; Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando Silva

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deficiency is strongly associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Inadequate penile arterial blood flow is one of the major causes of ED. The blood flow to the corpus cavernosum is mainly derived from the internal pudendal arteries (IPAs); however, no study has evaluated the effects of androgen deprivation on IPA's function. We hypothesized that castration impairs IPAs reactivity and structure, contributing to ED. In our study, Wistar male rats, 8-week-old, were castrated and studied 30 days after orchiectomy. Functional and structural properties of rat IPAs were determined using wire and pressure myograph systems, respectively. Protein expression was determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Plasma testosterone levels were determined using the IMMULITE 1000 Immunoassay System. Castrated rats exhibited impaired erectile function, represented by decreased intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure ratio. IPAs from castrated rats exhibited decreased phenylephrine- and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contraction and decreased acetylcholine- and EFS-induced vasodilatation. IPAs from castrated rats exhibited decreased internal diameter, external diameter, thickness of the arterial wall, and cross-sectional area. Castration decreased nNOS and α-actin expression and increased collagen expression, p38 (Thr180/Tyr182) phosphorylation, as well as caspase 3 cleavage. In conclusion, androgen deficiency is associated with impairment of IPA reactivity and structure and increased apoptosis signaling markers. Our findings suggest that androgen deficiency-induced vascular dysfunction is an event involving hypotrophic vascular remodeling of IPAs. PMID:27391248

  10. Androgens Modulate Endothelial Function and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Erectile Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Galoosian, Artin

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED) increases with age and cardiovascular disease risk factors, such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes. These risk factors are thought to contribute to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thus contributing to the pathophysiology of ED. The role of the endothelium in regulating erectile physiology is well established. However, the role of androgens in modulating endothelial function and endothelial repair mechanisms subsequent to vascular injury in erectile tissue remains a subject of intensive research. The clinical and preclinical evidence discussed in this review suggests that androgens regulate endothelial function and also play an important role in the development and maturation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are thought to play a critical role in repair of endothelial injury in vascular beds. In this review, we discuss the data available on the effects of androgens on endothelial function and EPCs in the repair of vascular injury. Indeed, more research is needed to fully understand the molecular and cellular basis of androgen action in regulating the development, differentiation, maturation, migration, and homing of EPCs to the site of injury. A better understanding of these processes will be critical to the development of new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of vascular ED. PMID:24255752

  11. Effects of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist on cognitive, sexual, and hormonal functions in patients with prostate cancer: relationship with testicular and adrenal androgen levels.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kohei; Sekine, Yositaka; Nomura, Masashi; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    To assess the cognitive and sexual/hormonal functioning of prostate cancer patients treated with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist, and the relationships thereof with adrenal and residual testicular androgen levels. Previously, we reported the effect of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist on testicular and adrenal androgen production in patients with prostate cancer. A 6-month treatment with an LH-RH agonist significantly reduced testicular androgens by 90-95% and adrenal androgens by 26-40%. This study evaluated the changes in cognitive and sexual/hormonal functions in the same cohort using the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire, respectively. In addition, the associations of each function with the serum testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E2), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (A-dione), and cortisol levels were studied. Cognitive functions did not change significantly during the treatment. Sexual functions were relatively low before treatment and worsened significantly after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Interestingly, sexual bothers were improved with the treatment. The treatment significantly worsened hormonal functions and bothers. Regarding specific items in the hormonal domains, hot flashes and body weight changes were the main effects of worsened hormonal function. Low levels of T and E2 and high levels of A-dione were associated with low MMSE scores at 6 months. Regarding sexual and hormonal functions, A-dione, E2, T, cortisol, and DHEA-S were associated with poorer functioning and bother. Especially, low T levels and high E2 levels were the most significant factors associated with worse sexual and hormonal bothers. The LH-RH agonist monotherapy worsened sexual and hormonal functions and hormonal bothers, but not sexual bothers or cognitive functions. The changes in these

  12. Morphogenesis of polycystic ovaries as assessed by pituitary-ovarian androgenic function.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takahide; Nonoguchi, Kousuke; Watanabe, Hirohiko; Ishikawa, Hironobu; Tamura, Izuru; Kinoshita, Katsuji

    2009-05-01

    Despite polycystic ovaries (PCO) being a common morphology in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and regular menstruation, the regulatory principles in the morphogenesis of antral follicles have not yet been elucidated. In recognition of the complementary interaction between androgen-induced expression of the FSH receptor and FSH-augmented expression of the androgen receptor in granulose cells of antral follicles, a possible correlation of antral follicle count (AFC) and pituitary-ovarian androgenic function was investigated in 180 infertile women over days 3-5 of the menstrual cycle. Six discrete types of PCO with decreasing pituitary-ovarian androgenic function were identified: Type I (classical Stein-Leventhal syndrome), Type II (hyperandrogenemism), Type III (singular hyper-LH), Type IV (cryptic hyperandrogenism), Type V (relative LH dominancy) and Type VI (relative FSH dominancy), in parallel to a diminishing number of AFC from Type I to Type VI. Because during the early follicular phase of the cycle until the selection of the dominant follicle, antral follicles are composed of newly emerged healthy follicles plus atretic antral follicles that remain non-ovulated from previous cycles, it is proposed that the six types of PCO may represent the folliculogenetic spectra along which PCO morphogenesis proceeds.

  13. Identification of endocrine active disinfection by-products (DBPs) that bind to the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Breanne E; Smeester, Lisa; Fry, Rebecca C; Weinberg, Howard S

    2017-11-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water occurs when chemical disinfectants such as chlorine and chloramine react with natural organic matter and anthropogenic pollutants. Some DBPs have been linked to bladder cancer and infertility; however, the underlying mechanism of action is unknown. One possibility is disruption of the endocrine system, with DBPs binding to the androgen receptor and subsequently altering gene expression. Using the androgen receptor-binding assay and in silico molecular docking, the binding affinity of 21 suspected and known DBPs were tested individually at concentrations over the range 0.1 nM-2 mM. 14 DBPs were found to bind at IC50 values ranging from 1.86 mM for 2,3-dichloropropionamide to 13.5 μM for 3,4,5,6-tetrachloro-benzoquinone as compared to the positive control, 4-n-nonylphenol which bound at 31.6 μM. Since DBPs are present in drinking waters as mixtures, the question of how IC50 values for individual DBPs might be affected by the presence of other chemicals is addressed. Seven of the chemicals with the strongest binding affinities and one chemical with no binding affinity were tested in binary mixtures with 4-n-nonylphenol, a known androgenic chemical found in some surface waters. In these binary mixtures, concentration additive binding was observed. While typical levels of individual androgenic DBPs in drinking water are below their measured IC50 values, their combined binding abilities in mixtures could be a source of androgen disruption. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Peripheral androgen action helps modulate vocal production in a suboscine passerine.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Heston, Jonathan B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2014-07-01

    Androgenic activation of intracellular androgen receptors (AR) influences avian vocal production, though this has largely been investigated at the level of the brain. We investigated the influence of predominantly peripheral AR on vocal output in wild Golden-collared Manakins (Manacus vitellinus). In this suboscine species, males court females by performing acrobatic displays and by producing relatively simple chee-poo vocalizations. To assess whether peripheral AR influences the acoustic structure of these vocal signals, we treated reproductively active adult males with the peripherally selective antiandrogen bicalutamide and then measured phonation performance. Inhibiting AR outside of the central nervous system increased the duration of the chee note and decreased the fundamental frequency of the poo note. This treatment caused no discernable change to chee-poo frequency modulation or entropy. Our results show that activation of peripheral AR mediates note-specific changes to temporal and pitch characteristics of the Golden-collared Manakin's main sexual call. Thus, our study provides one of the first demonstrations that androgenic action originating outside of the brain and likely on musculoskeletal targets can modulate avian vocal production.

  15. Peripheral androgen action helps modulate vocal production in a suboscine passerine

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Heston, Jonathan B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2015-01-01

    Androgenic activation of intracellular androgen receptors (AR) influences avian vocal production, though this has largely been investigated at the level of the brain. We investigated the influence of predominantly peripheral AR on vocal output in wild Golden-collared Manakins (Manacus vitellinus). In this suboscine species, males court females by performing acrobatic displays and by producing relatively simple chee-poo vocalizations. To assess whether peripheral AR influences the acoustic structure of these vocal signals, we treated reproductively active adult males with the peripherally selective antiandrogen bicalutamide and then measured phonation performance. Inhibiting AR outside of the central nervous system increased the duration of the chee note and decreased the fundamental frequency of the poo note. This treatment caused no discernable change to chee-poo frequency modulation or entropy. Our results show that activation of peripheral AR mediates note-specific changes to temporal and pitch characteristics of the Golden-collared Manakin’s main sexual call. Thus, our study provides one of the first demonstrations that androgenic action originating outside of the brain and likely on musculoskeletal targets can modulate avian vocal production. PMID:25780269

  16. The effect of androgen excess on maternal metabolism, placental function and fetal growth in obese dams.

    PubMed

    Fornes, Romina; Maliqueo, Manuel; Hu, Min; Hadi, Laila; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Ebefors, Kerstin; Nyström, Jenny; Labrie, Fernand; Jansson, Thomas; Benrick, Anna; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2017-08-14

    Pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are often overweight or obese. To study the effects of maternal androgen excess in obese dams on metabolism, placental function and fetal growth, female C57Bl6J mice were fed a control (CD) or a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 4-10 weeks, and then mated. On gestational day (GD) 15.5-17.5, dams were injected with dihydrotestosterone (CD-DHT, HF/HS-DHT) or a vehicle (CD-Veh, HF/HS-Veh). HF/HS dams had higher fat content, both before mating and on GD18.5, with no difference in glucose homeostasis, whereas the insulin sensitivity was higher in DHT-exposed dams. Compared to the CD groups, the livers from HF/HS dams weighed more on GD18.5, the triglyceride content was higher, and there was a dysregulation of liver enzymes related to lipogenesis and higher mRNA expression of Fitm1. Fetuses from HF/HS-Veh dams had lower liver triglyceride content and mRNA expression of Srebf1c. Maternal DHT exposure, regardless of diet, decreased fetal liver Pparg mRNA expression and increased placental androgen receptor protein expression. Maternal diet-induced obesity, together with androgen excess, affects maternal and fetal liver function as demonstrated by increased triglyceride content and dysfunctional expression of enzymes and transcription factors involved in de novo lipogenesis and fat storage.

  17. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Karen R; Smith, Lee B; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S; Chambers, Thomas J G; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O'Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L M; Anderson, Richard A; Sharpe, Richard M

    2014-05-06

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk.

  18. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    PubMed

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  19. Targeting Oct1 genomic function inhibits androgen receptor signaling and castration-resistant prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Obinata, D; Takayama, K; Fujiwara, K; Suzuki, T; Tsutsumi, S; Fukuda, N; Nagase, H; Fujimura, T; Urano, T; Homma, Y; Aburatani, H; Takahashi, S; Inoue, S

    2016-12-08

    Androgen receptor (AR) functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor to regulate its downstream signaling for prostate cancer progression. AR complex formation by multiple transcription factors is important for enhancer activity and transcriptional regulation. However, the significance of such collaborative transcription factors has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that Oct1, an AR collaborative factor, coordinates genome-wide AR signaling for prostate cancer growth. Using global analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we found that Oct1 is recruited to AR-binding enhancer/promoter regions and facilitates androgen signaling. Moreover, a major target of AR/Oct1 complex, acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3), contributes to tumor growth in nude mice, and its high expression is associated with poor prognosis in prostate cancer patients. Next, we examined the therapeutic effects of pyrrole-imidazole polyamides that target the Oct1-binding sequence identified in the center of the ACSL3 AR-binding site. We observed that treatment with Oct1 polyamide severely blocked the Oct1 binding at the ACSL3 enhancer responsible for its transcriptional activity and ACSL3 induction. In addition, Oct1 polyamides suppressed castration-resistant tumor growth and specifically repressed global Oct1 chromatin association and androgen signaling in prostate cancer cells, with few nonspecific effects on basal promoter activity. Thus, targeting Oct1 binding could be a novel therapeutic strategy for AR-activated castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  20. Chaperone Function in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    targeting of HSC70 and HSP72 inhibits HSP90 function and induces tumor-specific apoptosis. Cancer Cell 14, 250-262. Pratt, W. B., and Toft, D...localized and metastatic tumors. Prostate 61:276–290. 23. Powers, M. V., P. A. Clarke, and P. Workman. 2008. Dual targeting of HSC70 and HSP72 inhibits

  1. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and adrenal androgen (AA) functions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Da Silva, J A; Cutolo, M

    1996-05-01

    The available evidence reviewed does not allow definitive response to the question of a primary versus secondary role of sex hormone perturbations in RA. However, this conclusion should not be discouraging in view of the relatively recent focus upon this facet of the physiopathogenesis of RA and the enormous complexities of sex hormone biology and this disease. Specifically, data on the incidence of RA as well as life cycle changes in serum androgenic-anabolic (A-A) and sex hormone levels suggest important risk correlations. Furthermore, HLA-susceptibility markers for RA, gender, menopause and older age are all factors which significantly relate to the risk of developing RA and each has been shown to associate with sex hormone status. Whether or not HPG-AA hormonal status may modulate RA risk (or its course) primarily and independently or merely be predictive markers of other biological mechanisms was critically considered and requires further study. Sex hormone influences on cellular and humoral immunological reactivity and vascular pathogenetic mechanisms in RA were summarized. Androgens generally suppress immunoreactivity and cartilage responses to inflammation-mediated injury processes and may enhance synovial macrophage-like lining cell apoptosis. Oestrogens generally enhance immunoreactivity, offer some protection to inflammation-mediated cartilage damage (but less than androgens) and may inhibit apoptosis in certain in vitro cell models. Scant information is available on the balance of sex hormones (and glucocorticoids) in RA or its presumed pathogenetic mechanisms. Data were reviewed which support the concept of a spectrum of androgenicity in the normal population, particularly among women. A simplified schema of trophic and tropic steroidogenic mechanisms was proposed which could influence androgenic-anabolic (A-A) status and might relate to RA. Serum concentrations of DHAS (mumol/l), T (nmol/l) and O2 (pmol/l) span several orders of magnitude in normal

  2. An orally active selective androgen receptor modulator is efficacious on bone, muscle, and sex function with reduced impact on prostate.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey N; Chang, William; Chapman, Mark S; Finn, Patricia D; Hong, Mei Hua; López, Francisco J; Marschke, Keith B; Rosen, Jon; Schrader, William; Turner, Russell; van Oeveren, Arjan; Viveros, Humberto; Zhi, Lin; Negro-Vilar, Andres

    2007-01-01

    A number of conditions, including osteoporosis, frailty, and sexual dysfunction in both men and women have been improved using androgens. However, androgens are not widely used for these indications because of the side effects associated with these drugs. We describe an androgen receptor (AR) ligand that maintains expected anabolic activities with substantially diminished activity in the prostate. LGD2226 is a nonsteroidal, nonaromatizable, highly selective ligand for the AR, exhibiting virtually no affinity for the other intracellular receptors. We determined that AR bound to LGD2226 exhibits a unique pattern of protein-protein interactions compared with testosterone, fluoxymesterone (an orally available steroidal androgen), and other steroids, suggesting that LGD2226 alters the conformation of the ligand-binding domain. We demonstrated that LGD2226 is fully active in cell-based models of bone and muscle. LGD2226 exhibited anabolic activity on muscle and bone with reduced impact on prostate growth in rodent models. Biomechanical testing of bones from animals treated with LGD2226 showed strong enhancement of bone strength above sham levels. LGD2226 was also efficacious in a sex-behavior model in male rats measuring mounts, intromissions, ejaculations, and copulation efficiency. These results with an orally available, nonaromatizable androgen demonstrate the important role of the AR and androgens in mediating a number of beneficial effects in bone, muscle, and sexual function independent from the conversion of androgens into estrogenic ligands. Taken together, these results suggest that orally active, nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators may be useful therapeutics for enhancing muscle, bone, and sexual function.

  3. Lipid accumulation product (LAP) is related to androgenicity and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Maria Augusta; Moreira, Roberta M C; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2011-12-01

    To investigate whether lipid accumulation product (LAP) is related to androgen and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels and to cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women with no evidence of established cardiovascular disease. Cross-sectional study. LAP (waist-58 × triglycerides [nmol/L]), LAP ≥ arbitrary cutoff point of 34.5, serum testosterone, SHBG, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (us-CRP). Forty-nine women (mean age 55±5 years; median amenorrhea time 5.5 years [3-8]) were studied: 14% had the metabolic syndrome and 24.5% were hypertensive. Compared with LAP<34.5, LAP ≥ 34.5 (n=29, 59%) was associated with higher testosterone (p=0.021) and free androgen index (FAI) (p=0.003) and lower SHBG levels (p=0.013). Us-CRP (p=0.012), total cholesterol (p=0.041), glucose (p=0.020) and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) (p=0.019) were higher, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p=0.001) was lower with LAP ≥ 34.5. LAP was positively correlated with total testosterone (r=0.349, p=0.014), FAI (rs=0.470, p=0.001), us-CRP (r=0.315, p=0.042), systolic (r=0.318, p=0.028) and diastolic (r=0.327, p=0.023) blood pressure, total cholesterol (r=0.498, p<0.001) and glucose (rs=0.319, p=0.026). LAP was negatively correlated with SHBG (rs=-0.430, p=0.003) and HDL-C (r=-0.319, p=0.026). LAP index seems to be associated with androgens and SHBG and with cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women. Also, LAP seems to be a suitable method to screen for cardiovascular risk in postmenopause. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of the functional domains of ANT-1, a novel coactivator of the androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Shuli; Goto, Kiminobu; Chen Guangchun; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Nomura, Masatoshi; Okabe, Taijiro; Nawata, Hajime; Yanase, Toshihiko . E-mail: yanase@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-03

    Previously, we identified a transcriptional coactivator for the activation function-1 (AF-1) domain of the human androgen receptor (AR) and designated it androgen receptor N-terminal domain transactivating protein-1 (ANT-1). This coactivator, which contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs from amino acid (aa) 294, is identical to a component of U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and binds specifically to the AR or glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we identified four distinct functional domains. The AR-AF-1-binding domain, which bound to either aa 180-360 or 360-532 in AR-AF-1, clearly overlapped with TAU-1 and TAU-5. This domain and the subnuclear speckle formation domain in ANT-1 were assigned within the TPR motifs, while the transactivating and nuclear localization signal domains resided within the N-terminal sequence. The existence of these functional domains may further support the idea that ANT-1 can function as an AR-AF-1-specific coactivator while mediating a transcription-splicing coupling.

  5. Androgens Exert a Cysticidal Effect upon Taenia crassiceps by Disrupting Flame Cell Morphology and Function.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Escobedo, Galileo; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Dominguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The effects of testosterone (T4) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on the survival of the helminth cestode parasite Taenia crassiceps, as well as their effects on actin, tubulin and myosin expression and their assembly into the excretory system of flame cells are described in this paper. In vitro evaluations on parasite viability, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, video-microscopy of live flame cells, and docking experiments of androgens interacting with actin, tubulin, and myosin were conducted. Our results show that T4 and DHT reduce T. crassiceps viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, reaching 90% of mortality at the highest dose used (40 ng/ml) and time exposed (10 days) in culture. Androgen treatment does not induce differences in the specific expression pattern of actin, tubulin, and myosin isoforms as compared with control parasites. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a strong disruption of the parasite tegument, with reduced assembly, shape, and motion of flame cells. Docking experiments show that androgens are capable of affecting parasite survival and flame cell morphology by directly interacting with actin, tubulin and myosin without altering their protein expression pattern. We show that both T4 and DHT are able to bind actin, tubulin, and myosin affecting their assembly and causing parasite intoxication due to impairment of flame cell function. Live flame cell video microscopy showing a reduced motion as well changes in the shape of flame cells are also shown. In summary, T4 and DHT directly act on T. crassiceps cysticerci through altering parasite survival as well as the assembly and function of flame cells.

  6. Androgens Exert a Cysticidal Effect upon Taenia crassiceps by Disrupting Flame Cell Morphology and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Javier R.; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Palacios- Arreola, M. Isabel; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Escobedo, Galileo; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Dominguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The effects of testosterone (T4) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on the survival of the helminth cestode parasite Taenia crassiceps, as well as their effects on actin, tubulin and myosin expression and their assembly into the excretory system of flame cells are described in this paper. In vitro evaluations on parasite viability, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, video-microscopy of live flame cells, and docking experiments of androgens interacting with actin, tubulin, and myosin were conducted. Our results show that T4 and DHT reduce T. crassiceps viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, reaching 90% of mortality at the highest dose used (40 ng/ml) and time exposed (10 days) in culture. Androgen treatment does not induce differences in the specific expression pattern of actin, tubulin, and myosin isoforms as compared with control parasites. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a strong disruption of the parasite tegument, with reduced assembly, shape, and motion of flame cells. Docking experiments show that androgens are capable of affecting parasite survival and flame cell morphology by directly interacting with actin, tubulin and myosin without altering their protein expression pattern. We show that both T4 and DHT are able to bind actin, tubulin, and myosin affecting their assembly and causing parasite intoxication due to impairment of flame cell function. Live flame cell video microscopy showing a reduced motion as well changes in the shape of flame cells are also shown. In summary, T4 and DHT directly act on T. crassiceps cysticerci through altering parasite survival as well as the assembly and function of flame cells. PMID:26076446

  7. Androgen Receptor Coactivator ARID4B Is Required for the Function of Sertoli Cells in Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ray-Chang; Zeng, Yang; Pan, I-Wen; Wu, Mei-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Defects in spermatogenesis, a process that produces spermatozoa inside seminiferous tubules of the testis, result in male infertility. Spermatogenic progression is highly dependent on a microenvironment provided by Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells and epithelium of seminiferous tubules. However, genes that regulate such an important activity of Sertoli cells are poorly understood. Here, we found that AT-rich interactive domain 4B (ARID4B), is essential for the function of Sertoli cells to regulate spermatogenesis. Specifically, we generated Sertoli cell-specific Arid4b knockout (Arid4bSCKO) mice, and showed that the Arid4bSCKO male mice were completely infertile with impaired testis development and significantly reduced testis size. Importantly, severe structural defects accompanied by loss of germ cells and Sertoli cell-only phenotype were found in many seminiferous tubules of the Arid4bSCKO testes. In addition, maturation of Sertoli cells was significantly delayed in the Arid4bSCKO mice, associated with delayed onset of spermatogenesis. Spermatogenic progression was also defective, showing an arrest at the round spermatid stage in the Arid4bSCKO testes. Interestingly, we showed that ARID4B functions as a "coactivator" of androgen receptor and is required for optimal transcriptional activation of reproductive homeobox 5, an androgen receptor target gene specifically expressed in Sertoli cells and critical for spermatogenesis. Together, our study identified ARID4B to be a key regulator of Sertoli cell function important for male germ cell development.

  8. Oestradiol metabolism and androgen receptor genotypes are associated with right ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Manichaikul, Ani; Barr, R. Graham; Johnson, Craig; Bluemke, David A.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Tandri, Hari; Ouyang, Pamela; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are linked to right ventricular (RV) function, but the relationship between genetic variation in these pathways and RV function is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study of 2761 genotyped adults without cardiovascular disease. The relationships between RV measures and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 candidate genes were assessed. Urinary oestradiol (E2) metabolites produced by cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) and serum testosterone were measured in women and men respectively. In African-American (AA) women, the CYP1B1 SNP rs162561 was associated with RV ejection fraction (RVEF), such that each copy of the A allele was associated with a 2.0% increase in RVEF. Haplotype analysis revealed associations with RVEF in AA (global p<7.2×10−6) and white (global p=0.05) women. In white subjects, higher E2 metabolite levels were associated with significantly higher RVEF. In men, androgen receptors SNPs (rs1337080; rs5918764) were significantly associated with all RV measures and modified the relationship between testosterone and RVEF. Genetic variation in E2 metabolism and androgen signalling was associated with RV morphology in a sex-specific manner. The CYP1B1 SNP identified is in tight linkage disequilibrium with SNPs associated with pulmonary hypertension and oncogenesis, suggesting these pathways may underpin sexual dimorphism in RV failure. PMID:26647441

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of amino-pyridines as androgen receptor antagonists for stimulating hair growth and reducing sebum production.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lain-Yen; Lei, Huangshu John; Du, Daniel; Johnson, Theodore R; Fedij, Victor; Kostlan, Catherine; Yue, Wen Song; Lovdahl, Mark; Li, Jie Jack; Carroll, Mathew; Dettling, Danielle; Asbill, Jeffrey; Fan, Conglin; Wade, Kimberly; Pocalyko, David; Lapham, Kimberly; Yalamanchili, Radhika; Samas, Brian; Vrieze, Derek; Ciotti, Susan; Krieger-Burke, Teresa; Sliskovic, Drago; Welgus, Howard

    2007-10-15

    A series of amino-pyridines were synthesized and evaluated for androgen antagonist activities. Among these compounds, (R)-(+)-6-[methyl-(1-phenyl-ethyl)-amino]-4-trifluoromethyl-nicotinonitrile was the most active example of this class. This compound displayed potent androgen receptor antagonist activity as well as favorable pharmacokinetic characteristics for a potential topical agent. It also demonstrated remarkable potency for stimulating hair growth in a male C3H mouse model as well as reducing sebum production in the male Syrian hamster ear model.

  10. Direct evidence for the function of crustacean insulin-like androgenic gland factor (IAG): total chemical synthesis of IAG.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Kubota, Nozomi; Hojo, Hironobu; Okada, Ayumi; Kotaka, Sayaka; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Ohira, Tsuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    Insulin-like androgenic gland factor (IAG) is presumed to be a sex differentiation factor so-called androgenic gland hormone (AGH) in decapod crustacean, although the function of IAG peptide has not yet been reported. In this study, we synthesized IAG from the prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus, and its function was assessed by an in vitro bioassay. As a result, IAG with the insulin-type disulfide bond arrangement showed biological activity, whereas its disulfide isomer did not. These results strongly suggest that the native IAG peptide has an insulin-type disulfide, and it is the decapod AGH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  12. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture.

  13. Androgens and estradiol-17beta production by porcine uterine cells: In vitro study.

    PubMed

    Franczak, A; Kotwica, G

    2010-01-15

    Porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) uterine slices harvested during both early pregnancy and luteolysis produce steroid hormones. The aim of the present study was to determine (1) which porcine separated uterine cells secrete androgens: androstenedione (A(4)) and testosterone (T), and estradiol-17beta (E(2)) in culture; (2) if the production of A(4), T and E(2) in the uterine cells is regulated by P4 and OT; (3) if uterine tissues expressed cytochrome P450arom gene (CYP19). Uteri were collected on Days 14 to 16 of early pregnancy and the estrous cycle. Enzymatically separated epithelial cells, stromal cells, and myocytes were cultured in vitro for 2, 6, and 12h with control medium, progesterone (P(4); 10(-5) M), oxytocin (OT; 10(-7) M), and both hormones (P(4)+OT). The studied cells secreted A(4), T, and E(2) in vitro. Progesterone served as a substrate for steroid synthesis in the uterine cells. Isolated uterine cells, cultured separately, contributed in equal portion to the basal production of androgens (A(4) and T) during both early pregnancy and luteolysis. In pregnant pigs, the epithelial and stromal cells were rich sources of E(2) compared with myocytes. Myocytes produced E(2) mainly during luteolysis. Pregnant porcine endometrium and myometrium expressed the gene CYP19, which encodes for P450 aromatase, a steroidogenic enzyme. The results indicate an active steroidogenic pathway in porcine uterine cells. The epithelial cells, stromal cells, and myocytes participate in steroid production as an alternative source for their action in pigs.

  14. Partial androgen insensitivity with phenotypic variation caused by androgen receptor mutations that disrupt activation function 2 and the NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Charmian A; Tan, Jiann-an; He, Bin; Zhou, Zhong-xun; Mebarki, Farida; Morel, Yves; Forest, Maguelone G; Chatelain, Pierre; Ritzén, E Martin; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity with sex phenotype variation in two unrelated families was associated with missense mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene that disrupted the AR NH(2)-terminal/carboxy terminal interaction. Each mutation caused a single amino acid change within the region of the ligand-binding domain that forms activation function 2 (AF2). In one family, the mutation I737T was in alpha helix 4 and in the other F725L was between helices 3 and 4. Neither mutation altered androgen binding as determined by assays of mutant AR in the patient's cultured genital skin fibroblasts or of recombinant mutant receptors transfected into COS cells. In transient cotransfection assays in CV1 cells, transactivation with the AR mutants at low concentrations of DHT was reduced several fold compared with wild-type AR but increased at higher concentrations. Defects in NH(2)-terminal/carboxy terminal interactions were identified in mammalian two hybrid assays. In similar assays, there was reduced binding of the p160 coactivators TIF2/SRC2 and SRC1 to the mutant AR ligand binding domains (LBD). In the family with AR I737T, sex phenotype varied from severely defective masculinization in the proband to a maternal great uncle whose only manifestation of AIS was severe gynecomastia. He was fertile and passed the mutation to two daughters. The proband of the F725L family was also incompletely masculinized but was raised as a male while his half-sibling by a different father was affected more severely and reared as a female. These studies indicate that the function of an AR AF2 mutant in male development can vary greatly depending on the genetic background.

  15. 4-(Alkylthio)- and 4-(arylthio)-benzonitrile derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists for the topical suppression of sebum production.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna; Wang, Zhi; Hu, Lain-Yen; Kostlan, Catherine; Carroll, Matthew; Dettling, Danielle; Du, Daniel; Pocalyko, David; Wade, Kimberly

    2009-03-01

    The first examples of thioether-substituted benzonitriles as potential soft-drug androgen receptor antagonists are reported. A number of 4-(alkylthio)- and of 4-(arylthio)-benzonitrile analogs were evaluated in human androgen receptor binding and cellular functional assays. Analogs with potent in vitro binding and cellular activities were evaluated for topical in vivo efficacy in the Golden Syrian hamster ear model. Analogs from both the 4-(alkylthio)- and of 4-(arylthio)-benzonitrile series showed moderate reduction of wax esters in vivo.

  16. KLF4 functions as an activator of the androgen receptor through reciprocal feedback

    PubMed Central

    Siu, M-K; Suau, F; Chen, W-Y; Tsai, Y-C; Tsai, H-Y; Yeh, H-L; Liu, Y-N

    2016-01-01

    In prostate cancer, Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) depletion occurs frequently, suggesting a role as suppressor tumor. KLF4 is a transcription factor associated with androgen receptor (AR) expression; however, its cellular functions and signaling regulation mechanism remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that activated AR binds to the KLF4 promoter and enhances KLF4 expression, which reciprocally targets the AR promoter, thus sustaining KLF4 activity. Ectopic KLF4 expression in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells induced AR expression and decreased cell proliferation, invasion and bone metastasis. We previously showed that increased microRNA (miR)-1 expression is associated with reduced bone metastasis of prostate cancer cells. Here we observed that KLF4 targets the primary miR-1-2 stem-loop promoter and stimulates miR-1 expression. In clinical prostate cancer specimens, KLF4 levels were positively correlated with miR-1 and AR levels. These data suggest that the loss of KLF4 expression is one mechanistic link between aggressive prostate cancer progression and low canonical AR output through miR-1 inactivation. PMID:27991915

  17. Targeting the Binding Function 3 (BF3) Site of the Human Androgen Receptor Through Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Lack, Nathan A.; Axerio-Cilies, Peter; Tavassoli, Peyman; Han, Frank Q.; Chan, Ka Hong; Feau, Clementine; LeBlanc, Eric; Guns, Emma Tomlinson; Guy, R. Kiplin; Rennie, Paul S.; Cherkasov, Artem

    2013-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the best studied drug target for the treatment of prostate cancer. While there are a number of drugs that target the AR, they all work through the same mechanism of action and are prone to the development of drug resistance. There is a large unmet need for novel AR inhibitors which work through alternative mechanism(s). Recent studies have identified a novel site on the AR called Binding Function 3 (BF3) that is involved into AR transcriptional activity. In order to identify inhibitors that target the BF3 site, we have conducted a large-scale in-silico screen followed by experimental evaluation. A number of compounds were identified that effectively inhibited the AR transcriptional activity with no obvious cytotoxicity. The mechanism of action of these compounds was validated by biochemical assays and x-ray crystallography. These findings lay a foundation for the development of alternative or supplementary therapies capable of combating prostate cancer even in its anti-androgen resistant forms. PMID:22047606

  18. Understanding androgen action in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Michael W; House, Philip J; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2014-09-01

    Androgens play an important role in regulation of body fat distribution in humans. They exert direct effects on adipocyte differentiation in a depot-specific manner, via the androgen receptor (AR), leading to modulation of adipocyte size and fat compartment expansion. Androgens also impact directly on key adipocyte functions including insulin signalling, lipid metabolism, fatty acid uptake and adipokine production. Androgen excess and deficiency have implications for metabolic health in both males and females, and these metabolic effects may be mediated through adipose tissue via effects on fat distribution, adipocyte function and lipolysis. Research into the field of androgen metabolism in human and animal adipose tissue has produced inconsistent results; it is important to take into account the sex-, depot- and organism-specific effects of androgens in fat. In general, studies point towards a stimulatory effect on lipolysis, with impairment of adipocyte differentiation, insulin signalling and adipokine generation. Observed effects are frequently gender-specific. Adipose tissue is an important organ of pre-receptor androgen metabolism, through which local androgen availability is rigorously controlled. Adipose androgen exposure is tightly controlled by isoenzymes of AKR1C, 5α-reductase and others, but regulation of the balance between generation and irreversible inactivation remains poorly understood. In particular, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3 are crucial in the regulation of local androgen bioavailability within adipose tissue. These isoforms control the balance between activation of androstenedione (A) to testosterone (T) by the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity (17β-HSD) of AKR1C3, or inactivation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol by the 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) activity of AKR1C2. Most studies suggest that androgen inactivation is the predominant reaction in fat, particularly in the abdominal subcutaneous (SC

  19. Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    regulates genes involved in cell growth. Although powerful anti-androgen drugs can be administered to block AR action and have been used...successfully to treat patients with prostate cancer, over time the tumors become resistant to the drugs , leaving few treatment options. The goal of this...androgen receptor (AR), which regulates genes involved in cell growth. Although powerful anti-androgen drugs can be administered to block AR action

  20. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES: INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species Differences in Androgen and Estrogen Receptor Structure and Function Among Vertebrates and Invertebrates: Interspecies Extrapolations regarding Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals
    VS Wilson1, GT Ankley2, M Gooding 1,3, PD Reynolds 1,4, NC Noriega 1, M Cardon 1, P Hartig1,...

  1. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES: INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species Differences in Androgen and Estrogen Receptor Structure and Function Among Vertebrates and Invertebrates: Interspecies Extrapolations regarding Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals
    VS Wilson1, GT Ankley2, M Gooding 1,3, PD Reynolds 1,4, NC Noriega 1, M Cardon 1, P Hartig1,...

  2. PSPC1, NONO, and SFPQ are expressed in mouse Sertoli cells and may function as coregulators of androgen receptor-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Sho; Ikei, Asako; Taguchi, Yusuke; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Fujimoto, Nariaki; Obinata, Masuo; Uesugi, Seiichi; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2006-09-01

    In Sertoli cells of testis, androgen receptor-regulated gene transcription plays an indispensable role in maintaining spermatogenesis. Androgen receptor activity is modulated by a number of coregulators which are associated with the androgen receptor. Non-POU-domain-containing, octamer binding protein (NONO), a member of the DBHS-containing proteins, complexes with androgen receptor and functions as a coactivator for the receptor. Paraspeckle protein 1 alpha isoform (PSPC1, previously known as PSP1) and Splicing factor, proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ, previously known as PSF), other members of the DBHS-containing proteins, are also found in androgen receptor complexes, suggesting that these DBHS-containing proteins may cooperatively regulate androgen receptor-mediated gene transcription. We demonstrated that PSPC1, NONO, and SFPQ are coexpressed in Sertoli cell line TTE3 and interact reciprocally. The effect of the DBHS-containing proteins on the transcriptional activity was assessed using the construct containing androgen-responsive elements followed by a luciferase gene. The results showed that all the DBHS-containing proteins activate androgen receptor-mediated transcription, and PSPC1 is the most effective coactivator among them. Furthermore, we confirmed the presence of PSPC1, NONO, and SFPQ proteins in Sertoli cells of adult mouse testis sections. These observations suggest that PSPC1, NONO, and SFPQ form complexes with each other in Sertoli cells and may regulate androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional activity.

  3. Disrupting SUMOylation enhances transcriptional function and ameliorates polyglutamine androgen receptor–mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Jason P.; Reddy, Satya L.; Yu, Zhigang; Giorgetti, Elisa; Montie, Heather L.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Higgins, Jake; McEachin, Richard C.; Robins, Diane M.; Merry, Diane E.; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR) causes neuromuscular degeneration in individuals with spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). PolyQ AR has diminished transcriptional function and exhibits ligand-dependent proteotoxicity, features that have both been implicated in SBMA; however, the extent to which altered AR transcriptional function contributes to pathogenesis remains controversial. Here, we sought to dissociate effects of diminished AR function from polyQ-mediated proteotoxicity by enhancing the transcriptional activity of polyQ AR. To accomplish this, we bypassed the inhibitory effect of AR SUMOylation (where SUMO indicates small ubiquitin-like modifier) by mutating conserved lysines in the polyQ AR that are sites of SUMOylation. We determined that replacement of these residues by arginine enhances polyQ AR activity as a hormone-dependent transcriptional regulator. In a murine model, disruption of polyQ AR SUMOylation rescued exercise endurance and type I muscle fiber atrophy; it also prolonged survival. These changes occurred without overt alterations in polyQ AR expression or aggregation, revealing the favorable trophic support exerted by the ligand-activated receptor. Our findings demonstrate beneficial effects of enhancing the transcriptional function of the ligand-activated polyQ AR and indicate that the SUMOylation pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in SBMA. PMID:25607844

  4. Androgen and glucocorticoid production in the male killer whale (Orcinus orca): influence of age, maturity, and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J K; Steinman, K J; Fetter, G A; Robeck, T R

    2017-01-01

    Circulating concentrations of testosterone and its precursor androstenedione, as well as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and the adrenal hormones cortisol and corticosterone were measured at monthly intervals in 14 male killer whales (Orcinus orca) aged 0.8-38 years. Analyses were performed for examination of the relationships of age, sexual maturation status (STATUS), season, and environmental temperature (monthly air ambient temperature, A-TEMP) with hormone production using a mixed effects linear regression model with animal ID as the random variable. Hormone profiles, derived from enzyme immunoassay procedures validated herein, established that simultaneous up-regulation of androstenedione and testosterone production occurs at puberty, when males are aged 8-12 years. Androgen (testosterone and androstenedione) production in pubertal and adult males was influenced by season, with highest (p < 0.01) concentrations observed in spring and summer months. A significant effect of STATUS and season on DHEA production was also documented, with higher (p < 0.05) concentrations in pubertal and adult males compared to juvenile males, and higher (p < 0.05) concentrations in the months of summer than the fall. Among adult males (≥13 years), those classified as aged (≥31 years) had concentrations of testosterone and both glucocorticoids that were lower (p < 0.05), and those of androstenedione that were higher (p < 0.05) than their younger counterparts. The cortisol:corticosterone ratio for adult males was 7 : 1, and both glucocorticoids were affected by STATUS (p < 0.05), but not season or A-TEMP. Results of this research enhance our understanding of reproductive and adrenocortical function in healthy male killer whales and provide baseline profiles of hormone production for use in the species' health assessment and conservation.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water sources are increasingly impacted by upstream anthropogenic activities, including wastewater discharge, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and landfill leachate. Androgenic and estrogenic activities have been detected in surface waters downstream from ...

  6. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water sources are increasingly impacted by upstream anthropogenic activities, including wastewater discharge, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and landfill leachate. Androgenic and estrogenic activities have been detected in surface waters downstream from ...

  7. SUMO ligase PIAS1 functions as a target gene selective androgen receptor coregulator on prostate cancer cell chromatin.

    PubMed

    Toropainen, Sari; Malinen, Marjo; Kaikkonen, Sanna; Rytinki, Miia; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Jänne, Olli A; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays a central role in the development and growth of prostate carcinoma. PIAS1 is an AR- and SUMO-interacting protein and a putative transcriptional coregulator overexpressed in prostate cancer. To study the importance of PIAS1 for the androgen-regulated transcriptome of VCaP prostate cancer cells, we silenced its expression by RNAi. Transcriptome analyses revealed that a subset of the AR-regulated genes is significantly influenced, either activated or repressed, by PIAS1 depletion. Interestingly, PIAS1 depletion also exposed a new set of genes to androgen regulation, suggesting that PIAS1 can mask distinct genomic loci from AR access. In keeping with gene expression data, silencing of PIAS1 attenuated VCaP cell proliferation. ChIP-seq analyses showed that PIAS1 interacts with AR at chromatin sites harboring also SUMO2/3 and surrounded by H3K4me2; androgen exposure increased the number of PIAS1-occupying sites, resulting in nearly complete overlap with AR chromatin binding events. PIAS1 interacted also with the pioneer factor FOXA1. Of note, PIAS1 depletion affected AR chromatin occupancy at binding sites enriched for HOXD13 and GATA motifs. Taken together, PIAS1 is a genuine chromatin-bound AR coregulator that functions in a target gene selective fashion to regulate prostate cancer cell growth. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Rational design of a topical androgen receptor antagonist for the suppression of sebum production with properties suitable for follicular delivery.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna H; Johnson, Theodore R; Lu, Guang Wei; Du, Daniel; Datta, Kaushik; Grzemski, Felicity; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Spence, Julie; Wade, Kim; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Kevin; Lin, Kristin; Hu, Lain-Yen; Sexton, Karen; Raheja, Neil; Kostlan, Catherine; Pocalyko, David

    2010-06-10

    A novel nonsteroidal androgen receptor antagonist, (R)-4-(1-benzyl-4,4-dimethyl-2-oxopyrrolidin-3-yloxy)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (1), for the topical control of sebum production is reported. This compound, which is potent, selective, and efficacious in the clinically validated golden Syrian hamster ear animal model, was designed to be delivered to the pilosebaceous unit, the site of action, preferentially by the follicular route.

  9. Androgens Attenuate Vitamin D Production Induced by UVB Irradiation of the Skin of Male Mice by an Enzymatic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yingben; Ying, Lee; Horst, Ronald L; Watson, Gordon; Goltzman, David

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous exposure to UVB irradiation is an important source of vitamin D. Here, we examined sex-specific differences in cutaneous vitamin D production in mice. Both male and female mice on a vitamin D-deficient diet manifested vitamin D deficiency, with mineral abnormalities, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and osteomalacia. UVB irradiation significantly increased vitamin D levels in the skin of female mice and normalized serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels, as well as mineral and skeletal abnormalities. However, in male mice, the vitamin D response to UVB was attenuated and mineral and skeletal abnormalities were not normalized. The vitamin D precursor, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC), was significantly lower in the skin of male than female mice. This reduction was due to local androgen action in the skin as demonstrated by castration studies and skin-specific androgen receptor deletion in male mice, both of which reversed the male phenotype. Local androgen regulation in the skin of the CYP11A1 gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme that metabolizes cholesterol, 7DHC, and vitamin D, appeared to contribute to the gender differences in UVB-induced vitamin D production and to its reversal of vitamin D deficiency. Sex-specific, enzymatically regulated differences in cutaneous production of vitamin D may therefore be of importance to ensure vitamin D sufficiency.

  10. Chronic Exposure to Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Alters Neuronal Function in the Mammalian Forebrain via Androgen Receptor- and Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Henderson, Leslie P

    2009-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can promote detrimental effects on social behaviors for which γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor-mediated circuits in the forebrain play a critical role. While all AAS bind to androgen receptors (AR), they may also be aromatized to estrogens and thus potentially impart effects via estrogen receptors (ER). Chronic exposure of wild type male mice to a combination of chemically distinct AAS increased action potential (AP) frequency, selective GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs, and GABAergic synaptic current decay in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Experiments performed with pharmacological agents and in AR-deficient Tfm mutant mice suggest that the AAS-dependent enhancement of GABAergic transmission in wild type mice is AR-mediated. In AR-deficient mice, the AAS elicited dramatically different effects, decreasing AP frequency, sIPSC amplitude and frequency and the expression of selective GABAA receptor subunit mRNAs. Surprisingly, in the absence of AR signaling, the data indicate that the AAS do not act as ER agonists, but rather suggest a novel in vivo action in which the AAS inhibit aromatase and impair endogenous ER signaling. These results show that the AAS have the capacity to alter neuronal function in the forebrain via multiple steroid signaling mechanisms and suggest that effects of these steroids in the brain will depend not only on the balance of AR- vs. ER-mediated regulation for different target genes, but also on the ability of these drugs to alter steroid metabolism and thus the endogenous steroid milieu. PMID:19812324

  11. Chronic exposure to anabolic androgenic steroids alters neuronal function in the mammalian forebrain via androgen receptor- and estrogen receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Henderson, Leslie P

    2009-10-07

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) can promote detrimental effects on social behaviors for which GABA type A (GABA(A)) receptor-mediated circuits in the forebrain play a critical role. While all AAS bind to androgen receptors (AR), they may also be aromatized to estrogens and thus potentially impart effects via estrogen receptors (ER). Chronic exposure of wild-type male mice to a combination of chemically distinct AAS increased action potential (AP) frequency, selective GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs, and GABAergic synaptic current decay in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Experiments performed with pharmacological agents and in AR-deficient Tfm mutant mice suggest that the AAS-dependent enhancement of GABAergic transmission in wild-type mice is AR-mediated. In AR-deficient mice, the AAS elicited dramatically different effects, decreasing AP frequency, spontaneous IPSC amplitude and frequency and the expression of selective GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs. Surprisingly, in the absence of AR signaling, the data indicate that the AAS do not act as ER agonists, but rather suggest a novel in vivo action in which the AAS inhibit aromatase and impair endogenous ER signaling. These results show that the AAS have the capacity to alter neuronal function in the forebrain via multiple steroid signaling mechanisms and suggest that effects of these steroids in the brain will depend not only on the balance of AR- versus ER-mediated regulation for different target genes, but also on the ability of these drugs to alter steroid metabolism and thus the endogenous steroid milieu.

  12. Preparation of 4-aryl-2-trifluoromethylbenzonitrile derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists for topical suppression of sebum production.

    PubMed

    Van Camp, Jennifer A; Hu, Lain-Yen; Kostlan, Catherine; Lefker, Bruce; Li, Jie; Mitchell, Lorna; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wen-Song; Carroll, Matthew; Dettling, Danielle; Du, Daniel; Pocalyko, David; Wade, Kimberly

    2007-10-15

    A series of substituted 4-aryl-2-trifluoromethylbenzonitrile analogs were evaluated in the human androgen receptor binding and cellular functional assays. Analogs with sufficient in vitro binding and cellular potency (IC(50)<200 nM) were tested in the progesterone receptor binding assay for selectivity and in the Golden Syrian hamster ear model for in vivo efficacy. Within the series, compound 4 e was identified to be the most active analog in vivo (wax ester inhibition=86%).

  13. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: an anatomic evaluation and sexual function questionnaire pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jason M; Arnhym, Anne; Champeau, Angie; Ebbers, Michele; Coakley, Fergus; Baskin, Laurence

    2011-08-01

    To further characterize the anatomy and sexual function of women with CAIS compared to normal females, and assess the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to distinguish anatomical differences. In a prospective cohort pilot study, five individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome and six, normal, nulliparous women underwent an interview, physical examination, questionnaire completion and MRI of the pelvis. Statistical analysis was performed with emphasis on determining significant differences in anatomical findings and sexual satisfaction. MRI demonstrated statistically significant differences in vaginal depth and size that were not confirmed on physical exam. MRI and physical exam demonstrated a non-significant difference in average phallic thickness between the two groups, although the CAIS group clitoral width tended to be smaller. Physical exam demonstrated a higher average erect height and longer arm span in the CAIS patients but this was not statistically significant. No significant differences were noted in categories designed to assess satisfaction with ability to achieve orgasm, vaginal appearance and frequency of sexual intercourse between the two groups. The women with CAIS were as satisfied with sexual function as were the women within the control group. Physical exam and MRI did not find any statistically significant clinically relevant differences between the two groups. Copyright © 2010 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Testosterone production by tumor tissue in partial androgen deficiency in aged men (PADAM)].

    PubMed

    Pecherskiĭ, A V; Semiglazov, V F; Komiakov, B K; Guliev, B G; Gorelov, A I; Novikov, A I; Pecherskiĭ, V I; Simonov, N N; Guliaev, A V; Samusenko, I A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was examination of cause-effect relationships between PADAM, extragonadal production of androgens and high proliferative activity in aged men. The study group included 15 patients aged between 53 and 79 years with prostatic cancer (n = 5), urinary bladder cancer (n = 5) and cancer of the rectum (n = 5). Control samples of tissues of the prostatic gland, urinary bladder and rectum were obtained from dead bodies of men at the age between 18 and 29 years killed in the accidents at the age from 18 to 29 years. Testosterone levels in the tissues of peritumor zone of the prostate, in tumor tissue of patients with cancer of the prostate, urinary bladder and the rectum were higher than in blood serum. In prostatic cancer, testosterone in the tumor tissue was higher than in the tissues of prostatic peritumor zone. The values of Histochemical score AR of the peritumor zone in prostatic cancer patients were higher than those of the control group. It was detected that ER, PR, bcl-2, Ki-67 and p53 in prostatic tissue of young controls were absent while in patients with prostatic cancer these factors were expressed in the peritumor zone. In cancer of the urinary bladder, peritumor zone showed expression of PR, bcl-2, Ki-67 and p53, while no such expression was in the controls. ER, bcl-2, Ki-67 and p53 were registered in the peritumor zone of patients with cancer of the rectum but the controls had neither ER, bcl-2 nor p53 while Ki-67 expression in rectal cancer was higher than in the controls. The results of the study suggest that testosterone production by some tumors and tissues of the peritumor zone accompanied with high proliferative activity and dysregulation of the cell cycle is secondary to PADAM. These changes arise to compensate testicular deficiency and are manifestations of metabolic syndrome (X-syndrome). In this situation immune system fails to utilize all atypical cells.

