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Sample records for androgen production function

  1. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    PubMed

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  2. Functional link between bone morphogenetic proteins and insulin-like peptide 3 signaling in modulating ovarian androgen production

    PubMed Central

    Glister, Claire; Satchell, Leanne; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Wade, John D.; Dai, Yanzhenzi; Ivell, Richard; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Rodgers, Raymond J.; Knight, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are firmly implicated as intra-ovarian regulators of follicle development and steroidogenesis. Here we report a microarray analysis showing that treatment of cultured bovine theca cells (TC) with BMP6 significantly (>twofold; P < 0.01) up- or down-regulated expression of 445 genes. Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) was the most heavily down-regulated gene (−43-fold) with cytochrome P450, subfamily XVII (CYP17A1) and other key steroidogenic transcripts including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 family 11, subfamily A1 (CYP11A1) and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD3B1) also down-regulated. BMP6 also reduced expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 5A1 (NR5A1) known to target the promoter regions of the aforementioned genes. Real-time PCR confirmed these findings and also revealed a marked reduction in expression of INSL3 receptor, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2). Secretion of INSL3 protein and androstenedione were also suppressed suggesting a functional link between BMP and INSL3 pathways in controlling androgen synthesis. RNAi-mediated knockdown of INSL3 reduced INSL3 mRNA (75%) and protein (94%) level and elicited a 77% reduction in CYP17A1 mRNA and 83% reduction in androstenedione secretion. Knockdown of RXFP2 also reduced CYP17A1 expression (81%) and androstenedione secretion (88%). Conversely, treatment with exogenous (human) INSL3 increased androstenedione secretion ∼twofold. The CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone abolished androgen secretion and reduced expression of both INSL3 and RXFP2. Collectively, these findings indicate a positive autoregulatory role for INSL3 signaling in maintaining thecal androgen production, and visa versa. Moreover, BMP6-induced suppression of thecal androgen synthesis may be mediated, at least in part, by reduced INSL3-RXFP2 signaling. PMID:23530236

  3. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity. PMID:25416742

  4. Is androgen production in association with immune system activation potential evidence for existence of a functional adrenal/ovarian autoimmune system in women?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low functional ovarian reserve (FOR) is at all ages associated with low testosterone (T) levels. Causes are, however, unknown. We, therefore, investigate whether androgens with low FOR are associated with non-specific immune system activation. Methods 322 infertile women with low and normal FOR (controls) were assessed with a broadly based immune profile, which in previous studies has proven effective in differentiating infertile patients with and without immune system activation. Patients were either immune-positive (greater than or equal to one positive tested parameter) or immune negative (no positive test). 135 suffered from prematurely diminished FOR (POA/OPOI; < age 38), 155 from physiologic diminished FOR due to age (DOR; > age 40), and 32 were controls (< age 38 with normal age-specific FOR). Prevalence of immune-positive vs. negative was assessed in all 3 patient groups. Results Women with immune abnormalities, overall, demonstrated higher total T (TT, P = 0.004) and free T (FT, P < 0.001) levels than those without. The three clinical and two immunologic-defined patient groups demonstrated significant statistical interaction in mean TT (P = 0.008), with mean TT and FT in women with positive immune findings being significantly higher in control than in POA/OPOI and physiologic DOR patients (all 4 differences P < 0.001). No such differences between the three groups were seen in women without immune abnormalities. Conclusions In this study we used a definition of immune-positivity, which favors sensitivity over specificity, resulting in significant numbers of false-positives but likely only few false-negatives. The study allows suggesting the possibility of an immune system-derived androgen-production factor (APF), which maintains normal androgen levels but is deficient in women with low FOR and immune system inactivity. Existence of such an APF would suggest the presence of a still unknown functional adrenal autoimmune system

  5. Unveiling the crucial intermediates in androgen production

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Piotr J.; Gregory, Michael C.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Kincaid, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Ablation of androgen production through surgery is one strategy against prostate cancer, with the current focus placed on pharmaceutical intervention to restrict androgen synthesis selectively, an endeavor that could benefit from the enhanced understanding of enzymatic mechanisms that derives from characterization of key reaction intermediates. The multifunctional cytochrome P450 17A1 (CYP17A1) first catalyzes the typical hydroxylation of its primary substrate, pregnenolone (PREG) and then also orchestrates a remarkable C17–C20 bond cleavage (lyase) reaction, converting the 17-hydroxypregnenolone initial product to dehydroepiandrosterone, a process representing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of androgens. Now, we report the capture and structural characterization of intermediates produced during this lyase step: an initial peroxo-anion intermediate, poised for nucleophilic attack on the C20 position by a substrate-associated H-bond, and the crucial ferric peroxo-hemiacetal intermediate that precedes carbon–carbon (C-C) bond cleavage. These studies provide a rare glimpse at the actual structural determinants of a chemical transformation that carries profound physiological consequences. PMID:26668369

  6. In situ androgen and estrogen biosynthesis in endometrial cancer: focus on androgen actions and intratumoral production.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; McNamara, Keely May; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    In situ estrogen biosynthesis is considered to play pivotal roles in the development and progression of human endometrial carcinoma. However, the biological roles of androgen have remained virtually unknown. Various epidemiological studies have revealed that elevated serum androgen levels are generally associated with an increased risk of developing endometrial carcinoma; however, studies directly examining androgens in carcinoma tissues are relatively rare and reviews summarizing this information are scarce. Therefore, we summarized recent studies on androgens in endometrial carcinoma, especially focusing androgen actions and in situ androgen biosynthesis. Among the enzymes required for local biosynthesis of androgen, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 5 (conversion from androstenedione to testosterone) and 5α-reductase (reduction of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)) are the principal enzymes involved in the formation of biologically most potent androgen, DHT. Both enzymes and androgen receptor were expressed in endometrial carcinoma tissues, and in situ production of DHT has been reported to exist in endometrial carcinoma tissues. However, testosterone is not only a precursor of DHT production, but also a precursor of estradiol synthesis, as a substrate of the aromatase enzyme. Therefore, aromatase could be another key enzyme serving as a negative regulator for in situ production of DHT by reducing amounts of the precursor. In an in vitro study, DHT was reported to exert antiproliferative effects on endometrial carcinoma cells. Intracrine mechanisms of androgens, the downstream signals of AR, which are directly related to anticancer progression, and the clinical significance of DHT-AR pathway in the patients with endometrial carcinoma have, however, not been fully elucidated. PMID:27287451

  7. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system. PMID:27168746

  8. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-02-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system.

  9. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  10. Androgens.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rakesh; Handelsman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen abuse is the most potent and prevalent form of sports doping detected. It originated from the early years of the Cold War as an epidemic confined to drug cheating within elite power sports. In the decades following the end of the Cold War, it has become disseminated into an endemic based within the illicit drug subcultures serving recreational abusers seeking cosmetic body sculpting effects. Within sports, both direct androgen abuse (administration of androgens), as well as indirect androgen abuse (administration of nonandrogenic drugs to increase endogenous testosterone), is mostly readily detectable with mass spectrometry-based anti-doping urine tests. The ongoing temptation of fame and fortune and the effectiveness of androgen abuse in power sports continue to entice cheating via renewed approaches aiming to exploit androgens. These require ongoing vigilance, inventiveness in anti-doping science, and targeting coaches as well as athletes in order to build resilience against doping and maintain fairness in elite sport. The challenge of androgen abuse in the community among recreational abusers has barely been recognized and effective approaches remain to be developed. PMID:27347677

  11. Preliminary results suggesting exaggerated ovarian androgen production early in the course of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francis, G L; Getts, A; McPherson, J C

    1990-11-01

    Excess ovarian androgen production might be a cause of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO). Previous studies have evaluated adult women with long-standing abnormality of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. Abnormal ovarian function in such patients could be a primary or even a secondary finding. For that reason, this study was designed to evaluate ovarian androgen production in symptomatic adolescent females. Simultaneous adrenal suppression, by using dexamethasone, and ovarian stimulation, by using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), were achieved in 12 patients. Following stimulation, blood was serially obtained over 8 hr to measure gonadotropin, estrogen, and androgen responses. Based on the androgen response, patients could be divided into two groups. Group A (five) had a significant increase (p less than 0.01) in free testosterone, whereas group B (seven) had no increase in any androgen, including free testosterone (significantly different from group A, p = 0.01). All patients in group A had enlarged or cystic ovaries, whereas only one-quarter patients in group B had enlarged ovaries (significantly different from group A, p less than 0.03). The pituitary and estrogenic response was similar in both groups. These preliminary data suggest that some patients with PCO (group A) have a primary abnormality in ovarian androgen production early in the course of their disease.

  12. Androgen therapy in women.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2006-01-01

    Androgens in women either derive from direct ovarian production or from peripheral conversion of the adrenal sex steroid precursor, dehydroepiandrosterone, towards active androgens. Therefore, loss of adrenal or ovarian function, caused by Addison's disease or consequent to bilateral oophorectomy, results in severe androgen deficiency, clinically often associated with a loss of libido and energy. Importantly, physiological menopause does not necessarily lead to androgen deficiency, as androgen synthesis in the ovaries may persist despite the decline in estrogen production. However, the definition of female androgen deficiency, as recently provided by the Princeton consensus statement, is not precise enough and may lead to over-diagnosis due to the high prevalence of its diagnostic criteria: androgen levels below or within the lower quartile of the normal range and concurrent sexual dysfunction. Importantly, physiological menopause is not necessarily associated with androgen deficiency and therefore does not routinely require androgen therapy. Current replacement options include transdermal testosterone administration or dehydroepiandrosterone treatment, both of which have been shown to result in significant improvements, in particular in libido and mood, while effects on body composition and muscular function are not well documented. It is important to keep in mind that the number of randomized controlled trials is still limited and that currently none of the available preparations is officially approved for use in women. Currently, androgen replacement should be reserved for women with severe androgen deficiency due to an established cause and matching clinical signs and symptoms. PMID:16381985

  13. Androgen Receptor Structure, Function and Biology: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Rachel A; Grossmann, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung. Androgens can exert their actions via the AR in a DNA binding-dependent manner to regulate target gene transcription, or in a non-DNA binding-dependent manner to initiate rapid, cellular events such as the phosphorylation of 2nd messenger signalling cascades. More recently, ligand-independent actions of the AR have also been identified. Given the large volume of studies relating to androgens and the AR, this review is not intended as an extensive review of all studies investigating the AR, but rather as an overview of the structure, function, signalling pathways and biology of the AR as well as its important role in clinical medicine, with emphasis on recent developments in this field. PMID:27057074

  14. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  15. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  16. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  17. Androgens and Male Sexual Function: A Review of Human Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiavi, Raul C.; White, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    The scope of this article is a review and brief discussion of recently gathered information on androgens and sexual behavior in men. Current pharmacological research does not furnish specific evidence that administration of androgens or preprations that stimulate the secretion of endogenous androgens have beneficial effects on functional…

  18. Anti-androgens in gynaecological practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, M J; Franks, S

    1988-09-01

    Hirsutism and acne in women are common distressing problems. Unwanted hair growth, acne and seborrhoea result from the action of androgens on the skin. Such effects depend not only on increased androgen production by the ovary or adrenal gland but also on the bioavailability of androgen to peripheral tissues. This in turn is related to transport of androgens in plasma by specific binding proteins and to peripheral metabolism of testosterone and androstenedione to their more potent 5 alpha-reduced derivatives. An effective anti-androgen is one which blocks the androgen receptor-mediated actions of testosterone and DHT on skin. CPA, the treatment of choice in the UK, is a potent androgen receptor-blocking steroid which also has progestational properties. When combined with ethinyloestradiol it also suppresses ovarian function, thus reducing androgen production, and provides effective contraception. PMID:2976627

  19. Functional characterisation of a natural androgen receptor missense mutation (N771H) causing human androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cai, J; Cai, L-Q; Hong, Y; Zhu, Y-S

    2012-05-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder due to mutations of androgen receptor (AR) gene. Various AR mutations have been identified, and the characterisation of these mutations greatly facilitates our understanding of AR structure-function. In this study, we have analysed an AR missense mutation (N771H) identified in patients with AIS. Functional analysis of the mutant AR was performed by in vitro mutagenesis-cotransfection assays. Compared to the wild-type AR, the dose-response curve of dihydrotestosterone-induced transactivation activity in the mutant AR was greatly shifted to the right and significantly decreased. However, the maximal efficacy of transactivation activity in the mutant AR was similar to that of the wild type. Receptor binding assay indicated that the mutant AR had an approximately 2.5-fold lower binding affinity to dihydrotestosterone compared to the wild type. Western blot analysis showed that the size and the expression level of mutant AR in transfected cells were comparable to the wild type. These data underscore the importance of asparagine at amino acid position 771 of human AR in normal ligand binding and normal receptor function, and a mutation at this position results in androgen insensitivity in affected subjects.

  20. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  1. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  2. Normal postnatal androgen production and action in isolated micropenis and isolated hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Evans, B A; Williams, D M; Hughes, I A

    1991-09-01

    To try and find out if a defect in androgen biosynthesis or action could be responsible for the incomplete virilisation seen in boys with isolated hypospadias and isolated micropenis, androgen receptor binding was studied in genital skin fibroblasts established from 18 boys with isolated micropenis and 19 boys with isolated hypospadias. The production of gonadotrophins and testosterone was also measured in the boys with micropenis. There was no evidence of gonadotrophin deficiency, or of a defect in testosterone biosynthesis in the boys with micropenis, and there was no evidence of a quantitative or qualitative defect of androgen binding in either group. These isolated abnormalities may be the result of transient defects in androgen synthesis or action, or both, during a critical phase of embryogenesis.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS- Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to investigate chlorinated by-products of a selected number of steroids representing both estrogens and androgens. Highly controlled reaction conditions were used to ascertain product distribution. Bench-scale studies were conducted to identify...

  4. Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 has Dual Functions as a Major Regulator of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Changmeng; He, Housheng Hansen; Gao, Shuai; Chen, Sen; Yu, Ziyang; Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong; Chen, Mei Wei; Zhang, Jesse; Ahmed, Musaddeque; Wang, Yang; Metzger, Eric; Schüle, Roland; Liu, X. Shirley; Brown, Myles; Balk, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1, KDM1A) functions as a transcriptional corepressor through demethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4), but has coactivator function on some genes through unclear mechanisms. We show that LSD1, interacting with CoREST, associates with and coactivates androgen receptor (AR) on a large fraction of androgen-stimulated genes. A subset of these AR/LSD1-associated enhancer sites have histone 3 threonine 6 phosphorylation (H3T6ph), and these sites are further enriched for androgen-stimulated genes. Significantly, despite its coactivator activity, LSD1 still mediates H3K4me2 demethylation at these androgen-stimulated enhancers. FOXA1 is also associated with LSD1 at AR regulated enhancer sites, and a FOXA1 interaction with LSD1 enhances binding of both proteins at these sites. These findings show LSD1 functions broadly as a regulator of AR function, that it maintains a transcriptional repression function at AR-regulated enhancers through H3K4 demethylation, and has a distinct AR-linked coactivator function mediated by demethylation of other substrates. PMID:25482560

  5. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G.; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  6. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function.

    PubMed

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26379484

  7. Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function.

    PubMed

    Mhillaj, Emanuela; Morgese, Maria G; Tucci, Paolo; Bove, Maria; Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are mainly prescribed to treat several diseases caused by testosterone deficiency. However, athletes try to promote muscle growth by manipulating testosterone levels or assuming androgen anabolic steroids (AAS). These substances were originally synthesized to obtain anabolic effects greater than testosterone. Although AAS are rarely prescribed compared to testosterone, their off-label utilization is very wide. Furthermore, combinations of different steroids and doses generally higher than those used in therapy are common. Symptoms of the chronic use of supra-therapeutic doses of AAS include anxiety, depression, aggression, paranoia, distractibility, confusion, amnesia. Interestingly, some studies have shown that AAS elicited electroencephalographic changes similar to those observed with amphetamine abuse. The frequency of side effects is higher among AAS abusers, with psychiatric complications such as labile mood, lack of impulse control and high violence. On the other hand, AAS addiction studies are complex because data collection is very difficult due to the subjects' reticence and can be biased by many variables, including physical exercise, that alter the reward system. Moreover, it has been reported that AAS may imbalance neurotransmitter systems involved in the reward process, leading to increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. The goal of this article is to review the literature on steroid abuse and changes to the reward system in preclinical and clinical studies.

  8. Green tea polyphenol EGCG blunts androgen receptor function in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Asim, Mohammad; Hafeez, Bilal B.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Tarapore, Rohinton S.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the major treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, it is a temporary remission, and the patients almost inevitably develop hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). HRPC is almost incurable, although most HRPC cells still express androgen receptor (AR) and depend on the AR for growth, making AR a prime drug target. Here, we provide evidence that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea, is a direct antagonist of androgen action. In silico modeling and FRET-based competition assay showed that EGCG physically interacts with the ligand-binding domain of AR by replacing a high-affinity labeled ligand (IC50 0.4 μM). The functional consequence of this interaction was a decrease in AR-mediated transcriptional activation, which was due to EGCG mediated inhibition of interdomain N-C termini interaction of AR. Treatment with EGCG also repressed the transcriptional activation by a hotspot mutant AR (T877A) expressed ectopically as well as the endogenous AR mutant. As the physiological consequence of AR antagonism, EGCG repressed R1881-induced PCa cell growth. In a xenograft model, EGCG was found to inhibit AR nuclear translocation and protein expression. We also observed a significant down-regulation of androgen-regulated miRNA-21 and up-regulation of a tumor suppressor, miRNA-330, in tumors of mice treated with EGCG. Taken together, we provide evidence that EGCG functionally antagonizes androgen action at multiple levels, resulting in inhibition of PCa growth.—Siddiqui, I. A., Asim, M., Hafeez, B. B., Adhami, V. M., Tarapore, R. S., Mukhtar, H. Green tea polyphenol EGCG blunts androgen receptor function in prostate cancer. PMID:21177307

  9. Androgens Modulate Structure and Function of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Brain Clock

    PubMed Central

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; Butler, Matthew P.; LeSauter, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gonadal hormones can modulate circadian rhythms in rodents and humans, and androgen receptors are highly localized within the core region of the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain clock. Although androgens are known to modulate neural plasticity in other CNS compartments, the role of androgens and their receptors on plasticity in the SCN is unexplored. In the present study, we ask whether androgens influence the structure and function of the mouse SCN by examining the effects of gonadectomy (GDX) on the structure of the SCN circuit and its responses to light, including induction of clock genes and behavioral phase shifting. We found that after GDX, glial fibrillary acidic protein increased with concomitant decreases in the expression of the synaptic proteins synaptophysin and postsynaptic density 95. We also found that GDX exerts effects on the molecular and behavioral responses to light that are phase dependent. In late night [circadian time (CT)21], GDX increased light-induced mPer1 but not mPer2 expression compared with intact (INT) controls. In contrast, in early night (CT13.5), GDX decreased light induced mPer2 but had no effect on mPer1. At CT13.5, GDX animals also showed larger phase delays than did INT. Treatment of GDX animals with the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone restored glial fibrillary acidic protein, postsynaptic density 95, and synaptophysin in the SCN and reinstated the INT pattern of molecular and behavioral responses to light. Together, the results reveal a role for androgens in regulating circuitry in the mouse SCN, with functional consequences for clock gene expression and behavioral responses to photic phase resetting stimuli. PMID:21363939

  10. Androgen deficiency during mid- and late pregnancy alters progesterone production and metabolism in the porcine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, Malgorzata; Knapczyk-Stwora, Katarzyna; Ciereszko, Renata E; Golas, Aniela; Wieciech, Iwona; Slomczynska, Maria

    2014-06-01

    We determined whether androgen deficiency induced by flutamide treatment during mid- and late pregnancy affects the functions of the porcine corpus luteum (CL). Pregnant gilts were injected with flutamide between days 43 and 49 (gestation day [GD] 50F), days 83 and 89 (GD90F), or days 101 and 107 (GD108F) of gestation. Antiandrogen treatment increased the luteal progesterone concentration in the GD50F group and decreased progesterone content in the GD90F and GD108F groups. Luteal levels of side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 (CYP11A1) mRNA and protein were significantly downregulated in the GD90F and GD108F groups as compared with the respective controls. The 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase (HSD3B) mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced only in the GD108F group as compared with the control. Decreased luteal 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C1) mRNA and protein levels were observed in the GD50F group. Thus, androgen deficiency during pregnancy in pigs led to CL dysfunction that is marked by decreased progesterone production. Furthermore, exposure to flutamide during late pregnancy downregulated steroidogenic enzymes (CYP11A1 and HSD3B) in pigs. We conclude that androgens are important regulators of CL function during pregnancy.

  11. Social modulation of androgen levels in male teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rui F; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Carneiro, Luis A; Canario, Adelino V M

    2002-05-01

    Androgens are classically thought of as the sex steroids controlling male reproduction. However, in recent years evidence has accumulated showing that androgens can also be affected by the interactions between conspecifics, suggesting reciprocal interactions between androgens and behaviour. These results have been interpreted as an adaptation for individuals to adjust their agonistic motivation and to cope with changes in their social environment. Thus, male-male interactions would stimulate the production of androgens, and the levels of androgens would be a function of the stability of its social environment ['challenge hypothesis', Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 56 (1984) 417]. Here the available data on social modulation of androgen levels in male teleosts are reviewed and some predictions of the challenge hypothesis are addressed using teleosts as a study model. We investigate the causal link between social status, territoriality and elevated androgen levels and the available evidence suggests that the social environment indeed modulates the endocrine axis of teleosts. The association between higher androgen levels and social rank emerges mainly in periods of social instability. As reported in the avian literature, in teleosts the trade-off between androgens and parental care is indicated by the fact that during the parental phase breeding males decreased their androgen levels. A comparison of androgen responsiveness between teleost species with different mating and parenting systems also reveals that parenting explains the variation observed in androgen responsiveness to a higher degree than the mating strategy. Finally, the adaptive value of social modulation of androgens and some of its evolutionary consequences are discussed.

  12. Adrenal Androgen Production in Catarrhine Primates and the Evolution of Adrenarche

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robin M.; Sterner, Kirstin N.; Wildman, Derek E.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenarche is a developmental event involving differentiation of the adrenal gland and production of adrenal androgens, and has been hypothesized to play a role in the extension of the preadolescent phase of human ontogeny. It remains unclear whether any nonhuman primate species shows a similar suite of endocrine, biochemical, and morphological changes as are encompassed by human adrenarche. Here, we report serum concentrations of the adrenal androgens dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) measured in 698 cross-sectional and mixed longitudinal serum samples from catarrhine primates ranging from 0.6 to 47 years of age. DHEAS in Pan is most similar to that of humans in both age-related pattern and absolute levels, and a transient early increase appears to be present in Gorilla. DHEA levels are highest in Cercocebus, Cercopithecus, and Macaca. We also tested for evidence of adaptive evolution in six genes that code for proteins involved in DHEA/S synthesis. Our genetic analyses demonstrate the protein-coding regions of these genes are highly conserved among sampled primates. We describe a tandem gene duplication event probably mediated by a retro-transposon that resulted in two 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta 5-Delta 4 genes (HSD3B1 and HSD3B2) with tissue specific functions in catarrhines. In humans, HSD3B2 is expressed primarily in the adrenals, ovary, and testis, while HSD3B1 is expressed in the placenta. Taken together, our findings suggest that while adrenarche has been suggested to be unique to hominoids, the evolutionary roots for this developmental stage are more ancient. PMID:22271526

  13. Context-dependent effects of yolk androgens on nestling growth and immune function in a multibrooded passerine.

    PubMed

    Muriel, J; Salmón, P; Nunez-Buiza, A; de Salas, F; Pérez-Rodríguez, L; Puerta, M; Gil, D

    2015-08-01

    Female birds may adjust their offspring phenotype to the specific requirements of the environment by differential allocation of physiologically active substances into yolks, such as androgens. Yolk androgens have been shown to accelerate embryonic development, growth rate and competitive ability of nestlings, but they can also entail immunological costs. The balance between costs and benefits of androgen allocation is expected to depend on nestling environment. We tested this hypothesis in a multibrooded passerine, the spotless starling, Sturnus unicolor. We experimentally manipulated yolk androgen levels using a between-brood design and evaluated its effects on nestling development, survival and immune function. Both in first and replacement broods, the embryonic development period was shorter for androgen-treated chicks than controls, but there were no differences in second broods. In replacement broods, androgen-treated chicks were heavier and larger than those hatched from control eggs, but this effect was not observed in the other breeding attempts. Androgen exposure reduced survival with respect to controls only in second broods. Regarding immune function, we detected nonsignificant trends for androgen treatment to activate two important components of innate and adaptive immunity (IL-6 and Ig-A levels, respectively). Similarly, androgen-treated chicks showed greater lymphocyte proliferation than controls in the first brood and an opposite trend in the second brood. Our results indicate that yolk androgen effects on nestling development and immunity depend on the environmental conditions of each breeding attempt. Variation in maternal androgen allocation to eggs could be explained as the result of context-dependent optimal strategies to maximize offspring fitness.

  14. Steroidal androgens and nonsteroidal, tissue-selective androgen receptor modulator, S-22, regulate androgen receptor function through distinct genomic and nongenomic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Coss, Christopher C; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2008-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) ligands are important for the development and function of several tissues and organs. However, the poor oral bioavailability, pharmacokinetic properties, and receptor cross-reactivity of testosterone, coupled with side effects, place limits on its clinical use. Selective AR modulators (SARMs) elicit anabolic effects in muscle and bone, sparing reproductive organs like the prostate. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue selectivity remain ambiguous. We performed a variety of in vitro studies to compare and define the molecular mechanisms of an aryl propionamide SARM, S-22, as compared with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Studies indicated that S-22 increased levator ani muscle weight but decreased the size of prostate in rats. Analysis of the upstream intracellular signaling events indicated that S-22 and DHT mediated their actions through distinct pathways. Modulation of these pathways altered the recruitment of AR and its cofactors to the PSA enhancer in a ligand-dependent fashion. In addition, S-22 induced Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and rapid phosphorylation of several kinases, through pathways distinct from steroids. These studies reveal novel differences in the molecular mechanisms by which S-22, a nonsteroidal SARM, and DHT mediate their pharmacological effects.

  15. The ubiquitin-specific protease USP10 modulates androgen receptor function.

    PubMed

    Faus, Hortensia; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Huber, Martina; Bahr, Inke; Haendler, Bernard

    2005-12-21

    The role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in degrading nuclear hormone receptors and regulating their transcriptional function has emerged in the last few years. We identified the ubiquitin-specific protease USP10 as part of DNA-bound androgen receptor (AR) complexes purified from nuclear extracts of PC-3 cells stably expressing the AR. The interaction between USP10 and the AR was confirmed by GST pull-down assays. Fluorescence microscopy documented that USP10 was localised in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Cell-based transactivation assays in PC-3/AR cells revealed that overexpression of wild-type USP10, but not of an enzymatically inactive form, stimulated AR activity mediated by reporter constructs harbouring selective androgen response elements (AREs), non-selective steroid response elements (SREs) or the mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) promoter. Conversely, USP10 expression knock-down by siRNAs impaired the MMTV response to androgen. In summary, the data indicate that USP10 is a new cofactor that binds to the AR and stimulates the androgen response of target promoters. This finding underlines the role of the ubiquitin/proteasome system in modulating the AR function.

  16. Antioxidant and androgenic effects of dietary ginger on reproductive function of male diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghlissi, Zohra; Atheymen, Rim; Boujbiha, Mouhamed Ali; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Makni Ayedi, Fatma; Zeghal, Khaled; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Hakim, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidant and androgenic properties of ginger roots on the reproductive function of male diabetic rats. Animals were divided into three groups; the control (Control), diabetic (Diab) and diabetic fed with dietary ginger for 30 d (Diab + Z). Thereafter, blood samples were collected and reproductive organs (testis, epididymis, prostate and seminal vesicle) were removed for determination of sperm parameters, malondialdehyde (MDA) level, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate and lactate aminotransferase (AST and ALT) activities. Dietary ginger decreased blood glucose and MDA level, increased reproductive organ weights and testosterone level, improved semen quantity and motility, and ameliorated the SOD, CAT and GPx activities as well as testis AST, ALT, LDH and ALP activities. Intake of ginger roots improves the antioxidant and androgenic reproductive function of male diabetic rats in addition to its antidiabetic property.

  17. Establishment of a novel immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line stably expressing androgen receptor and its application for the functional screening of androgen receptor modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shan; Wang, Ming-Wei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Chan, F.L.

    2009-05-15

    In this study, we developed a human prostatic epithelial cell line BPH-1-AR stably expressing AR by lentiviral transduction. Characterization by immunoblot and RT-PCR showed that AR was stably expressed in all representative BPH-1-AR clones. Androgen treatment induced a secretory differentiation phenotype in BPH-1-AR cells but suppressed their cell proliferation. Treatments with AR agonists induced transactivation of a transfected PSA-gene promoter reporter in BPH-1-AR cells, whereas this transactivation was suppressed by an AR antagonist flutamide, indicating that the transduced AR in BPH-1-AR cells was functional. Finally, we utilized BPH-1-AR cells to evaluate the androgenic activities and growth effects of five newly developed non-steroidal compounds. Results showed that these compounds showed androgenic activities and growth-inhibitory effects on BPH-1-AR cells. Our results showed that BPH-1-AR cell line would be a valuable in vitro model for the study of androgen-regulated processes in prostatic epithelial cells and identification of compounds with AR-modulating activities.

  18. A novel approach to breast cancer prevention: reducing excessive ovarian androgen production in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Secreto, Giorgio; Sieri, Sabina; Agnoli, Claudia; Grioni, Sara; Muti, Paola; Zumoff, Barnett; Sant, Milena; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Krogh, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    Minimizing endogenous estrogen production and activity in women at high risk for breast cancer is a prominent approach to prevention of the disease. A number of clinical trials have shown that the administration of selective-estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors significantly reduces the incidence of breast cancer in healthy women. Unfortunately, these drugs often produce adverse effects on the quality of life and are, therefore, poorly accepted by many women, even those who are at high risk for breast cancer. We propose a novel alternative approach to decreasing estrogen production: suppression of ovarian synthesis of the androgen precursors of estrogens by administration of long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs to women with ovarian stromal hyperplasia. The specific target population would be elderly postmenopausal women, at increased risk of breast cancer, and with high blood levels of testosterone, marker of ovarian hyperandrogenemia, and recognized factor of risk for breast cancer. Testosterone levels are measured at baseline to identify women at risk and during the follow-up to evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The postmenopausal ovary is an important source of excessive androgen production which originates from the ovarian interstitial cell hyperplasia frequently present in breast cancer patients. We propose to counter the source of androgen excess in women with ovarian stromal hyperplasia, thus reducing the substrate for estrogen formation without completely inhibiting estrogen synthesis. Available evidence indicates that gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be safely used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women.

  19. A novel approach to breast cancer prevention: reducing excessive ovarian androgen production in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Secreto, Giorgio; Sieri, Sabina; Agnoli, Claudia; Grioni, Sara; Muti, Paola; Zumoff, Barnett; Sant, Milena; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Krogh, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    Minimizing endogenous estrogen production and activity in women at high risk for breast cancer is a prominent approach to prevention of the disease. A number of clinical trials have shown that the administration of selective-estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors significantly reduces the incidence of breast cancer in healthy women. Unfortunately, these drugs often produce adverse effects on the quality of life and are, therefore, poorly accepted by many women, even those who are at high risk for breast cancer. We propose a novel alternative approach to decreasing estrogen production: suppression of ovarian synthesis of the androgen precursors of estrogens by administration of long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs to women with ovarian stromal hyperplasia. The specific target population would be elderly postmenopausal women, at increased risk of breast cancer, and with high blood levels of testosterone, marker of ovarian hyperandrogenemia, and recognized factor of risk for breast cancer. Testosterone levels are measured at baseline to identify women at risk and during the follow-up to evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The postmenopausal ovary is an important source of excessive androgen production which originates from the ovarian interstitial cell hyperplasia frequently present in breast cancer patients. We propose to counter the source of androgen excess in women with ovarian stromal hyperplasia, thus reducing the substrate for estrogen formation without completely inhibiting estrogen synthesis. Available evidence indicates that gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be safely used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women. PMID:27393623

  20. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) influences androgen receptor (AR) function in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Paul; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Balaji, K.C.

    2008-09-05

    Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), founding member of PKD protein family, is down-regulated in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). We demonstrate that PKD1 and androgen receptor (AR) are present as a protein complex in PCa cells. PKD1 is associated with a transcriptional complex which contains AR and promoter sequence of the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) gene. Ectopic expression of wild type PKD1 and the kinase dead mutant PKD1 (K628W) attenuated the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR in prostate cancer cells and yeast cells indicating that PKD1 can affect AR transcription activity, whereas knocking down PKD1 enhanced the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR. Co-expression of kinase dead mutant with AR significantly inhibited androgen-mediated cell proliferation in both LNCaP and DU145 PC cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that PKD1 can influence AR function in PCa cells.

  1. Androgen Modulates Functions of Endothelial Progenitor Cells through Activated Egr1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yizhou; Li, Xizhe; Zhang, You; Shen, Zhenya; Yang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Researches show that androgens have important effects on migration of endothelial cells and endothelial protection in coronary heart disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) as a progenitor cell type that can differentiate into endothelial cells, have a critical role in angiogenesis and endothelial protection. The relationship between androgen and the functions of EPCs has animated much interest and controversy. In this study, we investigated the angiogenic and migratory functions of EPCs after treatment by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the molecular mechanisms as well. We found that DHT treatment enhanced the incorporation of EPCs into tubular structures formed by HUVECs and the migratory activity of EPCs in the transwell assay dose dependently. Moreover, microarray analysis was performed to explore how DHT changes the gene expression profiles of EPCs. We found 346 differentially expressed genes in androgen-treated EPCs. Angiogenesis-related genes like Egr-1, Vcan, Efnb2, and Cdk2ap1 were identified to be regulated upon DHT treatment. Furthermore, the enhanced angiogenic and migratory abilities of EPCs after DHT treatment were inhibited by Egr1-siRNA transfection. In conclusion, our findings suggest that DHT markedly enhances the vessel forming ability and migration capacity of EPCs. Egr1 signaling may be a possible pathway in this process. PMID:26697079

  2. Peripheral androgen action helps modulate vocal production in a suboscine passerine

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Heston, Jonathan B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2015-01-01

    Androgenic activation of intracellular androgen receptors (AR) influences avian vocal production, though this has largely been investigated at the level of the brain. We investigated the influence of predominantly peripheral AR on vocal output in wild Golden-collared Manakins (Manacus vitellinus). In this suboscine species, males court females by performing acrobatic displays and by producing relatively simple chee-poo vocalizations. To assess whether peripheral AR influences the acoustic structure of these vocal signals, we treated reproductively active adult males with the peripherally selective antiandrogen bicalutamide and then measured phonation performance. Inhibiting AR outside of the central nervous system increased the duration of the chee note and decreased the fundamental frequency of the poo note. This treatment caused no discernable change to chee-poo frequency modulation or entropy. Our results show that activation of peripheral AR mediates note-specific changes to temporal and pitch characteristics of the Golden-collared Manakin’s main sexual call. Thus, our study provides one of the first demonstrations that androgenic action originating outside of the brain and likely on musculoskeletal targets can modulate avian vocal production. PMID:25780269

  3. Fetal programming of adult Leydig cell function by androgenic effects on stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Karen R.; Smith, Lee B.; Atanassova, Nina; Macpherson, Sheila; McKinnell, Chris; van den Driesche, Sander; Jobling, Matthew S.; Chambers, Thomas J. G.; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; O’Hara, Laura; Platts, Sophie; Renato de Franca, Luiz; Lara, Nathália L. M.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth plays a role in programming of adult cardiometabolic disorders, which in men, are associated with lowered testosterone levels. Fetal growth and fetal androgen exposure can also predetermine testosterone levels in men, although how is unknown, because the adult Leydig cells (ALCs) that produce testosterone do not differentiate until puberty. To explain this conundrum, we hypothesized that stem cells for ALCs must be present in the fetal testis and might be susceptible to programming by fetal androgen exposure during masculinization. To address this hypothesis, we used ALC ablation/regeneration to identify that, in rats, ALCs derive from stem/progenitor cells that express chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II. These stem cells are abundant in the fetal testis of humans and rodents, and lineage tracing in mice shows that they develop into ALCs. The stem cells also express androgen receptors (ARs). Reduction in fetal androgen action through AR KO in mice or dibutyl phthalate (DBP) -induced reduction in intratesticular testosterone in rats reduced ALC stem cell number by ∼40% at birth to adulthood and induced compensated ALC failure (low/normal testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone). In DBP-exposed males, this failure was probably explained by reduced testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression, which is associated with increased histone methylation (H3K27me3) in the proximal promoter. Accordingly, ALCs and ALC stem cells immunoexpressed increased H3K27me3, a change that was also evident in ALC stem cells in fetal testes. These studies highlight how a key component of male reproductive development can fundamentally reprogram adult hormone production (through an epigenetic change), which might affect lifetime disease risk. PMID:24753613

  4. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and adrenal androgen (AA) functions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Da Silva, J A; Cutolo, M

    1996-05-01

    The available evidence reviewed does not allow definitive response to the question of a primary versus secondary role of sex hormone perturbations in RA. However, this conclusion should not be discouraging in view of the relatively recent focus upon this facet of the physiopathogenesis of RA and the enormous complexities of sex hormone biology and this disease. Specifically, data on the incidence of RA as well as life cycle changes in serum androgenic-anabolic (A-A) and sex hormone levels suggest important risk correlations. Furthermore, HLA-susceptibility markers for RA, gender, menopause and older age are all factors which significantly relate to the risk of developing RA and each has been shown to associate with sex hormone status. Whether or not HPG-AA hormonal status may modulate RA risk (or its course) primarily and independently or merely be predictive markers of other biological mechanisms was critically considered and requires further study. Sex hormone influences on cellular and humoral immunological reactivity and vascular pathogenetic mechanisms in RA were summarized. Androgens generally suppress immunoreactivity and cartilage responses to inflammation-mediated injury processes and may enhance synovial macrophage-like lining cell apoptosis. Oestrogens generally enhance immunoreactivity, offer some protection to inflammation-mediated cartilage damage (but less than androgens) and may inhibit apoptosis in certain in vitro cell models. Scant information is available on the balance of sex hormones (and glucocorticoids) in RA or its presumed pathogenetic mechanisms. Data were reviewed which support the concept of a spectrum of androgenicity in the normal population, particularly among women. A simplified schema of trophic and tropic steroidogenic mechanisms was proposed which could influence androgenic-anabolic (A-A) status and might relate to RA. Serum concentrations of DHAS (mumol/l), T (nmol/l) and O2 (pmol/l) span several orders of magnitude in normal

  5. Identification of the functional domains of ANT-1, a novel coactivator of the androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Shuli; Goto, Kiminobu; Chen Guangchun; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Nomura, Masatoshi; Okabe, Taijiro; Nawata, Hajime; Yanase, Toshihiko . E-mail: yanase@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-03

    Previously, we identified a transcriptional coactivator for the activation function-1 (AF-1) domain of the human androgen receptor (AR) and designated it androgen receptor N-terminal domain transactivating protein-1 (ANT-1). This coactivator, which contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs from amino acid (aa) 294, is identical to a component of U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and binds specifically to the AR or glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we identified four distinct functional domains. The AR-AF-1-binding domain, which bound to either aa 180-360 or 360-532 in AR-AF-1, clearly overlapped with TAU-1 and TAU-5. This domain and the subnuclear speckle formation domain in ANT-1 were assigned within the TPR motifs, while the transactivating and nuclear localization signal domains resided within the N-terminal sequence. The existence of these functional domains may further support the idea that ANT-1 can function as an AR-AF-1-specific coactivator while mediating a transcription-splicing coupling.

  6. Androgens Exert a Cysticidal Effect upon Taenia crassiceps by Disrupting Flame Cell Morphology and Function.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Escobedo, Galileo; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Dominguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The effects of testosterone (T4) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on the survival of the helminth cestode parasite Taenia crassiceps, as well as their effects on actin, tubulin and myosin expression and their assembly into the excretory system of flame cells are described in this paper. In vitro evaluations on parasite viability, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, video-microscopy of live flame cells, and docking experiments of androgens interacting with actin, tubulin, and myosin were conducted. Our results show that T4 and DHT reduce T. crassiceps viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, reaching 90% of mortality at the highest dose used (40 ng/ml) and time exposed (10 days) in culture. Androgen treatment does not induce differences in the specific expression pattern of actin, tubulin, and myosin isoforms as compared with control parasites. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a strong disruption of the parasite tegument, with reduced assembly, shape, and motion of flame cells. Docking experiments show that androgens are capable of affecting parasite survival and flame cell morphology by directly interacting with actin, tubulin and myosin without altering their protein expression pattern. We show that both T4 and DHT are able to bind actin, tubulin, and myosin affecting their assembly and causing parasite intoxication due to impairment of flame cell function. Live flame cell video microscopy showing a reduced motion as well changes in the shape of flame cells are also shown. In summary, T4 and DHT directly act on T. crassiceps cysticerci through altering parasite survival as well as the assembly and function of flame cells.