  15. Androgens and Hypertension in Men and Women: a Unifying View.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Costanzo; Lanzolla, Giulia; Moretti, Marta; Gnessi, Lucio; Carmina, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    This review was designed to revaluate the androgen role on the mechanisms of hypertension and cardiovascular risks in both men and women. Sex steroids are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but pathophysiological mechanism is not well understood. Androgens have an important effect on metabolism, adipose and endothelial cell function, and cardiovascular risk in both men and women. A focal point in this contest is represented by the possible gender-specific regulation of different tissues and in particular of the adipose cell. Available data confirm that androgen deficiency is linked to increased prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Adipocyte dysfunction seems to be the main involved mechanism. Androgen replacement reduces inflammation state in man, protecting by metabolic syndrome progression. In women, androgen excess has been considered as promoting factor of cardiovascular risk. However, recent data suggest that excessive androgen production has little effect per se in inducing hypertension in young women of reproductive age. Also in postmenopausal women, data on relative androgen excess and hypertension are missing, while adrenal androgen deficiency has been associated to increased mortality. Molecular mechanisms linking androgen dysregulation to hypertension are almost Unknown, but they seem to be related to increased visceral fat, promoting a chronic inflammatory state through different mechanisms. One of these may involve the recruitment and over-activation of NF-kB, a ubiquitous transcription factor also expressed in adipose cells, where it may cause the production of cytokines and other immune factors. The NF-kB signalling pathway may also influence brown adipogenesis leading to the preferential enlargement of visceral adipocytes. Chronic inflammation and adipocyte dysfunction may alter endothelial function leading to hypertension. Both in men and in women, particularly in the post-menopausal period, hypoandrogenism seems to be

  16. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms.

  17. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes stem Leydig cell development and inhibits LH-stimulated androgen production by regulating microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Rui; Ge, Ren-Shan; Zhang, Yufei; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2014-10-01

    Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in the testes, and their steroidogenic function is strictly controlled by the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis. Emerging evidence has indicated that fibroblast growth factors play a role in regulating stem Leydig cell development and steroidogenesis, but little is known about the regulatory mechanism. Using a seminiferous tubule culture system, we demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can promote stem Leydig cell proliferation and commitment toward differentiation in testosterone-producing Leydig cells. However, these promoting effects decreased with an increase in the bFGF dose. Previous studies have reported that bFGF inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated androgen production by downregulating the mRNA expression of steroidogenic genes in immature Leydig cells. However, the expression levels of 677 microRNAs did not change significantly during the LH-mediated process of testosterone synthesis. Five microRNAs (miR-29a, -29c, -142-3p, -451 and -335) were identified, and their expression in immature Leydig cells was regulated simultaneously by bFGF and LH. These results suggested that the inhibition of LH-stimulated androgen production may be modulated by a change in bFGF-mediated microRNA expression, which further impacts the signaling pathway of testosterone biosynthesis and steroidogenic gene expression.

  18. Androgenic anabolic steroids and arterial structure and function in male bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Sader, M A; Griffiths, K A; McCredie, R J; Handelsman, D J; Celermajer, D S

    2001-01-01

    The study examined arterial and cardiac structure and function in bodybuilders using androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS), compared to non-steroid-using bodybuilder controls. Adverse cardiovascular events have been reported in bodybuilders taking anabolic steroids. The cardiovascular effects of AAS, however, have not been investigated in detail. We recruited 20 male bodybuilders (aged 35 +/- 3 years), 10 actively using AAS and 10 who denied ever using steroids. Serum lipid and hormone levels, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), arterial reactivity, and left ventricular (LV) dimensions were measured. Vessel diameter was measured by ultrasound at rest, during reactive hyperemia (an endothelium-dependent response, leading to flow-mediated dilation, FMD), and after sublingual nitroglycerin (GTN, an endothelium-independent dilator). Arterial reactivity was also measured in 10 age-matched non-bodybuilding sedentary controls. Use of AAS was associated with significant decreases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol, sex hormone binding globulin, testosterone and gonadotrophin levels, and significant increases in LV mass and self-reported physical strength (p < 0.05). Carotid IMT (0.60 +/- 0.04 mm vs. 0.63 +/- 0.07 mm), arterial FMD (4.7 +/- 1.4% vs. 4.1 +/- 0.7%) and GTN responses (11.0 +/- 1.9% vs. 14.4 +/- 1.7%) were similar in both bodybuilding groups (p > 0.2). The GTN responses were significantly lower and carotid IMT significantly higher in both bodybuilding groups, however, compared with the non-bodybuilding sedentary controls (p = 0.01). Although high-level bodybuilding is associated with impaired vascular reactivity and increased arterial thickening, the use of AAS per se is not associated with significant abnormalities of arterial structure or function.

  19. Pantolactams as androgen receptor antagonists for the topical suppression of sebum production.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Karen E; Barrett, Stephen; Bridgwood, Katy; Carroll, Matthew; Dettling, Danielle; Du, Daniel; Fakhoury, Stephen; Fedij, Victor; Hu, Lain-Yen; Kostlan, Catherine; Pocalyko, David; Raheja, Neil; Smith, Yvonne; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Wade, Kimberly

    2011-09-15

    A series of pantolactam based compounds were identified as potent antagonists for the androgen receptor (AR). Those that possessed properties suitable for topical delivery were evaluated in the validated Hamster Ear Model. Several compounds were found to be efficacious in reducing wax esters, a major component of sebum, initiating further preclinical work on these compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal Mitochondrial Function and Impaired Granulosa Cell Differentiation in Androgen Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Chang, Heng-Yu; Kao, Shu-Huei; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yeh, Shuyuan; Tzeng, Chii-Reuy; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    In the ovary, the paracrine interactions between the oocyte and surrounded granulosa cells are critical for optimal oocyte quality and embryonic development. Mice lacking the androgen receptor (AR−/−) were noted to have reduced fertility with abnormal ovarian function that might involve the promotion of preantral follicle growth and prevention of follicular atresia. However, the detailed mechanism of how AR in granulosa cells exerts its effects on oocyte quality is poorly understood. Comparing in vitro maturation rate of oocytes, we found oocytes collected from AR−/− mice have a significantly poor maturating rate with 60% reached metaphase II and 30% remained in germinal vesicle breakdown stage, whereas 95% of wild-type AR (AR+/+) oocytes had reached metaphase II. Interestingly, we found these AR−/− female mice also had an increased frequency of morphological alterations in the mitochondria of granulosa cells with reduced ATP generation (0.18 ± 0.02 vs. 0.29 ± 0.02 µM/mg protein; p < 0.05) and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis. Mechanism dissection found loss of AR led to a significant decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) co-activator 1-β (PGC1-β) and its sequential downstream genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. These results indicate that AR may contribute to maintain oocyte quality and fertility via controlling the signals of PGC1-β-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis in granulosa cells. PMID:25941928

  1. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Medical consequences of doping with anabolic androgenic steroids: effects on reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) are appearance and performance-enhancing drugs (APEDs) used in competitive athletics, in recreational sports, and by body-builders. The global lifetime prevalence of AASs abuse is 6.4% for males and 1.6% for women. Many AASs, often obtained from the internet and dubious sources, have not undergone proper testing and are consumed at extremely high doses and in irrational combinations, also along with other drugs. Controlled clinical trials investigating undesired side effects are lacking because ethical restrictions prevent exposing volunteers to potentially toxic regimens, obscuring a causal relationship between AASs abuse and possible sequelae. Because of the negative feedback in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, in men AASs cause reversible suppression of spermatogenesis, testicular atrophy, infertility, and erectile dysfunction (anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism). Should spermatogenesis not recover after AASs abuse, a pre-existing fertility disorder may have resurfaced. AASs frequently cause gynecomastia and acne. In women, AASs may disrupt ovarian function. Chronic strenuous physical activity leads to menstrual irregularities and, in severe cases, to the female athlete triad (low energy intake, menstrual disorders and low bone mass), making it difficult to disentangle the effects of sports and AASs. Acne, hirsutism and (irreversible) deepening of the voice are further consequences of AASs misuse. There is no evidence that AASs cause breast carcinoma. Detecting AASs misuse through the control network of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) not only aims to guarantee fair conditions for athletes, but also to protect them from medical sequelae of AASs abuse.

  2. Profiling of Androgen Response in Rainbow Trout Pubertal Testis: Relevance to Male Gonad Development and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Antoine D.; Lardenois, Aurélie; Goupil, Anne-Sophie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Houlgatte, Rémi; Chalmel, Frédéric; Le Gac, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of testicular somatic cells to promote and sustain germ cell differentiation is largely regulated by sexual steroids and notably androgens. In fish species the importance of androgens is emphasized by their ability to induce sex reversal of the developing fries and to trigger spermatogenesis. Here we studied the influence of androgens on testicular gene expression in trout testis using microarrays. Following treatment of immature males with physiological doses of testosterone or 11-ketotestosterone, 418 genes that exhibit changes in expression were identified. Interestingly, the activity of testosterone appeared stronger than that of 11-ketotestosterone. Expression profiles of responsive genes throughout testis development and in isolated germ cells confirmed androgens to mainly affect gene expression in somatic cells. Furthermore, specific clusters of genes that exhibit regulation coincidently with changes in the natural circulating levels of androgens during the reproductive cycle were highlighted, reinforcing the physiological significance of these data. Among somatic genes, a phylogenetic footprinting study identified putative androgen response elements within the proximal promoter regions of 42 potential direct androgen target genes. Finally, androgens were also found to alter the germ line towards meiotic expression profiles, supporting the hypothesis of a role for the somatic responsive genes in driving germ cell fate. This study significantly increases our understanding of molecular pathways regulated by androgens in vertebrates. The highly cyclic testicular development in trout together with functions associated with regulated genes reveal potential mechanisms for androgen actions in tubule formation, steroid production, germ cell development and sperm secretion. PMID:23301058

  3. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  4. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  5. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  6. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  7. Effects of synthetic androgens on liver function using the rabbit as a model.

    PubMed

    Hild, Sheri Ann; Attardi, Barbara J; Koduri, Sailaja; Till, Bruce A; Reel, Jerry R

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the rabbit was a suitable model to test new synthetic androgens for potential liver toxicity within a short dosing interval. Adult male rabbits were dosed orally daily on days 0-13 with 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) as a positive control and testosterone (T) as a negative control to validate this model. Synthetic androgens tested were: 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT), dimethandrolone-undecanoate (DMAU), and 11β-methyl-19-nortestosterone-17β-dodecylcarbonate (11β-MNTDC). Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), as well as clearance of intravenous injected bromsulfonphthalein (BSP) from serum on days 0, 7, and 14, were determined. As expected, T (10 mg/kg/d) did not adversely affect BSP retention or serum liver enzymes. MT (10 mg/kg/d) increased BSP retention, and AST, ALT, GGT, and SDH levels, indicating that this model could detect androgens known to be hepatotoxic. DMAU and MENT (10 mg/kg/d) increased BSP retention and all 4 serum liver enzymes as well, but the effects were less than those observed with MT at the same dose. All parameters returned to baseline 2 weeks after cessation of dosing. 11β-MNTDC at 10 mg/kg/d did not have an effect on BSP retention or liver enzymes, but a slight increase in serum GGT levels was observed in rabbits treated with 25 mg/kg/d. For the androgens that exhibited liver toxicity at 10 mg/kg/d (MT, DMAU, and MENT), a no-observed-effect level of 1 mg/kg/d was established. Overall ranking of the synthetic androgens from most to least hepatotoxic on the basis of percent BSP retention was: MT & DMAU > MENT > 11β-MNTDC. Hence, the rabbit appears to be a promising model for detection of potential liver toxicity by synthetic androgens using BSP clearance and serum liver enzyme levels as early indicators of injury.

  8. Effects of Synthetic Androgens on Liver Function Using the Rabbit as a Model*†

    PubMed Central

    Hild, Sheri Ann; Attardi, Barbara J.; Koduri, Sailaja; Till, Bruce A.; Reel, Jerry R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the rabbit was a suitable model to test new synthetic androgens for potential liver toxicity within a short dosing interval. Adult male rabbits were dosed orally daily on days 0–13 with 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), as a positive control, and testosterone (T), as a negative control, to validate this model. Synthetic androgens tested were: 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT), dimethandrolone-undecanoate (DMAU), and 11β-methyl-19-nortestosterone-17β-dodecylcarbonate (11β-MNTDC). Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), as well as clearance of intravenous injected bromsulfonphthalein (BSP) from serum on days 0, 7 and 14, were determined. As expected, T (10 mg/kg/day) did not adversely affect BSP retention or serum liver enzymes. MT (10 mg/kg/day) increased BSP retention, and AST, ALT, GGT, and SDH levels indicating that this model could detect androgens known to be hepatotoxic. DMAU and MENT (10 mg/kg/day), increased BSP retention, and all 4 serum liver enzymes as well, but the effects were less than those observed with MT at the same dose. All parameters returned to baseline 2 weeks after cessation of dosing. 11β-MNTDC at 10 mg/kg/day did not have an effect on BSP retention or liver enzymes, but a slight increase in serum GGT levels was observed in rabbits treated with 25 mg/kg/day. For the androgens that exhibited liver toxicity at 10 mg/kg/day (MT, DMAU, and MENT), a no observed effect level (NOEL) of 1 mg/kg/day was established. Overall ranking of the synthetic androgens from most to least hepatotoxic based on %BSP retention was: MT ≫ DMAU > MENT > 11β-MNTDC. Hence, the rabbit appears to be a promising model for detection of potential liver toxicity by synthetic androgens using BSP clearance and serum liver enzyme levels as early indicators of injury. PMID:20378929

  9. Native functions of the androgen receptor are essential to pathogenesis in a Drosophila model of spinobulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nedelsky, Natalia B.; Pennuto, Maria; Smith, Rebecca B.; Palazzolo, Isabella; Moore, Jennifer; Nie, Zhiping; Neale, Geoffrey; Taylor, J. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Summary Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR). This mutation confers toxic function to AR through unknown mechanisms. Mutant AR toxicity requires binding of its hormone ligand, suggesting that pathogenesis involves ligand-induced changes in AR. However, whether toxicity is mediated by native AR function or a novel AR function is unknown. We systematically investigated events downstream of ligand-dependent AR activation in a Drosophila model of SBMA. We show that nuclear translocation of AR is necessary but not sufficient for toxicity and that DNA binding by AR is necessary for toxicity. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that a functional AF-2 domain is essential for toxicity, a finding corroborated by a genetic screen that identified AF-2 interactors as dominant modifiers of degeneration. These findings indicate that SBMA pathogenesis is mediated by misappropriation of native protein function, a mechanism that may apply broadly to polyglutamine diseases. PMID:20869592

  10. Effects of Androgen Blockade on Cognitive Function and Quality of Life in Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    to androgen levels (e.g., spatial ability, working memory for visual information). Bureaucratic requirements (largely related to institutional...examined men on both continuous and intermittent ADT, and a matched sample of control subjects using tests of working memory , information processing...sulfate ( DHEAS ), and albumin, as well as salivary cortisol levels at each time point. Body of Report This project faced numerous delays related to

  11. Androgens Regulate Gene Expression in Avian Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird’s body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  12. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+) cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  13. Androgen Action via Testicular Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells Is Important for Leydig Cell Function, Vasomotion and Testicular Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Sharpe, Richard M.; Moffat, Lindsey; Atanassova, Nina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Kilter, Sigrid; Bergh, Anders; Smith, Lee B.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow through the testicular microvasculature by vasomotion is thought to be important for normal testis function as it regulates interstitial fluid (IF) dynamics which is an important intra-testicular transport medium. Androgens control vasomotion, but how they exert these effects remains unclear. One possibility is by signalling via androgen receptors (AR) expressed in testicular arteriole smooth muscle cells. To investigate this and determine the overall importance of this mechanism in testis function, we generated a blood vessel smooth muscle cell-specific AR knockout mouse (SMARKO). Gross reproductive development was normal in SMARKO mice but testis weight was reduced in adulthood compared to control littermates; this reduction was not due to any changes in germ cell volume or to deficits in testosterone, LH or FSH concentrations and did not cause infertility. However, seminiferous tubule lumen volume was reduced in adult SMARKO males while interstitial volume was increased, perhaps indicating altered fluid dynamics; this was associated with compensated Leydig cell failure. Vasomotion was impaired in adult SMARKO males, though overall testis blood flow was normal and there was an increase in the overall blood vessel volume per testis in adult SMARKOs. In conclusion, these results indicate that ablating arteriole smooth muscle AR does not grossly alter spermatogenesis or affect male fertility but does subtly impair Leydig cell function and testicular fluid exchange, possibly by locally regulating microvascular blood flow within the testis. PMID:21049031

  14. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  15. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  16. Small molecule screening reveals a transcription-independent pro-survival function of androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narizhneva, Natalia V.; Tararova, Natalia D.; Ryabokon, Petro; Shyshynova, Inna; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Komarov, Pavel G.; Purmal, Andrei A.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Gurova, Katerina V.

    2010-01-01

    In prostate cancer (PCa) patients, initial responsiveness to androgen deprivation therapy is frequently followed by relapse due to development of treatment-resistant androgen-independent PCa. This is typically associated with acquisition of mutations in AR that allow activity as a transcription factor in the absence of ligand, indicating that androgen-independent PCa remains dependent on AR function. Our strategy to effectively target AR in androgen-independent PCa involved using a cell-based readout to isolate small molecules that inhibit AR transactivation function through mechanisms other than modulation of ligand binding. A number of the identified inhibitors were toxic to AR-expressing PCa cells regardless of their androgen dependence. Among these, some only suppressed PCa cell growth (ARTIS), while others induced cell death (ARTIK). ARTIK, but not ARTIS, compounds caused disappearance of AR protein from treated cells. siRNA against AR behaved like ARTIK compounds, while a dominant negative AR mutant that prevents AR-mediated transactivation but does not eliminate the protein showed only a growth suppressive effect. These observations reveal a transcription-independent function of AR that is essential for PCa cell viability and, therefore, is an ideal target for anti-PCa treatment. Indeed, several of the identified AR inhibitors demonstrated in vivo efficacy in mouse models of PCa and are candidates for pharmacologic optimization. PMID:19946220

  17. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-03-02

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression.

  18. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 functions as an epigenetic activator of the androgen receptor to promote prostate cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Deng, X; Shao, G; Zhang, H-T; Li, C; Zhang, D; Cheng, L; Elzey, B D; Pili, R; Ratliff, T L; Huang, J; Hu, C-D

    2017-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) is an emerging epigenetic enzyme that mainly represses transcription of target genes via symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues on histones H4R3, H3R8 and H2AR3. Accumulating evidence suggests that PRMT5 may function as an oncogene to drive cancer cell growth by epigenetic inactivation of several tumor suppressors. Here, we provide evidence that PRMT5 promotes prostate cancer cell growth by epigenetically activating transcription of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of PRMT5 or inhibition of PRMT5 by a specific inhibitor reduces the expression of AR and suppresses the growth of multiple AR-positive, but not AR-negative, prostate cancer cells. Significantly, knockdown of PRMT5 in AR-positive LNCaP cells completely suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Molecular analysis reveals that PRMT5 binds to the proximal promoter region of the AR gene and contributes mainly to the enriched symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 in the same region. Mechanistically, PRMT5 is recruited to the AR promoter by its interaction with Sp1, the major transcription factor responsible for AR transcription, and forms a complex with Brg1, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, on the proximal promoter region of the AR gene. Furthermore, PRMT5 expression in prostate cancer tissues is significantly higher than that in benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and PRMT5 expression correlates positively with AR expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Taken together, our results identify PRMT5 as a novel epigenetic activator of AR in prostate cancer. Given that inhibiting AR transcriptional activity or androgen synthesis remains the major mechanism of action for most existing anti-androgen agents, our findings also raise an interesting possibility that targeting PRMT5 may represent a novel approach for prostate cancer treatment by eliminating AR expression. PMID:27546619

  19. The effects of androgen deprivation therapy on cardiac function and heart failure: implications for management of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Scott; Butler, Javed; Hershatter, Bruce W; Khan, Mohammad K

    2014-12-01

    Conflicting clinical evidence regarding the possible association between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with heart failure in men with prostate cancer is reviewed, including 2 population-based registries showing such an association, and 1 showing no association. Studies of the effects of androgens on cardiomyocyte contractility at the molecular level, the effects of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, particularly cardiac function, and the beneficial effects of testosterone therapy for patients with heart failure might help illuminate this controversy. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of ADT on end points of heart failure. The authors weigh the possible adverse effects of ADT on cardiac function and heart failure against its known benefits to cancer outcomes, defined according to published, randomized trials, in a discussion of the implications of the preclinical and clinical literature on the management of prostate cancer in men at risk for heart failure. In the absence of conclusive evidence that ADT causes heart failure, the authors discuss clinical situations in which ADT may be delayed, given on a short-term or intermittent basis, or withheld from treatment with the goal of reducing the risks of heart failure without compromising prostate cancer outcomes.

  20. Polycystic ovary syndrome patients with high BMI tend to have functional disorders of androgen excess: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Mao, Yundong; Diao, Feiyang; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biochemical or clinical changes of hyperandrogenism are important elements of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is currently no consensus on the definition and diagnostic criteria of hyperandrogenism in PCOS. The aim of this study was to investigate the complex symptoms of hyperandrogenic disorders and the correlations between metabolism and hyperandrogenism in patients with PCOS from an outpatient reproductive medicine clinic in China. We conducted a case control study of 125 PCOS patients and 130 controls to evaluate differences in body mass index (BMI), total testosterone (TT), modified Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism score, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and free androgen index (FAI) between PCOS patients and controls and subgroups of PCOS. The prevalence of acne and hirsutism did not differ significantly between the hyperandrogenic and non-hyperandrogenic subgroup. Patients with signs of hyperandrogenism had significantly higher BMI (P < 0.05), but differences in TT, SHBG, FAI and waist/hip ratio were insignificant. The odds ratio of overweight was calculated for all PCOS patients. Our results suggest that PCOS patients with high BMI tend to have functional disorders of androgen excess; therefore, BMI may be a strong predictor of hyperandrogenism in PCOS. PMID:27526961

  1. A comprehensive analysis of coregulator recruitment, androgen receptor function and gene expression in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiang; Senapati, Dhirodatta; Venkadakrishnan, Varadha Balaji; Wang, Dan; DePriest, Adam D; Schlanger, Simon E; Ben-Salem, Salma; Valenzuela, Malyn May; Willard, Belinda; Mudambi, Shaila; Swetzig, Wendy M; Das, Gokul M; Shourideh, Mojgan; Koochekpour, Shahriah; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Yadav, Neelu; Chen, Xiwei; Lao, Changshi; Wang, Jianmin; Billaud, Jean-Noel

    2017-01-01

    Standard treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (CaP) prevents ligand-activation of androgen receptor (AR). Despite initial remission, CaP progresses while relying on AR. AR transcriptional output controls CaP behavior and is an alternative therapeutic target, but its molecular regulation is poorly understood. Here, we show that action of activated AR partitions into fractions that are controlled preferentially by different coregulators. In a 452-AR-target gene panel, each of 18 clinically relevant coregulators mediates androgen-responsiveness of 0–57% genes and acts as a coactivator or corepressor in a gene-specific manner. Selectivity in coregulator-dependent AR action is reflected in differential AR binding site composition and involvement with CaP biology and progression. Isolation of a novel transcriptional mechanism in which WDR77 unites the actions of AR and p53, the major genomic drivers of lethal CaP, to control cell cycle progression provides proof-of-principle for treatment via selective interference with AR action by exploiting AR dependence on coregulators. PMID:28826481

  2. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 Enhances Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Function and Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M.J.; Polanco, Maria J.; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O.; Taylor, J. Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis. PMID:25569348

  3. Semenogelin I promotes prostate cancer cell growth via functioning as an androgen receptor coactivator and protecting against zinc cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Izumi, Koji; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Zheng, Yichun; Li, Yi; Kawahara, Takashi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A seminal plasma protein, semenogelin I (SgI), contributes to sperm clotting, upon binding to Zn(2+), and can be proteolyzed by prostate-specific antigen (PSA), resulting in release of the trapped spermatozoa after ejaculation. In contrast, the role of SgI in the development and progression of any types of malignancies remains largely unknown. We previously demonstrated that SgI was overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and its expression was enhanced by zinc treatment in LNCaP cells. In the current study, using cell lines stably expressing SgI, we investigated its biological functions, in conjunction with zinc, androgen, and androgen receptor (AR), in prostate cancer. Zinc, without SgI, inhibited cell growth of both AR-positive and AR-negative lines. Co-expression of SgI prevented zinc inhibiting dihydrotestosterone-mediated proliferation of AR-positive cells, whereas SgI and/or dihydrotestosterone showed marginal effects in AR-negative cells. Similar effects of SgI overexpression in LNCaP on dihydrotestosterone-induced cell invasion, such as its significant enhancement with zinc, were seen. Overexpression of SgI in LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells also augmented dihydrotestosterone-mediated PSA expression (mRNA, protein) in the presence of zinc. However, culture in the conditioned medium containing secreted forms of SgI failed to significantly increase cell viability with or without zinc. In luciferase reporter gene assays, SgI showed even slight inhibitory effects (8% and 15% decreases in PC3 and CWR22Rv1, respectively) at 0 μM zinc and significant stimulatory effects (2.1- and 3.2-fold) at 100 μM zinc on dihydrotestosterone-enhanced AR transactivation. Co-immunoprecipitation then demonstrated dihydrotestosterone-induced physical interactions between AR and SgI. These results suggest that intracellular SgI, together with zinc, functions as an AR coactivator and thereby promotes androgen-mediated prostate cancer progression.

  4. Influence of Androgen Receptor Gene CAG and GGC Polymorphisms on Male Sexual Function: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Falzetti, Sara; delli Muti, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Background. No study has assessed the possible involvement of GGC androgen receptor (AR) polymorphism in sexual function. Our aim is to evaluate the association between CAG and GGC AR polymorphisms in this function. Methods. We retrospectively examined eighty-five outpatients. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic parameters were considered. Sexual assessment was performed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) which evaluates erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), intercourse satisfaction (IS), and overall satisfaction (OS). Results. In the whole sample, CAG repeats were inversely correlated with EF, OF, and total IIEF-15 score, whereas GGC tracts did not show any significant correlation with sexual function. CAG relationship with IIEF items retained significance only in the eugonadal but not in the hypogonadal cohort. On the other hand, GGC tracts were not found to be significantly correlated with IIEF variables in either eugonadal or hypogonadal subjects. In eugonadal subjects, logistic regression pointed out that a higher number of CAG triplets were associated with lower values of EF, OF, SD, OS, and total IIEF independently from other confounders. Conclusions. GGC polymorphism seems not to exert any influence on sexual function, whereas CAG polymorphism appears to affect sexual parameters only in eugonadal subjects. PMID:28243253

  5. Food components and contaminants as (anti)androgenic molecules.

    PubMed

    Marcoccia, Daniele; Pellegrini, Marco; Fiocchetti, Marco; Lorenzetti, Stefano; Marino, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Androgens, the main male sex steroids, are the critical factors responsible for the development of the male phenotype during embryogenesis and for the achievement of sexual maturation and puberty. In adulthood, androgens remain essential for the maintenance of male reproductive function and behavior. Androgens, acting through the androgen receptor (AR), regulate male sexual differentiation during development, sperm production beginning from puberty, and maintenance of prostate homeostasis. Several substances present in the environment, now classified as endocrine disruptors (EDCs), strongly interfere with androgen actions in reproductive and non-reproductive tissues. EDCs are a heterogeneous group of xenobiotics which include synthetic chemicals used as industrial solvents/lubricants, plasticizers, additives, agrochemicals, pharmaceutical agents, and polyphenols of plant origin. These compounds are even present in the food as components (polyphenols) or food/water contaminants (pesticides, plasticizers used as food packaging) rendering the diet as the main route of exposure to EDCs for humans. Although huge amount of literature reports the (anti)estrogenic effects of different EDCs, relatively scarce information is available on the (anti)androgenic effects of EDCs. Here, the effects and mechanism of action of phytochemicals and pesticides and plasticizers as possible modulators of AR activities will be reviewed taking into account that insight derived from principles of endocrinology are required to estimate EDC consequences on endocrine deregulation and disease.

  6. Testosterone and Erectile Function: From Basic Research to a New Clinical Paradigm for Managing Men with Androgen Insufficiency and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Goldstein, Irwin; Kim, Noel N.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Androgens are essential for the development and growth of the penis, and they regulate erectile physiology by multiple mechanisms. Our goal is to provide a concise overview of the basic research and how this knowledge can be translated into a new clinical paradigm for patient management. In addition, this new paradigm may serve as a basis for stimulating constructive debate regarding the use of testosterone in men, and to promote new, innovative basic and clinical research to further understand the underlying mechanisms of androgen action in restoring erectile physiology. Methods A literature review was performed utilizing the US National Library of Medicine's PubMed database. Results On the basis of evidence derived from laboratory animal studies and clinical data, we postulate that androgen insufficiency disrupts cellular-signaling pathways and produces pathologic alterations in penile tissues, leading to erectile dysfunction. In this review, we discuss androgen-dependent cellular, molecular, and physiologic mechanisms modulating erectile function in the animal model, and the implication of this knowledge in testosterone use in the clinical setting to treat erectile dysfunction. The new clinical paradigm incorporates many of the consensed points of view discussed in traditional consensed algorithms exclusively designed for men with androgen insufficiency. There are, however, novel and innovative differences with this new clinical paradigm. This paradigm represents a fresh effort to provide mandatory and optional management strategies for men with both androgen insufficiency and erectile dysfunction. Conclusions The new clinical paradigm is evidence-based and represents one of the first attempts to address a logical management plan for men with concomitant hormonal and sexual health concerns. PMID:17329016

  7. GLI1, a crucial mediator of sonic hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer, functions as a negative modulator for androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guangchun; Goto, Yutaka; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Matsubara, Eri; Nakamura, Masafumi; Zheng, Hong; Lu, Jian; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Nomura, Masatoshi

    2011-01-21

    Research highlights: {yields} GLI1, which play a central role in sonic hedgehog signaling in prostate cancer, can act as a co-repressor to substantially block androgen receptor-mediated transactivation. {yields} GLI1 directly interacts with AR. {yields} SHH-GLI pathway might be one of determinants governing the transition of prostate cancer from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state. -- Abstract: Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, acting in a combinatorial manner with androgen signaling, is essential for prostate patterning and development. Recently, elevated activation of SHH signaling has been shown to play important roles in proliferation, progression and metastasis of prostate cancer. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time, that GLI1, which has been shown to play a central role in SHH signaling in prostate cancer, can act as a co-repressor to substantially block androgen receptor (AR)-mediated transactivation, at least in part, by directly interacting with AR. Our observations suggest that the SHH-GLI pathway might be one of determinants governing the transition of prostate cancer from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent state by compensating, or even superseding androgen signaling.

  8. Androgen receptor functions as a negative transcriptional regulator of DEPTOR, mTOR inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yuichiro; Zhao, Shuai; Yamashita, Naoya; Yanai, Kazuyuki; Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Inouye, Yoshio

    2015-12-01

    It has been noticed that crosstalk between androgen receptor (AR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways plays a crucial role in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. To clarify this mechanism, we focused on DEPTOR, a naturally occurring inhibitor of mTOR. The treatment of a human AR-positive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, with the AR-agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) repressed DEPTOR mRNA expression in a time-dependent manner. This repression was abrogated by treatment with the AR-antagonist bicalutamide. Knockdown of DEPTOR mRNA by siRNA resulted in the increased phosphorylation of 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K), a substrate of mTORC1, accompanied by the elevated expression of cyclin D1, a positive regulator of cell proliferation. Furthermore, the ChIP assay demonstrated that AR could bind to AR-responsible element-like region within the 4th intron of the DEPTOR gene. The amount of acetylated histone H3 (Lys9, Lys14) was reduced by the DHT treatment in this region. Taken together, these results propose that AR-dependent prostate cancer cell proliferation requires decreased DEPTOR transcription directly controlled by AR.

  9. Increased production of azadirachtin from an improved method of androgenic cultures of a medicinal tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2011-07-01

    Present report is the first direct evidence of azadirachtin production in androgenic haploid cultures of Azadirachta indica, a woody medicinal tree. Anther cultures at early-late-uninucleate stage of microspores were established on MS medium with BAP (5 μM), 2,4-D (1 μM) and NAA (1 μM) containing 12% sucrose. The calli, induced, were further multiplied on 2,4-D and Kinetin media. Shoots, differentiated on BAP (2.2 μM) + NAA (0.05 μM) medium, were elongated on MS + BAP (0.5 μM) and multiplied on MS + BAP (1 μM) + CH (250 mg/l). Thereafter, the shoots were rooted on ¼ MS + IBA (0.5 μM). Cytological analysis of the calli and regenerants have confirmed their haploid status with the chromosome number as 2n = x = 12. The haploid cell lines and leaves from in vitro grown plantlets were analyzed for azadirachtin by RP-HPLC and mass spectroscopy. Maximum azadirachtin (728.41 μg/g DW) was detected in calli supporting best shoot proliferation while least (49 μg/g DW) was observed in an undifferentiated line from maintenance medium. This study has brought us a step closer to develop genetically pure lines that could serve as new and attractive alternative ways of homogeneous controlled production of high value compounds, round the year, independent of geographical and climatic barrier.

  10. Increased production of azadirachtin from an improved method of androgenic cultures of a medicinal tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Priyanka

    2011-01-01

    Present report is the first direct evidence of azadirachtin production in androgenic haploid cultures of Azadirachta indica, a woody medicinal tree. Anther cultures at early-late-uninucleate stage of microspores were established on MS medium with BAP (5 µM), 2,4-D (1 µM) and NAA (1 µM) containing 12% sucrose. The calli, induced, were further multiplied on 2,4-D and Kinetin media. Shoots, differentiated on BAP (2.2 µM) + NAA (0.05 µM) medium, were elongated on MS + BAP (0.5 µM) and multiplied on MS + BAP (1 µM) + CH (250 mg/l). Thereafter, the shoots were rooted on ¼ MS + IBA (0.5 µM). Cytological analysis of the calli and regenerants have confirmed their haploid status with the chromosome number as 2n = x = 12. The haploid cell lines and leaves from in vitro grown plantlets were analyzed for azadirachtin by RP-HPLC and mass spectroscopy. Maximum azadirachtin (728.41 µg/g DW) was detected in calli supporting best shoot proliferation while least (49 µg/g DW) was observed in an undifferentiated line from maintenance medium. This study has brought us a step closer to develop genetically pure lines that could serve as new and attractive alternative ways of homogeneous controlled production of high value compounds, round the year, independent of geographical and climatic barrier. PMID:21701249

  11. Androgen replacement for women.

    PubMed Central

    Basson, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a postmenopausal syndrome comprising specific changes in sexual desire and response associated with low free testosterone exists. To determine whether this syndrome is ameliorated by testosterone replacement. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Literature documenting that replacement of physiological levels of testosterone is beneficial and safe is scant. Only one randomized prospective blinded study examines sexual outcome in detail. MAIN MESSAGE: Testosterone is an important metabolic and sex hormone produced by the ovary throughout life. The variable reduction in ovarian testosterone production coincident with menopause is sometimes associated with a syndrome of specific changes in sexual desire and sexual response. Estrogen deficiency also impairs sexual response, but its replacement will not improve and might exacerbate sexual symptoms from androgen loss. Diagnosis of androgen deficiency is clinical, based on accurate assessment of a woman's sexual status before and after menopause and only confirmed (rather than diagnosed) by a low level of free testosterone. Partial androgen replacement restores much of the sexual response and facilitates sexual desire that is triggered by external cues. Avoiding supraphysiological levels of testosterone lessens risk of masculinization. Avoiding alkylated testosterone lessens hepatic or lipid impairment. CONCLUSION: Further prospective randomized studies of replacement of physiological levels of testosterone in women with androgen deficiency syndrome are needed, using formulations of testosterone available in Canada. The consistency of sexual changes, the associated personal and relationship distress, together with our clinical experience of the gratifying response to physiological replacement, make further studies urgently needed. PMID:10509222

  12. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; McInnes, Kerry; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Morgan, Stephanie; Atanassova, Nina; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Milne, Laura; Mitchell, Rod T; Smith, Lee B

    2015-03-01

    Leydig cell number and function decline as men age, and low testosterone is associated with all "Western" cardio-metabolic disorders. However, whether perturbed androgen action within the adult Leydig cell lineage predisposes individuals to this late-onset degeneration remains unknown. To address this, we generated a novel mouse model in which androgen receptor (AR) is ablated from ∼75% of adult Leydig stem cell/cell progenitors, from fetal life onward (Leydig cell AR knockout mice), permitting interrogation of the specific roles of autocrine Leydig cell AR signaling through comparison to adjacent AR-retaining Leydig cells, testes from littermate controls, and to human testes, including from patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This revealed that autocrine AR signaling is dispensable for the attainment of final Leydig cell number but is essential for Leydig cell maturation and regulation of steroidogenic enzymes in adulthood. Furthermore, these studies reveal that autocrine AR signaling in Leydig cells protects against late-onset degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in mice and inhibits Leydig cell apoptosis in both adult mice and patients with CAIS, possibly via opposing aberrant estrogen signaling. We conclude that autocrine androgen action within Leydig cells is essential for the lifelong support of spermatogenesis and the development and lifelong health of Leydig cells.

  13. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; McInnes, Kerry; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Morgan, Stephanie; Atanassova, Nina; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Milne, Laura; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cell number and function decline as men age, and low testosterone is associated with all “Western” cardio-metabolic disorders. However, whether perturbed androgen action within the adult Leydig cell lineage predisposes individuals to this late-onset degeneration remains unknown. To address this, we generated a novel mouse model in which androgen receptor (AR) is ablated from ∼75% of adult Leydig stem cell/cell progenitors, from fetal life onward (Leydig cell AR knockout mice), permitting interrogation of the specific roles of autocrine Leydig cell AR signaling through comparison to adjacent AR-retaining Leydig cells, testes from littermate controls, and to human testes, including from patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This revealed that autocrine AR signaling is dispensable for the attainment of final Leydig cell number but is essential for Leydig cell maturation and regulation of steroidogenic enzymes in adulthood. Furthermore, these studies reveal that autocrine AR signaling in Leydig cells protects against late-onset degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in mice and inhibits Leydig cell apoptosis in both adult mice and patients with CAIS, possibly via opposing aberrant estrogen signaling. We conclude that autocrine androgen action within Leydig cells is essential for the lifelong support of spermatogenesis and the development and lifelong health of Leydig cells.—O’Hara, L., McInnes, K., Simitsidellis, I., Morgan, S., Atanassova, N., Slowikowska-Hilczer, J., Kula, K., Szarras-Czapnik, M., Milne, L., Mitchell, R. T., Smith, L. B. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men. PMID:25404712

  14. AZD3514: a small molecule that modulates androgen receptor signaling and function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Loddick, Sarah A; Ross, Sarah J; Thomason, Andrew G; Robinson, David M; Walker, Graeme E; Dunkley, Tom P J; Brave, Sandra R; Broadbent, Nicola; Stratton, Natalie C; Trueman, Dawn; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Shaheen, Fadhel S; Jacobs, Vivien N; Cumberbatch, Marie; Wilson, Joanne; Jones, Rhys D O; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred; Gaughan, Luke; Womack, Chris; Barry, Simon T; Robson, Craig N; Critchlow, Susan E; Wedge, Stephen R; Brooks, A Nigel

    2013-09-01

    Continued androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling is a key driver in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after classical androgen ablation therapies have failed, and therefore remains a target for the treatment of progressive disease. Here, we describe the biological characterization of AZD3514, an orally bioavailable drug that inhibits androgen-dependent and -independent AR signaling. AZD3514 modulates AR signaling through two distinct mechanisms, an inhibition of ligand-driven nuclear translocation of AR and a downregulation of receptor levels, both of which were observed in vitro and in vivo. AZD3514 inhibited testosterone-driven seminal vesicle development in juvenile male rats and the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327H prostate tumors in adult rats. Furthermore, this class of compound showed antitumor activity in the HID28 mouse model of CRPC in vivo. AZD3514 is currently in phase I clinical evaluation.

  15. AZD3514: a small molecule that modulates androgen receptor signaling and function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Loddick, Sarah A; Ross, Sarah J; Thomason, Andrew G; Robinson, David M; Walker, Graeme E; Dunkley, Tom PJ; Brave, Sandra R; Broadbent, Nicola; Stratton, Natalie C; Trueman, Dawn; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Shaheen, Fadhel S; Jacobs, Vivien N; Cumberbatch, Marie; Wilson, Joanne; Jones, Rhys D O; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred; Gaughan, Luke; Womack, Chris; Barry, Simon T; Robson, Craig N; Critchlow, Susan E; Wedge, Stephen R; Brooks, Nigel A

    2013-01-01

    Continued androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling is a key driver in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after classical androgen ablation therapies have failed, and therefore remains a target for the treatment of progressive disease. Here we describe the biological characterization of AZD3514, an orally bioavailable drug that inhibits androgen-dependent and–independent AR signaling. AZD3514 modulates AR signaling through two distinct mechanisms, an inhibition of ligand driven nuclear translocation of AR and a down-regulation of receptor levels, both of which were observed in vitro and in vivo. AZD3514 inhibited testosterone-driven seminal vesicle development in juvenile male rats and the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327H prostate tumors in adult rats. Furthermore, this class of compound demonstrated anti-tumor activity in the HID28 mouse model of CRPC in vivo. AZD3514 is currently in Phase I clinical evaluation. PMID:23861347

  16. Strength training induces muscle hypertrophy and functional gains in black prostate cancer patients despite androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Erik D; Sheaff, Andrew K; Sood, Suchi; Ma, Lei; Francis, Jack D; Goldberg, Andrew P; Hurley, Ben F

    2013-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with weakness, fatigue, sarcopenia, and reduced quality of life (QoL). Black men have a higher incidence and mortality from PCa than Caucasians. We hypothesized that despite ADT, strength training (ST) would increase muscle power and size, thereby improving body composition, physical function, fatigue levels, and QoL in older black men with PCa. Muscle mass, power, strength, endurance, physical function, fatigue perception, and QoL were measured in 17 black men with PCa on ADT before and after 12 weeks of ST. Within-group differences were determined using t tests and regression models. ST significantly increased total body muscle mass (2.7%), thigh muscle volume (6.4%), power (17%), and strength (28%). There were significant increases in functional performance (20%), muscle endurance (110%), and QoL scores (7%) and decreases in fatigue perception (38%). Improved muscle function was associated with higher functional performance (R (2) = 0.54) and lower fatigue perception (R (2) = 0.37), and both were associated with improved QoL (R (2) = 0.45), whereas fatigue perception tended to be associated with muscle endurance (R (2) = 0.37). ST elicits muscle hypertrophy even in the absence of testosterone and is effective in counteracting the adverse functional consequences of ADT in older black men with PCa. These improvements are associated with reduced fatigue perception, enhanced physical performance, and improved QoL. Thus, ST may be a safe and well-tolerated therapy to prevent the loss of muscle mass, strength, and power commonly observed during ADT.

  17. Subtle structural changes in tetrahydroquinolines, a new class of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators, induce different functions.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Naoya; Kawai, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Isao

    2012-08-27

    Tetrahydroquinolines (THQs), a new class of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor (AR) modulators, have two indispensable functional groups, that is, a hydroxyl group for AR binding and a nitro group for agonistic activity. Interestingly, switching the nitro to a cyano group, the compound acts as an antagonist. To understand this phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were applied for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and representative THQs complexes with AR. Upon ligand binding, the hydroxyl group formed a tight hydrogen-bond (H-bond) with Asn705 on Helix 3 (H3). The immobilization of Asn705 on H3 is helpful in the formation of tight H-bonds with Asp890 on loop 11-12, and this immobilization consequently leads to a stabilization of H12. The difference in the DHT carbonyl isosteres affected the presence or absence of the H-bonds between the hydroxyl group of THQ and Thr877 and the distortion of H12, which is caused by the methyl group of THQ. Thus, the binding, agonist, and antagonist functions were controlled by subtle structural changes in THQ.

  18. Efficacy of walking exercise in promoting cognitive-psychosocial functions in men with prostate cancer receiving androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Ellen; Kilgour, Andrea; Lau, Y K James

    2012-07-30

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-melanoma cancer among men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the core therapy for men with advanced prostate cancer. It is only in recent years that clinicians began to recognize the cognitive-psychosocial side effects from ADT, which significantly compromise the quality of life of prostate cancer survivors. The objectives of the study are to determine the efficacy of a simple and accessible home-based, walking exercise program in promoting cognitive and psychosocial functions of men with prostate cancer receiving ADT. A 6-month prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial will be conducted to compare the Exercise Group with the Control Group. Twenty men with prostate cancer starting ADT will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of the two groups: the Exercise Group will receive instructions in setting up an individualized 6-month home-based, walking exercise program, while the Control Group will receive standard medical advice from the attending physician. The primary outcomes will be psychosocial and cognitive functions. Cognitive functions including memory, attention, working memory, and executive function will be assessed using a battery of neurocognitive tests at baseline and 6 months. Psychosocial functions including depression, anxiety and self-esteem will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The significance of the cognitive-psychosocial side effects of ADT in men with prostate cancer has only been recently recognized, and the management remains unclear. This study addresses this issue by designing a simple and accessible home-based, exercise program that may potentially have significant impact on reducing the cognitive and psychosocial side effects of ADT, and ultimately improving the health-related quality of life in men with prostate

  19. Androgen therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed

    Buvat, Jacques

    2003-11-01

    The physiological role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulphate (DHEAS) is poorly understood. It depends in a large part on their transformation into testosterone and estradiol. The capacity of DHEA as a neurosteroid, the recent discovery of putative specific DHEA receptors on endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, the steady decrease of DHEA production from the 40s on, together with certain human epidemiologic data as well as various beneficial effects of DHA supplementation in rodents have suggested the possibility that this steroid is involved in cognitive and memory, metabolic and vascular, immune and sexual functions and in their aging. However, epidemiologic studies are conflicting, and no well-designed clinical trials have definitely substantiated the role of DHEA in these functions in humans, or the utility and safety of DHEA supplementation. However, beneficial effects seem plausible in women with several conditions according to the results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials: the dose of 30 to 50 mg seems beneficial to the mood, sense of well being and sexual desire and activity of women with adrenal insufficiency. The only long-term trial of supplementation devoted to women over 60 reported significant increases in bone mineral density and, in the 70-79-year-old subgroup, in sexual desire, arousal, activity and satisfaction. The dose of 200 mg also proved to decrease disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Lastly, high DHEA doses have improved mood in various groups of patients of any age and gender with depressive symptoms. The use of DHEA therapy may also be discussed in women of any age when a trial of androgen supplementation seems justified because of the existence of an inhibited sexual desire or a sexual arousal disorder associated with documented androgen deficiency. The rather weak conversion of DHEA into testosterone protects from the risk of overdosing associated with testosterone preparations. However, it must

  20. Corepressive function of nuclear receptor coactivator 2 in androgen receptor of prostate cancer cells treated with antiandrogen.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Keisuke; Hara, Noboru; Nishiyama, Tsutomu; Tasaki, Masayuki; Ishizaki, Fumio; Tomita, Yoshihiko

    2016-05-25

    Recruitment of cofactors in the interaction of the androgen receptor (AR) and AR ligands plays a critical role in determining androgenic/antiandrogenic effects of the AR ligand on signaling, but the functions of key cofactors, including nuclear receptor coactivator (NCOA), remain poorly understood in prostate cancer cells treated with AR ligands. We examined prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and VCaP expressing mutated and wild-type ARs, respectively, to clarify the significance of NCOAs in the effect of antiandrogens. Hydroxyflutamide showed antagonistic activity against VCaP and an agonistic effect on LNCaP. Bicalutamide served as an antagonist for both. We analyzed mRNA transcription and protein expression of NCOAs in these cells pretreated with dihydrotestosterone and thereafter treated with the mentioned antiandrogens. Transcriptional silencing of candidate NCOAs and AR was performed using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Cell proliferation was evaluated with MTT assay. LNCaP treated with bicalutamide showed an about four-fold increase in the expression of NCOA2 mRNA compared to those pretreated with dihydrotestosterone alone (P <0.01). In VCaP pretreated with dihydrotestosterone, transcriptions of NCOA2 and NCOA7 were slightly increased with bicalutamide (1.96- and 2.42-fold, respectively) and hydroxyflutamide (1.33-fold in both). With Western blotting, the expression of NCOA2 protein also increased in LNCaP cells treated with bicalutamide compared with that in control cells pretreated with dihydrotestosterone alone. Following silencing with siRNA for NCOA2, PSA levels in media with LNCaP receiving bicalutamide were elevated compared with those in non-silencing controls (101.6 ± 4.2 vs. 87.8 ± 1.4 ng/mL, respectively, P =0.0495). In LNCaP cells treated with dihydrotestosterone and bicalutamide, NCOA2-silencing was associated with a higher proliferation activity compared with non-silencing control and AR-silencing. NCOA2, which has been thought to be

  1. Reduced muscle strength and functional performance in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen suppression: a comprehensive cross-sectional investigation.

    PubMed

    Galvão, D A; Taaffe, D R; Spry, N; Joseph, D; Turner, D; Newton, R U

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of androgen suppression therapy (AST) on upper and lower body muscle strength and a range of direct measures of physical performance using a cross-sectional design with 118 men (48 men undertaking AST for prostate cancer and 70 healthy aged-matched controls) from a single tertiary center. Primary end points included muscle strength for the upper- and lower-body; functional performance--repeated chair rise, usual and fast 6-m walk, 6-m backwards walk and 400-m walk time; and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry assessment--whole body, regional soft tissue composition and bone mineral density (BMD). Men on AST had significantly reduced muscle strength for the upper- and lower-body and impaired functional performance compared to controls (P<0.05). As expected, AST patients had significantly lower whole-body and hip BMD and higher percent of body fat than controls (P<0.05), and tended to have lower whole-body lean mass (-2.3 kg, P=0.077). Appendicular skeletal muscle was positively associated with upper-body (r=0.400-0.606, P<0.001) and lower-body (r=0.549-0.588, P<0.001) muscle strength, and strength was related to functional performance. Men undertaking AST were consistently impaired across a broad range of physical and functional musculoskeletal performance assessments compared with their age-matched normal controls. These findings are relevant for those patients considering AST for subclinical disease management, but whose physical reserve is marginal. Strategies to counter these adverse effects of AST need to be initiated so that independent living and quality of life can be maintained.

  2. Coactivator MYST1 regulates nuclear factor-κB and androgen receptor functions during proliferation of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Anbalagan; Chaurasia, Pratima; Xiao, Guang-Qian; Philizaire, Marc; Lv, Xiang; Yao, Shen; Burnstein, Kerry L; Liu, De-Pei; Levine, Alice C; Mujtaba, Shiraz

    2014-06-01

    In prostate cancer (PCa), the functional synergy between androgen receptor (AR) and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB) escalates the resistance to therapeutic regimens and promotes aggressive tumor growth. Although the underlying mechanisms are less clear, gene regulatory abilities of coactivators can bridge the transcription functions of AR and NF-κB. The present study shows that MYST1 (MOZ, YBF2 and SAS2, and TIP60 protein 1) costimulates AR and NF-κB functions in PCa cells. We demonstrate that activation of NF-κB promotes deacetylation of MYST1 by sirtuin 1. Further, the mutually exclusive interactions of MYST1 with sirtuin 1 vs AR regulate the acetylation of lysine 16 on histone H4. Notably, in AR-lacking PC3 cells and in AR-depleted LNCaP cells, diminution of MYST1 activates the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and caspase 3 that leads to apoptosis. In contrast, in AR-transformed PC3 cells (PC3-AR), depletion of MYST1 induces cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) N1A/p21, which results in G2M arrest. Concomitantly, the levels of phospho-retinoblastoma, E2F1, CDK4, and CDK6 are reduced. Finally, the expression of tumor protein D52 (TPD52) was unequivocally affected in PC3, PC3-AR, and LNCaP cells. Taken together, the results of this study reveal that the functional interactions of MYST1 with AR and NF-κB are critical for PCa progression.