  7. Androgens Exert a Cysticidal Effect upon Taenia crassiceps by Disrupting Flame Cell Morphology and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Javier R.; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Palacios- Arreola, M. Isabel; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Escobedo, Galileo; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Dominguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The effects of testosterone (T4) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on the survival of the helminth cestode parasite Taenia crassiceps, as well as their effects on actin, tubulin and myosin expression and their assembly into the excretory system of flame cells are described in this paper. In vitro evaluations on parasite viability, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, video-microscopy of live flame cells, and docking experiments of androgens interacting with actin, tubulin, and myosin were conducted. Our results show that T4 and DHT reduce T. crassiceps viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, reaching 90% of mortality at the highest dose used (40 ng/ml) and time exposed (10 days) in culture. Androgen treatment does not induce differences in the specific expression pattern of actin, tubulin, and myosin isoforms as compared with control parasites. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a strong disruption of the parasite tegument, with reduced assembly, shape, and motion of flame cells. Docking experiments show that androgens are capable of affecting parasite survival and flame cell morphology by directly interacting with actin, tubulin and myosin without altering their protein expression pattern. We show that both T4 and DHT are able to bind actin, tubulin, and myosin affecting their assembly and causing parasite intoxication due to impairment of flame cell function. Live flame cell video microscopy showing a reduced motion as well changes in the shape of flame cells are also shown. In summary, T4 and DHT directly act on T. crassiceps cysticerci through altering parasite survival as well as the assembly and function of flame cells. PMID:26076446

  8. Modulation of Androgen Receptor Activation Function 2 by Testosterone and Dihydrotestosterone*

    PubMed Central

    Askew, Emily B.; Gampe, Robert T.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Faggart, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is transcriptionally activated by high affinity binding of testosterone (T) or its 5α-reduced metabolite, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a more potent androgen required for male reproductive tract development. The molecular basis for the weaker activity of T was investigated by determining T-bound ligand binding domain crystal structures of wild-type AR and a prostate cancer somatic mutant complexed with the AR FXXLF or coactivator LXXLL peptide. Nearly identical interactions of T and DHT in the AR ligand binding pocket correlate with similar rates of dissociation from an AR fragment containing the ligand binding domain. However, T induces weaker AR FXXLF and coactivator LXXLL motif interactions at activation function 2 (AF2). Less effective FXXLF motif binding to AF2 accounts for faster T dissociation from full-length AR. T can nevertheless acquire DHT-like activity through an AR helix-10 H874Y prostate cancer mutation. The Tyr-874 mutant side chain mediates a new hydrogen bonding scheme from exterior helix-10 to backbone protein core helix-4 residue Tyr-739 to rescue T-induced AR activity by improving AF2 binding of FXXLF and LXXLL motifs. Greater AR AF2 activity by improved core helix interactions is supported by the effects of melanoma antigen gene protein-11, an AR coregulator that binds the AR FXXLF motif and targets AF2 for activation. We conclude that T is a weaker androgen than DHT because of less favorable T-dependent AR FXXLF and coactivator LXXLL motif interactions at AF2. PMID:17591767

  9. Oestradiol metabolism and androgen receptor genotypes are associated with right ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Manichaikul, Ani; Barr, R. Graham; Johnson, Craig; Bluemke, David A.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Tandri, Hari; Ouyang, Pamela; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are linked to right ventricular (RV) function, but the relationship between genetic variation in these pathways and RV function is unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study of 2761 genotyped adults without cardiovascular disease. The relationships between RV measures and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 10 candidate genes were assessed. Urinary oestradiol (E2) metabolites produced by cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) and serum testosterone were measured in women and men respectively. In African-American (AA) women, the CYP1B1 SNP rs162561 was associated with RV ejection fraction (RVEF), such that each copy of the A allele was associated with a 2.0% increase in RVEF. Haplotype analysis revealed associations with RVEF in AA (global p<7.2×10−6) and white (global p=0.05) women. In white subjects, higher E2 metabolite levels were associated with significantly higher RVEF. In men, androgen receptors SNPs (rs1337080; rs5918764) were significantly associated with all RV measures and modified the relationship between testosterone and RVEF. Genetic variation in E2 metabolism and androgen signalling was associated with RV morphology in a sex-specific manner. The CYP1B1 SNP identified is in tight linkage disequilibrium with SNPs associated with pulmonary hypertension and oncogenesis, suggesting these pathways may underpin sexual dimorphism in RV failure. PMID:26647441

  10. Inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) function by the reproductive orphan nuclear receptor DAX-1.

    PubMed

    Holter, Elin; Kotaja, Noora; Mäkela, Sari; Strauss, Leena; Kietz, Silke; Jänne, Olli A; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Palvimo, Jorma J; Treuter, Eckardt

    2002-03-01

    DAX-1 (NROB1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family that is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues. While a receptor function of DAX-1 remains enigmatic, previous work has indicated that DAX-1 inhibits the activity of the orphan receptor steroidogenic factor 1 and the estrogen receptors (ERs), presumably via direct occupation of the coactivator-binding surface and subsequent recruitment of additional corepressors. In vivo evidence points at a particular role of DAX-1 for the development and maintenance of male reproductive functions. In this study, we have identified the androgen receptor (AR) NR3C4 as a novel target for DAX-1. We show that DAX-1 potently inhibits ligand-dependent transcriptional activation as well as the interaction between the N- and C-terminal activation domains of AR. We provide evidence for direct interactions of the two receptors that involve the N-terminal repeat domain of DAX-1 and the C-terminal ligand-binding and activation domain of AR. Moreover, DAX-1, known to shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, is capable of relocalizing AR in both cellular compartments, suggesting that intracellular tethering is associated with DAX-1 inhibition. These results implicate novel inhibitory mechanisms of DAX-1 action with particular relevance for the modulation of androgen-dependent gene transcription in the male reproductive system. PMID:11875111

  11. Regulation of Sclerostin Production in Human Male Osteocytes by Androgens: Experimental and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Andrea; De Toni, Luca; Speltra, Elena; Rocca, Maria Santa; Taglialavoro, Giuseppe; Ferlin, Alberto; Foresta, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    In this study we aimed to elucidate a possible role of T in the regulation of sclerostin, a glycoprotein secreted by osteocytes known to regulate bone mass. To this end, we evaluated the effect of T stimulation on sclerostin production and gene expression in human cultured osteocytes. In addition, we evaluated serum sclerostin levels in a cohort of 20 hypogonadal male patients, compared with 20 age-matched eugonadal controls. Stimulation with DHT decreased sclerostin expression in cultured osteocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Confirming a direct androgen receptor-mediated effect on sclerostin production, flutamide coincubation and silencing of androgen receptor gene in osteocytes abolished the DHT effects. In addition, hypogonadal patients showed higher serum sclerostin levels with respect to controls (145.87 ± 50.83 pg/mL vs 84.02 ± 32.15 pg/mL; P < .001) and in both probands and controls, serum T levels were negatively correlated with sclerostin (R = -0.664, P = 0.007, and R = -0.447, P = .045, respectively). Finally, multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that T represented the only independent predictor of sclerostin levels. In conclusion, by showing a direct correlation between T and sclerostin, both in vivo and in vitro, this study adds further support to the emerging clinical and experimental studies focusing on sclerostin as a therapeutic target for osteoporosis treatment.

  12. ARA67/PAT1 Functions as a Repressor To Suppress Androgen Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanqing; Yang, Yue; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) may recruit multiple coregulators for proper or optimal transactivation. Here we report the identification and characterization of ARA67/PAT1 as an AR coregulator from a prostate cDNA library. ARA67/PAT1 was screened out as an AR N terminus interacting protein. Interaction mapping shows that the cooperation of multiple domains within ARA67/PAT1 may be required for the maximal interaction with AR. ARA67/PAT1 functions as a repressor with better suppressive effects on AR compared to glucocorticoid receptor and estrogen receptor. Further mechanism dissection reveals that the interrupted AR cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling may play a major role in ARA67/PAT1 mediated suppression on AR. Together, these results suggest that ARA67/PAT1 may function as a novel repressor that can modulate AR function in prostate cancer. PMID:14729952

  13. Social modulation of androgen levels in male teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rui F; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Carneiro, Luis A; Canario, Adelino V M

    2002-05-01

    Androgens are classically thought of as the sex steroids controlling male reproduction. However, in recent years evidence has accumulated showing that androgens can also be affected by the interactions between conspecifics, suggesting reciprocal interactions between androgens and behaviour. These results have been interpreted as an adaptation for individuals to adjust their agonistic motivation and to cope with changes in their social environment. Thus, male-male interactions would stimulate the production of androgens, and the levels of androgens would be a function of the stability of its social environment ['challenge hypothesis', Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 56 (1984) 417]. Here the available data on social modulation of androgen levels in male teleosts are reviewed and some predictions of the challenge hypothesis are addressed using teleosts as a study model. We investigate the causal link between social status, territoriality and elevated androgen levels and the available evidence suggests that the social environment indeed modulates the endocrine axis of teleosts. The association between higher androgen levels and social rank emerges mainly in periods of social instability. As reported in the avian literature, in teleosts the trade-off between androgens and parental care is indicated by the fact that during the parental phase breeding males decreased their androgen levels. A comparison of androgen responsiveness between teleost species with different mating and parenting systems also reveals that parenting explains the variation observed in androgen responsiveness to a higher degree than the mating strategy. Finally, the adaptive value of social modulation of androgens and some of its evolutionary consequences are discussed. PMID:11997222

  14. Androgen Receptor Coactivator ARID4B Is Required for the Function of Sertoli Cells in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yang; Pan, I-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Defects in spermatogenesis, a process that produces spermatozoa inside seminiferous tubules of the testis, result in male infertility. Spermatogenic progression is highly dependent on a microenvironment provided by Sertoli cells, the only somatic cells and epithelium of seminiferous tubules. However, genes that regulate such an important activity of Sertoli cells are poorly understood. Here, we found that AT-rich interactive domain 4B (ARID4B), is essential for the function of Sertoli cells to regulate spermatogenesis. Specifically, we generated Sertoli cell-specific Arid4b knockout (Arid4bSCKO) mice, and showed that the Arid4bSCKO male mice were completely infertile with impaired testis development and significantly reduced testis size. Importantly, severe structural defects accompanied by loss of germ cells and Sertoli cell-only phenotype were found in many seminiferous tubules of the Arid4bSCKO testes. In addition, maturation of Sertoli cells was significantly delayed in the Arid4bSCKO mice, associated with delayed onset of spermatogenesis. Spermatogenic progression was also defective, showing an arrest at the round spermatid stage in the Arid4bSCKO testes. Interestingly, we showed that ARID4B functions as a “coactivator” of androgen receptor and is required for optimal transcriptional activation of reproductive homeobox 5, an androgen receptor target gene specifically expressed in Sertoli cells and critical for spermatogenesis. Together, our study identified ARID4B to be a key regulator of Sertoli cell function important for male germ cell development. PMID:26258622

  15. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES: INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATIONS REGARDING ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species Differences in Androgen and Estrogen Receptor Structure and Function Among Vertebrates and Invertebrates: Interspecies Extrapolations regarding Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals
    VS Wilson1, GT Ankley2, M Gooding 1,3, PD Reynolds 1,4, NC Noriega 1, M Cardon 1, P Hartig1,...

  16. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  17. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  18. SUMO ligase PIAS1 functions as a target gene selective androgen receptor coregulator on prostate cancer cell chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Toropainen, Sari; Malinen, Marjo; Kaikkonen, Sanna; Rytinki, Miia; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Jänne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays a central role in the development and growth of prostate carcinoma. PIAS1 is an AR- and SUMO-interacting protein and a putative transcriptional coregulator overexpressed in prostate cancer. To study the importance of PIAS1 for the androgen-regulated transcriptome of VCaP prostate cancer cells, we silenced its expression by RNAi. Transcriptome analyses revealed that a subset of the AR-regulated genes is significantly influenced, either activated or repressed, by PIAS1 depletion. Interestingly, PIAS1 depletion also exposed a new set of genes to androgen regulation, suggesting that PIAS1 can mask distinct genomic loci from AR access. In keeping with gene expression data, silencing of PIAS1 attenuated VCaP cell proliferation. ChIP-seq analyses showed that PIAS1 interacts with AR at chromatin sites harboring also SUMO2/3 and surrounded by H3K4me2; androgen exposure increased the number of PIAS1-occupying sites, resulting in nearly complete overlap with AR chromatin binding events. PIAS1 interacted also with the pioneer factor FOXA1. Of note, PIAS1 depletion affected AR chromatin occupancy at binding sites enriched for HOXD13 and GATA motifs. Taken together, PIAS1 is a genuine chromatin-bound AR coregulator that functions in a target gene selective fashion to regulate prostate cancer cell growth. PMID:25552417

  19. Endostatin: A novel inhibitor of androgen receptor function in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo Hyoung; Isayeva, Tatyana; Larson, Matthew R.; Sawant, Anandi; Cha, Ha-Ram; Chanda, Diptiman; Chesnokov, Igor N.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to androgen receptor (AR)-targeted therapies compels the development of novel treatment strategies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report a profound effect of endostatin on prostate cancer cells by efficient intracellular trafficking, direct interaction with AR, reduction of nuclear AR level, and down-regulation of AR-target gene transcription. Structural modeling followed by functional analyses further revealed that phenylalanine-rich α1-helix in endostatin—which shares structural similarity with noncanonical nuclear receptor box in AR—antagonizes AR transcriptional activity by occupying the activation function (AF)-2 binding interface for coactivators and N-terminal AR AF-1. Together, our data suggest that endostatin can be recognized as an endogenous AR inhibitor that impairs receptor function through protein–protein interaction. These findings provide new insights into endostatin whose antitumor effect is not limited to inhibiting angiogenesis, but can be translated to suppressing AR-mediated disease progression in CRPC. PMID:25605930

  20. Inhibition of androgen and oestrogen production by clomiphene citrate in avian theca cells.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, R K; Marrone, B L

    1986-11-01

    Isolated theca cells (2 X 10(5)/ml) were pre-incubated for 1 h in the presence or absence of clomiphene citrate (10(-12)-10(-4) M). Ovine LH (50 ng/ml) was added and cells were incubated for an additional 3 h. A 50% inhibition of LH-stimulated androstenedione and oestrogen production was obtained with doses of 10(-8) M and 2 X 10(-7) M clomiphene, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of clomiphene on LH-stimulated androstenedione production was reversed by washing clomiphene from the cells before stimulation with LH. In subsequent experiments, the effects of clomiphene on C17-20-lyase and aromatase activities were examined. Conversion of [3H]17-hydroxyprogesterone to androstenedione was inhibited by 50% when theca cells were pretreated with 10(-5) M-clomiphene. In addition, conversion of testosterone to oestrogen by theca cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by clomiphene, with 50% inhibition occurring at a dose of 5 X 10(-6) M. The results show that clomiphene treatment in vitro inhibits androgen and oestrogen production in theca cells by inhibitory effects on the activities of C17-20-lyase and aromatase. In addition to the widely-accepted effects of clomiphene on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the present findings add further support to the suggestion that clomiphene exerts direct effects on ovarian steroidogenesis.

  1. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's testosterone. Tumors of the ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can both cause too much androgen production. ... come back after they have been removed. In polycystic ovary syndrome, these things can reduce symptoms caused by high ...

  2. INVESTIGATION OF TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF ESTROGENIC AND ANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water sources are increasingly impacted by upstream anthropogenic activities, including wastewater discharge, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and landfill leachate. Androgenic and estrogenic activities have been detected in surface waters downstream from ...

  3. Rational design of a topical androgen receptor antagonist for the suppression of sebum production with properties suitable for follicular delivery.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lorna H; Johnson, Theodore R; Lu, Guang Wei; Du, Daniel; Datta, Kaushik; Grzemski, Felicity; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Spence, Julie; Wade, Kim; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Kevin; Lin, Kristin; Hu, Lain-Yen; Sexton, Karen; Raheja, Neil; Kostlan, Catherine; Pocalyko, David

    2010-06-10

    A novel nonsteroidal androgen receptor antagonist, (R)-4-(1-benzyl-4,4-dimethyl-2-oxopyrrolidin-3-yloxy)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (1), for the topical control of sebum production is reported. This compound, which is potent, selective, and efficacious in the clinically validated golden Syrian hamster ear animal model, was designed to be delivered to the pilosebaceous unit, the site of action, preferentially by the follicular route.

  4. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms.

  5. Effects of long-term anabolic androgenic steroid administration on respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Gething, Alex D; Grace, Fergal M; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance training and long-term anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) administration on respiratory function. Subject groups consisted of AAS users (n = 9) who were still using AAS at time of testing (SU); AAS users (n = 6) who had been abstinent for > 3 months (SA), bodybuilding controls (n = 8) (BC), and (n = 8) sedentary male controls (SC). FEV(1), FVC, and PEF were measured. The results found that all subjects were within normal range, and there were no differences between groups. Maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and grip strength were both significantly greater in SU (P < 0.05) compared with SC; no significant difference was found between the other groups. Their MIP and grip strength was significantly correlated (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). The data from this study suggest that the combination of resistance training and AAS administration produce a significant increase in MIP in a cohort of long-term AAS users.

  6. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms. PMID:26373946

  7. Androgens Attenuate Vitamin D Production Induced by UVB Irradiation of the Skin of Male Mice by an Enzymatic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yingben; Ying, Lee; Horst, Ronald L; Watson, Gordon; Goltzman, David

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous exposure to UVB irradiation is an important source of vitamin D. Here, we examined sex-specific differences in cutaneous vitamin D production in mice. Both male and female mice on a vitamin D-deficient diet manifested vitamin D deficiency, with mineral abnormalities, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and osteomalacia. UVB irradiation significantly increased vitamin D levels in the skin of female mice and normalized serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels, as well as mineral and skeletal abnormalities. However, in male mice, the vitamin D response to UVB was attenuated and mineral and skeletal abnormalities were not normalized. The vitamin D precursor, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC), was significantly lower in the skin of male than female mice. This reduction was due to local androgen action in the skin as demonstrated by castration studies and skin-specific androgen receptor deletion in male mice, both of which reversed the male phenotype. Local androgen regulation in the skin of the CYP11A1 gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme that metabolizes cholesterol, 7DHC, and vitamin D, appeared to contribute to the gender differences in UVB-induced vitamin D production and to its reversal of vitamin D deficiency. Sex-specific, enzymatically regulated differences in cutaneous production of vitamin D may therefore be of importance to ensure vitamin D sufficiency.

  8. Structural and functional association of androgen receptor with telomeres in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junying; Richardson, Michelle; Reddy, Vidyavathi; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes from being recognized as damaged DNA, and telomere stability is required for genome stability. Here we demonstrate that telomere stability in androgen receptor (AR)-positive LNCaP human prostate cancer cells is dependent on AR and androgen, as AR inactivation by AR antagonist bicalutamide (Casodex), AR-knockdown, or androgen-depletion caused telomere dysfunction, and the effect of androgen-depletion or Casodex was blocked by the addition of androgen. Notably, neither actinomycin D nor cycloheximide blocked the DNA damage response to Casodex, indicating that the role of AR in telomere stability is independent of its role in transcription. We also demonstrate that AR is a component of telomeres, as AR-bound chromatin contains telomeric DNA, and telomeric chromatin contains AR. Importantly, AR inactivation by Casodex caused telomere aberrations, including multiple abnormal telomere signals, remindful of a fragile telomere phenotype that has been described previously to result from defective telomere DNA replication. We suggest that AR plays an important role in telomere stability and replication of telomere DNA in prostate cancer cells, and that AR inactivation-mediated telomere dysfunction may contribute to genomic instability and progression of prostate cancer cells. PMID:23363843

  9. PTP1B is an androgen receptor-regulated phosphatase associated with tumor-promoting functions in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Laurent; Labbé, David P.; Deblois, Geneviève; Bégin, Louis R.; Hardy, Serge; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Saad, Fred; Trotman, Lloyd; Giguère, Vincent; Tremblay, Michel L.

    2016-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR)-signaling axis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. The identification of AR targets contributing to prostate tumorigenesis is thus critical for the development of more effective therapies. Herein, we examined whether the AR could regulate classical protein tyrosine phosphatases, a family of enzymes increasingly associated with oncogenic processes. We found that protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a well-established regulator of metabolic signaling, was induced after androgenic stimulation of AR-expressing prostate cancer cells. This effect was observed both at the mRNA and protein levels, and translated into increased PTP1B activity. High-resolution location analyses on tiled array covering chromosome 20q revealed the recruitment of the AR to two response elements located within the first intron of the PTP1B gene (PTPN1) and correlated with an increase in RNA polymerase II recruitment to the transcriptional start site of PTPN1. Analysis of copy number alterations revealed that both PTPN1 and AR genes are co-amplified in metastatic tumors, and that PTPN1 amplification is associated with a subset of high-risk primary tumors. At the functional level, PTP1B depletion significantly delayed LNCaP tumor growth in vivo, and impaired androgen-induced cell migration and invasion in vitro. Importantly, androgen-independent cells also required PTP1B for optimal cell migration. Collectively, our results establish the AR as a transcriptional regulator of PTPN1 transcription, and suggest that PTP1B plays a tumor-promoting role in prostate cancer. This has important implications for prostate cancer biology, and supports the pre-clinical testing of PTP1B inhibitors for the treatment of the disease. PMID:22282656

  10. Basic fibroblast growth factor promotes stem Leydig cell development and inhibits LH-stimulated androgen production by regulating microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Rui; Ge, Ren-Shan; Zhang, Yufei; Zhang, Qihao; Xiang, Qi; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian

    2014-10-01

    Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in the testes, and their steroidogenic function is strictly controlled by the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis. Emerging evidence has indicated that fibroblast growth factors play a role in regulating stem Leydig cell development and steroidogenesis, but little is known about the regulatory mechanism. Using a seminiferous tubule culture system, we demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) can promote stem Leydig cell proliferation and commitment toward differentiation in testosterone-producing Leydig cells. However, these promoting effects decreased with an increase in the bFGF dose. Previous studies have reported that bFGF inhibits luteinizing hormone (LH)-stimulated androgen production by downregulating the mRNA expression of steroidogenic genes in immature Leydig cells. However, the expression levels of 677 microRNAs did not change significantly during the LH-mediated process of testosterone synthesis. Five microRNAs (miR-29a, -29c, -142-3p, -451 and -335) were identified, and their expression in immature Leydig cells was regulated simultaneously by bFGF and LH. These results suggested that the inhibition of LH-stimulated androgen production may be modulated by a change in bFGF-mediated microRNA expression, which further impacts the signaling pathway of testosterone biosynthesis and steroidogenic gene expression.

  11. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Medical consequences of doping with anabolic androgenic steroids: effects on reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) are appearance and performance-enhancing drugs (APEDs) used in competitive athletics, in recreational sports, and by body-builders. The global lifetime prevalence of AASs abuse is 6.4% for males and 1.6% for women. Many AASs, often obtained from the internet and dubious sources, have not undergone proper testing and are consumed at extremely high doses and in irrational combinations, also along with other drugs. Controlled clinical trials investigating undesired side effects are lacking because ethical restrictions prevent exposing volunteers to potentially toxic regimens, obscuring a causal relationship between AASs abuse and possible sequelae. Because of the negative feedback in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, in men AASs cause reversible suppression of spermatogenesis, testicular atrophy, infertility, and erectile dysfunction (anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism). Should spermatogenesis not recover after AASs abuse, a pre-existing fertility disorder may have resurfaced. AASs frequently cause gynecomastia and acne. In women, AASs may disrupt ovarian function. Chronic strenuous physical activity leads to menstrual irregularities and, in severe cases, to the female athlete triad (low energy intake, menstrual disorders and low bone mass), making it difficult to disentangle the effects of sports and AASs. Acne, hirsutism and (irreversible) deepening of the voice are further consequences of AASs misuse. There is no evidence that AASs cause breast carcinoma. Detecting AASs misuse through the control network of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) not only aims to guarantee fair conditions for athletes, but also to protect them from medical sequelae of AASs abuse.

  12. Species comparisons in molecular and functional attributes of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    While endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) have the potential to act via several mechanisms of action, one of the most widely studied is the ability of environmental chemicals to interact directly with either the estrogen (ER) or androgen receptor (AR). In vitro screening assay...

  13. [Epigenetic Regulation by Androgen Receptor and Possible Function in Bone Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic regulation underlying AR(Androgen receptor)mediated transcription is important component to understand pathophysiology of osteoporosis in men. In this commentary, it is reported recent findings related to epigenetic landscape governed by AR and its cofactors including lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), and possible implication for bone metabolism. PMID:27346313

  14. Profiling of androgen response in rainbow trout pubertal testis: relevance to male gonad development and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Antoine D; Lardenois, Aurélie; Goupil, Anne-Sophie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Houlgatte, Rémi; Chalmel, Frédéric; Le Gac, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of testicular somatic cells to promote and sustain germ cell differentiation is largely regulated by sexual steroids and notably androgens. In fish species the importance of androgens is emphasized by their ability to induce sex reversal of the developing fries and to trigger spermatogenesis. Here we studied the influence of androgens on testicular gene expression in trout testis using microarrays. Following treatment of immature males with physiological doses of testosterone or 11-ketotestosterone, 418 genes that exhibit changes in expression were identified. Interestingly, the activity of testosterone appeared stronger than that of 11-ketotestosterone. Expression profiles of responsive genes throughout testis development and in isolated germ cells confirmed androgens to mainly affect gene expression in somatic cells. Furthermore, specific clusters of genes that exhibit regulation coincidently with changes in the natural circulating levels of androgens during the reproductive cycle were highlighted, reinforcing the physiological significance of these data. Among somatic genes, a phylogenetic footprinting study identified putative androgen response elements within the proximal promoter regions of 42 potential direct androgen target genes. Finally, androgens were also found to alter the germ line towards meiotic expression profiles, supporting the hypothesis of a role for the somatic responsive genes in driving germ cell fate. This study significantly increases our understanding of molecular pathways regulated by androgens in vertebrates. The highly cyclic testicular development in trout together with functions associated with regulated genes reveal potential mechanisms for androgen actions in tubule formation, steroid production, germ cell development and sperm secretion. PMID:23301058

  15. β-Catenin Binds to the Activation Function 2 Region of the Androgen Receptor and Modulates the Effects of the N-Terminal Domain and TIF2 on Ligand-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang-Nian; Herrell, Roger; Byers, Stephen; Shah, Salimuddin; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Gelmann, Edward P.

    2003-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional molecule that is activated by signaling through WNT receptors. β-Catenin can also enhance the transcriptional activity of some steroid hormone receptors such as the androgen receptor and retinoic acid receptor α. Androgens can affect nuclear translocation of β-catenin and influence its subcellular distribution. Using mammalian two-hybrid binding assays, analysis of reporter gene transcription, and coimmunoprecipitation, we now show that β-catenin binds to the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) and modulates the transcriptional effects of TIF2 and the androgen receptor N-terminal domain (NTD). In functional assays, β-catenin bound to androgen receptor only in the presence of ligand agonists, not antagonists. β-Catenin binding to the androgen receptor LBD was independent of and cooperative with the androgen receptor NTD and the p160 coactivator TIF2, both of which bind to the activation function 2 (AF-2) region of the androgen receptor. Different mutations of androgen receptor helix 3 amino acids disrupted binding of androgen receptor NTD and β-catenin. β-Catenin, androgen receptor NTD, and TIF2 binding to the androgen receptor LBD were affected similarly by a subset of helix 12 mutations, but disruption of two sites on helix 12 affected only binding of β-catenin and not of TIF2 or the androgen receptor NTD. Mutational disruption of each of five LXXLL peptide motifs in the β-catenin armadillo repeats did not disrupt either binding to androgen receptor or transcriptional coactivation. ICAT, an inhibitor of T-cell factor 4 (TCF-4), and E-cadherin binding to β-catenin also blocked binding of the androgen receptor LBD. We also demonstrated cross talk between the WNT and androgen receptor signaling pathways because excess androgen receptor could interfere with WNT signaling and excess TCF-4 inhibited the interaction of β-catenin and androgen receptor. Taken together, the data show that β-catenin can bind to the

  16. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  17. MDC1 functionally identified as an androgen receptor co-activator participates in suppression of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyu; Sun, Hongmiao; Zou, Renlong; Zhou, Tingting; Wang, Shengli; Sun, Shiying; Tong, Changci; Luo, Hao; Li, Yanshu; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Enhua; Chen, Yuhua; Cao, Liu; Li, Feng; Zhao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for DNA damage response. However, the role of MDC1 in modulating gene transcription independently of DNA damage and the underlying mechanisms have not been fully defined. Androgen receptor (AR) is the central signaling pathway in prostate cancer (PCa) and its target genes are involved in both promotion and suppression of PCa. Here, we functionally identified MDC1 as a co-activator of AR. We demonstrate that MDC1 facilitates the association between AR and histone acetyltransferase GCN5, thereby increasing histone H3 acetylation level on cis-regulatory elements of AR target genes. MDC1 knockdown promotes PCa cells growth and migration. Moreover, depletion of MDC1 results in decreased expression of a subset of the endogenous androgen-induced target genes, including cell cycle negative regulator p21 and PCa metastasis inhibitor Vinculin, in AR positive PCa cell lines. Finally, the expression of MDC1 and p21 correlates negatively with aggressive phenotype of clinical PCa. These studies suggest that MDC1 as an epigenetic modifier regulates AR transcriptional activity and MDC1 may function as a tumor suppressor of PCa, and provide new insight into co-factor-AR-signaling pathway mechanism and a better understanding of the function of MDC1 on PCa. PMID:25934801

  18. Androgens Regulate Gene Expression in Avian Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird’s body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  19. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+) cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  20. Small molecule screening reveals a transcription-independent pro-survival function of androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Narizhneva, Natalia V; Tararova, Natalia D; Ryabokon, Petro; Shyshynova, Inna; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Komarov, Pavel G; Purmal, Andrei A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Gurova, Katerina V

    2009-12-15

    In prostate cancer (PCa) patients, initial responsiveness to androgen deprivation therapy is frequently followed by relapse due to development of treatment-resistant androgen-independent PCa. This is typically associated with acquisition of mutations in AR that allow activity as a transcription factor in the absence of ligand, indicating that androgen-independent PCa remains dependent on AR function. Our strategy to effectively target AR in androgen-independent PCa involved using a cell-based readout to isolate small molecules that inhibit AR transactivation function through mechanisms other than modulation of ligand binding. A number of the identified inhibitors were toxic to AR-expressing PCa cells regardless of their androgen dependence. Among these, some only suppressed PCa cell growth (ARTIS), while others induced cell death (ARTIK). ARTIK, but not ARTIS, compounds caused disappearance of AR protein from treated cells. siRNA against AR behaved like ARTIK compounds, while a dominant negative AR mutant that prevents AR-mediated transactivation but does not eliminate the protein showed only a growth suppressive effect. These observations reveal a transcription-independent function of AR that is essential for PCa cell viability and, therefore, is an ideal target for anti-PCa treatment. Indeed, several of the identified AR inhibitors demonstrated in vivo efficacy in mouse models of PCa and are candidates for pharmacologic optimization.

  1. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  2. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  3. Environmental stress-induced testis differentiation: androgen as a by-product of cortisol inactivation.

    PubMed

    Fernandino, Juan I; Hattori, Ricardo S; Moreno Acosta, Omar D; Strüssmann, Carlos A; Somoza, Gustavo M

    2013-10-01

    This review deals with the gonadal masculinization induced by thermal stress in fish with focus on the action of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) as this mechanism key transducer. High temperatures have been reported to produce male-skewed sex ratios in several species with TSD (temperature-dependent sex determination), and in some of them, this process was reported to be associated with high levels of cortisol, the hormone-related stress in vertebrates, during early gonad development. In addition, in pejerrey larvae reared at high-masculinizing temperatures, 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), the main and most potent androgen in fish, was also detected at high levels. In testicular explants, cortisol induced the synthesis of 11-KT, suggesting that its synthesis could be under the control of the stress axis at the time of gonadal fate determination. 11β-HSD is one of the enzymes shared by the glucocorticoid and androgen pathways; this enzyme converts cortisol to cortisone and also participates in the finals steps of the synthesis of the 11-oxigenated androgens. Based on these data and literature information, here we propose that the masculinization induced by thermal stress can be considered as a consequence of cortisol inactivation and the concomitant synthesis of 11-KT and discussing this as a possible mechanism of masculinization induced by different types of environmental stressors. PMID:23770022

  4. Educational Production Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polachek, Solomon W.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A constant partial elasticity of substitution production function for academic achievement is presented and estimated with nonlinear maximum likelihood methods. We find that ability and time devoted to various aspects of the learning process are the most important determinants of students' accomplishments. (Author/CTM)

  5. Polycystic ovary syndrome patients with high BMI tend to have functional disorders of androgen excess: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Mao, Yundong; Diao, Feiyang; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2016-05-01

    Biochemical or clinical changes of hyperandrogenism are important elements of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is currently no consensus on the definition and diagnostic criteria of hyperandrogenism in PCOS. The aim of this study was to investigate the complex symptoms of hyperandrogenic disorders and the correlations between metabolism and hyperandrogenism in patients with PCOS from an outpatient reproductive medicine clinic in China. We conducted a case control study of 125 PCOS patients and 130 controls to evaluate differences in body mass index (BMI), total testosterone (TT), modified Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism score, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and free androgen index (FAI) between PCOS patients and controls and subgroups of PCOS. The prevalence of acne and hirsutism did not differ significantly between the hyperandrogenic and non-hyperandrogenic subgroup. Patients with signs of hyperandrogenism had significantly higher BMI (P < 0.05), but differences in TT, SHBG, FAI and waist/hip ratio were insignificant. The odds ratio of overweight was calculated for all PCOS patients. Our results suggest that PCOS patients with high BMI tend to have functional disorders of androgen excess; therefore, BMI may be a strong predictor of hyperandrogenism in PCOS. PMID:27526961

  6. Polycystic ovary syndrome patients with high BMI tend to have functional disorders of androgen excess: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Mao, Yundong; Diao, Feiyang; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Biochemical or clinical changes of hyperandrogenism are important elements of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is currently no consensus on the definition and diagnostic criteria of hyperandrogenism in PCOS. The aim of this study was to investigate the complex symptoms of hyperandrogenic disorders and the correlations between metabolism and hyperandrogenism in patients with PCOS from an outpatient reproductive medicine clinic in China. We conducted a case control study of 125 PCOS patients and 130 controls to evaluate differences in body mass index (BMI), total testosterone (TT), modified Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism score, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and free androgen index (FAI) between PCOS patients and controls and subgroups of PCOS. The prevalence of acne and hirsutism did not differ significantly between the hyperandrogenic and non-hyperandrogenic subgroup. Patients with signs of hyperandrogenism had significantly higher BMI (P < 0.05), but differences in TT, SHBG, FAI and waist/hip ratio were insignificant. The odds ratio of overweight was calculated for all PCOS patients. Our results suggest that PCOS patients with high BMI tend to have functional disorders of androgen excess; therefore, BMI may be a strong predictor of hyperandrogenism in PCOS. PMID:27526961

  7. Activation of two mutant androgen receptors from human prostatic carcinoma by adrenal androgens and metabolic derivatives of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Stober, J; Gast, A; Peterziel, H; Hobisch, A; Radmayr, C; Hittmair, A; Bartsch, G; Cato, A C; Klocker, H

    1996-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central regulatory role in prostatic carcinoma and is a target of androgen ablation therapy. Recent detection of mutant receptors in tumor specimens suggest a contribution of AR alterations to progression towards androgen independence. In a specimen derived from metastatic prostate cancer we have reported a point mutation in the AR gene that leads to a single amino acid exchange in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. Another amino acid exchange resulting from a point mutation was also identified 15 amino acids away from our mutation. This mutation was detected in the AR gene isolated from an organ-confined prostatic tumor. Here we report the functional characterization of the two mutant receptors in the presence of adrenal androgens and testosterone metabolites. These studies were performed by cotransfecting androgen-responsive reporter genes and either the wild-type or mutant AR expression vectors into receptor negative DU-145 and CV-1 cells. The indicator genes used consisted of the promoter of the androgen-inducible prostate-specific antigen gene or the C' Delta9 enhancer fragment from the promoter of the mouse sex-limited protein driving the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. Cotransfection-transactivation assays revealed that the adrenal androgen androstenedione and two products of testosterone metabolism, androsterone and androstandiol, induced reporter gene activity more efficiently in the presence of the mutant receptors than in the presence of the wild-type receptor. No difference between wild-type and mutant receptors was observed in the presence of the metabolite androstandione. The interaction of receptor-hormone complexes with target DNA was studied in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic androgen mibolerone induced a faster migrating complex with all receptors, whereas the androgen metabolite androstandione induced this

  8. Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 enhances polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor function and toxicity in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M J; Polanco, Maria J; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Taylor, J Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis.

  9. Androgen Receptor Functional Analyses by High Throughput Imaging: Determination of Ligand, Cell Cycle, and Mutation-Specific Effects

    PubMed Central

    Szafran, Adam T.; Szwarc, Maria; Marcelli, Marco; Mancini, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding how androgen receptor (AR) function is modulated by exposure to steroids, growth factors or small molecules can have important mechanistic implications for AR-related disease therapies (e.g., prostate cancer, androgen insensitivity syndrome, AIS), and in the analysis of environmental endocrine disruptors. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the development of a high throughput (HT) image-based assay that quantifies AR subcellular and subnuclear distribution, and transcriptional reporter gene activity on a cell-by-cell basis. Furthermore, simultaneous analysis of DNA content allowed determination of cell cycle position and permitted the analysis of cell cycle dependent changes in AR function in unsynchronized cell populations. Assay quality for EC50 coefficients of variation were 5–24%, with Z' values reaching 0.91. This was achieved by the selective analysis of cells expressing physiological levels of AR, important because minor over-expression resulted in elevated nuclear speckling and decreased transcriptional reporter gene activity. A small screen of AR-binding ligands, including known agonists, antagonists, and endocrine disruptors, demonstrated that nuclear translocation and nuclear “speckling” were linked with transcriptional output, and specific ligands were noted to differentially affect measurements for wild type versus mutant AR, suggesting differing mechanisms of action. HT imaging of patient-derived AIS mutations demonstrated a proof-of-principle personalized medicine approach to rapidly identify ligands capable of restoring multiple AR functions. Conclusions/Significance HT imaging-based multiplex screening will provide a rapid, systems-level analysis of compounds/RNAi that may differentially affect wild type AR or clinically relevant AR mutations. PMID:18978937

  10. CACUL1 functions as a negative regulator of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hanbyeul; Lee, Sang Hyup; Um, Soo-Jong; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2016-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and thus its regulation is an important tool in PCa therapy. Here, we report that CDK2-associated cullin 1 (CACUL1) directly associates with AR and suppresses AR transcriptional activity. In addition, CACUL1 represses histone demethylase LSD1-mediated AR transactivation by competing with LSD1 for AR binding. Depletion of CACUL1 enhances the LSD1 occupancy of the AR-target promoter, accompanied by decreased accumulation of H3K9me2, a repressive transcriptional marker. CACUL1 and LSD1 oppositely regulate CDX-induced cell death in AR-positive LNCaP and metastatic castrate-resistant LNCaP-LN3 cells. These data suggest that CACUL1 impairs LSD1-mediated activation of AR, thereby implicating it as a potential antitumor target in PCa. PMID:27085459

  11. Correlation of product ion profiles with molecular structures of androgenic and anabolic steroids in ESI MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fuyu; Uboh, Cornelius E; Soma, Lawrence R; You, Youwen; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoqing

    2010-11-01

    Androgenic and anabolic steroids (AASs) are a class of chemical substances closely related to testosterone in molecular structure. They can be abused to enhance performances in human and equine athletes, and are banned by the sports authorities. To assist with method development for doping analyses of AASs, investigations were conducted to correlate their product ion profiles with the molecular structures. Although very similar in chemical structure, AASs generated noticeably different product ion profiles from collision-induced dissociation (CID). On the basis of both outlines of the product ion profiles and molecular structures, AASs studied were classified into six subclasses. In each subclass, the product ion profiles were identical or similar. However, the product ion profiles in one subclass were remarkably different from those in another. The classification reveals that the position and number of double bond(s) in conjugation with the 3-carbonyl group in the molecular structure of an AAS have significant effects on product ion profile. The presence or absence of the 19-methyl group in an AAS also has a remarkable influence on its product ion profile. A substitution in the A-, B- or D-ring of an AAS may cause a shift in mass value of the product ions. The correlation of product ion profiles with molecular structures of AASs has the implication that each AAS can be characterized by a combination of its [M + H](+) ion and product ion profile and as a result be identified with specificity. The classified product ion pattern may be useful in the identification of unknown AASs.

  12. Ligand fishing using new chitosan based functionalized Androgen Receptor magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Sikora, Adam; Chełminiak, Dorota; Ziegler-Borowska, Marta; Siódmiak, Tomasz; Moaddel, Ruin

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles with chemically modified chitosan has been proposed as a potential support for the immobilization of the androgen receptor (AR). The study involved comparison of different AR carriers like commercially available magnetic beads coated with silica (BcMag) and chitosan coated nanoparticles with different amount of amino groups. The immobilization was carried out through covalent immobilization of the AR through the terminal amino group or through available carboxylic acids. The initial characterization of the AR coated magnetic beads was carried out with dihydrotestosterone, a known AR ligand. Subsequently, chitosan modified nanporticles with long-distanced primary amino groups (Fe3O4CS-(NH2)3) (upto 8.34mM/g) were used for further study to isolate known AR ligands (bicalutamide, flutamide, hydroxyflutamide and levonogestrel) from a mixture of tested compounds in ammonium acetate buffer [10mM, pH 7.4]. The results showed that the selected nanoparticles are a promising semi-quantitative tool for the identification of high affinity compounds to AR and might be of special importance in the identification of novel agonists or antiandrogens. PMID:27156644

  13. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; McInnes, Kerry; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Morgan, Stephanie; Atanassova, Nina; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta; Kula, Krzysztof; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Milne, Laura; Mitchell, Rod T.; Smith, Lee B.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cell number and function decline as men age, and low testosterone is associated with all “Western” cardio-metabolic disorders. However, whether perturbed androgen action within the adult Leydig cell lineage predisposes individuals to this late-onset degeneration remains unknown. To address this, we generated a novel mouse model in which androgen receptor (AR) is ablated from ∼75% of adult Leydig stem cell/cell progenitors, from fetal life onward (Leydig cell AR knockout mice), permitting interrogation of the specific roles of autocrine Leydig cell AR signaling through comparison to adjacent AR-retaining Leydig cells, testes from littermate controls, and to human testes, including from patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). This revealed that autocrine AR signaling is dispensable for the attainment of final Leydig cell number but is essential for Leydig cell maturation and regulation of steroidogenic enzymes in adulthood. Furthermore, these studies reveal that autocrine AR signaling in Leydig cells protects against late-onset degeneration of the seminiferous epithelium in mice and inhibits Leydig cell apoptosis in both adult mice and patients with CAIS, possibly via opposing aberrant estrogen signaling. We conclude that autocrine androgen action within Leydig cells is essential for the lifelong support of spermatogenesis and the development and lifelong health of Leydig cells.—O’Hara, L., McInnes, K., Simitsidellis, I., Morgan, S., Atanassova, N., Slowikowska-Hilczer, J., Kula, K., Szarras-Czapnik, M., Milne, L., Mitchell, R. T., Smith, L. B. Autocrine androgen action is essential for Leydig cell maturation and function, and protects against late-onset Leydig cell apoptosis in both mice and men. PMID:25404712

  14. Androgen actions and the ovary.

    PubMed

    Walters, K A; Allan, C M; Handelsman, D J

    2008-03-01

    Although androgens and the androgen receptor (AR) have defining roles in male reproductive development and function, previously no role in female reproductive physiology beyond testosterone (T) as the precursor in estradiol (E(2)) biosynthesis was firmly established. Understanding the role and specific mechanisms of androgen action via the AR in the ovary has been limited by confusion on how to interpret results from pharmacological studies, because many androgens can be metabolized in vivo and in vitro to steroids that can also exert actions via the estrogen receptor (ESR). Recent genetic studies using mouse models with specific disruption of the Ar gene have highlighted the role that AR-mediated actions play in maintaining female fertility through key roles in the regulation of follicle health, development, and ovulation. Furthermore, these genetic studies have revealed that AR-mediated effects influence age-related female fertility, possibly via mechanisms acting predominantly at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in a dose-dependent manner. This review focuses on combining the findings from pharmacological studies and novel genetic mouse models to unravel the roles of ovarian androgen actions in relation to female fertility and ovarian aging, as well as creating new insights into the role of androgens in androgen-associated reproductive disorders such as polycystic ovarian syndrome.