  3. Spatial function in adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: clinical phenotype and implications for the androgen hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Elizabeth; Rovet, Joanne F

    2015-04-01

    Females with the classic form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency are said to perform better than unaffected female controls on tests of mental rotation or other visuospatial abilities, but findings are conflicting. We studied 31 adolescents and young adults with CAH and 19 unaffected sibling controls, who were given standardized spatial tests and tests of other sexually differentiated cognitive functions (verbal fluency, perceptual speed). The possible role of CAH subtype (salt-wasting or simple-virilizing) was evaluated. Only females with the more severe, salt-wasting form of CAH, but not females with the simple-virilizing form, performed significantly better than sex-matched sibling controls on measures of mental rotation. Subtype differences were not significant for verbal fluency or perceptual speed. Severity of prenatal genital virilization, but not postnatal age when medication was started, predicted accuracy on the Mental Rotations Test. Results are consistent with the possibility of an organizational effect of androgens in the central nervous system that impacts the development of spatial abilities. Implications for the timing of the hypothetical critical period are discussed.

  4. Androgen Receptor Signaling in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Chen, Jinbo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging preclinical findings have indicated that steroid hormone receptor signaling plays an important role in bladder cancer outgrowth. In particular, androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals have been shown to correlate with the promotion of tumor development and progression, which may clearly explain some sex-specific differences in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses the available data, suggesting the involvement of androgens and/or the androgen receptor pathways in urothelial carcinogenesis as well as tumor growth. While the precise mechanisms of the functions of the androgen receptor in urothelial cells remain far from being fully understood, current evidence may offer chemopreventive or therapeutic options, using androgen deprivation therapy, in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28241422

  5. Transcriptional up-regulation of the human androgen receptor by androgen in bone cells.

    PubMed

    Wiren, K M; Zhang, X; Chang, C; Keenan, E; Orwoll, E S

    1997-06-01

    Androgen regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression has been observed in a variety of tissues, generally as inhibition, and is thought to attenuate cellular responses to androgen. AR is expressed in osteoblasts, the bone-forming cell, suggesting direct actions of androgens on bone. Here we characterized the effect of androgen exposure on AR gene expression in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 and U-2 OS cells. Treatment of osteoblastic cells with the nonaromatizable androgen 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone increased AR steady state messenger RNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Reporter assays with 2.3 kilobases of the proximal 5'-flanking region of the human AR promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in transfected cultures showed that up-regulation of AR promoter activity by androgen was time and dose dependent. Treatment with other steroid hormones, including progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, and dexamethasone, was without effect. The antiandrogen hydroxyflutamide completely antagonized androgen up-regulation. Thus, in contrast to many other androgen target tissues, androgen exposure increases steady state AR messenger RNA levels in osteoblasts. This regulation occurs at least partially at the level of transcription, is mediated by the 5'-promoter region of the AR gene, and is dependent on functional AR. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of androgens have significant effects on AR expression in skeletal tissue.

  6. Gonadal and adrenal androgens are potent regulators of human bone cell metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasperk, C H; Wakley, G K; Hierl, T; Ziegler, R

    1997-03-01

    Androgens stimulate bone formation and play an important role in the maintenance of bone mass. Clinical observations suggest that both gonadal and adrenal androgens contribute to the positive impact of androgenic steroids on bone metabolism. We investigated the mechanism of action of the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated compound dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) on human osteoblastic cells (HOCs) in vitro. The DHEA- and DHEAS-induced effects were analyzed in parallel with the actions elicited by the gonadal androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). There was no qualitative difference between the effects of gonadal and adrenal androgens on HOC metabolism in vitro. Both were stimulatory as regards cell proliferation and differentiated functions, but the gonadal androgen DHT was significantly more potent than DHEA. The actions of DHT and DHEA on HOC proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) production could be prevented by the androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide and inhibitory transforming growth factor beta antibodies (TGF-beta ab), respectively, but were not affected by the presence of the 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta HSD) and 5-alpha-reductase (5-AR) inhibitor 17 beta-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-4-methyl- 4aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one (4-MA). This indicates that DHT and DHEA (1) exert their mitogenic effects by androgen receptor-mediated mechanisms, (2) stimulate ALP production by increased TGF-beta expression, (3) that the action of DHT is not affected by the presence of 4-MA, and that (4) DHEA does not need to be metabolized by 3 beta HSD or 5-AR first to exert its effects on HOCs in vitro.

  7. Prochloraz inhibits testosterone production at dosages below those that affect androgen-dependent organ weights or the onset of puberty in the male Sprague Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Blystone, Chad R; Furr, Johnathan; Lambright, Christy S; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Ryan, Bryce C; Wilson, Vickie S; Leblanc, Gerald A; Gray, Leon Earl

    2007-05-01

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR). We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would reduce testosterone production and delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with 0, 31.3, 62.5, or 125 mg/kg/day of PCZ from postnatal day (PND) 23 to 42 or 51. There was a significant delay in preputial separation (PPS) at 125 mg/kg/day PCZ and several of the androgen-dependent organ weights were decreased significantly, but the significant organ weight effects were not consistent between the 2 necropsies (PND 42 vs. 51). At both ages, serum testosterone levels and ex vivo testosterone release from the testis were significantly decreased whereas serum progesterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels were significantly increased at dose levels below those that affected PPS or reproductive organ weights. The hormone results suggested that PCZ was inhibiting CYP17 activity. In a second pubertal study (0, 3.9, 7.8, 15.6, 31.3, or 62.5 mg/kg/day PCZ), serum testosterone levels and ex vivo testosterone production were significantly reduced at 15.6 mg/kg/day PCZ. In order to examine the AR antagonism effects of PCZ, independent of its effects on testosterone synthesis, castrated immature male rats were dosed with androgen and 0, 15.6, 31.3, 62.5, or 125 mg/kg/day PCZ for 10-11 days (Hershberger assay). In this assay, androgen-sensitive organ weights were only significantly decreased at 125 mg/kg/day PCZ. These data from the pubertal assays demonstrate that PCZ decreases testosterone levels and delays rat pubertal development, as hypothesized. However, the fact that hormone levels were affected at dosage eightfold below that which delayed the onset of puberty suggests that rather large reductions in serum testosterone may be required to delay puberty and consistently reduce androgen-dependent tissue weights.

  8. Effects of long-term androgen deprivation therapy on cognitive function over 36 months in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Timilshina, Narhari; Duff-Canning, Sarah; Breunis, Henriette; Tannock, Ian F; Naglie, Gary; Fleshner, Neil E; Krahn, Murray D; Warde, Padraig; Marzouk, Shireen; Tomlinson, George A

    2017-01-01

    Many men with prostate cancer (PC) require long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), but to the authors' knowledge, its effects on cognitive function beyond 1 year are not described. Three groups of men aged ≥50 years who were matched based on age and education were enrolled: 77 patients with nonmetastatic PC who initiated continuous ADT, 82 patients with PC who were not receiving ADT (PC controls), and 82 healthy controls. A battery of 14 neuropsychological tests, examining 8 cognitive domains, was administered on 5 occasions over 36 months. Changes in cognitive scores over time were analyzed using 3 approaches: linear mixed effects regression, the percentage of participants per group with declines in ≥1/2 cognitive tests, and a global summary of cognitive change. The mean age of the study subjects was 68.9 years, with a median of 16 years of education. In mixed effects models adjusted for age and education, ADT use was not found to be associated with significant changes over time in any cognitive test compared with healthy controls. The percentage of participants declining by ≥1.5 standard deviations in ≥2 tests or ≥2 standard deviations in ≥1 tests was similar across groups. A global summary of cognitive change found no statistically significant worsening of cognitive function among ADT users compared with controls. Sensitivity analyses adjusting for duration of ADT and using multiple imputation for missing data did not materially alter the study findings. The ongoing use of ADT for up to 36 months does not appear to be associated with cognitive decline. Cancer 2017;123:237-244. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  9. Perspectives in production of functional meat products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilev, D.; Glišić, M.; Janković, V.; Dimitrijević, M.; Karabasil, N.; Suvajdžić, B.; Teodorović, V.

    2017-09-01

    The meat industry has met new challenges since the World Health Organization classified processed meat in carcinogenic Group 1. In relation to this, the functional food concept in meat processing has gained importance, especially in reducing carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as an additional imperative, apart from the usual fat and salt reduction and product enrichment with functional ingredients. PAH reduction relies on control of the smoking process, but there is also a possibility they could be degraded by means of probiotic microorganisms or spices. The reduction of N-nitroso compounds could be provided by lowering the amount of added nitrite/nitrate, using substitutes for these chemicals, and/or by preventing conditions for the creation of N-nitroso compounds. Nevertheless, fat and salt reductions still remain topical, and rely mostly on the use of functional ingredients as their substitutes.

  10. Detection of the arylpropionamide-derived selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-4 (Andarine) in a black-market product.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Kamber, Matthias; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2009-08-01

    Non-steroidal and tissue-selective anabolic agents such as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of various diseases such as sarcopenia or cancer cachexia. Advanced compounds of SARMs are based on an arylpropionamide-derived structure and leading drug candidates have successfully completed phase-II-clinical trials. Although none of these therapeutics have been approved, their performance-enhancing qualities and the black-market availability of these products makes them a viable target for misuse in the athletic community. In 2008, SARMs were added to the Prohibited List established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). That SARMs are the subject of misuse even without clinical approval was proved for the first time by the detection of the drug candidate Andarine (also referred to as S-4, S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide), advertised, sold and supplied via the Internet. The oily liquids, declared as green tea extracts and face moisturizer, were assayed using state-of-the-art analytical procedures and S-4 was found at concentrations of approximately 150 mg/mL. The authenticity of the product was demonstrated in comparison to reference material by liquid chromatography, high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry using positive and negative electrospray ionization, and comparison to reference material. Moreover, an impurity resulting from poor product purification was detected, accounting for approximately 10% of S-4. This consisted of 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenylamino)-propionamide. The ease of purchasing non-approved drug candidates that could potentially increase athletic performance demonstrates the need to operate proactively in the continued fight against doping. The early inclusion of emerging drugs into routine sports drug testing procedures is a key

  11. Suppression of androgen production by D-tryptophan-6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in man.

    PubMed Central

    Tolis, G; Mehta, A; Comaru-Schally, A M; Schally, A V

    1981-01-01

    Four male transsexual subjects were given a superactive luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue, D-tryptophan-6-LHRH at daily doses of 100 micrograms for 3--6 mo. A decrease in beard growth, acne, and erectile potency was noted; the latter was documented objectively with the recordings of nocturnal penile tumescence episodes. Plasma testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels fell to castrate values; basal prolactin and luteinizing hormone levels showed a small decline, whereas the acutely releasable luteinizing hormone was significantly suppressed. A rise of plasma testosterone from castrate to normal levels was demonstrable with the use of human chorionic gonadotropin. Discontinuation of treatment led to a normalization of erectile potency and plasma testosterone. The suppression of Leydig cell function by D-tryptophan-6-LHRH might have wide application in reproductive biology and in endocrine-dependent neoplasia (where it could replace surgical castration). PMID:6456277

  12. Evidence for reduced neuromuscular function in men with a history of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Girard, Danielle; Marino, Frank E; Cannon, Jack

    2014-05-01

    Indices of body composition and muscular strength were compared between men with prostate cancer (PCa) treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and asymptomatic matched men. Nine subjects aged 63-83 years with PCa who received ADT (PCa+ADT; duration 6-180 months) and 11 asymptomatic aged-matched eugonadal men (HM) aged 59-80 years were assessed for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and total testosterone (TT). Total body non-osseous lean mass (TBLM) and right thigh non-osseous fat-free mass (RTLM) were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Peak torque of the right knee extensors at 0° s(-1) (ISO) and 60° s(-1) (CON), maximal handgrip strength of the dominant hand (MHS) and whole-body strength (WBS) were assessed. ISO and CON per unit mass of RTLM and MHS and WBS per unit mass of TBLM were calculated. Age, height, mass, body mass index and prostate-specific antigen were comparable between groups (P>0·05), while TT was lower in PCa+ADT (P<0·01). RTLM was similar between groups (P≥0·075). Absolute ISO and CON were lower for PCa+ADT (P<0·01) as were CON per unit of RTLM and ISO per unit of RTLM (P<0·05). Absolute MHS, WBS and MHS per unit of TBLM and WBS per unit of TBLM were lower for PCa+ADT (P<0·01; P<0·05). Men with PCa who receive ADT experience significant losses in whole-body muscular strength compared with asymptomatic age-matched men, which may impair functional capacity. These losses in muscular strength appear to involve neuromuscular mechanisms that are yet to be identified. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The roles of androgen receptors and androgen-binding proteins in nongenomic androgen actions.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Cynthia A; Chang, Chawnshang

    2002-10-01

    The biological activity of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone is thought to occur predominantly through binding to the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that functions as a ligand-activated transcription factor. However, androgens have also been reported to induce the rapid activation of kinase-signaling cascades and modulate intracellular calcium levels. These effects are considered to be nongenomic because they occur in cell types that lack a functional AR, in the presence of inhibitors of transcription and translation, or are observed to occur too rapidly to involve changes in gene transcription. Such nongenomic effects of androgens may occur through AR functioning in the cytoplasm to induce the MAPK signal cascade. In addition, androgens may function through the sex hormone binding globulin receptor and possibly a distinct G protein-coupled receptor to activate second messenger signaling mechanisms. The physiological effect of nongenomic androgen action has yet to be determined. However, it may ultimately contribute to regulation of transcription factor activity, including mediation of the transcriptional activity of AR.

  14. In vitro androgenicity in pulp and paper mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Svenson, Anders; Allard, Ann-Sofie

    2004-10-01

    Pulp and paper mill effluents were examined for in vitro androgenicity using a recombinant yeast-based androgen receptor assay. Low levels of androgenic effects were detected in extracts of some effluents after activated sludge treatment. Yeast cell growth cell was inhibited in some samples, and this interfered with the androgenic response. Solid-phase fractionation revealed androgenicity after partial separation of components in the effluents. Comparison of levels in untreated effluent and in effluent treated in an aerated lagoon showed that this treatment had only a marginal effect on androgenicity. An assay of the fractions eluted with increasing concentrations of methanol showed that androgenic compounds were low to moderately lipophilic. In an attempt to identify these compounds, a number of wood-related compounds (guaiacol, vanillin, beta-sitosterol, betulin, pinosylvin-O-methyl ether, and a wood extract enriched in lignans) were examined but were found not to be androgenic. Raw process water was not androgenic, but water from a highly humified lake and process water from the production of pulp from partly decayed wood had low androgenicity. It therefore can be plausibly suggested that the androgens originated in decaying wood. An assay of androgenicity in the bile of juvenile rainbow trout exposed to effluents for 3 weeks showed increased dose-dependent levels of androgens after enzymatic hydrolysis of hormone conjugates. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The role of androgens in species recognition and sperm production in Atlantic mollies (Poecilia mexicana).

    PubMed

    Gabor, Caitlin R; Aspbury, Andrea S; Ma, Jacqueline; Nice, Chris C

    2012-02-01

    Much is known about the role of hormones in the regulation of vertebrate mating behavior, including receptivity, and several components of mate choice. Hormones may modulate reproductive behavior in such a way to increase or decrease the individual's motivation, and therefore hormones may be important in mediating behavior associated with reproductive isolation. The mating complex of the all female gynogenetic Amazon mollies, Poecilia formosa, and their parental species (sailfin mollies, P. latipinna, and Atlantic mollies, P. mexicana) is a model system for studying ultimate mechanisms of species recognition. However, proximate mechanisms, such as variation in hormone levels, and the effect of hormones on sperm production have not been extensively examined. We predict that one or more of the sex steroid hormones in teleost fish (11-ketotestosterone (KT), testosterone (T), and estradiol (E)) will play a role in species recognition (during mate choice and/or sperm priming) for Atlantic mollies (the maternal parental species) that are sympatric with Amazon mollies. We sequentially paired male Atlantic mollies with female conspecifics and Amazon mollies and obtained water-borne hormone samples before and after mating for all fish. We measured circulating KT, T, and E from the water samples. Although we did not find an overall KT response to mating with conspecifics as has been found previously in sailfin mollies, male Atlantic mollies that mated more with conspecific females had lower postmating T levels. Additionally, males attempted to mate more with conspecific females that had lower postmating E levels, but attempted to mate more with Amazon mollies that had higher postmating KT levels. We also examined the effect of KT on sperm priming (a mechanism of premating mate choice), and found that KT levels of male Atlantic mollies prior to mating are correlated with the sperm priming response when males were paired with conspecific females, but this correlation was not

  16. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection.

  17. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  18. Chronic Exposure to Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Alters Activity and Synaptic Function in Neuroendocrine Control Regions of the Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Penatti, Carlos A.A.; Oberlander, Joseph G.; Davis, Matthew C.; Porter, Donna M.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Disruption of reproductive function is a hallmark of abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in female subjects. To understand the central actions of AAS, patch clamp recordings were made in estrous, diestrous and AAS-treated mice from gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, neurons in the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and neurons in the anteroventroperiventricular nucleus (AVPV); regions known to provide GABAergic and kisspeptin inputs to the GnRH cells. Action potential (AP) frequency was significantly higher in GnRH neurons of estrous mice than in AAS-treated or diestrous animals. No significant differences in AAS-treated, estrous or diestrous mice were evident in the amplitude or kinetics of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPCSs), miniature PSCs or tonic currents mediated by GABAA receptors or in GABAA receptor subunit expression in GnRH neurons. In contrast, the frequency of GABAA receptor-mediated sPSCs in GnRH neurons showed an inverse correlation with AP frequency across the three hormonal states. Surprisingly, AP activity in the medial preoptic area (mPOA), a likely source of GABAergic afferents to GnRH cells, did not vary in concert with the sPSCs in the GnRH neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors did not alter the pattern in which there was lower AP frequency in GnRH neurons of AAS-treated and diestrous versus estrous mice. These data suggest that AAS do not impose their effects either directly on GnRH neurons or on putative GABAergic afferents in the mPOA. AP activity recorded from neurons in kisspeptin-rich regions of the anteroventroperiventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the expression of kisspeptin mRNA and peptide did vary coordinately with AP activity in GnRH neurons. Our data demonstrate that AAS treatment imposes a “diestrous-like” pattern of activity in GnRH neurons and suggest that this effect may arise from suppression of presynaptic kisspeptin-mediated excitatory drive arising from the AVPV. The

  19. Synergistic androgenic effect of a petroleum product caused by the joint action of at least three different types of compounds.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Candido, Angelica; Vrabie, Cozmina M; Scarlett, Alan G; Rowland, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    In a previous study, we found a dose-dependent synergistic effect in recombinant yeast stably transfected with the human androgen receptor (AR), in response to co-exposure to testosterone and a commercially-available lubricant (engine) oil for cars. As there is relatively little knowledge on synergistic toxic effects and causative compounds, particularly for the androgenic system, the objective of the present study was to investigate this oil in more detail. The oil was fractionated into SARA fractions (so-called 'saturates', 'aromatics', 'resins', and 'asphaltenes') by open column chromatography. Surprisingly, when exposing the recombinant AR yeast to testosterone in combination with the separate SARA fractions, the synergistic effect could not be reproduced fully. After pooling the fractions again however, the full synergism returned. From subsequent exposures to combinations of two or three SARA fractions, it appeared that both the 'saturates' and the 'resins' fraction were required for obtaining the synergistic response with testosterone. This clearly demonstrates a synergistic effect related to the androgenic system caused by the joint action of at least three chemically-distinct compounds, or groups of compounds (i.e. testosterone, 'resins' and 'saturates'). Although detailed chemical analyses could not reveal the identity of the causative compounds and the in vivo relevance of the present results remains unclear, the results do add to the growing body of evidence on the potentially extremely complex character of mixture effects.

  20. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, A O

    2001-06-20

    Androgens are important steroid hormones for expression of the male phenotype. They have characteristic roles during male sexual differentiation, during development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics, and during the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis. The two most important androgens in this respect are testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Each androgen has its own specific role during male sexual differentiation, testosterone is involved in the development and differentiation of Wolffian duct derived structures, whereas 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite of testosterone, is the active ligand in the urogenital sinus and tubercle and their derived structures. The actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor. This ligand dependent transcription factor belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors, including those for the other steroid hormones. The androgen receptor gene is located on the X-chromosome at Xq11--12 and codes for a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. Only one androgen receptor cDNA has been identified sofar, despite two different ligands. It is generally accepted that defects in the androgen receptor gene prevent the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46, XY individuals. The end-organ resistance to androgens has been designated as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and is distinct from other forms of male pseudohermaphroditism like 17 beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency, leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivating LH receptor mutations or 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency. Furthermore, two additional pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function -- spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, or Kennedy's disease) and prostate cancer. In the AR gene, four different types of mutations have been detected in DNA from individuals with AIS -- (i) single point mutations resulting in

  1. Prenatal Exposure to Low Levels of Androgen Accelerates Female Puberty Onset and Reproductive Senescence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Witham, Emily A.; Meadows, Jason D.; Shojaei, Shadi; Kauffman, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Sex steroid hormone production and feedback mechanisms are critical components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and regulate fetal development, puberty, fertility, and menopause. In female mammals, developmental exposure to excess androgens alters the development of the HPG axis and has pathophysiological effects on adult reproductive function. This study presents an in-depth reproductive analysis of a murine model of prenatal androgenization (PNA) in which females are exposed to a low dose of dihydrotestosterone during late prenatal development on embryonic d 16.5–18.5. We determined that PNA females had advanced pubertal onset and a delay in the time to first litter, compared with vehicle-treated controls. The PNA mice also had elevated testosterone, irregular estrous cyclicity, and advanced reproductive senescence. To assess the importance of the window of androgen exposure, dihydrotestosterone was administered to a separate cohort of female mice on postnatal d 21–23 [prepubertal androgenization (PPA)]. PPA significantly advanced the timing of pubertal onset, as observed by age of the vaginal opening, yet had no effects on testosterone or estrous cycling in adulthood. The absence of kisspeptin receptor in Kiss1r-null mice did not change the acceleration of puberty by the PNA and PPA paradigms, indicating that kisspeptin signaling is not required for androgens to advance puberty. Thus, prenatal, but not prepubertal, exposure to low levels of androgens disrupts normal reproductive function throughout life from puberty to reproductive senescence. PMID:22778229

  2. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  3. Androgen receptor, androgen-producing enzymes and their transcription factors in extramammary Paget disease.

    PubMed

    Azmahani, Abdullah; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Ozawa, Yohei; McNamara, Keely M; Fujimura, Taku; Haga, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Aiba, Setsuya; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-11-01

    Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) has been known to frequently express androgen receptor (AR). Therefore, androgens could play roles in the biological behavior of Paget cells. 5α-Reductase (5α-red) types 1 and 2 and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 5 (17β-HSD5) are pivotal in situ regulators of androgen production in androgen-responsive tissues including androgen-dependent neoplasms. Therefore, in this study, we immunolocalized AR, androgen-producing enzymes, and their transcription factors to assess the state of in situ androgen production and actions and its correlation of invasiveness in EMPD. We studied 51 cases of EMPD with known clinicopathological status. AR, 5α-red1, 17β-HSD5, and β-catenin immunoreactivity was evaluated by using the modified H-score method while cyclin D1, p53, forkhead box protein P1, and a proliferation marker, Ki-67, were quantified using labeling index. The mean scores of AR, 5α-red1, and 17β-HSD5 in invasive EMPD were all significantly higher than noninvasive EMPD (P < .0001). Ki-67 labeling index as well as the cyclin D1 score was also significantly higher in invasive than noninvasive lesions of EMPD. These results demonstrated that androgen receptor and androgen-producing enzymes were both associated with cell cycle regulation and subsequently the invasiveness of EMPD lesions and could also indicate those above as potential markers of invasive potentials in EMPD.

  4. Parasagittal hypothalamic knife cuts in male chicks: advancement of reproductive function and changes in plasma concentrations of luteinising hormone and androgen.

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, W J; Sharp, P J

    1985-04-01

    Advancement of reproductive function occurred in male domestic chicks after lateral hypothalamic deafferentation (bilateral knife cuts extending from the preoptic to the mamillary region) at 2 weeks of age. Five out of 24 chicks showed sexual precocity as shown by accelerated comb growth after surgery. The 5 chicks had significantly higher concentrations of plasma luteinising hormone (LH) and androgen (A) than 5 sham-operated controls. Maximum concentrations of plasma LH and A were observed 3 and 4 weeks respectively after surgery. It is concluded that in the male domestic chick gonadotropin secretion is inhibited by extrahypothalamic influences.

  5. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Davies, John D; Bunch, Trevor I; Pasterski, Vickie; Mastroyannopoulou, Kiki; MacDougall, Jane

    2012-10-20

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome in its complete form is a disorder of hormone resistance characterised by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype and testes producing age-appropriate normal concentrations of androgens. Pathogenesis is the result of mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor gene, which encodes for the ligand-activated androgen receptor--a transcription factor and member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This Seminar describes the clinical manifestations of androgen insensitivity syndrome from infancy to adulthood, reviews the mechanism of androgen action, and shows examples of how mutations of the androgen receptor gene cause the syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team and include gonadectomy to avoid gonad tumours in later life, appropriate sex-hormone replacement at puberty and beyond, and an emphasis on openness in disclosure.

  6. Development of adrenal cortical zonation and expression of key elements of adrenal androgen production in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) from birth to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Parker, C R; Grizzle, W E; Blevins, J K; Hawkes, K

    2014-04-25

    The basis for the pattern of adrenal androgen production in the chimpanzee, which resembles that of humans, is poorly defined. We characterized the developmental zonation and expression of elements of the androgen biosynthetic pathway in the chimpanzee adrenal. The newborn adrenal contained a broad fetal zone (FZ) expressing CYP17, SULT2A1, and Cytochrome B5 (CB5) but not HSD3B; the outer cortex expressed HSD3B but not SULT2A1 or CB5. During infancy, the FZ involuted and the HSD3B-expressing outer cortex broadened. By 3years of age, a thin layer of cells that expressed CB5, SULT2A1, and CYP17 adjoined the medulla and likely represented the zona reticularis; the outer cortex consisted of distinct zonae fasiculata and glomerulosa. Thereafter, the zona reticularis broadened as also occurs in the human. The adult chimpanzee adrenal displayed other human-like characteristics: intramedullary clusters of reticularis-like cells and also a cortical cuff of zona fasiculata-like cells adjoining the central vein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Disorders of androgen action.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Charles; Lumbroso, Serge; Paris, Françoise; Jeandel, Claire; Terouanne, B; Belon, Charles; Audran, F; Poujol, N; Georget, V; Gobinet, J; Jalaguier, S; Auzou, G; Nicolas, J C

    2002-08-01

    Disorders of androgen action are the main cause of male pseudohermaphroditism and include 5alphaR deficiency and androgen receptor defects. 5alphaR deficiency is characterized by female genitalia with some degree of masculinization, clitoromegaly, and severely bifid scrotum corresponding to the so-called pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias. At the onset of puberty, increased muscle mass, development of pubic hair, and phallic growth are associated with the acquisition of male gender identity. Normal or increased levels of testosterone and an elevated testosterone-to-dihydrotestosterone ratio after human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation testing suggest 5alphareductase deficiency, and the diagnosis can be ascertained by identifying the mutation in the 5alphaR-2 gene. Whatever the patient's age at diagnosis, psychological evaluation with 5alphaRD is vital. Androgen receptor defects encompass two clinical expressions: the complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndromes. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome should be suspected at birth in the presence of inguinal hernia in a girl without genital ambiguity. At puberty, the sign of alert is primary amenorrhea with normal female phenotype and harmonious mammary development but no pubic hair growth. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome covers a wide spectrum of undervirilized phenotypes ranging from clitoromegaly at birth to infertile men. In all cases, complementary investigations should include plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone as well as androgen-binding capacity in cultured genital skin fibroblasts. Diagnosis is confirmed by identification of the androgen receptor gene mutation. Although patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome are raised as females, patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome should be managed according to age at diagnosis, response to treatment with exogenous androgens, and the presence of an androgen gene mutation. Gonadectomy in complete androgen

  8. Ovarian hyperandrogenism and androgen-producing tumors.

    PubMed

    Lobo, R A

    1991-12-01

    The ovary is an active source of androgen secretion. This is regulated largely by LH but by insulin and other factors as well. Functional states include PCO as well as stromal hyperthecosis, which often mimics a neoplasm. Ovarian neoplasms are often gonadotropin responsive. Both functional and nonfunctional tumors may give rise to elevated androgen levels. Clinical history and the accurate assessment of testosterone measurements aid in the correct diagnosis of an androgen-secreting tumor. Imaging techniques, particularly vaginal ultrasound, are extremely valuable in making the diagnosis. Selective venous catheterization, although useful, should not be the primary diagnostic technique.

  9. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    PubMed

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  10. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action.

    PubMed

    DePriest, Adam D; Fiandalo, Michael V; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a 'pre-receptor level' database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a 'post-receptor level' database, and (ii) an 'other resources' database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to gene

  11. A regulatory role of androgen in ovarian steroidogenesis by rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Toru; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Hosoya, Takeshi; Fujita, Shiho; Nishiyama, Yuki; Iwata, Nahoko; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Otsuka, Fumio

    2017-09-01

    Excess androgen and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in the ovarian follicle has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Here we investigated the impact of androgen and IGF-I on the regulatory mechanism of ovarian steroidogenesis using rat primary granulosa cells. It was revealed that androgen treatment with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) amplified progesterone synthesis in the presence of FSH and IGF-I, whereas it had no significant effect on estrogen synthesis by rat granulosa cells. In accordance with the effects of androgen on steroidogenesis, DHT enhanced the expression of progesterogenic factors and enzymes, including StAR, P450scc and 3βHSD, and cellular cAMP synthesis induced by FSH and IGF-I. Of note, treatment with DHT and IGF-I suppressed Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and transcription of the BMP target gene Id-1, suggesting that androgen and IGF-I counteract BMP signaling that inhibits FSH-induced progesterone synthesis in rat granulosa cells. DHT was revealed to suppress the expression of BMP-6 receptors, consisting of ALK-2, ALK-6 and ActRII, while it increased the expression of inhibitory Smads in rat granulosa cells. In addition, IGF-I treatment upregulated androgen receptor (AR) expression and DHT treatment suppressed IGF-I receptor expression on rat granulosa cells. Collectively, the results indicate that androgen and IGF-I mutually interact and accelerate progesterone production, at least in part, by regulating endogenous BMP signaling in rat granulosa cells. Cooperative effects of androgen and IGF-I counteract endogenous BMP-6 activity in rat granulosa cells, which is likely to be functionally linked to the steroidogenic property shown in the PCOS ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Androgens Mediate Sex-Dependent Gonadotropin Expression During Late Prenatal Development in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kreisman, Michael J; Song, Christopher I; Yip, Kathleen; Natale, Bryony V; Natale, David R; Breen, Kellie M

    2017-09-01

    Central organization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is initiated during fetal life. At this critical time, gonadal hormones mediate sex-specific development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which then dictates reproductive physiology and behavior in adulthood. Although studies have investigated the effects of prenatal androgens on central factors influencing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release, the impact of fetal androgens on gonadotrope function has been overlooked. In the current study, we demonstrated that gonadotropin gene expression and protein production were robustly elevated in female mice compared with males during late fetal development and that this sex difference was dependent on fetal androgens. Treatment of dams from embryonic day (E)15.5 to E17.5 with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or the androgen antagonist flutamide eliminated the sex difference at E18.5. Specifically, flutamide relieved the suppression in male gene expression, elevating the level to that of females, whereas testosterone or DHT attenuated female gene expression to male levels. The gonadotrope population is equivalent in males and females, and gonadotropic cells in both sexes express androgen receptors, suggesting that androgen-dependent transcriptional regulation can occur in these cells in either sex. Studies using mouse models lacking GnRH signaling show that GnRH is necessary for enhanced gonadotropin expression in females and is therefore required to observe the sex difference. Collectively, these data suggest that circuits controlling GnRH input to the fetal pituitary are unrestrained in females yet robustly inhibited in males via circulating androgens and demonstrate plasticity in gonadotropin synthesis and secretion in both sexes depending on the androgen milieu during late prenatal development. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  13. Estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists in effluents from Norwegian North Sea oil production platforms.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Harman, Christopher; Smith, Andy; Thomas, Kevin V

    2007-03-01

    The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and androgen receptor (AR) antagonist potencies of offshore produced water effluents collected from the Norwegian Sector were determined using recombinant yeast estrogen and androgen screens. Solid phase extraction (SPE) concentrates of the effluents showed E2 agonist activities similar to those previously reported for the United Kingdom (UK) Continental Shelf (<0.1-4 ng E2 L(-1)). No activity was detected in the filtered oil droplets suggesting that produced water ER activity is primarily associated with the dissolved phase. Targeted analysis for methyl- to nonyl-substituted alkylphenol isomers show the occurrence of known ER agonists in the analysed samples. For the first time, AR antagonists were detected in both the dissolved and oil associated phase at concentrations of between 20 and 8000 microg of flutamide equivalents L(-1). The identity of the AR antagonists is unknown, however this represents a significant input into the marine environment of unknown compounds that exert a known biological effect. It is recommended that further analysis using techniques such as bioassay-directed analysis is performed to identify the compounds/groups of compounds that are responsible in order to improve the assessment of the risk posed by produced water discharges to the marine environment.

  14. Production Function Geometry with "Knightian" Total Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truett, Dale B.; Truett, Lila J.

    2007-01-01

    Authors of principles and price theory textbooks generally illustrate short-run production using a total product curve that displays first increasing and then diminishing marginal returns to employment of the variable input(s). Although it seems reasonable that a temporary range of increasing returns to variable inputs will likely occur as…

  15. Production Function Geometry with "Knightian" Total Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truett, Dale B.; Truett, Lila J.

    2007-01-01

    Authors of principles and price theory textbooks generally illustrate short-run production using a total product curve that displays first increasing and then diminishing marginal returns to employment of the variable input(s). Although it seems reasonable that a temporary range of increasing returns to variable inputs will likely occur as…

  16. Androgen Bioassay for the Detection of Non-labeled Androgenic Compounds in Nutritional Supplements.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elliot R; McGrath, Kristine C Y; Li, XiaoHong; Heather, Alison K

    2017-08-08

    Both athletes and the general population use nutritional supplements. Athletes often turn to supplements hoping that consuming the supplement will help them be more competitive and healthy while the general population hopes to improve body image or vitality. While many supplements contain ingredients that may have useful properties, there are supplements that are contaminated with compounds that are banned for use in sport or have been deliberately adulterated to fortify a supplement with an ingredient that will produce the advertised effect. In the present study, we have used yeast- and mammalian cell androgen bioassays to characterize the androgenic bioactivity of 112 sports supplements available from the Australian market, either over the counter or via the Internet. All 112 products did not declare an androgen on the label as an included ingredient. Our findings show that 6/112 supplements had strong androgenic bioactivity in the yeast cell bioassay, indicating products spiked or contaminated with androgens. The mammalian cell bioassay confirmed the strong androgenic bioactivity of 5/6 positive supplements. Supplement 6 was metabolized to weaker androgenic bioactivity in the mammalian cells. Further to this, Supplement 6 was positive in a yeast cell progestin bioassay. Together, these findings highlight that nutritional supplements, taken without medical supervision, could expose or predispose users to the adverse consequences of androgen abuse. The findings reinforce the need to increase awareness of the dangers of nutritional supplements and highlight the challenges that clinicians face in the fast-growing market of nutritional supplements.

  17. Endothelial Cell Death, Angiogenesis, and Microvascular Function after Castration in an Androgen-Dependent Tumor: Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Safabakhsh, Nina; Sckell, Axel; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Ping; Benjamin, Laura; Yuan, Fan; Keshet, Eli

    1998-09-01

    The sequence of events that leads to tumor vessel regression and the functional characteristics of these vessels during hormone--ablation therapy are not known. This is because of the lack of an appropriate animal model and monitoring technology. By using in vivo microscopy and in situ molecular analysis of the androgen-dependent Shionogi carcinoma grown in severe combined immunodeficient mice, we show that castration of these mice leads to tumor regression and a concomitant decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Androgen withdrawal is known to induce apoptosis in Shionogi tumor cells. Surprisingly, tumor endothelial cells begin to undergo apoptosis before neoplastic cells, and rarefaction of tumor vessels precedes the decrease in tumor size. The regressing vessels begin to exhibit normal phenotype, i.e., lower diameter, tortuosity, vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion. Two weeks after castration, a second wave of angiogenesis and tumor growth begins with a concomitant increase in VEGF expression. Because human tumors often relapse following hormone--ablation therapy, our data suggest that these patients may benefit from combined anti-VEGF therapy.

  18. Synthesis of novel C17 steroidal carbamates. Studies on CYP17 action, androgen receptor binding and function, and prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vânia M A; Vasaitis, Tadas S; Guo, Zhiyong; Njar, Vincent C O; Salvador, Jorge A R

    2008-11-01

    We have exploited the reaction of 1,1'-carbonylbis(2-methylimidazole) (CBMI) with several 17beta-hydroxy androstanes to synthesize a series of novel C17 steroidal carbamates. Structural elucidation features have been provided for the final compounds based on 1D and 2D NMR techniques, IR spectroscopy, and related literature. The new compounds were tested for inhibition of human cytochrome 17alpha-hydroxylase-C17,20-lyase (CYP17) and androgen receptor (AR) binding and function effects. Their inhibitory potential against PC-3 cell proliferation was also evaluated. Compounds 11 and 23 were found to inhibit CYP17 with IC50 values of 17.1 and 11.5 microM, respectively. The carbamate moiety at C17 allowed tight binding of the synthesized compounds to both wild-type (wt-) and mutated AR. When bound to the mutated AR, the compounds were found to have a dual effect, stimulating transcription at low concentrations while almost fully blocking it at the higher concentrations tested, in the presence of the natural androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Compounds 8 and 12 were the most active against PC-3 cell proliferation with EC50 values of 2.2 and 0.2 microM, respectively.

  19. Anabolic androgenic steroids abuse and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Bello, S; Bonsignore, A; Cantatore, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    In the athletes the wide use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) cause series damage in various organs, in particular, analyzing the liver, elevation on the levels of liver enzymes, cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors, both benign and malignant, and peliosis hepatis are described. A prolonged AAS administration provokes an increase in the activities of liver lysosomal hydrolases and a decrease in some components of the microsomal drug-metabolizing system and in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes without modifying classical serum indicators of hepatic function. Liver is a key organ actively involved in numerous metabolic and detoxifying functions. As a consequence, it is continuously exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous oxidants that are by-products of many biochemical pathways and, in fact, it has been demonstrated that intracellular oxidant production is more active in liver than in tissues, like the increase of inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and the inhibitors of apoptosis NF- κB and Heat Shock Proteins.

  20. Androgens, androgen receptors, and male gender role behavior.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J D

    2001-09-01

    Studies of genetic males with single gene mutations that impair testosterone formation or action and consequently prevent development of the normal male phenotype provide unique insight into the control of gender role behavior. 46,XY individuals with either of two autosomal recessive mutations [17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17 beta-HSD3) deficiency or steroid 5 alpha-reductase 2 (5 alpha-R2) deficiency] have a female phenotype at birth and are raised as females but frequently change gender role behavior to male after the expected time of puberty. In contrast, genetic males with mutations that impair profoundly the function of the androgen receptor are also raised as females and have consistent female behavior as adults. Furthermore, the rare men with mutations that impair estrogen synthesis or the estrogen receptor have male gender role behavior. These findings indicate that androgens are important determinants of gender role behavior (and probably of gender identity) and that this action is mediated by the androgen receptor and not the result of conversion of androgen to estrogen. The fact that all genetic males with 17 beta-HSD3 or 5 alpha-R2 deficiency do not change gender role behavior indicates that other factors are also important determinants of this process.

  1. Androgens and women's health.

    PubMed

    Redmond, G P

    1998-01-01

    Androgenic disorders are those conditions in women characterized by excessive androgen action. They are the most common endocrinopathy of women, affecting from 10% to 20%. Signs are: persistent acne, hirsutism and androgenic alopecia, which is the female equivalent of male pattern baldness. A subgroup, those traditionally labeled as having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), additionally have anovulation, as well as menstrual abnormalities and, often, obesity. Although women with androgenic disorders usually present themselves for help with the skin or menstrual changes, there are other important implications regarding their health. Women with PCOS have varying degrees of insulin resistance, and an increased incidence of Type II diabetes mellitus, as well as unfavorable lipid patterns. The presence of these risk factors is suggested by upper segment obesity, darkening of the skin, and the other skin changes that make up acanthosis nigricans. Diagnosis involves measurement of circulating androgens (of which free testosterone is most important), together with prolactin and FSH when menstrual dysfunction is present. Many women with androgenic skin changes have normal serum androgen levels, suggesting increased end organ sensitivity to androgens. Others have hyperandrogenism (of ovarian or adrenal origin). Treatment is usually successful in controlling acne, reducing hirsutism and stabilizing, or partially reversing, androgenic alopecia. Pharmacological approaches involve suppressing androgen levels, for example, the use of an appropriate oral contraceptive, or antagonizing androgen action with several medications that have this activity. Unfortunately, most women with androgenic disorders are frustrated in their efforts to obtain medical help. Understanding androgenic disorders will enable the physician to significantly help the majority of women with these conditions.

  2. Androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Cynthia A; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-04-01

    The normal development and maintenance of the prostate is dependent on androgen acting through the androgen receptor (AR). AR remains important in the development and progression of prostate cancer. AR expression is maintained throughout prostate cancer progression, and the majority of androgen-independent or hormone refractory prostate cancers express AR. Mutation of AR, especially mutations that result in a relaxation of AR ligand specificity, may contribute to the progression of prostate cancer and the failure of endocrine therapy by allowing AR transcriptional activation in response to antiandrogens or other endogenous hormones. Similarly, alterations in the relative expression of AR coregulators have been found to occur with prostate cancer progression and may contribute to differences in AR ligand specificity or transcriptional activity. Prostate cancer progression is also associated with increased growth factor production and an altered response to growth factors by prostate cancer cells. The kinase signal transduction cascades initiated by mitogenic growth factors modulate the transcriptional activity of AR and the interaction between AR and AR coactivators. The inhibition of AR activity through mechanisms in addition to androgen ablation, such as modulation of signal transduction pathways, may delay prostate cancer progression.

  3. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-01-01

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  4. Androgens and sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, W M; Gorski, R A; Lippe, B M; Green, R

    1982-04-01

    Sexual behavior in humans may be classified according to gender role, gender identity, and gender orientation. Sexually dimorphic behavior in humans is generally felt to be determined by postnatal socialization. Recent work in laboratory animals shows that sexual behavior is a function of circulating steroid hormones, particularly androgens. Testosterone given during a critical period in prenatal or immediate postnatal life causes permanent organizational effects on brain structure and function in laboratory animals. Studies in human patients with testicular feminization, 5-alpha-reductase deficiency, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or prenatal steroid hormone exposure, provide clinical examples of possible effects of prenatal hormone action in the brain as opposed to postnatal socialization. However, these studies do not permit a clear assessment of the role played by either prenatal steroid hormones or postnatal socialization factors in the ultimate expression of sexual behavior in humans.

  5. Systematic and functional characterization of novel androgen receptor variants arising from alternative splicing in the ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Uo, T; Dvinge, H; Sprenger, C C; Bradley, R K; Nelson, P S; Plymate, S R

    2017-01-01

    The presence of intact ligand-binding domain (LBD) ensures the strict androgen-dependent regulation of androgen receptor (AR): binding of androgen induces structural reorganization of LBD resulting in release of AR from HSP90, suppression of nuclear export which otherwise dominates over import and nuclear translocation of AR as a transcription factor. Thus, loss or defects of the LBD abolish constraint from un-liganded LBD as exemplified by constitutively active AR variants (AR-Vs), which are associated with emerging resistance mechanism to anti-AR therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Recent analysis of the AR splicing landscapes revealed mCRPC harboring multiple AR-Vs with diverse patterns of inclusion/exclusion of exons (exons 4–8) corresponding to LBD to produce namely exon-skipping variants. In silico construction for these AR-Vs revealed four novel AR-Vs having unique features: Exclusion of specified exons introduces a frameshift in variants v5es, v6es and v7es. ARv56es maintains the reading frame resulting in the inclusion of the C-terminal half of the LBD. We systematically characterized these AR-Vs regarding their subcellular localization, affinity for HSP90 and transactivation capability. Notably, ARv5es was free from HSP90, exclusively nuclear, and constitutively active similarly as previously reported for v567es. In contrast, v6es and v7es were similar in that they are cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive and bind HSP90, ARv56es was present in both nucleus and cytoplasm, does not bind HSP90 and is transcriptionally inactive. Converting these transcriptionally inactive AR-Vs into active forms, we identified the two separate elements that allosterically suppress otherwise constitutively active AR-Vs; one in exon 5 for v6es and v7es and the other in exon 8 for v56es. Our findings identify a novel constitutively active AR-V, ARv5es and establish a method to predict potential activities of AR-Vs carrying impaired LBD. PMID:27694897

  6. Testofen, a specialised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract reduces age-related symptoms of androgen decrease, increases testosterone levels and improves sexual function in healthy aging males in a double-blind randomised clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Amanda; Steels, Elizabeth; Inder, Warrick J; Abraham, Suzanne; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effect of Testofen, a specialised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract on the symptoms of possible androgen deficiency, sexual function and serum androgen concentrations in healthy aging males. This was a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial involving 120 healthy men aged between 43 and 70 years of age. The active treatment was standardised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract at a dose of 600 mg/day for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Aging Male Symptom questionnaire (AMS), a measure of possible androgen deficiency symptoms; secondary outcome measures were sexual function and serum testosterone. There was a significant decrease in AMS score over time and between the active and placebo groups. Sexual function improved, including number of morning erections and frequency of sexual activity. Both total serum testosterone and free testosterone increased compared to placebo after 12 weeks of active treatment. Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract is a safe and effective treatment for reducing symptoms of possible androgen deficiency, improves sexual function and increases serum testosterone in healthy middle-aged and older men.

  7. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition

    PubMed Central

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. METHODS A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. RESULTS Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight

  8. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition.

    PubMed

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T K; Norman, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight potential roles for androgens

  9. Adolescent androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick Henry; Schwartz, Robert A

    2011-10-01

    Adolescent androgenic alopecia is pattern hair loss occurring in boys and girls younger than 18 years, whereas early-onset androgenic alopecia refers to pattern hair loss before 35 years of age. A number of studies published in the last decade have helped to elucidate the prevalence of adolescent androgenic alopecia, have clarified the genetic as well as physiologic mechanisms underlying hair loss, and have revealed the associated psychologic and systemic morbidities. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of adolescent androgenic alopecia.

  10. Improving functional value of meat products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangang; Xiao, Shan; Samaraweera, Himali; Lee, Eun Joo; Ahn, Dong U

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to develop meat and meat products with physiological functions to promote health conditions and prevent the risk of diseases. This review focuses on strategies to improve the functional value of meat and meat products. Value improvement can be realized by adding functional compounds including conjugated linoneleic acid, vitamin E, n3 fatty acids and selenium in animal diets to improve animal production, carcass composition and fresh meat quality. In addition, functional ingredients such as vegetable proteins, dietary fibers, herbs and spices, and lactic acid bacteria can be directly incorporated into meat products during processing to improve their functional value for consumers. Functional compounds, especially peptides, can also be generated from meat and meat products during processing such as fermentation, curing and aging, and enzymatic hydrolysis. This review further discusses the current status, consumer acceptance, and market for functional foods from the global viewpoints. Future prospects for functional meat and meat products are also discussed.

  11. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  12. Disruption of Androgen Receptor Signaling in Males by Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Luccio-Camelo, Doug C.; Prins, Gail S

    2011-01-01

    Androgen-disruptors are environmental chemicals in that interfere with the biosynthesis, metabolism or action of endogenous androgens resulting in a deflection from normal male developmental programming and reproductive tract growth and function. Since male sexual differentiation is entirely androgen-dependent, it is highly susceptible to androgen-disruptors. Animal models and epidemiological evidence link exposure to androgen disrupting chemicals with reduced sperm counts, increased infertility, testicular dysgenesis syndrome, and testicular and prostate cancers. Further, there appears to be increased sensitivity to these agents during critical developmental windows when male differentiation is at its peak. A variety of in vitro and in silico approaches have been used to identify broad classes of androgen disrupting molecules that include organochlorinated pesticides, industrial chemicals, and plasticizers with capacity to ligand the androgen receptor. The vast majority of these synthetic molecules act as anti-androgens. This review will highlight the evidence for androgen disrupting chemicals that act through interference with the androgen receptor, discussing specific compounds for which there is documented in vivo evidence for male reproductive tract perturbations. PMID:21515368

  13. Aging Impairs VEGF-Mediated, Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lecce, Laura; Lam, Yuen Ting; Lindsay, Laura A.; Yuen, Sui Ching; Simpson, Philippa J. L.; Handelsman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a progressive impairment of vascular repair mechanisms with advancing age concomitant with a steady decline in circulating androgen levels in men. Emerging evidence indicates androgens regulate angiogenesis; however, little research has focused on the impact of age upon androgen-mediated regulation of angiogenic mechanisms. Human dermal fibroblasts from young (<30 years) and older (>65 years) men were incubated with DHT, with or without androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide, or phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Fibroblast-conditioned medium was used to stimulate angiogenic functions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Nuclear fractionation and fluorescence microscopy were used to study androgen receptor (AR) distribution. Conditioned medium from fibroblasts of young men, but not old men, treated with DHT produced a 3-fold increase in human umbilical vein endothelial cell tubulogenesis and 2-fold increase in migration via increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion, predominantly of VEGF145. DHT-induced VEGF secretion from fibroblasts of young men was AR-dependent and increased AKT phosphorylation, which was abrogated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibition. By contrast, fibroblasts from older men were unresponsive to DHT and lacked androgen-mediated enhancement in VEGF production. These findings were associated with reduced AR nuclear translocation in old fibroblasts. The failure of DHT-induced paracrine stimulation of angiogenesis in fibroblasts from older men is likely due to defective nuclear translocation of AR. This first demonstration of androgen resistance (or insensitivity) acquired by human fibroblasts with aging suggests that pharmacological testosterone therapy for old men may be less effective in enhancing angiogenesis and facilitating tissue regeneration mechanisms reliant on paracrine release of VEGF. PMID:25058601

  14. Effects of Aromatase Inhibition and Androgen Activity on Serotonin and Behavior in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.; Robertson, Nicola; Colemen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] T+Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM), [4] T+Letrozole (non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM), [5] Flutamide+ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor) or [6] dihydrotestosterone (DHT)+ATD (n=5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p <0.0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p<0.0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response; and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a non-competitve inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p<0.0008; r2 =0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity supports

  15. Androgens and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie Anne

    2008-01-01

    Hair's importance in human communication means that abnormalities like excess hair in hirsutism or hair loss in alopecia cause psychological distress. Androgens are the main regulator of human hair follicles, changing small vellus follicles producing tiny, virtually invisible hairs into larger intermediate and terminal follicles making bigger, pigmented hairs. The response to androgens varies with the body site as it is specific to the hair follicle itself. Normally around puberty, androgens stimulate axillary and pubic hair in both sexes, plus the beard, etc. in men, while later they may also inhibit scalp hair growth causing androgenetic alopecia. Androgens act within the follicle to alter the mesenchyme-epithelial cell interactions, changing the length of time the hair is growing, the dermal papilla size and dermal papilla cell, keratinocyte and melanocyte activity. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of androgen action in follicles should improve therapies for poorly controlled hair disorders like hirsutism and alopecia.