  15. Strength Training Induces Muscle Hypertrophy and Functional Gains in Black Prostate Cancer Patients Despite Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Ben F.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) is associated with weakness, fatigue, sarcopenia, and reduced quality of life (QoL). Black men have a higher incidence and mortality from PCa than Caucasians. We hypothesized that despite ADT, strength training (ST) would increase muscle power and size, thereby improving body composition, physical function, fatigue levels, and QoL in older black men with PCa. Methods. Muscle mass, power, strength, endurance, physical function, fatigue perception, and QoL were measured in 17 black men with PCa on ADT before and after 12 weeks of ST. Within-group differences were determined using t tests and regression models. Results. ST significantly increased total body muscle mass (2.7%), thigh muscle volume (6.4%), power (17%), and strength (28%). There were significant increases in functional performance (20%), muscle endurance (110%), and QoL scores (7%) and decreases in fatigue perception (38%). Improved muscle function was associated with higher functional performance (R 2 = 0.54) and lower fatigue perception (R 2 = 0.37), and both were associated with improved QoL (R 2 = 0.45), whereas fatigue perception tended to be associated with muscle endurance (R 2 = 0.37). Conclusions. ST elicits muscle hypertrophy even in the absence of testosterone and is effective in counteracting the adverse functional consequences of ADT in older black men with PCa. These improvements are associated with reduced fatigue perception, enhanced physical performance, and improved QoL. Thus, ST may be a safe and well-tolerated therapy to prevent the loss of muscle mass, strength, and power commonly observed during ADT. PMID:23089339

  16. Subtle structural changes in tetrahydroquinolines, a new class of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators, induce different functions.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Naoya; Kawai, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Isao

    2012-08-27

    Tetrahydroquinolines (THQs), a new class of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor (AR) modulators, have two indispensable functional groups, that is, a hydroxyl group for AR binding and a nitro group for agonistic activity. Interestingly, switching the nitro to a cyano group, the compound acts as an antagonist. To understand this phenomenon, molecular dynamics simulations were applied for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and representative THQs complexes with AR. Upon ligand binding, the hydroxyl group formed a tight hydrogen-bond (H-bond) with Asn705 on Helix 3 (H3). The immobilization of Asn705 on H3 is helpful in the formation of tight H-bonds with Asp890 on loop 11-12, and this immobilization consequently leads to a stabilization of H12. The difference in the DHT carbonyl isosteres affected the presence or absence of the H-bonds between the hydroxyl group of THQ and Thr877 and the distortion of H12, which is caused by the methyl group of THQ. Thus, the binding, agonist, and antagonist functions were controlled by subtle structural changes in THQ.

  17. Alterations in luteal production of androstenedione, testosterone, and estrone, but not estradiol, during mid- and late pregnancy in pigs: effects of androgen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grzesiak, Malgorzata; Knapczyk-Stwora, Katarzyna; Ciereszko, Renata E; Wieciech, Iwona; Slomczynska, Maria

    2014-09-15

    flutamide exposure. Both CYP17A1 and 17β-HSD1 were immunolocalized exclusively in small luteal cells, whereas CYP19A1 and 17β-HSD7 were found in large luteal cells of control and flutamide-treated CLs. Overall, flutamide administration led to the alterations in A4, T, and E1, but not in E2, production in the CL of pregnancy in pigs, probably because of disrupted steroidogenic enzymes expression. These changes suggest that androgens are important modulators of luteal function during pregnancy in pigs.

  18. Neuroprotective actions of androgens on motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Fargo, Keith N; Foecking, Eileen M; Jones, Kathryn J; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2009-07-01

    Androgens have a variety of protective and therapeutic effects in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here we review these effects as they related specifically to spinal and cranial motoneurons. Early in development, androgens are critical for the formation of important neuromuscular sex differences, decreasing the magnitude of normally occurring cell death in select motoneuron populations. Throughout the lifespan, androgens also protect against motoneuron death caused by axonal injury. Surviving motoneurons also display regressive changes to their neurites as a result of both direct axonal injury and loss of neighboring motoneurons. Androgen treatment enhances the ability of motoneurons to recover from these regressive changes and regenerate both axons and dendrites, restoring normal neuromuscular function. Androgens exert these protective effects by acting through a variety of molecular pathways. Recent work has begun to examine how androgen treatment can interact with other treatment strategies in promoting recovery from motoneuron injury.

  19. Transcriptional up-regulation of the human androgen receptor by androgen in bone cells.

    PubMed

    Wiren, K M; Zhang, X; Chang, C; Keenan, E; Orwoll, E S

    1997-06-01

    Androgen regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression has been observed in a variety of tissues, generally as inhibition, and is thought to attenuate cellular responses to androgen. AR is expressed in osteoblasts, the bone-forming cell, suggesting direct actions of androgens on bone. Here we characterized the effect of androgen exposure on AR gene expression in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 and U-2 OS cells. Treatment of osteoblastic cells with the nonaromatizable androgen 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone increased AR steady state messenger RNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Reporter assays with 2.3 kilobases of the proximal 5'-flanking region of the human AR promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in transfected cultures showed that up-regulation of AR promoter activity by androgen was time and dose dependent. Treatment with other steroid hormones, including progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, and dexamethasone, was without effect. The antiandrogen hydroxyflutamide completely antagonized androgen up-regulation. Thus, in contrast to many other androgen target tissues, androgen exposure increases steady state AR messenger RNA levels in osteoblasts. This regulation occurs at least partially at the level of transcription, is mediated by the 5'-promoter region of the AR gene, and is dependent on functional AR. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of androgens have significant effects on AR expression in skeletal tissue. PMID:9165014

  20. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  1. The effect of atorvastatin and atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy on androgen production in hyperandrogenic women with elevated cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Okopien, B

    2015-02-01

    Statins decreased serum androgen levels in hyperandrogenemic women with polycystic ovary syndrome. No previous study has investigated whether this effect is dose-dependent and observed in patients simultaneously treated with other hypolipidemic agents. The study included 23 premenopausal women with elevated total testosterone levels coexisting with hypercholesterolemia, unsuccessfully treated for at least 6 months with atorvastatin (20 mg daily). These patients were then treated with either an increased dose of atorvastatin (40 mg daily, n=11) or atorvastatin (20 mg daily) plus ezetimibe (10 mg daily) (n=12). Plasma lipids, glucose homeostasis markers and serum levels of androgens, sex hormone-binding globulin and gonadotropins were assessed at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. Although both treatments decreased plasma levels of total and LDL-cholesterol levels, only high-dose atorvastatin reduced serum levels of total testosterone, free testosterone and androstendione. The effect of high-dose atorvastatin on serum androgen levels did not differ between insulin-resistant and insulin-sensitive subjects. The obtained results suggest that atorvastatin reduces serum androgen levels in a dose-dependent manner and that its administration in a higher dose is associated with a more pronounced effect on serum androgens than combination therapy with low-dose atorvastatin and ezetimibe.

  2. LINE-1 ORF-1p functions as a novel androgen receptor co-activator and promotes the growth of human prostatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinying; Feng, Fan; Yang, Yutao; Gao, Xudong; Cui, Jiajun; Zhang, Chuanfu; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Zhongxian; Qv, Jianhui; Wang, Chunping; Zeng, Zhen; Zhu, Yunfeng; Yang, Yongping

    2013-02-01

    Widespread interest in the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by the androgen receptor (AR) has been stimulated by the finding that AR signaling is critically important in the progression of human prostate cancers. Co-factors, the co-repressors, or the co-activators are responsible for the regulation of AR activation. The pro-oncogene human Long Interspersed Nucleotide acid Element-1 (LINE-1) encodes LINE-1 ORF-1p and plays important roles in the development and progression of several human carcinomas. In this study, the results showed that LINE-1 ORF-1p increased the AR transcriptional activity and in turn enhanced the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the presence of R1881. A physical protein-protein interaction between the AR signaling and the LINE-1 ORF-1p was identified by the immunoprecipitation assays and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, LINE-1 ORF-1p would function as a novel AR positive co-regulator through modulating its cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to the androgen response element in the PSA gene promoter. Our date also showed that the LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP (ligand dependent) and PC-3 (ligand independent) human prostatic carcinoma cells. By investigating a novel role of the LINE-1 ORF-1p in the androgen/androgen receptor signaling pathway regulation, our study identifies that LINE-1 ORF-1p may be a novel AR co-regulator and molecular target for human prostate carcinoma therapy.

  3. Prospective echocardiographic assessment of androgenic-anabolic steroids effects on cardiac structure and function in strength athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, F; Cheriex, E C; Kuipers, H

    2003-07-01

    Since the abuse of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) has been associated with the occurrence of serious cardiovascular disease in young athletes, we performed two studies to investigate the effects of short-term AAS administration on heart structure and function in experienced male strength athletes, with special reference to dose and duration of drug abuse. In Study 1 the effects of AAS were assessed in 17 experienced male strength athletes (age 31 +/- 7 y) who self-administered AAS for 8 or 12 - 16 weeks and in 15 non-using strength athletes (age 33 +/- 5 y) in a non-blinded design. In Study 2 the effects of administration of nandrolone decanoate (200 mg/wk i. m.) for eight weeks were investigated in 16 bodybuilders in a randomised double blind, placebo controlled design. In all subjects M-mode and two-dimensional Doppler-echocardiography were performed at baseline and after 8 weeks AAS administration. In the athletes of Study 1 who used AAS for 12 - 16 weeks a third echocardiogram was also made at the end of the AAS administration period. Echocardiographic examinations included the determination of the aortic diameter (AD), left atrium diameter (LA), left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD), interventricular septum thickness (IVS), posterior wall end diastolic wall thickness (PWEDWT), left ventricular mass (LVM), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), ejection fraction (EF) and right ventricular diameter (RVD). For assessment of the diastolic function measurements of E and A peak velocities and calculation of E/A ratio were used. In addition, acceleration and deceleration times of the E-top (ATM and DT, respectively) were determined. For evaluation of factors associated with stroke volume the aorta peak flow (AV) and left ventricular ejection times (LVET) were determined. In Study 1 eight weeks AAS self-administration did not result in changes of blood pressure or cardiac size and function. Additionally, duration of AAS self-administration did not have any

  4. Androgen actions on the human hair follicle: perspectives.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shigeki; Itami, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Androgens stimulate beard growth but suppress hair growth in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). This condition is known as 'androgen paradox'. Human pilosebaceous units possess enough enzymes to form the active androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. In hair follicles, 5α-reductase type 1 and 2, androgen receptors (AR) and AR coactivators can regulate androgen sensitivity of dermal papillae (DP). To regulate hair growth, androgens stimulate production of IGF-1 as positive mediators from beard DP cells and of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, dickkopf1 and IL-6 as negative mediators from balding DP cells. In addition, androgens enhance inducible nitric oxide synthase from occipital DP cells and stem cell factor for positive regulation of hair growth in beard and negative regulation of balding DP cells. Moreover, AGA involves crosstalk between androgen and Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Finally, recent data on susceptibility genes have provided us with the impetus to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of AGA. PMID:23016593

  5. Detection of the arylpropionamide-derived selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-4 (Andarine) in a black-market product.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Kamber, Matthias; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2009-08-01

    Non-steroidal and tissue-selective anabolic agents such as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of various diseases such as sarcopenia or cancer cachexia. Advanced compounds of SARMs are based on an arylpropionamide-derived structure and leading drug candidates have successfully completed phase-II-clinical trials. Although none of these therapeutics have been approved, their performance-enhancing qualities and the black-market availability of these products makes them a viable target for misuse in the athletic community. In 2008, SARMs were added to the Prohibited List established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). That SARMs are the subject of misuse even without clinical approval was proved for the first time by the detection of the drug candidate Andarine (also referred to as S-4, S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide), advertised, sold and supplied via the Internet. The oily liquids, declared as green tea extracts and face moisturizer, were assayed using state-of-the-art analytical procedures and S-4 was found at concentrations of approximately 150 mg/mL. The authenticity of the product was demonstrated in comparison to reference material by liquid chromatography, high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry using positive and negative electrospray ionization, and comparison to reference material. Moreover, an impurity resulting from poor product purification was detected, accounting for approximately 10% of S-4. This consisted of 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenylamino)-propionamide. The ease of purchasing non-approved drug candidates that could potentially increase athletic performance demonstrates the need to operate proactively in the continued fight against doping. The early inclusion of emerging drugs into routine sports drug testing procedures is a key

  6. Effect of prolonged administration of anabolic and androgenic steroids on reproductive function in the mare.

    PubMed

    Turner, J E; Irvine, C H

    1982-01-01

    Administration to mares of the anabolic steroid, methandriol, at the maximum recommended dose (300 mg every 3 weeks) for 1 1/2 years had no effect on reproductive characteristics except for suppression of GnRH-induced LH release and a tendency to suppress basal LH levels and the height of the ovulatory LH surge. A 4-fold increase in dosage caused marked suppression of basal LH, the LH surge, and GnRH-induced LH release. Other reproductive responses were minimally affected. There were no behavioural effects, and no changes in weight occurred when mares were compared with matched controls. Small and moderate doses of testosterone induced behavioural changes without affecting reproductive function. However, large doses, which raised plasma testosterone to levels similar to those of stallions, eventually caused total suppression of all reproductive activity within 1 month and the development of markedly vicious stallion-like behaviour. Apart from the aggression all changes disappeared within 1 month after the end of treatment. PMID:6762438

  7. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  8. Ligand- and coactivator-mediated transactivation function (AF2) of the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain is inhibited by the cognate hinge region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Lu, J; Yong, E L

    2001-03-01

    Transactivation functions (AF2) in the ligand-binding domains (LBD) of many steroid receptors are well characterized, but there is little evidence to support such a function for the LBD of the androgen receptor (AR). We report a mutant AR, with residues 628-646 in the hinge region deleted, which exhibited transactivation activity that was more than double that of the wild type (WT) AR. Although no androgen-dependent AF2 activity could be observed for the WT ARLBD fused to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, the mutant ARLBD(Delta628-646) was 30-40 times more active than the WT ARLBD. In the presence of the p160 coactivator TIF2, AR(Delta628-646) was significantly more active than similarly treated WT AR. Deletion of residues 628-646 also enhanced TIF2-ARLBD activity 8-fold, an effect not present when the LBD-interacting LXXLL motifs of TIF2 were mutated, suggesting that the negative modulatory activity of residues 628-646 were exerted via coactivator pathways. Although the AP-1 (c-Jun/c-Fos) system and NcoR have been reported to interact with and repress the activity of some steroid receptors, c-Jun, c-Fos, c-Jun/c-Fos, nor NcoR function was consistently affected by the absence or presence of residues 628-646, implying that the AR hinge region exerts its silencing effects in a manner independent of these corepressors. Our data provide evidence for the novel finding that strong androgen-dependent AF2 exists in the ARLBD and is the first report of a negative regulatory domain in the AR. Because mutations in this region are commonly associated with prostate cancer, it is important to characterize the mechanisms by which the hinge region exerts its repressor effect on ligand-activated and coactivator-mediated AF2 activity of the ARLBD.

  9. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. Prenatal exposure to low levels of androgen accelerates female puberty onset and reproductive senescence in mice.

    PubMed

    Witham, Emily A; Meadows, Jason D; Shojaei, Shadi; Kauffman, Alexander S; Mellon, Pamela L

    2012-09-01

    Sex steroid hormone production and feedback mechanisms are critical components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and regulate fetal development, puberty, fertility, and menopause. In female mammals, developmental exposure to excess androgens alters the development of the HPG axis and has pathophysiological effects on adult reproductive function. This study presents an in-depth reproductive analysis of a murine model of prenatal androgenization (PNA) in which females are exposed to a low dose of dihydrotestosterone during late prenatal development on embryonic d 16.5-18.5. We determined that PNA females had advanced pubertal onset and a delay in the time to first litter, compared with vehicle-treated controls. The PNA mice also had elevated testosterone, irregular estrous cyclicity, and advanced reproductive senescence. To assess the importance of the window of androgen exposure, dihydrotestosterone was administered to a separate cohort of female mice on postnatal d 21-23 [prepubertal androgenization (PPA)]. PPA significantly advanced the timing of pubertal onset, as observed by age of the vaginal opening, yet had no effects on testosterone or estrous cycling in adulthood. The absence of kisspeptin receptor in Kiss1r-null mice did not change the acceleration of puberty by the PNA and PPA paradigms, indicating that kisspeptin signaling is not required for androgens to advance puberty. Thus, prenatal, but not prepubertal, exposure to low levels of androgens disrupts normal reproductive function throughout life from puberty to reproductive senescence.

  11. Androgen receptors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Klocker, H; Bartsch, G; Hobisch, A

    2002-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR), a transcription factor that mediates the action of androgens in target tissues, is expressed in nearly all prostate cancers. Carcinoma of the prostate is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in men in industrialized countries. Palliative treatment for non-organ-confined prostate cancer aims to down-regulate the concentration of circulating androgen or to block the transcription activation function of the AR. AR function during endocrine therapy was studied in tumor cells LNCaP subjected to long-term steroid depletion; newly generated sublines could be stimulated by lower concentrations of androgen than parental cells and showed up-regulation of AR expression and activity as well as resistance to apoptosis. Androgenic hormones regulate the expression of key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and 4, and that of the cell cycle inhibitor p27. Inhibition of AR expression could be achieved by potential chemopreventive agents flufenamic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, polyunsaturated fatty acids and interleukin-1beta, and by the application of AR antisense oligonucleotides. In the clinical situation, AR gene amplification and point mutations were reported in patients with metastatic disease. These mutations generate receptors which could be activated by other steroid hormones and non-steroidal antiandrogens. In the absence of androgen, the AR could be activated by various growth-promoting (growth factors, epidermal growth factor receptor-related oncogene HER-2/neu) and pleiotropic (protein kinase A activators, interleukin-6) compounds as well as by inducers of differentiation (phenylbutyrate). AR function is modulated by a number of coactivators and corepressors. The three coactivators, TIF-2, SRC-1 and RAC3, are up-regulated in relapsed prostate cancer. New experimental therapies for prostate cancer are aimed to down-regulate AR expression and to overcome difficulties which occur because of the acquisition of agonistic properties

  12. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection.

  13. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  14. Synergistic androgenic effect of a petroleum product caused by the joint action of at least three different types of compounds.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Candido, Angelica; Vrabie, Cozmina M; Scarlett, Alan G; Rowland, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    In a previous study, we found a dose-dependent synergistic effect in recombinant yeast stably transfected with the human androgen receptor (AR), in response to co-exposure to testosterone and a commercially-available lubricant (engine) oil for cars. As there is relatively little knowledge on synergistic toxic effects and causative compounds, particularly for the androgenic system, the objective of the present study was to investigate this oil in more detail. The oil was fractionated into SARA fractions (so-called 'saturates', 'aromatics', 'resins', and 'asphaltenes') by open column chromatography. Surprisingly, when exposing the recombinant AR yeast to testosterone in combination with the separate SARA fractions, the synergistic effect could not be reproduced fully. After pooling the fractions again however, the full synergism returned. From subsequent exposures to combinations of two or three SARA fractions, it appeared that both the 'saturates' and the 'resins' fraction were required for obtaining the synergistic response with testosterone. This clearly demonstrates a synergistic effect related to the androgenic system caused by the joint action of at least three chemically-distinct compounds, or groups of compounds (i.e. testosterone, 'resins' and 'saturates'). Although detailed chemical analyses could not reveal the identity of the causative compounds and the in vivo relevance of the present results remains unclear, the results do add to the growing body of evidence on the potentially extremely complex character of mixture effects.

  15. Synergistic androgenic effect of a petroleum product caused by the joint action of at least three different types of compounds.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Candido, Angelica; Vrabie, Cozmina M; Scarlett, Alan G; Rowland, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    In a previous study, we found a dose-dependent synergistic effect in recombinant yeast stably transfected with the human androgen receptor (AR), in response to co-exposure to testosterone and a commercially-available lubricant (engine) oil for cars. As there is relatively little knowledge on synergistic toxic effects and causative compounds, particularly for the androgenic system, the objective of the present study was to investigate this oil in more detail. The oil was fractionated into SARA fractions (so-called 'saturates', 'aromatics', 'resins', and 'asphaltenes') by open column chromatography. Surprisingly, when exposing the recombinant AR yeast to testosterone in combination with the separate SARA fractions, the synergistic effect could not be reproduced fully. After pooling the fractions again however, the full synergism returned. From subsequent exposures to combinations of two or three SARA fractions, it appeared that both the 'saturates' and the 'resins' fraction were required for obtaining the synergistic response with testosterone. This clearly demonstrates a synergistic effect related to the androgenic system caused by the joint action of at least three chemically-distinct compounds, or groups of compounds (i.e. testosterone, 'resins' and 'saturates'). Although detailed chemical analyses could not reveal the identity of the causative compounds and the in vivo relevance of the present results remains unclear, the results do add to the growing body of evidence on the potentially extremely complex character of mixture effects. PMID:26461438

  16. Effect of inter-cycle interval on oocyte production in humans in the presence of the weak androgen DHEA and follicle stimulating hormone: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In various animal models androgens have been demonstrated to enhance follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) activity on granulosa cells during small growing follicle stages. To assess whether similar synergism may also exist in humans we investigated women on androgen (dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA) supplementation with varying concomitant FSH exposure. Methods In a case controlled cohort study we determine if time interval between IVF cycles of IVF treatment with FSH had an effect on ovarian response to ovulation induction in women supplemented with DHEA. Among 85 women with known low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR), supplemented with DHEA, and undergoing at least 3 consecutive IVF cycles, 68 demonstrated short (<120 days) intervals between repeated cycles (Group 1) and were, therefore, considered to have consistent FSH exposure. In contrast 17 women (Group 2) demonstrated long (> = 120 days) intervals between repeated cycles and, therefore, were considered to demonstrate inconsistent FSH exposure. Trends in oocyte yields were compared between these groups, utilizing mixed model repeated measures ANOVA, adjusted for initial age and FSH dose. Results Only women in Group I demonstrated a linear increase in oocyte yields across their three cycles of treatments (F = 7.92; df 1, 68.6; p = 0.017). Moreover, the analysis revealed a significant interaction between the two patient groups and cycle number for retrieved oocytes (F = 6.32, df = 2, 85.9, p = 0.003). Conclusions This study offers preliminary confirmatory evidence that repeated short interval exposure to androgens in combination with FSH improves human FOR. A higher level of evidence will require prospectively randomized studies. PMID:25048047

  17. Theaflavin-3,3'-digallate and penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose inhibit rat liver microsomal 5alpha-reductase activity and the expression of androgen receptor in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Hsiao; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2004-07-01

    Androgens play a critical role in regulating the growth, differentiation and survival of epithelial cells in many androgen-responsive organs, such as prostate and skin. The enzyme steroid 5alpha-reductase (EC 1.3.99.5) catalyzes the conversion of testosterone (T) to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT then binds to androgen receptors (AR) and functions in the nucleus to regulate specific gene expression. Androgens via their cognate receptor may be involved in the development and progression of benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer, hirsutism, male pattern alopecia and acne. The aim of this study was to determine whether theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3) and penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (5GG) have inhibitory effects on androgen production and action. We found that TF3 and 5GG inhibit rat liver microsomal 5alpha-reductase activity. Furthermore, TF3 and 5GG significantly reduced androgen-responsive LNCaP prostate cancer cell growth, suppressed expression of the AR and lowered androgen-induced prostate-specific antigen secretion and fatty acid synthase protein level. In conclusion, our result suggests that TF3 and 5GG might be useful chemoprevention agents for prostate cancer through suppressing the function of androgen and its receptor. PMID:14963012

  18. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action.

    PubMed

    DePriest, Adam D; Fiandalo, Michael V; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a 'pre-receptor level' database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a 'post-receptor level' database, and (ii) an 'other resources' database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to gene

  19. Regulators of Androgen Action Resource: a one-stop shop for the comprehensive study of androgen receptor action

    PubMed Central

    Fiandalo, Michael V.; Schlanger, Simon; Heemers, Frederike; Mohler, James L.; Liu, Song; Heemers, Hannelore V.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is the main target for treatment of non-organ-confined prostate cancer (CaP). Failure of life-prolonging AR-targeting androgen deprivation therapy is due to flexibility in steroidogenic pathways that control intracrine androgen levels and variability in the AR transcriptional output. Androgen biosynthesis enzymes, androgen transporters and AR-associated coregulators are attractive novel CaP treatment targets. These proteins, however, are characterized by multiple transcript variants and isoforms, are subject to genomic alterations, and are differentially expressed among CaPs. Determining their therapeutic potential requires evaluation of extensive, diverse datasets that are dispersed over multiple databases, websites and literature reports. Mining and integrating these datasets are cumbersome, time-consuming tasks and provide only snapshots of relevant information. To overcome this impediment to effective, efficient study of AR and potential drug targets, we developed the Regulators of Androgen Action Resource (RAAR), a non-redundant, curated and user-friendly searchable web interface. RAAR centralizes information on gene function, clinical relevance, and resources for 55 genes that encode proteins involved in biosynthesis, metabolism and transport of androgens and for 274 AR-associated coregulator genes. Data in RAAR are organized in two levels: (i) Information pertaining to production of androgens is contained in a ‘pre-receptor level’ database, and coregulator gene information is provided in a ‘post-receptor level’ database, and (ii) an ‘other resources’ database contains links to additional databases that are complementary to and useful to pursue further the information provided in RAAR. For each of its 329 entries, RAAR provides access to more than 20 well-curated publicly available databases, and thus, access to thousands of data points. Hyperlinks provide direct access to

  20. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    PubMed

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  1. Endothelial Cell Death, Angiogenesis, and Microvascular Function after Castration in an Androgen-Dependent Tumor: Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Safabakhsh, Nina; Sckell, Axel; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Ping; Benjamin, Laura; Yuan, Fan; Keshet, Eli

    1998-09-01

    The sequence of events that leads to tumor vessel regression and the functional characteristics of these vessels during hormone--ablation therapy are not known. This is because of the lack of an appropriate animal model and monitoring technology. By using in vivo microscopy and in situ molecular analysis of the androgen-dependent Shionogi carcinoma grown in severe combined immunodeficient mice, we show that castration of these mice leads to tumor regression and a concomitant decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Androgen withdrawal is known to induce apoptosis in Shionogi tumor cells. Surprisingly, tumor endothelial cells begin to undergo apoptosis before neoplastic cells, and rarefaction of tumor vessels precedes the decrease in tumor size. The regressing vessels begin to exhibit normal phenotype, i.e., lower diameter, tortuosity, vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion. Two weeks after castration, a second wave of angiogenesis and tumor growth begins with a concomitant increase in VEGF expression. Because human tumors often relapse following hormone--ablation therapy, our data suggest that these patients may benefit from combined anti-VEGF therapy.

  2. Antioxidants Abrogate Alpha-Tocopherylquinone-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Androgen Receptor in Androgen-Responsive Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; MacKenzie, Debra A.; Olguin, Sarah L.; Scariano, John K.; Rabinowitz, Ian; Thompson, Todd A.

    2016-01-01

    Tocopherylquinone (TQ), the oxidation product of alpha-tocopherol (AT), is a bioactive molecule with distinct properties from AT. In this study, AT and TQ are investigated for their comparative effects on growth and androgenic activity in prostate cancer cells. TQ potently inhibited the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines (e.g., LAPC4 and LNCaP cells), whereas the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (e.g., DU145 cells) was not affected by TQ. Due to the growth inhibitory effects induced by TQ on androgen-responsive cells, the anti-androgenic properties of TQ were examined. TQ inhibited the androgen-induced activation of an androgen-responsive reporter and inhibited the release of prostate specific antigen from LNCaP cells. TQ pretreatment was also found to inhibit AR activation as measured using the Multifunctional Androgen Receptor Screening assay. Furthermore, TQ decreased androgen-responsive gene expression, including TM4SF1, KLK2, and PSA over 5-fold, whereas AT did not affect the expression of androgen-responsive genes. Of importance, the antiandrogenic effects of TQ on prostate cancer cells were found to result from androgen receptor protein down-regulation produced by TQ that was not observed with AT treatment. Moreover, none of the androgenic endpoints assessed were affected by AT. The down-regulation of androgen receptor protein by TQ was abrogated by co-treatment with antioxidants. Overall, the biological actions of TQ were found to be distinct from AT, where TQ was found to be a potent inhibitor of cell growth and androgenic activity in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells. PMID:26986969

  3. Development of adrenal cortical zonation and expression of key elements of adrenal androgen production in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) from birth to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Parker, C R; Grizzle, W E; Blevins, J K; Hawkes, K

    2014-04-25

    The basis for the pattern of adrenal androgen production in the chimpanzee, which resembles that of humans, is poorly defined. We characterized the developmental zonation and expression of elements of the androgen biosynthetic pathway in the chimpanzee adrenal. The newborn adrenal contained a broad fetal zone (FZ) expressing CYP17, SULT2A1, and Cytochrome B5 (CB5) but not HSD3B; the outer cortex expressed HSD3B but not SULT2A1 or CB5. During infancy, the FZ involuted and the HSD3B-expressing outer cortex broadened. By 3years of age, a thin layer of cells that expressed CB5, SULT2A1, and CYP17 adjoined the medulla and likely represented the zona reticularis; the outer cortex consisted of distinct zonae fasiculata and glomerulosa. Thereafter, the zona reticularis broadened as also occurs in the human. The adult chimpanzee adrenal displayed other human-like characteristics: intramedullary clusters of reticularis-like cells and also a cortical cuff of zona fasiculata-like cells adjoining the central vein.

  4. Genetic ablation of androgen receptor signaling in fetal Leydig cell lineage affects Leydig cell functions in adult testis.

    PubMed

    Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Lopez, Carolina; Ferguson, Lydia; Myhr, Courtney; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-06-01

    It is commonly accepted that androgen-producing fetal Leydig cells (FLC) are substituted by adult Leydig cells (ALC) during perinatal testis development. The mechanisms influencing this process are unclear. We used mice with a retinoid acid receptor 2 promoter-Cre recombinase transgene (Rarb-cre) expressed in embryonic FLC precursors, but not in postnatal testis, and a dual fluorescent Cre recombinase reporter to label FLC and ALC in vivo. All FLC in newborn testis had the recombinant, whereas the majority of LC in adult testis had the nonrecombinant reporter. Primary LC cultures from adult testis had either recombinant (20%) or nonrecombinant (80%) cells, demonstrating that the FLC survive in adult testis and their ontogeny is distinct from ALC. Conditional inactivation of androgen receptor (AR) allele using the Rarb-cre transgene resulted in a 50% increase of AR-negative LC in adult testis. The mutant males became infertile with age, with all LC in older testis showing signs of incomplete differentiation, such as a large number of big lipid droplets, an increase of finger-like protrusions, and a misexpression of steroidogenic or FLC- and ALC-specific genes. We propose that the antiandrogenic exposure during early development may similarly result in an increase of FLC in adult testis, leading to abnormal LC differentiation.

  5. Anabolic androgenic steroids abuse and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Neri, M; Bello, S; Bonsignore, A; Cantatore, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Fineschi, V

    2011-05-01

    In the athletes the wide use of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids (AAS) cause series damage in various organs, in particular, analyzing the liver, elevation on the levels of liver enzymes, cholestatic jaundice, liver tumors, both benign and malignant, and peliosis hepatis are described. A prolonged AAS administration provokes an increase in the activities of liver lysosomal hydrolases and a decrease in some components of the microsomal drug-metabolizing system and in the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes without modifying classical serum indicators of hepatic function. Liver is a key organ actively involved in numerous metabolic and detoxifying functions. As a consequence, it is continuously exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous oxidants that are by-products of many biochemical pathways and, in fact, it has been demonstrated that intracellular oxidant production is more active in liver than in tissues, like the increase of inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and the inhibitors of apoptosis NF- κB and Heat Shock Proteins.

  6. Biochemical and physiological aspects of endogenous androgens.

    PubMed

    Kicman, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to give a synopsis of the major aspects concerning the biochemistry of endogenous androgens, supplemented with several facets of physiology, particularly with respect to testosterone. Testosterone continues to be the most common adverse finding declared by World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories, such samples having an augmented testosterone to epitestosterone ratio. Knowledge regarding the precursors and metabolism of endogenous testosterone is therefore fundamental to understanding many of the issues concerning doping with testosterone and its prohormones, including the detection of their administration. Further, adverse findings for nandrolone are frequent, but this steroid and 19-norandrostenedione are also produced endogenously, an appealing hypothesis being that they are minor by-products of the aromatization of androgens. At sports tribunals pertaining to adverse analytical findings of natural androgen administration, experts often raise issues that concern some aspect of steroid biochemistry and physiology. Salient topics included within this review are the origins and interconversion of endogenous androgens, the biosynthesis of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mechanism of aromatization, the molecular biology of the androgen receptor, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, disturbances to this axis by anabolic steroid administration, the transport (binding) of androgens in blood, and briefly the metabolism and excretion of androgens.

  7. Estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists in effluents from Norwegian North Sea oil production platforms.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Harman, Christopher; Smith, Andy; Thomas, Kevin V

    2007-03-01

    The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and androgen receptor (AR) antagonist potencies of offshore produced water effluents collected from the Norwegian Sector were determined using recombinant yeast estrogen and androgen screens. Solid phase extraction (SPE) concentrates of the effluents showed E2 agonist activities similar to those previously reported for the United Kingdom (UK) Continental Shelf (<0.1-4 ng E2 L(-1)). No activity was detected in the filtered oil droplets suggesting that produced water ER activity is primarily associated with the dissolved phase. Targeted analysis for methyl- to nonyl-substituted alkylphenol isomers show the occurrence of known ER agonists in the analysed samples. For the first time, AR antagonists were detected in both the dissolved and oil associated phase at concentrations of between 20 and 8000 microg of flutamide equivalents L(-1). The identity of the AR antagonists is unknown, however this represents a significant input into the marine environment of unknown compounds that exert a known biological effect. It is recommended that further analysis using techniques such as bioassay-directed analysis is performed to identify the compounds/groups of compounds that are responsible in order to improve the assessment of the risk posed by produced water discharges to the marine environment. PMID:17258235

  8. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-07-22

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  9. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-01-01

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  10. Testofen, a specialised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract reduces age-related symptoms of androgen decrease, increases testosterone levels and improves sexual function in healthy aging males in a double-blind randomised clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Amanda; Steels, Elizabeth; Inder, Warrick J; Abraham, Suzanne; Vitetta, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effect of Testofen, a specialised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract on the symptoms of possible androgen deficiency, sexual function and serum androgen concentrations in healthy aging males. This was a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial involving 120 healthy men aged between 43 and 70 years of age. The active treatment was standardised Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract at a dose of 600 mg/day for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Aging Male Symptom questionnaire (AMS), a measure of possible androgen deficiency symptoms; secondary outcome measures were sexual function and serum testosterone. There was a significant decrease in AMS score over time and between the active and placebo groups. Sexual function improved, including number of morning erections and frequency of sexual activity. Both total serum testosterone and free testosterone increased compared to placebo after 12 weeks of active treatment. Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract is a safe and effective treatment for reducing symptoms of possible androgen deficiency, improves sexual function and increases serum testosterone in healthy middle-aged and older men. PMID:26791805

  11. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition

    PubMed Central

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. METHODS A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. RESULTS Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight

  12. Evidence that obesity and androgens have independent and opposing effects on gonadotropin production from puberty to maturity.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Robert L; Bordini, Brian

    2010-12-10

    Optimal fat mass is necessary for normal gonadotropin levels in adults, and both undernutrition and overnutrition suppress gonadotropins: thus, the gonadotropin response to relative adipose mass is biphasic. Adult obesity is associated with blunted luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse amplitude that is partially attributable to increased LH clearance rate. Testosterone appears to have a biphasic effect on gonadotropin production in females. Moderate elevations of testosterone appear to stimulate LH production at both the hypothalamic and pituitary level, while very high levels of testosterone suppress LH. Thus, obesity per se appears to suppress gonadotropin production, and moderate hyperandrogenemia in women appears to stimulate LH. The ordinary hypergonadotropic hyperandrogenism of obese women appears to be an exception to this model because it is usually due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition in which intrinsic functional ovarian hyperandrogenism and excess adiposity share a common origin that involves insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemia. LH elevation seems to be secondary to hyperandrogenemia and is absent in the most obese cases. Overweight early pubertal girls have significant blunting of sleep-related LH production, which is the first hormonal change of puberty. The data are compatible with the possibility that excess adiposity may paradoxically subtly suppress hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in early puberty although it is known to contribute to the early onset of puberty. PMID:20816944

  13. Prepubertal mouse testis growth and maturation and androgen production are acutely sensitive to di-n-butyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Moody, Sarah; Goh, Hoey; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Rippon, Paul; Loveland, Kate L; Itman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Phthalates are plasticizers with widespread industrial, domestic, and medical applications. Epidemiological data indicating increased incidence of testicular dysgenesis in boys exposed to phthalates in utero are reinforced by studies demonstrating that phthalates impair fetal rodent testis development. Because humans are exposed to phthalates continuously from gestation through adulthood, it is imperative to understand what threat phthalates pose at other life stages. To determine the impact during prepuberty, we assessed the consequences of oral administration of 1 to 500 mg di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)/kg/d in corn oil to wild-type (C57BL/6J) male mice from 4 to 14 days of age. Dose-dependent effects on testis growth correlated with reduced Sertoli cell proliferation. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses identified delayed spermatogenesis and impaired Sertoli cell maturation after exposure to 10 to 500 mg DBP/kg/d. Interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was indicated in mice fed 500 mg DBP/kg/d, which had elevated circulating inhibin but no change in serum FSH. Increased immunohistochemical staining for inhibin-α was apparent at doses of 10 to 500 mg DBP/kg/d. Serum testosterone and testicular androgen activity were lower in the 500 mg DBP/kg/d group; however, reduced anogenital distance in all DBP-treated mice suggested impaired androgen action at earlier time points. Long-term effects were evident, with smaller anogenital distance and indications of disrupted spermatogenesis in adult mice exposed prepubertally to doses from 1 mg DBP/kg/d. These data demonstrate the acute sensitivity of the prepubertal mouse testis to DBP at doses 50- to 500-fold lower than those used in rat and identify the upregulation of inhibin as a potential mechanism of DBP action.

  14. Disruption of Androgen Receptor Signaling in Males by Environmental Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Luccio-Camelo, Doug C.; Prins, Gail S

    2011-01-01

    Androgen-disruptors are environmental chemicals in that interfere with the biosynthesis, metabolism or action of endogenous androgens resulting in a deflection from normal male developmental programming and reproductive tract growth and function. Since male sexual differentiation is entirely androgen-dependent, it is highly susceptible to androgen-disruptors. Animal models and epidemiological evidence link exposure to androgen disrupting chemicals with reduced sperm counts, increased infertility, testicular dysgenesis syndrome, and testicular and prostate cancers. Further, there appears to be increased sensitivity to these agents during critical developmental windows when male differentiation is at its peak. A variety of in vitro and in silico approaches have been used to identify broad classes of androgen disrupting molecules that include organochlorinated pesticides, industrial chemicals, and plasticizers with capacity to ligand the androgen receptor. The vast majority of these synthetic molecules act as anti-androgens. This review will highlight the evidence for androgen disrupting chemicals that act through interference with the androgen receptor, discussing specific compounds for which there is documented in vivo evidence for male reproductive tract perturbations. PMID:21515368

  15. Production Function Geometry with "Knightian" Total Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truett, Dale B.; Truett, Lila J.

    2007-01-01

    Authors of principles and price theory textbooks generally illustrate short-run production using a total product curve that displays first increasing and then diminishing marginal returns to employment of the variable input(s). Although it seems reasonable that a temporary range of increasing returns to variable inputs will likely occur as…

  16. Androgens and the breast.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  17. Androgens and the breast

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation. PMID:19889198

  18. Effects of Aromatase Inhibition and Androgen Activity on Serotonin and Behavior in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.; Robertson, Nicola; Colemen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] T+Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM), [4] T+Letrozole (non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM), [5] Flutamide+ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor) or [6] dihydrotestosterone (DHT)+ATD (n=5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p <0.0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p<0.0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response; and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a non-competitve inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p<0.0008; r2 =0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity supports

  19. Effects of aromatase inhibition and androgen activity on serotonin and behavior in male macaques.

    PubMed

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala P; Robertson, Nicola; Coleman, Kristine

    2013-06-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with (a) placebo; (b) testosterone (T); (c) T + Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM); (d) T + Letrozole (nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM); (e) Flutamide + ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor); or (f) dihydrotestosterone (DHT) + ATD (n = 5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p < .0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p < .0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a noncompetitive inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p < .0008; r² = 0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity

  20. Conversion of Androgen Receptor Signaling From a Growth Suppressor in Normal Prostate Epithelial Cells to an Oncogene in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves a Gain of Function in c-Myc Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vander Griend, Donald J.; Litvinov, Ivan V.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, androgen-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling within prostate stromal cells induces their secretion of paracrine factors, termed “andromedins” which stimulate growth of the epithelial cells. The present studies demonstrate that androgen-dependent andromedin-driven growth stimulation is counter-balanced by androgen-induced AR signaling within normal adult prostate epithelial cells resulting in terminal G0 growth arrest coupled with terminal differentiation into ΔNp63-negative, PSA-expressing secretory luminal cells. This cell autonomous AR-driven terminal differentiation requires DNA-binding of the AR protein, is associated with decreases in c-Myc m-RNA and protein, are coupled with increases in p21, p27, and SKP-2 protein expression, and does not require functional p53. These changes result in down-regulation of Cyclin D1 protein and RB phosphoryation. shRNA knockdown documents that neither RB, p21, p27 alone or in combination are required for such AR-induced G0 growth arrest. Transgenic expression of a constitutive vector to prevent c-Myc down-regulation overrides AR-mediated growth arrest in normal prostate epithelial cells, which documents that AR-induced c-Myc down-regulation is critical in terminal growth arrest of normal prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, in prostate cancer cells, androgen-induced AR signaling paradoxically up-regulates c-Myc expression and stimulates growth as documented by inhibition of both of these responses following exposure to the AR antagonist, bicalutamide. These data document that AR signaling is converted from a growth suppressor in normal prostate epithelial cells to an oncogene in prostate cancer cells during prostatic carcinogenesis and that this conversion involves a gain of function for regulation of c-Myc expression. PMID:24948876

  1. Course and Predictors of Cognitive Function in Patients With Prostate Cancer Receiving Androgen-Deprivation Therapy: A Controlled Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Brian D.; Jim, Heather S.L.; Booth-Jones, Margaret; Small, Brent J.; Sutton, Steven K.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Park, Jong Y.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Fishman, Mayer N.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may be at risk for cognitive impairment; however, evidence is mixed in the existing literature. Our study examined the impact of ADT on impaired cognitive performance and explored potential demographic and genetic predictors of impaired performance. Patients and Methods Patients with prostate cancer were assessed before or within 21 days of starting ADT (n = 58) and 6 and 12 months later. Age- and education-matched patients with prostate cancer treated with prostatectomy only (n = 84) and men without prostate cancer (n = 88) were assessed at similar intervals. Participants provided baseline blood samples for genotyping. Mean-level cognitive performance was compared using mixed models; cognitive impairment was compared using generalized estimating equations. Results ADT recipients demonstrated higher rates of impaired cognitive performance over time relative to all controls (P = .01). Groups did not differ at baseline (P > .05); however, ADT recipients were more likely to demonstrate impaired performance within 6 and 12 months (P for both comparisons < .05). Baseline age, cognitive reserve, depressive symptoms, fatigue, and hot flash interference did not moderate the impact of ADT on impaired cognitive performance (P for all comparisons ≥ .09). In exploratory genetic analyses, GNB3 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1047776 was associated with increased rates of impaired performance over time in the ADT group (P < .001). Conclusion Men treated with ADT were more likely to demonstrate impaired cognitive performance within 6 months after starting ADT relative to matched controls and to continue to do so within 12 months after starting ADT. If confirmed, findings may have implications for patient education regarding the risks and benefits of ADT. PMID:25964245

  2. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  3. Improving functional value of meat products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangang; Xiao, Shan; Samaraweera, Himali; Lee, Eun Joo; Ahn, Dong U

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to develop meat and meat products with physiological functions to promote health conditions and prevent the risk of diseases. This review focuses on strategies to improve the functional value of meat and meat products. Value improvement can be realized by adding functional compounds including conjugated linoneleic acid, vitamin E, n3 fatty acids and selenium in animal diets to improve animal production, carcass composition and fresh meat quality. In addition, functional ingredients such as vegetable proteins, dietary fibers, herbs and spices, and lactic acid bacteria can be directly incorporated into meat products during processing to improve their functional value for consumers. Functional compounds, especially peptides, can also be generated from meat and meat products during processing such as fermentation, curing and aging, and enzymatic hydrolysis. This review further discusses the current status, consumer acceptance, and market for functional foods from the global viewpoints. Future prospects for functional meat and meat products are also discussed.

  4. SPECIES DIFFERENCES IN ANDROGEN AND ESTROGEN RECEPTOR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION AMONG VERTEBRATES AND INVERTEBRATES FOR INTERSPECIES EXTRAPOLATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone minics or antagonists, including the EDSTAC Tier 1 Screening (TIS) Battery, typically use only mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). However, there is uncertainty concerning species differences in binding affin...

  5. Androgen levels and female social dominance in Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    von Engelhardt, N; Kappeler, P M; Heistermann, M

    2000-08-01

    Morphological and behavioural traits which improve agonistic power are subject to intrasexual selection and, at the proximate level, are influenced by circulating androgens. Because intrasexual selection in mammals is more intense among males, they typically dominate females. Female social dominance is therefore unexpected and, indeed, rare. Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are sexually monomorphic primates in which all adult females dominate all males. The goal of our study was to test the prediction that female dominance in this species is associated with high androgen levels. Using two captive groups, we collected data on agonistic behaviour and non-invasively assessed their androgen concentrations in faeces and saliva by enzyme immunoassay. We found that adult female L. catta do not have higher androgen levels than males. However, during the mating season there was a twofold increase in both the androgen levels and conflict rates among females. This seasonal increase in their androgen levels was probably not due to a general increase in ovarian hormone production because those females showing the strongest signs of follicular development tended to have low androgen concentrations. At the individual level neither the individual aggression rates nor the proportion of same-sexed individuals dominated were correlated with their androgen levels. We conclude that female dominance in ring-tailed lemurs is neither based on physical superiority nor on high androgen levels and that it is equally important to study male subordination and prenatal brain priming effects for a complete understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:11007329

  6. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF PUBERTY IN THE MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with...

  7. Androgen receptor cofactors in prostate cancer: potential therapeutic targets of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Naito, Seiji

    2011-09-01

    Androgens, acting through the androgen receptor (AR), are responsible for many male reproductive and nonreproductive functions. Moreover, aberrant androgen/AR signaling plays a critical role in androgen-dependent prostate cancer (PCa) as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The formation of a productive AR transcriptional complex requires AR cofactors that interact functionally and structurally with the AR. Since the discovery of the first such cofactor in 1995, an ever increasing number of proteins have been identified as AR coactivators or corepressors. The expression and function of several AR cofactors have been investigated in PCa, and a clear link between AR cofactors and the development and progression of PCa has been identified. Recently, AR splice variants in CRPC were reported, which display significant constitutive activity in the absence of ligand. Then, this discovery revolutionized the concept of AR cofactors in CRPC. The current review aims to provide an overview of AR cofactor proteins in the context of PCa. In addition, we discuss the potential of AR cofactors as novel therapeutic targets for PCa, particularly for CRPC.

  8. What do urologists think patients need to know when starting on androgen deprivation therapy? The perspective from Canada versus countries with lower gross domestic product

    PubMed Central

    Rot, Irena; Wassersug, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) side effects are numerous and negatively impact prostate cancer patients’ quality of life. There is considerable discrepancy though among Canadian urologists regarding what ADT side effects and side effect management strategies. Little is known about global differences in ADT patient education. Methods International respondents were recruited via online posting and at an international urology conference. Hypotheses suggest that economic and cultural differences influence patient education practices; therefore, international respondents were divided into 3 categories (high, medium, and low gross domestic product). Results No differences were found between responses from Canadian urologists and high GDP countries. Compared to responses from low GDP countries, Canadian urologists are more likely to endorse informing patients about: osteoporosis, loss of muscle mass, weight gain, fatigue/sleep disturbance, relationship changes, cognitive changes, and loss of body hair. Infertility was the only side effect more often disclosed by urologists in low GDP counties. Recommended management strategies for hot flashes are more likely to be pharmaceutical in Canada, and behavioral in low GDP countries. Management strategies for gynecomastia are emphasized more in low GDP countries. Physical exercise is endorsed consistently more often by Canadian urologists. Conclusions ADT educational practices vary greatly between Canada and lower GDP countries. Factors that could contribute to differences include economics (e.g., ADT drug costs), differences in side effect presentation due to different ADT drugs used, racial differences in perceived side effect burden, disease status at ADT commencement, and cultural differences in patient-physician shared-decision making. PMID:27141453

  9. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to

  10. Spongian diterpenoids inhibit androgen receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu Chi; Meimetis, Labros G; Tien, Amy H; Mawji, Nasrin R; Carr, Gavin; Wang, Jun; Andersen, Raymond J; Sadar, Marianne D

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer. Antiandrogens compete with physiological ligands for AR ligand-binding domain (LBD). High-throughput screening of a marine natural product library for small molecules that inhibit AR transcriptional activity yielded the furanoditerpenoid spongia-13(16),-14-dien-19-oic acid, designated terpene 1 (T1). Characterization of T1 and the structurally related semi-synthetic analogues (T2 and T3) revealed that these diterpenoids have antiandrogen properties that include inhibition of both androgen-dependent proliferation and AR transcriptional activity by a mechanism that involved competing with androgen for AR LBD and blocking essential N/C interactions required for androgen-induced AR transcriptional activity. Structure activity relationship analyses revealed some chemical features of T1 that are associated with activity and yielded T3 as the most potent analogue. In vivo, T3 significantly reduced the weight of seminal vesicles, which are an androgen-dependent tissue, thereby confirming T3’s on-target activity. The ability to create analogues of diterpenoids that have varying antiandrogen activity represents a novel class of chemical compounds for the analysis of AR ligand-binding properties and therapeutic development. PMID:23443807

  11. Androgen receptors and experimental bone loss - an in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Coimbra, Leila Santana; Rossa, Carlos; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone is a sex hormone that exhibits many functions beyond reproduction; one such function is the regulation of bone metabolism. The role played by androgen receptors during testosterone-mediated biological processes associated with bone metabolism is largely unknown. This study aims to use a periodontal disease model in vivo in order to assess the involvement of androgen receptors on microbial-induced inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in experimental bone loss. The impact of hormone deprivation was tested through both orchiectomy and chemical blockage of androgen receptor using flutamide (FLU). Additionally, the direct effect of exogenous testosterone, and the role of the androgen receptor, on osteoclastogenesis were investigated. Thirty male adult rats (n=10/group) were subjected to: 1-orchiectomy (OCX); 2-OCX sham surgery; or 3-OCX sham surgery plus FLU, four weeks before the induction of experimental bone loss. Ten OCX sham-operated rats were not subjected to experimental bone loss and served as healthy controls. The rats were euthanized two weeks later, so as to assess bone resorption and the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gingival tissue and serum. In order to study the in vitro impact of testosterone, osteoclasts were differentiated from RAW264.7 cells and testosterone was added at increasing concentrations. Both OCX and FLU increased bone resorption, but OCX alone was observed to increase osteoclast count. IL-1β production was increased only in the gingival tissue of OCX animals, whereas FLU-treated animals presented a decreased expression of IL-6. Testosterone reduced the osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly impacted the production of TNF-α; FLU partially reversed these actions. When taken together, our results indicate that testosterone modulates experimental bone loss, and that this action is mediated, at least in part, via the androgen receptor.

  12. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  13. Constitutively-active androgen receptor variants function independently of the HSP90 chaperone but do not confer resistance to HSP90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Joanna L; Selth, Luke A; Centenera, Margaret M; Townley, Scott L; Sun, Shihua; Plymate, Stephen R; Tilley, Wayne D; Butler, Lisa M

    2013-05-01

    The development of lethal, castration resistant prostate cancer is associated with adaptive changes to the androgen receptor (AR), including the emergence of mutant receptors and truncated, constitutively active AR variants. AR relies on the molecular chaperone HSP90 for its function in both normal and malignant prostate cells, but the requirement for HSP90 in environments with aberrant AR expression is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the efficacy of three HSP90 inhibitors, 17-AAG, HSP990 and AUY922, against clinically-relevant AR missense mutants and truncated variants. HSP90 inhibition effectively suppressed the signaling of wild-type AR and all AR missense mutants tested. By contrast, two truncated AR variants, AR-V7 and ARv567es, exhibited marked resistance to HSP90 inhibitors. Supporting this observation, nuclear localization of the truncated AR variants was not affected by HSP90 inhibition and AR variant:HSP90 complexes could not be detected in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, HSP90 inhibition resulted in accumulation of AR-V7 and ARv567es in both cell lines and human tumor explants. Despite the apparent independence of AR variants from HSP90 and their treatment-associated induction, the growth of cell lines with endogenous or enforced expression of AR-V7 or ARv567es remained highly sensitive to AUY922. This study demonstrates that functional AR variant signaling does not confer resistance to HSP90 inhibition, yields insight into the interaction between AR and HSP90 and provides further impetus for the clinical application of HSP90 inhibitors in advanced prostate cancer.

  14. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-08-27

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa.

  15. Development of selective androgen receptor modulators and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Rodan, Gideon A; Schmidt, Azi

    2002-01-01

    Androgens control a broad range of physiological functions. The androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor that mediates the diverse biological actions of androgens, is a ligand inducible transcription factor. Abnormalities in the androgen signaling system result in many disturbances ranging from changes in gender determination and sexual development to psychiatric and emotional disorders. Androgen replacement therapy can improve many clinical conditions including hypogonadism and osteoporosis, but is limited by the lack of efficacious and safe therapeutic agents with easy delivery options. Recent progress in the area of gene regulation by steroid receptors and by selective receptor modulators provides an opportunity to examine if selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) could address some of the problems associated with current androgen therapy. Since the composition of the transcriptional initiation complex recruited by liganded AR determines the specificity of gene regulation, synthetic ligands aimed at initiating transcription of tissue and promoter specific genes offers hope for developing better androgen therapy. Establishment of assays that predict synthetic ligand activity is critical for SARM development. Advancement in high throughput compound screening and gene fingerprinting technologies, such as microarrays and proteomics, will facilitate and accelerate identification of effective SARMs.

  16. Androgens and the aging male.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to women, men do not experience a sudden cessation of gonadal function comparable to menopause. However, there is a progressive reduction in male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function: testosterone levels decline through both central (pituitary) and peripheral (testicular) mechanisms, and there is a loss of the circadian rhythm of testosterone secretion. The progressive decline in testosterone levels has been demonstrated in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, and overall at least 25% of men over age 70 meet laboratory criteria for hypogonadism (ie, testosterone deficiency). Such age-associated HPG hypofunctioning, which has been termed "andropause," is thought to be responsible for a variety of symptoms experienced by elderly men, including weakness, fatigue, reduced muscle and bone mass, impaired hematopoiesis, sexual dysfunction (including erectile dysfunction and loss of libido), and depression. Although, it has been difficult to establish correlations between these symptoms and plasma testosterone levels, there is some evidence that testosterone replacement leads to symptom relief, particularly with respect to muscle strength, bone mineral density, and erectile dysfunction. There is little evidence of a link between the HPG axis hypofunctioning and depressive illness, and exogenous androgens have not been consistently shown to have antidepressant activity. This article reviews the relationship between androgens, depression, and sexual function in aging men.

  17. A functionally significant cross-talk between androgen receptor and ErbB2 pathways in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Ali; Hughes-Davies, Luke

    2008-06-01

    Recent studies have identified novel subgroups in ER-negative breast cancer based on the expression pattern of androgen receptor (AR). One subtype (molecular apocrine) has an over-expression of steroid-response genes and ErbB2. Using breast cancer cell lines with molecular apocrine features, we demonstrate a functional cross-talk between AR and ErbB2 pathways. We show that stimulation of AR and ErbB2 pathways leads to the cross-regulation of gene expression for AR, ErbB2, FOXA1, XBP1, TFF3, and KLK3. As opposed to the physiologic transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) observed with the testosterone treatment, we demonstrate that the addition of ErbB2 inhibition leads to a persistent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which negatively regulates the downstream signaling and cell growth. This suggests a mechanism for the cross-talk involving the ERK pathway. Moreover, testosterone stimulates the proliferation of molecular apocrine breast cell lines, and this effect can be reversed using antiandrogen flutamide and anti-ErbB2 AG825. Conversely, the growth stimulatory effect of heregulin can also be inhibited with flutamide, suggesting a cross-talk between the AR and ErbB2 pathways affecting cell proliferation. Importantly, there is a synergy with the combined use of flutamide and AG825 on cell proliferation and apoptosis, which indicates a therapeutic advantage in the combined blockage of AR and ErbB2 pathways.

  18. Sintokamide A Is a Novel Antagonist of Androgen Receptor That Uniquely Binds Activation Function-1 in Its Amino-terminal Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Banuelos, Carmen A.; Tavakoli, Iran; Tien, Amy H.; Caley, Daniel P.; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Jun; Yang, Yu Chi; Imamura, Yusuke; Yan, Luping; Wen, Jian Guo; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a validated drug target for all stages of prostate cancer including metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). All current hormone therapies for CRPC target the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of AR and ultimately all fail with resumed AR transcriptional activity. Within the AR N-terminal domain (NTD) is activation function-1 (AF-1) that is essential for AR transcriptional activity. Inhibitors of AR AF-1 would potentially block most AR mechanisms of resistance including constitutively active AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain. Here we provide evidence that sintokamide A (SINT1) binds AR AF-1 region to specifically inhibit transactivation of AR NTD. Consistent with SINT1 targeting AR AF-1, it attenuated transcriptional activities of both full-length AR and constitutively active AR splice variants, which correlated with inhibition of growth of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells expressing AR splice variants. In vivo, SINT1 caused regression of CRPC xenografts and reduced expression of prostate-specific antigen, a gene transcriptionally regulated by AR. Inhibition of AR activity by SINT1 was additive to EPI-002, a known AR AF-1 inhibitor that is in clinical trials (NCT02606123). This implies that SINT1 binds to a site on AF-1 that is unique from EPI. Consistent with this suggestion, these two compounds showed differences in blocking AR interaction with STAT3. This work provides evidence that the intrinsically disordered NTD of AR is druggable and that SINT1 analogs may provide a novel scaffold for drug development for the treatment of prostate cancer or other diseases of the AR axis. PMID:27576691

  19. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  20. Role of the Androgen-Androgen Receptor Axis in the Treatment Resistance of Advanced Prostate Cancer: From Androgen-Dependent to Castration Resistant and Further.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Naohiro

    2016-06-01

    After the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, prostate cancer diagnosis has shifted to early and curative stages, although 10-20% of patients still present with metastatic and incurable cancer. Prostate cancer is androgen-dependent, and most patients with prostate cancer initially respond to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). After 1-2 years of the treatment, advanced prostate cancer eventually progresses to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). A variety of mechanisms of progression from androgen-dependent prostate cancer to CRPC under ADT have been postulated, and the key pathway is re-activation of the androgen-androgen receptor (AR) axis, for example, caused by AR mutation/overexpression/splice variants, altered expression of AR cofactors, and increased production of androgens. Recently approved new agents, such as the hormonal agents abiraterone and enzalutamide and the chemotherapeutic agent cabazitaxel, have demonstrated survival benefit in men with CRPC. However, the prolongation of survival times provided with these agents is limited because of the treatment resistance. Androgen-AR axis still plays a pivotal role in the resistance to the new agents for CRPC. To improve the prognosis of patients with CRPC, intensive research to identify effective agents, treatment strategies, and useful predictive biomarkers to select the patients who can benefit from such treatments are required. Additional clinical data, with a better understanding of the biology of CRPC, may provide better CRPC treatment outcomes. This article reviews the underlying mechanisms of treatment resistance and future direction of CRPC treatments.

  1. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss

  2. EFFECT OF THE ANTI-ANDROGENIC ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR VINCLOZOLIN ON EMBRYONIC TESTIS CORD FORMATION AND POSTNATAL TESTIS DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION. (R827405)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vinclozolin is a systemic dicarboximide fungicide that is used on fruits, vegetables, ornamental plants, and turf grass. Vinclozolin and its metabolites are known to be endocrine disruptors and act as androgen receptor antagonists. The hypothesis tested in the current study is...

  3. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  4. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  5. Water Production Functions For High Plains Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing demands on limited water supplies will require maximizing crop production per unit water. Field studies are being carried out near Greeley, Colorado to develop water production functions for crops grown in the Great Plains. These yield per unit water relationships can be used to determi...

  6. Expression of androgen and progesterone receptors in primary human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M; Galanopoulos, T; Neville-Golden, J; Antoniades, H N

    1993-03-01

    Meningiomas are common brain tumors that show a predilection for females and become more aggressive during pregnancy and menses. The existence of gender-specific hormone receptors in meningiomas has long been a matter of controversy; the recent cloning of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors has facilitated their direct evaluation. The authors have demonstrated the expression of androgen and progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein product in nine primary human meningiomas by Northern blot analysis. Cellular localization was achieved by in situ hybridization analysis. Estrogen receptor expression was not detected. Normal adult meninges were shown to express very low levels of both androgen and progesterone receptors.

  7. Production of recombinant insulin-like androgenic gland hormones from three decapod species: In vitro testicular phosphorylation and activation of a newly identified tyrosine kinase receptor from the Eastern spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Chandler, Jennifer C; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Sagi, Amir; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) is responsible for male sexual differentiation. To date, the biochemical pathways through which IAG exerts its effects are poorly understood and could be elucidated through the production of a functional recombinant IAG (rIAG). We have successfully expressed glycosylated, biologically active IAG using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. We co-expressed recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of the B and A chains (the mature hormone) tethered by a flexible linker, producing rIAGs of the following commercially important species: Eastern spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi (Sv), redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq) and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). We then tested the biological activity of each, through the ability to increase phosphorylation in the testis; both Sv and Cq rIAGs significantly elevated phosphorylation specific to their species, and in a dose-dependent manner. Mr rIAG was tested on Macrobrachium australiense (Ma), eliciting a similar response. Moreover, using bioinformatics analyses of the de novo assembled spiny lobster transcriptome, we identified a spiny lobster tyrosine kinase insulin receptor (Sv-TKIR). We validated this discovery with a receptor activation assay in COS-7 cells expressing Sv-TKIR, using a reporter SRE-LUC system designed for RTKs, with each of the rIAG proteins acting as the activation ligand. Using recombinant proteins, we aim to develop specific tools to control sexual development through the administration of IAG within the critical sexual differentiation time window. The biologically active rIAGs generated might facilitate commercially feasible solutions for the long sought techniques for sex-change induction and monosex population culture in crustaceans and shed new light on the physiological mode of action of IAG in crustaceans.

  8. Production of recombinant insulin-like androgenic gland hormones from three decapod species: In vitro testicular phosphorylation and activation of a newly identified tyrosine kinase receptor from the Eastern spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Chandler, Jennifer C; Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Sagi, Amir; Battaglene, Stephen C; Elizur, Abigail; Ventura, Tomer

    2016-04-01

    In crustaceans the insulin-like androgenic gland hormone (IAG) is responsible for male sexual differentiation. To date, the biochemical pathways through which IAG exerts its effects are poorly understood and could be elucidated through the production of a functional recombinant IAG (rIAG). We have successfully expressed glycosylated, biologically active IAG using the Pichia pastoris yeast expression system. We co-expressed recombinant single-chain precursor molecules consisting of the B and A chains (the mature hormone) tethered by a flexible linker, producing rIAGs of the following commercially important species: Eastern spiny lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi (Sv), redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (Cq) and giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). We then tested the biological activity of each, through the ability to increase phosphorylation in the testis; both Sv and Cq rIAGs significantly elevated phosphorylation specific to their species, and in a dose-dependent manner. Mr rIAG was tested on Macrobrachium australiense (Ma), eliciting a similar response. Moreover, using bioinformatics analyses of the de novo assembled spiny lobster transcriptome, we identified a spiny lobster tyrosine kinase insulin receptor (Sv-TKIR). We validated this discovery with a receptor activation assay in COS-7 cells expressing Sv-TKIR, using a reporter SRE-LUC system designed for RTKs, with each of the rIAG proteins acting as the activation ligand. Using recombinant proteins, we aim to develop specific tools to control sexual development through the administration of IAG within the critical sexual differentiation time window. The biologically active rIAGs generated might facilitate commercially feasible solutions for the long sought techniques for sex-change induction and monosex population culture in crustaceans and shed new light on the physiological mode of action of IAG in crustaceans. PMID:26883686

  9. Mechanism of androgen action in cultured dermal papilla cells derived from human hair follicles with varying responses to androgens in vivo.

    PubMed

    Randall, V A; Thornton, M J; Hamada, K; Messenger, A G

    1992-06-01

    Androgens are major regulators of human hair growth, but their effects vary: many follicles are stimulated by androgens, e.g., beard; some remain unaffected, e.g., eyelashes; whereas scalp follicles undergo regression and balding in genetically disposed individuals. Because the dermal papilla controls many aspects of the hair follicle, androgens may act via the dermal papilla, affecting the other follicular components indirectly. In this hypothesis androgens would alter dermal papilla cell production of regulatory substances, e.g., growth factors and/or extracellular matrix components. To test this theory the mechanism of androgen action has been compared in primary lines of dermal papilla cells cultured from androgen-dependent follicles and relatively androgen-independent non-balding scalp. Androgen receptor levels were assayed by saturation analysis (9-10 points; 0.05-10 nmol/l) using the synthetic androgen [3H]-mibolerone and specificity was confirmed by competition studies. Androgen metabolism was investigated both intracellularly and in the media after a 2-h incubation with 5 nM [3H]-testosterone. Carrier and [14C] steroids were added to the extracts before separation by thin-layer chromatography; steroid identity was confirmed by recrystallization. Dermal papilla cells from androgen-dependent follicles contained higher levels of specific, high-affinity, low-capacity androgen receptors than non-balding scalp cells. Testosterone metabolism also varied with beard, public and scalp cells containing testosterone and androstenedione intracellularly, but only beard cells producing 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, in line with the scanty beard growth found in 5 alpha-reductase deficiency. Elsewhere we have shown that cultured dermal papilla cells produce extracellular matrix components and mitogenic factors. These results all concur with our original hypothesis and suggest that further studies of such cells may elucidate the paradoxical effects of androgens on human hair

  10. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Chinese families with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SONG; XU, HAIKUN; AN, WEI; ZHU, DECHUN; LI, DEJUN

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for normal male sex differentiation and are responsible for the normal development of male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. The physiological effects of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). Mutations in the AR gene are the most common cause of androgen insensitivity syndrome. The present study undertook a genetic analysis of the AR gene in two unrelated families affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) in China. In family 1, a previously reported nonsense mutation (G-to-A; p.W751X) was identified in exon 5 of the AR gene. In addition, a novel missense mutation was detected in exon 6 of the AR gene from family 2; this mutation resulted in a predicted amino acid change from phenylalanine to serine at codon 804 (T-to-C; p.F804S) in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of AR. Computer simulation of the structural changes generated by the p.F804S substitution revealed marked conformational alterations in the hydrophobic core responsible for the stability and function of the AR-LBD. In conclusion, the present study identified two mutations from two unrelated Chinese families affected by CAIS. The novel mutation (p.F804S) may provide insights into the molecular mechanism underlying CAIS. Furthermore, it expands on the number of mutational hot spots in the international AR mutation database, which may be useful in the future for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:27284311

  11. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  12. Androgens and dry eye in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D A; Wickham, L A; Rocha, E M; Krenzer, K L; Sullivan, B D; Steagall, R; Cermak, J M; Dana, M R; Ullman, M D; Sato, E H; Gao, J; Rocha, F J; Ono, M; Silveira, L A; Lambert, R W; Kelleher, R S; Tolls, D B; Toda, I

    1999-06-22

    Sjögren's syndrome is an extremely complex and currently incurable autoimmune disorder, which occurs primarily in females, and is associated with lacrimal gland inflammation, meibomian gland dysfunction, and severe dry eye. We hypothesize that androgen deficiency, which reportedly occurs in primary and secondary Sjögren's syndrome (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis), is a critical etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of dry eye syndromes. We further hypothesize that androgen treatment to the ocular surface will promote both lacrimal and meibomian gland function and alleviate both "aqueous-deficient" and "evaporative" dry eye. Our results demonstrate that androgens regulate both lacrimal and meibomian gland function, and suggest that topical androgen administration may serve as a safe and effective therapy for the treatment of dry eye in Sjögren's syndrome.

  13. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome is associated with increases in androgen levels. In men reductions in androgen levels is associated with inflammation. Androgen supplements reduce inflammation in men. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. In this review the possibility that androgens may have different effects on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae in males and females will be discussed. PMID:21274756

  15. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    represent a fine tuning mechanism for tissue-specific androgen activation preparing for the major changes in androgen production during puberty. PMID:27003302

  16. Androgenic influence on serotonergic activation of the HPA stress axis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nirupa; Plyler, Kimberly S; Daniels, Derek; Bale, Tracy L

    2011-05-01

    The higher incidence of stress-mediated affective disorders in women may be a function of gonadal hormone influence on complex interactions between serotonin and neural circuits that mediate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) receives serotonergic innervation, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as citalopram activate the HPA axis independent of stress. We have previously demonstrated that the magnitude of this serotonergic activation was greater in females and was attenuated by testosterone administration; however, the potential central sites of action where androgens reduce these serotonergic effects have not been determined. Therefore, we examined a time course of corticosterone production and used central c-Fos protein levels to assay neuronal activation in stress-related brain regions in female, male, and gonadectomized male mice after an acute citalopram injection (15 mg/kg). In the hippocampus, c-Fos-immunoreactivity was greater in males than in females or gonadectomized males. This same pattern emerged in the lateral septum after vehicle and gonadectomy reversed the effect of citalopram. These regions are important for inhibitory influences on the PVN, and accordingly, hippocampal c-Fos levels were negatively correlated with corticosterone production. No sex differences in c-Fos were detected in the PVN, cingulate cortex, or paraventricular thalamus in response to vehicle or citalopram. These data support brain region-specific regulation of the HPA axis where sex differences may be mediated partly through androgen enhancement of signaling in inhibitory regions.

  17. Regulation of androgen action during establishment of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Douglas A; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-07-01

    During the establishment of pregnancy, the ovarian-derived hormones progesterone and oestradiol regulate remodelling of the endometrium to promote an environment that is able to support and maintain a successful pregnancy. Decidualisation is characterised by differentiation of endometrial stromal cells that secrete growth factors and cytokines that regulate vascular remodelling and immune cell influx. This differentiation process is critical for reproduction, and inadequate decidualisation is implicated in the aetiology of pregnancy disorders such as foetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. In contrast to progesterone and oestradiol, the role of androgens in regulating endometrial function is poorly understood. Androgen receptors are expressed in the endometrium, and androgens are reported to regulate both the transcriptome and the secretome of endometrial stromal cells. In androgen-target tissues, circulating precursors are activated to mediate local effects, and recent studies report that steroid concentrations detected in endometrial tissue are distinct to those detected in the peripheral circulation. New evidence suggests that decidualisation results in dynamic changes in the expression of androgen biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting a role for pre-receptor regulation of androgen action during the establishment of pregnancy. These results suggest that such enzymes could be future therapeutic targets for the treatment of infertility associated with endometrial dysfunction. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that androgens play a beneficial role in regulating the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Future studies should be focussed on investigating the safety and efficacy of androgen supplementation with the potential for utilisation of novel therapeutics, such as selective androgen receptor modulators, to improve reproductive outcomes in women.

  18. PAPSS2 Deficiency Causes Androgen Excess via Impaired DHEA Sulfation—In Vitro and in Vivo Studies in a Family Harboring Two Novel PAPSS2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oostdijk, Wilma; Idkowiak, Jan; Mueller, Jonathan W.; House, Philip J.; Taylor, Angela E.; O'Reilly, Michael W.; Hughes, Beverly A.; de Vries, Martine C.; Kant, Sarina G.; Santen, Gijs W. E.; Verkerk, Annemieke J. M. H.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wit, Jan M.; Losekoot, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Context: PAPSS2 (PAPS synthase 2) provides the universal sulfate donor PAPS (3′-phospho-adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate) to all human sulfotransferases, including SULT2A1, responsible for sulfation of the crucial androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Impaired DHEA sulfation is thought to increase the conversion of DHEA toward active androgens, a proposition supported by the previous report of a girl with inactivating PAPSS2 mutations who presented with low serum DHEA sulfate and androgen excess, clinically manifesting with premature pubarche and early-onset polycystic ovary syndrome. Patients and Methods: We investigated a family harboring two novel PAPSS2 mutations, including two compound heterozygous brothers presenting with disproportionate short stature, low serum DHEA sulfate, but normal serum androgens. Patients and parents underwent a DHEA challenge test comprising frequent blood sampling and urine collection before and after 100 mg DHEA orally, with subsequent analysis of DHEA sulfation and androgen metabolism by mass spectrometry. The functional impact of the mutations was investigated in silico and in vitro. Results: We identified a novel PAPSS2 frameshift mutation, c.1371del, p.W462Cfs*3, resulting in complete disruption, and a novel missense mutation, c.809G>A, p.G270D, causing partial disruption of DHEA sulfation. Both patients and their mother, who was heterozygous for p.W462Cfs*3, showed increased 5α-reductase activity at baseline and significantly increased production of active androgens after DHEA intake. The mother had a history of oligomenorrhea and chronic anovulation that required clomiphene for ovulation induction. Conclusions: We provide direct in vivo evidence for the significant functional impact of mutant PAPSS2 on DHEA sulfation and androgen activation. Heterozygosity for PAPSS2 mutations can be associated with a phenotype resembling polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:25594860

  19. Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD).

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard S; Elliott, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    Opioid therapy is one of the most effective forms of analgesia currently in use. In the past few decades, the use of opioids as a long-term treatment for chronic pain has increased dramatically. Accompanying this upsurge in the use of long-term opioid therapy has been an increase in the occurrence of opioid associated endocrinopathy, most commonly manifested as an androgen deficiency and therefore referred to as opioid associated androgen deficiency (OPIAD). This syndrome is characterized by the presence of inappropriately low levels of gonadotropins (follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone) leading to inadequate production of sex hormones, particularly testosterone. Symptoms that may manifest in patients with OPIAD include reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, hot flashes, and depression. Physical findings may include reduced facial and body hair, anemia, decreased muscle mass, weight gain, and osteopenia or osteoporosis. Additionally, both men and women with OPIAD may suffer from infertility. While the literature regarding OPIAD remains limited, it is apparent that OPIAD is becoming increasingly prevalent among chronic opioid consumers but often goes unrecognized. OPIAD can have a significant negative impact on the the quality of life of opioid users, and clinicians should anticipate the potential for its occurrence whenever long-term opioid prescribing is undertaken. Once diagnosed, treatment for OPIAD may be offered utilizing a number of androgen replacement therapy options including a variety of testosterone preparations and, for female patients with OPIAD, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplementation. Follow-up evaluation of patients receiving androgen replacement therapy should include a review of any unresolved symptoms of hypogonadism, laboratory evaluation, and surveillance for potential adverse effects of androgen replacement therapy including prostate disease in males.: PMID:22786453

  20. Sensitization of androgen refractory prostate cancer cells to anti-androgens through re-expression of epigenetically repressed androgen receptor - Synergistic action of quercetin and curcumin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Lokesh; Mohanty, Sujit K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-08-15

    Epigenetic repression of Androgen Receptor (AR) gene by hypermethylation of its promoter causes resistance in prostate cancer (CaP) to androgen deprivation therapy with anti-androgens. Some dietary phytocompounds like quercetin (Q) and curcumin (C) with reported DNMT-inhibitory activity were tested for their ability to re-express the AR in AR-negative CaP cell lines PC3 and DU145. Combined treatment with Q+C was much more effective than either Q or C in inhibiting DNMT, causing global hypomethylation, restoring AR mRNA and protein levels and causing apoptosis via mitochondrial depolarization of PC3 and DU145. The functional AR protein expressed in Q+C treated cells sensitized them to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced proliferation, bicalutamide-induced apoptosis, bound to androgen response element to increase luciferase activity in gene reporter assay and was susceptible to downregulation by AR siRNA. Bisulfite sequencing revealed high methylation of AR promoter CpG sites in AR-negative DU145 and PC3 cell lines that was significantly demethylated by Q+C treatment, which restored AR expression. Notable synergistic effects of Q+C combination in re-sensitizing androgen refractory CaP cells to AR-mediated apoptosis, their known safety in clinical use, and epidemiological evidences relating their dietary consumption with lower cancer incidences indicate their potential for use in chemoprevention of androgen resistance in prostate cancer. PMID:27132804

  1. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) is regulated by androgens and enhances androgen-dependent prostate development.

    PubMed

    Keil, Kimberly P; Mehta, Vatsal; Branam, Amanda M; Abler, Lisa L; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Joshi, Pinak S; Schmitz, Christopher T; Marker, Paul C; Vezina, Chad M

    2012-12-01

    Fetal prostate development from urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium requires androgen receptor (AR) activation in UGS mesenchyme (UGM). Despite growing awareness of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the UGS, we are still limited in our knowledge of androgen-responsive genes in UGM that initiate prostate ductal development. We found that WNT inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) mRNA is more abundant in male vs. female mouse UGM in which its expression temporally and spatially overlaps androgen-responsive steroid 5α-reductase 2 (Srd5a2). Wif1 mRNA is also present in prostatic buds during their elongation and branching morphogenesis. Androgens are necessary and sufficient for Wif1 expression in mouse UGS explant mesenchyme, and testicular androgens remain necessary for normal Wif1 expression in adult mouse prostate stroma. WIF1 contributes functionally to prostatic bud formation. In the presence of androgens, exogenous WIF1 protein increases prostatic bud number and UGS basal epithelial cell proliferation without noticeably altering the pattern of WNT/β-catenin-responsive Axin2 or lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1) mRNA. Wif1 mutant male UGSs exhibit increased (Sfrp)2 and (Sfrp)3 expression and form the same number of prostatic buds as the wild-type control males. Collectively our results reveal Wif1 as one of the few known androgen-responsive genes in the fetal mouse UGM and support the hypothesis that androgen-dependent Wif1 expression is linked to the mechanism of androgen-induced prostatic bud formation.

  2. Androgens inhibit aromatase expression through DAX-1: insights into the molecular link between hormone balance and Leydig cancer development.

    PubMed

    Maris, Pamela; Campana, Antonella; Barone, Ines; Giordano, Cinzia; Morelli, Catia; Malivindi, Rocco; Sisci, Diego; Aquila, Saveria; Rago, Vittoria; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Catalano, Stefania; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) of the testis are steroid-secreting tumors associated with various steroid biosynthetic abnormalities and endocrine dysfunctions. Despite their overall rarity, LCTs are still of substantial interest owing to the paucity of information regarding their exact nature and malignant potential. In the present study, we disclose the ability of androgens to inhibit Leydig tumor cell proliferation by opposing to self-sufficient in situ estrogen production. In rat Leydig tumor cells, R2C, androgen treatment significantly decreases the expression and the enzymatic activity of cytocrome P450 aromatase, responsible for the local conversion of androgens into estrogens. This inhibitory effect relies on androgen receptor (AR) activation and involves negative regulation of the CYP19 gene transcriptional activity through the nuclear orphan receptor DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1). Ligand-activated AR up-regulates the expression of DAX-1 and promotes its increased recruitment within the steroidogenic factor-1 site-containing region of the aromatase proximal promoter II in association with the nuclear receptor corepressor. The biological relevance in LCTs of the newly highlighted functional interplay between AR, DAX-1, and aromatase is underlined by our in vivo observations, revealing a marked down-regulation of AR and DAX-1 expression and a strong increase in aromatase levels in testes tissues from old Fischer rats with spontaneously developed Leydig cell neoplasia, compared with normal testes tissues from younger animals. In elucidating a mechanism by which androgens modulate the growth of Leydig tumor cells, our finding support the hypothesis that maintaining the adequate balance between androgen and estrogens may represent the key for blocking estrogen-secreting Leydigioma development, opening new prospects for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25603045

  3. Water Production Functions for High Plains Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water Production Functions for High Plains Crops Water consumptive use by a crop can be reduced through limited (deficit) irrigation. If the reduced consumptive use (CU) can be quantified, the saved water can be transferred to other users. If the value of the transferred water is greater than the fa...

  4. Vocal cues to male androgen levels in giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D; Keating, Jennifer L; Kersey, David; Rengui, Li; Huang, Yan; Swaisgood, Ronald R

    2011-02-23

    Little is known about the potential of non-human mammal vocalizations to signal information on the hormonal status of the caller. In the current study, we used endocrine data and acoustic analyses to determine whether male giant panda bleats provide reliable information about the caller's current androgen levels. Our results revealed significant relationships between acoustic features of male giant panda bleats and the caller's faecal androgen metabolite concentrations. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration that the acoustic structure of a non-human mammal call has the potential to yield information about the caller's current androgen levels. We go on to discuss the anatomical basis for our findings and the potential functional relevance of signalling information on male androgen levels in giant panda sexual communication. PMID:20810426

  5. Myocytic androgen receptor controls the strength but not the mass of limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Céline; Duteil, Delphine; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Messaddeq, Nadia; Malivindi, Rocco; Kato, Shigeaki; Chambon, Pierre; Metzger, Daniel

    2010-08-10

    The anabolic effects of androgens on skeletal muscles are thought to be mediated predominantly through the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the ligand-dependent nuclear receptor superfamily. However, despite numerous studies performed in men and in rodents, these effects remain poorly understood. To characterize androgen signaling in skeletal muscles, we generated mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in myofibers. We show that myocytic AR controls androgen-induced insulin-like growth factor IEa (IGF-IEa) expression in the highly androgen-sensitive perineal muscles and that it mediates androgen-stimulated postnatal hypertrophy of these muscles. In contrast, androgen-dependent postnatal hypertrophy of limb muscle fibers is independent of myocytic AR. Thus, androgens control perineal and limb muscle mass in male mice through myocytic AR-dependent and -independent pathways, respectively. Importantly, we also show that AR deficiency in limb myocytes impairs myofibrillar organization of sarcomeres and decreases muscle strength, thus demonstrating that myocytic AR controls key pathways required for maximum force production. These distinct androgen signaling pathways in perineal and limb muscles may allow the design of screens to identify selective androgen modulators of muscle strength.