  16. The Role of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids in Disruption of the Physiological Function in Discrete Areas of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Giuseppe; Sessa, Francesco; Albano, Giuseppe Davide; Sani, Gabriele; Maglietta, Francesca; Roshan, Mohsin H K; Volti, Giovanni Li; Bernardini, Renato; Avola, Roberto; Pomara, Cristoforo; Salerno, Monica

    2017-10-02

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse is often associated with a wide spectrum of adverse effects. These drugs are frequently abused by adolescents and athletes for esthetic purposes, as well as for improvement of their endurance and performances. In this literature review, we evaluated the correlation between AAS and anxiety or aggression. Two pathways are thought to be involved in AAS-induced behavioral disorders. Direct pathway via the amygdalo-fugal pathway, which connects the central nucleus of the amygdala to the brainstem, is involved in cognitive-emotive and homeostatic processes. The latter is modified by chronic AAS use, which subsequently leads to increased anxiety. Indirect pathways via the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic signals which are modified by AAS abuse in latero-anterior hypothalamus and can mediate the aggressive behavior. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms underlying the behavioral alterations following AAS abuse is unclear and remains ambiguous as additional long-term studies aimed to understand the precise mechanisms are required.

  17. Key attributes of ecological production functions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological production functions (EPFs) link ecosystems, stressors, and management actions to ecosystem service (ES) production. Though essential for improving environmental management, relatively little attention has been directed toward the characteristics of EPFs. EPFs may be d...

  18. Key attributes of ecological production functions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological production functions (EPFs) link ecosystems, stressors, and management actions to ecosystem service (ES) production. Though essential for improving environmental management, relatively little attention has been directed toward the characteristics of EPFs. EPFs may be d...

  19. DNA replication-dependent induction of gene proximity by androgen.

    PubMed

    Coll-Bastus, Nuria; Mao, Xueying; Young, Bryan D; Sheer, Denise; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2015-02-15

    The male hormone androgen, working through the androgen receptor (AR), plays a major role in physiological process and disease development. Previous studies of AR mainly focus on its transcriptional activity. Here, we found that androgen-induced TMPRSS2 and ERG gene proximity is mediated by AR control of DNA replication rather than gene transcription. We demonstrate that, in both AR transactivation-positive and -negative prostate cells, androgen regulates DNA replication and androgen-induced gene proximity relies on both DNA replication-licensing and actual DNA replication activity. Androgen stimulation advances DNA replication timing of certain genomic regions, which may potentially increase gene proximity through sharing the same replication factory at a similar time. Therefore, we have revealed novel mechanisms of AR biological function, which will stimulate new research directions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Androgen regulation of axon growth and neurite extension in motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Fargo, Keith N.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Foecking, Eileen M.; Poletti, Angelo; Jones, Kathryn J.

    2008-01-01

    Androgens act on the CNS to affect motor function through interaction with a widespread distribution of intracellular androgen receptors (AR). This review highlights our work on androgens and process outgrowth in motoneurons, both in vitro and in vivo. The actions of androgens on motoneurons involve the generation of novel neuronal interactions that are mediated by the induction of androgen-dependent neurite or axonal outgrowth. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for the androgenic regulation of the extension and regeneration of motoneuron neurites in vitro using cultured immortalized motoneurons, and axons in vivo using the hamster facial nerve crush paradigm. We place particular emphasis on the relevance of these effects to SBMA and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:18387610

  1. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-11-01

    Endocrine disruptors are hormone mimics that modify hormonal action in humans and animals. It is thought that some endocrine disruptors modify estrogen and androgen action in humans and animals by suppressing aromatase activity. Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the key enzyme that converts C19 androgens to aromatic C18 estrogenic steroids. We have developed a novel aromatase inhibitor screening method that allows us to identify antiaromatase activity of various environmental chemicals. The screen was developed by coexpressing the human aromatase and the mouse androgen receptor in yeast cells, which carry the androgen-responsive ss-galactosidase reporter plasmid. Functional expression of aromatase in yeast has been demonstrated using the [3H]-water release assay with intact cells as well as with yeast microsomes. The aromatase activity could be blocked by known aromatase inhibitors such as aminoglutethimide (AG). Yeast-produced androgen receptors were able to transactivate a yeast basal promoter linked to an androgen-responsive element in response to androgens. The resultant triple yeast transformant responded to the treatment of testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). In the absence of the aromatase inhibitor AG, transcriptional activation was observed only for the nonaromatizable androgen 5 alpha-DHT. However, the two aromatizable androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) induced the reporter activity in the presence of AG. Using this yeast-based assay, we confirmed that two flavones, chrysin and alpha-naphtholflavone, are inhibitors of aromatase. Thus, this yeast system allows us to develop a high-throughput screening method, without using radioactive substrate, to identify aromatase inhibitors as well as new ligands (nonaromatizable androgen mimics) for the androgen receptors. In addition, this screening method also allows us to distinguish nonandrogenic aromatase inhibitors from inhibitors with androgenic activity. This yeast

  2. Sex differences in juvenile rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) agonistic screams: life history differences and effects of prenatal androgens.

    PubMed

    Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Gouzoules, Harold; Wallen, Kim

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated sex differences in juvenile rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) vocal behavior during agonistic contexts, and the effects of prenatal androgens on these differences. A total of 59 subjects (5-8 per treatment group) received exogenous androgen (testosterone enanthate), an anti-androgen (flutamide) or vehicle injections (DMSO) for 30 or 35 days during the second (early) or third (late) trimester of pregnancy. An additional 19 unmanipulated controls were included in the analysis. Screams by juvenile males and females between the ages of 1 and 3 years were compared to the screams of adult female exemplars using a discriminant function analysis. Juvenile females produced more adult-female like screams than did juvenile males. Females exposed to androgen treatment late in gestation produced a more masculine pattern of screams. Flutamide treatment in males either early or late in gestation did not significantly affect scream production. Flutamide treatments in females late in gestation, however, masculinized scream production. Androgen treatments administered late in gestation hyper-masculinized male scream production. No sex differences in the contextual usage of screams emerged. These findings suggest that both life history differences and the early hormone environment contribute to sex differences in juvenile rhesus macaque vocal production. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Conversion of Androgen Receptor Signaling From a Growth Suppressor in Normal Prostate Epithelial Cells to an Oncogene in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves a Gain of Function in c-Myc Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vander Griend, Donald J.; Litvinov, Ivan V.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, androgen-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling within prostate stromal cells induces their secretion of paracrine factors, termed “andromedins” which stimulate growth of the epithelial cells. The present studies demonstrate that androgen-dependent andromedin-driven growth stimulation is counter-balanced by androgen-induced AR signaling within normal adult prostate epithelial cells resulting in terminal G0 growth arrest coupled with terminal differentiation into ΔNp63-negative, PSA-expressing secretory luminal cells. This cell autonomous AR-driven terminal differentiation requires DNA-binding of the AR protein, is associated with decreases in c-Myc m-RNA and protein, are coupled with increases in p21, p27, and SKP-2 protein expression, and does not require functional p53. These changes result in down-regulation of Cyclin D1 protein and RB phosphoryation. shRNA knockdown documents that neither RB, p21, p27 alone or in combination are required for such AR-induced G0 growth arrest. Transgenic expression of a constitutive vector to prevent c-Myc down-regulation overrides AR-mediated growth arrest in normal prostate epithelial cells, which documents that AR-induced c-Myc down-regulation is critical in terminal growth arrest of normal prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, in prostate cancer cells, androgen-induced AR signaling paradoxically up-regulates c-Myc expression and stimulates growth as documented by inhibition of both of these responses following exposure to the AR antagonist, bicalutamide. These data document that AR signaling is converted from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells during prostatic carcinogenesis and that this conversion involves a gain of function for regulation of c-Myc expression. PMID:24948876

  4. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF PUBERTY IN THE MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with...

  5. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF PUBERTY IN THE MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with...

  6. Course and Predictors of Cognitive Function in Patients With Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen-Deprivation Therapy: A Controlled Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Brian D.; Jim, Heather S.L.; Booth-Jones, Margaret; Small, Brent J.; Sutton, Steven K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Park, Jong Y.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Fishman, Mayer N.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may be at risk for cognitive impairment; however, evidence is mixed in the existing literature. Our study examined the impact of ADT on impaired cognitive performance and explored potential demographic and genetic predictors of impaired performance. Patients and Methods Patients with prostate cancer were assessed before or within 21 days of starting ADT (n = 58) and 6 and 12 months later. Age- and education-matched patients with prostate cancer treated with prostatectomy only (n = 84) and men without prostate cancer (n = 88) were assessed at similar intervals. Participants provided baseline blood samples for genotyping. Mean-level cognitive performance was compared using mixed models; cognitive impairment was compared using generalized estimating equations. Results ADT recipients demonstrated higher rates of impaired cognitive performance over time relative to all controls (P = .01). Groups did not differ at baseline (P > .05); however, ADT recipients were more likely to demonstrate impaired performance within 6 and 12 months (P for both comparisons < .05). Baseline age, cognitive reserve, depressive symptoms, fatigue, and hot flash interference did not moderate the impact of ADT on impaired cognitive performance (P for all comparisons ≥ .09). In exploratory genetic analyses, GNB3 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1047776 was associated with increased rates of impaired performance over time in the ADT group (P < .001). Conclusion Men treated with ADT were more likely to demonstrate impaired cognitive performance within 6 months after starting ADT relative to matched controls and to continue to do so within 12 months after starting ADT. If confirmed, findings may have implications for patient education regarding the risks and benefits of ADT. PMID:25964245

  7. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  8. Enrichment of putative prostate cancer stem cells after androgen deprivation: upregulation of pluripotency transactivators concurs with resistance to androgen deprivation in LNCaP cell lines.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Daniel; Zheng, Junying; Liu, Gentao; Wang, Shunyou; Yamashiro, Joyce; Reiter, Robert E; Huang, Jiaoti; Zeng, Gang

    2013-09-01

    Prostate cancer stem cells (PCSC) offer theoretical explanations to many clinical and biological behaviors of the disease in human. In contrast to approaches of using side populations and cell-surface markers to isolate and characterize the putative PCSC, we hypothesize that androgen deprivation leads to functional enrichment of putative PCSC. Human prostate cancer lines LNCaP, LAPC4 and LAPC9 were depleted of androgen in cell cultures and in castrated SCID mice. The resultant androgen deprivation-resistant or castration-resistant populations, in particular in LNCaP and its derivative cell lines, displayed increased expression of pluripotency transactivators and significantly higher tumorigenicity. Individual tumor cell clones were isolated from castration-resistant bulk cultures of LNCaP (CR-LNCaP) and tested for tumorigenicity in male SCID mice under limiting dilution conditions. As few as 200 cells were able to form spheres in vitro, and generate tumors with similar growth kinetics as 10(6) LNCaP or 10(4) CR-LNCaP cells in vivo. These putative PCSC were CD44(+) /CD24(-) and lack the expression of prostate lineage proteins. When transplanted into the prostate of an intact male SCID mouse, these putative PCSC seemed to show limited differentiation into Ck5(+) , Ck8(+) , Ck5(+) /Ck8(+) , and AR(+) cells. On the other hand, stable transduction of LNCaP with retrovirus encoding Sox2 led to androgen-deprivation resistant growth and down-regulation of major prostate lineage gene products in vitro. Concurrence of overexpression of pluripotency transactivators and resistance to androgen deprivation supported the role of putative PCSC in the emergence of prostate cancer resistant to androgen deprivation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Androgen levels and female social dominance in Lemur catta.

    PubMed Central

    von Engelhardt, N; Kappeler, P M; Heistermann, M

    2000-01-01

    Morphological and behavioural traits which improve agonistic power are subject to intrasexual selection and, at the proximate level, are influenced by circulating androgens. Because intrasexual selection in mammals is more intense among males, they typically dominate females. Female social dominance is therefore unexpected and, indeed, rare. Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are sexually monomorphic primates in which all adult females dominate all males. The goal of our study was to test the prediction that female dominance in this species is associated with high androgen levels. Using two captive groups, we collected data on agonistic behaviour and non-invasively assessed their androgen concentrations in faeces and saliva by enzyme immunoassay. We found that adult female L. catta do not have higher androgen levels than males. However, during the mating season there was a twofold increase in both the androgen levels and conflict rates among females. This seasonal increase in their androgen levels was probably not due to a general increase in ovarian hormone production because those females showing the strongest signs of follicular development tended to have low androgen concentrations. At the individual level neither the individual aggression rates nor the proportion of same-sexed individuals dominated were correlated with their androgen levels. We conclude that female dominance in ring-tailed lemurs is neither based on physical superiority nor on high androgen levels and that it is equally important to study male subordination and prenatal brain priming effects for a complete understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:11007329

  10. 2, 4-Dichloro-6-nitrophenol, a photonitration product of 2, 4-dichlorophenol, caused anti-androgenic potency in Chinese rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Cao; Yuan, Lilai; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2016-09-01

    2,4-Dichloro-6-nitrophenol (DCNP) is an environmental transformation product of 2,4-dichlorophenol that has been identified as widespread in effluent wastewater, but little is known about its toxicity because this compound is not regulated. Therefore, to investigate the endocrine disruption potency of DCNP in Chinese rare minnows (Gobiocypris rarus), adult and juvenile fish were exposed to various concentrations of DCNP (2, 20, and 200 μg/L) for 28 d. After 28 d exposure, the plasma vitellogenin (VTG) levels were reduced in females while increased in males and juvenile fish considerably, as compared with the control. These results suggested that DCNP affects the HPG-axis in a sex-dependent way. Testosterone (T) levels in the plasma were significantly lower in adult and juvenile fish and were accompanied by an increased estradiol (E2)/T ratio. Histopathological observation revealed hypertrophy of the hepatocytes and nuclear pyknosis in the liver, the inhibition of spermatogenesis in the testes, and the degeneration of oocytes in the ovaries after DCNP exposure. The expression pattern of selected genes indicated that the nuclear receptor, steroidogenesis and gonadotropin regulation pathways were perturbed after DCNP exposure. Above all, our results demonstrated that DCNP clearly had anti-androgenic activity in both adult and juvenile fish and can therefore be considered as an endocrine-disrupting chemical.

  11. What do urologists think patients need to know when starting on androgen deprivation therapy? The perspective from Canada versus countries with lower gross domestic product

    PubMed Central

    Rot, Irena; Wassersug, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) side effects are numerous and negatively impact prostate cancer patients’ quality of life. There is considerable discrepancy though among Canadian urologists regarding what ADT side effects and side effect management strategies. Little is known about global differences in ADT patient education. Methods International respondents were recruited via online posting and at an international urology conference. Hypotheses suggest that economic and cultural differences influence patient education practices; therefore, international respondents were divided into 3 categories (high, medium, and low gross domestic product). Results No differences were found between responses from Canadian urologists and high GDP countries. Compared to responses from low GDP countries, Canadian urologists are more likely to endorse informing patients about: osteoporosis, loss of muscle mass, weight gain, fatigue/sleep disturbance, relationship changes, cognitive changes, and loss of body hair. Infertility was the only side effect more often disclosed by urologists in low GDP counties. Recommended management strategies for hot flashes are more likely to be pharmaceutical in Canada, and behavioral in low GDP countries. Management strategies for gynecomastia are emphasized more in low GDP countries. Physical exercise is endorsed consistently more often by Canadian urologists. Conclusions ADT educational practices vary greatly between Canada and lower GDP countries. Factors that could contribute to differences include economics (e.g., ADT drug costs), differences in side effect presentation due to different ADT drugs used, racial differences in perceived side effect burden, disease status at ADT commencement, and cultural differences in patient-physician shared-decision making. PMID:27141453

  12. What do urologists think patients need to know when starting on androgen deprivation therapy? The perspective from Canada versus countries with lower gross domestic product.

    PubMed

    Rot, Irena; Wassersug, Richard J; Walker, Lauren M

    2016-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) side effects are numerous and negatively impact prostate cancer patients' quality of life. There is considerable discrepancy though among Canadian urologists regarding what ADT side effects and side effect management strategies. Little is known about global differences in ADT patient education. International respondents were recruited via online posting and at an international urology conference. Hypotheses suggest that economic and cultural differences influence patient education practices; therefore, international respondents were divided into 3 categories (high, medium, and low gross domestic product). No differences were found between responses from Canadian urologists and high GDP countries. Compared to responses from low GDP countries, Canadian urologists are more likely to endorse informing patients about: osteoporosis, loss of muscle mass, weight gain, fatigue/sleep disturbance, relationship changes, cognitive changes, and loss of body hair. Infertility was the only side effect more often disclosed by urologists in low GDP counties. Recommended management strategies for hot flashes are more likely to be pharmaceutical in Canada, and behavioral in low GDP countries. Management strategies for gynecomastia are emphasized more in low GDP countries. Physical exercise is endorsed consistently more often by Canadian urologists. ADT educational practices vary greatly between Canada and lower GDP countries. Factors that could contribute to differences include economics (e.g., ADT drug costs), differences in side effect presentation due to different ADT drugs used, racial differences in perceived side effect burden, disease status at ADT commencement, and cultural differences in patient-physician shared-decision making.

  13. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES FOR INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone minics or antagonists, including the EDSTAC Tier 1 Screening (TIS) Battery, typically use only mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). However, there is uncertainty concerning species differences in binding affin...

  14. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES FOR INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone minics or antagonists, including the EDSTAC Tier 1 Screening (TIS) Battery, typically use only mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). However, there is uncertainty concerning species differences in binding affin...

  15. ERG Expression Levels in Prostate Tumors Reflect Functional Status of the Androgen Receptor (AR) as a Consequence of Fusion of ERG with AR Regulated Gene Promoters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    literature review. Asian J Androl 2008; 10: 855-63. [30] Donovan MJ , Osman I, Khan FM, et al. Androgen receptor expression is associated with...Nat Rev Urol 2009; 6: 429-39. [8] Heinlein CA, Chang C. Androgen receptor in prostate cancer. Endocr Rev 2004; 25: 276-308. [9] Linja MJ , Visakorpi...Klezovitch O , Risk M, Coleman I, et al. A causal role for ERG in neoplastic transformation of prostate epithelium. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2008; 105: 2105

  16. Uncertainty Product Scattering Function Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    of the receiver may be written as I’(,,,•)1L- L//_+ " s(•S(-T, O4’),2-1 .(,, A4,) drd4 𔃻 (2.12) where •r =--r- ÷(2.13) and (2.14) In Equation (2.12...the ambiguity function is constant regardless of the normalized signal, i. e. I x (r,( ) 12 drd4 =I X(0 ,0 ) 12. (2.24) This property, which is known...functions where P,(÷L•) +J’C f+R0 .(r, 4)Tf,(L7T, AO) drd4 + [ L Lo 1?.(-, 4){,_x , A~,/4,)x.Z,(Ar,( )A(4( ) + + X,(AT•, A4’)x;,(AT, A4’) + Xgf(AT, A4’)X

  17. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism independently influences recovery of male sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy in postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Few and contradictory studies have evaluated the possible influence of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on male sexual function. In this study we evaluated the role of AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the recovery of sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition which is often associated with hypopituitarism and in which the sexual benefits of TRT must be distinguished from those of pituitary-function replacement therapies. Fifteen men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT. Main outcome measures included sexual parameters as assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, levels of pituitary dependent hormones (total testosterone, free T3, free T4, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1], prolactin), and results of genetic analysis (AR gene CAG repeat number). Plasma concentrations of free T3, free T4, cortisol, and prolactin did not vary significantly between the two phases, while testosterone and IGF-1 increased significantly after TRT. A significant improvement in all sexual parameters studied was found. The number of CAG triplets was negatively and significantly correlated with changes in all the sexual parameters, while opposite correlations were found between changes in sexual parameters and changes in testosterone levels; no correlation of change in IGF1 with change in sexual parameters was reported. On multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for changes in testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and changes in sexual parameters were confirmed. Shorter length AR gene CAG repeat number is associated with the recovery of sexual function after TRT in postsurgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-replacement therapies. © 2014 International Society

  18. A novel point mutation (R840S) in the androgen receptor in a Brazilian family with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melo, K F; Latronico, A C; Costa, E M; Billerbeck, A E; Mendonca, B B; Arnhold, I J

    1999-10-01

    Mutations of the androgen receptor gene causing androgen insensitivity syndrome in 46, XY individuals, result in phenotypes ranging from complete female to ambiguous genitalia to males with minor degrees of undervirilization. We studied two Brazilian brothers with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. They were born with perineal hypospadias, bifid scrotum, small penis and cryptorchidism, and developed gynecomastia at puberty. Genomic DNA was extracted and denaturinggradient gel electrophoresis of exon 7 of the androgen receptor gene followed by sequence analysis revealed a new mutation, a C A transversion, altering codon 840 from arginine (CGT) to serine (AGT). R840 is located in the androgen binding domain, in a "hot spot" region, important for the formation and function of the hormone receptor-complex and within the region that is involved in androgen receptor dimerization. Replacement of arginine (basic) by serine (neutral and polar) is a nonconservative substitution. Three mutations in this residue (R840C, R840G nonconservative and R840H, conservative) were previously reported in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and when expressed "in vitro" lead to a subnormal transactivation of a reporter gene. We conclude that the novel R840 mutation in the androgen receptor is the cause of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in this Brazilian family.

  19. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mongan, Nigel P; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Bunch, Trevor; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2015-08-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) results from androgen receptor dysfunction and is a common cause of disorder of sex development. The AIS phenotype largely depends on the degree of residual androgen receptor (AR) activity. This review describes the molecular action of androgens and the range of androgen receptor gene mutations, essential knowledge to understand the pathogenesis of the complete and partial forms of this syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended for clinical management from infancy through to adulthood. Hormone replacement therapy is needed following gonadectomy. Patients who choose to retain the gonads are at risk of developing germ cell tumors for which sensitive circulating tumor markers may soon become available. Whilst the contribution of AR dysfunction to complete AIS is well understood, the involvement of the AR and associated proteins as contributors to partial AIS is an area of active research. Disorders of sex development such as AIS which are related to AR dysfunction offer a breadth of manifestations for the clinician to manage and opportunities for further research on the mechanism of androgen action.

  20. Generating functions for tensor product decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuksa, Jan; Pošta, Severin

    2013-11-01

    The paper deals with the tensor product decomposition problem. Tensor product decompositions are of great importance in the quantum physics. A short outline of the state of the art for the of semisimple Lie groups is mentioned. The generality of generating functions is used to solve tensor products. The corresponding generating function is rational. The feature of this technique lies in the fact that the decompositions of all tensor products of all irreducible representations are solved simultaneously. Obtaining the generating function is a difficult task in general. We propose some changes to an algorithm using Patera-Sharp character generators to find this generating function, which simplifies the whole problem to simple operations over rational functions.

  1. Do androgens influence hair growth by altering the paracrine factors secreted by dermal papilla cells?

    PubMed

    Randall, V A; Hibberts, N A; Thornton, M J; Merrick, A E; Hamada, K; Kato, S; Jenner, T J; de Oliveira, I; Messenger, A G

    2001-01-01

    Androgens regulate many aspects of human hair growth in both sexes. After puberty they transform tiny vellus follicles in many areas, e.g. the face, to terminal ones producing long, thick, pigmented hairs. In genetically predisposed individuals, androgens also cause the reverse transformation of terminal scalp follicles into vellus ones, causing balding. In the current hypothesis for androgen action, androgens control most follicular cells indirectly acting via the mesenchyme-derived dermal papilla which regulates many aspects of follicular activity. In this model androgens binding to androgen receptors in dermal papilla cells alter their production of regulatory molecules which influence other follicular components; these molecules may be soluble paracrine factors and/or extracellular matrix proteins. This hypothesis is supported by immunohistochemical localisation of androgen receptors in dermal papilla cell nuclei and the demonstrations that androgen receptor content and testosterone metabolism patterns of cultured dermal papilla cells from various body sites reflect hair growth in androgen-insensitivity syndromes. The next question is whether androgens alter the paracrine factors secreted by dermal papilla cells. Cultured dermal papilla cells do release soluble, proteinaceous factors into their media which stimulate the growth of keratinocytes and other dermal papilla cells. This mitogenic potential can cross species from humans to rodents. Importantly, testosterone in vitro stimulates the mitogenic potential of beard cells, but in contrast inhibits production by balding scalp cells reflecting their in vivo androgenic responses. Since androgens in vitro do alter the secretion of paracrine factors the current focus lies in identifying specific factors produced, e.g. IGF-I and stem cell factor (SCF), using ELISA and RT-PCR, and comparing their expression in cells from follicles with varying responses to androgens in vivo or under androgen stimulation in vitro

  2. Androgen receptors and experimental bone loss - an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Coimbra, Leila Santana; Rossa, Carlos; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone is a sex hormone that exhibits many functions beyond reproduction; one such function is the regulation of bone metabolism. The role played by androgen receptors during testosterone-mediated biological processes associated with bone metabolism is largely unknown. This study aims to use a periodontal disease model in vivo in order to assess the involvement of androgen receptors on microbial-induced inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in experimental bone loss. The impact of hormone deprivation was tested through both orchiectomy and chemical blockage of androgen receptor using flutamide (FLU). Additionally, the direct effect of exogenous testosterone, and the role of the androgen receptor, on osteoclastogenesis were investigated. Thirty male adult rats (n=10/group) were subjected to: 1-orchiectomy (OCX); 2-OCX sham surgery; or 3-OCX sham surgery plus FLU, four weeks before the induction of experimental bone loss. Ten OCX sham-operated rats were not subjected to experimental bone loss and served as healthy controls. The rats were euthanized two weeks later, so as to assess bone resorption and the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gingival tissue and serum. In order to study the in vitro impact of testosterone, osteoclasts were differentiated from RAW264.7 cells and testosterone was added at increasing concentrations. Both OCX and FLU increased bone resorption, but OCX alone was observed to increase osteoclast count. IL-1β production was increased only in the gingival tissue of OCX animals, whereas FLU-treated animals presented a decreased expression of IL-6. Testosterone reduced the osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly impacted the production of TNF-α; FLU partially reversed these actions. When taken together, our results indicate that testosterone modulates experimental bone loss, and that this action is mediated, at least in part, via the androgen receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Androgen receptors and experimental bone loss – An in vivo and in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Coimbra, Leila Santana; Rossa, Carlos; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a sex hormone that exhibits many functions beyond reproduction; one such function is the regulation of bone metabolism. The role played by androgen receptors during testosterone-mediated biological processes associated with bone metabolism is largely unknown. This study aims to use a periodontal disease model in vivo in order to assess the involvement of androgen receptors on microbial-induced inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in experimental bone loss. The impact of hormone deprivation was tested through both orchiectomy and chemical blockage of androgen receptor using flutamide (FLU). Additionally, the direct effect of exogenous testosterone, and the role of the androgen receptor, on osteoclastogenesis were investigated. Thirty male adult rats (n=10/group) were subjected to: 1- orchiectomy (OCX); 2- OCX sham-surgery; or 3- OCX sham-surgery plus FLU, four weeks before the induction of experimental bone loss. Ten OCX sham-operated rats were not subjected to experimental bone loss and served as healthy controls. The rats were euthanized two weeks later, so as to assess bone resorption and the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gingival tissue and serum. In order to study the in vitro impact of testosterone, osteoclasts were differentiated from RAW264.7 cells and testosterone was added at increasing concentrations. Both OCX and FLU increased bone resorption, but OCX alone was observed to increase osteoclast count. IL-1β production was increased only in the gingival tissue of OCX animals, whereas FLU-treated animals presented a decreased expression of IL-6. Testosterone reduced the osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly impacted the production of TNF-α; FLU partially reversed these actions. When taken together, our results indicate that testosterone modulates experimental bone loss, and that this action is mediated, at least in part, via the androgen receptor. PMID:26450018

  4. MicroRNA Library-Based Functional Screening Identified Androgen-Sensitive miR-216a as a Player in Bicalutamide Resistance in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-10-21

    Prostate cancer is a major hormone-dependent tumor affecting men, and is often treated by hormone therapy at the primary stages. Despite its initial efficiency, the disease eventually acquires resistance, resulting in the recurrence of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Recent studies suggest that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) function is one of the mechanisms underlying hormone therapy resistance. Identification of critical miRNAs involved in endocrine resistance will therefore be important for developing therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed an miRNA library screening to identify anti-androgen bicalutamide resistance-related miRNAs in prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Cells were infected with a lentiviral miRNA library and subsequently maintained in media containing either bicalutamide or vehicle for a month. Microarray analysis determined the amounts of individual miRNA precursors and identified 2 retained miRNAs after one-month bicalutamide treatment. Of these, we further characterized miR-216a, because its function in prostate cancer remains unknown. miR-216a could be induced by dihydrotestosterone in LNCaP cells and ectopic expression of miR-216a inhibited bicalutamide-mediated growth suppression of LNCaP cells. Furthermore, a microarray dataset revealed that the expression levels of miR-216a were significantly higher in clinical prostate cancer than in benign samples. These results suggest that functional screening using an miRNA expression library could be useful for identifying novel miRNAs that contribute to bicalutamide resistance in prostate cancer.

  5. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to

  6. Androgen circle of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Homburg, Roy

    2009-07-01

    Although the aetiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is still not known and the search for causative genes is proving elusive, it is generally agreed that hyperandrogenism is at the heart of the syndrome. Here, it is proposed that excess androgens are the root cause of PCOS starting from their influence on the female fetus in programming gene expression, producing the characteristic signs and symptoms which are then exacerbated by a propagation of excess ovarian androgen production from multiple small follicles, anovulation and insulin resistance in the reproductive life-span, thus setting up a vicious perpetual circle of androgen excess. This opinion paper, rather than being a full-scale review, is intentionally biased in support of this hypothesis that androgen excess is the 'root of all evil' in PCOS; in the hope that its acceptance could lead to more direct treatment of the syndrome in all its facets rather than the symptomatic treatment of side effects of androgen excess that we are addressing today.

  7. Product functions: interfaces with ergonomic design.

    PubMed

    Campos, Lívia F de A; Lanutti, Jamille N de L; Paschoarelli, Luis Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In addition to technical quality, increasing emphasis is being placed on the importance of elements such as the appearance and meaning of products. To be successful, therefore, attention must be paid to the aesthetic and symbolic functions of objects as well as to reliability and physical quality. Study of the interfaces of these functions may provide a theoretical basis for the ergonomic design of products. The objective of this review is to attempt to establish the nature of these interfaces.

  8. GC-MS quantitative analysis of black market pharmaceutical products containing anabolic androgenic steroids seized by the Brazilian Federal Police.

    PubMed

    Neves, Diana Brito da Justa; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2017-06-01

    The use of counterfeit or substandard medicines can have an important health impact, resulting in therapeutic failure, be toxic or even cause death. Anabolic steroids are a frequent target for counterfeiters worldwide, being the second most frequent counterfeited class in Brazil. The aims of this work were to optimize and validate a GC-MS method for the quantitative determination of anabolic steroids in tablet, aqueous suspension and oil solution forms, and to analyze pharmaceutical products sent to Brazilian Federal Police (BFP) for forensic analysis. Sample preparation included extraction with methanol in ultrasonic bath followed by centrifugation. The method was successfully validated and 345 samples of pharmaceutical products were analyzed (328 medicines and 17 dietary supplements). About 42% of the medicines were counterfeits, 28.7% of tablets, 12.0% of suspensions and 65.2% of oil solutions; 11% were considered substandards. Five dietary supplements contained undeclared anabolic steroids, including two containing methandrostenolone at 5.4 and 5.8mg/capsule, equivalent to levels found in medicines. The proposed method is suitable for implementation in routine analysis for identification of counterfeits and substandard products. The analytical results show the need to raise awareness of consumers over the risks from the consumption of anabolic steroids from the clandestine market and for more incisive actions from government agencies aiming at decreasing the availability of these products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional chromatographic technique for natural product isolation†

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Eichhorst, Nicole; Engelder, Pearce; Mesa, Celestina; Kithsiri Wijeratne, E. M.; Gunaherath, G. M. Kamal B.; Leslie Gunatilaka, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural product discovery arises through a unique interplay between chromatographic purification and biological assays. Currently, most techniques used for natural product purification deliver leads without a defined biological action. We now describe a technique, referred to herein as functional chromatography, that deploys biological affinity as the matrix for compound isolation. PMID:25588099

  10. Water Production Functions For High Plains Crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing demands on limited water supplies will require maximizing crop production per unit water. Field studies are being carried out near Greeley, Colorado to develop water production functions for crops grown in the Great Plains. These yield per unit water relationships can be used to determi...

  11. Follicular fluid concentrations of lipids and their metabolites are associated with intraovarian gonadotropin-stimulated androgen production in women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Gervais, A; Battista, M-C; Carranza-Mamane, B; Lavoie, H B; Baillargeon, J-P

    2015-05-01

    Although growing evidence points toward a role of lipotoxicity in the development of hyperandrogenesis, the main feature of polycystic ovary syndrome, few studies directly assessed this association in vivo in humans, and none targeted the ovarian milieu. The main objective of this study was to correlate follicular fluid (FF) T levels with lipids, lipid metabolites, and inflammation markers. This was a cross-sectional study. Recruitment was performed in two fertility clinics at one private and one academic center. Eighty women requiring in vitro fertilization were recruited during one of their scheduled visit at the fertility clinic. All women aged between 18 and 40 years with a body mass index between 18 and 40 kg/m(2) were invited to participate. There were no interventions. At the time of oocyte aspiration, FF was collected and analyzed for total T, lipids [nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) plus triglycerides], NEFA metabolites (acylcarnitines; markers of ineffective NEFAs β-oxidation), and inflammatory marker composition. The hypothesis being tested was formulated before the data collection. FF T levels were significantly correlated with FF levels of lipids (r = 0.381, P = .001; independently of IL-6), acylcarnitines (r ≥ 0.255, all P = .008; not independently of lipids), and IL-6 (r = 0.300, P = .009, independently of lipids). Additionally, FF lipid levels were significantly and strongly correlated with acylcarnitines (r ≥ 0.594; all P < .001). These results suggest that ovarian androgen production is related to intraovarian exposure to lipids, independently of inflammation and mainly through ineffective NEFA β-oxidation (as shown by higher acylcarnitine levels). Inflammation is also associated with intraovarian androgenesis, independently of lipids.

  12. Irradiation selectively inhibits expression from the androgen-dependent Pem homeobox gene promoter in sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Maiti, S; Meistrich, M L; Wilson, G; Shetty, G; Marcelli, M; McPhaul, M J; Morris, P L; Wilkinson, M F

    2001-04-01

    How radiation blocks spermatogenesis in certain strains of rats, such as LBNF(1), is not known. Because the block depends on androgen, we propose that androgen affects Sertoli cell function in irradiated LBNF(1) rats, resulting in the failure of spermatogonial differentiation. To begin to identify genes that may participate in this irradiation-induced blockade of spermatogenesis, we investigated the expression of several Sertoli genes in response to irradiation. The expression of the PEM: homeobox gene from its androgen-dependent Sertoli-specific proximal promoter (Pp) was dramatically reduced more than 100-fold in response to irradiation. In contrast, most other genes and gene products reported to be localized to the Sertoli cell, including FSH receptor (FSHR), androgen receptor (AR), SGP1, and the transcription factor CREB, did not exhibit significant changes in expression, whereas transferrin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression dramatically increased in response to irradiation. Irradiation also decreased Pp-driven PEM: mRNA levels in mouse testes (approximately 10-fold), although higher doses of irradiation than in rats were required to inhibit PEM: gene expression in testes of mice, consistent with their greater radioresistance. The decrease in Pem gene expression in mouse testis was also selective, as the expression of CREB, GATA-1, and SGP1 were little affected by irradiation. We conclude that the dramatic irradiation-triggered reduction of Pem expression in Sertoli cells is a conserved response that may be a marker for functional changes in response to irradiation.

  13. Androgens and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Bart L.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2009-01-01

    Testosterone is the major gonadal sex steroid produced by the testes in men. Testosterone is also produced in smaller amounts by the ovaries in women. The adrenal glands produce the weaker androgens dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and androstenedione. These androgens collectively affect skeletal homeostasis throughout life in both men and women, particularly at puberty and during adult life. Because testosterone can be metabolized to estradiol by the aromatase enzyme, there has been controversy as to which gonadal sex steroid has the greater skeletal effect. The current evidence suggests that estradiol plays a greater role in maintenance of skeletal health than testosterone, but that androgens also have direct beneficial effects on bone. Supraphysiological levels of testosterone likely have similar effects on bone as lower levels via direct interaction with androgen receptors, as well as effects mediated by estrogen receptors after aromatization to estradiol. Whether high doses of synthetic, non-aromatizable androgens may, in fact, be detrimental to bone due to suppression of endogenous testosterone (and estrogen) levels is a potential concern that warrants further study. PMID:18992761

  14. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-08-27

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa.

  15. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N.; Elliott, David J.; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y.; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  16. Reduction Formulae for Products of Theta Functions

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    In four cases it is already known that the product of two distinct Jacobian theta functions having the same variable z and the same nome q is a multiple of a single Jacobian theta function, with the multiple independent of z. The main purpose of the present note is to show that this property also applies in the remaining two cases. PMID:26900529

  17. Update on androgenicity.

    PubMed

    Thorneycroft, I H

    1999-02-01

    The development of a new generation of progestins deemed less androgenic than their earlier counterparts has led to a number of misconceptions regarding their possible benefits in combination oral contraceptives. All combination oral contraceptives are beneficial for treating such androgenic conditions as acne and hirsutism. The only expressed androgenic effect of some first- and second-generation combined oral contraceptives are changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels. However, the overall effect of today's low-dose oral contraceptives is largely lipid neutral, and human and monkey studies have shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with reduced, not increased, atherosclerosis rates. Myocardial infarction rates are not increased among oral contraceptive users, except among those who are heavy smokers.

  18. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  19. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  20. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  1. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ieuan Arwel; Werner, Ralf; Bunch, Trevor; Hiort, Olaf

    2012-10-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) fall within the generic category of 46,XY DSD (disorder of sex development) and present as phenotypes associated with complete or partial resistance to the action of androgens. Three categories are recognized: complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS), partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), mild androgen insensitivity syndrome (MAIS). The androgen receptor (AR) is encoded by an 8 exon gene on the X chromosome long arm. More than 800 mutations in the AR gene have been reported in AIS patients (www.androgendb.mcgill.ca/). They are distributed throughout the gene with a preponderance located in the ligand binding domain. The most severe mutations are generally associated with a CAIS phenotype, but the correlation is less defined in PAIS. CAIS presents typically as primary amenorrhoea in an adolescent female and less commonly in infancy with bilateral inguinal/labial swellings due to testes. The differential diagnosis in CAIS is limited, whereas in PAIS, numerous other causes of DSD can also produce the typical phenotype of micropenis, severe hypospadias and bifid scrotum. Management issues in CAIS involve timing of gonadectomy, appropriate hormone replacement therapy and assessment of the need for vaginal dilation or rarely, vaginal surgery. The risk of gonadal germ cell tumor is low during childhood and adolescence but increases in later adulthood. Expert psychological counseling is mandatory to manage the disconnect between chromosomal, gonadal and phenotypic sex and to choreograph the evolving process of disclosure from late childhood through to maturity. It is implicit that management in AIS requires a multidisciplinary team and engagement with patient advocacy groups.

  2. Targeting the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Terence W; Ryan, Charles J

    2012-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is critical to the growth and survival of prostate cancer. Although medical castration and antiandrogen therapy can decrease AR activity and lower PSA, castration resistance eventually develops. Recent work exploring the molecular structure and evolution of AR in response to hormonal therapies has revealed novel mechanisms of progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and yielded new targets for drug development. This review focuses on understanding the mechanisms of persistent AR signaling in the castrate environment, and highlights new therapies either currently available or in clinical trials, including androgen synthesis inhibitors and novel direct AR inhibitors.

  3. Measurement of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Testosterone is the major androgen measured in clinical and research investigations of both men and women. Nevertheless, many other androgens have an important role in the investigation of andrenal and gonadal physiology and pathology. Commercial assays are generally used in clinical laboratories but these have poor precision at low concentrations and poor sensitivity. Extraction assays, described in this chapter, can be much more sensitive and precise. There is interest in measuring free steriods and a steady-state gel filtration method used in the author's laboratory is described. Methods are also provided for the measurement of steroids in saliva and hair.

  4. Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Asra; Hanif, Farha; Hanif, Shumaila Muhammad; Abdullah, Farhan Essa; Shamim, Muhammad Shahid

    2008-07-01

    The incidence of Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) is about 1 in 20,000. People with CAIS are normal appearing females, despite the presence of testes and a 46, XY chromosome constitution. We came across a case in which a 17 years old girl presented with the complaint of inguinal hernia and amenorrhea. Subsequent investigations were done revealing absence of female internal genitalia and the presence of abdominal mass, possibly testes. Syndrome has been linked to mutations in AR, the gene for the human Androgen Receptor, located at Xq11-12 leading to the insensitivity of the receptor to testosterone. Gonadectomy was performed and life long Hormone replacement therapy was advised.

  5. Sintokamide A Is a Novel Antagonist of Androgen Receptor That Uniquely Binds Activation Function-1 in Its Amino-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Banuelos, Carmen A.; Tavakoli, Iran; Tien, Amy H.; Caley, Daniel P.; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yu Chi; Imamura, Yusuke; Yan, Luping; Wen, Jian Guo; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer including metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). All current hormone therapies for CRPC target the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of AR and ultimately all fail with resumed AR transcriptional activity. Within the AR N-terminal domain (NTD) is activation function-1 (AF-1) that is essential for AR transcriptional activity. Inhibitors of AR AF-1 would potentially block most AR mechanisms of resistance including constitutively active AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain. Here we provide evidence that sintokamide A (SINT1) binds AR AF-1 region to specifically inhibit transactivation of AR NTD. Consistent with SINT1 targeting AR AF-1, it attenuated transcriptional activities of both full-length AR and constitutively active AR splice variants, which correlated with inhibition of growth of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells expressing AR splice variants. In vivo, SINT1 caused regression of CRPC xenografts and reduced expression of prostate-specific antigen, a gene transcriptionally regulated by AR. Inhibition of AR activity by SINT1 was additive to EPI-002, a known AR AF-1 inhibitor that is in clinical trials (NCT02606123). This implies that SINT1 binds to a site on AF-1 that is unique from EPI. Consistent with this suggestion, these two compounds showed differences in blocking AR interaction with STAT3. This work provides evidence that the intrinsically disordered NTD of AR is druggable and that SINT1 analogs may provide a novel scaffold for drug development for the treatment of prostate cancer or other diseases of the AR axis. PMID:27576691

  6. Pharmaceutical evaluation of naftopidil enantiomers: Rat functional assays in vitro and estrogen/androgen induced rat benign prostatic hyperplasia model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun-Jun; Cai, Yi; Yi, Yan-Zhen; Huang, Min-Yi; Zhu, Liu; He, Fei; Liu, Xia-Wen; Huang, Bi-Yun; Yuan, Mu

    2016-11-15

    Naftopidil (NAF) is a α1D/1A adrenoceptor selective drug used for the treatment of both benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS). However, NAF is used as a racemate in clinic. To compare the differences and similarities among two enantiomers and racemate, pharmacological activities were evaluated through rat functional assays in vitro and estrogen/androgen (E/T) induced rat BPH model in vivo. NAF and the two enantiomers showed similar blocking activity on α1 receptor. S-NAF exhibited more α1D/1A adrenoceptor subtype selectivity than R-NAF and the racemate. The selectivity ratios pA2 (α1D)/pA2 (α1B) and pA2 (α1A)/pA2 (α1B) were 40.7- and 16.2-fold, respectively. NAF and its enantiomers effectively prevented the development of rat prostatic hyperplasia via suppressing the increase of the prostatic wet weight, visually. The quantitative analysis of the relative acinus volume, relative stroma volume, relative epithelial volume, epithelial height and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were carried out. S-NAF showed an advantage on the effect of inhibiting prostate wet weight and stroma volume over R-NAF and racemate NAF (P<0.05). Nevertheless, no other significant difference was observed between these two enantiomers. In conclusion, both R-NAF and S-NAF not only relax prostate muscle but also inhibit the prostate growth, thus relieve BPH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss

  8. EFFECT OF THE ANTI-ANDROGENIC ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR VINCLOZOLIN ON EMBRYONIC TESTIS CORD FORMATION AND POSTNATAL TESTIS DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION. (R827405)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinclozolin is a systemic dicarboximide fungicide that is used on fruits, vegetables, ornamental plants, and turf grass. Vinclozolin and its metabolites are known to be endocrine disruptors and act as androgen receptor antagonists. The hypothesis tested in the current study is...

  9. EFFECT OF THE ANTI-ANDROGENIC ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR VINCLOZOLIN ON EMBRYONIC TESTIS CORD FORMATION AND POSTNATAL TESTIS DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION. (R827405)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinclozolin is a systemic dicarboximide fungicide that is used on fruits, vegetables, ornamental plants, and turf grass. Vinclozolin and its metabolites are known to be endocrine disruptors and act as androgen receptor antagonists. The hypothesis tested in the current study is...

  10. Production of recombinant insulin-like androgenic gland hormones from three decapod species: In vitro testicular phosphorylation and activation of a newly identified tyrosine kinase receptor from the Eastern spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Chandler, Jennifer C; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Sagi, Amir; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) is responsible for male sexual differentiation. To date, the biochemical pathways through which IAG exerts its effects are poorly understood and could be elucidated through the production of a functional recombinant IAG (rIAG). We have successfully expressed glycosylated, biologically active IAG using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. We co-expressed recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of the B and A chains (the mature hormone) tethered by a flexible linker, producing rIAGs of the following commercially important species: Eastern spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi (Sv), redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq) and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). We then tested the biological activity of each, through the ability to increase phosphorylation in the testis; both Sv and Cq rIAGs significantly elevated phosphorylation specific to their species, and in a dose-dependent manner. Mr rIAG was tested on Macrobrachium australiense (Ma), eliciting a similar response. Moreover, using bioinformatics analyses of the de novo assembled spiny lobster transcriptome, we identified a spiny lobster tyrosine kinase insulin receptor (Sv-TKIR). We validated this discovery with a receptor activation assay in COS-7 cells expressing Sv-TKIR, using a reporter SRE-LUC system designed for RTKs, with each of the rIAG proteins acting as the activation ligand. Using recombinant proteins, we aim to develop specific tools to control sexual development through the administration of IAG within the critical sexual differentiation time window. The biologically active rIAGs generated might facilitate commercially feasible solutions for the long sought techniques for sex-change induction and monosex population culture in crustaceans and shed new light on the physiological mode of action of IAG in crustaceans.

  11. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  12. Functional equations for orbifold wreath products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsi, Carla; Seaton, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    We present generating functions for extensions of multiplicative invariants of wreath symmetric products of orbifolds presented as the quotient by the locally free action of a compact, connected Lie group in terms of orbifold sector decompositions. Particularly interesting instances of these product formulas occur for the Euler and Euler-Satake characteristics, which we compute for a class of weighted projective spaces. This generalizes results known for global quotients by finite groups to all closed, effective orbifolds. We also describe a combinatorial approach to extensions of multiplicative invariants using decomposable functors that recovers the formula for the Euler-Satake characteristic of a wreath product of a global quotient orbifold.