  6. Anti-androgens act jointly in suppressing spiggin concentrations in androgen-primed female three-spined sticklebacks - prediction of combined effects by concentration addition.

    PubMed

    Pottinger, T G; Katsiadaki, I; Jolly, C; Sanders, M; Mayer, I; Scott, A P; Morris, S; Kortenkamp, A; Scholze, M

    2013-09-15

    Increasing attention is being directed at the role played by anti-androgenic chemicals in endocrine disruption of wildlife within the aquatic environment. The co-occurrence of multiple contaminants with anti-androgenic activity highlights a need for the predictive assessment of combined effects, but information about anti-androgen mixture effects on wildlife is lacking. This study evaluated the suitability of the androgenised female stickleback screen (AFSS), in which inhibition of androgen-induced spiggin production provides a quantitative assessment of anti-androgenic activity, for predicting the effect of a four component mixture of anti-androgens. The anti-androgenic activity of four known anti-androgens (vinclozolin, fenitrothion, flutamide, linuron) was evaluated from individual concentration-response data and used to design a mixture containing each chemical at equipotent concentrations. Across a 100-fold concentration range, a concentration addition approach was used to predict the response of fish to the mixture. Two studies were conducted independently at each of two laboratories. By using a novel method to adjust for differences between nominal and measured concentrations, good agreement was obtained between the actual outcome of the mixture exposure and the predicted outcome. This demonstrated for the first time that androgen receptor antagonists act in concert in an additive fashion in fish and that existing mixture methodology is effective in predicting the outcome, based on concentration-response data for individual chemicals. The sensitivity range of the AFSS assay lies within the range of anti-androgenicity reported in rivers across many locations internationally. The approach taken in our study lays the foundations for understanding how androgen receptor antagonists work together in fish and is essential in informing risk assessment methods for complex anti-androgenic mixtures in the aquatic environment.

  7. Accumulation of 5 alpha-reduced androgen glucosiduronates associated with impaired removal in young male hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Boudou, P; Naret, C; Fiet, J; Bonete, R; Tritto, G; Le Duc, A; Poignet, J L; Man, N K

    1995-12-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal function is commonly altered in dialysis patients. Even though an improvement in general status and well-being has been noted after recombinant human erythropoietin supplementation, no significant changes were observed in the sex hormone profile. Pituitary gonadal axis as well as 5 alpha-reduced androgen glucosiduronates (i.e. 5 alpha-androstane,3 alpha,17 beta-diol and androsterone) profiles were studied in 23 young male stable dialyzed patients and compared to an age-matched group of healthy subjects. 5 alpha-Reduced androgen glucosiduronates are products of peripheral testosterone (T) metabolism and seem to be a useful tool in assessment of the male androgen status. Their polarity facilitates their urinary excretion, and their clearance is similar to the glomerular filtration rate in healthy men. We observed 1) a pituitary-Leydig cell dysfunction supported by normal serum estradiol and T levels, low free T, and increased LH levels; 2) an alteration of the dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate-DHEA interconversion, reflected by a dramatic decrease in DHEA while DHEA sulfate levels remained in the normal range; 3) an accumulation of 5 alpha-reduced androgen glucosiduronates, whose removal was impaired as shown by their very low sieving coefficients (< 0.012). Taken together, the above observations are consistent with alteration of spermatogenesis with respect to dialysis duration in which earlier elevated baseline serum LH levels indicate a primary defect in Leydig cell function.

  8. The physiological and pharmacological basis for the ergogenic effects of androgens in elite sports.

    PubMed

    Choong, Karen; Lakshman, Kishore M; Bhasin, Shalender

    2008-05-01

    Androgen doping in power sports is undeniably rampant worldwide. There is strong evidence that androgen administration in men increases skeletal muscle mass, maximal voluntary strength and muscle power. However, we do not have good experimental evidence to support the presumption that androgen administration improves physical function or athletic performance. Androgens do not increase specific force or whole body endurance measures. The anabolic effects of testosterone on the skeletal muscle are mediated through androgen receptor signaling. Testosterone promotes myogenic differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells and inhibits their differentiation into the adipogenic lineage. Testosterone binding to androgen receptor induces a conformational change in androgen receptor protein, causing it to associate with beta-catenin and TCF-4 and activate downstream Wnt target genes thus promoting myogenic differentiation. The adverse effects of androgens among athletes and recreational bodybuilders are under reported and include acne, deleterious changes in the cardiovascular risk factors, including a marked decrease in plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol level, suppression of spermatogenesis resulting in infertility, increase in liver enzymes, hepatic neoplasms, mood and behavioral disturbances, and long term suppression of the endogenous hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Androgens are often used in combination with other drugs which may have serious adverse events of their own. In spite of effective methods for detecting androgen doping, the policies for screening of athletes are highly variable in different countries and organizations and even existing policies are not uniformly enforced.

  9. Androgen receptor roles in hepatocellular carcinoma, cirrhosis, and hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen-Lung; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Yeh, Shuyuan; Cai, Xiujun; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays important roles in normal liver function and in progression of liver diseases. In studies of non-cancerous liver diseases, AR knockout mouse models of liver disease have revealed that androgen/AR signaling suppresses the development of steatosis, virus-related hepatitis, and cirrhosis. In addition, studies have shown that targeting AR in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) improves their self-renewal and migration potentials, thereby increasing the efficacy of BM-MSC transplantation as a way to control the progression of cirrhosis. Androgen/AR signaling is known to be involved in the initiation of carcinogen- or Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, studies have demonstrated that AR, rather than androgen, plays the dominant role in cancer initiation. Therefore, targeting AR might be an appropriate therapy for patients with early-stage HCC. In contrast, androgen/AR signaling has been shown to suppress metastasis of HCC in patients with late-stage disease. In addition, there is evidence that therapy comprising Sorafenib and agents that enhance the functional expression of AR may suppress the progression of late-stage HCC. PMID:24424503

  10. Androgen Receptor (AR) Promotes Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Development via Modulating Inflammatory IL1α and TGFβ1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Luo, Jie; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Wang, Ronghao; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Eugene; Yan, Chen; Sparks, Janet; Lee, Soo Ok; Cho, Joshua; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Gender difference is a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurism formation yet the reason for male predominance remains unclear. Androgen and the androgen receptor influence the male gender difference, indicating that androgen receptor signaling may affect abdominal aortic aneurism development. Using angiotensin II induced abdominal aortic aneurism in apolipoprotein E null mouse models (82.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), we found that mice lacking androgen receptor failed to develop abdominal aortic aneurism and aorta had dramatically reduced macrophages infiltration and intact elastic fibers. These findings suggested that androgen receptor expression in endothelial cells, macrophages or smooth muscle cells might play a role in abdominal aortic aneurism development. Selective knockout of androgen receptor in each of these cell types further demonstrated that mice lacking androgen receptor in macrophages (20% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence) or smooth muscle cells (12.5% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence), but not in endothelial cells (71.4% abdominal aortic aneurism incidence) had suppressed abdominal aortic aneurism development. Mechanism dissection showed that androgen receptor functioned through modulation of interleukin 1α and transforming growth factor β1 signals and by targeting androgen receptor with androgen receptor degradation enhancer ASC-J9® led to significant suppression of abdominal aortic aneurism development. These results demonstrate the underlying mechanism by which androgen receptor influences abdominal aortic aneurism development through interleukin 1α and transforming growth factor β1, and provides a potential new therapy to suppress/prevent abdominal aortic aneurism by targeting androgen receptor with ASC-J9®. PMID:26324502

  11. Mass spectrometry of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-07-01

    Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are an emerging class of drugs for treatment of various diseases including osteoporosis and muscle wasting as well as the correction of age-related functional decline such as muscle strength and power. Several SARMs, which have advanced to preclinical and clinical trials, are composed of diverse chemical structures including arylpropionamide-, bicyclic hydantoin-, quinoline-, and tetrahydroquinoline-derived nuclei. Since January 2008, SARMs have been categorized as anabolic agents and prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Suitable detection methods for these low-molecular weight drugs were based on mass spectrometric approaches, which necessitated the elucidation of dissociation pathways in order to characterize and identify the target analytes in doping control samples as well as potential metabolic products and synthetic analogs. Fragmentation patterns of representatives of each category of SARMs after electrospray ionization (ESI) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) as well as electron ionization (EI) are summarized. The complexity and structural heterogeneity of these drugs is a daunting challenge for detection methods.

  12. Molecular evolution of the androgenic hormone in terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Cerveau, Nicolas; Bouchon, Didier; Bergès, Thierry; Grève, Pierre

    2014-04-25

    In crustaceans, the androgenic gland (AG), thanks to the synthesis of the androgenic gland hormone (AGH), controls the differentiation of the primary and secondary male sexual characters. In this study, we amplified 12 new AGH cDNAs in species belonging to five different families of the infra-order Ligiamorpha of terrestrial isopods. Putative essential amino acids for the production of a functional AGH protein exhibit signatures of negative selection and are strictly conserved including typical proteolytic cleavage motifs, a putative N-linked glycosylation motif on the A chains and the eight Cys positions. An insulin-like growth factor motif was also identified in Armadillidium AGH sequences. The phylogenetic relationships of AGH sequences allowed one to distinguish two main clades, corresponding to members of the Armadillidiidae and the Porcellionidae families which are congruent with the narrow specificity of AG heterospecific grafting. An in-depth understanding of the regulation of AGH expression would help deciphering the interaction between Wolbachia, widespread feminizing endosymbiotic bacteria in isopods, and the sex differentiation of their hosts.

  13. Evidence for increased tissue androgen sensitivity in neurturin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Simanainen, Ulla; Gao, Yan Ru Ellen; Desai, Reena; Jimenez, Mark; Spaliviero, Jennifer; Keast, Janet R; Handelsman, David J

    2013-01-01

    Neurturin (NTN) is a member of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family and signals through GDNF family receptor alpha 2 (GFRα2). We hypothesised that epithelial atrophy reported in the reproductive organs of Ntn (Nrtn)- and Gfrα2 (Gfra2)-deficient mice could be due to NTN affecting the hormonal environment. To investigate this, we compared the reproductive organs of Ntn- and Gfrα2-deficient male mice in parallel with an analysis of their circulating reproductive hormone levels. There were no significant structural changes within the organs of the knockout mice; however, serum and intratesticular testosterone and serum LH levels were very low. To reconcile these observations, we tested androgen sensitivity by creating a dihydrotestosterone (DHT) clamp (castration plus DHT implant) to create fixed circulating levels of androgens, allowing the evaluation of androgen-sensitive endpoints. At the same serum DHT levels, serum LH levels were lower and prostate and seminal vesicle weights were higher in the Ntn knockout (NTNKO) mice than in the wild-type mice, suggesting an increased response to androgens in the accessory glands and hypothalamus and pituitary of the NTNKO mice. Testicular and pituitary responsiveness was unaffected in the NTNKO males, as determined by the response to the human chorionic gonadotrophin or GNRH analogue, leuprolide, respectively. In conclusion, our results suggest that NTN inactivation enhances androgen sensitivity in reproductive and neuroendocrine tissues, revealing a novel mechanism to influence reproductive function and the activity of other androgen-dependent tissues.

  14. Androgens and cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Spoletini, I; Vitale, C; Pelliccia, F; Fossati, C; Rosano, G M C

    2014-12-01

    Androgens play a pivotal role in cardiovascular function and their effects differ between men and women. In postmenopausal women, testosterone replacement within physiological levels is associated with overall well-being. However, a definitive explanation as to how androgens have an impact on cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women and whether they may be used for cardiovascular treatment has yet to be established. With these aims, a systematic review of the existing studies on the link between androgens and cardiovascular disease and the effects of testosterone therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women has been conducted. The few existing studies on cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women indicate no effect or a deleterious effect of increasing androgens and increased cardiovascular risk. However, there is evidence of a favorable effect of androgens on surrogate cardiovascular markers in postmenopausal women, such as high density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, body fat mass and triglycerides. Further studies are therefore needed to clarify the impact of therapy with androgens on cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women. The cardiovascular effect of testosterone or methyltestosterone with or without concomitant estrogens needs to be elucidated.

  15. Identification of novel genes that regulate androgen receptor signaling and growth of androgen-deprived prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Levina, Elina; Ji, Hao; Chen, Mengqiang; Baig, Mirza; Oliver, David; Ohouo, Patrice; Lim, Chang-uk; Schools, Garry; Carmack, Steven; Ding, Ye; Broude, Eugenia V.; Roninson, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer progression to castration refractory disease is associated with anomalous transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in an androgen-depleted milieu. To identify novel gene products whose downregulation transactivates AR in prostate cancer cells, we performed a screen of enzymatically-generated shRNA lenti-libraries selecting for transduced LNCaP cells with elevated expression of a fluorescent reporter gene under the control of an AR-responsive promoter. The shRNAs present in selected populations were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to identify target genes. Highly enriched gene targets were then validated with siRNAs against selected genes, testing first for increased expression of luciferase from an AR-responsive promoter and then for altered expression of endogenous androgen-regulated genes in LNCaP cells. We identified 20 human genes whose silencing affected the expression of exogenous and endogenous androgen-responsive genes in prostate cancer cells grown in androgen-depleted medium. Knockdown of four of these genes upregulated the expression of endogenous AR targets and siRNAs targeting two of these genes (IGSF8 and RTN1) enabled androgen-independent proliferation of androgen-dependent cells. The effects of IGSF8 appear to be mediated through its interaction with a tetraspanin protein, CD9, previously implicated in prostate cancer progression. Remarkably, homozygous deletions of IGSF8 are found almost exclusively in prostate cancers but not in other cancer types. Our study shows that androgen independence can be achieved through the inhibition of specific genes and reveals a novel set of genes that regulate AR signaling in prostate cancers. PMID:26036626

  16. Regulation of expression of Na+,K+-ATPase in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blok, L J; Chang, G T G; Steenbeek-Slotboom, M; Weerden, W M van; Swarts, H G P; Pont, J J H H M De; Steenbrugge, G J van; Brinkmann, A O

    1999-01-01

    The β1-subunit of Na+,K+-ATPase was isolated and identified as an androgen down-regulated gene. Expression was observed at high levels in androgen-independent as compared to androgen-dependent (responsive) human prostate cancer cell lines and xenografts when grown in the presence of androgens. Down-regulation of the β1-subunit was initiated at concentrations between 0.01 nM and 0.03 nM of the synthetic androgen R1881 after relatively long incubation times (> 24 h). Using polyclonal antibodies, the concentration of β1-subunit protein, but not of the α1-subunit protein, was markedly reduced in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP-FGC) cultured in the presence of androgens. In line with these observations it was found that the protein expression of total Na+,K+-ATPase in the membrane (measured by 3H-ouabain binding) was also markedly decreased. The main function of Na+,K+-ATPase is to maintain sodium and potassium homeostasis in animal cells. The resulting electrochemical gradient is facilitative for transport of several compounds over the cell membrane (for example cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent experimentally used in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer). Here we observed that a ouabain-induced decrease of Na+,K+-ATPase activity in LNCaP-FGC cells results in reduced sensitivity of these cells to cisplatin-treatment. Surprisingly, androgen-induced decrease of Na+,K+-ATPase expression, did not result in significant protection against the chemotherapeutic agent. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10487609

  17. Estrogenic and androgenic effects of municipal wastewater effluent on reproductive endpoint biomarkers in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Carina; Högfors, Eva; Salste, Lotta; Bergelin, Eija; Olsson, Per-Erik; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Wiklund, Tom

    2009-05-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants have been associated with the release of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, which consequently lead to alterations of reproductive function in aquatic organisms. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) has quantifiable biomarkers for assessment of both estrogen (vitellogenin) and androgen (spiggin) activity, which makes this species very valuable in the research of endocrine disruption. The estrogenic and androgenic biomarkers were used for evaluating exposure effects of municipal wastewater effluent. We evaluated the effects of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT), and wastewater effluents on induction of vitellogenin and spiggin production, gonadosomatic index, hepatosomatic index, nephrosomatic index, plasma steroid levels, and histopathology. Adult female and male sticklebacks were exposed to 20 ng/L of EE2, 10 microg/L of MT, and wastewater effluent (10, 50, and 80% of original concentration) in a flow-through system for an exposure of one week and an extended exposure of four weeks. Chemical analyses of the steroids were done for verification of exposure concentrations and presence in the used wastewater. Our results show that municipal wastewater effluent exerts estrogenic action on three-spined stickleback as observed by elevated vitellogenin levels in exposed fish, corresponding to the effect seen in fish exposed to EE2. Furthermore, wastewater and EE2 exerted similar histopathological effects on testis of exposed fish. Although domestic effluent is suspected to have a high content of natural androgens, no obvious androgenic effect of wastewater was observed in the present study.

  18. Androgen receptors, sex behavior, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rebecca L; Lumia, Augustus R; McGinnis, Marilyn Y

    2012-01-01

    Androgens are intricately involved in reproductive and aggressive behaviors, but the role of the androgen receptor in mediating these behaviors is less defined. Further, activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis can influence each other at the level of the androgen receptor. Knowledge of the mechanisms for androgens' effects on behaviors through the androgen receptor will guide future studies in elucidating male reproductive and aggressive behavior repertoires.

  19. A competitive inhibitor that reduces recruitment of androgen receptor to androgen-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Milu T; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Shapiro, David J

    2012-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in the growth and progression of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancers. To identify novel inhibitors of AR transactivation that block growth of prostate cancer cells, a luciferase-based high-throughput screen of ~160,000 small molecules was performed in cells stably expressing AR and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-luciferase reporter. CPIC (1-(3-(2-chlorophenoxy) propyl)-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile) was identified as a small molecule that blocks AR transactivation to a greater extent than other steroid receptors. CPIC inhibited AR-mediated proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, with minimal toxicity in AR-negative cell lines. CPIC treatment also reduced the anchorage-independent growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. CPIC functioned as a pure antagonist by inhibiting the expression of AR-regulated genes in LAPC-4 cells that express wild-type AR and exhibited weak agonist activity in LNCaP cells that express the mutant AR-T877A. CPIC treatment did not reduce AR levels or alter its nuclear localization. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the site of action of CPIC. CPIC inhibited recruitment of androgen-bound AR to the PSA promoter and enhancer sites to a greater extent than bicalutamide. CPIC is a new therapeutic inhibitor that targets AR-mediated gene activation with potential to arrest the growth of prostate cancer.

  20. AB69. Phyto-androgenic androgens in men’s health, sex and aging FX

    PubMed Central

    Adimoelja, Arif; Siauw, Ali Fuchih

    2014-01-01

    Protodioscin is a Herbal Steroid Saponin extract derived mainly from Tribulus terristris L. grown mainly in Bulgaria. This herbal plant begun well known in main stream medicine since the periods around 1972 in Indonesia when this phyto-steroid compound has been proven of having the ability to be converted to DHEA and further to another androgenic androgen (T) in hypogonadal men in the presence of 5-alpha-dehydrogenase (A. Adimoelja, 1976, 1978). Biogenic androgens and androgenic androgens Testosterone as a product of the male gonads from blood serum cholesterol. Cholesterol is further converted to DHEA. This product is identified as one of the biogenic or endogenic androgens (testosterone, pregnenolone, progesterone, aldosterone, androstendione). Health disorders are often hampered by the tendencies of men or women to conceal their health (sexual health) conditions due to fear and/or embarrassments. If these conditions are not being soonest medically diagnosed and left to be untreated, another un-healthy condition may appear. (hypertension, high blood serum cholesterol, decrease HDL, CVD). Decrease libido, sex arousal and ED are the first expression of the down-degraded health conditions which may appear (A. Adimoelja 1985). Prescription of phytopharmaceuticals in mainstream medicine Surprisingly more phyto-pharmaceuticals in mainstream medicine were unconsciously prescribed by physicians (25% of prescriptions, WHO, 1908). Prescriptions were made to support health conditions and promote sexual health problems, most common as aphrodisiacs. Prtodioscin and health enhancers Protodioscin indeed promote health condition in hypogonadic men (A.Adimoelja and Tjahjo Djojo Tanojo, 2009). Regretfully most herbal products whih has been promoted as health foods in the market, or sex-tonics are combined with other chemical product(s), some of which combined with erectogenics (W. Pangkahila, 2010). Sharlip ID (USA) too reported in the “Newark Star Ledger in 2002” that 9 out

  1. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways. PMID:25615818

  2. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity. - Highlights: • Mixtures of AR antagonists at low individual concentrations cause complete inhibition.

  3. Mixture effects at very low doses with combinations of anti-androgenic pesticides, antioxidants, industrial pollutant and chemicals used in personal care products.

    PubMed

    Orton, Frances; Ermler, Sibylle; Kugathas, Subramaniam; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Many xenobiotics have been identified as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their ability to produce combined effects at low concentrations is missing. Such data can reveal whether joint effects at the receptor are induced at low levels and may support the prioritisation of in vivo evaluations and provide orientations for the grouping of anti-androgens in cumulative risk assessment. Combinations of 30 AR antagonists from a wide range of sources and exposure routes (pesticides, antioxidants, parabens, UV-filters, synthetic musks, bisphenol-A, benzo(a)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate and pentabromodiphenyl ether) were tested using a reporter gene assay (MDA-kb2). Chemicals were combined at three mixture ratios, equivalent to single components' effect concentrations that inhibit the action of dihydrotesterone by 1%, 10% or 20%. Concentration addition (CA) and independent action were used to calculate additivity expectations. We observed complete suppression of dihydrotestosterone effects when chemicals were combined at individual concentrations eliciting 1%, 10% or 20% AR antagonistic effect. Due to the large number of mixture components, the combined AR antagonistic effects occurred at very low concentrations of individual mixture components. CA slightly underestimated the combined effects at all mixture ratios. In conclusion, large numbers of AR antagonists from a wide variety of sources and exposure routes have the ability of acting together at the receptor to produce joint effects at very low concentrations. Significant mixture effects are observed when chemicals are combined at concentrations that individually do not induce observable AR antagonistic effects. Cumulative risk assessment for AR antagonists should apply grouping criteria based on effects where data are available, rather than on criteria of chemical similarity. PMID:24055644

  4. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression profiles of androgen receptors in spotted scat (Scatophagus argus).

    PubMed

    Chen, H P; Deng, S P; Dai, M L; Zhu, C H; Li, G L

    2016-01-01

    Androgen plays critical roles in vertebrate reproductive systems via androgen receptors (ARs). In the present study, the full-length spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) androgen receptor (sAR) cDNA sequence was cloned from testis. The sAR cDNA measured 2448 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 2289 bp, encoding 763 amino acids. Amino acid alignment analyses showed that the sARs exhibited highly evolutionary conserved functional domains. Phylogenetically, the sARs clustered within the ARβ common vertebrate group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that sAR expression varied in level and distribution throughout the tissues of both females and males. sAR expression was detected during testicular development by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the highest transcription of sARs was observed in the mid-testicular stage, and remained at a high expression level until the late-testicular stage. In addition, the effects of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) and estrogen (E2) on the expression of sARs in ovaries were determined using quantitative RT-PCR. sAR expression increased at 12 and 24 h post-MT treatment and decreased with E2 treatment. The present study provides preliminary evidence indicating gonadal plasticity of spotted scat under exogenous steroidal hormone treatments. It also provides a theoretical basis for sex reversal and production of artificial pseudo-males for female monosex breeding. PMID:27173207

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression profiles of androgen receptors in spotted scat (Scatophagus argus).

    PubMed

    Chen, H P; Deng, S P; Dai, M L; Zhu, C H; Li, G L

    2016-01-01

    Androgen plays critical roles in vertebrate reproductive systems via androgen receptors (ARs). In the present study, the full-length spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) androgen receptor (sAR) cDNA sequence was cloned from testis. The sAR cDNA measured 2448 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 2289 bp, encoding 763 amino acids. Amino acid alignment analyses showed that the sARs exhibited highly evolutionary conserved functional domains. Phylogenetically, the sARs clustered within the ARβ common vertebrate group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that sAR expression varied in level and distribution throughout the tissues of both females and males. sAR expression was detected during testicular development by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the highest transcription of sARs was observed in the mid-testicular stage, and remained at a high expression level until the late-testicular stage. In addition, the effects of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) and estrogen (E2) on the expression of sARs in ovaries were determined using quantitative RT-PCR. sAR expression increased at 12 and 24 h post-MT treatment and decreased with E2 treatment. The present study provides preliminary evidence indicating gonadal plasticity of spotted scat under exogenous steroidal hormone treatments. It also provides a theoretical basis for sex reversal and production of artificial pseudo-males for female monosex breeding.

  6. Proline-Directed Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanfei; Chen, Shaoyong

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been identified for decades and mediates essential steroid functions. Like most of biological molecules, AR functional activities are modulated by post-translational modifications. This review is focused on the reported activities and significance of AR phosphorylation, with particular emphasis on proline-directed serine/threonine phosphorylation that occurs predominantly on the receptor. The marked enrichment of AR phosphorylation in the most diverse N-terminal domain suggests that targeting AR phosphorylation can be synergistic to antagonizing the C-terminal domain by clinical antiandrogens. PMID:25866551

  7. Restoration of spermatogenesis and male fertility using an androgen receptor transgene.

    PubMed

    Walker, William H; Easton, Evan; Moreci, Rebecca S; Toocheck, Corey; Anamthathmakula, Prashanth; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam

    2015-01-01

    Androgens signal through the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate male secondary sexual characteristics, reproductive tract development, prostate function, sperm production, bone and muscle mass as well as body hair growth among other functions. We developed a transgenic mouse model in which endogenous AR expression was replaced by a functionally modified AR transgene. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) was constructed containing all AR exons and introns plus 40 kb each of 5' and 3' regulatory sequence. Insertion of an internal ribosome entry site and the EGFP gene 3' to AR allowed co-expression of AR and EGFP. Pronuclear injection of the BAC resulted in six founder mice that displayed EGFP production in appropriate AR expressing tissues. The six founder mice were mated into a Sertoli cell specific AR knockout (SCARKO) background in which spermatogenesis is blocked at the meiosis stage of germ cell development. The AR-EGFP transgene was expressed in a cyclical manner similar to that of endogenous AR in Sertoli cells and fertility was restored as offspring were produced in the absence of Sertoli cell AR. Thus, the AR-EGFP transgene under the control of AR regulatory elements is capable of rescuing AR function in a cell selective, AR-null background. These initial studies provide proof of principle that a strategy employing the AR-EGFP transgene can be used to understand AR functions. Transgenic mice expressing selective modifications of the AR-EGFP transgene may provide crucial information needed to elicit the molecular mechanisms by which AR acts in the testis and other androgen responsive tissues. PMID:25803277

  8. Androgen replacement therapy: present and future.

    PubMed

    Gooren, Louis J G; Bunck, Mathijs C M

    2004-01-01

    The major goal of androgen substitution is to replace testosterone at levels as close to physiological levels as is possible. For some androgen-dependent functions testosterone is a pro-hormone, peripherally converted to 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 17beta-estradiol (E2), of which the levels preferably should be within normal physiological ranges. Furthermore, androgens should have a good safety profile without adverse effects on the prostate, serum lipids, liver or respiratory function, and they must be convenient to use and patient-friendly, with a relative independence from medical services. Natural testosterone is viewed as the best androgen for substitution in hypogonadal men. The reason behind the selection is that testosterone can be converted to DHT and E2, thus developing the full spectrum of testosterone activities in long-term substitution. The mainstays of testosterone substitution are parenteral testosterone esters (testosterone enantate and testosterone cipionate) administered every 2-3 weeks. A major disadvantage is the strongly fluctuating levels of plasma testosterone, which are not in the physiological range at least 50% of the time. Also, the generated plasma E2 is usually supraphysiological. A major improvement is parenteral testosterone undecanoate producing normal plasma levels of testosterone for 12 weeks, with normal plasma levels of DHT and E2 also. Subcutaneous testosterone implants provide the patient, depending on the dose of implants, with normal plasma testosterone for 3-6 months. However, their use is not widespread. Oral testosterone undecanoate dissolved in castor oil bypasses the liver via its lymphatic absorption. At a dosage of 80 mg twice daily, plasma testosterone levels are largely in the normal range, but plasma DHT tends to be elevated. For two decades transdermal testosterone preparations have been available and have an attractive pharmacokinetic profile. Scrotal testosterone patches generate supraphysiological

  9. Life's Impact on the Soil Production Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Emma; Willenbring, Jane; Brocard, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Soil melds life and lithology, but the top-down production of soil by the incorporation of organic matter has typically been viewed through a lens of soil biogeochemistry and the bottom-up weathering of bedrock viewed from a geomorphologic perspective. We merge these perspectives by developing a variation on the classic geomorphological soil production function [1] that accounts for the influence of top-down soil production by additions of organic material. In the classic view [1], production rate of soil from bedrock weathering is a function of the thickness of the soil horizon. Under steady state conditions, this thickness is controlled by a constant coefficient of diffusion and by the hillslope curvature. Across the globe, equilibrium landscapes can be hard to find. We explore the many ways that biota influence the upper soil horizons and move the soil-hillslope system out of steady state using measurements of in situ 10Be at depth in soil profiles. Our empirical case study is in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory of northeastern Puerto Rico, where long term ecological monitoring suggests an average of 375 m My-1 of litter fall [2] and as much as 17.5 m My-1 of dust [3] is contributed to the forest floor. This substantial volume of material forms an active surficial layer, functionally increasing the residence time of grains deeper in the soil profile. Litter recycling influences the cosmogenic dose rate to be higher by increasing the residence time of grains and to be lower by increasing environmental shielding. In unconstrained systems, probabilistic modeling can determine a range of solutions for the ages of grains determined with 10Be depth profiles[4]. We compare the probabilistic outcomes to actual measurements of the in situ 10Be at depth in soil profiles from the Luquillo Mountains. Life living in the soil, rather than on it, is of equal importance in the Luquillo Mountains. On average, the soil is occupied by 200 individual earthworms per m2 [5

  10. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Matthew D L; Wu, Frederick C W

    2014-01-01

    Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well-tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies.

  11. Androgen effects on skeletal muscle: implications for the development and management of frailty

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Matthew DL; Wu, Frederick CW

    2014-01-01

    Androgens have potent anabolic effects on skeletal muscle and decline with age in parallel to losses in muscle mass and strength. This loss of muscle mass and function, known as sarcopenia, is the central event in development of frailty, the vulnerable health status that presages adverse outcomes and rapid functional decline in older adults. The potential role of falling androgen levels in the development of frailty and their utility as function promoting therapies in older men has therefore attracted considerable attention. This review summarizes current concepts and definitions in muscle ageing, sarcopenia and frailty, and evaluates recent developments in the study of androgens and frailty. Current evidence from observational and interventional studies strongly supports an effect of androgens on muscle mass in ageing men, but effects on muscle strength and particularly physical function have been less clear. Androgen treatment has been generally well–tolerated in studies of older men, but concerns remain over higher dose treatments and use in populations with high cardiovascular risk. The first trials of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) suggest similar effects on muscle mass and function to traditional androgen therapies in older adults. Important future directions include the use of these agents in combination with exercise training to promote functional ability across different populations of older adults, as well as more focus on the relationships between concurrent changes in hormone levels, body composition and physical function in observational studies. PMID:24457838

  12. Paracrine and intracrine contributions of androgens and estrogens to adipose tissue biology: physiopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Waraich, Rizwana S; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2013-08-01

    In mammals, the male and female hormones androgen and estrogen act as endocrine regulators of energy metabolism. However, adipose tissue is also a site of androgen and estrogen synthesis; androgens convert to estrogens in these tissues, and adipose tissue is also a reservoir of steroids that act locally in a paracrine and intracrine manner. Thus, in adipose tissue, the local output of sex hormones is more complex than would be suggested by routine measurement of serum hormone concentrations. This review integrates studies on the effects of androgens and estrogens in the developmental programming of adipose tissue function in early life and addresses the contributions of local androgen and estrogen metabolism on adipose tissue function in adults.

  13. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Mohamad; Khatami, Saied Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR) encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN) in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015). The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234). Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity. PMID:26221130

  14. Transcription Factors Involved in Prostate Gland Adaptation to Androgen Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Ribeiro, Rafaela; Nishan, Umar; Vidal, Ramon Oliveira; Barbosa, Guilherme Oliveira; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Cesar, Carlos Lenz; Carvalho, Hernandes F.

    2014-01-01

    Androgens regulate prostate physiology, and exert their effects through the androgen receptor. We hypothesized that androgen deprivation needs additional transcription factors to orchestrate the changes taking place in the gland after castration and for the adaptation of the epithelial cells to the androgen-deprived environment, ultimately contributing to the origin of castration-resistant prostate cancer. This study was undertaken to identify transcription factors that regulate gene expression after androgen deprivation by castration (Cas). For the sake of comparison, we extended the analysis to the effects of administration of a high dose of 17β-estradiol (E2) and a combination of both (Cas+E2). We approached this by (i) identifying gene expression profiles and enrichment terms, and by searching for transcription factors in the derived regulatory pathways; and (ii) by determining the density of putative transcription factor binding sites in the proximal promoter of the 10 most up- or down-regulated genes in each experimental group in comparison to the controls Gapdh and Tbp7. Filtering and validation confirmed the expression and localized EVI1 (Mecom), NFY, ELK1, GATA2, MYBL1, MYBL2, and NFkB family members (NFkB1, NFkB2, REL, RELA and RELB) in the epithelial and/or stromal cells. These transcription factors represent major regulators of epithelial cell survival and immaturity as well as an adaptation of the gland as an immune barrier in the absence of functional stimulation by androgens. Elk1 was expressed in smooth muscle cells and was up-regulated after day 4. Evi1 and Nfy genes are expressed in both epithelium and stroma, but were apparently not affected by androgen deprivation. PMID:24886974

  15. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  16. Androgen response element of the glycine N-methyltransferase gene is located in the coding region of its first exon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Ming; Yen, Chia-Hung; Tzeng, Tsai-Yu; Huang, Yu-Zen; Chou, Kuan-Hsien; Chang, Tai-Jay; Arthur Chen, Yi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Androgen plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PCa (prostate cancer). Previously, we identified GNMT (glycine N-methyltransferase) as a tumour susceptibility gene and characterized its promoter region. Besides, its enzymatic product-sarcosine has been recognized as a marker for prognosis of PCa. The goals of this study were to determine whether GNMT is regulated by androgen and to map its AREs (androgen response elements). Real-time PCR analyses showed that R1881, a synthetic AR (androgen receptor) agonist induced GNMT expression in AR-positive LNCaP cells, but not in AR-negative DU145 cells. In silico prediction showed that there are four putative AREs in GNMT-ARE1, ARE2 and ARE3 are located in the intron 1 and ARE4 is in the intron 2. Consensus ARE motif deduced from published AREs was used to identify the fifth ARE-ARE5 in the coding region of exon 1. Luciferase reporter assay found that only ARE5 mediated the transcriptional activation of R1881. ARE3 overlaps with a YY1 [Yin and Yang 1 (motif (CaCCATGTT, +1118/+1126)] that was further confirmed by antibody supershift and ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays. EMSA (electrophoretic mobility shift assay) and ChIP assay confirmed that AR interacts with ARE5 in vitro and in vivo. In summary, GNMT is an AR-targeted gene with its functional ARE located at +19/+33 of the first exon. These results are valuable for the study of the influence of androgen on the gene expression of GNMT especially in the pathogenesis of cancer. PMID:23883094

  17. Cephalopod Ink: Production, Chemistry, Functions and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Derby, Charles D.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most distinctive and defining features of coleoid cephalopods—squid, cuttlefish and octopus—is their inking behavior. Their ink, which is blackened by melanin, but also contains other constituents, has been used by humans in various ways for millennia. This review summarizes our current knowledge of cephalopod ink. Topics include: (1) the production of ink, including the functional organization of the ink sac and funnel organ that produce it; (2) the chemical components of ink, with a focus on the best known of these—melanin and the biochemical pathways involved in its production; (3) the neuroecology of the use of ink in predator-prey interactions by cephalopods in their natural environment; and (4) the use of cephalopod ink by humans, including in the development of drugs for biomedical applications and other chemicals for industrial and other commercial applications. As is hopefully evident from this review, much is known about cephalopod ink and inking, yet more striking is how little we know. Towards closing that gap, future directions in research on cephalopod inking are suggested. PMID:24824020

  18. Identification and Characterization of the Androgen Receptor From the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Kohno, Satomi; Doheny, Brenna M.; Ogino, Yukiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Guillette, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development, reproduction, and health throughout the life span of vertebrates, particularly during the initiation and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. Androgen signaling is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. Mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors, such as exogenous hormones or contaminants that mimic hormones, can disrupt endocrine signaling and function. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a unique model for ecological research in that it exhibits environment-dependent sex determination, is oviparous and long lived. Alligators from a contaminated environment exhibit low reproductive success and morphological disorders of the testis and phallus in neonates and juveniles, both associated with androgen signaling; thus, the alterations are hypothesized to be related to disrupted androgen signaling. However, this line of research has been limited because of a lack of information on the alligator AR gene. Here, we isolated A mississippiensis AR homologs (AmAR) and evaluated receptor-hormone/chemical interactions using a transactivation assay. We showed that AmAR responded to all natural androgens and their effects were inhibited by cotreatment with antiandrogens, such as flutamide, p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, and vinclozolin. Intriguingly, we found a spliced form of the AR from alligator cDNA, which lacks seven amino acids within the ligand-binding domain that shows no response to androgens. Finally, we have initial data on a possible dominant-negative function of the spliced form of the AR against androgen-induced AmAR. PMID:25974402

  19. Identification and Characterization of the Androgen Receptor From the American Alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Shinichi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Kohno, Satomi; Doheny, Brenna M; Ogino, Yukiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Katsu, Yoshinao; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-08-01

    Androgens are essential for the development, reproduction, and health throughout the life span of vertebrates, particularly during the initiation and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. Androgen signaling is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. Mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors, such as exogenous hormones or contaminants that mimic hormones, can disrupt endocrine signaling and function. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), a unique model for ecological research in that it exhibits environment-dependent sex determination, is oviparous and long lived. Alligators from a contaminated environment exhibit low reproductive success and morphological disorders of the testis and phallus in neonates and juveniles, both associated with androgen signaling; thus, the alterations are hypothesized to be related to disrupted androgen signaling. However, this line of research has been limited because of a lack of information on the alligator AR gene. Here, we isolated A mississippiensis AR homologs (AmAR) and evaluated receptor-hormone/chemical interactions using a transactivation assay. We showed that AmAR responded to all natural androgens and their effects were inhibited by cotreatment with antiandrogens, such as flutamide, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, and vinclozolin. Intriguingly, we found a spliced form of the AR from alligator cDNA, which lacks seven amino acids within the ligand-binding domain that shows no response to androgens. Finally, we have initial data on a possible dominant-negative function of the spliced form of the AR against androgen-induced AmAR. PMID:25974402

  20. Androgen receptor (AR) in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Eugene; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the highest leading cause of death worldwide. Several risk factors have been linked to CVDs, including smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and gender among others. Sex hormones, especially the androgen and its receptor, androgen receptor (AR), have been linked to many diseases with a clear gender difference. Here, we summarize the effects of androgen/AR on CVDs, including hypertension, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial hypertrophy, and heart failure, as well as the metabolic syndrome/diabetes and their impacts on CVDs. Androgen/AR signaling exacerbates hypertension, and anti-androgens may suppress hypertension. Androgen/AR signaling plays dual roles in strokes, depending on different kinds of factors; however, generally males have a higher incidence of strokes than females. Androgen and AR differentially modulate atherosclerosis. Androgen deficiency causes elevated lipid accumulation to enhance atherosclerosis; however, targeting AR in selective cells without altering serum androgen levels would suppress atherosclerosis progression. Androgen/AR signaling is crucial in AAA development and progression, and targeting androgen/AR profoundly restricts AAA progression. Men have increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with age-matched women that may be due to androgens. Finally, androgen/AR plays important roles in contributing to obesity and insulin/leptin resistance to increase the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Rapid effects of androgens in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benten, W Peter M; Guo, Z; Krücken, J; Wunderlich, F

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the existence of membrane receptors for testosterone (mAR) in mouse macrophages of the cell lines IC-21 and RAW 264.7 as well as their roles in nongenomic pathways, gene expression and cell functioning. Both cell lines lack intracellular androgen receptors (iARs) and respond to testosterone with rapid rises in [Ca2+]i. These rises in [Ca2+]i can neither be inhibited by iAR- nor by iER blockers, but are rather mediated through mAR. Pharmacological approaches suggest that the mAR belongs to the class of membrane receptors which are coupled to phospholipase C via pertussis toxin (PTX) sensitive G-proteins. The mAR can be localized as specific surface binding sites for testosterone-BSA-FITC by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)and flow cytometry, and are characterized by their agonist-sequestrability. In order to examine a possible role of the testosterone-induced rise in [Ca2+]i on gene expression, a c-fos promoter reporter gene construct was transfected into RAW 264.7 macrophages. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by testosterone cannot significantly activate the c-fos promoter directly. Also, no significant activation of ERK1/2, JNK/SAPK and p38 can be observed following testosterone-stimulation alone. However, testosterone-induced rises in [Ca2+]i do have specific effects on gene expression in context with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced genotropic signaling: testosterone specifically down-regulates LPS-induced activation of c-fos promoter, p38 MAPK and NO production. In fetal calf serum (FCS)-induced genotropic signaling, the situation is reversed, i.e. testosterone augments the activation of c-fos promoter and ERK1/2. Our studies demonstrate a cross-talk between the testosterone-induced nongenomic Ca2+ signaling and the genotropic signaling induced by LPS and FCS in macrophages. PMID:15288774

  2. Molecular targets of androgen signaling that characterize skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, James G.; Yaden, Benjamin C.; Bullock, Heather; Chen, Keyue; Shetler, Pamela; Bryant, Henry U.; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    The high regenerative capacity of adult skeletal muscle relies on a self-renewing depot of adult stem cells, termed muscle satellite cells (MSCs). Androgens, known mediators of overall body composition and specifically skeletal muscle mass, have been shown to regulate MSCs. The possible overlapping function of androgen regulation of muscle growth and MSC activation has not been carefully investigated with regards to muscle regeneration.Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine coinciding androgen-mediated genetic changes in an in vitro MSC model and clinically relevant in vivo models. A gene signature was established via microarray analysis for androgen-mediated MSC engagement and highlighted several markers including follistatin (FST), IGF-1, C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In an in vivo muscle atrophy model, androgen re-supplementation significantly increased muscle size and expression of IGF-1, FST, and HGF, while significantly decreasing expression of GR. Biphasic gene expression profiles over the 7-day re-supplementation period identifed temporal androgen regulation of molecular targets involved in satellite cell engagement into myogenesis. In a muscle injury model, removal of androgens resulted in delayed muscle recovery and regeneration. Modifications in the androgen signaling gene signature, along with reduced Pax7 and MyoD expression, suggested that limited MSC activation and increased inflammation contributed to the delayed regeneration. However, enhanced MSC activation in the androgen-deplete mouse injury model was driven by an androgen receptor (AR) agonist. These results provide novel in vitro and in vivo evidence describing molecular targets of androgen signaling, while also increasing support for translational use of AR agonists in skeletal muscle recovery and regeneration. PMID:26457071

  3. Water Production Functions for Central Plains Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sustaining irrigated agriculture with limited water supplies requires maximizing productivity per unit of water. Relationships between crop production and water consumed are basic information required to maximize productivity. This information can be used to determine if deficit irrigation is eco...

  4. Functionality of probiotics - potential for product development.

    PubMed

    Dekker, James; Collett, Michael; Prasad, Jaya; Gopal, Pramod

    2007-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly accepted by consumers that live lactic acid bacteria do exert health benefits when eaten. In addition, it is also becoming recognised that not all probiotic bacteria are equal. It is now no longer just a question of providing sufficient numbers of viable bacteria in a product; industry must also provide proof of efficacy for each strain. In the early 1990s, Fonterra embarked on a programme to develop proprietary probiotic strains, and as a result, commercialised two strains, Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. Over the past decade, Fonterra has developed a significant body of peerreviewed published reports around these strains, including studies showing safety in animal and human trials, protection against pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7, modulation of human and animal immune markers at realistic dose rates, and efficacy in human clinical trials. Based on this work, HN019 and HN001 have been applied to several functional foods both by Fonterra (under the DR10 and DR20 brands, respectively) and by third parties (e.g. under the HOWARU brand by Danisco). While the 'gold standard' of proof of efficacy is a phase III clinical trial, ethical considerations as well as expense preclude the use of clinical trials as screening tools for probiotics. Therefore, biomarkers have to be employed to identify strains with probiotic utility, and to define the different positive health benefits of existing probiotic strains. However, as the mechanisms by which most probiotic bacteria exert their health benefits remain unclear, the question of which biomarkers accurately reflect efficacy in vivo remains unresolved. With recent technological advances, and the shift toward probiotics targeted to specific conditions, researchers are beginning to tease out how probiotic bacteria work, and it is this knowledge that will inform biomarker development and improve the ability to offer the market safe

  5. Role of 5α-reductase inhibitors in androgen-stimulated skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Azzouni, Faris; Zeitouni, Nathalie; Mohler, James

    2013-02-01

    5α-reductase (5α-R) isozymes are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. This enzyme family is composed of 3 members that perform several important biologic functions. 5α-R isozymes play an important role in benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and androgen-stimulated skin disorders, which include androgenic alopecia, acne, and hirsutism. Discovery of 5α-R type 2 deficiency in 1974 sparked interest in development of pharmaceutical agents to inhibit 5α-R isozymes, and 2 such inhibitors are currently available for clinical use: finasteride and dutasteride. 5α-R inhibitors are US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Only finasteride is FDA-approved for treatment of male androgenic alopecia. This article reviews the pathophysiology of androgen-stimulated skin disorders and the key clinical trials using 5α-R inhibitors in the treatment of androgen-stimulated skin disorders. PMID:23377402

  6. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  7. Crosstalk between RON and androgen receptor signaling in the development of castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Batth, Izhar; Yun, Huiyoung; Hussain, Suleman; Meng, Peng; Osumulski, Powel; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Bedolla, Roble; Profit, Amanda; Reddick, Robert; Kumar, Addanki

    2016-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the fatal form of prostate cancer. Although reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) occurs following androgen deprivation, the precise mechanism involved is unclear. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase, RON alters mechanical properties of cells to influence epithelial to mesenchymal transition and functions as a transcription factor to differentially regulate AR signaling. RON inhibits AR activation and subset of AR-regulated transcripts in androgen responsive LNCaP cells. However in C4-2B, a castrate-resistant sub-line of LNCaP and AR-negative androgen independent DU145 cells, RON activates subset of AR-regulated transcripts. Expression of AR in PC-3 cells leads to activation of RON under androgen deprivation but not under androgen proficient conditions implicating a role for RON in androgen independence. Consistently, RON expression is significantly elevated in castrate resistant prostate tumors. Taken together our results suggest that RON activation could aid in promoting androgen independence and that inhibition of RON in combination with AR antagonist(s) merits serious consideration as a therapeutic option during hormone deprivation therapy. PMID:26872377

  8. Ligand Binding to the Androgen Receptor Induces Conformational Changes That Regulate Phosphatase Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Song; Xin, Hong-Wu; Kelley, Joshua B.; Spencer, Adam; Brautigan, David L.; Paschal, Bryce M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a mechanism for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) targeting to the androgen receptor (AR) and provide insight into the more general issue of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AR. Simian virus 40 (SV40) small t antigen (ST) binding to N-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit induces structural changes transduced to C-terminal HEAT repeats. This enables the C-terminal HEAT repeats in the PP2A A subunit, including HEAT repeat 13, to discriminate between androgen- and androgen antagonist-induced AR conformations. The PP2A-AR interaction was used to show that an AR mutant in prostate cancer cells (T877A) is activated by multiple ligands without acquiring the same conformation as that induced by androgen. The correlation between androgen binding to AR and increased phosphorylation of the activation function 1 (AF-1) region implies that changes in AR conformation or chaperone composition are causal to kinase access to phosphorylation sites. However, AF-1 phosphorylation sites are kinase accessible prior to androgen binding. This suggests that androgens can enhance the phosphorylation state of AR either by negatively regulating the ability of the ligand-binding domain to bind phosphatases or by inducing an AR conformation that is resistant to phosphatase action. SV40 ST subverts this mechanism by promoting the direct transfer of PP2A onto androgen-bound AR, resulting in multisite dephosphorylation. PMID:17325038

  9. Androgen receptor targeted therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Bench to clinic.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yusuke; Sadar, Marianne D

    2016-08-01

    The androgen receptor is a transcription factor and validated therapeutic target for prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy remains the gold standard treatment, but it is not curative, and eventually the disease will return as lethal castration-resistant prostate cancer. There have been improvements in the therapeutic landscape with new agents approved, such as abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel and Ra-223, in the past 5 years. New insight into the mechanisms of resistance to treatments in advanced disease is being and has been elucidated. All current androgen receptor-targeting therapies inhibit the growth of prostate cancer by blocking the ligand-binding domain, where androgen binds to activate the receptor. Persuasive evidence supports the concept that constitutively active androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain are one of the resistant mechanisms underlying advanced disease. Transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor requires a functional AF-1 region in its N-terminal domain. Preclinical evidence proved that this domain is a druggable target to forecast a potential paradigm shift in the management of advanced prostate cancer. This review presents an overview of androgen receptor-related mechanisms of resistance as well as novel therapeutic agents to overcome resistance that is linked to the expression of androgen receptor splice variants in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  10. The primate thyroid gland contains receptors for androgens.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, P J; McGill, H C; Lissitzky, J C; Martin, P M

    1984-12-01

    The gonadal steroids have long been known to modulate thyroid function. Most studies suggest that the gonadal steroids act indirectly through the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to modulate thyroid function. The following studies were conducted to determine whether there are receptors for androgens in the thyroid itself. Cytosols from male and female euthyroid patients were analyzed for the presence of androgen with the synthetic analog methyltrienolone [( 3H]R1881). No evidence of androgen receptors was found in any of the cytosols prepared from female patients. In all males studied, androgen receptors were found in concentrations ranging from 100-150 fmol/10 mg DNA for the cytosols and from 690-2800 fmol/10 mg DNA for the nuclear extracts. The receptors had a dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 5-10 X 10(-10) M for the cytosol and approximately 10-15 X 10(-10) M for the nuclear extracts. In addition to the human studies, studies in baboons were conducted to determine the possible cell type which might contain receptors for androgens. Male and female baboons were injected with [3H] dihydrotestosterone and killed between 1 and 1 1/2 h later. The thyroids were removed and processed for autoradiography. In autoradiograms from animals injected with [3H]dihydrotestosterone, nuclear localization of radioactivity was found in virtually all of the follicular cells. Also, label was found overlying the colloid, with heaviest labeling near the cells. These data suggest that there may be direct actions of androgens on follicular cells.

  11. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGENS AND ANDROGENS ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN MAMMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last decade, several classes of chemicals have been shown in laboratory studies to disrupt reproductive development by acting as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists and/or inhibitors of fetal Leydig cell testosterone production. Some phthalate esters alter gubernacular...

  12. Yolk androgen deposition without an energetic cost for female rockhopper penguins: a compensatory strategy to accelerate brood reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Poisbleau, Maud; Carslake, David; Demongin, Laurent; Eens, Marcel; Chastel, Olivier; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Whether androgen deposition in eggs is physiologically costly for female birds has remained a crucial but unsolved question, despite a broad use of this assumption in functional studies. We tested whether females depositing high androgen concentrations experienced higher mass losses than females depositing low androgen concentrations. Analysing female body mass change during egg formation in rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome), we observed no energetic cost to androgen deposition. Nevertheless, lighter females laid eggs with higher yolk androgen concentrations. This relationship existed only for the second-laid egg (B-egg), but not for the first-laid egg (A-egg). Since the B-egg is usually the first to hatch and the only one to produce a fledging chick, we hypothesize that differential yolk androgen deposition may be an adaptive strategy for females to affect brood reduction. PMID:21325311

  13. INTERACTION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS WITH THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of several environmental chemicals capable of binding to the androgen receptor (AR) and interfering with its normal function has heightened concern for adverse effects across a broad spectrum of environmental chemicals. We previously demonstrated AR antagonist act...

  14. Retinoic acid receptor beta and angiopoietin-like protein 1 are involved in the regulation of human androgen biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Udhane, Sameer S.; Pandey, Amit V.; Hofer, Gaby; Mullis, Primus E.; Flück, Christa E.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for sexual development and reproduction. However, androgen regulation in health and disease is poorly understood. We showed that human adrenocortical H295R cells grown under starvation conditions acquire a hyperandrogenic steroid profile with changes in steroid metabolizing enzymes HSD3B2 and CYP17A1 essential for androgen production. Here we studied the regulatory mechanisms underlying androgen production in starved H295R cells. Microarray expression profiling of normal versus starved H295R cells revealed fourteen differentially expressed genes; HSD3B2, HSD3B1, CYP21A2, RARB, ASS1, CFI, ASCL1 and ENC1 play a role in steroid and energy metabolism and ANGPTL1, PLK2, DUSP6, DUSP10 and FREM2 are involved in signal transduction. We discovered two new gene networks around RARB and ANGPTL1, and show how they regulate androgen biosynthesis. Transcription factor RARB stimulated the promoters of genes involved in androgen production (StAR, CYP17A1 and HSD3B2) and enhanced androstenedione production. For HSD3B2 regulation RARB worked in cooperation with Nur77. Secretory protein ANGPTL1 modulated CYP17A1 and DUSP6 expression by inducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation. By contrast, our studies revealed no evidence for hormones or cell cycle involvement in regulating androgen biosynthesis. In summary, these studies establish a firm role for RARB and ANGPTL1 in the regulation of androgen production in H295R cells. PMID:25970467

  15. Anoxic Androgen Degradation by the Denitrifying Bacterium Sterolibacterium denitrificans via the 2,3-seco Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Po-Hsiang; Yu, Chang-Ping; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Lin, Ching-Wen; Ismail, Wael; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Kuo, An-Ti

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradation of steroids is a crucial biochemical process mediated exclusively by bacteria. So far, information concerning the anoxic catabolic pathways of androgens is largely unknown, which has prevented many environmental investigations. In this work, we show that Sterolibacterium denitrificans DSMZ 13999 can anaerobically mineralize testosterone and some C19 androgens. By using a 13C-metabolomics approach and monitoring the sequential appearance of the intermediates, we demonstrated that S. denitrificans uses the 2,3-seco pathway to degrade testosterone under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, based on the identification of a C17 intermediate, we propose that the A-ring cleavage may be followed by the removal of a C2 side chain at C-5 of 17-hydroxy-1-oxo-2,3-seco-androstan-3-oic acid (the A-ring cleavage product) via retro-aldol reaction. The androgenic activities of the bacterial culture and the identified intermediates were assessed using the lacZ-based yeast androgen assay. The androgenic activity in the testosterone-grown S. denitrificans culture decreased significantly over time, indicating its ability to eliminate androgens. The A-ring cleavage intermediate (≤500 μM) did not exhibit androgenic activity, whereas the sterane-containing intermediates did. So far, only two androgen-degrading anaerobes (Sterolibacterium denitrificans DSMZ 13999 [a betaproteobacterium] and Steroidobacter denitrificans DSMZ 18526 [a gammaproteobacterium]) have been isolated and characterized, and both of them use the 2,3-seco pathway to anaerobically degrade androgens. The key intermediate 2,3-seco-androstan-3-oic acid can be used as a signature intermediate for culture-independent environmental investigations of anaerobic degradation of C19 androgens. PMID:24657867

  16. Targeting intratumoral androgens: statins and beyond.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Michael T; Yu, Evan Y

    2016-09-01

    While initially effective, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not curative, and nearly all men with advanced prostate cancer will eventually progress to the more resistant, and ultimately lethal form of the disease, so called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The maintenance of androgens within the prostate cancer microenvironment likely represents one of the key mechanisms by which this transition from hormone-sensitive to CRPC occurs. This can be accomplished either through intratumoral androgen biosynthesis or the active transport of androgens and androgenic precursors into the tumor microenvironment. More recently, preclinical and clinical data supported therapeutic strategies that seek to target these two mechanisms, either through the use of drugs that impair androgen biosynthesis (e.g. inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes CYP17 and AKR1C3 with abiraterone and indomethacin, respectively) or drugs that inhibit the SLCO transporters responsible for importing androgens (e.g. statins). PMID:27583031

  17. Targeting intratumoral androgens: statins and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Yu, Evan Y.

    2016-01-01

    While initially effective, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not curative, and nearly all men with advanced prostate cancer will eventually progress to the more resistant, and ultimately lethal form of the disease, so called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The maintenance of androgens within the prostate cancer microenvironment likely represents one of the key mechanisms by which this transition from hormone-sensitive to CRPC occurs. This can be accomplished either through intratumoral androgen biosynthesis or the active transport of androgens and androgenic precursors into the tumor microenvironment. More recently, preclinical and clinical data supported therapeutic strategies that seek to target these two mechanisms, either through the use of drugs that impair androgen biosynthesis (e.g. inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes CYP17 and AKR1C3 with abiraterone and indomethacin, respectively) or drugs that inhibit the SLCO transporters responsible for importing androgens (e.g. statins). PMID:27583031

  18. The Education Production Function: Its Evolving Role in Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Production research in education is dominated by attempts to estimate the structural parameters of the education production function. This article explores the meaning of the function, critically reviews past estimation efforts, and gives examples of the use of the function as a source of insight to guide policy-relevant studies. (TJH)

  19. Androgen receptor mutations in carcinoma of the prostate: significance for endocrine therapy.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Klocker, H; Bartsch, G; Hobisch, A

    2001-01-01

    Endocrine therapy for advanced prostate cancer involves androgen ablation (orchiectomy or application of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs) and/or blockade of the androgen receptor (AR) with either steroidal (cyproterone acetate) or nonsteroidal (hydroxyflutamide, bicalutamide and nilutamide) antiandrogens. These antagonists prevent androgen-induced conformational change and activation of the AR. During long term androgen ablation, the AR adapts to an environment with low androgen concentrations and becomes hypersensitive to low concentrations of androgens, either alone or in combination with various cellular regulators. Bicalutamide can switch from antagonist to agonist during long-term androgen withdrawal, as shown in prostate cancer LNCaP cells. AR point mutations were detected in metastatic lesions from human prostate cancer more frequently than in primary tumors. Although functional characterization of only some mutant AR detected in prostate cancer tissue has been performed, data available suggest that they are activated by dihydrotestosterone, its precursors and metabolites, synthetic androgens, estrogenic and progestagenic steroids and hydroxyflutamide. A direct association between AR mutations and endocrine withdrawal syndrome has been investigated in only one study thus far. There is no evidence at present that activation of any of the mutant AR genes detected in prostate cancer is enhanced in the presence of a nonsteroidal AR stimulator. Coactivators of the AR are proteins that associate with the receptor, possess histone acetylase activity and facilitate AR activation. The coregulatory proteins ARA70 and ARA160 differentially affected the activity of the mutated AR Glu(231)-->Gly, which was discovered in a mouse authochthonous prostate tumor. ARA70 enhanced receptor activation by both androgen and estradiol, whereas ARA160 augmented only androgen-induced AR activity. Novel experimental therapies that down-regulate AR expression have been

  20. Bypass Mechanisms of the Androgen Receptor Pathway in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rute B.; Dits, Natasja F.; Erkens-Schulze, Sigrun; van Weerden, Wytske M.; Jenster, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is initially dependent on androgens for survival and growth, making hormonal therapy the cornerstone treatment for late-stage tumors. However, despite initial remission, the cancer will inevitably recur. The present study was designed to investigate how androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells eventually survive and resume growth under androgen-deprived and antiandrogen supplemented conditions. As model system, we used the androgen-responsive PC346C cell line and its therapy-resistant sublines: PC346DCC, PC346Flu1 and PC346Flu2. Methodology/Principal Findings Microarray technology was used to analyze differences in gene expression between the androgen-responsive and therapy-resistant PC346 cell lines. Microarray analysis revealed 487 transcripts differentially-expressed between the androgen-responsive and the therapy-resistant cell lines. Most of these genes were common to all three therapy-resistant sublines and only a minority (∼5%) was androgen-regulated. Pathway analysis revealed enrichment in functions involving cellular movement, cell growth and cell death, as well as association with cancer and reproductive system disease. PC346DCC expressed residual levels of androgen receptor (AR) and showed significant down-regulation of androgen-regulated genes (p-value = 10−7). Up-regulation of VAV3 and TWIST1 oncogenes and repression of the DKK3 tumor-suppressor was observed in PC346DCC, suggesting a potential AR bypass mechanism. Subsequent validation of these three genes in patient samples confirmed that expression was deregulated during prostate cancer progression. Conclusions/Significance Therapy-resistant growth may result from adaptations in the AR pathway, but androgen-independence may also be achieved by alternative survival mechanisms. Here we identified TWIST1, VAV3 and DKK3 as potential players in the bypassing of the AR pathway, making them good candidates as biomarkers and novel therapeutical targets. PMID:20976069

  1. MicroRNAs Are Mediators of Androgen Action in Prostate and Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Jiang, Jinmai; Gusev, Yuriy; Jones, Amanda; Kearbey, Jeffrey D.; Miller, Duane D.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dalton, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) function is critical for the development of male reproductive organs, muscle, bone and other tissues. Functionally impaired AR results in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). The interaction between AR and microRNA (miR) signaling pathways was examined to understand the role of miRs in AR function. Reduction of androgen levels in Sprague-Dawley rats by castration inhibited the expression of a large set of miRs in prostate and muscle, which was reversed by treatment of castrated rats with 3 mg/day dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or selective androgen receptor modulators. Knockout of the miR processing enzyme, DICER, in LNCaP prostate cancer cells or tissue specifically in mice inhibited AR function leading to AIS. Since the only function of miRs is to bind to 3′ UTR and inhibit translation of target genes, androgens might induce miRs to inhibit repressors of AR function. In concordance, knock-down of DICER in LNCaP cells and in tissues in mice induced the expression of corepressors, NCoR and SMRT. These studies demonstrate a feedback loop between miRs, corepressors and AR and the imperative role of miRs in AR function in non-cancerous androgen-responsive tissues. PMID:21048966

  2. Canonical Estimation of Joint Educational Production Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chizmar, John F.; Zak, Thomas A.

    1984-01-01

    This article views learning and attitude formation within the context of joint production. Tables show summary statistics and estimated marginal products and rates for each output. These estimates reveal trade-offs within the learning process that differ for men and women. (PB)

  3. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and adrenal androgen functions in rheumatoid arthritis: an odyssey of hormonal relationships to the disease.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Chatterton, R T; Aldag, J C

    1999-06-22

    serum DHEAS level (mumol/L) was found in the pre-RA subgroup I, than in the 43 CN (2.14 +/- 0.47 vs. 3.62 +/- 0.37, respectively, (p = 0.033). The 25 older pre-RA and 100 CN (subgroups II and III) showed close mean DHEAS levels (1.89 +/- 0.30 and 1.94 +/- 0.14, respectively, p = 0.45). The serum DHEAS levels in pre-RA vs. CN subgroups were validated in a second reference laboratory. Also, the youngest pre-RA subgroup (I) showed a significant dissociation between entry serum DHEAS and cortisol levels (r = -0.660, p = 0.027), which differed (p = 0.017) from its matched CN, and from the older pre-RA (p = 0.004). Analyses of results based upon subgroupings by EMS and entry age (a, b, c, d) showed similar results. No significant differences were found between pre-RA and CN groups in levels of serum cortisol, other adrenal steroids, or the sex hormones assayed. In a sample of younger premenopausal women, significantly low serum DHEAS levels were found 4 to 20 years prior to onset of RA. Dissociation of serum cortisol and DHEAS levels was also found in the youngest, but not older, pre-RA subjects. The data suggest that subtle adrenal cortical dysfunction, manifested mainly by adrenal androgen (AA) deficiency, may either predispose to younger-onset RA or be a long-term marker in a minority subgroup of women.

  4. Photoperiod and testosterone regulate androgen receptor immunostaining in the Siberian hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Bittman, Eric L; Ehrlich, David A; Ogdahl, Justyne L; Jetton, Amy E

    2003-09-01

    Day length regulates the effects of gonadal steroids on gonadotropin secretion and behavior in seasonal breeders. To determine whether this influence of photoperiod results from changes in androgen receptor expression in Siberian hamster brain regions that regulate neuroendocrine function, androgen receptor immunostaining was examined in castrated animals given either no androgen replacement or one of three doses of testosterone (T) resulting in physiological serum concentrations. Half of the animals were housed under inhibitory photoperiod conditions, and immunostaining was quantified 11 days later. Measurement of serum gonadotropin and prolactin concentrations confirmed that androgen exerted graded effects on pituitary function but that the animals were killed before photoperiodic influences had fully developed. T significantly increased the numbers of androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells in every brain region examined. Photoperiod exerted no significant influence on androgen receptor-immunoreactive cell number in the arcuate nucleus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), medial preoptic nucleus, or in medial amygdala. An interaction between T and photoperiod was observed in the BNST and in the rostral and middle portions of the arcuate nucleus. Although increasing concentrations of T resulted in more intense cellular immunostaining in the BNST and arcuate, this effect was not influenced by day length. These results indicate that relatively short-duration (11 days) exposure to inhibitory photoperiod triggers localized and regionally specific changes in androgen receptor expression.

  5. Role of non-genomic androgen signalling in suppressing proliferation of fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Castoria, G; Giovannelli, P; Di Donato, M; Ciociola, A; Hayashi, R; Bernal, F; Appella, E; Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A

    2014-12-04

    The functions of androgen receptor (AR) in stromal cells are still debated in spite of the demonstrated importance of these cells in organ development and diseases. Here, we show that physiological androgen concentration (10 nM R1881 or DHT) fails to induce DNA synthesis, while it consistently stimulates cell migration in mesenchymal and transformed mesenchymal cells. Ten nanomolar R1881 triggers p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and its stabilization in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Activation of Rac and its downstream effector DYRK 1B is responsible for p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell quiescence. Ten nanomolar androgen also inhibits transformation induced by oncogenic Ras in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Overexpression of an AR mutant unable to interact with filamin A, use of a small peptide displacing AR/filamin A interaction, and filamin A knockdown indicate that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex regulates the pathway leading to p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. As the AR/filamin A complex is also responsible for migration stimulated by 10 nM androgen, our report shows that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex controls, through Rac 1, the decision of cells to halt cell cycle and migration. This study reveals a new and unexpected role of androgen/AR signalling in coordinating stromal cell functions.

  6. Discovery of Potent 17β-Hydroxywithanolides for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer by High-Throughput Screening of a Natural Products Library for Androgen-Induced Gene Expression Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya-Ming; Liu, Manping X; Grunow, Nathan; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Paine-Murrieta, Gillian; Felder, Stephen; Kris, Richard M; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie

    2015-09-10

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most prevalent cancer among men in Western societies, and those who develop metastatic castration-resistant PC (CRPC) invariably succumb to the disease. The need for effective treatments for CRPC is a pressing concern, especially due to limited durable responses with currently employed therapies. Here, we demonstrate the successful application of a high-throughput gene-expression profiling assay directly targeting genes of the androgen receptor pathway to screen a natural products library leading to the identification of 17β-hydroxywithanolides 1-5, of which physachenolide D (5) exhibited potent and selective in vitro activity against two PC cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3. Epoxidation of 5 afforded physachenolide C (6) with higher potency and stability. Structure-activity relationships for withanolides as potential anti-PC agents are presented together with in vivo efficacy studies on compound 6, suggesting that 17β-hydroxywithanolides are promising candidates for further development as CRPC therapeutics.

  7. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Schmit, V.; Weinstein, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with /sup 125/I-lipoproteins (human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)). The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly /sup 125/I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin (mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)). In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production.

  8. Loss of exogenous androgen dependence by prostate tumor cells is associated with elevated glucuronidation potential

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Brenna M.; Howell, Michelle E.; Wei, Qin; Ma, Linlin; Romsdahl, Trevor; Loughman, Eileen G.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Seravalli, Javier; Barycki, Joseph J.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate epithelial cells control the potency and availability of androgen hormones in part by inactivation and elimination. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for androgen inactivation by the prostate glucuronidation enzymes UGT2B15 and UGT2B17. UGDH expression is androgen stimulated, which increases the production of UDP-glucuronate, and fuels UGT-catalyzed glucuronidation. In this study, we compared the glucuronidation potential and its impact on androgen-mediated gene expression in an isogenic LNCaP model for androgen dependent versus castration resistant prostate cancer. Despite significantly lower androgen-glucuronide output, LNCaP 81 castration resistant tumor cells expressed higher levels of UGDH, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17. However, the magnitude of androgen-activated UGDH and PSA expression, as well as the AR-dependent repression of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was blunted several-fold in these cells. Consistent with these results, the ligand-activated binding of AR to the PSA promoter and subsequent transcriptional activation were also significantly reduced in castration resistant cells. Analysis of the UDP-sugar pools and flux through pathways downstream of UDP-glucuronate production revealed that these glucuronidation precursor metabolites were channeled through proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic pathways, leading to increased surface expression of Notch 1. Knockdown of UGDH diminished Notch1 and increased glucuronide output. Overall, these results support a model in which the aberrant partitioning of UDP-glucuronate and other UDP-sugars into alternative pathways during androgen deprivation contributes to the loss of prostate tumor cell androgen sensitivity by promoting altered cell surface proteoglycan expression. PMID:27307252

  9. Androgen receptor splice variants and polycystic ovary syndrome: cause or effect?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kirsty A; Handelsman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen action provides not only a classical pivotal role in male development and functions but also a recently proven role in female reproductive physiology. Splice variants of AR are reported to occur in various androgen-sensitive cancers and now, a recent study by Wang et al. proposed that AR splice variants have an etiological role in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Although further investigations are required to fully appraise the significance of their discovery, these seminal findings have exciting and important implications for opening a new chapter in the understanding of the role of AR signaling in the origins and pathogenesis of PCOS. PMID:26306851

  10. Early androgen exposure modulates spatial cognition in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, S.C.; Temple, V.; Oh, E.; VanRyzin, C.; Williams, A.; Cornwell, B.; Grillon, C.; Pine, D.S.; Ernst, M.; Merke, DP

    2008-01-01

    Major questions remain about the exact role of hormones in cognition. Furthermore, the extent to which early perturbation in steroid function affects human brain development continues to be a wide open area of research. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH), a genetic disorder of steroid dysfunction characterized in part by in utero over-production of testosterone, was used as a natural model for addressing this question. Here, CAH (n=54, mean age = 17.53, 31 female) patients were compared to healthy age- and sex-matched individuals (n=55, mean age = 19.02, 22 female) on a virtual equivalent of the Morris Water Maze task (Morris, 1984), an established measure of sex differences in spatial cognition in rodents. Findings revealed that females with CAH with the most severe form of the disease and expected highest level of in utero exposure to androgens were found to perform similarly to both healthy males and CAH males, whereas strong sex differences were apparent in milder forms of the disorder and in controls. Moreover, advanced bone age, an indicator of long-term childhood exposure to testosterone was correlated with improved performance. The results indicate that individuals exposed to both excess androgens prenatally and prolonged exposure during childhood may manifest long-lasting changes in cognitive function. Such finding suggests a pivotal role of hormonal function on brain development in humans, mirroring results from the animal literature. PMID:18675711

  11. Water Production Functions For High Plains Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declining water supplies is the critical resource issue for irrigated agriculture in the High Plains and much of the western U.S. Farmers need to maximize production per unit water consumed to remain economically viable and sustain irrigated agriculture. The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Wat...

  12. The role of androgens in follicle maturation and ovulation induction: friend or foe of infertility treatment?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of androgens on follicle maturation have been controversial for some time. Here, we review the potential of their applications in improving human ovulation induction, based on human and animal data, reported in the literature. Methods We reviewed the published literature for the years 2005-2011, using relevant key words, in PubMed, Medline and Cochrane reviews, and then performed secondary reviews of referenced articles, which previously had not been known or preceded the searched time period. A total of 217 publications were reviewed. Results Contrary to widely held opinion, recent data, mostly developed in the mouse, convincingly demonstrate essential contribution of androgens to normal follicle maturation and, therefore, female fertility. Androgens appear most engaged at preantral and antral stages, primarily affect granulosa cells, and exert effects via androgen receptors (AR) through transcriptional regulation but also in non-genomic ways, with ligand-activated AR modulating follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) activity in granulosa cells. While some androgens, like testosterone (T) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), appear effective in improving functional ovarian reserve (FOR) in women with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), others may even exert opposite effects. Such differences in androgens may, at least partially, reflect different levels of agonism to AR. Discussion Selective androgens appear capable of improving early stages of folliculogenesis. They, therefore, may represent forerunners of a completely new class of ovulation-inducing medications, which, in contrast to gonadotropins, affect follicle maturation at much earlier stages. PMID:21849061

  13. Androgen responsiveness of the new human endometrial cancer cell line MFE-296.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, R; Beck, S; Filmer, A; Hushmand Nia, A; Kunzmann, R; Koch, M; Slater, E P; Schulz, K D

    1994-04-01

    MFE-296 endometrial cancer cells express androgen receptors in vitro. These cells, which are tumorigenic in nude mice, are derived from a moderately differentiated human endometrial adenocarcinoma. They express vimentin and the cytokeratins 7, 8, 18, and 19. Karyotyping revealed near-tetraploidy for most of the cells. No marker chromosomes were observed. DNA analyses confirmed the genetic identity of the cell line and the patient from whom the cell line was derived. Proliferation of MFE-296 cells was inhibited by the progestin R5020 and the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The inhibition of proliferation by DHT was antagonized by the antiandrogen Casodex, demonstrating the involvement of the androgen receptor. Androgen binding was determined at 22,000 binding sites per cell using a whole-cell assay (KD = 0.05 nM) and 30 fmol/mg protein with the dextran charcoal method; 7 fmol/mg protein of progesterone receptors were found, whereas estrogen receptors were below 5 fmol/mg protein. The androgen receptor was functionally intact, as demonstrated by transfection experiments with a reporter-gene construct, containing an androgen-responsive element. In MFE-296 cells the content of the androgen receptor was up-regulated by its own ligand.

  14. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment. In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  15. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  16. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  17. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone. They can exert strong effects on the human body that may be beneficial for athletic performance. A review of the literature revealed that most laboratory studies did not investigate the actual doses of AAS currently abused in the field. Therefore, those studies may not reflect the actual (adverse) effects of steroids. The available scientific literature describes that short-term administration of these drugs by athletes can increase strength and bodyweight. Strength gains of about 5-20% of the initial strength and increments of 2-5 kg bodyweight, that may be attributed to an increase of the lean body mass, have been observed. A reduction of fat mass does not seem to occur. Although AAS administration may affect erythropoiesis and blood haemoglobin concentrations, no effect on endurance performance was observed. Little data about the effects of AAS on metabolic responses during exercise training and recovery are available and, therefore, do not allow firm conclusions. The main untoward effects of short- and long-term AAS abuse that male athletes most often self-report are an increase in sexual drive, the occurrence of acne vulgaris, increased body hair and increment of aggressive behaviour. AAS administration will disturb the regular endogenous production of testosterone and gonadotrophins that may persist for months after drug withdrawal. Cardiovascular risk factors may undergo deleterious alterations, including elevation of blood pressure and depression of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-, HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol levels. In echocardiographic studies in male athletes, AAS did not seem to affect cardiac structure and function, although in animal studies these drugs have been observed to exert hazardous effects on heart structure and function. In studies of athletes, AAS were not found to damage the liver. Psyche and behaviour seem to be strongly affected by AAS

  18. Effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hartgens, Fred; Kuipers, Harm

    2004-01-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of the male hormone testosterone. They can exert strong effects on the human body that may be beneficial for athletic performance. A review of the literature revealed that most laboratory studies did not investigate the actual doses of AAS currently abused in the field. Therefore, those studies may not reflect the actual (adverse) effects of steroids. The available scientific literature describes that short-term administration of these drugs by athletes can increase strength and bodyweight. Strength gains of about 5-20% of the initial strength and increments of 2-5 kg bodyweight, that may be attributed to an increase of the lean body mass, have been observed. A reduction of fat mass does not seem to occur. Although AAS administration may affect erythropoiesis and blood haemoglobin concentrations, no effect on endurance performance was observed. Little data about the effects of AAS on metabolic responses during exercise training and recovery are available and, therefore, do not allow firm conclusions. The main untoward effects of short- and long-term AAS abuse that male athletes most often self-report are an increase in sexual drive, the occurrence of acne vulgaris, increased body hair and increment of aggressive behaviour. AAS administration will disturb the regular endogenous production of testosterone and gonadotrophins that may persist for months after drug withdrawal. Cardiovascular risk factors may undergo deleterious alterations, including elevation of blood pressure and depression of serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-, HDL2- and HDL3-cholesterol levels. In echocardiographic studies in male athletes, AAS did not seem to affect cardiac structure and function, although in animal studies these drugs have been observed to exert hazardous effects on heart structure and function. In studies of athletes, AAS were not found to damage the liver. Psyche and behaviour seem to be strongly affected by AAS

  19. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Prostate Epithelial Homeostasis by Androgen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boyu; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Henry, Gervaise; Malewska, Alicia; Wei, Xing; Zhang, Li; Brinkley, William; Zhang, Yiqun; Castro, Patricia D; Titus, Mark; Chen, Rui; Sayeeduddin, Mohammad; Raj, Ganesh V; Mauck, Ryan; Roehrborn, Claus; Creighton, Chad J; Strand, Douglas W; Ittmann, Michael M; Xin, Li

    2016-09-15

    Prostate inflammation has been suggested as an etiology for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We show that decreased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in luminal cells of human BPH specimens correlates with a higher degree of regional prostatic inflammation. However, the cause-and-effect relationship between the two events remains unclear. We investigated specifically whether attenuating AR activity in prostate luminal cells induces inflammation. Disrupting luminal cell AR signaling in mouse models promotes cytokine production cell-autonomously, impairs epithelial barrier function, and induces immune cell infiltration, which further augments local production of cytokines and chemokines including Il-1 and Ccl2. This inflammatory microenvironment promotes AR-independent prostatic epithelial proliferation, which can be abolished by ablating IL-1 signaling or depleting its major cellular source, the macrophages. This study demonstrates that disrupting luminal AR signaling promotes prostate inflammation, which may serve as a mechanism for resistance to androgen-targeted therapy for prostate-related diseases. PMID:27594448

  20. Survival advantage of AMPK activation to androgen-independent prostate cancer cells during energy stress.

    PubMed

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Wu, Yue; Mohler, James L; Ip, Clement

    2010-10-01

    Androgen-independent prostate cancer usually develops as a relapse following androgen ablation therapy. Removing androgen systemically causes vascular degeneration and nutrient depletion of the prostate tumor tissue. The fact that the malignancy later evolves to androgen-independence suggests that some cancer cells are able to survive the challenge of energy/nutrient deprivation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important manager of energy stress. The present study was designed to investigate the role of AMPK in contributing to the survival of the androgen-independent phenotype. Most of the experiments were carried out in the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and the androgen-independent C4-2 cells. These two cell lines have the same genetic background, since the C4-2 line is derived from the LNCaP line. Glucose deprivation (GD) was instituted to model energy stress encountered by these cells. The key findings are as follows. First, the activation of AMPK by GD was much stronger in C4-2 cells than in LNCaP cells, and the robustness of AMPK activation was correlated favorably with cell viability. Second, the response of AMPK was specific to energy deficiency rather than to amino acid deficiency. The activation of AMPK by GD was functional, as demonstrated by appropriate phosphorylation changes of mTOR and mTOR downstream substrates. Third, blocking AMPK activation by chemical inhibitor or dominant negative AMPK led to increased apoptotic cell death. The observation that similar results were found in other androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, including CW22Rv1 abd VCaP, provided further assurance that AMPK is a facilitator on the road to androgen-independence of prostate cancer cells.

  1. Orexin Decreases Aromatase Gene Expression in The Hypothalamus of Androgenized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Maliheh; Alishah, Zahra; Khazali, Homayoun; Mahmoudi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background Orexin is a hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide, which third cerebral injection of it mainly exerts inhibitory effects on reproductive functions. It increases significantly the Aromatase (Cyp19) gene expression in the hypothalamus of male rats. Aromatase is an enzyme which converts androgens to estradiol in the hypothalamus of rats. Prenatal or neonatal exposure of females to testosterone masculinizes the pattern of Cyp19 mRNA levels in adulthood. In the present study the effects of central injections of orexin-A on hypothalamic Cyp19 gene expression of adult female rats were investigated, while they had been androgenized on third day of postnatal life. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, twenty female Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (50 µg/100 µl) on their third day of postnatal life. Adult androgenized rats weighing 180-220 g, received either 3 µl saline or one of 2, 4 or 8 µg/3 µl concentration of orexin via third cerebral ventricle. Five non-androgenized rats, as control group, received intra cerebral ventricle (ICV) injection of 3 µl saline. The hypothalamuses were dissected out and mean Cyp19 mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Data were analyzed by unpaired t test and one-way ANOVA using SPSS software, version 16. Results Mean relative Cyp19 mRNA level was significantly increased in the hypothalamus of androgenized compared to non-androgenized female rats. Central injec- tions of 2, 4 or 8 µg/3 µl orexin decreased significantly the hypothalamic Cyp19 mRNA level of androgenized rats compared to androgenized-control groups. Conclusion The results suggested that the orexin may exert inhibitory effects on the gene expression of Cyp19 in the hypothalamus of neonatal androgenized female rats in adulthood. PMID:27441052

  2. Anogenital distance as a marker of androgen exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Thankamony, A; Pasterski, V; Ong, K K; Acerini, C L; Hughes, I A

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal foetal testis development has been proposed to underlie common disorders of the male reproductive system such as cryptorchidism, hypospadias, reduced semen quality and testicular germ cell tumour, which are regarded as components of a 'testicular dysgenesis syndrome'. The increasing trends and geographical variation in their incidence have been suggested to result from in utero exposure to environmental chemicals acting as endocrine disruptors. In rodents, the anogenital distance (AGD), measured from the anus to the base of genital tubercle, is a sensitive biomarker of androgen exposure during a critical embryonic window of testis development. In humans, several epidemiological studies have shown alterations in AGD associated with prenatal exposure to several chemicals with potential endocrine disrupting activity. However, the link between AGD and androgen exposure in humans is not well-defined. This review focuses on the current evidence for such a relationship. As in rodents, a clear gender difference is detected during foetal development of the AGD in humans which is maintained thereafter. Reduced AGD in association with clinically relevant outcomes of potential environmental exposures, such as cryptorchidism or hypospadias, is in keeping with AGD as a marker of foetal testicular function. Furthermore, AGD may reflect variations in prenatal androgen exposure in healthy children as shorter AGD at birth is associated with reduced masculine play behaviour in preschool boys. Several studies provide evidence linking shorter AGD with lower fertility, semen quality and testosterone levels in selected groups of adults attending andrology clinics. Overall, the observational data in humans are consistent with experimental studies in animals and support the use of AGD as a biomarker of foetal androgen exposure. Future studies evaluating AGD in relation to reproductive hormones in both infants and adults, and to gene polymorphisms, will help to further delineate

  3. Influencing factors on color and product-function association.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Hsien

    2011-06-01

    The associations of age, sex, and matching types with color and product-function were examined in a real-world product scenario (shampoo) among 128 volunteers (M age = 29.3 yr.; SD = 15.6). A pilot study identified eight popular colors and eight product-functions. The association between color and product-function was explored in the main sample. Responses suggested seven pairings of color/product-functions: Red/Hot oil treatment, Yellow/Bright and shiny hair, Green/Herbal extracts, Blue/Deep cleaning, Purple/Soothing, Black/Antiseptic, and White/Anti-dandruff. Analyses indicated that adult participants required more repetitions for retention, as did memorization with random pairing compared to participant-selected pairings. There were statistically significant correlations of responses to colors and product functions. With known color/product-function associations, manufacturers might promote their products more effectively. It is suggested that the associations might be sex- or culture-specific. PMID:21879633

  4. Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) bark oil on heat stress-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor density in developing Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Türk, Gaffari; Şimşek, Ülkü G; Çeribaşı, Ali O; Çeribaşı, Songül; Özer Kaya, Şeyma; Güvenç, Mehmet; Çiftçi, Mehmet; Sönmez, Mustafa; Yüce, Abdurrauf; Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Tonbak, Fadime

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cinnamon bark oil (CBO) on heat stress (HS)-induced changes in sperm production, testicular lipid peroxidation, testicular apoptosis, and androgenic receptor (AR) density in developing Japanese quails. Fifteen-day-old 90 male chicks were assigned to two main groups. The first group (45 chicks) was kept in a thermoneutral room at 22 °C for 24 h/day. The second group (45 chicks) was kept in a room with high ambient temperature at 34 °C for 8 h/day (from 9 AM-5 PM) and at 22 °C for 16 h/day. Each of these two main groups was then divided into three subgroups (CBO groups 0, 250, 500 ppm) consisting of 15 chicks (six treatment groups in 2 × 3 factorial order). Each of subgroups was replicated for three times and each replicate included five chicks. Heat stress caused significant decreases in body weight, spermatid and testicular sperm numbers, the density of testicular Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic marker) and AR immunopositivity, and significant increases in testicular lipid peroxidation level, the density of testicular Bax (apoptotic marker) immunopositivity, and a Bax/Bcl-2 ratio along with some histopathologic damages. However, 250 and 500 ppm CBO supplementation provided significant improvements in HS-induced increased level of testicular lipid peroxidation, decreased number of spermatid and testicular sperm, decreased densities of Bcl-2 and AR immunopositivity, and some deteriorated testicular histopathologic lesions. In addition, although HS did not significantly affect the testicular glutathione level, addition of both 250 and 500 ppm CBO to diet of quails reared in both HS and thermoneutral conditions caused a significant increase when compared with quails without any consumption of CBO. In conclusion, HS-induced lipid peroxidation causes testicular damage in developing male Japanese quails and, consumption of CBO, which has antiperoxidative effect, protects their testes against HS.