  13. 19-Hydroxylation of androgens in the rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E F; Miyairi, S; Fishman, J

    1985-01-01

    Aromatization of androgens in the central nervous system is linked with sexual differentiation of the brain and, thus, determines the nature of sexual behavior and the control of gonadotropin secretion. The process of aromatization, as determined in the human placenta, proceeds through two successive hydroxylations at C-19, the products of which are then virtually completely converted via a third hydroxylation at C-2 to estrogens. We now report that in the rat brain, 19-hydroxylation of androgens greatly exceeds aromatization and the 19-hydroxy- and 19-oxoandrogen products accumulate in quantities 5 times greater than the estrogens. This relationship implies that the aromatization sequence in the brain is deficient in the terminal hydroxylase, and the process is distinct from that in other tissues. The function of 19-hydroxy- and 19-oxotestosterone in the central nervous system is unknown but, unlike the reduced or aromatized metabolites of the male hormone, these substances cannot be delivered from the circulation and their presence in the brain is totally dependent on in situ formation, making them logical candidates for modulators of neuronal functions. PMID:3857612

  14. Anti-androgen resistance in prostate cancer cells chronically induced by interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Staverosky, Julia A; Zhu, Xin-Hua; Ha, Susan; Logan, Susan K

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been linked to cancer initiation and progression in a variety of tissues, yet the impact of acute and chronic inflammatory signaling on androgen receptor function has not been widely studied. In this report, we examine the impact of the inflammation-linked cytokine, interleukin-1β on androgen receptor function in prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that acute interleukin-1β treatment inhibits the transcription of the androgen receptor gene itself, resulting in the reduction of androgen receptor protein levels. Interestingly, in cells subjected to chronic interleukin-1β stimulation, the transcription of the androgen receptor gene is restored within a few cell passages and the cells acquire the ability to grow in the presence of the anti-androgen, bicalutamide. Importantly, the changes that accompany this loss of androgen receptor regulation and gain of anti-androgen resistance are stably heritable since once established, the phenotype is maintained even in the absence of exogenously added interleukin-1β. Further, bicalutamide resistance correlates with increased transcription of androgen receptor target genes and histone H3K4 dimethylation at M-phase gene enhancers. Overall, our studies demonstrate a novel route to anti-androgen resistance upon exposure to an inflammatory cytokine and provide a new tool to further understand how anti-androgen resistance emerges under chronic inflammation. PMID:25374900

  15. Androgen deprivation causes selective deficits in the biomechanical leg muscle function of men during walking: a prospective case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ada S.; Gray, Hans; Schache, Anthony G.; Hoermann, Rudolf; Lim Joon, Daryl; Zajac, Jeffrey D.; Pandy, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Although muscle mass declines with testosterone deficiency in men, previous studies of muscle function have not demonstrated consistent deficits, likely due to relatively insensitive methodology. Our objective was to determine the effects of testosterone deprivation on the biomechanical function of individual lower‐limb muscles. Methods We conducted a 12‐month prospective, observational case–control study of 34 men newly commencing androgen deprivation treatment (ADT) for prostate cancer and 29 age‐matched prostate cancer controls. Participants were assessed at 0, 6, and 12 months while walking in a biomechanics laboratory. We combined video‐based motion capture and ground reaction force data with computerized musculoskeletal modelling to assess the following primary outcomes: (i) peak joint torques at the hip, knee and ankle, and corresponding individual muscle forces; (ii) individual muscle contributions to acceleration of the body's centre of mass; and (iii) walking speed, stride length, and step width. A linear mixed model was used to compare mean differences between groups. Results Compared with controls over 12 months, men receiving ADT had a mean reduction in total testosterone level from 14.1 to 0.4 nmol/L, and demonstrated more marked decreases in peak hip flexor torque by 14% [mean difference −0.11 N/kg (−0.19, −0.03), P = 0.01] and peak knee extensor torque by 16% [−0.11 N/kg (−0.20, −0.02), P = 0.02] of the initial mean value. Correspondingly, iliopsoas force decreased by 14% (P = 0.006), and quadriceps force decreased by 11%, although this narrowly missed statistical significance (P = 0.07). Soleus decreased contribution to forward acceleration of the body's centre of mass by 17% [mean difference −0.17 m/s2 (−0.29, −0.05), P < 0.01]. No significant changes between groups were observed in other joint torques or individual muscle contributions to acceleration of the body

  16. Pharmacological studies on androgen suppression in therapy of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sandow, J; von Rechenberg, W; Engelbart, K

    1988-01-01

    In hormone-dependent prostate carcinoma, androgens can be suppressed into the castrate range by LHRH agonists. Testosterone secretion is blocked at two levels: testicular androgens and adrenal androgens. In humans, the contribution of testicular androgens is about 95%, whereas in the rat, the adrenal androgen secretion is negligible. Pharmacological studies were performed on the suppressive effect of the LHRH agonist, buserelin on androgen-dependent organs in adult rats. The reduction in pituitary and testicular binding capacity was monitored during treatment by injection, or by long-term infusion. Marked differences in suppressive mechanisms activated by the different regimens were observed. Changes in testicular steroid biosynthesis were analysed by incubation of testes after treatment with HCG, measuring the spectrum of C21/C19-steroids in incubation media. In particular, the levels of intraprostatic androgens were determined during treatment with daily buserelin injections, or with sustained release formulations of buserelin. The tissue content of testosterone and 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were both markedly lowered. In castrate rats, stimulation of adrenal function by ACTH infusion had no effect on the prostate weight or intratesticular T/DHT content. Combination therapy during the initial phase of treatment by an androgen receptor blocker (cyproterone acetate) and buserelin (infusion or implants) was more effective to suppress prostate weight and intra-prostatic T/DHT content than therapy with the single compounds alone. Spermatogenesis and fertility were suppressed after prolonged treatment periods of 6-12 months; the testicular atrophy was not reversible in these long-term injection studies. Similar studies in dogs and monkeys have shown a different result: inhibition of spermatogenesis was fully reversible. It is concluded that studies on the mechanism of androgen suppression by LHRH agonists and the effects on androgen dependent organs provide

  17. Free and conjugated estrogens and androgens in stallion semen.

    PubMed

    Lemazurier, Emmanuel; Moslemi, Safa; Sourdaine, Pascal; Desjardins, Isabelle; Plainfosse, Bruno; Seralini, Gilles-Eric

    2002-02-01

    The steroid content of semen from a total of 11 mature fertile stallions was studied during two breeding seasons and one winter. The levels of free and conjugated substrates (testosterone and androstenedione), and products (estradiol and estrone), of aromatase were measured by radioimmunoassay with a validated method. The results were seasonally and monthly highly variable with characteristic peaks. The concentrations of free and conjugated estrogens were always higher in the gel-free ejaculate than in the gel except in one subfertile stallion used as comparison. Furthermore, the steroid production and the maximal resulting aromatase activity, estimated by the estrogens/androgens ratio, peaked in April-May and June. The breeding season (spring and summer) presents a clear estrogenic profile with estrogens/androgens ratios higher in contrast to the nonbreeding period (autumn and winter). The involvement of estrogens in the regulation of reproduction and equine spermatogenesis is discussed, and estrogens production and thus equine aromatase is proposed as a strong marker of testicular endocrine function.

  18. The Stress Response Mediator ATF3 Represses Androgen Signaling by Binding the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Jiang, Ming; Cui, Hongmei; Chen, Mengqian; Buttyan, Ralph; Hayward, Simon W.; Hai, Tsonwin; Wang, Zhengxin

    2012-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a common mediator of cellular stress response signaling and is often aberrantly expressed in prostate cancer. We report here that ATF3 can directly bind the androgen receptor (AR) and consequently repress AR-mediated gene expression. The ATF3-AR interaction requires the leucine zipper domain of ATF3 that independently binds the DNA-binding and ligand-binding domains of AR, and the interaction prevents AR from binding to cis-acting elements required for expression of androgen-dependent genes while inhibiting the AR N- and C-terminal interaction. The functional consequences of the loss of ATF3 expression include increased transcription of androgen-dependent genes in prostate cancer cells that correlates with increased ability to grow in low-androgen-containing medium and increased proliferative activity of the prostate epithelium in ATF3 knockout mice that is associated with prostatic hyperplasia. Our results thus demonstrate that ATF3 is a novel repressor of androgen signaling that can inhibit AR functions, allowing prostate cells to restore homeostasis and maintain integrity in the face of a broad spectrum of intrinsic and environmental insults. PMID:22665497

  19. Recent advances in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuqing; Lanter, James C; Sui, Zhihua

    2009-09-01

    The androgens testosterone and its more potent tissue metabolite 5-alpha-dihydrotesterone regulate diverse physiological process involving both reproductive and non-reproductive functions. Most of the signaling effects of androgens are mediated through the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors. The AR has been a target for drug development focused on the treatment of pathological conditions arising from abnormal androgen levels or altered target tissue responsiveness, the improvement of physical performance and the regulation of male fertility. The primary focus for drug design has been the synthesis of chemicals to regulate the transcriptional activity of AR based on the structural and functional properties of the ligands, with a recent preference for selectively anabolic non-steroidals. A new class of molecules targeting androgen receptors called selective androgen receptor modulators is being developed, analogous to the clinically successful and at present marketed selective estrogen receptor modulators. This article highlights and reviews research advances in this field that have been published in patent literature since 2003. The structural diversity of selective androgen receptor modulators has dramatically increased. Several compounds have emerged as clinical and preclinical candidates.

  20. Water Production Functions for High Plains Crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water Production Functions for High Plains Crops Water consumptive use by a crop can be reduced through limited (deficit) irrigation. If the reduced consumptive use (CU) can be quantified, the saved water can be transferred to other users. If the value of the transferred water is greater than the fa...

  1. Comparison of Right Ventricle Systolic Function between Long-Term Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid User and Nonuser Bodybuilder Athletes: A Study of Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Alizade, Elnur; Avci, Anil; Tabakcı, Mehmet Mustafa; Toprak, Cuneyt; Zehir, Regayip; Acar, Goksel; Kargin, Ramazan; Emiroğlu, Mehmet Yunas; Akçakoyun, Mustafa; Pala, Selçuk

    2016-08-01

    Right ventricular (RV) effects of long-term use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are not clearly known. The aim of this study was to assess RV systolic functions by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) in AAS user and nonuser bodybuilders. A total of 33 competitive male bodybuilders (15 AAS users, 18 AAS nonusers) were assessed. To assess RV systolic functions, all participants underwent standard two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, and 2DSTE. Interventricular septal thickness, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, relative wall thickness, and left ventricle mass index were significantly higher in AAS users than nonusers. While standard diastolic parameters were not statistically different between the groups, tissue Doppler parameters including RV E' and E'/A' were lower in AAS users than nonusers (10.1 ± 2.0 vs. 12.7 ± 2.1; P = 0.001, 1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.5 ± 0.4; P = 0.009, respectively). Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, RV fractional area change, and RV S' were in normal ranges. However, RV S' was found to be lower in users than nonusers (12.2 ± 2.2 vs. 14.6 ± 2.8, P = 0.011). RV free wall longitudinal strain and strain rate were decreased in AAS users in comparison with nonusers (-20.2 ± 3.1 vs. -23.3 ± 3.5; P = 0.012, -3.2 ± 0.1 vs. -3.4 ± 0.1; P = 0.022, respectively). In addition, there were good correlations between 2DSTE parameters and RV S', E', and E'/A'. Despite normal standard systolic echo parameters, peak systolic RV free wall strain and strain rate were reduced in AAS user bodybuilders in comparison with nonusers. Strain and strain rate by 2DSTE may be useful for early determination of subclinical RV dysfunction in AAS user bodybuilders. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Androgen antagonists in androgen target tissues.

    PubMed

    Tindall, D J; Chang, C H; Lobl, T J; Cunningham, G R

    1984-01-01

    Most antiandrogens appear to act by binding to the androgen receptor and competitively inhibiting the binding of testosterone and cihydrotestosterone to the receptor. Focusing on those compounds which appear to inhibit androgen receptor mediated responses, this review discusses the chemistry of those antiandrogens which have been studied to the extent that their mechanism of action is at least partially understood, outlines the mechanism of androgen action as it is currently understood and suggests how antiandrogens might fit in with this mechanism, indicates the major metabolites of several important antiandrogens, and discusses the clinical applications of several antiandrogens. Cyproterone acetate has been studied extensively as a potential male contraceptive. Although it was recognized that 100 mg of cyproterone acetate per day inhibited spermatogenesis, that dose also reduced libido and potency. Following the administration of 10 or 20 mg of cyproterone acetate per day to 15 males for 26 weeks, the following observations were made: the number of motile sperm was reduced; the quality of their motion was impaired; and the ability of the sperm to penetrate cervical mucus was decreased. Sperm density was also suppressed, but neither it nor sperm motility were inhibited to the extent necessary for contraception. Antiandrogens have been demonstrated to be beneficial in treating 5 clinical syndromes or diseases: acne, seborrhea, hirsutism with or without menstrual abnormalities; precocious puberty; benign prostatic hypertrophy; cancer of the prostate; and sexual deviates. Since 3 of these conditions are very common, effective and safe treatment would have a large market. At this time, antiandrogens are widely used in Europe for treatment of seborrhea, acne, and hirsutism and a large Veterans Administration Cooperative Study in the US was approved but has not yet been funded to compare antiandrogens with other treatments for cancer of the prostate. Studies to assess

  3. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome with thermolability in the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenji; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Soh, Jintetsu; Ohe, Hiroshi; Shima, Hiroki; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2006-01-01

    We report case of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in a 12-year-old boy referred to our clinic complaining of bilateral gynecomastia and left undescended testicle. Laparoscopy for undescended testicle and bilateral mastectomy were performed, and the left testicle was absent. When skin fibroblasts of the scrotum obtained during surgery were cultured to analyse the androgen receptors, a slight thermolability was observed. Genomic examination of the androgen receptor gene could not detect any mutations.

  4. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Xu, Haikun; An, Wei; Zhu, Dechun; Li, Dejun

    2016-06-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  5. A model of ovulatory regulation examining the effects of insulin-mediated testosterone production on ovulatory function.

    PubMed

    Graham, Erica J; Selgrade, James F

    2017-03-07

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common cause of infertility in women, is often accompanied by abnormal reproductive and metabolic hormone levels. Specifically, androgens such as testosterone are elevated in many PCOS women, and the syndrome itself is frequently associated with insulin resistance, which leads to hyperinsulinemia, i.e., elevated insulin. Although the precise role of insulin in ovulatory function is unclear, its role in ovulatory dysfunction is often linked to the effects of increased ovarian androgen production. We present a mathematical model of the menstrual cycle that incorporates regulation by the pituitary-ovarian axis and mechanisms of ovarian testosterone production. We determine a physiological role for testosterone in the normal ovulatory cycle and study the role of hyperinsulinemia in pathological regulation of the cycle. Model results indicate increased ovulatory disruption with elevated insulin-mediated testosterone production and suggest that variations in the response of ovarian follicles to essential signals can alter the degree to which hyperinsulinemia disrupts the ovulatory cycle. The model also provides insight into the various PCOS phenotypes and the severity of ovulatory dysfunction.

  6. Androgen stimulates endothelial cell proliferation via an androgen receptor/VEGF/cyclin A-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jingjing; Hong, Yuan; Weng, Chunyan; Tan, Chen; Imperato-McGinley, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidences support that androgen displays beneficial effects on cardiovascular functions although the mechanism of androgen actions remains to be elucidated. Modulation of endothelial cell growth and function is a potential mechanism of androgen actions. We demonstrated in the present study that androgens [dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone], but not 17β-estradiol, produced a time- and dose-dependent induction of cell proliferation in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) as evident by increases in viable cell number and DNA biosynthesis. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis showed that DHT induced androgen receptor (AR), cyclin A, cyclin D1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The addition of casodex, a specific AR antagonist, or transfection of a specific AR siRNA blocked DHT-induced cell proliferation and target gene expression, indicating that the DHT effects are mediated via AR. Moreover, coadministration of SU5416 to block VEGF receptors, or transfection of a specific VEGF-A siRNA to knockdown VEGF expression, produced a dose-dependent blockade of DHT induction of cell proliferation and cyclin A gene expression. Interestingly, roscovitine, a selective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, also blocked the DHT stimulation of cell proliferation with a selective inhibition of DHT-induced VEGF-A expression. These results indicate that androgens acting on AR stimulate cell proliferation through upregulation of VEGF-A, cyclin A, and cyclin D1 in HAECs, which may be beneficial to cardiovascular functions since endothelial cell proliferation could assist the repair of endothelial injury/damage in cardiovascular system. PMID:21257919

  7. A western-style diet, with and without chronic androgen treatment, alters the number, structure and function of small antral follicles in ovaries of young adult monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cecily V.; Xu, Fuhua; Xu, Jing; Ting, Alison Y.; Galbreath, Etienne; McGee, Whitney K.; Zelinski, Mary B.; Hennebold, Jon D.; Cameron, Judy L.; Stouffer, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the small antral follicle (SAF) cohort in ovaries of adult rhesus monkeys following consumption of a western-style diet (WSD), with or without chronically elevated androgen levels since before puberty. Design Cholesterol or testosterone (T; n=6/group) implants were placed subcutaneously in female rhesus macaques beginning at 1 yr of age (pre-pubertal), with addition of a WSD (high fat/fructose) at 5.5 yrs (menarche ~2.6 yrs). Ovaries were collected at 7 yrs of age. One ovary/female was embedded in paraffin for morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. The SAFs (<2.5mm) were dissected from the other ovary obtained at/near menses in a subgroup of females (n=3/group), and processed for microarray analyses of the SAF transcriptome. Ovaries of adult monkeys consuming a standard macaque diet (low in fats and sugars) were obtained at similar stages of the menstrual cycle and used as controls for all analyses. Setting National primate research center Animals Adult, female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Interventions None Main outcome measures Histological analyses, SAF counts and morphology, protein localization and abundance in SAFs, transcriptome in SAFs (mRNAs) Results Compared to controls, consumption of a WSD, with and without T treatment, increased the numbers of SAFs per ovary, due to the presence of more atretic follicles. Numbers of granulosa cells expressing cellular proliferation markers (pRb and pH3) was greater in healthy SAFs, while numbers of cells expressing the cell cycle inhibitor (p21) was higher in atretic SAFs. Intense CYP17A1 staining was observed in the theca cells of SAFs from WSD+/− T groups, compared to controls. Microarray analyses of the transcriptome in SAFs isolated from WSD and WSD+T treated females and controls consuming a standard diet, identified 1944 genes whose mRNA levels changed ≥2-fold among the three groups. Further analyses identified several gene pathways altered by WSD and/or WSD+T associated with

  8. Characterization of two forms of mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP): implications for evolutionary relationships and ligand-binding function.

    PubMed

    Karn, Robert C; Laukaitis, Christina M

    2003-06-17

    Mouse salivary androgen-binding protein (ABP) is a member of the secretoglobin family produced in the submaxillary glands of house mice (Mus musculus). We report the cDNA sequences and amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of ABP from a mouse cDNA library, identifying the two subunits by their pIs and molecular weights. An anomalously high molecular weight of the alpha subunit is likely due to glycosylation at a single site. A phylogenetic comparison of the three subunits of ABP with the chains of other mammalian secretoglobins shows that ABP is most closely related to mouse lachrymal protein and to the major cat allergen Fel dI. An evaluation of the most conserved residues in ABP and the other secretoglobins, in light of structural data reported by others [Callebaut, I., Poupon, A., Bally, R., Demaret, J.-P., Housset, D., Delettre, J., Hossenlopp, P., and Mornon, J.-P. (2000) Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 923, 90-112; Pattabiraman, N., Matthews, J., Ward, K., Mantile-Selvaggi, G., Miele, L., and Mukherjee, A. (2000) Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 923, 113-127], allows us to draw conclusions about the critical residues important in ligand binding by the two different ABP dimers and to assess the importance of ligand binding in the function of the molecule. In addition to the cDNAs, which represent those of the musculus subspecies of Mus musculus, we also report the coding regions of the beta and gamma subunit cDNAs from two other mouse inbred strains which represent the other two subspecies: M. musculus domesticus and M. musculus castaneus. The high nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rate ratios (K(a)/K(s)) for both the beta and gamma subunits suggest that these two proteins are evolving under strong directional selection, as has been reported for the alpha subunit [Hwang, J., Hofstetter, J., Bonhomme, F., and Karn, R. (1997) J. Hered. 88, 93-97; Karn, R., and Clements, M. (1999) Biochem. Genet. 37, 187-199].

  9. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  10. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  11. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    represent a fine tuning mechanism for tissue-specific androgen activation preparing for the major changes in androgen production during puberty. PMID:27003302

  12. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are hormone mimics that modify hormonal action in humans and animals. It is thought that some endocrine disruptors modify estrogen and androgen action in humans and animals by suppressing aromatase activity. Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the key enzyme that converts C19 androgens to aromatic C18 estrogenic steroids. We have developed a novel aromatase inhibitor screening method that allows us to identify antiaromatase activity of various environmental chemicals. The screen was developed by coexpressing the human aromatase and the mouse androgen receptor in yeast cells, which carry the androgen-responsive ss-galactosidase reporter plasmid. Functional expression of aromatase in yeast has been demonstrated using the [3H]-water release assay with intact cells as well as with yeast microsomes. The aromatase activity could be blocked by known aromatase inhibitors such as aminoglutethimide (AG). Yeast-produced androgen receptors were able to transactivate a yeast basal promoter linked to an androgen-responsive element in response to androgens. The resultant triple yeast transformant responded to the treatment of testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). In the absence of the aromatase inhibitor AG, transcriptional activation was observed only for the nonaromatizable androgen 5 alpha-DHT. However, the two aromatizable androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) induced the reporter activity in the presence of AG. Using this yeast-based assay, we confirmed that two flavones, chrysin and alpha-naphtholflavone, are inhibitors of aromatase. Thus, this yeast system allows us to develop a high-throughput screening method, without using radioactive substrate, to identify aromatase inhibitors as well as new ligands (nonaromatizable androgen mimics) for the androgen receptors. In addition, this screening method also allows us to distinguish nonandrogenic aromatase inhibitors from inhibitors with androgenic activity. This yeast

  13. Clustered functional MRI of overt speech production.

    PubMed

    Sörös, Peter; Sokoloff, Lisa Guttman; Bose, Arpita; McIntosh, Anthony R; Graham, Simon J; Stuss, Donald T

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the neural network of overt speech production, event-related fMRI was performed in 9 young healthy adult volunteers. A clustered image acquisition technique was chosen to minimize speech-related movement artifacts. Functional images were acquired during the production of oral movements and of speech of increasing complexity (isolated vowel as well as monosyllabic and trisyllabic utterances). This imaging technique and behavioral task enabled depiction of the articulo-phonologic network of speech production from the supplementary motor area at the cranial end to the red nucleus at the caudal end. Speaking a single vowel and performing simple oral movements involved very similar activation of the cortical and subcortical motor systems. More complex, polysyllabic utterances were associated with additional activation in the bilateral cerebellum, reflecting increased demand on speech motor control, and additional activation in the bilateral temporal cortex, reflecting the stronger involvement of phonologic processing.

  14. PAPSS2 Deficiency Causes Androgen Excess via Impaired DHEA Sulfation—In Vitro and in Vivo Studies in a Family Harboring Two Novel PAPSS2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oostdijk, Wilma; Idkowiak, Jan; Mueller, Jonathan W.; House, Philip J.; Taylor, Angela E.; O'Reilly, Michael W.; Hughes, Beverly A.; de Vries, Martine C.; Kant, Sarina G.; Santen, Gijs W. E.; Verkerk, Annemieke J. M. H.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wit, Jan M.; Losekoot, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Context: PAPSS2 (PAPS synthase 2) provides the universal sulfate donor PAPS (3′-phospho-adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate) to all human sulfotransferases, including SULT2A1, responsible for sulfation of the crucial androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Impaired DHEA sulfation is thought to increase the conversion of DHEA toward active androgens, a proposition supported by the previous report of a girl with inactivating PAPSS2 mutations who presented with low serum DHEA sulfate and androgen excess, clinically manifesting with premature pubarche and early-onset polycystic ovary syndrome. Patients and Methods: We investigated a family harboring two novel PAPSS2 mutations, including two compound heterozygous brothers presenting with disproportionate short stature, low serum DHEA sulfate, but normal serum androgens. Patients and parents underwent a DHEA challenge test comprising frequent blood sampling and urine collection before and after 100 mg DHEA orally, with subsequent analysis of DHEA sulfation and androgen metabolism by mass spectrometry. The functional impact of the mutations was investigated in silico and in vitro. Results: We identified a novel PAPSS2 frameshift mutation, c.1371del, p.W462Cfs*3, resulting in complete disruption, and a novel missense mutation, c.809G>A, p.G270D, causing partial disruption of DHEA sulfation. Both patients and their mother, who was heterozygous for p.W462Cfs*3, showed increased 5α-reductase activity at baseline and significantly increased production of active androgens after DHEA intake. The mother had a history of oligomenorrhea and chronic anovulation that required clomiphene for ovulation induction. Conclusions: We provide direct in vivo evidence for the significant functional impact of mutant PAPSS2 on DHEA sulfation and androgen activation. Heterozygosity for PAPSS2 mutations can be associated with a phenotype resembling polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:25594860

  15. A new dawn for androgens: Novel lessons from 11-oxygenated C19 steroids.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Elzette; Arlt, Wiebke; Storbeck, Karl-Heinz

    2017-02-05

    The abundant adrenal C19 steroid 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione (11OHA4) has been written off as a dead-end product of adrenal steroidogenesis. However, recent evidence has demonstrated that 11OHA4 is the precursor to the potent androgenic 11-oxygenated steroids, 11-ketotestosterone and 11-ketodihydrotestosterone, that bind and activate the human androgen receptor similarly to testosterone and DHT. The significance of this discovery becomes apparent when considering androgen dependent diseases such as castration resistant prostate cancer and diseases associated with androgen excess, e.g. congenital adrenal hyperplasia and polycystic ovary syndrome. In this review we describe the production and metabolism of 11-oxygenated steroids. We subsequently discuss their androgenic activity and highlight the putative role of these androgens in disease states.

  16. Selective Androgen Receptor Downregulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    used to down-regulate the AR include antisense oligonucleotides (9, 10), ribozyme treatments (11, 12), AR dominant negatives (13) and small...findings suggest that ICI may present a useful treatment option for patients with AR-dependent PCa. Unlike the ribozyme , antisense, siRNA, or dominant...of the androgen receptor messenger RNA and functional inhibition of androgen receptor activity by a hammerhead ribozyme . Mol Endocrinol, 12: 1558

  17. Biological factors and the determination of androgens in female subjects.

    PubMed

    Enea, C; Boisseau, N; Diaz, V; Dugué, B

    2008-11-01

    The idea of the presence of androgens in females may sound peculiar as androgens generally refer to male hormones. Although produced in small amounts in women, androgens have direct and significant effects on many aspects of female physiology. Moreover, androgens are precursors to estrogens, which are the predominant female sex hormones. The measurement of androgens in blood is important in the diagnosis of both gonadal and adrenal functional disturbances, as well as monitoring subsequent treatments. The accuracy of such measurements is crucial in sports medicine and doping control. Therefore, the concentration of androgens in female subjects is frequently measured. Analysing such compounds with accuracy is especially difficult, costly and time consuming. Therefore, laboratories widely use direct radioimmunoassay kits, which are often insensitive and inaccurate. It is especially complicated to determine the level of androgens in women, as the concentration is much lower compared to the concentration found in males. Additionally, the amount of androgens in fluids tends to decrease with aging. Analyses of hormone concentrations are influenced by a myriad of factors. The factors influencing the outcome of these tests can be divided into in vivo preanalytical factors (e.g., aging, chronobiological rhythms, diet, menstrual cycle, physical exercise, etc.), in vitro preanalytical factors (e.g., specimen collection, equipment, transport, storage, etc.) and as mentioned before, analytical factors. To improve the value of these tests, the strongly influencing factors must be controlled. This can be accomplished using standardised assays and specimen collection procedures. In general, sufficient attention is not given to the preanalytical (biological) factors, especially in the measurement of androgens in females. Biological factors (non-pathological factors) that may influence the outcome of these tests in female subjects have received little attention and are the topic of

  18. Cordyceps fungi: natural products, pharmacological functions and developmental products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanwei; Gong, Zhenghua; Su, Ying; Lin, Juan; Tang, Kexuan

    2009-03-01

    Parasitic Cordyceps fungi, such as Cordyceps sinensis, is a parasitic complex of fungus and caterpillar, which has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries particularly in China, Japan and other Asian countries. This article gives a general idea of the latest developments in C. sinensis research, with regard to the active chemical components, the pharmacological effects and the research and development of products in recent years. The common names for preparations include DongChongXiaCao in Chinese, winter worm summer grass in English. It has many bioactive components, such as 3'-deoxyadenosine, cordycepic acid and Cordyceps polysaccharides. It is commonly used to replenish the kidney and soothe the lung, and for the treatment of fatigue. It also can be used to treat conditions such as night sweating, hyposexuality, hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidaemia, asthenia after severe illness, respiratory disease, renal dysfunction, renal failure, arrhythmias and other heart disease and liver disease. Because of its rarity and outstanding curative effects, several mycelia strains have been isolated from natural Cordyceps and manufactured by fermentation technology, and are commonly sold as health food products. In addition, some substitutes such as C. militaris and adulterants also have been used; therefore, quality control of C. sinensis and its products is very important to ensure their safety and efficacy. Recent research advances in the study of Cordyceps, including Cordyceps mushrooms, chemical components, pharmacological functions and developmental products, has been reviewed and discussed. Developing trends in the field have also been appraised.

  19. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boehmer, A L; Brinkmann, O; Brüggenwirth, H; van Assendelft, C; Otten, B J; Verleun-Mooijman, M C; Niermeijer, M F; Brunner, H G; Rouwé, C W; Waelkens, J J; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, W J; van der Kwast, T H; de Vroede, M A; Drop, S L

    2001-09-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivity syndrome patients, genetic counseling of their families, and insight into the functional domains of the AR. The commonly accepted concept of dependence on fetal androgens of the development of Wolffian ducts was studied in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) patients. In a nationwide survey in The Netherlands, all cases (n = 49) with the presumptive diagnosis androgen insensitivity syndrome known to pediatric endocrinologists and clinical geneticists were studied. After studying the clinical phenotype, mutation analysis and functional analysis of mutant receptors were performed using genital skin fibroblasts and in vitro expression studies. Here we report the findings in families with multiple affected cases. Fifty-nine percent of androgen insensitivity syndrome patients had other affected relatives. A total of 17 families were studied, seven families with CAIS (18 patients), nine families with partial androgen insensitivity (24 patients), and one family with female prepubertal phenotypes (two patients). No phenotypic variation was observed in families with CAIS. However, phenotypic variation was observed in one-third of families with partial androgen insensitivity resulting in different sex of rearing and differences in requirement of reconstructive surgery. Intrafamilial phenotypic variation was observed for mutations R846H, M771I, and deletion of amino acid N682. Four newly identified mutations were found. Follow-up in families with different AR gene mutations provided information on residual androgen action in vivo and the development of the prepubertal and adult phenotype. Patients with a functional complete defective AR had some pubic hair, Tanner

  20. Free fatty acids increase androgen precursors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mai, K; Bobbert, T; Kullmann, V; Andres, J; Rochlitz, H; Osterhoff, M; Weickert, M O; Bähr, V; Möhlig, M; Pfeiffer, A F H; Diederich, S; Spranger, J

    2006-04-01

    There is considerable evidence that metabolic factors such as insulin resistance may induce hyperandrogenemia in polycystic ovary syndrome. However, other metabolic factors such as free fatty acids (FFAs) may also contribute to androgen excess. The objective was to study effects of FFAs on adrenal production of androgen precursors in vivo. We investigated eight healthy young men, because male individuals produce the androgen precursors dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, and androstenedione predominantly in the adrenal gland. A randomized controlled crossover trial was performed. After a 10-h overnight fast, 20% lipid/heparin or saline/heparin infusion was given at a rate of 1.5 ml/min. Four hours after start of lipid infusion, a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp was performed. DHEA, androstenedione, 17-OH-progesterone, testosterone, estrone, LH, FSH, ACTH, and cortisol were measured. The adrenal androgen precursors DHEA and androstenedione showed a circadian decline during saline/heparin infusion (P < 0.05 vs. baseline, respectively), whereas no significant changes were observed during lipid/heparin infusion (P = not significant vs. baseline, respectively). Correspondingly, DHEA and androstenedione values were significantly elevated during lipid compared with saline infusion (P < 0.05, respectively), and areas under curve of both androgen precursors were significantly increased with lipid compared with saline infusion. Notably, all changes were detected before induction of insulin resistance. This study demonstrates that FFAs increase production of androgen precursors in vivo in men. These data tentatively suggest that hyperandrogenemia in polycystic ovary syndrome may be induced, at least in part, by elevated FFAs.

  1. Using ecological production functions to link ecological ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecological production functions (EPFs) link ecosystems, stressors, and management actions to ecosystem services (ES) production. Although EPFs are acknowledged as being essential to improve environmental management, their use in ecological risk assessment has received relatively little attention. Ecological production functions may be defined as usable expressions (i.e., models) of the processes by which ecosystems produce ES, often including external influences on those processes. We identify key attributes of EPFs and discuss both actual and idealized examples of their use to inform decision making. Whenever possible, EPFs should estimate final, rather than intermediate, ES. Although various types of EPFs have been developed, we suggest that EPFs are more useful for decision making if they quantify ES outcomes, respond to ecosystem condition, respond to stressor levels or management scenarios, reflect ecological complexity, rely on data with broad coverage, have performed well previously, are practical to use, and are open and transparent. In an example using pesticides, we illustrate how EPFs with these attributes could enable the inclusion of ES in ecological risk assessment. The biggest challenges to ES inclusion are limited data sets that are easily adapted for use in modeling EPFs and generally poor understanding of linkages among ecological components and the processes that ultimately deliver the ES. We conclude by advocating for the incorporation into E

  2. Using ecological production functions to link ecological ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecological production functions (EPFs) link ecosystems, stressors, and management actions to ecosystem services (ES) production. Although EPFs are acknowledged as being essential to improve environmental management, their use in ecological risk assessment has received relatively little attention. Ecological production functions may be defined as usable expressions (i.e., models) of the processes by which ecosystems produce ES, often including external influences on those processes. We identify key attributes of EPFs and discuss both actual and idealized examples of their use to inform decision making. Whenever possible, EPFs should estimate final, rather than intermediate, ES. Although various types of EPFs have been developed, we suggest that EPFs are more useful for decision making if they quantify ES outcomes, respond to ecosystem condition, respond to stressor levels or management scenarios, reflect ecological complexity, rely on data with broad coverage, have performed well previously, are practical to use, and are open and transparent. In an example using pesticides, we illustrate how EPFs with these attributes could enable the inclusion of ES in ecological risk assessment. The biggest challenges to ES inclusion are limited data sets that are easily adapted for use in modeling EPFs and generally poor understanding of linkages among ecological components and the processes that ultimately deliver the ES. We conclude by advocating for the incorporation into E

  3. Androgen Induces a Switch from Cytoplasmic Retention to Nuclear Import of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Li; Llewellyn, Ryan; Kesler, Cristina T.; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Snow, Chelsi J.; Shank, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has critical functions as a transcription factor in both normal and cancer cells, but the specific mechanisms that regulate its nuclear localization are not well defined. We found that an AR mutation commonly reported in prostate cancer generates an androgen-independent gain of function for nuclear import. The substitution, Thr877Ala, is within the ligand-binding domain, but the nuclear import gain of function is mediated by the bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) spanning the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and hinge region. Bipartite NLS activity depends on the structure provided by the DBD, and protein interactions with the bipartite NLS are repressed by the hinge region. The bipartite NLS is recognized by importin 7, a nuclear import receptor for several proteins. Importin 7 binding to AR, however, inhibits import by shielding the bipartite NLS. Androgen binding relieves the inhibition by inducing a switch that promotes exchange of importin 7 for karyopherin alpha import receptors. Importin 7 contributes to the regulation of AR import by restraining import until androgen is detected in the cytoplasm. PMID:24100013

  4. Androgen receptor (AR) coregulators: an overview.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Cynthia A; Chang, Chawnshang

    2002-04-01

    The biological action of androgens is mediated through the androgen receptor (AR). Androgen-bound AR functions as a transcription factor to regulate genes involved in an array of physiological processes, most notably male sexual differentiation and maturation, and the maintenance of spermatogenesis. The transcriptional activity of AR is affected by coregulators that influence a number of functional properties of AR, including ligand selectivity and DNA binding capacity. As the promoter of target genes, coregulators participate in DNA modification, either directly through modification of histones or indirectly by the recruitment of chromatin-modifying complexes, as well as functioning in the recruitment of the basal transcriptional machinery. Aberrant coregulator activity due to mutation or altered expression levels may be a contributing factor in the progression of diseases related to AR activity, such as prostate cancer. AR demonstrates distinct differences in its interaction with coregulators from other steroid receptors due to differences in the functional interaction between AR domains, possibly resulting in alterations in the dynamic interactions between coregulator complexes.

  5. Functionality of enterococci in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Giraffa, Giorgio

    2003-12-01

    Enterococci have important implications in the dairy industry. They occur as nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) in a variety of cheeses, especially artisan cheeses produced in southern Europe from raw or pasteurised milk, and in natural milk or whey starter cultures. They play an acknowledged role in the development of sensory characteristics during ripening of many cheeses and have been also used as components of cheese starter cultures. The positive influence of enterococci on cheese seems due to specific biochemical traits such as lipolytic activity, citrate utilisation, and production of aromatic volatile compounds. Some enterococci of dairy origin have also been reported to produce bacteriocins (enterocins) inhibitory against food spoilage or pathogenic bacteria, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae, Clostridium spp., and Bacillus spp. The technological application of enterocins, shown to be produced during cheese manufacture, led to propose enterococci as adjunct starter or protective cultures in cheeses. There is evidence that enterococci, either added as adjunct starters or present as nonstarter NSLAB, could find potential application in the processing of some fermented dairy products. Literature suggest that the complex biochemical and ecological phenomena explaining the technological functionality of the enterococci in dairy products, are still to be fully understood. Clearly, the clinical research on enterococci underlines also that the safety of dairy products containing enterococci is an issue that the industry must carefully address before proceeding to their application.

  6. The physiological and pharmacological basis for the ergogenic effects of androgens in elite sports.

    PubMed

    Choong, Karen; Lakshman, Kishore M; Bhasin, Shalender

    2008-05-01

    Androgen doping in power sports is undeniably rampant worldwide. There is strong evidence that androgen administration in men increases skeletal muscle mass, maximal voluntary strength and muscle power. However, we do not have good experimental evidence to support the presumption that androgen administration improves physical function or athletic performance. Androgens do not increase specific force or whole body endurance measures. The anabolic effects of testosterone on the skeletal muscle are mediated through androgen receptor signaling. Testosterone promotes myogenic differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells and inhibits their differentiation into the adipogenic lineage. Testosterone binding to androgen receptor induces a conformational change in androgen receptor protein, causing it to associate with beta-catenin and TCF-4 and activate downstream Wnt target genes thus promoting myogenic differentiation. The adverse effects of androgens among athletes and recreational bodybuilders are under reported and include acne, deleterious changes in the cardiovascular risk factors, including a marked decrease in plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol level, suppression of spermatogenesis resulting in infertility, increase in liver enzymes, hepatic neoplasms, mood and behavioral disturbances, and long term suppression of the endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Androgens are often used in combination with other drugs which may have serious adverse events of their own. In spite of effective methods for detecting androgen doping, the policies for screening of athletes are highly variable in different countries and organizations and even existing policies are not uniformly enforced.

  7. Classical androgen receptors in non-classical sites in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sarkey, Sara; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; DonCarlos, Lydia L.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptors are expressed in many different neuronal populations in the central nervous system where they often act as transcription factors in the cell nucleus. However, recent studies have detected androgen receptor immunoreactivity in neuronal and glial processes of the adult rat neocortex, hippocampal formation, and amygdala as well as in the telencephalon of Eastern Fence and green anole lizards. This review discusses previously published findings on extranuclear androgen receptors, as well as new experimental results that begin to establish a possible functional role for androgen receptors in axons within cortical regions. Electron microscopic studies have revealed that androgen receptor immunoreactive processes in the rat brain correspond to axons, dendrites and glial processes. New results show that lesions of the dorsal CA1 region by local administration of ibotenic acid reduce the density of androgen receptor immunoreactive axons in the cerebral cortex and the amygdala, suggesting that these axons may originate in the hippocampus. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in axons is also decreased by the intracerebroventricular administration of colchicine, suggesting that androgen receptor protein is transported from the perikaryon to the axons by fast axonal transport. Androgen receptors in axons located in the cerebral cortex and amygdala and originating in the hippocampus may play an important role in the rapid behavioral effects of androgens. PMID:18402960

  8. Seminal Plasma Proteins as Androgen Receptor Corregulators Promote Prostate Cancer Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0412 TITLE: Seminal Plasma Proteins as Androgen Receptor Corregulators Promote Prostate Cancer Growth PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE Seminal Plasma Proteins as Androgen Receptor Corregulators Promote Prostate Cancer Growth 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13...semenogelin I (SgI) in the presence of zinc, promote prostate cancer growth via functioning as androgen receptor (AR) co-activators. Using cell lines

  9. Inhibitors for Androgen Receptor Activation Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    new class of chemical therapeutics for treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray crystallography, high throughput screening, medicinal... treatments because anti-androgen resis- tance usually develops. We conducted functional and x-ray screens to identify compounds that bind the AR surface and...possibility that such compounds could be used for prostate cancer treatment . It is unlikely that natural T3 or Triac concentrations approach levels required

  10. Androgen Receptor (AR) Promotes Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Development via Modulating Inflammatory IL1α and TGFβ1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Luo, Jie; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Wang, Ronghao; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Eugene; Yan, Chen; Sparks, Janet; Lee, Soo Ok; Cho, Joshua; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Gender difference is a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurism formation yet the reason for male predominance remains unclear. Androgen and the androgen receptor influence the male gender difference, indicating that androgen receptor signaling may affect abdominal aortic aneurism development. Using angiotensin II induced abdominal aortic aneurism in apolipoprotein E null mouse models (82.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), we found that mice lacking androgen receptor failed to develop abdominal aortic aneurism and aorta had dramatically reduced macrophages infiltration and intact elastic fibers. These findings suggested that androgen receptor expression in endothelial cells, macrophages or smooth muscle cells might play a role in abdominal aortic aneurism development. Selective knockout of androgen receptor in each of these cell types further demonstrated that mice lacking androgen receptor in macrophages (20% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence) or smooth muscle cells (12.5% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), but not in endothelial cells (71.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence) had suppressed abdominal aortic aneurism development. Mechanism dissection showed that androgen receptor functioned through modulation of interleukin 1α and transforming growth factor β1 signals and by targeting androgen receptor with androgen receptor degradation enhancer ASC-J9® led to significant suppression of abdominal aortic aneurism development. These results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which androgen receptor influences abdominal aortic aneurism development through interleukin 1α and transforming growth factor β1, and provides a potential new therapy to suppress/prevent abdominal aortic aneurism by targeting androgen receptor with ASC-J9®. PMID:26324502

  11. Metabolic syndrome in androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Hima; Upadya, Gatha M

    2016-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease in various studies. The relationship between androgenic alopecia and metabolic syndrome, a known risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, is still poorly understood. To study the association between metabolic syndrome and early-onset androgenic alopecia. A hospital-based analytical cross-sectional study was done on men in the age group of 18-55 years. Eighty five clinically diagnosed cases with early-onset (<35 years) androgenic alopecia of Norwood grade III or above, and 85 controls without androgenic alopecia were included. Data collected included anthropometric measurements, arterial blood pressure and history of chronic diseases. Fasting blood and lipid profile were determined. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed as per the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.00. Metabolic syndrome was seen in 19 (22.4%) patients with androgenic alopecia and 8 (9.4%) controls (P = 0.021). Abdominal obesity, hypertension and lowered high-density lipoprotein were significantly higher in patients with androgenic alopecia versus their respective controls. The limitations of our study include small sample size in subgroups and the lack of evidence of a temporal relationship between metabolic syndrome and androgenic alopecia. A higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome is seen in men with early-onset androgenic alopecia. Early screening for metabolic syndrome and its components is beneficial in patients with early-onset androgenic alopecia.

  12. [Dermatologic indications for anti-androgenic treatment].

    PubMed

    Zaun, H; Ludwig, E

    1978-11-01

    In spite of remarkable therapeutic results obtained by gestagens with antiandrogenic activity, usually combined with estrogen, in oily seborrhea, acne, Fox-Fordyce disease, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism many dermatologist still hesitate to treat the named disorders by hormones. The reason for their hesitation appears to be the erroneous belief, that the named disturbances represent hormonal disorders the treatment of which does not belong to dermatology. After a survey on the mechanism of action of antiandrogens the basic difference between androgen dependent skin disorders and endocrinopathies with manifestation on the skin and its appendages is explained. Androgen dependent skin disorders, like oily seborrhea and most cases of acne are not the result of endocrine disturbances in the sense of an pathologically increased or decreased production of sexual hormons. Administering sexual hormons the physician takes advantage of the sebosuppressive effect of female sexual hormons as he does of the antiallergic activity of the hormon cortisol (and related compounds) in the treatment of eczemas. The antiandrogenic treatment of androgenetic alopecia, hirsutism and androgenetic acne--with their underlying hormonal disturbance, consisting in an increased production of androgens, represents an quasi etiological therapy. As in these cases the hormonal disturbances finds its expression mainly or exclusively in disorders of the skin or hair growth, the dermatologist, preferentially in cooperation with endocrinogists and/or gynacologists remains entitled to take over the treatment. The available drugs are discussed and suggestions are made for their appropriate use.

  13. Chemical Suppression of the Reactivated Androgen Signaling Pathway in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-08

    Prostate Cancer, Castration Resistant Disease, Hedgehog Signaling, Smoothened, Gli, Cyclopamine, Androgen Signaling, Androgen Biosynthesis, Androgen...role of Hedgehog /Gli Signaling in generating the androgen-independent growth phenotype of castration resistant prostate cancer and will test the ability...of drugs that target Hedgehog /Gli as a means to suppress the androgen independent growth behavior associated with castration resistant prostate

  14. Concept and Viability of Androgen Annihilation for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, James L.

    2014-01-01

    There remains no standard of care for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy but who have no radiographic metastases, even though this is the second largest group of prostate cancer (CaP) patients in the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may cure some men with advanced CaP based on single institution series and a randomized clinical trial of immediate versus delayed ADT for men found to have pelvic lymph node metastasis at the time of radical prostatectomy. ADT may be more effective when initiated for minimal disease burden, which can be detected using PSA after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, and if more complete disruption of the androgen axis using newer agents decreases the chance that androgen-sensitive cells survive to adapt to a low androgen environment. Androgens may be “annihilated” sing simultaneously a luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) antagonist or agonist to inhibit testicular production of testosterone, a cytochrome P45017A1 (CYP17A1) inhibitor to diminish metabolism of testosterone via the adrenal pathway and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via the backdoor pathway, a 5α-reductase inhibitor to diminish testosterone reduction to DHT and backdoor metabolism of progesterone substrates to DHT, and a newer anti-androgen to compete better with DHT for the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain. Early initiation of androgen annihilation for induction as part of planned intermittent ADT should be safe, may reduce tumor burden below a threshold that allows eradication by the immune system, and may cure many men who have failed definitive local therapy. PMID:24771515

  15. Discordant measures of androgen-binding kinetics in two mutant androgen receptors causing mild or partial androgen insensitivity, respectively.

    PubMed

    Shkolny, D L; Beitel, L K; Ginsberg, J; Pekeles, G; Arbour, L; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M A

    1999-02-01

    We have characterized two different mutations of the human androgen receptor (hAR) found in two unrelated subjects with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS): in one, the external genitalia were ambiguous (partial, PAIS); in the other, they were male, but small (mild, MAIS). Single base substitutions have been found in both individuals: E772A in the PAIS subject, and R871G in the MAIS patient. In COS-1 cells transfected with the E772A and R871G hARs, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for mibolerone (MB) and methyltrienolone are normal. Nonetheless, the mutant hAR from the PAIS subject (E772A) has elevated nonequilibrium dissociation rate constants (k(diss)) for both androgens. In contrast, the MAIS subject's hAR (R871G) has k(diss) values that are apparently normal for MB and methyltrienolone; in addition, the R871G hAR's ability to bind MB resists thermal stress better than the hAR from the PAIS subject. The E772A and R871G hARs, therefore, confer the same pattern of discordant androgen-binding parameters in transfected COS-1 cells as observed previously in the subjects' genital skin fibroblasts. This proves their pathogenicity and correlates with the relative severity of the clinical phenotype. In COS-1 cells transfected with an androgen-responsive reporter gene, trans-activation was 50% of normal in cells containing either mutant hAR. However, mutant hAR-MB binding is unstable during prolonged incubation with MB, whereas normal hAR-MB binding increases. Thus, normal equilibrium dissociation constants alone, as determined by Scatchard analysis, may not be indicative of normal hAR function. An increased k(diss) despite a normal Kd for a given androgen suggests that it not only has increased egress from a mutant ligand-binding pocket, but also increased access to it. This hypothesis has certain implications in terms of the three-dimensional model of the ligand-binding domain of the nuclear receptor superfamily.

  16. Life's Impact on the Soil Production Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Emma; Willenbring, Jane; Brocard, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Soil melds life and lithology, but the top-down production of soil by the incorporation of organic matter has typically been viewed through a lens of soil biogeochemistry and the bottom-up weathering of bedrock viewed from a geomorphologic perspective. We merge these perspectives by developing a variation on the classic geomorphological soil production function [1] that accounts for the influence of top-down soil production by additions of organic material. In the classic view [1], production rate of soil from bedrock weathering is a function of the thickness of the soil horizon. Under steady state conditions, this thickness is controlled by a constant coefficient of diffusion and by the hillslope curvature. Across the globe, equilibrium landscapes can be hard to find. We explore the many ways that biota influence the upper soil horizons and move the soil-hillslope system out of steady state using measurements of in situ 10Be at depth in soil profiles. Our empirical case study is in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory of northeastern Puerto Rico, where long term ecological monitoring suggests an average of 375 m My-1 of litter fall [2] and as much as 17.5 m My-1 of dust [3] is contributed to the forest floor. This substantial volume of material forms an active surficial layer, functionally increasing the residence time of grains deeper in the soil profile. Litter recycling influences the cosmogenic dose rate to be higher by increasing the residence time of grains and to be lower by increasing environmental shielding. In unconstrained systems, probabilistic modeling can determine a range of solutions for the ages of grains determined with 10Be depth profiles[4]. We compare the probabilistic outcomes to actual measurements of the in situ 10Be at depth in soil profiles from the Luquillo Mountains. Life living in the soil, rather than on it, is of equal importance in the Luquillo Mountains. On average, the soil is occupied by 200 individual earthworms per m2 [5

  17. The selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024 (enobosarm) improves lean body mass and physical function in healthy elderly men and postmenopausal women: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Dalton, James T; Barnette, Kester G; Bohl, Casey E; Hancock, Michael L; Rodriguez, Domingo; Dodson, Shontelle T; Morton, Ronald A; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Cachexia, also known as muscle wasting, is a complex metabolic condition characterized by loss of skeletal muscle and a decline in physical function. Muscle wasting is associated with cancer, sarcopenia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, end-stage renal disease, and other chronic conditions and results in significant morbidity and mortality. GTx-024 (enobosarm) is a nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that has tissue-selective anabolic effects in muscle and bone, while sparing other androgenic tissue related to hair growth in women and prostate effects in men. GTx-024 has demonstrated promising pharmacologic effects in preclinical studies and favorable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in phase I investigation. METHODS: A 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial was conducted to evaluate GTx-024 in 120 healthy elderly men (>60 years of age) and postmenopausal women. The primary endpoint was total lean body mass assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and secondary endpoints included physical function, body weight, insulin resistance, and safety. RESULTS: GTx-024 treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in total lean body mass that were statistically significant (P < 0.001, 3 mg vs. placebo) and clinically meaningful. There were also significant improvements in physical function (P = 0.013, 3 mg vs. placebo) and insulin resistance (P = 0.013, 3 mg vs. placebo). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatment groups. CONCLUSION: GTx-024 showed a dose-dependent improvement in total lean body mass and physical function and was well tolerated. GTx-024 may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of muscle wasting associated with cancer and other chronic diseases.

  18. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Nicolás; Motos, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a disorder caused by a mutation of the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR; Xq11-q12). The prevalence of AIS has been estimated to be one case in every 20,000 to 64,000 newborn males for the complete syndrome (CAIS), and the prevalence is unknown for the partial syndrome (PAIS). The symptoms range from phenotypically normal males with impaired spermatogenesis to phenotypically normal women with primary amenorrhea. Various forms of ambiguous genitalia have been observed at birth. The diagnosis is confirmed by determining the exact mutation in the AR gene. PAIS individuals require precise diagnosis as early as possible so that the sex can be assigned, treatment can be recommended, and they can receive proper genetic counseling. After birth, differential diagnosis should be performed using other forms of abnormal sexual differentiation of primary amenorrhea. The treatment of AIS is based on reinforcement sexual identity, gonadectomy planning, and hormone replacement therapy. The prognosis for CAIS is good if the testicular tissue is removed at the appropriate time. For PAIS, the prognosis depends on the ambiguity of the genitalia and physical and psychosocial adjustment to the assigned sex.

  19. Androgens and cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Spoletini, I; Vitale, C; Pelliccia, F; Fossati, C; Rosano, G M C

    2014-12-01

    Androgens play a pivotal role in cardiovascular function and their effects differ between men and women. In postmenopausal women, testosterone replacement within physiological levels is associated with overall well-being. However, a definitive explanation as to how androgens have an impact on cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women and whether they may be used for cardiovascular treatment has yet to be established. With these aims, a systematic review of the existing studies on the link between androgens and cardiovascular disease and the effects of testosterone therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women has been conducted. The few existing studies on cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women indicate no effect or a deleterious effect of increasing androgens and increased cardiovascular risk. However, there is evidence of a favorable effect of androgens on surrogate cardiovascular markers in postmenopausal women, such as high density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, body fat mass and triglycerides. Further studies are therefore needed to clarify the impact of therapy with androgens on cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women. The cardiovascular effect of testosterone or methyltestosterone with or without concomitant estrogens needs to be elucidated.

  20. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products.

    PubMed

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity.

  1. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity. - Highlights: • Mixtures of AR antagonists at low individual concentrations cause complete inhibition.

  2. Brief communication: Fecal androgen excretion and fetal sex effects during gestation in wild Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis).

    PubMed

    Fürtbauer, Ines; Heistermann, Michael; Schülke, Oliver; Ostner, Julia

    2012-02-01

    In placental mammals, pregnancy usually is associated with an increase in maternal androgens, which may significantly impact fetal growth and differentiation, and affect postnatal development and behavior. Owing to their slow life histories and challenging social conditions, determination of maternal androgens and potential interference effects of fetal androgen production are of particular interest in wild primates. However, androgen production has been rarely investigated in wild female primates, and studies on maternal androgens during gestation in particular often do not span the entire pregnancy. Here, we characterize fecal androgen production throughout gestation in wild Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis) using noninvasive hormone analysis and, furthermore, examine fetal sex effects on maternal androgen excretion. A total of 207 fecal samples were analyzed from seven females for concentrations of immunoreactive epiandrosterone (iEA). Fecal iEA concentrations, as predicted based on cercopithecine blood-serum patterns, increased during early gestation and were significantly higher during the first trimester compared with preconception concentrations and those recorded during later stages of gestation. Further, during the third trimester, male-carrying mothers showed significantly higher iEA concentrations compared with female-carrying mothers. This first characterization of fecal androgen excretion during gestation in Assamese macaques indicates both a maternal and fetal effect on androgen production. Although our sample size is small, our results, nevertheless, provide the basis for assessing potential influences of maternal androgens on postnatal offspring development and behavior.

  3. Cephalopod ink: production, chemistry, functions and applications.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D

    2014-05-12

    One of the most distinctive and defining features of coleoid cephalopods-squid, cuttlefish and octopus-is their inking behavior. Their ink, which is blackened by melanin, but also contains other constituents, has been used by humans in various ways for millennia. This review summarizes our current knowledge of cephalopod ink. Topics include: (1) the production of ink, including the functional organization of the ink sac and funnel organ that produce it; (2) the chemical components of ink, with a focus on the best known of these-melanin and the biochemical pathways involved in its production; (3) the neuroecology of the use of ink in predator-prey interactions by cephalopods in their natural environment; and (4) the use of cephalopod ink by humans, including in the development of drugs for biomedical applications and other chemicals for industrial and other commercial applications. As is hopefully evident from this review, much is known about cephalopod ink and inking, yet more striking is how little we know. Towards closing that gap, future directions in research on cephalopod inking are suggested.

  4. Cephalopod Ink: Production, Chemistry, Functions and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Derby, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most distinctive and defining features of coleoid cephalopods—squid, cuttlefish and octopus—is their inking behavior. Their ink, which is blackened by melanin, but also contains other constituents, has been used by humans in various ways for millennia. This review summarizes our current knowledge of cephalopod ink. Topics include: (1) the production of ink, including the functional organization of the ink sac and funnel organ that produce it; (2) the chemical components of ink, with a focus on the best known of these—melanin and the biochemical pathways involved in its production; (3) the neuroecology of the use of ink in predator-prey interactions by cephalopods in their natural environment; and (4) the use of cephalopod ink by humans, including in the development of drugs for biomedical applications and other chemicals for industrial and other commercial applications. As is hopefully evident from this review, much is known about cephalopod ink and inking, yet more striking is how little we know. Towards closing that gap, future directions in research on cephalopod inking are suggested. PMID:24824020

  5. Loss of androgen receptor binding to selective androgen response elements causes a reproductive phenotype in a knockin mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schauwaers, Kris; De Gendt, Karel; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Atanassova, Nina; Haelens, Annemie; Callewaert, Leen; Moehren, Udo; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Verhoeven, Guido; Verrijdt, Guy; Claessens, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Androgens influence transcription of their target genes through the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) that subsequently interacts with specific DNA motifs in these genes. These DNA motifs, called androgen response elements (AREs), can be classified in two classes: the classical AREs, which are also recognized by the other steroid hormone receptors; and the AR-selective AREs, which display selectivity for the AR. For in vitro interaction with the selective AREs, the androgen receptor DNA-binding domain is dependent on specific residues in its second zinc-finger. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these selective elements, we generated a germ-line knockin mouse model, termed SPARKI (SPecificity-affecting AR KnockIn), in which the second zinc-finger of the AR was replaced with that of the glucocorticoid receptor, resulting in a chimeric protein that retains its ability to bind classical AREs but is unable to bind selective AREs. The reproductive organs of SPARKI males are smaller compared with wild-type animals, and they are also subfertile. Intriguingly, however, they do not display any anabolic phenotype. The expression of two testis-specific, androgen-responsive genes is differentially affected by the SPARKI mutation, which is correlated with the involvement of different types of response elements in their androgen responsiveness. In this report, we present the first in vivo evidence of the existence of two functionally different types of AREs and demonstrate that AR-regulated gene expression can be targeted based on this distinction. PMID:17360365

  6. Water Production Functions for Central Plains Crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sustaining irrigated agriculture with limited water supplies requires maximizing productivity per unit of water. Relationships between crop production and water consumed are basic information required to maximize productivity. This information can be used to determine if deficit irrigation is eco...

  7. The Androgen Receptor Supports Tumor Progression After the Loss of Ovarian Function in a Preclinical Model of Obesity and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wellberg, Elizabeth A; Checkley, L Allyson; Giles, Erin D; Johnson, Stevi J; Oljira, Robera; Wahdan-Alaswad, Reema; Foright, Rebecca M; Dooley, Greg; Edgerton, Susan M; Jindal, Sonali; Johnson, Ginger C; Richer, Jennifer K; Kabos, Peter; Thor, Ann D; Schedin, Pepper; MacLean, Paul S; Anderson, Steven M

    2017-07-24

    The androgen receptor (AR) has context-dependent roles in breast cancer growth and progression. Overall, high tumor AR levels predict a favorable patient outcome, but several studies have established a tumor promotional role for AR, particularly in supporting the growth of estrogen receptor positive (ER-positive) breast cancers after endocrine therapy. Our previous studies have demonstrated that obesity promotes mammary tumor progression after ovariectomy (OVX) in a rat model of postmenopausal breast cancer. Here, we investigated a potential role for AR in obesity-associated post-OVX mammary tumor progression following ovarian estrogen loss. In this model, we found that obese but not lean rats had nuclear localized AR in tumors that progressed 3 weeks after OVX, compared to those that regressed. AR nuclear localization is consistent with activation of AR-dependent transcription. Longer-term studies (8 weeks post-OVX) showed that AR nuclear localization and expression were maintained in tumors that had progressed, but AR expression was nearly lost in tumors that were regressing. The anti-androgen enzalutamide effectively blocked tumor progression in obese rats by promoting tumor necrosis and also prevented the formation of new tumors after OVX. Neither circulating nor mammary adipose tissue levels of the AR ligand testosterone were elevated in obese compared to lean rats; however, IL-6, which we previously reported to be higher in plasma from obese versus lean rats, sensitized breast cancer cells to low levels of testosterone. Our study demonstrates that, in the context of obesity, AR plays a role in driving ER-positive mammary tumor progression in an environment of low estrogen availability, and that circulating factors unique to the obese host, including IL-6, may influence how cancer cells respond to steroid hormones.

  8. Androgen Metabolism in Progression to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    related hormones. BJU. Int. 101, 1084- 1089 . Bao,B.Y., Chuang,B.F., Wang,Q., Sartor,O., Balk,S.P., Brown,M., Kantoff,P.W., and Lee,G.S. (2008). Androgen...in castration- resistant prostate cancer, with a correlative assessment of androgen-related hormones. BJU. Int. 101, 1084- 1089 . Bao,B.Y., Chuang,B.F

  9. Hematological changes during androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Mathis; Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2012-03-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with a plethora of adverse effects, consistent with the androgen dependency of multiple reproductive and somatic tissues. One such tissue is the hemopoietic system, and one of the most predictable consequences of ADT is the development of anemia. Although anemia caused by ADT is rarely severe, ADT is often given to frail, elderly men with increased susceptibility to anemia due to multiple other causes. ADT-associated anemia may contribute to fatigue and reduced quality of life (QoL) in such men, although this requires further study. While anemia is an independent risk factor of mortality in men with prostate cancer, it is not known whether treatment of ADT-associated anemia alters clinically important outcomes, or whether treatment affects mortality. Awareness of the phenomenon of ADT-induced anemia should avoid unnecessary work-up in mild cases of normocytic normochromic anemia. However, assessment and treatment of more severe anemia may be required. This should be determined on an individual basis. In contrast to the well-described actions of ADT on erythropoiesis, its effect on other hemopoietic lineages has been less well elucidated. While preclinical studies have found roles for androgens in maturation and differentiated function of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets, the implications of these findings for men with prostate cancer receiving ADT require further studies.

  10. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways.

  11. Expression of Pleiotrophin in the Prostate is Androgen Regulated and it Functions as an Autocrine Regulator of Mesenchyme and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and as a Paracrine Regulator of Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Brigid; Vanpoucke, Griet; Grace, O Cathal; Smith, Lee; Anderson, Richard A; Riddick, Antony CP; Franco, Omar E; Hayward, Simon W; Thomson, Axel A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Androgens and paracrine signaling from mesenchyme/stroma regulate development and disease of the prostate, and gene profiling studies of inductive prostate mesenchyme have identified candidate molecules such as pleiotrophin (Ptn). METHODS Ptn transcripts and protein were localized by in situ and immunohistochemistry and Ptn mRNA was quantitated by Northern blot and qRT-PCR. Ptn function was examined by addition of hPTN protein to rat ventral prostate organ cultures, primary human fetal prostate fibroblasts, prostate cancer associated fibroblasts, and BPH1 epithelia. RESULTS During development, Ptn transcripts and protein were expressed in ventral mesenchymal pad (VMP) and prostatic mesenchyme. Ptn was localized to mesenchyme surrounding ductal epithelial tips undergoing branching morphogenesis, and was located on the surface of epithelia. hPTN protein stimulated branching morphogenesis and stromal and epithelial proliferation, when added to rat VP cultures, and also stimulated growth of fetal human prostate fibroblasts, prostate cancer associated fibroblasts, and BPH1 epithelia. PTN mRNA was enriched in patient-matched normal prostate fibroblasts versus prostate cancer associated fibroblasts. PTN also showed male enriched expression in fetal human male urethra versus female, and between wt male and ARKO male mice. Transcripts for PTN were upregulated by testosterone in fetal human prostate fibroblasts and organ cultures of female rat VMP. Ptn protein was increased by testosterone in organ cultures of female rat VMP and in rat male urethra compared to female. CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that in the prostate Ptn functions as a regulator of both mesenchymal and epithelial proliferation, and that androgens regulate Ptn levels. Prostate 71:305–317, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20812209

  12. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W.; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element (CRE) in the human BCRP promoter that is functional in human cancer cell lines of multiple lineages. 8Br-cAMP increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway also led to an increase in BCRP promoter reporter activity and to phosphorylation of the c-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound phospho-CREB; point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is also involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in multiple human cancer cell lines following activation of a variety of signaling pathways. PMID:25615818

  13. Improved androgen specificity of AR-EcoScreen by CRISPR based glucocorticoid receptor knockout.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Nick; Andringa, Dave; de Leeuw, Willem-Jan; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Iida, Mitsuru; Houtman, Corine J; de Boer, Jacob; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja H; Hamers, Timo

    2017-08-11

    The AR-EcoScreen is a widely used reporter assay for the detection of androgens and anti-androgens. Endogenous expression of glucocorticoid receptors and their affinity for the androgen responsive element that drives reporter expression, however, makes the reporter cells sensitive to interference by glucocorticoids and less specific for (anti-)androgens. To create a glucocorticoid insensitive derivative of the AR-EcoScreen, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing was used to develop glucocorticoid receptor knockout mutants by targeting various sites in the glucocorticoid gene. Two mutant cell lines were further characterized and validated against the unmodified AR-EcoScreen with a set of 19 environmentally relevant chemicals and a series of environmental passive sampler extracts with (anti-)androgenic activity. Sequencing of the targeted sites revealed premature stop codons following frame-shift mutations, leading to an absence of functional glucocorticoid receptor expression. The introduced mutations rendered cell lines insensitive to glucocorticoid activation and caused no significant difference in the responsiveness towards (anti-)androgens, compared to the unmodified AR-EcoScreen cells, allowing the selective, GR-independent, determination of (anti-)androgenicity in environmental passive sampler extracts. The increase in selectivity for (anti-)androgens improves reliability of the AR-EcoScreen and will provide higher accuracy in determining (anti-)androgenic potential when applied in toxicity screening and environmental monitoring of both single compounds and mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular biology of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Jarmo

    2012-04-16

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the most common specific cause of 46,XY disorder in sex development. The androgen signaling pathway is complex but so far, the only gene linked with AIS is the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR are found in most subjects with complete AIS but in partial AIS, the rate has varied 28-73%, depending on the case selection. More than 400 different mutations in AR leading to AIS have been reported. Most mutations are missense substitutions located in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. However, when systematically screened, a substantial amount of mutations can be detected also in the N-terminal domain encoded by exon 1. Within this exon lie two trinucleotide, CAG and GGN repeat regions which are polymorphic in length. Their role in androgen insensitivity is somewhat unclear. Recent advances in protein modeling have resulted in better understanding of the mechanism of known AR mutations.

  15. Functionality of probiotics - potential for product development.

    PubMed

    Dekker, James; Collett, Michael; Prasad, Jaya; Gopal, Pramod

    2007-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly accepted by consumers that live lactic acid bacteria do exert health benefits when eaten. In addition, it is also becoming recognised that not all probiotic bacteria are equal. It is now no longer just a question of providing sufficient numbers of viable bacteria in a product; industry must also provide proof of efficacy for each strain. In the early 1990s, Fonterra embarked on a programme to develop proprietary probiotic strains, and as a result, commercialised two strains, Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. Over the past decade, Fonterra has developed a significant body of peerreviewed published reports around these strains, including studies showing safety in animal and human trials, protection against pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7, modulation of human and animal immune markers at realistic dose rates, and efficacy in human clinical trials. Based on this work, HN019 and HN001 have been applied to several functional foods both by Fonterra (under the DR10 and DR20 brands, respectively) and by third parties (e.g. under the HOWARU brand by Danisco). While the 'gold standard' of proof of efficacy is a phase III clinical trial, ethical considerations as well as expense preclude the use of clinical trials as screening tools for probiotics. Therefore, biomarkers have to be employed to identify strains with probiotic utility, and to define the different positive health benefits of existing probiotic strains. However, as the mechanisms by which most probiotic bacteria exert their health benefits remain unclear, the question of which biomarkers accurately reflect efficacy in vivo remains unresolved. With recent technological advances, and the shift toward probiotics targeted to specific conditions, researchers are beginning to tease out how probiotic bacteria work, and it is this knowledge that will inform biomarker development and improve the ability to offer the market safe

  16. Clinical, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of androgen insensitivity syndromes from south Indian cohort and detection and in-silico characterization of androgen receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    V G, Abilash; S, Radha; K M, Marimuthu; K, Thangaraj; S, Arun; S, Nishu; A, Mohana Priya; J, Meena; D, Anuradha

    2016-01-30

    Rare cases of 9 complete androgen insensitivity syndromes, 9 cases of partial androgen insensitivity syndromes and equal number of male control samples were selected for this study. Few strong variations in clinical features were noticed; Giemsa banded metaphase revealed a 46,XY karyotype and the frequency of chromosome aberrations were significantly higher when compared with control samples. DNA sequence analysis of the androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndromes revealed three missense mutations - c.C1713>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved histidine residue with glutamine p.(His571Glu) in DNA-binding domain, c.A1715>G resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved tyrosine residue with cysteine p.(Tyr572Cys) in DNA-binding domain and c.G2599>A resulting in the replacement of a highly conserved valine residue with methionine p.(Val867Met) in ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor gene respectively. The heterozygous type of mutations c.C1713>G and c.G2599>A observed in mothers of the patients for familial cases concluding that the mutation was inherited from the mother. The novel mutation c.C1713>G is reported first time in androgen insensitivity syndrome. In-silico analysis of mutations observed in androgen receptor gene of androgen insensitivity syndrome predicted that the substitution at Y572C and V867M could probably disrupt the protein structure and function.

  17. Proteasome function is required for platelet production

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dallas S.; Smith, Matthew C.P.; Campbell, Robert A.; Zimmerman, Patrick W.; Franks, Zechariah B.; Kraemer, Bjorn F.; Machlus, Kellie R.; Ling, Jing; Kamba, Patrick; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Rowley, Jesse W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Sola-Visner, Martha; Italiano, Joseph E.; Christensen, Hilary; Kahr, Walter H.A.; Li, Dean Y.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome inhibiter bortezomib has been successfully used to treat patients with relapsed multiple myeloma; however, many of these patients become thrombocytopenic, and it is not clear how the proteasome influences platelet production. Here we determined that pharmacologic inhibition of proteasome activity blocks proplatelet formation in human and mouse megakaryocytes. We also found that megakaryocytes isolated from mice deficient for PSMC1, an essential subunit of the 26S proteasome, fail to produce proplatelets. Consistent with decreased proplatelet formation, mice lacking PSMC1 in platelets (Psmc1fl/fl Pf4-Cre mice) exhibited severe thrombocytopenia and died shortly after birth. The failure to produce proplatelets in proteasome-inhibited megakaryocytes was due to upregulation and hyperactivation of the small GTPase, RhoA, rather than NF-κB, as has been previously suggested. Inhibition of RhoA or its downstream target, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), restored megakaryocyte proplatelet formation in the setting of proteasome inhibition in vitro. Similarly, fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor used clinically to treat cerebral vasospasm, restored platelet counts in adult mice that were made thrombocytopenic by tamoxifen-induced suppression of proteasome activity in megakaryocytes and platelets (Psmc1fl/fl Pdgf-Cre-ER mice). These results indicate that proteasome function is critical for thrombopoiesis, and suggest inhibition of RhoA signaling as a potential strategy to treat thrombocytopenia in bortezomib-treated multiple myeloma patients. PMID:25061876

  18. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  19. Androgen Activation of the Folate Receptor α Gene through Partial Tethering of the Androgen Receptor by C/EBPα○

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Zhang, Juan; Kelley, Karen M.M.; Gonit, Mesfin; Hao, Hong; Ratnam, Manohar

    2010-01-01

    The folate receptor α (FRα) is critical for normal embryonic and fetal development. The receptor has a relatively narrow tissue specificity which includes the visceral endoderm and the placenta and mediates delivery of folate, inadequacy of which results in termination of pregnancy or developmental defects. We have previously reported that the FRα gene is negatively and directly regulated by estrogen and positively but indirectly by progesterone and glucocorticoid. To further investigate hormonal control of this gene and in view of the growing evidence for the importance of the androgen receptor (AR) in endometrial and placental functions, we examined the response of the FRα gene to androgen. Here we demonstrate that the FRα gene is directly activated by androgen. The P4 promoter of the FRα gene is the target of hormone-dependent activation by the androgen receptor (AR) in a manner that is co-activator-dependent. The site of functional association of AR in the FRα gene maps to a 35bp region occurring ~1500bp upstream of the target promoter. The functional elements within this region are an androgen response element (ARE) half-site and a non-canonical C/EBP element that cooperate to recruit AR in a manner that is dependent on the DNA-bound C/EBPα. Since the placenta is rich in C/EBPα, the findings underscore the multiplicity of mechanisms by which the FRα gene is under the exquisite control of steroid hormones. PMID:20817090

  20. Androgen replacement therapy: present and future.

    PubMed

    Gooren, Louis J G; Bunck, Mathijs C M

    2004-01-01

    The major goal of androgen substitution is to replace testosterone at levels as close to physiological levels as is possible. For some androgen-dependent functions testosterone is a pro-hormone, peripherally converted to 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), of which the levels preferably should be within normal physiological ranges. Furthermore, androgens should have a good safety profile without adverse effects on the prostate, serum lipids, liver or respiratory function, and they must be convenient to use and patient-friendly, with a relative independence from medical services. Natural testosterone is viewed as the best androgen for substitution in hypogonadal men. The reason behind the selection is that testosterone can be converted to DHT and E2, thus developing the full spectrum of testosterone activities in long-term substitution. The mainstays of testosterone substitution are parenteral testosterone esters (testosterone enantate and testosterone cipionate) administered every 2-3 weeks. A major disadvantage is the strongly fluctuating levels of plasma testosterone, which are not in the physiological range at least 50% of the time. Also, the generated plasma E2 is usually supraphysiological. A major improvement is parenteral testosterone undecanoate producing normal plasma levels of testosterone for 12 weeks, with normal plasma levels of DHT and E2 also. Subcutaneous testosterone implants provide the patient, depending on the dose of implants, with normal plasma testosterone for 3-6 months. However, their use is not widespread. Oral testosterone undecanoate dissolved in castor oil bypasses the liver via its lymphatic absorption. At a dosage of 80 mg twice daily, plasma testosterone levels are largely in the normal range, but plasma DHT tends to be elevated. For two decades transdermal testosterone preparations have been available and have an attractive pharmacokinetic profile. Scrotal testosterone patches generate supraphysiological

  1. Influencing factors on color and product-function association.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Hsien

    2011-06-01

    The associations of age, sex, and matching types with color and product-function were examined in a real-world product scenario (shampoo) among 128 volunteers (M age = 29.3 yr.; SD = 15.6). A pilot study identified eight popular colors and eight product-functions. The association between color and product-function was explored in the main sample. Responses suggested seven pairings of color/product-functions: Red/Hot oil treatment, Yellow/Bright and shiny hair, Green/Herbal extracts, Blue/Deep cleaning, Purple/Soothing, Black/Antiseptic, and White/Anti-dandruff. Analyses indicated that adult participants required more repetitions for retention, as did memorization with random pairing compared to participant-selected pairings. There were statistically significant correlations of responses to colors and product functions. With known color/product-function associations, manufacturers might promote their products more effectively. It is suggested that the associations might be sex- or culture-specific.

  2. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Mohamad; Khatami, Saied Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR) encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN) in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015). The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234). Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity. PMID:26221130

  3. Androgen Receptor Variants and Prostate Cancer in Humanized AR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Albertelli, Megan A.; O’Mahony, Orla A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Androgen, acting via the androgen receptor (AR), is central to male development, differentiation and hormone-dependent diseases such as prostate cancer. AR is actively involved in the initiation of prostate cancer, the transition to androgen independence, and many mechanisms of resistance to therapy. To examine genetic variation of AR in cancer, we created mice by germ-line gene targeting in which human AR sequence replaces that of the mouse. Since shorter length of a polymorphic N-terminal glutamine (Q) tract has been linked to prostate cancer risk, we introduced alleles with 12, 21 or 48 Qs to test this association. The three “humanized” AR mouse strains (h/mAR) are normal physiologically, as well as by cellular and molecular criteria, although slight differences are detected in AR target gene expression, correlating inversely with Q tract length. However, distinct allele-dependent differences in tumorigenesis are evident when these mice are crossed to a transgenic prostate cancer model. Remarkably, Q tract variation also differentially impacts disease progression following androgen depletion. This finding emphasizes the importance of AR function in androgen-independent as well as –dependent disease. These mice provide a novel genetic paradigm in which to dissect opposing functions of AR in tumor suppression vs. oncogenesis. PMID:17936615

  4. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  5. Identification of miR-30b-3p and miR-30d-5p as direct regulators of androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer by complementary functional microRNA library screening

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Binod; Khaleghzadegan, Salar; Mears, Brian; Hatano, Koji; Kudrolli, Tarana A.; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Yeater, David B.; Ewing, Charles M.; Luo, Jun; Isaacs, William B.; Marchionni, Luigi; Lupold, Shawn E.

    2016-01-01

    The Androgen Receptor (AR) plays a key role in prostate biology and in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castration resistance. The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in aberrant AR signaling have not been fully characterized. Here we screened a library of 810 miRNA mimics to identify miRNAs that alter AR activity in complementary functional assays including protein lysate microarray (LMA) quantification of AR and PSA protein levels, AR transcriptional reporter activity, and AR-positive PCa cell viability. Candidate AR-regulating miRNAs were verified through AR transcriptional reporter and cell viability assays. MiRNA binding sites were found within the AR 3′-untranslated region (UTR) and within the AR and AR-V7 coding regions. MiRNA activity was characterized by western blotting, 3′-UTR reporter assay, and AR-GFP and AR-V7-GFP reporter assays. Results uncovered miR-30 family members as direct AR inhibitors. Inhibition of endogenous miR-30b-3p and miR-30d-5p enhanced AR expression and androgen-independent cell growth. Droplet digital RT-PCR quantification of miR-30c-5p and miR-30d-5p revealed significantly reduced levels in metastatic castration resistant PCa (CRPC), when compared to healthy prostate tissues. MiR-30d-5p levels were inversely correlated with AR activity, as measured by PSA mRNA, in metastatic CRPC. Collectively, these studies provide a comprehensive evaluation of AR-regulating miRNAs in PCa. PMID:27683042

  6. Identification of miR-30b-3p and miR-30d-5p as direct regulators of androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer by complementary functional microRNA library screening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Binod; Khaleghzadegan, Salar; Mears, Brian; Hatano, Koji; Kudrolli, Tarana A; Chowdhury, Wasim H; Yeater, David B; Ewing, Charles M; Luo, Jun; Isaacs, William B; Marchionni, Luigi; Lupold, Shawn E

    2016-11-08

    The Androgen Receptor (AR) plays a key role in prostate biology and in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to castration resistance. The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in aberrant AR signaling have not been fully characterized. Here we screened a library of 810 miRNA mimics to identify miRNAs that alter AR activity in complementary functional assays including protein lysate microarray (LMA) quantification of AR and PSA protein levels, AR transcriptional reporter activity, and AR-positive PCa cell viability. Candidate AR-regulating miRNAs were verified through AR transcriptional reporter and cell viability assays. MiRNA binding sites were found within the AR 3'-untranslated region (UTR) and within the AR and AR-V7 coding regions. MiRNA activity was characterized by western blotting, 3'-UTR reporter assay, and AR-GFP and AR-V7-GFP reporter assays. Results uncovered miR-30 family members as direct AR inhibitors. Inhibition of endogenous miR-30b-3p and miR-30d-5p enhanced AR expression and androgen-independent cell growth. Droplet digital RT-PCR quantification of miR-30c-5p and miR-30d-5p revealed significantly reduced levels in metastatic castration resistant PCa (CRPC), when compared to healthy prostate tissues. MiR-30d-5p levels were inversely correlated with AR activity, as measured by PSA mRNA, in metastatic CRPC. Collectively, these studies provide a comprehensive evaluation of AR-regulating miRNAs in PCa.

  7. Urinary profiles of progestin and androgen metabolites in female polar bears during parturient and non-parturient cycles

    PubMed Central

    Mastromonaco, Gabriela F.; Owen, Megan A.; Kouba, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Due to the environmental and anthropogenic impacts that continue to threaten the reproductive success of polar bears, a more detailed understanding of their reproductive cycle is needed. Captive populations of polar bears provide an excellent opportunity to learn more about the reproductive physiology of the species. Progestin (P4) and androgen (T) metabolites in urine, and their ratio (P4:T), were examined during 11 reproductive cycles of captive female polar bears (n = 4) to characterize the steroid hormone profile during pregnancy and determine possible variations related to reproductive failure. The concentration of hormone metabolites in urine were determined through enzyme immunoassay. Reproductive cycles were classified as pregnant (n = 3), anovulatory (n = 4) and ovulatory-non-parturient (n = 4) based on the changes in urinary hormone metabolite values and cub production. In the absence of a lactational suppression of estrus, elevated androgen concentrations suggested resumption of follicular development within 3 weeks of parturition. Breeding behaviours were most often observed when androgen values were at their highest or in decline. Ovulation was identified by a return to basal androgen concentration and elevation of progestins within 1–4 weeks after breeding. As a result, urinary concentrations of progestins were greater than androgens (P4:T ratio ≥ 1.0) during ovulatory cycles whereas the P4:T ratio was <1.0 when females were anovulatory. Progestins and the P4:T ratio of parturient cycles were greatest beginning in June/July (17–20 weeks after breeding) and reached a peak at 24–37 weeks (mid-October/mid-November, 4–9 weeks before birth of cubs). Non-invasive monitoring of hormone metabolites in urine provided a rapid determination of endocrine function for improved husbandry and reproductive management of polar bears in captivity. Further research is warranted to understand the reproductive endocrinology of polar bears and its impact

  8. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Matthew DL; Wu, Frederick CW

    2014-01-01

    Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well–tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies. PMID:24457838

  9. Paracrine and intracrine contributions of androgens and estrogens to adipose tissue biology: physiopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Waraich, Rizwana S; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2013-08-01

    In mammals, the male and female hormones androgen and estrogen act as endocrine regulators of energy metabolism. However, adipose tissue is also a site of androgen and estrogen synthesis; androgens convert to estrogens in these tissues, and adipose tissue is also a reservoir of steroids that act locally in a paracrine and intracrine manner. Thus, in adipose tissue, the local output of sex hormones is more complex than would be suggested by routine measurement of serum hormone concentrations. This review integrates studies on the effects of androgens and estrogens in the developmental programming of adipose tissue function in early life and addresses the contributions of local androgen and estrogen metabolism on adipose tissue function in adults.

  10. Executive functioning in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Agoston, A Monica; Gonzalez-Bolanos, Maria Teresa; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Vanderburg, Nancy; Sarafoglou, Kyriakie

    2017-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a disorder characterized by impaired cortisol synthesis leading to excessive production of adrenal androgens. Prenatal and postnatal exposure to excess androgens may increase neural vulnerability to insult and affect cognitive functions, particularly dopamine-dependent neural circuits responsible for executive functioning (EF). Our study aimed to investigate relationship between more pronounced androgen exposure and EF-related behaviors in children with CAH, as well as sex differences in these associations. Parents of patients with CAH (n=41, boys=17, girls=24; age: M=8.41, SD=4.43) completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), a measure assessing behavioral manifestations of EF. Assessments of bone age advancement, a proxy of cumulative androgen exposure, were analyzed. Advanced bone age predicted more inhibition difficulties in boys but not in girls, and more difficulties in all other BRIEF domains in the total sample. Excessive androgen production affected EF such that more advanced bone age led to more EF-related difficulties. Sex differences in inhibition may result from estrogen exposure moderating the impact of androgens in girls but not in boys. Future interventions may include targeting EF in patients with CAH to enhance quality of life and reduce cognitive consequences associated with this disease.

  11. Androgen receptor (AR) in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Eugene; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the highest leading cause of death worldwide. Several risk factors have been linked to CVDs, including smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and gender among others. Sex hormones, especially the androgen and its receptor, androgen receptor (AR), have been linked to many diseases with a clear gender difference. Here, we summarize the effects of androgen/AR on CVDs, including hypertension, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial hypertrophy, and heart failure, as well as the metabolic syndrome/diabetes and their impacts on CVDs. Androgen/AR signaling exacerbates hypertension, and anti-androgens may suppress hypertension. Androgen/AR signaling plays dual roles in strokes, depending on different kinds of factors; however, generally males have a higher incidence of strokes than females. Androgen and AR differentially modulate atherosclerosis. Androgen deficiency causes elevated lipid accumulation to enhance atherosclerosis; however, targeting AR in selective cells without altering serum androgen levels would suppress atherosclerosis progression. Androgen/AR signaling is crucial in AAA development and progression, and targeting androgen/AR profoundly restricts AAA progression. Men have increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with age-matched women that may be due to androgens. Finally, androgen/AR plays important roles in contributing to obesity and insulin/leptin resistance to increase the metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Identification and Characterization of the Androgen Receptor From the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Kohno, Satomi; Doheny, Brenna M.; Ogino, Yukiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Guillette, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development, reproduction, and health throughout the life span of vertebrates, particularly during the initiation and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. Androgen signaling is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. Mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors, such as exogenous hormones or contaminants that mimic hormones, can disrupt endocrine signaling and function. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a unique model for ecological research in that it exhibits environment-dependent sex determination, is oviparous and long lived. Alligators from a contaminated environment exhibit low reproductive success and morphological disorders of the testis and phallus in neonates and juveniles, both associated with androgen signaling; thus, the alterations are hypothesized to be related to disrupted androgen signaling. However, this line of research has been limited because of a lack of information on the alligator AR gene. Here, we isolated A mississippiensis AR homologs (AmAR) and evaluated receptor-hormone/chemical interactions using a transactivation assay. We showed that AmAR responded to all natural androgens and their effects were inhibited by cotreatment with antiandrogens, such as flutamide, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, and vinclozolin. Intriguingly, we found a spliced form of the AR from alligator cDNA, which lacks seven amino acids within the ligand-binding domain that shows no response to androgens. Finally, we have initial data on a possible dominant-negative function of the spliced form of the AR against androgen-induced AmAR. PMID:25974402

  13. Androgen dependent mechanisms of pro-angiogenic networks in placental and tumor development.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Veronika M; de Brot, Simone; Robinson, Robert S; Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Rakha, Emad; Walton, Thomas; Gardner, David S; Lund, Emma F; Whitchurch, Jonathan; Haigh, Daisy; Lochray, Jack M; Robinson, Brian D; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Fray, Rupert G; Persson, Jenny L; Ødum, Niels; Miftakhova, Regina R; Rizvanov, Albert A; Hughes, Ieuan A; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Heery, David M; Rutland, Catrin S; Mongan, Nigel P

    2017-02-20

    The placenta and tumors share important characteristics, including a requirement to establish effective angiogenesis. In the case of the placenta, optimal angiogenesis is required to sustain the blood flow required to maintain a successful pregnancy, whereas in tumors establishing new blood supplies is considered a key step in supporting metastases. Therefore the development of novel angiogenesis inhibitors has been an area of active research in oncology. A subset of the molecular processes regulating angiogenesis are well understood in the context of both early placentation and tumorigenesis. In this review we focus on the well-established role of androgen regulation of angiogenesis in cancer and relate these mechanisms to placental angiogenesis. The physiological actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand dependent transcription factor. Androgens and the AR are essential for normal male embryonic development, puberty and lifelong health. Defects in androgen signalling are associated with a diverse range of clinical disorders in men and women including disorders of sex development (DSD), polycystic ovary syndrome in women and many cancers. We summarize the diverse molecular mechanisms of androgen regulation of angiogenesis and infer the potential significance of these pathways to normal and pathogenic placental function. Finally, we offer potential research applications of androgen-targeting molecules developed to treat cancer as investigative tools to help further delineate the role of androgen signalling in placental function and maternal and offspring health in animal models.

  14. Identification and Characterization of the Androgen Receptor From the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Kohno, Satomi; Doheny, Brenna M; Ogino, Yukiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-08-01

    Androgens are essential for the development, reproduction, and health throughout the life span of vertebrates, particularly during the initiation and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. Androgen signaling is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. Mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors, such as exogenous hormones or contaminants that mimic hormones, can disrupt endocrine signaling and function. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a unique model for ecological research in that it exhibits environment-dependent sex determination, is oviparous and long lived. Alligators from a contaminated environment exhibit low reproductive success and morphological disorders of the testis and phallus in neonates and juveniles, both associated with androgen signaling; thus, the alterations are hypothesized to be related to disrupted androgen signaling. However, this line of research has been limited because of a lack of information on the alligator AR gene. Here, we isolated A mississippiensis AR homologs (AmAR) and evaluated receptor-hormone/chemical interactions using a transactivation assay. We showed that AmAR responded to all natural androgens and their effects were inhibited by cotreatment with antiandrogens, such as flutamide, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, and vinclozolin. Intriguingly, we found a spliced form of the AR from alligator cDNA, which lacks seven amino acids within the ligand-binding domain that shows no response to androgens. Finally, we have initial data on a possible dominant-negative function of the spliced form of the AR against androgen-induced AmAR.

  15. Isolation of human Leydig cell mesenchymal precursors from patients with the androgen insensitivity syndrome: testosterone production and response to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation in culture.

    PubMed

    Chemes, H; Cigorraga, S; Bergadá, C; Schteingart, H; Rey, R; Pellizzari, E

    1992-05-01

    Mature Leydig cells, the main source of testicular testosterone in mammals, arise from immature mesenchymal precursors through an LH-dependent differentiation process. In order to study the steroidogenic potential of these precursors, undifferentiated mesenchymal cells were obtained from the testicular interstitium of two patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. After double digestion with collagenase and separation of the suspensions in a Percoll density gradient, the cells were cultured in Ham's F12 medium: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (1:1) supplemented with antibiotics, transferrin, insulin, hydrocortisone, and vitamin E with or without 1 IU of hCG/ml. At 11 days in culture, samples were removed for morphological characterization and determination of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity (3 beta-HSD). Testosterone concentration was determined by RIA in the culture medium at different intervals. Cultured cells were mesenchymal in appearance, elongated in shape, with numerous processes running in different directions. No mature Leydig cells were present. In basal conditions, the percentages of 3 beta-HSD-positive cells at 11 days on patients 1 and 2 were 33% and 28%, respectively, and the testosterone concentrations in the culture media were 4.8 and 8.4 ng.10(6) cells.24 h, respectively. In cultures stimulated with hCG, there was an increase of histochemical reactivity (47% and 42% in patients 1 and 2, respectively) and in the amount of testosterone secreted (10.2 and 12.0 ng.10(6) cells, respectively). Electron microscopic studies of cultures grown in the absence of hCG demonstrated a homogenous population of poorly differentiated, fibroblastic-type mesenchymal cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Androgen supplementation in older women: too much hype, not enough data.

    PubMed

    Padero, Maria Clara M; Bhasin, Shalender; Friedman, Theodore C

    2002-06-01

    Androgen supplementation in women has received enormous attention in the scientific and lay communities. That it enhances some aspects of cognitive function, sexual function, muscle mass, strength, and sense of well-being is not in question. What is not known is whether physiological testosterone replacement can improve health-related outcome in older women without its virilizing side effects. Although it is assumed that the testosterone dose-response relationship is different in women than in men and that clinically relevant outcomes on the above-mentioned effects can be achieved at lower testosterone doses, these assumptions have not been tested rigorously. Androgen deficiency has no clear-cut definition. Clinical features may include impaired sexual function, low energy, depression, and a total testosterone level of less than 15 ng/dL, the lower end of the normal range. Measurement of free testosterone is ideal, because it provides a better estimate of the biologically relevant fraction. It is not widely used in clinical practice, because some methods of measuring free testosterone assay are hampered by methodological difficulties. In marked contrast to the abrupt decline in estrogen and progesterone production at menopause, serum testosterone is lower in older women than in menstruating women, with the decline becoming apparent a decade before menopause. This article reviews testosterone's effects on sexual function, cognitive function, muscle mass, body composition, and immune function in postmenopausal women.

  17. Molecular targets of androgen signaling that characterize skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, James G.; Yaden, Benjamin C.; Bullock, Heather; Chen, Keyue; Shetler, Pamela; Bryant, Henry U.; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    The high regenerative capacity of adult skeletal muscle relies on a self-renewing depot of adult stem cells, termed muscle satellite cells (MSCs). Androgens, known mediators of overall body composition and specifically skeletal muscle mass, have been shown to regulate MSCs. The possible overlapping function of androgen regulation of muscle growth and MSC activation has not been carefully investigated with regards to muscle regeneration.Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine coinciding androgen-mediated genetic changes in an in vitro MSC model and clinically relevant in vivo models. A gene signature was established via microarray analysis for androgen-mediated MSC engagement and highlighted several markers including follistatin (FST), IGF-1, C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In an in vivo muscle atrophy model, androgen re-supplementation significantly increased muscle size and expression of IGF-1, FST, and HGF, while significantly decreasing expression of GR. Biphasic gene expression profiles over the 7-day re-supplementation period identifed temporal androgen regulation of molecular targets involved in satellite cell engagement into myogenesis. In a muscle injury model, removal of androgens resulted in delayed muscle recovery and regeneration. Modifications in the androgen signaling gene signature, along with reduced Pax7 and MyoD expression, suggested that limited MSC activation and increased inflammation contributed to the delayed regeneration. However, enhanced MSC activation in the androgen-deplete mouse injury model was driven by an androgen receptor (AR) agonist. These results provide novel in vitro and in vivo evidence describing molecular targets of androgen signaling, while also increasing support for translational use of AR agonists in skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration. PMID:26457071

  18. Immunohistochemical analysis of androgen effects on androgen receptor expression in developing Leydig and Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, L X; Bardin, C W; Hardy, M P

    1997-03-01

    Leydig and Sertoli cells are both targets of androgen action in the testis. Androgen exerts contrasting effects on the two cell types partially inhibiting steroidogenesis in adult Leydig cell and stimulating adult Sertoli cell functions required to support spermatogenesis. The developmental changes in the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of androgen receptor (AR) also differ between Leydig and Sertoli cells, with Leydig cell AR mRNA being highest on day 35 postpartum, whereas Sertoli cell AR mRNA levels are highest on day 90. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the concentrations of AR in Leydig and Sertoli cells are differentially regulated during development using quantitative immunostaining. AR protein levels were measured in rat testes after hormonal treatments at three developmental stages: on days 21, 35, and 90 postpartum. At each age, five groups of animals were treated for 4 days with: 1) vehicle; 2) LHRH antagonist (NalGlu, 0.3 mg/kg BW.day) to suppress endogenous levels of androgen that accompany inhibition of LH and FSH secretion; 3) NalGlu + LH (0.2 mg/kg BW.day); 4) NalGlu + testosterone (T, at 7.5 mg/kg BW.day); and 5) NalGlu + MENT (a potent synthetic androgen, 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, 0.7 mg/kg BW.day). AR protein was visualized by immunohistochemistry and measured by computer-assisted image analysis in Leydig and Sertoli cells using frozen sections of tests. After NalGlu treatment, AR levels in Leydig cells declined sharply to 42% and 31% of vehicle control (P < 0.01) in the 21 and 35 days postpartum age groups, respectively, but in 90-day-old rats there was no change. AR levels were partially maintained by exogenous LH, and completely maintained by exogenous androgen treatments in Leydig cells from 21- and 35-day-old rats, whereas in Leydig cells from 90-day-old rats, AR levels were unaffected in all treatment groups. In contrast, after NalGlu treatment, the AR concentration in Sertoli cells from 90-day-old rats were reduced

  19. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    03- catenin in lipogenesis can be assigned. In addition to being highly expressed in adipose tissue, both PPAR8 and PPARy are thought to serve...ProliferationPrlfato? a) Androgen Dependent PrCa b) Androgen Independent PrCa Figure 3 a) ER TR VDR VDR Wnt -*P-cat - *lo AR Wn Ic AR: RAR, RAR, RXR RXR* PPAR8 PPARy ...97) Tcf-4 PPARy Activation Increased PPAR7 detected in colonic cancer cells (85) Table 11. Nuclear Receptor Modulation of Wnt//J-catenin/Tcf

  20. Gonadal and adrenal androgen secretion in hirsute females.

    PubMed

    Molta, L; Schwartz, U

    1986-05-01

    The pathophysiology of glandular androgen hypersecretion must be regarded as a continuous process without sharp borderlines from normal to non-tumorous conditions, such as polycystic ovaries and hyperthecosis, to neoplastic disease. Hirsutism and related symptoms are most often caused by excess androgens of ovarian and/or adrenal origin, i.e. testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, delta 4-androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulphate. As demonstrated by selective catheterization of glandular effluents, combined hypersecretion occurs more frequently then either purely gonadal or adrenal overproduction. No correlation can be found between the type, frequency and extent of hormonal changes and the clinical, laparoscopic, angiographic, or histological findings. Dynamic function tests do not reliably discriminate between the various aetiological subgroups due to extremely variable and even non-specific individual responsiveness. Selective catheterization is presently the most sensitive method for the preoperative identification and localization of androgen-secreting neoplasms.

  1. Stromal Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Damien A.; Buchanan, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer development and progression is the result of complex interactions between epithelia cells and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, in a series of dynamic process amenable to regulation by hormones. Whilst androgen action through the androgen receptor (AR) is a well-established component of prostate cancer biology, it has been becoming increasingly apparent that changes in AR signalling in the surrounding stroma can dramatically influence tumour cell behavior. This is reflected in the consistent finding of a strong association between stromal AR expression and patient outcomes. In this review, we explore the relationship between AR signalling in fibroblasts/myofibroblasts and prostate cancer cells in the primary site, and detail the known functions, actions, and mechanisms of fibroblast AR signaling. We conclude with an evidence-based summary of how androgen action in stroma dramatically influences disease progression. PMID:28117763

  2. Heavy Flavour Production as Probe of Gluon Sivers Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Rohini M.; Kaushik, Abhiram; Misra, Anuradha; Rawoot, Vaibhav; Sonawane, Bipin

    2017-03-01

    Heavy flavour production like J/ψ and D-meson production in scattering of electrons/unpolarized protons off polarized proton target offer promising probes to investigate gluon Sivers function. In this talk, I will summarize our recent work on transverse single spin asymmetry in J/ψ -production and D-meson production in p p^\\uparrow scattering using a generalized parton model approach. We compare predictions obtained using different models of gluon Sivers function within this approach and then, taking into account the transverse momentum dependent evolution of the unpolarized parton distribution functions and gluon Sivers function, we study the effect of evolution on asymmetry.

  3. Role of 5α-reductase inhibitors in androgen-stimulated skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Azzouni, Faris; Zeitouni, Nathalie; Mohler, James

    2013-02-01

    5α-reductase (5α-R) isozymes are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. This enzyme family is composed of 3 members that perform several important biologic functions. 5α-R isozymes play an important role in benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and androgen-stimulated skin disorders, which include androgenic alopecia, acne, and hirsutism. Discovery of 5α-R type 2 deficiency in 1974 sparked interest in development of pharmaceutical agents to inhibit 5α-R isozymes, and 2 such inhibitors are currently available for clinical use: finasteride and dutasteride. 5α-R inhibitors are US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Only finasteride is FDA-approved for treatment of male androgenic alopecia. This article reviews the pathophysiology of androgen-stimulated skin disorders and the key clinical trials using 5α-R inhibitors in the treatment of androgen-stimulated skin disorders.

  4. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGENS AND ANDROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN MAMMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last decade, several classes of chemicals have been shown in laboratory studies to disrupt reproductive development by acting as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists and/or inhibitors of fetal Leydig cell testosterone production. Some phthalate esters alter gubernacular...

  5. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGENS AND ANDROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN MAMMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last decade, several classes of chemicals have been shown in laboratory studies to disrupt reproductive development by acting as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists and/or inhibitors of fetal Leydig cell testosterone production. Some phthalate esters alter gubernacular...

  6. Computational Interpretations of Analysis via Products of Selection Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escardó, Martín; Oliva, Paulo

    We show that the computational interpretation of full comprehension via two well-known functional interpretations (dialectica and modified realizability) corresponds to two closely related infinite products of selection functions.

  7. Androgen, Estrogen and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have accomplished the following: 1) Characterized androgen responsive genes in mouse bone marrow (BM) via...castration (androgen ablation) and estrogen stimulation. 2) Measurements of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and of genes that regulate the local... gene expression in the bone marrow. In males, the main source of estrogen is through conversion of androgen by aromatase. We postulate that gene

  8. Crosstalk between RON and androgen receptor signaling in the development of castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Batth, Izhar; Yun, Huiyoung; Hussain, Suleman; Meng, Peng; Osumulski, Powel; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Bedolla, Roble; Profit, Amanda; Reddick, Robert; Kumar, Addanki

    2016-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the fatal form of prostate cancer. Although reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) occurs following androgen deprivation, the precise mechanism involved is unclear. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase, RON alters mechanical properties of cells to influence epithelial to mesenchymal transition and functions as a transcription factor to differentially regulate AR signaling. RON inhibits AR activation and subset of AR-regulated transcripts in androgen responsive LNCaP cells. However in C4-2B, a castrate-resistant sub-line of LNCaP and AR-negative androgen independent DU145 cells, RON activates subset of AR-regulated transcripts. Expression of AR in PC-3 cells leads to activation of RON under androgen deprivation but not under androgen proficient conditions implicating a role for RON in androgen independence. Consistently, RON expression is significantly elevated in castrate resistant prostate tumors. Taken together our results suggest that RON activation could aid in promoting androgen independence and that inhibition of RON in combination with AR antagonist(s) merits serious consideration as a therapeutic option during hormone deprivation therapy. PMID:26872377

  9. Crosstalk between RON and androgen receptor signaling in the development of castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Batth, Izhar; Yun, Huiyoung; Hussain, Suleman; Meng, Peng; Osmulski, Pawel; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Bedolla, Roble; Profit, Amanda; Reddick, Robert; Kumar, Addanki

    2016-03-22

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the fatal form of prostate cancer. Although reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) occurs following androgen deprivation, the precise mechanism involved is unclear. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase, RON alters mechanical properties of cells to influence epithelial to mesenchymal transition and functions as a transcription factor to differentially regulate AR signaling. RON inhibits AR activation and subset of AR-regulated transcripts in androgen responsive LNCaP cells. However in C4-2B, a castrate-resistant sub-line of LNCaP and AR-negative androgen independent DU145 cells, RON activates subset of AR-regulated transcripts. Expression of AR in PC-3 cells leads to activation of RON under androgen deprivation but not under androgen proficient conditions implicating a role for RON in androgen independence. Consistently, RON expression is significantly elevated in castrate resistant prostate tumors. Taken together our results suggest that RON activation could aid in promoting androgen independence and that inhibition of RON in combination with AR antagonist(s) merits serious consideration as a therapeutic option during hormone deprivation therapy.