  5. Structure and Function of Macroalgal Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Young, Ryan M; Schoenrock, Kathryn M; von Salm, Jacqueline L; Amsler, Charles D; Baker, Bill J

    2015-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of marine phyco-derived secondary metabolites in the 1950s there has been a rapid increase in the description of new algal natural products. These metabolites have multiple ecological roles as well as commercial value as potential drugs or lead compounds. With the emergence of resistance to our current arsenal of drugs as well as the development of new chemotherapies for currently untreatable diseases, new compounds must be sourced. As outlined in this chapter algae produce a diverse range of chemicals many of which have potential for the treatment of human afflictions.In this chapter we outline the classes of metabolites produced by this chemically rich group of organisms as well as their respective ecological roles in the environment. Algae are found in nearly every environment on earth, with many of these organisms possessing the ability to shape the ecosystem they inhabit. With current challenges to climate stability, understanding how these important organisms interact with their environment as well as one another might afford better insight into how they respond to a changing climate.

  6. New insights into the androgen biotransformation in prostate cancer: A regulatory network among androgen, androgen receptors and UGTs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuan; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Androgen, as one kind of steroid hormones, is pivotal in the hormone-sensitive cancer, such as prostate cancer (PCa). The synthesis, elimination, and bioavailability of androgen in prostate cells have been proved to be a main cause of the carcinogenesis, maintenance and deterioration of PCa. This review illustrates the outlines of androgen biotransformation, and further discusses the different enzymes, especially UDP-glucuronyltransferases (UGTs) embedded in both benign and malignant prostate cells, which catalyze the reactions. Although many inhibitors of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of androgens have been developed into drugs to fight against PCa, the elimination procedures metabolized by the UGTs are less emphasized. Thus the regulatory network among androgen, androgen receptors (AR) and UGTs is carefully reviewed in this article, indicating the determinant effects of UGTs on prostatic androgens and the regulation of AR. Finally, the hypothesis is also put forward that the regulators of UGTs may be developed to accelerate the androgen elimination and benefit PCa therapy. PMID:26926093

  7. Pharmacological characterization of AC-262536, a novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Piu, Fabrice; Gardell, Luis R; Son, Thomas; Schlienger, Nathalie; Lund, Birgitte W; Schiffer, Hans H; Vanover, Kim E; Davis, Robert E; Olsson, Roger; Bradley, Stefania Risso

    2008-03-01

    Because of the limitations and liabilities of current testosterone therapies, non-steroidal tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators may provide a clinically meaningful advance in therapy. Using a functional cell-based assay AC-262536 was identified as a potent and selective AR ligand, with partial agonist activity relative to the natural androgen testosterone. A 2-week chronic study in castrated male rats indicated that AC-262536 significantly improves anabolic parameters in these animals, especially in stimulating the growth of the levator ani and in suppressing elevated LH levels. In sharp contrast to testosterone, AC-262536 has weak androgenic effects, as measured by prostate and seminal vesicle weights. Thus, AC-262536 represents a novel class of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with beneficial anabolic effects.

  8. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. PMID:24565564

  9. Single-Chain Probes for Illuminating Androgenicity of Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol introduces a single-chain probe carrying a functional peptide in the N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor (AR NTD) for illuminating androgenicity of ligands. In the single-chain probe, a functional peptide in the AR NTD was genetically fused to the ligand-binding domain of AR (AR LBD) via a flexible linker, and then sandwiched between the N- and C-terminal fragments of split-firefly luciferase (FLuc) dissected at D415. This single-chain probe exerts (1) a high signal-to-background ratio and (2) sensitive discrimination between agonists and antagonists, where the dimerization of AR LBD is not involved. The present protocol guides a fundamental methodology on how to discriminate weak protein-protein (peptide) binding, and provides a new insight into the intramolecular folding inside monomeric AR. PMID:27424901

  10. The Role of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in the Skin-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Chang, Philip; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin related diseases, such as androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris. Current treatments for these androgen/AR-involved diseases, which target the synthesis of androgens or prevent its binding to AR, can cause significant adverse side effects. Based on the recent studies using AR knockout mice, it has been suggested that AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases. Here we review recent studies of androgen/AR roles in several skin-related disorders, including acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism, as well as cutaneous wound healing. PMID:22829074

  11. Ecological Production Functions: A Theoretical and Practical Exploration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological production functions characterize relationships between ecosystem condition, management practices, and the delivery of economically valuable ecosystem services. Many in the ecosystem service research community view ecological research directed toward developing ecolog...

  12. Exercise and Serum Androgens in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerlind, Kim C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study examining the effect of a 10-week hydraulic resistance exercise program on serum androgen levels, strength, and lean body weight in 18 college women revealed that training did not result in significant increases in androgen hormones, although there were significant gains in strength. (Author/CB)

  13. The effects of model androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone on mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) reproduction under different salinities.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Chelsea O; Frasca, Salvatore; Provatas, Anthony A; Lama, Tanya; DeGuise, Sylvain; Bosker, Thijs

    2015-08-01

    Endocrine disrupting substances (EDSs) have the potential to disturb sensitive hormone pathways, particularly those involved in development and reproduction. Both fresh and estuarine water bodies receive inputs of EDSs from a variety of sources, including sewage effluent, industrial effluent and agricultural runoff. Based on current literature, freshwater species appear to respond to lower levels of EDSs than estuarine or marine species. Therefore, effects elicited by EDSs in freshwater teleosts may not be an accurate representation of how EDSs affect teleosts in estuarine and marine environments. To address this potential difference, a short-term reproductive bioassay was conducted under conditions of low and high salinity using mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a euryhaline species that is native to the east coast of North America. The goals of this study were to determine the response of mummichog when exposed to an androgenic EDS and whether salinity affected the response. A model androgen, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), was selected for this experiment. Impacts on reproduction were evaluated at multiple biological levels, including physiological (sex steroid levels), organismal (gonad size and gonad morphology), and functional (egg production) endpoints. Under conditions of high salinity, egg production was significantly reduced at all exposure concentrations. Under conditions of low salinity, there were no significant differences based on DHT treatment; however, egg production in all treatment groups including the control were significantly reduced relative to the high salinity control group. Other reproductive endpoints, such as sex steroid production, showed stronger correlation to fecundity in females than males. This study demonstrates that mummichog fecundity is sensitive to androgenic endocrine disruption while also underscoring the importance of how changes in salinity, an environmental variable, can impact reproduction. PMID:26141585

  14. The effects of model androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone on mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) reproduction under different salinities.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Chelsea O; Frasca, Salvatore; Provatas, Anthony A; Lama, Tanya; DeGuise, Sylvain; Bosker, Thijs

    2015-08-01

    Endocrine disrupting substances (EDSs) have the potential to disturb sensitive hormone pathways, particularly those involved in development and reproduction. Both fresh and estuarine water bodies receive inputs of EDSs from a variety of sources, including sewage effluent, industrial effluent and agricultural runoff. Based on current literature, freshwater species appear to respond to lower levels of EDSs than estuarine or marine species. Therefore, effects elicited by EDSs in freshwater teleosts may not be an accurate representation of how EDSs affect teleosts in estuarine and marine environments. To address this potential difference, a short-term reproductive bioassay was conducted under conditions of low and high salinity using mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), a euryhaline species that is native to the east coast of North America. The goals of this study were to determine the response of mummichog when exposed to an androgenic EDS and whether salinity affected the response. A model androgen, 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), was selected for this experiment. Impacts on reproduction were evaluated at multiple biological levels, including physiological (sex steroid levels), organismal (gonad size and gonad morphology), and functional (egg production) endpoints. Under conditions of high salinity, egg production was significantly reduced at all exposure concentrations. Under conditions of low salinity, there were no significant differences based on DHT treatment; however, egg production in all treatment groups including the control were significantly reduced relative to the high salinity control group. Other reproductive endpoints, such as sex steroid production, showed stronger correlation to fecundity in females than males. This study demonstrates that mummichog fecundity is sensitive to androgenic endocrine disruption while also underscoring the importance of how changes in salinity, an environmental variable, can impact reproduction.

  15. Hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Lourdes; Ong, Ken K; López-Bermejo, Abel; Dunger, David B; de Zegher, Francis

    2014-08-01

    Hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess is the most common cause of hirsutism, acne and menstrual irregularity in adolescent girls. Here, we propose that the disorder frequently originates from an absolute or relative excess of lipids in adipose tissue, and from associated changes in insulin sensitivity, gonadotropin secretion and ovarian androgen release. Girls from populations with genotypes attuned to nutritionally harsh conditions seem to be particularly vulnerable to the development of hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess in today's obesogenic environment. We propose that hirsutism, hyperandrogenaemia and menstrual irregularity (≥2 years after menarche) is used as a diagnostic triad for the disorder. No pharmacological therapy has been approved for girls with androgen excess; however, lifestyle intervention is essential to reduce adiposity. In girls without obesity who are not sexually active, insulin sensitization has more broadly normalizing effects than estradiol-progestogen combinations. The early recognition of girls at risk of developing hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess might enable prevention in childhood.

  16. Crop water production functions for grain sorghum and winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of water-limited cropping systems can be reduced by untimely distribution of water as well as cold and heat stress. The objective was to develop relationships among weather parameters, water use, and grain productivity to produce functions forecasting grain yields of grain sorghum and w...

  17. Renormdynamics, multiparticle production, negative binomial distribution, and Riemann zeta function

    SciTech Connect

    Makhaldiani, N. V.

    2013-09-15

    After short introduction, we consider different aspects of the renormdynamics. Then scaling functions of the multiparticle production processes and corresponding stochastic dynamics are considered. Nonperturbative quasi-particle dynamics is considered on the base of the toy QCD-O(N)-sigma model. Last section concerns to the NBD-Riemann zeta function connection.

  18. Identification of an educational production function for diverse technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Production function analysis used to estimate the cost effectiveness of three alternative technologies in higher education: traditional instruction, instructional television, and computer-assisted instruction is presented. Criteria and selection of a functional form are outlined and a general discussion of variable selection and measurement is presented.

  19. A Modification of Lotka's Function for Scientific Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, P. H.; Fang, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the validity of Lotka's function for a measurement of scientific productivity. A systematic deviation of this function from numerical examples has been found by introducing a different least-square formulation instead of a logarithmic linearization. Therefore, a modification of the measurement of the publication frequencies is proposed.…

  20. Androgens in human evolution. A new explanation of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    2001-01-01

    Human evolution consists of chronological changes in gene regulation of a continuous and relatively stable genome, activated by hormones, the production of which is intermittently affected by endogenous and exogenous forces. Periodic variations in the gonadal androgen, testosterone, and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), significantly participated in all hominid transformations. The hominid characteristics of early Australopithecines are primarily a result of increased testosterone. The first significant cold of the early Pleistocene resulted in an increase in DHEA that simultaneously produced Homo and the robust Australopithecines. Subsequent Pleistocene climatic changes and differential reproduction produced changes in DHEA and testosterone ratios that caused extinction of the robust Australopithecines and further changes and continuation of Homo. Changes in testosterone and DHEA produce allometric and behavioral changes that are identifiable and vigorous in modern populations. PMID:11702658

  1. Androgens in human evolution. A new explanation of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    2001-01-01

    Human evolution consists of chronological changes in gene regulation of a continuous and relatively stable genome, activated by hormones, the production of which is intermittently affected by endogenous and exogenous forces. Periodic variations in the gonadal androgen, testosterone, and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), significantly participated in all hominid transformations. The hominid characteristics of early Australopithecines are primarily a result of increased testosterone. The first significant cold of the early Pleistocene resulted in an increase in DHEA that simultaneously produced Homo and the robust Australopithecines. Subsequent Pleistocene climatic changes and differential reproduction produced changes in DHEA and testosterone ratios that caused extinction of the robust Australopithecines and further changes and continuation of Homo. Changes in testosterone and DHEA produce allometric and behavioral changes that are identifiable and vigorous in modern populations.

  2. Protective effect of androgens against inflammation induced cartilage degradation in male rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, J A; Larbre, J P; Spector, T D; Perry, L A; Scott, D L; Willoughby, D A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease which predominantly affects women. Interestingly, low serum androgen levels and clinical improvement with androgen replacement have been reported in male patients. The aetiopathogenic role of sex hormones in arthritis and their potential long term effects on joint destruction and disability remains unclear, however. This study was designed to investigate the potential influence of sex hormones on inflammation induced cartilage degradation in male rodents. METHODS--An in vivo model of cotton wrapped cartilage implants was used to assess the effects of androgen, oestradiol, and progesterone on inflammation induced cartilage degradation, and in vitro techniques were used to investigate the direct actions on cartilage metabolism and cytokine production in male animals. RESULTS--Orchidectomy resulted in accelerated cartilage damage which was reversed by replacement of physiological levels of androgens. Granulomatous tissue from castrated male rodents produced higher amounts of interleukin 1. Sex hormones reduced spontaneous proteoglycan loss in vitro but did not interfere with the effects of interleukin 1 on cultured cartilage. CONCLUSIONS--Androgens appear to protect cartilage from inflammation induced breakdown in male animals. These results support a pathogenic role for hypoandrogenism in rheumatoid arthritis and suggest that long term androgen replacement may help prevent joint damage and disability. PMID:8484695

  3. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elliot R.; McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Heather, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping. PMID:23389345

  4. MiR137 is an androgen regulated repressor of an extended network of transcriptional coregulators

    PubMed Central

    Whitchurch, Jonathan; McWilliam, Andrew; Ødum, Niels; Persson, Jenny L.; Heery, David M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.; Mongan, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and the androgen receptor (AR) play crucial roles in male development and the pathogenesis and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The AR functions as a ligand dependent transcription factor which recruits multiple enzymatically distinct epigenetic coregulators to facilitate transcriptional regulation in response to androgens. Over-expression of AR coregulators is implicated in cancer. We have shown that over-expression of KDM1A, an AR coregulator, contributes to PCa recurrence by promoting VEGFA expression. However the mechanism(s) whereby AR coregulators are increased in PCa remain poorly understood. In this study we show that the microRNA hsa-miR-137 (miR137) tumor suppressor regulates expression of an extended network of transcriptional coregulators including KDM1A/LSD1/AOF1, KDM2A/JHDM1A/FBXL11, KDM4A/JMJD2A, KDM5B JARID1B/PLU1, KDM7A/JHDM1D/PHF8, MED1/TRAP220/DRIP205 and NCoA2/SRC2/TIF2. We show that expression of miR137 is increased by androgen in LnCaP androgen PCa responsive cells and that the miR137 locus is epigenetically silenced in androgen LnCaP:C4-2 and PC3 independent PCa cells. In addition, we found that restoration of miR137 expression down-regulates expression of VEGFA, an AR target gene, which suggests a role of miR137 loss also in cancer angiogenesis. Finally we show functional inhibition of miR137 function enhanced androgen induction of PSA/KLK3 expression. Our data indicate that miR137 functions as an androgen regulated suppressor of androgen signaling by modulating expression of an extended network of transcriptional coregulators. Therefore, we propose that epigenetic silencing of miR137 is an important event in promoting androgen signaling during prostate carcinogenesis and progression. PMID:26461474

  5. Research Resource: Hormones, Genes, and Athleticism: Effect of Androgens on the Avian Muscular Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Chan, Tak-Ming; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Chew, Jenifer G; Xiao, Xinshu; Schlinger, Barney A

    2016-02-01

    Male vertebrate social displays vary from physically simple to complex, with the latter involving exquisite motor command of the body and appendages. Studies of these displays have, in turn, provided substantial insight into neuromotor mechanisms. The neotropical golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus) has been used previously as a model to investigate intricate motor skills because adult males of this species perform an acrobatic and androgen-dependent courtship display. To support this behavior, these birds express elevated levels of androgen receptors (AR) in their skeletal muscles. Here we use RNA sequencing to explore how testosterone (T) modulates the muscular transcriptome to support male manakin courtship displays. In addition, we explore how androgens influence gene expression in the muscles of the zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), a model passerine bird with a limited courtship display and minimal muscle AR. We identify androgen-dependent, muscle-specific gene regulation in both species. In addition, we identify manakin-specific effects that are linked to muscle use during the manakin display, including androgenic regulation of genes associated with muscle fiber contractility, cellular homeostasis, and energetic efficiency. Overall, our results point to numerous genes and gene networks impacted by androgens in male birds, including some that underlie optimal muscle function necessary for performing acrobatic display routines. Manakins are excellent models to explore gene regulation promoting athletic ability. PMID:26745669

  6. Androgen receptors in a cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni: structure, localization, and expression levels.

    PubMed

    Harbott, Lene K; Burmeister, Sabrina S; White, Richard B; Vagell, Mike; Fernald, Russell D

    2007-09-01

    Androgens are an important output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis that controls reproduction in all vertebrates. In male teleosts two androgens, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone, control sexual differentiation and development in juveniles and reproductive behavior in adults. Androgenic signals provide feedback at many levels of the HPG axis, including the hypothalamic neurons that synthesize and release gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), but the precise cellular site of androgen action in the brain is not known. Here we describe two androgen receptor subtypes, ARalpha and ARbeta, in the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni and show that these subtypes are differentially located throughout the adult brain in nuclei known to function in the control of reproduction. ARalpha was expressed in the ventral part of the ventral telencephalon, the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus and the ventral hypothalamus, whereas ARbeta was more widely expressed in the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, the POA, and the ventral and dorsal hypothalamus. We provide the first evidence in any vertebrate that the GnRH1-releasing neurons, which serve as the central control point of the HPG axis, express both subtypes of AR. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we show that A. burtoni AR subtypes have different expression levels in adult tissue, with ARalpha showing significantly higher expression than ARbeta in the pituitary, and ARbeta expressed at a higher level than ARalpha in the anterior and middle brain. These data provide important insight into the role of androgens in regulating the vertebrate reproductive axis.

  7. Effect of isotretinoin on serum levels of precursor and peripherally derived androgens in patients with acne.

    PubMed

    Lookingbill, D P; Demers, L M; Tigelaar, R E; Shalita, A R

    1988-04-01

    Sebaceous glands are stimulated by androgens and can convert them to more active forms. Isotretinoin, however, has a profound inhibitory effect on sebaceous gland size and function. This study evaluated the effect of isotretinoin on serum levels of precursor and tissue-derived androgens. Twenty-four subjects (15 men and nine women) were treated for 20 weeks with 1 mg/kg/d of isotretinoin. Serum samples were obtained at baseline, 8, 16, and 24 weeks, and assayed for precursor androgens--total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (free T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S); and tissue androgens--dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and its metabolite, 3 alpha-androstanediol glucuronide (3 alpha-diol G). Isotretinoin had no meaningful effects on precursor androgens, except for producing an elevation of free T in women. In contrast, isotretinoin produced depressions in the serum levels of DHT and 3 alpha-diol G in women and in 3 alpha-diol G in men. These decreases are believed to be the result, rather than the cause, of a reduction in the size of the sebaceous glands: The magnitude of the observed decreases may represent the amount of tissue-derived androgens that sebaceous glands normally contribute to the circulating pool. PMID:2965551

  8. Androgen receptor non-nuclear regulation of prostate cancer cell invasion mediated by Src and matriptase.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Lamb, Laura E; Schulz, Veronique V; Nollet, Eric A; Miranti, Cindy K

    2015-03-30

    Castration-resistant prostate cancers still depend on nuclear androgen receptor (AR) function despite their lack of dependence on exogenous androgen. Second generation anti-androgen therapies are more efficient at blocking nuclear AR; however resistant tumors still develop. Recent studies indicate Src is highly active in these resistant tumors. By manipulating AR activity in several different prostate cancer cell lines through RNAi, drug treatment, and the use of a nuclear-deficient AR mutant, we demonstrate that androgen acting on cytoplasmic AR rapidly stimulates Src tyrosine kinase via a non-genomic mechanism. Cytoplasmic AR, acting through Src enhances laminin integrin-dependent invasion. Active Matriptase, which cleaves laminin, is elevated within minutes after androgen stimulation, and is subsequently shed into the medium. Matriptase activation and shedding induced by cytoplasmic AR is dependent on Src. Concomitantly, CDCP1/gp140, a Matriptase and Src substrate that controls integrin-based migration, is activated. However, only inhibition of Matriptase, but not CDCP1, suppresses the AR/Src-dependent increase in invasion. Matriptase, present in conditioned medium from AR-stimulated cells, is sufficient to enhance invasion in the absence of androgen. Thus, invasion is stimulated by a rapid but sustained increase in Src activity, mediated non-genomically by cytoplasmic AR, leading to rapid activation and shedding of the laminin protease Matriptase.

  9. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, or end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty, and hypogonadism. This review summarizes the current standing of research and development of SARMs, crystallography of AR with SARMs, plausible mechanisms for their action and the potential therapeutic indications for this emerging class of drugs. PMID:19079612

  10. Nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator Ostarine in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Zilbermint, Mihail F; Dobs, Adrian S

    2009-10-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex syndrome, affecting up to 60% of the approximately 1.4 million patients diagnosed with cancer each year in the USA. This condition is characterized by progressive deterioration of a patient's nutritional status, weight loss, anorexia, diminished quality of life and increased mortality and morbidity. Current therapy with progestational, anti-inflammatory and anabolic agents is often ineffective and has a large number of undesirable effects. The newly developed nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator Ostarine has demonstrated promising results in Phase I and II clinical trials, increasing total lean body mass, enhancing functional performance and decreasing total tissue percent fat. This selective androgen receptor modulator may have the ability to perform as a potent anabolic agent with minimal side effects on other organs (prostate and hair follicles), thus presenting a new strategy in managing cancer cachexia. However, more extensive data is required before its efficacy is confirmed.

  11. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  12. Conjunctival mucin deficiency in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS).

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Flavio; Moretti, Costanzo; Micera, Alessandra; Bonini, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Sex steroid hormones are essential for a healthy ocular surface and the androgen receptor impairment found in patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) has been described to cause meibomian gland dysfunction and functional dry eye for lipid tear film layer instability. However, it has not been reported if the mucous layer is also affected. A 37-year-old CAIS patient with persistent symptoms of dry eye underwent ophthalmological examination and was evaluated for qualitative and quantitative tear function tests and conjunctival cytology. Samples obtained from the conjunctival epithelium were stained for histology and immunohistochemistry and compared with three age-matched female controls. Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR for MUC1 and MUC5AC were also performed on these samples. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and relative real-time RT-PCR showed a decrease in the expression of MUC1 and MUC5AC in CAIS. Changes in the tear film mucous layer were accompanied by a reduction in the tear film break up time test. This is the first report describing mucous layer alteration associated with androgen receptor impairment. Decreased mucin levels contribute in explaining the tear film instability in CAIS and should be considered an additional cause of dry eye in sex steroid hormone pathology.

  13. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  14. Mechanisms of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in North America. Almost all prostate cancers begin in an androgen-dependent state, so androgen deprivation therapy is administered and results in improved clinical outcomes. However, over time, some cancerous cells are able to survive and grow during this treatment, resulting in androgen-independent prostate cancer. At this point, the disease is fatal, as there are no effective targeted therapies available. Most prostate cancer tumors require androgen receptor (AR) signalling for survival. During the progression to androgen-independence, this signalling cascade has been found to be altered at many levels within prostate cancers. Mechanisms that enhance AR signalling during androgen deprivation include: AR gene amplifications, AR gene mutations, changes in expression of AR co-regulatory proteins, changes in expression of steroid-generating enzymes, ligand-independent activation of AR via ‘outlaw’ pathways, and AR-independent pathways that become activated, termed ‘bypass’ pathways. One or more of these aforementioned changes can lead to prostate cancer cells to gain androgen-independent properties. Understanding the molecular alterations that occur during this process will allow for improved therapeutic strategies to target key molecules and pathways important for this progression. PMID:27683456

  15. Mechanisms of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in North America. Almost all prostate cancers begin in an androgen-dependent state, so androgen deprivation therapy is administered and results in improved clinical outcomes. However, over time, some cancerous cells are able to survive and grow during this treatment, resulting in androgen-independent prostate cancer. At this point, the disease is fatal, as there are no effective targeted therapies available. Most prostate cancer tumors require androgen receptor (AR) signalling for survival. During the progression to androgen-independence, this signalling cascade has been found to be altered at many levels within prostate cancers. Mechanisms that enhance AR signalling during androgen deprivation include: AR gene amplifications, AR gene mutations, changes in expression of AR co-regulatory proteins, changes in expression of steroid-generating enzymes, ligand-independent activation of AR via ‘outlaw’ pathways, and AR-independent pathways that become activated, termed ‘bypass’ pathways. One or more of these aforementioned changes can lead to prostate cancer cells to gain androgen-independent properties. Understanding the molecular alterations that occur during this process will allow for improved therapeutic strategies to target key molecules and pathways important for this progression.

  16. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in pursuit of tissue-selective androgens.

    PubMed

    Omwancha, Josephat; Brown, Terry R

    2006-10-01

    The androgen receptor mediates the androgenic and anabolic activity of the endogenous steroids testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Current knowledge of the androgen receptor protein structure, and the molecular mechanisms surrounding the binding properties and activities of agonists and antagonists has led to the design and development of novel nonsteroidal ligands with selected tissue-specific androgen receptor agonist and antagonist activities. The activity of these compounds, termed selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), is directed toward the maintenance or enhancement of anabolic effects on bone and muscle with minimal androgenic effects on prostate growth. SARMs are of potential therapeutic value in the treatment of male hypogonadism, osteoporosis, frailty and muscle wasting, burn injury and would healing, anemia, mood and depression, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

  17. Androgen deprivation causes truncation of the C-terminal region of androgen receptor in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Inoue, Kaoru; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Inui, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, whereas mutant AR lacking the C-terminal ligand-binding domain functions in a ligand-independent manner. In the present study we report that the C-terminal truncated AR, which we named AR-NH1 (the N-terminal fragment of AR cleaved in the neighborhood of helix 1 of the ligand-binding domain), is produced in LNCaP prostatic carcinoma cells. The AR-NH1 of ~90 kDa was observed in an androgen-independent LNCaP subline and was further accumulated by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. MG132 treatment caused the accumulation of AR-NH1 even in parent LNCaP cells. AR-NH1 was produced in the absence of ligand or in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide, whereas AR agonists suppressed its production. AR-NH1 was detected with different AR antibodies recognizing amino acid residues 1-20 and 300-316 and was also generated from exogenous AR. Both siRNA-mediated AR knockdown and treatment with a serine protease inhibitor (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride) reduced AR-NH1 levels. According to the predicted cleavage site (between amino acid residues 660-685) and its nuclear localization, it is assumed that AR-NH1 functions as a constitutively active transcription factor. These data suggest that AR-NH1 is produced under hormone therapy and contributes to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer due to its ligand-independent transcriptional activity.

  18. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  19. Androgen-responsive gene database: integrated knowledge on androgen-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Ma, Yunsheng; Chen, Congcong; Fu, Xuping; Yang, Shu; Li, Xia; Yu, Guohua; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2009-11-01

    Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes.

  20. Opioid-Induced Androgen Deficiency (OPIAD): Diagnosis, Management, and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Timothy K; Wosnitzer, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD) was initially recognized as a possible consequence of opioid use roughly four decades ago. Long-acting opioid use carries risks of addiction, tolerance, and systemic side effects including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with consequent testosterone depletion leading to multiple central and peripheral effects. Hypogonadism is induced through direct inhibitory action of opioids on receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as well as testosterone production within the testes. Few studies have systematically investigated hormonal changes induced by long-term opioid administration or the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in patients with OPIAD. Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is a testosterone enhancement treatment which upregulates endogenous hypothalamic function. This review will focus on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of OPIAD, including summary of literature evaluating OPIAD treatment with TRT, and areas of future investigation. PMID:27586511

  1. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  2. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies.

  3. Using Plant Functional Traits to Explain Diversity–Productivity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Roscher, Christiane; Schumacher, Jens; Gubsch, Marlén; Lipowsky, Annett; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina; Schmid, Bernhard; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Background The different hypotheses proposed to explain positive species richness–productivity relationships, i.e. selection effect and complementarity effect, imply that plant functional characteristics are at the core of a mechanistic understanding of biodiversity effects. Methodology/Principal Findings We used two community-wide measures of plant functional composition, (1) community-weighted means of trait values (CWM) and (2) functional trait diversity based on Rao’s quadratic diversity (FDQ) to predict biomass production and measures of biodiversity effects in experimental grasslands (Jena Experiment) with different species richness (2, 4, 8, 16 and 60) and different functional group number and composition (1 to 4; legumes, grasses, small herbs, tall herbs) four years after establishment. Functional trait composition had a larger predictive power for community biomass and measures of biodiversitity effects (40–82% of explained variation) than species richness per se (<1–13% of explained variation). CWM explained a larger amount of variation in community biomass (80%) and net biodiversity effects (70%) than FDQ (36 and 38% of explained variation respectively). FDQ explained similar proportions of variation in complementarity effects (24%, positive relationship) and selection effects (28%, negative relationship) as CWM (27% of explained variation for both complementarity and selection effects), but for all response variables the combination of CWM and FDQ led to significant model improvement compared to a separate consideration of different components of functional trait composition. Effects of FDQ were mainly attributable to diversity in nutrient acquisition and life-history strategies. The large spectrum of traits contributing to positive effects of CWM on biomass production and net biodiversity effects indicated that effects of dominant species were associated with different trait combinations. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the

  4. Male gender identity in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    T'Sjoen, Guy; De Cuypere, Griet; Monstrey, Stan; Hoebeke, Piet; Freedman, F Kenneth; Appari, Mahesh; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Van Borsel, John; Cools, Martine

    2011-06-01

    Women and girls with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) invariably have a female typical core gender identity. In this case report, we describe the first case of male gender identity in a CAIS individual raised female leading to complete sex reassignment involving both androgen treatment and phalloplasty. CAIS was diagnosed at age 17, based on an unambiguously female phenotype, a 46,XY karyotype, and a 2660delT androgen receptor (AR) gene mutation, leading to a premature stop in codon 807. Bilateral gonadectomy was performed but a short period of estrogen treatment induced a negative emotional reaction and treatment was stopped. Since the age of 3, childhood-onset cross gender behavior had been noticed. After a period of psychotherapy, persisting male gender identity was confirmed. There was no psychiatric co-morbidity and there was an excellent real life experience. Testosterone substitution was started, however without inducing any of the desired secondary male characteristics. A subcutaneous mastectomy was performed and the patient received phalloplasty by left forearm free flap and scrotoplasty. Testosterone treatment was continued, without inducing virilization, and bone density remained normal. The patient qualifies as female-to-male transsexual and was treated according to the Standards of Care by the World Professional Association for Transgender Health with good outcome. However, we do not believe that female sex of rearing as a standard procedure should be questioned in CAIS. Our case challenges the role of a functional AR pathway in the development of male gender identity.

  5. New facets of androgen replacement therapy during childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Rogol, Alan D

    2005-07-01

    The goals of androgen therapy for adolescents are to promote linear growth and secondary sexual characteristics, at the same time as permitting the normal accrual of muscle mass and bone mineral content. Secondary goals are mainly in the psychosocial sphere, in which pubertally delayed boys feel that they look too young, are not considered a 'peer' in their age group and have difficulty competing in athletic endeavours. These goals are irrespective of the causes of delayed pubertal development: constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP), a transient but very common form of pubertal delay and, much less commonly, primary or secondary permanent hypogonadism. Not all boys with CDGP require testosterone therapy, but those that come to a referral practice are likely candidates, as the watchful waiting period has finished. Although a range of androgen preparations is available for adults (injectable, oral, implantable and cutaneous patches and gels), most are drug delivery devices that are appropriate for full adult androgen replacement. These doses are too large for the induction of puberty. Therefore, at present, the injectable form is the only one that is easily adaptable for the increasing amounts of androgen necessary for the various stages of pubertal development. All preparations deliver testosterone that is readily converted to dihydrotestosterone by 5-alpha reductase. The author's practice is to begin with injecting 50-75 mg of one of the long-acting esters (enanthate or cypionate) per month, and gradually escalate to 100-150 mg/month, before changing to twice monthly dosage. As most adolescents have delayed puberty, the therapy is needed for 6-18 months before the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis functions at the late adolescent/adult level in those with CDGP. Those with permanent hypogonadism will require lifelong therapy. Once adequate virilisation is induced, and virtually full adult height is reached, any of the therapies noted above can be used

  6. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  7. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  8. Detection of persistent organic pollutants binding modes with androgen receptor ligand binding domain by docking and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are persistent in the environment after release from industrial compounds, combustion productions or pesticides. The exposure of POPs has been related to various reproductive disturbances, such as reduced semen quality, testicular cancer, and imbalanced sex ratio. Among POPs, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (4,4’-DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are the most widespread and well-studied compounds. Recent studies have revealed that 4,4’-DDE is an antagonist of androgen receptor (AR). However, the mechanism of the inhibition remains elusive. CB-153 is the most common congener of PCBs, while the action of CB-153 on AR is still under debate. Results Molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches have been employed to study binding modes and inhibition mechanism of 4,4’-DDE and CB-153 against AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Several potential binding sites have been detected and analyzed. One possible binding site is the same binding site of AR natural ligand androgen 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Another one is on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function (AF2) region, which is crucial for the co-activators recruitment. Besides, a novel possible binding site was observed for POPs with low binding free energy with the receptor. Detailed interactions between ligands and the receptor have been represented. The disrupting mechanism of POPs against AR has also been discussed. Conclusions POPs disrupt the function of AR through binding to three possible biding sites on AR/LBD. One of them shares the same binding site of natural ligand of AR. Another one is on AF2 region. The third one is in a cleft near N-terminal of the receptor. Significantly, values of binding free energy of POPs with AR/LBD are comparable to that of natural ligand androgen DHT. PMID:24053684

  9. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically raised as females and have a female gender identity. Affected individuals have male internal sex organs ( ... and may have a male or a female gender identity. People with mild androgen insensitivity are born ...

  10. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  11. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Singer, Eric A; Golijanin, Dragan J; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Messing, Edward M

    2008-02-01

    Androgen deprivation continues to play a crucial role in the treatment of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In the 65 years since its use was first described, urologists and medical oncologists have developed new and innovative ways to manipulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with the goal of alleviating symptoms and prolonging the life of men with prostate cancer. Despite the successes that androgen deprivation therapy has brought, each method and regimen possesses unique benefits and burdens, of which the clinician and patient must be cognizant. This review discusses the first-line androgen deprivation methods and regimens presently in use with special attention paid to their side effects and the management of them, as well as the question of when to initiate androgen deprivation therapy.

  12. TACC2 is an androgen-responsive cell cycle regulator promoting androgen-mediated and castration-resistant growth of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Suzuki, Takashi; Urano, Tomohiko; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Satoru; Homma, Yukio; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-05-01

    Despite the existence of effective antiandrogen therapy for prostate cancer, the disease often progresses to castration-resistant states. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance for androgen deprivation in terms of the androgen receptor (AR)-regulated pathways is a requisite to manage castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Using a ChIP-cloning strategy, we identified functional AR binding sites (ARBS) in the genome of prostate cancer cells. We discovered that a centrosome- and microtubule-interacting gene, transforming acidic coiled-coil protein 2 (TACC2), is a novel androgen-regulated gene. We identified a functional AR-binding site (ARBS) including two canonical androgen response elements in the vicinity of TACC2 gene, in which activated hallmarks of histone modification were observed. Androgen-dependent TACC2 induction is regulated by AR, as confirmed by AR knockdown or its pharmacological inhibitor bicalutamide. Using long-term androgen-deprived cells as cellular models of CRPC, we demonstrated that TACC2 is highly expressed and contributes to hormone-refractory proliferation, as small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TACC2 reduced cell growth and cell cycle progression. By contrast, in TACC2-overexpressing cells, an acceleration of the cell cycle was observed. In vivo tumor formation study of prostate cancer in castrated immunocompromised mice revealed that TACC2 is a tumor-promoting factor. Notably, the clinical significance of TACC2 was demonstrated by a correlation between high TACC2 expression and poor survival rates. Taken together with the critical roles of TACC2 in the cell cycle and the biology of prostate cancer, we infer that the molecule is a potential therapeutic target in CRPC as well as hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. PMID:22456197

  13. Androgen deprivation treatment of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Houts, Frederick W; Taller, Inna; Tucker, Douglas E; Berlin, Fred S

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are underutilized in patients seeking diminution of problematic sexual drives. This chapter reviews the literature on surgical castration of sex offenders, anti-androgen use and the rationale for providing androgen deprivation therapy, rather than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or more conservative interventions, for patients with paraphilias and excessive sexual drive. Discussions of informed consent, side effects, contraindications and case examples are provided.

  14. Androgen deprivation treatment of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Houts, Frederick W; Taller, Inna; Tucker, Douglas E; Berlin, Fred S

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are underutilized in patients seeking diminution of problematic sexual drives. This chapter reviews the literature on surgical castration of sex offenders, anti-androgen use and the rationale for providing androgen deprivation therapy, rather than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or more conservative interventions, for patients with paraphilias and excessive sexual drive. Discussions of informed consent, side effects, contraindications and case examples are provided. PMID:22005210

  15. Androgen receptor in male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Adamczyk, Aagnieszka; Niemiec, Joanna; Harazin-Lechowska, Agnieszka; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Jakubowicz, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    We present the androgen receptor (AR) status in 32 breast cancers diagnosed in male patients. Androgen receptor expression was found in 62.5% tumors and it was more frequent (85% of cases) in estrogen-positive tumours. The analyses of its impact on treatment results showed that AR immmunopositivity is a prognostic factor for overall survival, and AR immunonegativity is also correlated with worse prognosis (distant metastases developed more frequently and earlier).

  16. Functionality of alternative protein in gluten-free product development.

    PubMed

    Deora, Navneet Singh; Deswal, Aastha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. The current treatment for celiac disease is life-long adherence to a strict gluten-exclusion diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. A major limitation in the production of gluten-free products is the lack of protein functionality in non-wheat cereals. Additionally, commercial gluten-free mixes usually contain only carbohydrates, which may significantly limit the amount of protein in the diet. In the recent past, various approaches are attempted to incorporate protein-based ingredients and to modify the functional properties for gluten-free product development. This review aims to the highlight functionality of the alternative protein-based ingredients, which can be utilized for gluten-free product development both functionally as well as nutritionally.

  17. Production Functions Revisited in the Context of Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail-Wilcox, Bettye; King, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Educational reform depends more on clearly defined missions and operational efficiency than on improved teacher quality. This article defines adequacy, equality, equity, and efficiency; examines numerous production function studies of teacher characteristics and policy and administrative structures; and summarizes seven policy implications.…

  18. Functionality of alternative protein in gluten-free product development.

    PubMed

    Deora, Navneet Singh; Deswal, Aastha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. The current treatment for celiac disease is life-long adherence to a strict gluten-exclusion diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. A major limitation in the production of gluten-free products is the lack of protein functionality in non-wheat cereals. Additionally, commercial gluten-free mixes usually contain only carbohydrates, which may significantly limit the amount of protein in the diet. In the recent past, various approaches are attempted to incorporate protein-based ingredients and to modify the functional properties for gluten-free product development. This review aims to the highlight functionality of the alternative protein-based ingredients, which can be utilized for gluten-free product development both functionally as well as nutritionally. PMID:26048849

  19. Development of US EPA's Ecological Production Function Library

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA is developing a library of ecological production functions (EPFs) to help communities plan for sustainable access to ecosystem goods and services (EGS). Several databases already compile information about the value of EGS. However, they focus on static representations of...

  20. Production of modern functional materials based on renewable vegetable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, D. V.; Reva, V. P.

    2013-05-01

    An energy-saving technology for production of variously structured carbon modifications from a renewable vegetable raw material, i.e., the waste of agricultural crops and peat moss, has been developed. Promising functional materials — refractory compounds (tungsten and titanium carbides) and oil sorbents possessing a combination of high operating characteristics — have been formed on the basis of the synthesized carbon modifications.