  10. The foam production system of the male Japanese quail: characterization of structure and function.

    PubMed

    Seiwert, C M; Adkins-Regan, E

    1998-01-01

    The research described here characterizes a unique neuromuscular system involved in reproductive behavior--the foam production system of the male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). Male quail produce a large amount of foam that is transferred to the female during copulation, enhancing male fertilization success. The source is the foam gland complex, a large sexually dimorphic, androgen sensitive, external protuberance of the dorsal cloaca, consisting of glandular units interdigitated with striated muscle fibers of the sphincter cloacae muscle (mSC). Electromyographic (EMG) analysis of mSC activity in freely moving males interacting with females revealed different characteristics of the EMG signal during copulation, voiding of excreta, and other mSC movement. The amount of mSC activity and also the amount of foam produced were greatly increased by the presence of a female behind a screen. Denervation of mSC eliminated normal mSC movement and also abolished foam production, confirming that mSC activity is the mechanism for foam production. The spinal cord locations of the motoneurons innervating the major cloacal muscles, including mSC, were determined by injecting cholera-toxin conjugated horseradish peroxidase into each muscle. Labelled somata with multiple primary dendrites were located in Area IX of the lateral motor column of synsacral segments 7, 8, or 9 or 8, 9, and 10. The motoneurons serving mSC were intermingled with those projecting to the other cloacal muscles, but there were differences in the rostralcaudal placement of these neural populations. Thus mSC activity is an integral part of the male's reproductive behavior, mSC activity can be socially stimulated, and mSC activity occurring in anticipation of copulation is likely to be functionally significant. Continued investigation of this highly accessible system has the potential to shed light on the mechanisms by which complex motor acts are produced and hormonally regulated.

  11. Risks of Serious Toxicities from Intermittent versus Continuous Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Population Based Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huei-Ting; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Philips, George K; Barac, Ana; Fu, Alex Z; Penson, David F; Zhou, Yingjun; Potosky, Arnold L

    2017-05-01

    Randomized trials have shown that intermittent androgen deprivation therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer may improve sexual and physical functioning compared to continuous androgen deprivation therapy without compromising survival. To our knowledge it is unknown whether intermittent androgen deprivation therapy alters the risk of serious toxicities associated with continuous androgen deprivation therapy. We performed a population based cohort study of 9,772 men 66 years old or older who were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer from 2002 to 2011 and treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy was defined as a single 90-day interval between 2 androgen deprivation therapy sessions during which patients visited their physicians or underwent prostate specific antigen testing. Outcomes included acute myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, type 2 diabetes and fracture. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the HRs of the comparative risk of serious toxicities between intermittent and continuous androgen deprivation therapy. A total of 2,113 (22%), 769 (9%) and 899 men (9%) had a new cardiovascular event, diabetes or fracture, respectively, within 5 years of starting androgen deprivation therapy. Compared to the continuous androgen deprivation therapy group, the intermittent therapy group was at lower risk for serious cardiovascular events (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77), particularly in reducing the risk of heart failure (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49-0.78) and fracture (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.38-0.70, each p <0.0001). Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a lower risk of heart failure and fracture compared to continuous androgen deprivation therapy. This raises toxicity concerns for continuous relative to intermittent therapy and suggests that intermittent androgen deprivation therapy may represent a safer therapeutic choice in elderly men with advanced prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017

  12. Water Production Functions For High Plains Crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Declining water supplies is the critical resource issue for irrigated agriculture in the High Plains and much of the western U.S. Farmers need to maximize production per unit water consumed to remain economically viable and sustain irrigated agriculture. The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Wat...

  13. Discovery of Potent 17β-Hydroxywithanolides for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer by High-Throughput Screening of a Natural Products Library for Androgen-Induced Gene Expression Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Liu, Manping X; Grunow, Nathan; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Paine-Murrieta, Gillian; Felder, Stephen; Kris, Richard M; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-09-10

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most prevalent cancer among men in Western societies, and those who develop metastatic castration-resistant PC (CRPC) invariably succumb to the disease. The need for effective treatments for CRPC is a pressing concern, especially due to limited durable responses with currently employed therapies. Here, we demonstrate the successful application of a high-throughput gene-expression profiling assay directly targeting genes of the androgen receptor pathway to screen a natural products library leading to the identification of 17β-hydroxywithanolides 1-5, of which physachenolide D (5) exhibited potent and selective in vitro activity against two PC cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3. Epoxidation of 5 afforded physachenolide C (6) with higher potency and stability. Structure-activity relationships for withanolides as potential anti-PC agents are presented together with in vivo efficacy studies on compound 6, suggesting that 17β-hydroxywithanolides are promising candidates for further development as CRPC therapeutics.

  14. Effects of the antimicrobial contaminant triclocarban, and co-exposure with the androgen 17β-trenbolone, on reproductive function and ovarian transcriptome of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Jensen, Kathleen M; Cavallin, Jenna E; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Kahl, Michael D; Leino, Richard L; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Wehmas, Leah C; Perkins, Edward J; Ankley, Gerald T

    2017-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent routinely detected in surface waters that has been hypothesized to interact with the vertebrate endocrine system. The present study examined the effects of TCC alone and in combination with the model endocrine disruptor 17β-trenbolone (TRB) on fish reproductive function. Adult Pimephales promelas were continuously exposed to either 1 µg TCC/L or 5 µg TCC/L, to 0.5 µg TRB/L, or to a mixture (MIX) of 5 µg TCC/L and 0.5 µg TRB/L for 22 d, and a variety of reproductive and endocrine-related endpoints were examined. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fathead minnows exposed to TRB, MIX, or 5 µg TCC/L. Exposure to 1 µg TCC/L had no effect on reproduction. In general, both TRB and MIX treatments caused similar physiological effects, evoking significant reductions in female plasma vitellogenin, estradiol, and testosterone, and significant increases in male plasma estradiol. Based on analysis of the ovarian transcriptome, there were potential pathway impacts that were common to both TRB- and TCC-containing treatment groups. In most cases, however, those pathways were more plausibly linked to differences in reproductive status than to androgen-specific functions. Overall, TCC was reproductively toxic to fish at concentrations at or near those that have been measured in surface water. There was little evidence that TCC elicits reproductive toxicity through a specific mode of endocrine or reproductive action, nor that it could augment the androgenic effects of TRB. Nonetheless, the relatively small margin of safety between some measured environmental concentrations and effect concentrations suggests that concern is warranted. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:231-242. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article

  15. Retinoic acid receptor beta and angiopoietin-like protein 1 are involved in the regulation of human androgen biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Udhane, Sameer S.; Pandey, Amit V.; Hofer, Gaby; Mullis, Primus E.; Flück, Christa E.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for sexual development and reproduction. However, androgen regulation in health and disease is poorly understood. We showed that human adrenocortical H295R cells grown under starvation conditions acquire a hyperandrogenic steroid profile with changes in steroid metabolizing enzymes HSD3B2 and CYP17A1 essential for androgen production. Here we studied the regulatory mechanisms underlying androgen production in starved H295R cells. Microarray expression profiling of normal versus starved H295R cells revealed fourteen differentially expressed genes; HSD3B2, HSD3B1, CYP21A2, RARB, ASS1, CFI, ASCL1 and ENC1 play a role in steroid and energy metabolism and ANGPTL1, PLK2, DUSP6, DUSP10 and FREM2 are involved in signal transduction. We discovered two new gene networks around RARB and ANGPTL1, and show how they regulate androgen biosynthesis. Transcription factor RARB stimulated the promoters of genes involved in androgen production (StAR, CYP17A1 and HSD3B2) and enhanced androstenedione production. For HSD3B2 regulation RARB worked in cooperation with Nur77. Secretory protein ANGPTL1 modulated CYP17A1 and DUSP6 expression by inducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation. By contrast, our studies revealed no evidence for hormones or cell cycle involvement in regulating androgen biosynthesis. In summary, these studies establish a firm role for RARB and ANGPTL1 in the regulation of androgen production in H295R cells. PMID:25970467

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a nuclear androgen receptor activated by 11-ketotestosterone

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Per-Erik; Berg, A Håkan; von Hofsten, Jonas; Grahn, Birgitta; Hellqvist, Anna; Larsson, Anders; Karlsson, Johnny; Modig, Carina; Borg, Bertil; Thomas, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Although 11-ketotestosterone is a potent androgen and induces male secondary sex characteristics in many teleosts, androgen receptors with high binding affinity for 11-ketotestosterone or preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone have not been identified. So, the mechanism by which 11-ketotestosterone exhibits such high potency remains unclear. Recently we cloned the cDNA of an 11-ketotestosterone regulated protein, spiggin, from three-spined stickleback renal tissue. As spiggin is the only identified gene product regulated by 11-ketotestosterone, the stickleback kidney is ideal for determination of the mechanism of 11-ketotestosterone gene regulation. A single androgen receptor gene with two splicing variants, belonging to the androgen receptor-β subfamily was cloned from stickleback kidney. A high affinity, saturable, single class of androgen specific binding sites, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor, was identified in renal cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Measurement of ligand binding moieties in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions as well as to the recombinant receptor revealed lower affinity for 11-ketotestosterone than for dihydrotestosterone. Treatment with different androgens did not up-regulate androgen receptor mRNA level or increase receptor abundance, suggesting that auto-regulation is not involved in differential ligand activation. However, comparison of the trans-activation potential of the stickleback androgen receptor with the human androgen receptor, in both human HepG2 cells and zebrafish ZFL cells, revealed preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone of the stickleback receptor, but not of the human receptor. These findings demonstrate the presence of a receptor preferentially activated by 11-ketotestosterone in the three-spined stickleback, so far the only one known in any animal. PMID:16107211

  17. Anoxic Androgen Degradation by the Denitrifying Bacterium Sterolibacterium denitrificans via the 2,3-seco Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Po-Hsiang; Yu, Chang-Ping; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Lin, Ching-Wen; Ismail, Wael; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Kuo, An-Ti

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradation of steroids is a crucial biochemical process mediated exclusively by bacteria. So far, information concerning the anoxic catabolic pathways of androgens is largely unknown, which has prevented many environmental investigations. In this work, we show that Sterolibacterium denitrificans DSMZ 13999 can anaerobically mineralize testosterone and some C19 androgens. By using a 13C-metabolomics approach and monitoring the sequential appearance of the intermediates, we demonstrated that S. denitrificans uses the 2,3-seco pathway to degrade testosterone under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, based on the identification of a C17 intermediate, we propose that the A-ring cleavage may be followed by the removal of a C2 side chain at C-5 of 17-hydroxy-1-oxo-2,3-seco-androstan-3-oic acid (the A-ring cleavage product) via retro-aldol reaction. The androgenic activities of the bacterial culture and the identified intermediates were assessed using the lacZ-based yeast androgen assay. The androgenic activity in the testosterone-grown S. denitrificans culture decreased significantly over time, indicating its ability to eliminate androgens. The A-ring cleavage intermediate (≤500 μM) did not exhibit androgenic activity, whereas the sterane-containing intermediates did. So far, only two androgen-degrading anaerobes (Sterolibacterium denitrificans DSMZ 13999 [a betaproteobacterium] and Steroidobacter denitrificans DSMZ 18526 [a gammaproteobacterium]) have been isolated and characterized, and both of them use the 2,3-seco pathway to anaerobically degrade androgens. The key intermediate 2,3-seco-androstan-3-oic acid can be used as a signature intermediate for culture-independent environmental investigations of anaerobic degradation of C19 androgens. PMID:24657867

  18. The synthetic progestin levonorgestrel is a potent androgen in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Fick, Jerker; Brandt, Ingvar; Brunström, Björn

    2013-02-19

    The use of progestins has resulted in contamination of aquatic environments and some progestins have in experimental studies been shown to impair reproduction in fish and amphibians at low ng L(-1) concentrations. The mechanisms underlying their reproductive toxicity are largely unknown. Some progestins, such as levonorgestrel (LNG), exert androgenic effects in mammals by activating the androgen receptor (AR). Male three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) kidneys produce spiggin, a gluelike glycoprotein used in nest building, and its production is directly governed by androgens. Spiggin is normally absent in females but its production in female kidneys can be induced by AR agonists. Spiggin serves as the best known biomarker for androgens in fish. We exposed adult female sticklebacks to LNG at 5.5, 40, and 358 ng L(-1) for 21 days. Androgenic effects were found at LNG concentrations ≥40 ng L(-1) including induction of spiggin transcription, kidney hypertrophy, and suppressed liver vitellogenin transcription. These are the first in vivo quantitative data showing that LNG is a potent androgen in fish supporting the contention that androgenic effects of certain progestins contribute to their reproductive toxicity.

  19. INTERACTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern for adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist act...

  20. INTERACTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern for adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist act...

  1. Evidence that cytochrome b{sub 5} acts as a redox donor in CYP17A1 mediated androgen synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Duggal, Ruchia; Liu, Yilin; Gregory, Michael C.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Kincaid, James R.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2016-08-19

    Cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) is an important drug target for castration resistant prostate cancer. It is a bi-functional enzyme, catalyzing production of glucocorticoid precursors by hydroxylation of pregnene-nucleus, and androgen biosynthesis by a second C−C lyase step, at the expense of glucocorticoid production. Cytochrome b{sub 5} (cyt b{sub 5}) is known to be a key regulator of the androgen synthesis reaction in vivo, by a mechanism that is not well understood. Two hypotheses have been proposed for the mechanism by which cyt b{sub 5} increases androgen biosynthesis. Cyt b{sub 5} could act as an allosteric effector, binding to CYP17A1 and either changing its selective substrate affinity or altering the conformation of the P450 to increase the catalytic rate or decrease unproductive uncoupling channels. Alternatively, cyt b{sub 5} could act as a redox donor for supply of the second electron in the P450 cycle, reducing the oxyferrous complex to form the reactive peroxo-intermediate. To understand the mechanism of lyase enhancement by cyt b{sub 5}, we generated a redox-inactive form of cyt b{sub 5}, in which the heme is replaced with a Manganese-protoporphyrin IX (Mn-b{sub 5}), and investigated enhancement of androgen producing lyase reaction by CYP17A1. Given the critical significance of a stable membrane anchor for all of the proteins involved and the need for controlled stoichiometric ratios, we employed the Nanodisc system for this study. The redox inactive form was observed to have no effect on the lyase reaction, while reactions with the normal heme-iron containing cyt b{sub 5} were enhanced ∼5 fold as compared to reactions in the absence of cyt b{sub 5}. We also performed resonance Raman measurements on ferric CYP17A1 bound to Mn-b{sub 5}. Upon addition of Mn-b{sub 5} to Nanodisc reconstituted CYP17A1, we observed clear evidence for the formation of a b{sub 5}-CYP17A1 complex, as noted by changes in the porphyrin modes and alteration in the proximal

  2. Anti and Androgenic Activities in MDA-KB2 Cells: A Comparison of Performance in 96 Well Versus HTS Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed the MDA-kb2 cell line to screen androgen agonists/antagonists (Wilson et al., ToxSci 66:69, 2002). MDA-kb2 has been used to quantify anti- and androgenic activities of chemicals, mixtures, combustion by-products, oil dispersants and waste, source and drinking water s...

  3. Anti and Androgenic Activities in MDA-KB2 Cells: A Comparison of Performance in 96 Well Versus HTS Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed the MDA-kb2 cell line to screen androgen agonists/antagonists (Wilson et al., ToxSci 66:69, 2002). MDA-kb2 has been used to quantify anti- and androgenic activities of chemicals, mixtures, combustion by-products, oil dispersants and waste, source and drinking water s...

  4. Pareto-Optimality, Efficiency Analysis and Empirical Production Functions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    General, 120, 3, 253-281 (1957). 15. Fenchel , W., Convex Sets , Cones and Functions , Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J. (1953). 16. Fbrsund, F...concave, piecewise linear function on DE" Proof: A necessary and sufficient condition for fr(x) to be concave is that its hypograph is a convex set (cf...34 production function . The work of R. Shephard [18], [19] under severe restrictions on the mathematical structure of production possibility sets and cost

  5. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  6. Microfluidic production of polymeric functional microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kunqiang

    This dissertation focuses on applying droplet-based microfluidics to fabricate new classes of polymeric microparticles with customized properties for various applications. The integration of microfluidic techniques with microparticle engineering allows for unprecedented control over particle size, shape, and functional properties. Specifically, three types of microparticles are discussed here: (1) Magnetic and fluorescent chitosan hydrogel microparticles and their in-situ assembly into higher-order microstructures; (2) Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microbeads with phosphorescent properties for oxygen sensing; (3) Macroporous microparticles as biological immunosensors. First, we describe a microfluidic approach to generate monodisperse chitosan hydrogel microparticles that can be further connected in-situ into higher-order microstructures. Microparticles of the biopolymer chitosan are created continuously by contacting an aqueous solution of chitosan at a microfluidic T-junction with a stream of hexadecane containing a nonionic detergent, followed by downstream crosslinking of the generated droplets by a ternary flow of glutaraldehyde. Functional properties of the microparticles can be easily varied by introducing payloads such as magnetic nanoparticles and/or fluorescent dyes into the chitosan solution. We then use these prepared microparticles as "building blocks" and assemble them into high ordered microstructures, i.e. microchains with controlled geometry and flexibility. Next, we describe a new approach to produce monodisperse microbeads of PDMS using microfluidics. Using a flow-focusing configuration, a PDMS precursor solution is dispersed into microdroplets within an aqueous continuous phase. These droplets are collected and thermally cured off-chip into soft, solid microbeads. In addition, our technique allows for direct integration of payloads, such as an oxygen-sensitive porphyrin dye, into the PDMS microbeads. We then show that the resulting dye

  7. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and adrenal androgen functions in rheumatoid arthritis: an odyssey of hormonal relationships to the disease.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Chatterton, R T; Aldag, J C

    1999-06-22

    serum DHEAS level (mumol/L) was found in the pre-RA subgroup I, than in the 43 CN (2.14 +/- 0.47 vs. 3.62 +/- 0.37, respectively, (p = 0.033). The 25 older pre-RA and 100 CN (subgroups II and III) showed close mean DHEAS levels (1.89 +/- 0.30 and 1.94 +/- 0.14, respectively, p = 0.45). The serum DHEAS levels in pre-RA vs. CN subgroups were validated in a second reference laboratory. Also, the youngest pre-RA subgroup (I) showed a significant dissociation between entry serum DHEAS and cortisol levels (r = -0.660, p = 0.027), which differed (p = 0.017) from its matched CN, and from the older pre-RA (p = 0.004). Analyses of results based upon subgroupings by EMS and entry age (a, b, c, d) showed similar results. No significant differences were found between pre-RA and CN groups in levels of serum cortisol, other adrenal steroids, or the sex hormones assayed. In a sample of younger premenopausal women, significantly low serum DHEAS levels were found 4 to 20 years prior to onset of RA. Dissociation of serum cortisol and DHEAS levels was also found in the youngest, but not older, pre-RA subjects. The data suggest that subtle adrenal cortical dysfunction, manifested mainly by adrenal androgen (AA) deficiency, may either predispose to younger-onset RA or be a long-term marker in a minority subgroup of women.

  8. Androgen excess: Investigations and management.

    PubMed

    Lizneva, Daria; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Walker, Walidah; Azziz, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Androgen excess (AE) is a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and results in, or contributes to, the clinical phenotype of these patients. Although AE will contribute to the ovulatory and menstrual dysfunction of these patients, the most recognizable sign of AE includes hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia or female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Evaluation includes not only scoring facial and body terminal hair growth using the modified Ferriman-Gallwey method but also recording and possibly scoring acne and alopecia. Moreover, assessment of biochemical hyperandrogenism is necessary, particularly in patients with unclear or absent hirsutism, and will include assessing total and free testosterone (T), and possibly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and androstenedione, although these latter contribute limitedly to the diagnosis. Assessment of T requires use of the highest quality assays available, generally radioimmunoassays with extraction and chromatography or mass spectrometry preceded by liquid or gas chromatography. Management of clinical hyperandrogenism involves primarily either androgen suppression, with a hormonal combination contraceptive, or androgen blockade, as with an androgen receptor blocker or a 5α-reductase inhibitor, or a combination of the two. Medical treatment should be combined with cosmetic treatment including topical eflornithine hydrochloride and short-term (shaving, chemical depilation, plucking, threading, waxing, and bleaching) and long-term (electrolysis, laser therapy, and intense pulse light therapy) cosmetic treatments. Generally, acne responds to therapy relatively rapidly, whereas hirsutism is slower to respond, with improvements observed as early as 3 months, but routinely only after 6 or 8 months of therapy. Finally, FPHL is the slowest to respond to therapy, if it will at all, and it may take 12 to 18 months of therapy for an observable response.

  9. Aberrant E2F activation by polyglutamine expansion of androgen receptor in SBMA neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Ito, Saya; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Furutani, Takashi; Shirode, Yuko; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Kimura, Shuhei; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sally; Lim, Jinseon; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Kouzmenko, Alexander P.; Aigaki, Toshiro; Tabata, Tetsuya; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat (polyQ) expansion within the human androgen receptor (AR). Unlike other neurodegenerative diseases caused by abnormal polyQ expansion, the onset of SBMA depends on androgen binding to mutant human polyQ-AR proteins. This is also observed in Drosophila eyes ectopically expressing the polyQ-AR mutants. We have genetically screened mediators of androgen-induced neurodegeneration caused by polyQ-AR mutants in Drosophila eyes. We identified Rbf (Retinoblastoma-family protein), the Drosophila homologue of human Rb (Retinoblastoma protein), as a neuroprotective factor. Androgen-dependent association of Rbf or Rb with AR was remarkably potentiated by aberrant polyQ expansion. Such potentiated Rb association appeared to attenuate recruitment of histone deacetyltransferase 1 (HDAC1), a corepressor of E2F function. Either overexpression of Rbf or E2F deficiency in fly eyes reduced the neurotoxicity of the polyQ-AR mutants. Induction of E2F function by polyQ-AR-bound androgen was suppressed by Rb in human neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that abnormal expansion of polyQ may potentiate innate androgen-dependent association of AR with Rb. This appears to lead to androgen-dependent onset of SBMA through aberrant E2F transactivation caused by suppressed histone deacetylation. PMID:19237573

  10. Aberrant E2F activation by polyglutamine expansion of androgen receptor in SBMA neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Ito, Saya; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Furutani, Takashi; Shirode, Yuko; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Kimura, Shuhei; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sally; Lim, Jinseon; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Kouzmenko, Alexander P; Aigaki, Toshiro; Tabata, Tetsuya; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-03-10

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat (polyQ) expansion within the human androgen receptor (AR). Unlike other neurodegenerative diseases caused by abnormal polyQ expansion, the onset of SBMA depends on androgen binding to mutant human polyQ-AR proteins. This is also observed in Drosophila eyes ectopically expressing the polyQ-AR mutants. We have genetically screened mediators of androgen-induced neurodegeneration caused by polyQ-AR mutants in Drosophila eyes. We identified Rbf (Retinoblastoma-family protein), the Drosophila homologue of human Rb (Retinoblastoma protein), as a neuroprotective factor. Androgen-dependent association of Rbf or Rb with AR was remarkably potentiated by aberrant polyQ expansion. Such potentiated Rb association appeared to attenuate recruitment of histone deacetyltransferase 1 (HDAC1), a corepressor of E2F function. Either overexpression of Rbf or E2F deficiency in fly eyes reduced the neurotoxicity of the polyQ-AR mutants. Induction of E2F function by polyQ-AR-bound androgen was suppressed by Rb in human neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that abnormal expansion of polyQ may potentiate innate androgen-dependent association of AR with Rb. This appears to lead to androgen-dependent onset of SBMA through aberrant E2F transactivation caused by suppressed histone deacetylation.

  11. Role of non-genomic androgen signalling in suppressing proliferation of fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castoria, G; Giovannelli, P; Di Donato, M; Ciociola, A; Hayashi, R; Bernal, F; Appella, E; Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A

    2014-01-01

    The functions of androgen receptor (AR) in stromal cells are still debated in spite of the demonstrated importance of these cells in organ development and diseases. Here, we show that physiological androgen concentration (10 nM R1881 or DHT) fails to induce DNA synthesis, while it consistently stimulates cell migration in mesenchymal and transformed mesenchymal cells. Ten nanomolar R1881 triggers p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and its stabilization in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Activation of Rac and its downstream effector DYRK 1B is responsible for p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell quiescence. Ten nanomolar androgen also inhibits transformation induced by oncogenic Ras in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Overexpression of an AR mutant unable to interact with filamin A, use of a small peptide displacing AR/filamin A interaction, and filamin A knockdown indicate that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex regulates the pathway leading to p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. As the AR/filamin A complex is also responsible for migration stimulated by 10 nM androgen, our report shows that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex controls, through Rac 1, the decision of cells to halt cell cycle and migration. This study reveals a new and unexpected role of androgen/AR signalling in coordinating stromal cell functions. PMID:25476896

  12. Effects of androgen and leptin on behavioral and cellular responses in female rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Wang, Tienpei; Johansson, Julia; Sun, Shan; Wang, Wei; Egecioglu, Emil; Billig, Håkan; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2011-09-01

    The causes of anxiety and depression in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remain elusive. To identify steps linking androgen signaling to the regulation of affective symptoms in vivo, we compared behavioral responses in female rats continuously exposed to DHT from puberty (a model of DHT-induced PCOS) and in rats exposed to DHT for 1week. Continuous and 1week of DHT exposure resulted in a general decrease in locomotor activity and time spent on the open arms in the elevated plus maze, indicating anxiety-like behavior. Rats with DHT-induced PCOS have increases in adiposity and circulating leptin levels accompanied by leptin resistance. One week of DHT exposure decreased androgen receptor (AR) expression in the hypothalamus and leptin synthesis and function in adipocytes; it also inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and attenuated leptin activity by increasing levels of soluble leptin receptor, a leptin-binding protein, in the hypothalamus. This may affect the androgen-induced anxiety-related behavior in female rats. In conclusion, our results highlight the central role of androgens in behavioral function in female rats and suggest that androgens directly regulate the AR by decreasing its hypothalamic expression. Androgens also increase leptin synthesis in adipocytes, which drives central leptin signaling, and may regulate anxiety-related behaviors. Elucidating mechanisms by which androgens modulate female anxiety-like behavior may uncover useful approaches for treating women with PCOS who have symptoms of anxiety.

  13. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaskararao, G; Himabindu, Y; Nayak, Samir Rajan; Sriharibabu, M

    2014-07-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  14. Posttranslational modification of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Travis; Tindall, Donald J; Huang, Haojie

    2013-07-16

    The androgen receptor (AR) is important in the development of the prostate by regulating transcription, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. AR undergoes posttranslational modifications that alter its transcription activity, translocation to the nucleus and stability. The posttranslational modifications that regulate these events are of utmost importance to understand the functional role of AR and its activity. The majority of these modifications occur in the activation function-1 (AF1) region of the AR, which contains the transcriptional activation unit 1 (TAU1) and 5 (TAU5). Identification of the modifications that occur to these regions may increase our understanding of AR activation in prostate cancer and the role of AR in the progression from androgen-dependent to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Most of the posttranslational modifications identified to date have been determined using the full-length AR in androgen dependent cells. Further investigations into the role of posttranslational modifications in androgen-independent activation of full-length AR and constitutively active splicing variants are warranted, findings from which may provide new therapeutic options for CRPC.

  15. 4-Nitro-3-phenylphenol has both androgenic and anti-androgenic-like effects in rats

    PubMed Central

    TRISOMBOON, Jiratthiya; LI, ChunMei; SUZUKI, Akira; WATANABE, Gen; TAYA, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disruption of 4-nitro-3-phenylphenol (PNMPP) on immature male Wistar-Imamichi rats, the rat pituitary was exposed to PNMPP (10–5–10–9 M) for 24 h with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in experiment I. In addition, the Leydig cells (10–5–10–9 M) were exposed to PNMPP for 24 h with or without human chronic gonadotropin (hCG) in experiment II. Our results showed that the PNMPP at 10–5–10–7 M suppressed follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) productions from GnRH-stimulated pituitary cells. At the same time, PNMPP 10–5–10–7 M induced an increase in testosterone production from the Leydig cells treated with or without hCG. Based on our results, it can be concluded that that PNMPP might have both androgen agonist action by decreasing FSH and LH production in the pituitary and anti-androgenic action by increasing testosterone production in the Leydig cell. PMID:25736398

  16. 4-Nitro-3-phenylphenol has both androgenic and anti-androgenic-like effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Trisomboon, Jiratthiya; Li, ChunMei; Suzuki, Akira; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disruption of 4-nitro-3-phenylphenol (PNMPP) on immature male Wistar-Imamichi rats, the rat pituitary was exposed to PNMPP (10(-5)-10(-9) M) for 24 h with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in experiment I. In addition, the Leydig cells (10(-5)-10(-9) M) were exposed to PNMPP for 24 h with or without human chronic gonadotropin (hCG) in experiment II. Our results showed that the PNMPP at 10(-5)-10(-7) M suppressed follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) productions from GnRH-stimulated pituitary cells. At the same time, PNMPP 10(-5)-10(-7) M induced an increase in testosterone production from the Leydig cells treated with or without hCG. Based on our results, it can be concluded that that PNMPP might have both androgen agonist action by decreasing FSH and LH production in the pituitary and anti-androgenic action by increasing testosterone production in the Leydig cell.

  17. Early androgen exposure modulates spatial cognition in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

    PubMed

    Mueller, S C; Temple, V; Oh, E; VanRyzin, C; Williams, A; Cornwell, B; Grillon, C; Pine, D S; Ernst, M; Merke, D P

    2008-08-01

    Major questions remain about the exact role of hormones in cognition. Furthermore, the extent to which early perturbation in steroid function affects human brain development continues to be a wide open area of research. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a genetic disorder of steroid dysfunction characterized in part by in utero over-production of testosterone, was used as a natural model for addressing this question. Here, CAH (n=54, mean age=17.53, 31 female) patients were compared to healthy age- and sex-matched individuals (n=55, mean age=19.02, 22 female) on a virtual equivalent of the Morris Water Maze task [Morris, R., 1984. Developments of a water-maze procedure for studying spatial learning in the rat. J. Neurosci. Methods 11, 47-60], an established measure of sex differences in spatial cognition in rodents. Findings revealed that females with CAH with the most severe form of the disease and expected highest level of in utero exposure to androgens were found to perform similarly to both healthy males and CAH males, whereas strong sex differences were apparent in milder forms of the disorder and in controls. Moreover, advanced bone age, an indicator of long-term childhood exposure to testosterone was correlated with improved performance. The results indicate that individuals exposed to both excess androgens prenatally and prolonged exposure during childhood may manifest long-lasting changes in cognitive function. Such finding suggests a pivotal role of hormonal function on brain development in humans, mirroring results from the animal literature.

  18. Androgenic effect of honeybee drone milk in castrated rats: roles of methyl palmitate and methyl oleate.

    PubMed

    Seres, A B; Ducza, E; Báthori, M; Hunyadi, A; Béni, Z; Dékány, M; Hajagos-Tóth, J; Verli, J; Gáspár, Róbert

    2014-04-28

    Numerous honeybee (Apis mellifera) products have been used in traditional medicine to treat infertility and to increase vitality in both men and women. Drone milk (DM) is a relatively little-known honeybee product with a putative sexual hormone effect. The oestrogenic effect of a fraction of DM has recently been reported in rats. However, no information is available on the androgenic effects of DM. The purpose of the present study was to determine the androgen-like effect of DM in male rats and to identify effective compounds. A modified Hershberger assay was used to investigate the androgenic effect of crude DM, and the plasma level of testosterone was measured. The prostatic mRNA and protein expression of Spot14-like androgen-inducible protein (SLAP) were also examined with real-time PCR and Western blot techniques. GC-MS and NMR spectroscopic investigations were performed to identify the active components gained by bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude DM increased the relative weights of the androgen-dependent organs and the plasma testosterone level in castrated rats and these actions were flutamide-sensitive. DM increased the tissue mRNA and protein level of SLAP, providing further evidence of its androgen-like character. After bioactivity-guided fractionation, two fatty acid esters, methyl palmitate (MP) and methyl oleate (MO), were identified as active compounds. MP alone showed an androgenic effect, whereas MO increased the weight of androgen-sensitive tissues and the plasma testosterone level only in combination. The experimental data of DM and its active compounds (MO and MP) show androgenic activity confirming the traditional usage of DM. DM or MP or/and MO treatments may project a natural mode for the therapy of male infertility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Androgens regulate ovarian follicular development by increasing follicle stimulating hormone receptor and microRNA-125b expression.

    PubMed

    Sen, Aritro; Prizant, Hen; Light, Allison; Biswas, Anindita; Hayes, Emily; Lee, Ho-Joon; Barad, David; Gleicher, Norbert; Hammes, Stephen R

    2014-02-25

    Although androgen excess is considered detrimental to women's health and fertility, global and ovarian granulosa cell-specific androgen-receptor (AR) knockout mouse models have been used to show that androgen actions through ARs are actually necessary for normal ovarian function and female fertility. Here we describe two AR-mediated pathways in granulosa cells that regulate ovarian follicular development and therefore female fertility. First, we show that androgens attenuate follicular atresia through nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways by enhancing expression of the microRNA (miR) miR-125b, which in turn suppresses proapoptotic protein expression. Second, we demonstrate that, independent of transcription, androgens enhance follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor expression, which then augments FSH-mediated follicle growth and development. Interestingly, we find that the scaffold molecule paxillin regulates both processes, making it a critical regulator of AR actions in the ovary. Finally, we report that low doses of exogenous androgens enhance gonadotropin-induced ovulation in mice, further demonstrating the critical role that androgens play in follicular development and fertility. These data may explain reported positive effects of androgens on ovulation rates in women with diminished ovarian reserve. Furthermore, this study demonstrates mechanisms that might contribute to the unregulated follicle growth seen in diseases of excess androgens such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

  20. Systematic Product Development of Control and Diagnosis Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, R.; Simundsson, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the scientific field of systematic product development a wide range of helpful methods, guidelines and tools were generated and published in recent years. Until now little special attention was given to design guidelines aiming at supporting product development engineers to design products that allow and support control or diagnosis functions. The general trend to ubiquitous computing and the first development steps towards cognitive systems as well as a general trend toward higher product safety, reliability and reduced total cost of ownership (TCO) in many engineering fields lead to a higher importance of control and diagnosis. In this paper a first attempt is made to formulate general valid guidelines how products can be developed in order to allow and to achieve effective and efficient control and diagnosis. The guidelines are elucidated on the example of an automated guided vehicle. One main concern of this paper is the integration of control and diagnosis functionalities into the development of complete systems which include mechanical, electrical and electronic subsystems. For the development of such systems the strategies, methods and tools of systematic product development have attracted significant attention during the last decades. Today, the functionality and safety of most products is to a large degree dependent on control and diagnosis functionalities. Still, there is comparatively little research concentrating on the integration of the development of these functionalities into the overall product development processes. The paper starts with a background describing Systematic Product Development. The second section deals with the product development of the sample product. The third part clarifies the notions monitoring, control and diagnosis. The following parts summarize some insights and formulate first hypotheses concerning control and diagnosis in Systematic Product Development.

  1. (1R,2S)-4-(2-cyano-cyclohexyl-oxy)-2-trifluoromethyl-benzonitrile, a potent androgen receptor antagonist for stimulating hair growth and reducing sebum production.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lain-Yen; Du, Daniel; Hoffman, Jennifer; Smith, Yvonne; Fedij, Victor; Kostlan, Catherine; Johnson, Theodore R; Huang, Yun; Kesten, Steve; Harter, William; Yue, Wen Song; Li, Jie Jack; Barvian, Nicole; Mitchell, Lorna; Lei, Huangshu John; Lefker, Bruce; Carroll, Mathew; Dettling, Danielle; Krieger-Burke, Teresa; Samas, Brian; Yalamanchili, Radhika; Lapham, Kimberly; Pocalyko, David; Sliskovic, Drago; Ciotti, Susan; Stoller, Brenda; Hena, Mostofa A; Ding, Qizhu; Maiti, Samarendra N; Stier, Michael; Welgus, Howard

    2007-11-01

    Synthesis, pharmacology, and pharmacokinetic profiles of (1R, 2S)-4-(2-cyano-cyclohexyl-oxy)-2-trifluoromethyl-benzonitrile are reported. This compound demonstrated remarkable potency for stimulating hair growth in a male C3H mouse model as well as reducing sebum production in the male Syrian hamster ear model.

  2. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    well as mechanisms associated with prostate cancer growth and expansion, we may be able to develop therapies that prolong lives. Understanding the...and G. A. Coetzee. 2004. Androgen receptor signaling: mechanism of interleukin-6 inhibition. Cancer Res. 64:2619–2626. 19. Jia, L., and G. A. Coetzee...the prostate specific antigen locus: steroidal and non-steroidal mechanisms . Mol. Cancer Res. 1:385–392. 21. Johnstone, R. W. 2002. Histone

  3. Androgen Metabolism in Progression to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    by research staff. Dose modifications for toxicity were outlined in the protocol. As mifepristone is metabolized by CYP4503A4, concomitant...phase II study of mifepristone (RU-486) in castration- resistant prostate cancer, with a correlative assessment of androgen-related hormones. BJU. Int...due to CYP17A1 blockade and not a toxic effect (Figure 2B). Abiraterone, a more specific CYP17A1 inhibitor, similarly decreased basal PSA and ERG

  4. Ecological Production Functions: A Theoretical and Practical Exploration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological production functions characterize relationships between ecosystem condition, management practices, and the delivery of economically valuable ecosystem services. Many in the ecosystem service research community view ecological research directed toward developing ecolog...

  5. Ecological Production Functions: A Theoretical and Practical Exploration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological production functions characterize relationships between ecosystem condition, management practices, and the delivery of economically valuable ecosystem services. Many in the ecosystem service research community view ecological research directed toward developing ecolog...

  6. Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on heat stress-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor density in developing Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gaffari; Şimşek, Ülkü G; Çeribaşı, Ali O; Çeribaşı, Songül; Özer Kaya, Şeyma; Güvenç, Mehmet; Çiftçi, Mehmet; Sönmez, Mustafa; Yüce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cinnamon bark oil (CBO) on heat stress (HS)-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) density in developing Japanese quails. Fifteen-day-old 90 male chicks were assigned to two main groups. The first group (45 chicks) was kept in a thermoneutral room at 22 °C for 24 h/day. The second group (45 chicks) was kept in a room with high ambient temperature at 34 °C for 8 h/day (from 9 AM-5 PM) and at 22 °C for 16 h/day. Each of these two main groups was then divided into three subgroups (CBO groups 0, 250, 500 ppm) consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2 × 3 factorial order). Each of subgroups was replicated for three times and each replicate included five chicks. Heat stress caused significant decreases in body weight, spermatid and testicular sperm numbers, the density of testicular Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic marker) and AR immunopositivity, and significant increases in testicular lipid peroxidation level, the density of testicular Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositivity, and a Bax/Bcl-2 ratio along with some histopathologic damages. However, 250 and 500 ppm CBO supplementation provided significant improvements in HS-induced increased level of testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased number of spermatid and testicular sperm, decreased densities of Bcl-2 and AR immunopositivity, and some deteriorated testicular histopathologic lesions. In addition, although HS did not significantly affect the testicular glutathione level, addition of both 250 and 500 ppm CBO to diet of quails reared in both HS and thermoneutral conditions caused a significant increase when compared with quails without any consumption of CBO. In conclusion, HS-induced lipid peroxidation causes testicular damage in developing male Japanese quails and, consumption of CBO, which has antiperoxidative effect, protects their testes against HS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  7. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment. In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  8. Integral representations for products of Airy functions Part 2. Cubic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W. H.

    Integral representations are obtained for some cubic products of the Airy functions Ai(z) and Bi(z). These integral representations are of the Laplace contour type but they involve the modified Bessel functions of order 16. From these results it is then possible to evaluate a number of definite integrals involving such cubic products.

  9. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone. They can exert strong effects on the human body that may be beneficial for athletic performance. A review of the literature revealed that most laboratory studies did not investigate the actual doses of AAS currently abused in the field. Therefore, those studies may not reflect the actual (adverse) effects of steroids. The available scientific literature describes that short-term administration of these drugs by athletes can increase strength and bodyweight. Strength gains of about 5-20% of the initial strength and increments of 2-5 kg bodyweight, that may be attributed to an increase of the lean body mass, have been observed. A reduction of fat mass does not seem to occur. Although AAS administration may affect erythropoiesis and blood haemoglobin concentrations, no effect on endurance performance was observed. Little data about the effects of AAS on metabolic responses during exercise training and recovery are available and, therefore, do not allow firm conclusions. The main untoward effects of short- and long-term AAS abuse that male athletes most often self-report are an increase in sexual drive, the occurrence of acne vulgaris, increased body hair and increment of aggressive behaviour. AAS administration will disturb the regular endogenous production of testosterone and gonadotrophins that may persist for months after drug withdrawal. Cardiovascular risk factors may undergo deleterious alterations, including elevation of blood pressure and depression of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-, HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol levels. In echocardiographic studies in male athletes, AAS did not seem to affect cardiac structure and function, although in animal studies these drugs have been observed to exert hazardous effects on heart structure and function. In studies of athletes, AAS were not found to damage the liver. Psyche and behaviour seem to be strongly affected by AAS

  10. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  11. Specificity of simple hormone response elements in androgen regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Marschke, K B; Tan, J A; Kupfer, S R; Wilson, E M; French, F S

    1995-11-01

    Androgen (AR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors recognize a family of 15 base pair partial palindromic hormone response elements (HRE). We have studied receptor interactions with several HREs from androgen regulated genes to determine their potential to mediate a selective androgen response. Synthetic oligonucleotides corresponding to the elements were analysed for receptor binding and steroid dependent transcriptional enhancer activities. Each HRE contained the 3' half-site sequence (5'-TGTNCT-3') of the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) consensus sequence. HREs that countained the 5' half-site GRE consensus sequence (5'-A/GGNACA/G-3') had the strongest and-rogen response element (ARE) and GRE activities. In methylation interference assays, AR and GR interacted with identical base contact sites in the response elements. Two elements that deviated from the GRE consensus sequence by a single optimal base in the 5' half, had reduced ARE activity with no significant change in GRE activity and displayed lower binding of AR than GR in mobility shift assays using purified DNA binding domain peptides. Transfections with AR/GR and GR/AR chimeras containing the N-terminal domain of one receptor linked to the DNA-binding and C-terminal domains of the other suggested that N-terminal domain functions of GR also contributed to the greater GRE than ARE activities of the response elements.

  12. 9S binding protein for androgens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Wilson, E M; Lea, O A; French, F S

    1977-05-01

    A steroid binding protein fraction with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 9 S (molecular weight approximately equal to 200,000) has been identified in 105,000 X g supernatants of several androgen-responsive organs. Highest concentrations were found in epididymis and testis, but small amounts were detected in prostate, seminal vesicle, kidney, submandibular gland, and lung. The 9S protein binds [3H]dihydrotestosterone (17beta-hydroxy-5alpha-androstan-3-one) and [3H]progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione) with equilibrium binding constants of approximately 10(5) M-1 and 10(6) M-1, respectively. The concentration of 9S binding sites in epididymis is approximately 10(-11) mol/mg of supernatant protein, which is at least 10(5) times greater than the concentration of androgen receptor. 9S binding protein appears to be a nonsecretory, intracellular protein and has properties different from the andorgen receptor. It is unretarded on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography at pH 8.0, and its sedimentation rate on sucrose gradients is not altered at high ionic strength (0.4 M KCl). Like the androgen receptor, its binding activity, which is maximal between pH 7 and 9.5, is heat labile, decreased by sulfhydryl reagents, and enhanced by 2-mercaptoethanol. It is suggested that because of its high concentration and low affinity, 9S binding protein may function in the intracellular accumulation of compartmentalization of androgens or progesterone.

  13. Defining the functional traits that drive bacterial decomposer community productivity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rachael; Alessi, Anna M.; Bird, Susannah; McQueen-Mason, Simon J.; Bruce, Neil C.; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial communities are essential to a wide range of ecologically and industrially important processes. To control or predict how these communities function, we require a better understanding of the factors which influence microbial community productivity. Here, we combine functional resource use assays with a biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) experiment to determine whether the functional traits of constituent species can be used to predict community productivity. We quantified the abilities of 12 bacterial species to metabolise components of lignocellulose and then assembled these species into communities of varying diversity and composition to measure their productivity growing on lignocellulose, a complex natural substrate. A positive relationship between diversity and community productivity was caused by a selection effect whereby more diverse communities were more likely to contain two species that significantly improved community productivity. Analysis of functional traits revealed that the observed selection effect was primarily driven by the abilities of these species to degrade β-glucan. Our results indicate that by identifying the key functional traits underlying microbial community productivity we could improve industrial bioprocessing of complex natural substrates. PMID:28323280

  14. Defining the functional traits that drive bacterial decomposer community productivity.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rachael; Alessi, Anna M; Bird, Susannah; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Bruce, Neil C; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2017-03-21

    Microbial communities are essential to a wide range of ecologically and industrially important processes. To control or predict how these communities function, we require a better understanding of the factors which influence microbial community productivity. Here, we combine functional resource use assays with a biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) experiment to determine whether the functional traits of constituent species can be used to predict community productivity. We quantified the abilities of 12 bacterial species to metabolise components of lignocellulose and then assembled these species into communities of varying diversity and composition to measure their productivity growing on lignocellulose, a complex natural substrate. A positive relationship between diversity and community productivity was caused by a selection effect whereby more diverse communities were more likely to contain two species that significantly improved community productivity. Analysis of functional traits revealed that the observed selection effect was primarily driven by the abilities of these species to degrade β-glucan. Our results indicate that by identifying the key functional traits underlying microbial community productivity we could improve industrial bioprocessing of complex natural substrates.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 21 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.22.

  15. Crop water production functions for grain sorghum and winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Productivity of water-limited cropping systems can be reduced by untimely distribution of water as well as cold and heat stress. The objective was to develop relationships among weather parameters, water use, and grain productivity to produce functions forecasting grain yields of grain sorghum and w...

  16. The association between personal care products and lung function.

    PubMed

    Dales, Robert E; Cakmak, Sabit; Leech, Judith; Liu, Ling

    2013-02-01

    Chemical exposures are important determinants of respiratory health. The objective of the present study was to determine the association between the use of personal care products, which may contain respirable components, and lung function. Using questionnaire and spirometry data collected during the Canadian Health Measures population survey, the association was tested between 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV(l)) and forced vital capacity (FVC) expressed as a percentage of predicted, and the frequency of use of personal care products categorized as eye makeup, fragrances, hairstyle products, lipstick, and scented body products. Five thousand sixteen of the 5604 participants in the survey reported using at least one personal care product in the past 3 months. Among men and women, an interquartile increase in hairstyle products was associated with an approximate 2% decrease in both FEV(1) and FVC (P < .05). Among women, each product category was associated with a significant decrease in lung function with the largest observed effect being a 4.08% (95% confidence interval, 7.71-0.45) decrease in FVC associated with an interquartile range increase in the frequency of use of scented body products. This study provides data suggesting that using personal care products may have a small adverse effect on lung function. Further research is warranted to investigate this possibility. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The androgen receptor gene: a major modifier of speed of neuronal transmission and intelligence?

    PubMed

    Manning, J T

    2007-01-01

    Humans show considerable additive genetic variance in cognitive ability or general intelligence (g) but the genes that influence this variation are largely unknown. It is suggested here that the X-linked androgen receptor gene (AR) has a major modifying effect on speed of neuronal transmission and thus on g. The AR is polymorphic in its N-terminal transactivation domain which encodes a polyglutamine tract (CAGn) with a parametric mean of n=21 CAG repeats and normal variation between n=11 and n=30 repeats . Very low repeat numbers are associated with mental retardation, repeat numbers above 30 with reduced cognitive function, and CAGn greater than 40 with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Within the range of 11-30 repeats short CAG chains are associated with high androgen sensitivity and high sperm counts. Despite this, all human populations contain many individuals with n>21 repeats. I suggest that within the range of 11-30 repeats there is a positive association with speed of neuronal transmission and values of g. The advantage of high g and the consequent spread of alleles for high CAGn will be countered by the negative effects on sperm production. Below CAGn=11 and above CAGn=30 neuronal speed may reduce, thus leading to reductions in g and loss of function of neurons. In support of the model I discuss the link between the X-chromosome and g, the comparative structure of the AR gene in the primates, and the variation in CAGn and g in human ethnic groups.

  18. Imaging characteristics of androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jay; Knoll, Abraham; Gilet, Anthony; Kim, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), also known as testicular feminization, is a genetic disorder which leads to lack of response to androgens caused by a defect in the androgen receptor. It is relatively uncommon and is usually diagnosed through clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, physical exam, radiological imaging, and genetic analysis. Our case is a middle-aged woman with complete AIS and demonstrates the importance of the various imaging modalities that are implemented in initially diagnosing and assisting in surgical management.

  19. Identification of an educational production function for diverse technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Production function analysis used to estimate the cost effectiveness of three alternative technologies in higher education: traditional instruction, instructional television, and computer-assisted instruction is presented. Criteria and selection of a functional form are outlined and a general discussion of variable selection and measurement is presented.

  20. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    PCa (9). Thus far, the techniques that have been used to down-regulate the AR include antisense oligonucleotides (10, 11), ribozyme treatments (12...Our findings suggest that ICI may present a useful treatment option for patients with AR-dependent PCa. Unlike the ribozyme , antisense, siRNA, or...Catalytic cleavage of the androgen receptor messenger RNA and functional inhibition of androgen receptor activity by a hammerhead ribozyme . Mol Endocrinol

  2. Novel mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene (l790p) associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raicu, Florina; Giuliani, Rossella; Gatta, Valentina; Palka, Chiara; Franchi, Paolo Guanciali; Lelli-Chiesa, Pierluigi; Tumini, Stefano; Stuppia, Liborio

    2008-07-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), resulting in an impaired embryonic sex differentiation in 46,XY genetic men. Complete androgen insensitivity (CAIS) produces a female external phenotype, whereas cases with partial androgen insensitivity (PAIS) have various ambiguities of the genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity (MAIS) is characterized by undermasculinization and gynecomastia. Here we describe a 2-month-old 46,XY female patient, with all of the characteristics of CAIS. Defects in testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis were excluded. Sequencing of the AR gene showed the presence in exon 6 of a T to C transition in the second base of codon 790, nucleotide position 2369, causing a novel missense Leu790Pro mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. The identification of a novel AR mutation in a girl with CAIS provides significant information due to the importance of missense mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the AR, which are able to induce functional abnormalities in the androgen binding capability, stabilization of active conformation, or interaction with coactivators.

  3. Survival Advantage of AMPK Activation to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells During Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Wu, Yue; Mohler, James L.; Ip, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Androgen-independent prostate cancer usually develops as a relapse following androgen ablation therapy. Removing androgen systemically causes vascular degeneration and nutrient depletion of the prostate tumor tissue. The fact that the malignancy later evolves to androgen-independence suggests that some cancer cells are able to survive the challenge of energy/nutrient deprivation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important manager of energy stress. The present study was designed to investigate the role of AMPK in contributing to the survival of the androgen-independent phenotype. Most of the experiments were carried out in the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and the androgen-independent C4-2 cells. These two cell lines have the same genetic background, since the C4-2 line is derived from the LNCaP line. Glucose deprivation (GD) was instituted to model energy stress encountered by these cells. The key findings are as follows. First, the activation of AMPK by GD was much stronger in C4-2 cells than in LNCaP cells, and the robustness of AMPK activation was correlated favorably with cell viability. Second, the response of AMPK was specific to energy deficiency rather than to amino acid deficiency. The activation of AMPK by GD was functional, as demonstrated by appropriate phosphorylation changes of mTOR and mTOR downstream substrates. Third, blocking AMPK activation by chemical inhibitor or dominant negative AMPK led to increased apoptotic cell death. The observation that similar results were found in other androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, including CW22Rv1 abd VCaP, provided further assurance that AMPK is a facilitator on the road to androgen-independence of prostate cancer cells. PMID:20570728

  4. Survival advantage of AMPK activation to androgen-independent prostate cancer cells during energy stress.

    PubMed

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Wu, Yue; Mohler, James L; Ip, Clement

    2010-10-01

    Androgen-independent prostate cancer usually develops as a relapse following androgen ablation therapy. Removing androgen systemically causes vascular degeneration and nutrient depletion of the prostate tumor tissue. The fact that the malignancy later evolves to androgen-independence suggests that some cancer cells are able to survive the challenge of energy/nutrient deprivation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important manager of energy stress. The present study was designed to investigate the role of AMPK in contributing to the survival of the androgen-independent phenotype. Most of the experiments were carried out in the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and the androgen-independent C4-2 cells. These two cell lines have the same genetic background, since the C4-2 line is derived from the LNCaP line. Glucose deprivation (GD) was instituted to model energy stress encountered by these cells. The key findings are as follows. First, the activation of AMPK by GD was much stronger in C4-2 cells than in LNCaP cells, and the robustness of AMPK activation was correlated favorably with cell viability. Second, the response of AMPK was specific to energy deficiency rather than to amino acid deficiency. The activation of AMPK by GD was functional, as demonstrated by appropriate phosphorylation changes of mTOR and mTOR downstream substrates. Third, blocking AMPK activation by chemical inhibitor or dominant negative AMPK led to increased apoptotic cell death. The observation that similar results were found in other androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, including CW22Rv1 abd VCaP, provided further assurance that AMPK is a facilitator on the road to androgen-independence of prostate cancer cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Orexin Decreases Aromatase Gene Expression in The Hypothalamus of Androgenized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Maliheh; Alishah, Zahra; Khazali, Homayoun; Mahmoudi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background Orexin is a hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide, which third cerebral injection of it mainly exerts inhibitory effects on reproductive functions. It increases significantly the Aromatase (Cyp19) gene expression in the hypothalamus of male rats. Aromatase is an enzyme which converts androgens to estradiol in the hypothalamus of rats. Prenatal or neonatal exposure of females to testosterone masculinizes the pattern of Cyp19 mRNA levels in adulthood. In the present study the effects of central injections of orexin-A on hypothalamic Cyp19 gene expression of adult female rats were investigated, while they had been androgenized on third day of postnatal life. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, twenty female Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (50 µg/100 µl) on their third day of postnatal life. Adult androgenized rats weighing 180-220 g, received either 3 µl saline or one of 2, 4 or 8 µg/3 µl concentration of orexin via third cerebral ventricle. Five non-androgenized rats, as control group, received intra cerebral ventricle (ICV) injection of 3 µl saline. The hypothalamuses were dissected out and mean Cyp19 mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Data were analyzed by unpaired t test and one-way ANOVA using SPSS software, version 16. Results Mean relative Cyp19 mRNA level was significantly increased in the hypothalamus of androgenized compared to non-androgenized female rats. Central injec- tions of 2, 4 or 8 µg/3 µl orexin decreased significantly the hypothalamic Cyp19 mRNA level of androgenized rats compared to androgenized-control groups. Conclusion The results suggested that the orexin may exert inhibitory effects on the gene expression of Cyp19 in the hypothalamus of neonatal androgenized female rats in adulthood. PMID:27441052

  6. Single amino acid substitutions at 2 of 14 positions in an ultra-conserved region of the androgen receptor yield an androgen-binding domain that is reversibly thermolabile

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliou, M.; Lumbroso, R.; Alvarado, C.

    1994-09-01

    The stereochemistry of the androgen receptor (AR) that is responsible for androgen-specific binding and for its contribution to the transregulatory attributes of an androgen-receptor complex are unknown. Our objective is to define structure-function relations of the human AR by correlating germline missense mutations at its X-linked locus with its resultant misbehavior. Subjects with Arg773Cys have complete androgen insensitivity. We and several other laboratories have reported that their genital skin fibroblasts (GSF) have negligible androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees}. We have found that Phe763Leu also causes CAI, but with approximately 10 fmol/mg protein androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees} (R-deficient). Within COS-1 cells transfected with each mutant AR cDNA, Phe763Leu and Arg773Cys androgen-binding activities are reversibly thermolabile, by a factor of 2, at 37{degrees} versus 22{degrees}, only in the presence of androgen; in the absence of androgen they are thermostable at 37{degrees}. We have discovered that (for a reason yet unknown) the GSF from a third family with Arg773Cys (and no other coding sequence mutation) have 20-40 mol/mg protein of androgen-binding activity at 37{degrees} when measured with 3-6 nFM androgen. This activity reversibly doubles at 22{degrees}. The reversible thermolability of an AR with Arg773Cys (and probably with Phe763Leu) is demonstrable within GSF. Ligand-dependence of this thermolability implies that ligand induces these mutant AR to undergo a deviant conformational change in, or near, a 14-aa region that shares 90% identity/similarity with its closest receptor relatives.

  7. [Effects of anti-androgens on sexual function. Double-blind comparative studies on allylestrenol and chlormadinone acetate Part I: Nocturnal penile tumescence monitoring].

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Sato, Y; Suzuki, R; Tanda, H; Kato, S; Mori, K; Matsumoto, H; Maki, A; Kadono, M

    1990-02-01

    Allylestrenol (ALE) and chlormadinone acetate (CMA) were administered to patients with prostatomegaly by the double-blind method, and the effects of these antiandrogens on their sexual function were objectively compared. Each agent was orally administered to 58 patients in a dosage of 50 mg/day for 12 consecutive weeks. For the objective evaluation of the sexual function, nocturnal penil tumescence (NPT) was measured using an erectometer. For the subjective evaluation the conventional interview method was employed. The levels of hormones relating to sexual function were also determined. A decrease in NPT was noted in both the ALE and CMA groups, but the degree of the decrease was significantly smaller in the ALE group than in the CMA group (p less than 0.001). The results of the interview, revealed a large between the two drug groups; in the CMA group, marked worsening for all items. In the determination of hormones, levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone and estradiol were decreased in both drug groups, while the prolactin level was increased in both groups. The changes in the testosterone, estradiol and prolactin levels in the CMA group were significantly dominant compared with those in the ALE group. In addition, drop-out cases due to a decrease in the sexual function numbered 7 (12.1%) in the CMA group, while there were no such drop-out cases in the ALE group; the difference in the drop-out rate was thus significant. In conclusion, ALE's effects on the sexual function were concluded to be smaller than those of CMA.

  8. Genomic and non-genomic effects of androgens in the cardiovascular system: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Herald, Angela K; Alves-Lopes, Rheure; Montezano, Augusto C; Ahmed, S Faisal; Touyz, Rhian M

    2017-07-01

    The principle steroidal androgens are testosterone and its metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is converted from testosterone by the enzyme 5α-reductase. Through the classic pathway with androgens crossing the plasma membrane and binding to the androgen receptor (AR) or via mechanisms independent of the ligand-dependent transactivation function of nuclear receptors, testosterone induces genomic and non-genomic effects respectively. AR is widely distributed in several tissues, including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Androgens are essential for many developmental and physiological processes, especially in male reproductive tissues. It is now clear that androgens have multiple actions besides sex differentiation and sexual maturation and that many physiological systems are influenced by androgens, including regulation of cardiovascular function [nitric oxide (NO) release, Ca(2+) mobilization, vascular apoptosis, hypertrophy, calcification, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation]. This review focuses on evidence indicating that interplay between genomic and non-genomic actions of testosterone may influence cardiovascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. ANDROGEN RECEPTOR LEVELS ARE UPREGULATED BY AKT IN PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Susan; Ruoff, Rachel; Kahoud, Nicole; Franke, Thomas F.; Logan, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest a functional link between the androgen receptor (AR) and the serine/threonine kinase Akt in the development and progression of prostate cancer. To investigate the impact of Akt activity on AR homeostasis, we treated androgen-dependent LNCaP and LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells with Akt inhibitor. Akt inhibition decreased AR expression, suggesting that Akt activity was required for regulation of AR protein levels. However, while androgen-independent LNCaP-abl cells also showed diminished AR protein levels in response to Akt inhibition, treatment of androgen-independent LNCaP-AI cells failed to alter AR protein levels upon similar treatment, suggesting that AR protein levels in these androgen-independent prostate cells were regulated by mechanisms independent of Akt activation. Regulation of AR, downstream of activated Akt, also was observed in vivo when examining transgenic mice that overexpress constitutively active mutant myristoylated (myr)-Akt1 in the prostate. Transgenic mice animals expressing activated myr-Akt1 exhibited higher levels of AR mRNA and protein. Expression of activated myr-Akt1 did not alter prostate cell growth and no significant size differences between prostate tissues derived from transgenic animals were observed when comparing transgenic to wild-type mice. Still, transgenic mice overexpressing Akt exhibited higher levels of γH2AX and phosphorylated Chk2 in prostate tissue. These changes in markers associated with oncogene-induced senescence confirmed significant altered signaling in the transgenic mouse model. Overall, results presented here suggest that AR levels are regulated by the Akt pathway. PMID:21317204

  10. A Single Injection of Hypertrophied Androgenic Gland Cells Produces All-Female Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Levy, Tom; Rosen, Ohad; Eilam, Brit; Azulay, Dudu; Aflalo, Eliahu D; Manor, Rivka; Shechter, Assaf; Sagi, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Monosex culture, common in animal husbandry, enables gender-specific management. Here, production of all-female prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) was achieved by a novel biotechnology comprising three steps: (a) A single injection of suspended hypertrophied androgenic gland cells caused fully functional sex reversal of females into "neo-males" bearing the WZ genotype; (b) crossing neo-males with normal females (WZ) yielded genomically validated WW females; and (c) WW females crossed with normal males (ZZ) yielded all-female progeny. This is the first sustainable biotechnology for large-scale all-female crustacean aquaculture. The approach is particularly suited to species in which females are superior to males and offers seedstock protection, thereby ensuring a quality seed supply. Our technology will thus revolutionize not only the structure of the crustacean aquaculture industry but can also be applied to other sectors. Finally, the production of viable and reproducible females lacking the Z chromosome questions its role, with respect to sexuality.

  11. Androgen ablation elicits PP1-dependence for AR stabilization and transactivation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Liu, Jihong; Wang, Liang; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-05-01

    Previous reports have documented protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) as an essential androgen receptor (AR) activator. However, more systemic studies are needed to further define PP1 effects on AR, particularly in the settings of prostate cancer cells and under conditions mimicking androgen ablation. PP1 effects on AR protein expression, degradation, ubiquitination, and stabilization were examined in non-prostate cancer cells, followed by validation on exogenous settings in androgen-sensitive (LNCaP and VCaP) and castration-resistant (C4-2) prostate cancer cells. Effects of PP1 on AR protein expression, on AR-mediated transcription of exogenous reporter and endogenous gene, and on LNCaP and C4-2 cell proliferation were monitored under androgen-containing versus androgen-depleted conditions to assess the effects of PP1 on AR responsiveness to androgen. In this report, we determined that PP1 functions to stabilize AR proteins that exclusively undergo the proteasome-dependent degradation, and the stimulatory effects of PP1 were predominantly mediated by the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD). Consistently, PP1 enhances AR protein stability by disrupting the LBD-mediated and K48-linked ubiquitination cascade. We further validated the above findings in the prostate cancer cells by showing that PP1 inhibition can increase ubiquitin- and proteasome-dependent degradation of endogenous AR under androgen deprivation. Significantly, we found that PP1 could markedly activate AR transcriptional activities under conditions mimicking androgen ablation and that androgen sensitivity was substantially evoked by PP1 inhibition in the prostate cancer cell lines. As summarized in a simplified model, our studies defined an essential PP1-mediated pathway for AR protein stabilization that can compensate the loss of androgen and established a mechanistic link between PP1 and androgen responsiveness. The amplified PP1-dependence for AR activation under the androgen ablated conditions provides a

  12. [Effects of anti-androgens on sexual function. Double-blind comparative studies on allylestrenol and chlormadinone acetate. Part II: Self-assessment questionnaire method].

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Sato, Y; Suzuki, R; Tanda, H; Kato, S; Mori, K; Matsumoto, H; Maki, A; Kadono, M

    1990-02-01

    Allylestrenol (ALE) and chlormadinone acetate (CMA) were administered to patients with prostatomegaly by the double-blind method, and a self-assessment questionnaire method developed by the authors was used to study the influence of these two antiandrogens on their sexual function. Each test drug was orally administered to 58 patients, in a daily dosage of 50 mg for 12 consecutive weeks. The questionnaires consisted of 6 categories each consisting of 5 questions, or 30 questions in total. The 6 categories were "sexual desire," "erectile capacity" and "ejaculation," which relate to the sexual function, and "living environment (including the frequency of sex)," "dysuria" and "dummy (personality)." Each question was graded into 0-10 points, and each patient was requested to circle the number which best described his status. The scores were compiled and statistically analyzed. Many patients were senile. Evaluable answers were obtained for 99 (85.3%) of the 116 patients. Factor analysis based on the preadministration scores confirmed the contents of the questionnaires to be appropriate for the objectives of the present study. Multiple regression analysis revealed a high correlation between the self-assessment scores and objective data (nocturnal penile tumescence values; NPT values) when dropout cases due to a decrease in the sexual function and non-replying cases were excluded. The self-assessment questionnaire method was concluded to be as useful an objective test method as the NPT measurement for examining the sexual function. Aggravation of the "frequency of urination during night" was conspicuous in the CMA group, and there was a significant difference (p less than 0.05) in this parameter between the two groups. Except for this parameter, dysuria was improved in both administration groups, and there was no significant difference in the efficacy of the two drugs. Both drugs tended to suppress overall sexual function, but the suppression was less severe in the ALE

  13. Resveratrol inhibits androgen production of human adrenocortical H295R cells by lowering CYP17 and CYP21 expression and activities

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Nesa; Bouchoucha, Nadia; Sauter, Kay-Sara

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes, became very popular for its suggested protective effects against aging. It was reported to have similar positive effects on the human metabolism as caloric restriction. Recently, positive effects of resveratrol on steroid biosynthesis in cell systems and in humans suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome have also been reported, but the exact mechanism of this action remains unknown. Sirtuins seem targeted by resveratrol to mediate its action on energy homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of resveratrol on steroidogenesis in human adrenal H295R cells. Resveratrol was found to inhibit protein expression and enzyme activities of CYP17 and CYP21. It did not alter CYP17 and CYP21 mRNA expression, nor protein degradation. Only SIRT3 mRNA expression was found to be altered by resveratrol, but SIRT1, 3 and 5 overexpression did not result in a change in the steroid profile of H295R cells, indicating that resveratrol may not engage sirtuins to modulate steroid production. Previous studies showed that starvation leads to a hyperandrogenic steroid profile in H295R cells through inhibition of PKB/Akt signaling, and that resveratrol inhibits steroidogenesis of rat ovarian theca cells via the PKB/Akt pathway. Therefore, the effect of resveratrol on PKB/Akt signaling was tested in H295R cells and was found to be decreased under starvation growth conditions, but not under normal growth conditions. Overall, these properties of action together with recent clinical findings make resveratrol a candidate for the treatment of hyperandrogenic disorders such as PCOS. PMID:28323907

  14. Resveratrol inhibits androgen production of human adrenocortical H295R cells by lowering CYP17 and CYP21 expression and activities.

    PubMed

    Marti, Nesa; Bouchoucha, Nadia; Sauter, Kay-Sara; Flück, Christa E

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural compound found in grapes, became very popular for its suggested protective effects against aging. It was reported to have similar positive effects on the human metabolism as caloric restriction. Recently, positive effects of resveratrol on steroid biosynthesis in cell systems and in humans suffering from polycystic ovary syndrome have also been reported, but the exact mechanism of this action remains unknown. Sirtuins seem targeted by resveratrol to mediate its action on energy homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of resveratrol on steroidogenesis in human adrenal H295R cells. Resveratrol was found to inhibit protein expression and enzyme activities of CYP17 and CYP21. It did not alter CYP17 and CYP21 mRNA expression, nor protein degradation. Only SIRT3 mRNA expression was found to be altered by resveratrol, but SIRT1, 3 and 5 overexpression did not result in a change in the steroid profile of H295R cells, indicating that resveratrol may not engage sirtuins to modulate steroid production. Previous studies showed that starvation leads to a hyperandrogenic steroid profile in H295R cells through inhibition of PKB/Akt signaling, and that resveratrol inhibits steroidogenesis of rat ovarian theca cells via the PKB/Akt pathway. Therefore, the effect of resveratrol on PKB/Akt signaling was tested in H295R cells and was found to be decreased under starvation growth conditions, but not under normal growth conditions. Overall, these properties of action together with recent clinical findings make resveratrol a candidate for the treatment of hyperandrogenic disorders such as PCOS.

  15. The effects of model androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone on mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) reproduction under different salinities.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Chelsea O; Frasca, Salvatore; Provatas, Anthony A; Lama, Tanya; DeGuise, Sylvain; Bosker, Thijs

    2015-08-01

    Endocrine disrupting substances (EDSs) have the potential to disturb sensitive hormone pathways, particularly those involved in development and reproduction. Both fresh and estuarine water bodies receive inputs of EDSs from a variety of sources, including sewage effluent, industrial effluent and agricultural runoff. Based on current literature, freshwater species appear to respond to lower levels of EDSs than estuarine or marine species. Therefore, effects elicited by EDSs in freshwater teleosts may not be an accurate representation of how EDSs affect teleosts in estuarine and marine environments. To address this potential difference, a short-term reproductive bioassay was conducted under conditions of low and high salinity using mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a euryhaline species that is native to the east coast of North America. The goals of this study were to determine the response of mummichog when exposed to an androgenic EDS and whether salinity affected the response. A model androgen, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), was selected for this experiment. Impacts on reproduction were evaluated at multiple biological levels, including physiological (sex steroid levels), organismal (gonad size and gonad morphology), and functional (egg production) endpoints. Under conditions of high salinity, egg production was significantly reduced at all exposure concentrations. Under conditions of low salinity, there were no significant differences based on DHT treatment; however, egg production in all treatment groups including the control were significantly reduced relative to the high salinity control group. Other reproductive endpoints, such as sex steroid production, showed stronger correlation to fecundity in females than males. This study demonstrates that mummichog fecundity is sensitive to androgenic endocrine disruption while also underscoring the importance of how changes in salinity, an environmental variable, can impact reproduction.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of AC-262536, a novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Piu, Fabrice; Gardell, Luis R; Son, Thomas; Schlienger, Nathalie; Lund, Birgitte W; Schiffer, Hans H; Vanover, Kim E; Davis, Robert E; Olsson, Roger; Bradley, Stefania Risso

    2008-03-01

    Because of the limitations and liabilities of current testosterone therapies, non-steroidal tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators may provide a clinically meaningful advance in therapy. Using a functional cell-based assay AC-262536 was identified as a potent and selective AR ligand, with partial agonist activity relative to the natural androgen testosterone. A 2-week chronic study in castrated male rats indicated that AC-262536 significantly improves anabolic parameters in these animals, especially in stimulating the growth of the levator ani and in suppressing elevated LH levels. In sharp contrast to testosterone, AC-262536 has weak androgenic effects, as measured by prostate and seminal vesicle weights. Thus, AC-262536 represents a novel class of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with beneficial anabolic effects.

  17. [Morris syndrome: description of a case characterized by partial androgen insensitivity].

    PubMed

    Creta, Massimiliano; Smelzo, Salvatore; Di Vito, Concetta; De Stefano, Giacomo; Forchia, Francesco; Chiancone, Francesco; Imbimbo, Ciro

    2010-01-01

    The Morris syndrome is a X-linked recessive condition due to a complete or partial insensitivity to androgens, resulting in a failure of normal masculinization of the external genitalia in chromosomally male individuals. This failure of virilization can be either complete or partial depending on the amount of residual androgen receptor function. The phenotype of individuals with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome may range from mildly virilized female external genitalia to mildly undervirilized male external genitalia. We describe a case of Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a 21-year-old patient with a 46, XY karyotype, bilateral inguinal masses, clitoral enlargement and partial posterior labial fusion. Surgical care consisted of bilateral orchiectomy and plastic surgery of external genitalia. The patient underwent estrogen replacement therapy.

  18. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens.

  19. The role of androgen and androgen receptor in skin-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Chang, Philip; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-09-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin-related diseases, such as androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris. Current treatments for these androgen/AR-involved diseases, which target the synthesis of androgens or prevent its binding to AR, can cause significant adverse side effects. Based on the recent studies using AR knockout mice, it has been suggested that AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases. Here, we review recent studies of androgen/AR roles in several skin-related disorders, including acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism, as well as cutaneous wound healing.

  20. The Role of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in the Skin-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Chang, Philip; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin related diseases, such as androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris. Current treatments for these androgen/AR-involved diseases, which target the synthesis of androgens or prevent its binding to AR, can cause significant adverse side effects. Based on the recent studies using AR knockout mice, it has been suggested that AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases. Here we review recent studies of androgen/AR roles in several skin-related disorders, including acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism, as well as cutaneous wound healing. PMID:22829074

  1. Androgen Metabolism in Progression to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    levels of AKR1C3 relative to VCaP cells (Fig. 1B). Ketoconazole , an inhibitor of an upstream step in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1), decreases basal PSA...1A, right panel). However, as expected, ketoconazole does not prevent block PSA expression in response to androstenedione. Taken 5 together...Indomethacin (20µM) 0 1 10 100 0 1 10 100 0 1 10 100 DMSO VCaP LNCaP DMSO Ketoconazole (2µM) 0 1 10 100 0 1 10 100 VCaP IDMTHN 433 434 436 + R el at iv

  2. Androgen metabolite-dependent growth of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer as a possible aromatase inhibitor-resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hanamura, Toru; Niwa, Toshifumi; Nishikawa, Sayo; Konno, Hiromi; Gohno, Tatsuyuki; Tazawa, Chika; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Kurosumi, Masafumi; Takei, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Ito, Ken-Ichi; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2013-06-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) have been reported to exert their antiproliferative effects in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer not only by reducing estrogen production but also by unmasking the inhibitory effects of androgens such as testosterone (TS) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the role of androgens in AI-resistance mechanisms is not sufficiently understood. 5α-Androstane-3β,17β-diol (3β-diol) generated from DHT by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD3B1) shows androgenic and substantial estrogenic activities, representing a potential mechanism of AI resistance. Estrogen response element (ERE)-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transfected MCF-7 breast cancer cells (E10 cells) were cultured for 3 months under steroid-depleted, TS-supplemented conditions. Among the surviving cells, two stable variants showing androgen metabolite-dependent ER activity were selected by monitoring GFP expression. We investigated the process of adaptation to androgen-abundant conditions and the role of androgens in AI-resistance mechanisms in these variant cell lines. The variant cell lines showed increased growth and induction of estrogen-responsive genes rather than androgen-responsive genes after stimulation with androgens or 3β-diol. Further analysis suggested that increased expression of HSD3B1 and reduced expression of androgen receptor (AR) promoted adaptation to androgen-abundant conditions, as indicated by the increased conversion of DHT into 3β-diol by HSD3B1 and AR signal reduction. Furthermore, in parental E10 cells, ectopic expression of HSD3B1 or inhibition of AR resulted in adaptation to androgen-abundant conditions. Coculture with stromal cells to mimic local estrogen production from androgens reduced cell sensitivity to AIs compared with parental E10 cells. These results suggest that increased expression of HSD3B1 and reduced expression of AR might reduce the sensitivity to AIs as demonstrated by enhanced androgen

  3. Contributions of androgen and estrogen to fetal programming of ovarian dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, David H; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Dumesic, Daniel A

    2006-01-01

    In female mammals, including humans, deviations from normal androgenic or estrogenic exposure during fetal development are detrimental to subsequent adult ovarian function. Androgen deficiency, without accompanying estrogen deficit, has little apparent impact on ovarian development. Fetal estrogen deficiency, on the other hand, results in impaired oocyte and follicle development, immature and abnormal adult ovaries, and excessive ovarian stimulation from endogenous gonadotropins ultimately generating hemorrhagic follicles. Complete estrogen deficiency lasting into adulthood results in partial ovarian masculinization. Fetal androgen excess, on the other hand, mediated either by direct androgen action or following androgen aromatization to estrogen, reprograms ovarian development and reproductive neuroendocrinology to mimic that found in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: enlarged, polyfollicular, hyperandrogenic, anovulatory ovaries with accompanying LH hypersecretion. Oocyte developmental competence is also compromised. Insulin is implicated in the mechanism of both anovulation and deficient oocyte development. Fetal estrogen excess induces somewhat similar disruption of adult ovarian function to fetal androgen excess. Understanding the quality of the fetal female sex steroid hormone environment is thus becoming increasingly important in improving our knowledge of mechanisms underlying a variety of female reproductive pathologies. PMID:16606451

  4. Development and Characterization of Uterine Glandular Epithelium Specific Androgen Receptor Knockout Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Skulte, Katherine A; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2015-11-01

    While estrogen action is the major driver of uterine development, androgens acting via the androgen receptor (AR) may also promote uterine growth as suggested by uterine phenotypes in global AR knockout (ARKO) female mice. Because AR is expressed in uterine endometrial glands, we generated (Cre/loxP) uterine gland epithelium-specific ARKO (ugeARKO) to determine the role of endometrial gland-specific androgen actions. However, AR in uterine gland epithelium may not be required for normal uterine development and function because ugeARKO females had normal uterine development and fertility. To determine if exogenous androgens acting via AR can fully support uterine growth in the absence of estrogens, the ARKO and ugeARKO females were ovariectomized and treated with supraphysiological doses of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (nonaromatizable androgen). Both dihydrotestosterone and testosterone supported full uterine regrowth in wild-type females while ARKO females had no regrowth (comparable to ovariectomized only). These findings suggest that androgens acting via AR can promote full uterine regrowth in the absence of estrogens. The ugeARKO had 50% regrowth when compared to intact uterine glands, and histomorphologically, both the endometrial and myometrial areas were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, suggesting glandular epithelial AR located in the endometrium may indirectly modify myometrial development. Additionally, to confirm Cre function in endometrial glands, we generated uge-specific PTEN knockout mouse model. The ugePTEN knockout females developed severe endometrial hyperplasia and therefore present a novel model for future research.

  5. MicroRNA Targets of Human Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    A large number of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk of prostate cancer . Among them are androgens, dietary factors ...our understanding with respect to molecular mechanisms, signaling pathways and intrinsic factors which contribute to the development of prostate cancer ...ribonuclease which function to process precursor- microRNAs (pre- miRNAs ) to mature miRNA (Denli et al. 2004; Sohn et al. 2007; Mueller et al. 2010). miRNAs are

  6. [Mechanism of the refractory state of androgen hormone in Armadillidium vulgare Latr. (crustacean, isopod, oniscoid) harboring a feminizing bacteria].

    PubMed

    Juchault, P; Legrand, J J

    1985-12-01

    In thelygenous lines of Armadillidium vulgare, neo-females and intersex males (iM) with feminizing symbiotic bacteria are not masculinized by an extract from iM androgenic gland, which, however, masculinizes bacterialess genetic females. Injection of iM hemolymph extract masculinizes these genetic females. This indicates that androgenic hormone is present in iM hemolymph. Lack of androgenic hormone activity in thelygenous lines is supposed to result from the action of bacteria on the androgenic hormone receptors. Since a temporary recovery of the male differentiation of iM can be induced by implantation of different parts of central nervous system, bacteria effect is probably indirect, through an action on a neurosecretory system, perhaps one of those controlling the functioning of the androgenic gland.

  7. Exercise and Serum Androgens in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerlind, Kim C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study examining the effect of a 10-week hydraulic resistance exercise program on serum androgen levels, strength, and lean body weight in 18 college women revealed that training did not result in significant increases in androgen hormones, although there were significant gains in strength. (Author/CB)

  8. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome--a review.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Meghan B; Eyvazzadeh, Aimee D; Quint, Elisabeth; Smith, Yolanda R

    2008-12-01

    This review paper highlights important diagnostic and therapeutic concerns for girls with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS). CAIS is an androgen receptor defect disorder associated with vaginal and uterine agenesis in women with a 46,XY karyotype. The major clinical issues surrounding this syndrome include timing of gonadectomy, hormone replacement, vaginal dilation, and attention to psychological issues.

  9. Developmental programming by androgen affects the circadian timing system in female mice.

    PubMed

    Mereness, Amanda L; Murphy, Zachary C; Sellix, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Circadian clocks play essential roles in the timing of events in the mammalian hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis. The molecular oscillator driving these rhythms has been localized to tissues of the HPO axis. It has been suggested that synchrony among these oscillators is a feature of normal reproductive function. The impact of fertility disorders on clock function and the role of the clock in the etiology of endocrine pathology remain unknown. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a particularly devastating fertility disorder, affecting 5%-10% of women at childbearing age with features including a polycystic ovary, anovulation, and elevated serum androgen. Approximately 40% of these women have metabolic syndrome, marked by hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. It has been suggested that developmental exposure to excess androgen contributes to the etiology of fertility disorders, including PCOS. To better define the role of the timing system in these disorders, we determined the effects of androgen-dependent developmental programming on clock gene expression in tissues of the metabolic and HPO axes. Female PERIOD2::luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice were exposed to androgen (dihydrotestosterone [DHT]) in utero (Days 16-18 of gestation) or for 9-10 wk (DHT pellet) beginning at weaning (pubertal androgen excess [PAE]). As expected, both groups of androgen-treated mice had disrupted estrous cycles. Analysis of PER2::LUC expression in tissue explants revealed that excess androgen produced circadian misalignment via tissue-dependent effects on phase distribution. In vitro treatment with DHT differentially affected the period of PER2::LUC expression in tissue explants and granulosa cells, indicating that androgen has direct and tissue-specific effects on clock gene expression that may account for the effects of developmental programming on the timing system. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  10. Androgens and innate immunity in rehabilitated semi-captive orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio) from Malaysian Borneo.

    PubMed

    Prall, Sean P; Ambu, Laurentius; Nathan, Senthilvel; Alsisto, Sylvia; Ramirez, Diana; Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2015-06-01

    Despite the implications for the development of life-history traits, endocrine-immune trade-offs in apes are not well studied. This is due, in part, to difficulty in sampling wild primates, and lack of methods available for immune measures using samples collected noninvasively. Evidence for androgen-mediated immune trade-offs in orangutans is virtually absent, and very little is known regarding their pattern of adrenal development and production of adrenal androgens. To remedy both of these deficiencies, sera were collected from orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio) (N = 38) at the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre, Sabah, Malaysia, during routine health screenings. Testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) were assayed, along with two measures of functional innate immunity. DHEA-S concentrations, but not DHEA, increased with age in this sample of 1-18 year old animals. DHEA concentrations were higher in animals with higher levels of serum bacteria killing ability, while DHEA-S and testosterone concentrations were higher in animals with reduced complement protein activity. Patterns of DHEA-S concentration in this sample are consistent with patterns of adrenarche observed in other apes. Results from this study suggest that in addition to testosterone, DHEA and DHEA-S may have potent effects on immunological activity in this species.

  11. Non-competitive androgen receptor inhibition in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy O; Bolton, Eric C; Huang, Yong; Feau, Clementine; Guy, R Kiplin; Yamamoto, Keith R; Hann, Byron; Diamond, Marc I

    2009-04-28

    Androgen receptor (AR) inhibitors are used to treat multiple human diseases, including hirsutism, benign prostatic hypertrophy, and prostate cancer, but all available anti-androgens target only ligand binding, either by reduction of available hormone or by competitive antagonism. New strategies are needed, and could have an important impact on therapy. One approach could be to target other cellular mechanisms required for receptor activation. In prior work, we used a cell-based assay of AR conformation change to identify non-ligand inhibitors of AR activity. Here, we characterize 2 compounds identified in this screen: pyrvinium pamoate, a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, and harmol hydrochloride, a natural product. Each compound functions by a unique, non-competitive mechanism and synergizes with competitive antagonists to disrupt AR activity. Harmol blocks DNA occupancy by AR, whereas pyrvinium does not. Pyrvinium inhibits AR-dependent gene expression in the prostate gland in vivo, and induces prostate atrophy. These results highlight new therapeutic strategies to inhibit AR activity.

  12. Work function analysis of vegetarian entrée production.

    PubMed

    Maloney, S; Zolber, K; Burke, K; Connell, B; Shavlik, G

    1986-02-01

    Data on labor time for food production can be used as an effective management tool. It is essential for foodservice managers to know how labor time is being used (1). A continuous time study was conducted to determine total labor time for the production of eight vegetarian entrées in a hospital foodservice system. Two work areas were observed: the ingredient assembly area and the cooks' production area. Times were recorded by work function to identify how labor time was distributed. Results showed (a) observed frequency for each work function, (b) time expended in seconds per portion for each work function, (c) percentage distribution of labor time by work function, (d) total time for each employee involved in entrée production, and (e) percentage of total time in which each employee was involved in the production of each entrée. Total labor time varied by type of entrée, ranging from 39.97 to 19.33 seconds per portion. Entrées with the highest labor time required the largest amount of hand labor. A one-way analysis of variance indicated significant differences in mean labor time among the eight vegetarian entrées for direct labor time (p = .0009), and total labor time (p = .0018). No significant differences were found among entrées for indirect labor or delay time.

  13. The androgen-induced protein AIbZIP facilitates proliferation of prostate cancer cells through downregulation of p21 expression

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiang; Cui, Min; Asada, Rie; Kanemoto, Soshi; Saito, Atsushi; Matsuhisa, Koji; Kaneko, Masayuki; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Androgen-Induced bZIP (AIbZIP) is structurally a bZIP transmembrane transcription factor belonging to the CREB/ATF family. This molecule is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells and is transcriptionally upregulated by androgen treatment. Here, we investigated molecular mechanism of androgen-dependent expression of AIbZIP and its physiological function in prostate cancer cells. Our data showed that SAM pointed domain-containing ETS transcription factor (SPDEF), which is upregulated by androgen treatment, directly activates transcription of AIbZIP. Knockdown of AIbZIP caused a significant reduction in the proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells with robust expression of p21. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that AIbZIP interacts with old astrocyte specifically induced substance (OASIS), which is a CREB/ATF family transcription factor, and prevents OASIS from promoting transcription of its target gene p21. These findings showed that AIbZIP induced by the androgen receptor (AR) axis plays a crucial role in the proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, and could be a novel target of therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:27853318

  14. Androgen therapy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    McGrath, K-C Y; McRobb, L S; Heather, A K

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in Western society today. There is a striking gender difference in CVD with men predisposed to earlier onset and more severe disease. Following the recent reevaluation and ongoing debate regarding the estrogen protection hypothesis, and given that androgen use and abuse is increasing in our society, the alternate view that androgens may promote CVD in men is assuming increasing importance. Whether androgens adversely affect CVD in either men or women remains a contentious issue within both the cardiovascular and endocrinological fraternities. This review draws from basic science, animal and clinical studies to outline our current understanding regarding androgen effects on atherosclerosis, the major CVD, and asks where future directions of atherosclerosis-related androgen research may lie.

  15. Modeling of the Gross Regional Product on the Basis of Production Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadovin, Nikolay S.; Kokotkina, Tatiana N.; Barkalova, Tatiana G.; Tsaregorodsev, Evgeny I.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to elaboration and construction of a static model of macroeconomics in which economics is considered as an unstructured holistic unit, the input of which receives the resources, and the output is the result of the functioning of economics in the form of gross domestic product or gross regional product. Resources are…

  16. Membrane Protein Production in Lactococcus lactis for Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Seigneurin-Berny, Daphne; King, Martin S; Sautron, Emiline; Moyet, Lucas; Catty, Patrice; André, François; Rolland, Norbert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Frelet-Barrand, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, expression and study of membrane proteins in heterologous systems remains difficult. Among the bacterial systems available, the Gram-positive lactic bacterium, Lactococcus lactis, traditionally used in food fermentations, is nowadays widely used for large-scale production and functional characterization of bacterial and eukaryotic membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to describe the different possibilities for the functional characterization of peripheral or intrinsic membrane proteins expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

  17. Using Plant Functional Traits to Explain Diversity–Productivity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Roscher, Christiane; Schumacher, Jens; Gubsch, Marlén; Lipowsky, Annett; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina; Schmid, Bernhard; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Background The different hypotheses proposed to explain positive species richness–productivity relationships, i.e. selection effect and complementarity effect, imply that plant functional characteristics are at the core of a mechanistic understanding of biodiversity effects. Methodology/Principal Findings We used two community-wide measures of plant functional composition, (1) community-weighted means of trait values (CWM) and (2) functional trait diversity based on Rao’s quadratic diversity (FDQ) to predict biomass production and measures of biodiversity effects in experimental grasslands (Jena Experiment) with different species richness (2, 4, 8, 16 and 60) and different functional group number and composition (1 to 4; legumes, grasses, small herbs, tall herbs) four years after establishment. Functional trait composition had a larger predictive power for community biomass and measures of biodiversitity effects (40–82% of explained variation) than species richness per se (<1–13% of explained variation). CWM explained a larger amount of variation in community biomass (80%) and net biodiversity effects (70%) than FDQ (36 and 38% of explained variation respectively). FDQ explained similar proportions of variation in complementarity effects (24%, positive relationship) and selection effects (28%, negative relationship) as CWM (27% of explained variation for both complementarity and selection effects), but for all response variables the combination of CWM and FDQ led to significant model improvement compared to a separate consideration of different components of functional trait composition. Effects of FDQ were mainly attributable to diversity in nutrient acquisition and life-history strategies. The large spectrum of traits contributing to positive effects of CWM on biomass production and net biodiversity effects indicated that effects of dominant species were associated with different trait combinations. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the

  18. Androgens in human evolution. A new explanation of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    2001-01-01

    Human evolution consists of chronological changes in gene regulation of a continuous and relatively stable genome, activated by hormones, the production of which is intermittently affected by endogenous and exogenous forces. Periodic variations in the gonadal androgen, testosterone, and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), significantly participated in all hominid transformations. The hominid characteristics of early Australopithecines are primarily a result of increased testosterone. The first significant cold of the early Pleistocene resulted in an increase in DHEA that simultaneously produced Homo and the robust Australopithecines. Subsequent Pleistocene climatic changes and differential reproduction produced changes in DHEA and testosterone ratios that caused extinction of the robust Australopithecines and further changes and continuation of Homo. Changes in testosterone and DHEA produce allometric and behavioral changes that are identifiable and vigorous in modern populations.

  19. Functional and Behavioral Product Information Representation and Consistency Validation for Collaboration in Product Lifecycle Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baysal, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    Information models that represent the function, assembly and behavior of artifacts are critical in the conceptual development of a product and its evaluation. Much research has been conducted in this area; however, existing models do not relate function, behavior and structure in a comprehensive and consistent way. In this work, NIST's Core…

  20. Functional and Behavioral Product Information Representation and Consistency Validation for Collaboration in Product Lifecycle Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baysal, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    Information models that represent the function, assembly and behavior of artifacts are critical in the conceptual development of a product and its evaluation. Much research has been conducted in this area; however, existing models do not relate function, behavior and structure in a comprehensive and consistent way. In this work, NIST's Core…

  1. Joint pricing and production management: a geometric programming approach with consideration of cubic production cost function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Seyed Jafar; Hamidi Hesarsorkh, Aghil; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Bonyadi Naeini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Coordination and harmony between different departments of a company can be an important factor in achieving competitive advantage if the company corrects alignment between strategies of different departments. This paper presents an integrated decision model based on recent advances of geometric programming technique. The demand of a product considers as a power function of factors such as product's price, marketing expenditures, and consumer service expenditures. Furthermore, production cost considers as a cubic power function of outputs. The model will be solved by recent advances in convex optimization tools. Finally, the solution procedure is illustrated by numerical example.

  2. Identifying Inputs Toward Production Function Application in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copa, George H.

    Production function applications to improve the efficiency of educational programs require identification of inputs and outputs and the establishment of a data bank to provide information on input and output variables. This generalizable input identification model organizes inputs for systems analysis at various levels of inputs and provides a…

  3. Development of US EPA's Ecological Production Function Library

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA is developing a library of ecological production functions (EPFs) to help communities plan for sustainable access to ecosystem goods and services (EGS). Several databases already compile information about the value of EGS. However, they focus on static representations of...

  4. Equality of Educational Opportunity Quantified: A Production Function Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Anita A.; Wolfe, Barbara L.

    This paper discusses a statistical analysis of the impact on student learning of socioeconomic characteristics, certain aspects of the school environment, and the amount of educational resources expanded on students. It is felt that the analysis is quite similar to what economists do when they estimate production functions for films; but that…

  5. Development of US EPA's Ecological Production Function Library

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA is developing a library of ecological production functions (EPFs) to help communities plan for sustainable access to ecosystem goods and services (EGS). Several databases already compile information about the value of EGS. However, they focus on static representations of...

  6. Functionality of alternative protein in gluten-free product development.

    PubMed

    Deora, Navneet Singh; Deswal, Aastha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. The current treatment for celiac disease is life-long adherence to a strict gluten-exclusion diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. A major limitation in the production of gluten-free products is the lack of protein functionality in non-wheat cereals. Additionally, commercial gluten-free mixes usually contain only carbohydrates, which may significantly limit the amount of protein in the diet. In the recent past, various approaches are attempted to incorporate protein-based ingredients and to modify the functional properties for gluten-free product development. This review aims to the highlight functionality of the alternative protein-based ingredients, which can be utilized for gluten-free product development both functionally as well as nutritionally.

  7. Androgen deprivation-induced senescence promotes outgrowth of androgen-refractory prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Dominick G A; Giribaldi, Maria G; Munoz, Anisleidys; Halvorsen, Katherine; Patel, Asmita; Jorda, Merce; Perez-Stable, Carlos; Rai, Priyamvada

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation (AD) is an effective method for initially suppressing prostate cancer (PC) progression. However, androgen-refractory PC cells inevitably emerge from the androgen-responsive tumor, leading to incurable disease. Recent studies have shown AD induces cellular senescence, a phenomenon that is cell-autonomously tumor-suppressive but which confers tumor-promoting adaptations that can facilitate the advent of senescence-resistant malignant cell populations. Because androgen-refractory PC cells emerge clonally from the originally androgen-responsive tumor, we sought to investigate whether AD-induced senescence (ADIS) affects acquisition of androgen-refractory behavior in androgen-responsive LNCaP and LAPC4 prostate cancer cells. We find that repeated exposure of these androgen-responsive cells to senescence-inducing stimuli via cyclic AD leads to the rapid emergence of ADIS-resistant, androgen-refractory cells from the bulk senescent cell population. Our results show that the ADIS phenotype is associated with tumor-promoting traits, notably chemoresistance and enhanced pro-survival mechanisms such as inhibition of p53-mediated cell death, which encourage persistence of the senescent cells. We further find that pharmacologic enforcement of p53/Bax activation via Nutlin-3 prior to establishment of ADIS is required to overcome the associated pro-survival response and preferentially trigger pervasive cell death instead of senescence during AD. Thus our study demonstrates that ADIS promotes outgrowth of androgen-refractory PC cells and is consequently a suboptimal tumor-suppressor response to AD.

  8. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elliot R.; McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Heather, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping. PMID:23389345

  9. Biosynthesis and Function of Polyacetylenes and Allied Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Minto, Robert E.; Blacklock, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    Polyacetylenic natural products are a substantial class of often unstable compounds containing a unique carbon-carbon triple bond functionality, that are intriguing for their wide variety of biochemical and ecological functions, economic potential, and surprising mode of biosynthesis. Isotopic tracer experiments between 1960 and 1990 demonstrated that the majority of these compounds are derived from fatty acid and polyketide precursors. During the past decade, research into the metabolism of polyacetylenes has swiftly advanced, driven by the cloning of the first genes responsible for polyacetylene biosynthesis in plants, moss, fungi, and actinomycetes, and the initial characterization of the gene products. The current state of knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular genetics of polyacetylenic secondary metabolic pathways will be presented together with an up-to-date survey of new terrestrial and marine natural products, their known biological activities, and a discussion of their likely metabolic origins. PMID:18387369

  10. Star product, discrete Wigner functions, and spin-system tomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, P.; Andreev, V. A.; Isar, A.; Man'ko, V. I.; Man'ko, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    We develop the star-product formalism for spin states and consider different methods for constructing operator systems forming sets of dequantizers and quantizers, establishing a relation between them. We study the physical meaning of the operator symbols related to them. Quantum tomograms can also serve as operator symbols. We show that the possibility to express discrete Wigner functions in terms of measurable quantities follows because these functions can be related to quantum tomograms. We investigate the physical meaning of tomograms and spin-system tomogram symbols, which they acquire in the framework of the star-product formalism. We study the structure of the sum kernels, which can be used to express the operator symbols, calculated using different sets of dequantizers and also arising in calculating the star product of operator symbols, in terms of one another.

  11. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  12. Urban Scaling and the Production Function for Cities

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, José; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Strumsky, Deborah; West, Geoffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    The factors that account for the differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult to measure and identify unambiguously. Here we show that a microscopic derivation of urban scaling relations for economic quantities vs. population, obtained from the consideration of social and infrastructural properties common to all cities, implies an effective model of economic output in the form of a Cobb-Douglas type production function. As a result we derive a new expression for the Total Factor Productivity (TFP) of urban areas, which is the standard measure of economic productivity per unit of aggregate production factors (labor and capital). Using these results we empirically demonstrate that there is a systematic dependence of urban productivity on city population size, resulting from the mismatch between the size dependence of wages and labor, so that in contemporary US cities productivity increases by about 11% with each doubling of their population. Moreover, deviations from the average scale dependence of economic output, capturing the effect of local factors, including history and other local contingencies, also manifest surprising regularities. Although, productivity is maximized by the combination of high wages and low labor input, high productivity cities show invariably high wages and high levels of employment relative to their size expectation. Conversely, low productivity cities show both low wages and employment. These results shed new light on the microscopic processes that underlie urban economic productivity, explain the emergence of effective aggregate urban economic output models in terms of labor and capital inputs and may inform the development of economic theory related to growth. PMID:23544042

  13. Parallel evolution between aromatase and androgen receptor in the animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Basant; Tiwary, Besant K; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2009-01-01

    There are now many known cases of orthologous or unrelated proteins in different species that have undergone parallel evolution to satisfy a similar function. However, there are no reported cases of parallel evolution for proteins that bind a common ligand but have different functions. We focused on two proteins that have different functions in steroid hormone biosynthesis and action but bind a common ligand, androgen. The first protein, androgen receptor (AR), is a nuclear hormone receptor and the second one, aromatase (cytochrome P450 19 [CYP19]), converts androgen to estrogen. We hypothesized that binding of the androgen ligand has exerted common selective pressure on both AR and CYP19, resulting in a signature of parallel evolution between these two proteins, though they perform different functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that rates of amino acid change in AR and CYP19 are strongly correlated across the metazoan phylogeny, whereas no significant correlation was found in the control set of proteins. Moreover, we inferred that genomic toolkits required for steroid biosynthesis and action were present in a basal metazoan, cnidarians. The close similarities between vertebrate and sea anemone AR and CYP19 suggest a very ancient origin of their endocrine functions at the base of metazoan evolution. Finally, we found evidence supporting the hypothesis that the androgen-to-estrogen ratio determines the gonadal sex in all metazoans.

  14. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  15. Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator Ostarine in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Zilbermint, Mihail F; Dobs, Adrian S

    2009-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome, affecting up to 60% of the approximately 1.4 million patients diagnosed with cancer each year in the USA. This condition is characterized by progressive deterioration of a patient's nutritional status, weight loss, anorexia, diminished quality of life and increased mortality and morbidity. Current therapy with progestational, anti-inflammatory and anabolic agents is often ineffective and has a large number of undesirable effects. The newly developed nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator Ostarine has demonstrated promising results in Phase I and II clinical trials, increasing total lean body mass, enhancing functional performance and decreasing total tissue percent fat. This selective androgen receptor modulator may have the ability to perform as a potent anabolic agent with minimal side effects on other organs (prostate and hair follicles), thus presenting a new strategy in managing cancer cachexia. However, more extensive data is required before its efficacy is confirmed.

  16. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, or end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty, and hypogonadism. This review summarizes the current standing of research and development of SARMs, crystallography of AR with SARMs, plausible mechanisms for their action and the potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs. PMID:19079612

  17. Research Resource: Hormones, Genes, and Athleticism: Effect of Androgens on the Avian Muscular Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Chan, Tak-Ming; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Chew, Jenifer G; Xiao, Xinshu; Schlinger, Barney A

    2016-02-01

    Male vertebrate social displays vary from physically simple to complex, with the latter involving exquisite motor command of the body and appendages. Studies of these displays have, in turn, provided substantial insight into neuromotor mechanisms. The neotropical golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus) has been used previously as a model to investigate intricate motor skills because adult males of this species perform an acrobatic and androgen-dependent courtship display. To support this behavior, these birds express elevated levels of androgen receptors (AR) in their skeletal muscles. Here we use RNA sequencing to explore how testosterone (T) modulates the muscular transcriptome to support male manakin courtship displays. In addition, we explore how androgens influence gene expression in the muscles of the zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), a model passerine bird with a limited courtship display and minimal muscle AR. We identify androgen-dependent, muscle-specific gene regulation in both species. In addition, we identify manakin-specific effects that are linked to muscle use during the manakin display, including