  1. School District Inputs and Biased Estimation of Educational Production Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Michael

    1985-01-01

    In 1979, Eric Hanushek pointed out a potential problem in estimating educational production functions, particularly at the precollege level. He observed that it is frequently inappropriate to include school-system variables in equations using the individual student as the unit of observation. This study offers limited evidence supporting this…

  2. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  3. EVALUATION OF THE MODEL ANTI-ANDROGEN FLUTAMIDE FOR ASSESSING THE MECHANISTIC BASIS OF RESPONSES TO AN ANDROGEN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we characterized the effects of flutamide, a model mammalian androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, on endocrine function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a small fish species which is widely used for testing endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Binding as...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE MODEL ANTI-ANDROGEN FLUTAMIDE FOR ASSESSING THE MECHANISTIC BASIS OF RESPONSES TO AN ANDROGEN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (JOURNAL ARTICLE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we characterized the effects of flutamide, a model mammalian androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, on endocrine function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a small fish species which is widely used for testing endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Binding a...

  5. Behavioral performance of tfm mice supports the beneficial role of androgen receptors in spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Angela; Robertson, Jennifer; Raber, Jacob

    2005-02-01

    In adulthood, androgens and androgen receptors might contribute to the sexually dimorphic performance in spatial learning and memory, but their roles seem complex. To study the potential role of androgen receptors in spatial learning and memory, we tested adult 6-8-month-old mutant mice with a naturally occurring defect in the androgen receptor gene (testicular feminization mutant or tfm) and C57Bl/6J wild-type mice. Because the trait is X-linked, only tfm males are completely androgen insensitive while female tfm mice are heterozygous, carrying one wild-type and one tfm copy of the androgen receptor. Here we show that female tfm carrier mice outperform tfm male mice in the water maze, while there are no gender differences in water maze performance in wild-type mice. In tfm mice, there were no gender differences in measures of anxiety in the open field or plus maze or sensorimotor function, indicating that potential differences in these measures did not contribute to the differences observed in the water maze. There were no differences in tfm and wild-type female and male mice in emotional learning and memory in the passive avoidance test. These findings support a beneficial role for androgen receptors in spatial learning and memory.

  6. Cross-talk between androgen receptor/filamin A and TrkA regulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Donato, Marzia; Bilancio, Antonio; D'Amato, Loredana; Claudiani, Pamela; Oliviero, Maria Antonietta; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Auricchio, Alberto; Appella, Ettore; Migliaccio, Antimo; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Castoria, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Steroids and growth factors control neuronal development through their receptors under physiological and pathological conditions. We show that PC12 cells harbor endogenous androgen receptor (AR), whose inhibition or silencing strongly interferes with neuritogenesis stimulated by the nonaromatizable synthetic androgen R1881 or NGF. This implies a role for AR not only in androgen signaling, but also in NGF signaling. In turn, a pharmacological TrkA inhibitor interferes with NGF- or androgen-induced neuritogenesis. In addition, androgen or NGF triggers AR association with TrkA, TrkA interaction with PI3-K δ, and downstream activation of PI3-K δ and Rac in PC12 cells. Once associated with AR, filamin A (FlnA) contributes to androgen or NGF neuritogenesis, likely through its interaction with signaling effectors, such as Rac. This study thus identifies a previously unrecognized reciprocal cross-talk between AR and TrkA, which is controlled by β1 integrin. The contribution of FlnA/AR complex and PI3-K δ to neuronal differentiation by androgens and NGF is also novel. This is the first description of AR function in PC12 cells. PMID:26063730

  7. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ali; Zhao, Jonathan C; Kim, Jung; Fong, Ka-Wing; Yang, Yeqing Angela; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Yu, Jindan

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR) activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2, thereby preventing AR ubiquitination and protein degradation. Consequently, HOTAIR expression is sufficient to induce androgen-independent AR activation and drive the AR-mediated transcriptional program in the absence of androgen. Functionally, HOTAIR overexpression increases, whereas HOTAIR knockdown decreases, prostate cancer cell growth and invasion. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence of lncRNAs as drivers of androgen-independent AR activity and CRPC progression, and they support the potential of lncRNAs as therapeutic targets.

  8. Biosynthesis and Function of Polyacetylenes and Allied Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Minto, Robert E.; Blacklock, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    Polyacetylenic natural products are a substantial class of often unstable compounds containing a unique carbon-carbon triple bond functionality, that are intriguing for their wide variety of biochemical and ecological functions, economic potential, and surprising mode of biosynthesis. Isotopic tracer experiments between 1960 and 1990 demonstrated that the majority of these compounds are derived from fatty acid and polyketide precursors. During the past decade, research into the metabolism of polyacetylenes has swiftly advanced, driven by the cloning of the first genes responsible for polyacetylene biosynthesis in plants, moss, fungi, and actinomycetes, and the initial characterization of the gene products. The current state of knowledge of the biochemistry and molecular genetics of polyacetylenic secondary metabolic pathways will be presented together with an up-to-date survey of new terrestrial and marine natural products, their known biological activities, and a discussion of their likely metabolic origins. PMID:18387369

  9. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  10. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  11. Functional and Behavioral Product Information Representation and Consistency Validation for Collaboration in Product Lifecycle Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baysal, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    Information models that represent the function, assembly and behavior of artifacts are critical in the conceptual development of a product and its evaluation. Much research has been conducted in this area; however, existing models do not relate function, behavior and structure in a comprehensive and consistent way. In this work, NIST's Core…

  12. Microfluidic production of multiple emulsions and functional microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Yong; Choi, Tae Min; Shim, Tae Soup; Frijns, Raoul A M; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2016-09-21

    Recent advances in microfluidics have enabled the controlled production of multiple-emulsion drops with onion-like topology. The multiple-emulsion drops possess an intrinsic core-shell geometry, which makes them useful as templates to create microcapsules with a solid membrane. High flexibility in the selection of materials and hierarchical order, achieved by microfluidic technologies, has provided versatility in the membrane properties and microcapsule functions. The microcapsules are now designed not just for storage and release of encapsulants but for sensing microenvironments, developing structural colours, and many other uses. This article reviews the current state of the art in the microfluidic-based production of multiple-emulsion drops and functional microcapsules. The three main sections of this paper discuss distinct microfluidic techniques developed for the generation of multiple emulsions, four representative methods used for solid membrane formation, and various applications of functional microcapsules. Finally, we outline the current limitations and future perspectives of microfluidics and microcapsules. PMID:27470590

  13. A Role for Androgens in Epithelial Proliferation and Formation of Glands in the Mouse Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Gibson, Douglas A.; Cousins, Fiona L.; Esnal-Zufiaurre, Arantza

    2016-01-01

    The endometrium consists of stromal and epithelial compartments (luminal and glandular) with distinct functions in the regulation of uterine homeostasis. Ovarian sex steroids, namely 17β-estradiol and progesterone, play essential roles in modulating uterine cell proliferation, stromal-epithelial cross-talk and differentiation in preparation for pregnancy. The effect of androgens on uterine function remains poorly understood. The current study investigated the effect of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on mouse endometrial function. Ovx female mice were given a single sc injection (short treatment) or 7 daily injections (long treatment) of vehicle alone (5% ethanol, 0.4% methylcellulose) or vehicle with the addition of 0.2 mg DHT (n=8/group) and a single injection of bromodeoxyuridine 2 hours prior to tissue recovery. Treatment with DHT increased uterine weight, the area of the endometrial compartment and immunoexpression of the androgen receptor in the luminal and glandular epithelium. Treatment-dependent proliferation of epithelial cells was identified by immunostaining for MKi67 and bromodeoxyuridine. Real-time PCR identified significant DHT-dependent changes in the concentrations of mRNAs encoded by genes implicated in the regulation of the cell cycle (Wee1, Ccnd1, Rb1) and stromal-epithelial interactions (Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt7a, Cdh1, Vcl, Igf1, Prl8, Prlr) as well as a striking effect on the number of endometrial glands. This study has revealed a novel role for androgens in regulating uterine function with an effect on the glandular compartment of the endometrium. This previously unrecognized role for androgens has implications for our understanding of the role of androgens in regulation of endometrial function and fertility in women. PMID:26963473

  14. A Role for Androgens in Epithelial Proliferation and Formation of Glands in the Mouse Uterus.

    PubMed

    Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Gibson, Douglas A; Cousins, Fiona L; Esnal-Zufiaurre, Arantza; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-05-01

    The endometrium consists of stromal and epithelial compartments (luminal and glandular) with distinct functions in the regulation of uterine homeostasis. Ovarian sex steroids, namely 17β-estradiol and progesterone, play essential roles in modulating uterine cell proliferation, stromal-epithelial cross-talk and differentiation in preparation for pregnancy. The effect of androgens on uterine function remains poorly understood. The current study investigated the effect of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on mouse endometrial function. Ovx female mice were given a single sc injection (short treatment) or 7 daily injections (long treatment) of vehicle alone (5% ethanol, 0.4% methylcellulose) or vehicle with the addition of 0.2 mg DHT (n=8/group) and a single injection of bromodeoxyuridine 2 hours prior to tissue recovery. Treatment with DHT increased uterine weight, the area of the endometrial compartment and immunoexpression of the androgen receptor in the luminal and glandular epithelium. Treatment-dependent proliferation of epithelial cells was identified by immunostaining for MKi67 and bromodeoxyuridine. Real-time PCR identified significant DHT-dependent changes in the concentrations of mRNAs encoded by genes implicated in the regulation of the cell cycle (Wee1, Ccnd1, Rb1) and stromal-epithelial interactions (Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt7a, Cdh1, Vcl, Igf1, Prl8, Prlr) as well as a striking effect on the number of endometrial glands. This study has revealed a novel role for androgens in regulating uterine function with an effect on the glandular compartment of the endometrium. This previously unrecognized role for androgens has implications for our understanding of the role of androgens in regulation of endometrial function and fertility in women. PMID:26963473

  15. Joint pricing and production management: a geometric programming approach with consideration of cubic production cost function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Seyed Jafar; Hamidi Hesarsorkh, Aghil; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Bonyadi Naeini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Coordination and harmony between different departments of a company can be an important factor in achieving competitive advantage if the company corrects alignment between strategies of different departments. This paper presents an integrated decision model based on recent advances of geometric programming technique. The demand of a product considers as a power function of factors such as product's price, marketing expenditures, and consumer service expenditures. Furthermore, production cost considers as a cubic power function of outputs. The model will be solved by recent advances in convex optimization tools. Finally, the solution procedure is illustrated by numerical example.

  16. Drug insight: Testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2006-03-01

    Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with beta-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging.

  17. Urban Scaling and the Production Function for Cities

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, José; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Strumsky, Deborah; West, Geoffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    The factors that account for the differences in the economic productivity of urban areas have remained difficult to measure and identify unambiguously. Here we show that a microscopic derivation of urban scaling relations for economic quantities vs. population, obtained from the consideration of social and infrastructural properties common to all cities, implies an effective model of economic output in the form of a Cobb-Douglas type production function. As a result we derive a new expression for the Total Factor Productivity (TFP) of urban areas, which is the standard measure of economic productivity per unit of aggregate production factors (labor and capital). Using these results we empirically demonstrate that there is a systematic dependence of urban productivity on city population size, resulting from the mismatch between the size dependence of wages and labor, so that in contemporary US cities productivity increases by about 11% with each doubling of their population. Moreover, deviations from the average scale dependence of economic output, capturing the effect of local factors, including history and other local contingencies, also manifest surprising regularities. Although, productivity is maximized by the combination of high wages and low labor input, high productivity cities show invariably high wages and high levels of employment relative to their size expectation. Conversely, low productivity cities show both low wages and employment. These results shed new light on the microscopic processes that underlie urban economic productivity, explain the emergence of effective aggregate urban economic output models in terms of labor and capital inputs and may inform the development of economic theory related to growth. PMID:23544042

  18. Fetal feminization and female gender identity in the testicular feminizing syndrome of androgen insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Masica, D N; Money, J; Ehrhardt, A A

    1971-06-01

    Interview data on aspects of sex and eroticism from a sample of 10 chromosomally male (XY) patients with the complete testicular feminization (androgen insensitivity) syndrome and from a sample of 23 patients with the late-treated adrenogenital syndrome showed marked differences. Homosexual experiences and/or dreams were lacking in the androgen-insensitive group as compared with the adrenogenital group (p[Symbol: see text]0.01).The androgen-insensitive group reported lower frequency of sexual arousal from visual stimuli than did the adrenogenital group (p[Symbol: see text]0.05).Findings on different aspects of sexual behavior suggest a tendency for the androgen-insensitive patients as a group to have a lower sex drive, to be less keenly aware of their sex drive, to be less assertive in heterosexual relations, and to be less versatile in coitus than the adrenogenital patients. No case of exclusive lesbianism, transsexualism, or transvestism was reported from either patient group. Although the two groups differed in sexual and erotic behavior, both were within the range of what in our culture is accepted as feminine. Nonetheless, the androgen-insensitive patients conformed more closely to the conventional feminine stereotype. Regarding explicit satisfaction with female sex role and with cosmetic and clothing interests, the androgen-insensitive group was characteristically feminine. Findings on the Draw-a-Person Test and the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey are compatible with the results of normal females, but are in sharp contrast with those of normal males. Interview and psychometric data thus concur in showing the androgen-insensitive patients to be unmistakably feminine in behavior and outlook. Their femininity is best conceived of as a product of hormonal nonandrogenization, prenatally and later, in combination with the social experiences of rearing and development, after initial assignment as a girl. PMID:24179056

  19. Androgen receptors in the bonnethead, Sphyrna tiburo: cDNA cloning and tissue-specific expression in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Tyminski, John P; Gelsleichter, James J; Motta, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    As demonstrated in past studies, androgens appear to play critical roles in regulating reproduction in male sharks. However, little is known about the cell-specific actions of androgens in these fishes. To address this, this study examined androgen targets in reproductive organs of a seasonally reproducing shark, the bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo). A partial bonnethead AR cDNA clone was isolated and found to exhibit strong homology with known vertebrate ARs. Using RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, AR was found to be expressed in multiple cell types in the male bonnethead testis (premeiotic germ cells, Leydig-like interstitial cells, Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cells, and mature spermatozoa) and gonadal ducts (stromal cells, luminal epithelial cells, mature spermatozoa). Furthermore, AR expression in these organs was found to vary temporally in relation to the seasonal reproductive cycle. Based on immunocytochemistry, the presence of AR protein in male bonnethead reproductive organs was largely consistent with patterns of AR gene expression with the single exception of mature spermatozoa, which exhibited consistently strong mRNA expression but only inconsistent and weak AR protein immunoreactivity. These results suggest important roles for androgens in regulating germ cell proliferation, hormone production, spermatid elongation, spermiation, and gonadal duct function in male bonnetheads. In addition, high abundance of AR mRNA in bonnethead spermatozoa suggest the potential for de novo protein synthesis following spermiation/copulation and/or a role for AR mRNA in early embryonic development, both of which have been proposed to explain the occurrence of mRNA transcripts in spermatozoa from various vertebrates.

  20. Androgen receptors in the bonnethead, Sphyrna tiburo: cDNA cloning and tissue-specific expression in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Tyminski, John P; Gelsleichter, James J; Motta, Philip J

    2015-12-01

    As demonstrated in past studies, androgens appear to play critical roles in regulating reproduction in male sharks. However, little is known about the cell-specific actions of androgens in these fishes. To address this, this study examined androgen targets in reproductive organs of a seasonally reproducing shark, the bonnethead (Sphyrna tiburo). A partial bonnethead AR cDNA clone was isolated and found to exhibit strong homology with known vertebrate ARs. Using RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, AR was found to be expressed in multiple cell types in the male bonnethead testis (premeiotic germ cells, Leydig-like interstitial cells, Sertoli cells, peritubular myoid cells, and mature spermatozoa) and gonadal ducts (stromal cells, luminal epithelial cells, mature spermatozoa). Furthermore, AR expression in these organs was found to vary temporally in relation to the seasonal reproductive cycle. Based on immunocytochemistry, the presence of AR protein in male bonnethead reproductive organs was largely consistent with patterns of AR gene expression with the single exception of mature spermatozoa, which exhibited consistently strong mRNA expression but only inconsistent and weak AR protein immunoreactivity. These results suggest important roles for androgens in regulating germ cell proliferation, hormone production, spermatid elongation, spermiation, and gonadal duct function in male bonnetheads. In addition, high abundance of AR mRNA in bonnethead spermatozoa suggest the potential for de novo protein synthesis following spermiation/copulation and/or a role for AR mRNA in early embryonic development, both of which have been proposed to explain the occurrence of mRNA transcripts in spermatozoa from various vertebrates. PMID:26320857

  1. Testosterone supplementation in men with type 2 diabetes, visceral obesity and partial androgen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Boyanov, M A; Boneva, Z; Christov, V G

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of oral testosterone supplementation therapy on glucose homeostasis, obesity and sexual function in middle-aged men with type 2 diabetes and mild androgen deficiency. Forty-eight middle-aged men, with type 2 diabetes, (visceral) obesity and symptoms of androgen deficiency, were included in this open-label study. Twenty-four subjects received testosterone undecanoate (TU; 120 mg daily, for 3 months); 24 subjects received no treatment. Body composition was analyzed by bio-impedance. Parameters of metabolic control were determined. Symptoms of androgen deficiency and erectile dysfunction were scored by self-administered questionnaires. TU had a positive effect on (visceral) obesity: statistically significant reduction in body weight (2.66%), waist-hip ratio (-3.96%) and body fat (-5.65%); negligible changes were found in the control group. TU significantly improved metabolic control: decrease in blood glucose values and mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (from 10.4 to 8.6%). TU treatment significantly improved symptoms of androgen deficiency (including erectile dysfunction), with virtually no change in the control group. There were no adverse effects on blood pressure or hematological, biochemical and lipid parameters, and no adverse events. Oral TU treatment of type 2 diabetic men with androgen deficiency improves glucose homeostasis and body composition (decrease in visceral obesity), and improves symptoms of androgen deficiency (including erectile dysfunction). In these men, the benefit of testosterone supplementation therapy exceeds the correction of symptoms of androgen deficiency and also includes glucose homeostasis and metabolic control. PMID:12809074

  2. Cardiovascular physiology of androgens and androgen testosterone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shanhong; Komesaroff, Paul A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty

    2009-03-01

    Women before menopause are at relatively lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with age-matched men and after menopause this gender advantage disappears. Androgen has been known to be an independent factor contributing to the higher male susceptibility to CVD, through adverse effects on lipids, blood pressure, and glucose metabolism. High androgen levels also contribute to CVD development in women with polycystic ovary syndrome as well as androgen abusing athletes and body builders. On the other hand, decline in androgen levels, as a result of ageing in men, is associated with hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Postmenopausal women, particularly those with oophorectomy are generally in low levels of sex hormones and androgen insufficiency is independently associated with the higher incidence of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Androgen testosterone therapy (ATT) has been commonly used to improve well-being and libido in aging men with low androgen levels. The therapy has been demonstrated also to effectively reduce atherogenesis in these people. The use of ATT in postmenopausal women has increased in recent years and to date, however, the cardiovascular benefits of such therapy in these women remain uncertain. This review focuses on research regarding the impact of endogenous androgens and ATT on the cardiovascular physiology and CVD development in postmenopausal women.

  3. Selective androgen receptor modulators as improved androgen therapy for advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2014-11-01

    Androgens were at one time a therapeutic mainstay in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Despite comparable efficacy, SERMs and aromatase inhibitors eventually became the therapies of choice due to in part to preferred side-effect profiles. Molecular characterization of breast tumors has revealed an abundance of androgen receptor expression but the choice of an appropriate androgen receptor ligand (agonist or antagonist) has been confounded by multiple conflicting reports concerning the role of the receptor in the disease. Modern clinical efforts have almost exclusively utilized antagonists. However, the recent clinical development of selective androgen receptor modulators with greatly improved side-effect profiles has renewed interest in androgen agonist therapy for advanced breast cancer.

  4. Function of copper in cytochrome production in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.L.; Mattoon, J.R.; Ortegon, V.

    1986-05-01

    Investigations which are attempting to elucidate the nature of the involvement of copper (Cu) in hemoprotein production in yeast have disclosed that the syntheses of cytochromes aa/sub 3/, b and c are influenced differentially by the absence of Cu. Cells are grown in minimal media (29/sup 0/C, 200 rpm, 48-72 hrs) +/- bathocuproine disulfonate (BC), a specific Cu chelator; spectra of standardized samples are compared for evaluation of porphyrin and hemoprotein production. The use of mutants helped localize the effect of BC (or Cu) along the biosynthesis pathway. Mutants included the parent (D28), which provided a general reference point, D28/F8, deficient in ferrochelatase, which accumulated protoporphyrin, B231/C1, deficient in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, which accumulated uroporphyrins and GT38/7A, deficient in amino levulinic acid (ALA) synthetase, which synthesized cytochromes in proportion to the ALA added. In each case BC lowered porphyrin and cytochrome production. Cytochrome production in GT 38/7A and D28 was differentially affected by BC. Cytochrome aa/sub 3/ was eliminated by low levels as expected. Cytochrome b was eliminated by 50X and Cytochrome c was decreased markedly but not eliminated by 100X BC. These observations suggest (1) that porphyrin biosynthesis may be influenced but not blocked (2) a function of Cu in the mitochondrial production (assembly) of Cytochrome b and (3) a possible function of Cu in the transport, across mitochondrial membranes, of hemoprotein or porphyrin intermediates.

  5. The functionality of plum ingredients in meat products: a review.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Nathan; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C; Crandall, Philip G

    2015-04-01

    Dried plums (prunes) have been marketed to consumers for consumption directly from the package as a convenient snack and have been reported to have broad health benefits. Only recently have fractionated, dried plum ingredients been investigated for their functionality in food and feed products. Dried plum puree, dried plum fiber, dried plum powder, dried plum concentrate, and fresh plum concentrate have been investigated to date. They have been evaluated as fat replacers in baked goods, antioxidants in meat formulations, phosphate replacers in chicken marinades, and antimicrobials in food systems. Overall, dried plum products have been shown to be effective at reducing lipid oxidation and show promise as antimicrobials.

  6. Mechanisms of androgen deficiency in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with the wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grinspoon, S; Corcoran, C; Stanley, T; Rabe, J; Wilkie, S

    2001-09-01

    Although prior studies suggest reduced androgen levels in women with acquired immune deficiency syndrome wasting, little is known regarding the regulation of adrenal and ovarian androgen secretion in such patients. We investigated ovarian and adrenal function in 13 human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with acquired immune deficiency syndrome wasting and 21 age- and body mass index-matched healthy control subjects studied in the early follicular phase. Subjects received hCG (5000 U, im) on d 1 and Cosyntropin (0.25 mg, i.v.) on d 3 after dexamethasone (1 mg, orally, at 2400 h) pretreatment on d 2. At baseline, human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects demonstrated significantly reduced T [18 +/- 2 vs. 25 +/- 2 ng/dl (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.9 +/- 0.1 nmol/liter); P = 0.02], free T [1.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.2 pg/ml (5.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 8.3 +/- 0.6 pmol/liter); P = 0.001], androstenedione [119 +/- 6 vs. 162 +/- 14 ng/dl (4.16 +/- 0.20 vs. 5.66 +/- 0.48 nmol/liter); P = 0.02], and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate [0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.55 +/- 0.19 microg/ml (2.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.2 +/- 0.5 micromol/liter); P = 0.047] levels compared with the control subjects. T [8 +/- 2 vs. 6 +/- 2 ng/dl (0.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.1 nmol/liter); P = 0.48], free T [0.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (1.7 +/- 0.7 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.5 pmol/liter); P = 0.85], 17 hydroxyprogesterone [0.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 microg/liter (1.6 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.6 nmol/liter); P = 0.63], and androstenedione [-1 +/- 12 vs. 8 +/- 11 ng/dl (-0.03 +/- 0.42 vs. 0.28 +/- 0.39 nmol/liter), P = 0.61] responses to hCG were not different between the groups. Cortisol responses were increased and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate responses were decreased in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected vs. control subjects after ACTH stimulation. The ratio of DHEA to cortisol was significantly decreased at 60 (71 +/- 11 vs. 107 +/- 10; P = 0.02) and 90 (63 +/- 8 vs. 102 +/- 9; P = 0.004) min post-ACTH in the human immunodeficiency

  7. Polymicrobial Multi-functional Approach for Enhancement of Crop Productivity.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chilekampalli A; Saravanan, Ramu S

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing global need for enhancing the food production to meet the needs of the fast-growing human population. Traditional approach to increasing agricultural productivity through high inputs of chemical nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers and pesticides is not sustainable because of high costs and concerns about global warming, environmental pollution, and safety concerns. Therefore, the use of naturally occurring soil microbes for increasing productivity of food crops is an attractive eco-friendly, cost-effective, and sustainable alternative to the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. There is a vast body of published literature on microbial symbiotic and nonsymbiotic nitrogen fixation, multiple beneficial mechanisms used by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), the nature and significance of mycorrhiza-plant symbiosis, and the growing technology on production of efficacious microbial inoculants. These areas are briefly reviewed here. The construction of an inoculant with a consortium of microbes with multiple beneficial functions such as N(2) fixation, biocontrol, phosphate solubilization, and other plant growth-promoting properties is a positive new development in this area in that a single inoculant can be used effectively for increasing the productivity of a broad spectrum of crops including legumes, cereals, vegetables, and grasses. Such a polymicrobial inoculant containing several microorganisms for each major function involved in promoting the plant growth and productivity gives it greater stability and wider applications for a range of major crops. Intensifying research in this area leading to further advances in our understanding of biochemical/molecular mechanisms involved in plant-microbe-soil interactions coupled with rapid advances in the genomics-proteomics of beneficial microbes should lead to the design and development of inoculants with greater efficacy for increasing the productivity of a wide range of crops.

  8. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes. PMID:23828605

  9. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes.

  10. Review: Production and functionality of active peptides from milk.

    PubMed

    Muro Urista, C; Álvarez Fernández, R; Riera Rodriguez, F; Arana Cuenca, A; Téllez Jurado, A

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, research on the production of active peptides obtained from milk and their potential functionality has grown, to a great extent. Bioactive peptides have been defined as specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions or conditions, and they may ultimately have an influence on health. Individual proteins of casein or milk-derived products such as cheese and yogurt have been used as a protein source to study the isolation and activity of peptides with several applications. Currently, the milk whey waste obtained in the production of cheese also represents a protein source from which active peptides could be isolated with potential industrial applications. The active properties of milk peptides and the results found with regard to their physiological effects have led to the classification of peptides as belonging to the group of ingredients of protein nature, appropriate for use in functional foods or pharmaceutical formulations. In this study, the main peptides obtained from milk protein and the past research studies about its production and biological activities will be explained. Second, an analysis will be made on the methods to determinate the biological activities, the separation of bioactive peptides and its structure identification. All of these form the base required to obtain synthetic peptides. Finally, we explain the experimental animal and human trials done in the past years. Nevertheless, more research is required on the design and implementation of equipment for the industrial production and separation of peptides. In addition, different authors suggest that more emphasis should therefore be given to preclinical studies, proving that results are consistent and that effects are demonstrated repeatedly by several research human groups.

  11. Seasonality of adult male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata): androgens and behavior in a confined troop.

    PubMed

    Rostal, D C; Glick, B B; Eaton, G G; Resko, J A

    1986-12-01

    Seasonal variations in levels of serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), reproductive behavior, and social behavior were investigated in 12 adult males (5 to 20+ years of age) of the Oregon troop of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). Blood samples were collected at 2- to 4-month intervals, and behaviors were monitored twice weekly over a 15-month period. Significant seasonal variations in levels of testosterone and DHT, and in frequencies of mount series, ejaculations, number of female partners, displays, courtship, and aggression were observed. Seasonal variations in reproductive and social behaviors did not correlate with seasonal variations in androgen levels because seasonal increases in these behaviors followed seasonal increases in the androgens with a 1- to 2-month delay. However, significant correlations between increased androgen levels and the onset of mating activity occur when mean monthly frequencies of mount series are shifted 1 to 2 months earlier to coincide with the rise in serum androgen levels. The frequency of adult male play and male-male mounting increased significantly when androgen levels were low. We suggest that photoperiod changes may function as a proximate cue in male Japanese macaques which induces a state of biological readiness for mating, and the behavioral consequences (i.e., mating) are then dependent upon the presence of receptive females.

  12. Dose-Dependent Effects of Androgens on the Circadian Timing System and Its Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew P.; Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; LeSauter, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the locus of a master clock that regulates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. Gonadectomy in male mice lengthens the period of circadian rhythms and increases the day-to-day variability of activity onset time. Both of these responses are rescued by the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone. Androgen receptors (AR) are localized in SCN neurons that receive direct retinal input. To explore how androgens affect circadian clock function and its responsiveness to photic cues, we measured wheel-running behavior and SCN AR expression in intact, gonadectomized, and testosterone-replaced mice, held under various photic conditions. Gonadectomy lengthened circadian period in constant dim light but not in constant darkness. Increasing intensities of constant light parametrically increased circadian period, and this was potentiated at all intensities by gonadectomy. In contrast, gonadectomy did not alter light-induced pupil constriction, suggesting a nonretinal locus of hormone action. In hormone-replaced animals housed in constant darkness, T concentration was positively correlated with precision of activity onset and with SCN AR expression and negatively correlated with duration of activity. We infer the existence of two androgenic mechanisms: one modulates SCN responsiveness to light, and the second modulates SCN timekeeping and locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, the effects of androgens on period are a result of hormonal modulation of the SCN's response to photic input rather than to a change in the inherent period of oscillators in the absence of light. PMID:22492303

  13. SUMOylation modulates the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor in a target gene and pathway selective manner.

    PubMed

    Sutinen, Päivi; Malinen, Marjo; Heikkinen, Sami; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2014-07-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays an important regulatory role in prostate cancer. AR's transcriptional activity is regulated by androgenic ligands, but also by post-translational modifications, such as SUMOylation. To study the role of AR SUMOylation in genuine chromatin environment, we compared androgen-regulated gene expression and AR chromatin occupancy in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines stably expressing wild-type (wt) or doubly SUMOylation site-mutated AR (AR-K386R,K520R). Our genome-wide gene expression analyses reveal that the SUMOylation modulates the AR function in a target gene and pathway selective manner. The transcripts that are differentially regulated by androgen and SUMOylation are linked to cellular movement, cell death, cellular proliferation, cellular development and cell cycle. Fittingly, SUMOylation mutant AR cells proliferate faster and are more sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, ChIP-seq analyses show that the SUMOylation can modulate the chromatin occupancy of AR on many loci in a fashion that parallels their differential androgen-regulated expression. De novo motif analyses reveal that FOXA1, C/EBP and AP-1 motifs are differentially enriched at the wtAR- and the AR-K386R,K520R-preferred genomic binding positions. Taken together, our data indicate that SUMOylation does not simply repress the AR activity, but it regulates AR's interaction with the chromatin and the receptor's target gene selection.

  14. Astrocytes in the Rat Medial Amygdala Are Responsive to Adult Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan T.; Schneider, Amanda; DonCarlos, Lydia L.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    The posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) exhibits numerous sex differences including differences in volume and in the number and morphology of neurons and astroctyes. In adulthood, gonadal hormones, including both androgens and estrogens, have been shown to play a role in maintaining the masculine character of many of these sex differences, but whether adult gonadal hormones maintain the increased number and complexity of astrocytes in the male MePD was unknown. To answer this question we examined astrocytes in the MePD of male and female Long Evans rats that were gonadectomized as adults and treated for 30 days with either testosterone or a control treatment. At the end of treatment brains were collected and immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Stereological analysis revealed that adult androgen levels influenced the number and complexity of astrocytes in the MePD of both sexes, but the specific effects of androgens were different in males and females. However, sex differences in the number and complexity of adult astrocytes persisted even in the absence of gonadal hormones in adulthood, suggesting that androgens also act earlier in life to determine these adult sex differences. Using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, we found robust androgen receptor immunostaining in a subpopulation of MePD astrocytes, suggesting that testosterone may act directly on MePD astrocytes to influence their structure and function. PMID:22581688

  15. Demand for functional and nutritional enhancements in specialty milk products.

    PubMed

    Gulseven, Osman; Wohlgenant, Michael

    2014-10-01

    This article investigates the socio-demographic determinants affecting the demand for functional and nutritional enhancements in milk products based on a two-stage model. In order to derive the implicit market values of these enhancements, first we estimated the relationship between the prices of differentiated dairy products and the amount or respectively the presence of specific characteristics in these products. Next, using these implicit prices along with the information on households' demographic background, we analyzed the socio-demographic factors that affect consumer demand for specific functional and nutritional enhancements. The model is estimated using a combined panel data set based on AC Nielsen Retail Homescan Panel and the USDA Nutrient Database. Our results indicate that being lactose/cholesterol free (LFCF) and organic implies substantially higher price premiums, whereas soy has a negative price. Socio-demographic factors such as income, racial profile, presence of children; education level and age have significant effects on the demand for functional enhancements. Specialty milk consumption increases with age, education, and presence of kids, whereas it declines with income. The ratio of specialty milk consumption to total milk consumption is substantially higher among Hispanic, Asian and African-American households. PMID:24997409

  16. Is lactate an undervalued functional component of fermented food products?

    PubMed Central

    Garrote, Graciela L.; Abraham, Analía G.; Rumbo, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Although it has been traditionally regarded as an intermediate of carbon metabolism and major component of fermented dairy products contributing to organoleptic and antimicrobial properties of food, there is evidence gathered in recent years that lactate has bioactive properties that may be responsible of broader properties of functional foods. Lactate can regulate critical functions of several key players of the immune system such as macrophages and dendritic cells, being able to modulate inflammatory activation of epithelial cells as well. Intraluminal levels of lactate derived from fermentative metabolism of lactobacilli have been shown to modulate inflammatory environment in intestinal mucosa. The molecular mechanisms responsible to these functions, including histone deacetylase dependent-modulation of gene expression and signaling through G-protein coupled receptors have started to be described. Since lactate is a major fermentation product of several bacterial families with probiotic properties, we here propose that it may contribute to some of the properties attributed to these microorganisms and in a larger view, to the properties of food products fermented by lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26150815

  17. Androgen Receptor Exon 1 Mutation Causes Androgen Insensitivity by Creating Phosphorylation Site and Inhibiting Melanoma Antigen-A11 Activation of NH2- and Carboxyl-terminal Interaction-dependent Transactivation*

    PubMed Central

    Lagarde, William H.; Blackwelder, Amanda J.; Minges, John T.; Hnat, Andrew T.; French, Frank S.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH2- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH2-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif 433WHTLF437 required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero. PMID:22334658

  18. Double Parton Fragmentation Function and its Evolution in Quarkonium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the results of a recent study on a new perturbative QCD factorization formalism for the production of heavy quarkonia of large transverse momentum pT at collider energies. Such a new factorization formalism includes both the leading power (LP) and next-to-leading power (NLP) contributions to the cross section in the mQ2/p_T^2 expansion for heavy quark mass mQ. For the NLP contribution, the so-called double parton fragmentation functions are involved, whose evolution equations have been derived. We estimate fragmentation functions in the non-relativistic QCD formalism, and found that their contribution reproduce the bulk of the large enhancement found in explicit NLO calculations in the color singlet model. Heavy quarkonia produced from NLP channels prefer longitudinal polarization, in contrast to the single parton fragmentation function. This might shed some light on the heavy quarkonium polarization puzzle.

  19. Discovery AND Therapeutic Promise OF Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects. PMID:15994457

  20. Discovery and therapeutic promise of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2005-06-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects.

  1. Food availability affects the maternal transfer of androgens and antibodies into eggs of a colonial seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gasparini, J.; Boulinier, T.; Gill, V.A.; Gil, D.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Roulin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mothers can improve the quality of their offspring by increasing the level of certain components in their eggs. To examine whether or not mothers increase deposition of such components in eggs as a function of food availability, we food-supplemented black-legged kittiwake females (Rissa tridactyla) before and during egg laying and compared deposition of androgens and antibodies into eggs of first and experimentally induced replacement clutches. Food-supplemented females transferred lower amounts of androgens and antibodies into eggs of induced replacement clutches than did non-food-supplemented mothers, whereas first clutches presented no differences between treatments. Our results suggest that when females are in lower condition, they transfer more androgens and antibodies into eggs to facilitate chick development despite potential long-term costs for juveniles. Females in prime condition may avoid these potential long-term costs because they can provide their chicks with more and higher quality resources. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  2. Design and synthesis of an array of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Trump, Ryan P; Blanc, Jean-Baptiste E; Stewart, Eugene L; Brown, Peter J; Caivano, Matilde; Gray, David W; Hoekstra, William J; Willson, Timothy M; Han, Bajin; Turnbull, Philip

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design, using shape comparison and fast docking computer algorithms, and rapid parallel synthesis of a 1300 member array based on GSK7721, a 4-aminobenzonitrile androgen receptor (AR) antagonist identified by focused screening of the GSK compound collection. The array yielded 352 submicromolar and 17 subnanomolar AR agonists as measured by a cell-based reporter gene functional assay. The rapid synthesis of a large number of active compounds provided valuable information in the optimization of AR modulators, which may be useful in treating androgen deficiency in aging males.

  3. Biocatalysis for the production of industrial products and functional foods from rice and other agricultural produce.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Casimir C; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2008-11-26

    Many industrial products and functional foods can be obtained from cheap and renewable raw agricultural materials. For example, starch can be converted to bioethanol as biofuel to reduce the current demand for petroleum or fossil fuel energy. On the other hand, starch can also be converted to useful functional ingredients, such as high fructose and high maltose syrups, wine, glucose, and trehalose. The conversion process involves fermentation by microorganisms and use of biocatalysts such as hydrolases of the amylase superfamily. Amylases catalyze the process of liquefaction and saccharification of starch. It is possible to perform complete hydrolysis of starch by using the fusion product of both linear and debranching thermostable enzymes. This will result in saving energy otherwise needed for cooling before the next enzyme can act on the substrate, if a sequential process is utilized. Recombinant enzyme technology, protein engineering, and enzyme immobilization are powerful tools available to enhance the activity of enzymes, lower the cost of enzyme through large scale production in a heterologous host, increase their thermostability, improve pH stability, enhance their productivity, and hence making it competitive with the chemical processes involved in starch hydrolysis and conversions. This review emphasizes the potential of using biocatalysis for the production of useful industrial products and functional foods from cheap agricultural produce and transgenic plants. Rice was selected as a typical example to illustrate many applications of biocatalysis in converting low-value agricultural produce to high-value commercial food and industrial products. The greatest advantages of using enzymes for food processing and for industrial production of biobased products are their environmental friendliness and consumer acceptance as being a natural process. PMID:18942836

  4. Biocatalysis for the production of industrial products and functional foods from rice and other agricultural produce.

    PubMed

    Akoh, Casimir C; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2008-11-26

    Many industrial products and functional foods can be obtained from cheap and renewable raw agricultural materials. For example, starch can be converted to bioethanol as biofuel to reduce the current demand for petroleum or fossil fuel energy. On the other hand, starch can also be converted to useful functional ingredients, such as high fructose and high maltose syrups, wine, glucose, and trehalose. The conversion process involves fermentation by microorganisms and use of biocatalysts such as hydrolases of the amylase superfamily. Amylases catalyze the process of liquefaction and saccharification of starch. It is possible to perform complete hydrolysis of starch by using the fusion product of both linear and debranching thermostable enzymes. This will result in saving energy otherwise needed for cooling before the next enzyme can act on the substrate, if a sequential process is utilized. Recombinant enzyme technology, protein engineering, and enzyme immobilization are powerful tools available to enhance the activity of enzymes, lower the cost of enzyme through large scale production in a heterologous host, increase their thermostability, improve pH stability, enhance their productivity, and hence making it competitive with the chemical processes involved in starch hydrolysis and conversions. This review emphasizes the potential of using biocatalysis for the production of useful industrial products and functional foods from cheap agricultural produce and transgenic plants. Rice was selected as a typical example to illustrate many applications of biocatalysis in converting low-value agricultural produce to high-value commercial food and industrial products. The greatest advantages of using enzymes for food processing and for industrial production of biobased products are their environmental friendliness and consumer acceptance as being a natural process.

  5. Steroidogenic enzyme profile in an androgen-secreting adrenocortical oncocytoma associated with hirsustism

    PubMed Central

    Tetsi Nomigni, Milène; Ouzounian, Sophie; Benoit, Alice; Vadrot, Jacqueline; Tissier, Frédérique; Renouf, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Hervé; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Louiset, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutism induced by hyperandrogenism can be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, 21-hydroxylase (OH) deficiency or androgen-secreting tumors, including ovarian and adrenal tumors. Adrenal androgen-secreting tumors are frequently malignant. Adrenal oncocytomas represent rare causes of hyperandrogenism. The aim of the study was to investigate steroidogenic enzyme expression and steroid secretion in an androgen-secreting adrenal oncocytoma in a young woman presenting with hirsutism. Hyperandrogenism was diagnosed on the basis of elevated plasma Δ4-androstenedione and testosterone levels. Pelvic ultrasound was normal, CT scanning revealed a right adrenal mass. Androgens were assessed in adrenal and ovarian vein samples and proved a right adrenal origin. Adrenalectomy normalized androgen levels and the adrenal tumor was diagnosed as an oncocytoma. Real time-PCR, immunohistochemistry and cell culture studies were performed on tumor explants to investigate the steroid secretion profile. Among enzymes required for cortisol synthesis, 17α-OH and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3β-HSD2) were highly expressed whereas 21-OH and 11β-OH were weakly produced at the mRNA and/or protein levels. Enzymes involved in testosterone production, 17β-HSD5 and 17β-HSD3, were also detected. ACTH receptor was present in the tissue. Cortisol, Δ4-androstenedione and testosterone secretions by cultured cells were increased by ACTH. These results provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of abnormal expression profile of steroidogenic enzymes in an adrenocortical oncocytoma. Our results also indicate that Δ4-androstenedione hypersecretion resulted from high 17α-OH and 3β-HSD2 expression in combination with low expression of 21-OH and 11β-OH. Testosterone production was ascribed to occurrence of 17β-HSD5 and 17β-HSD3. Finally, our results indicate that androgen secretion was stimulated by ACTH. PMID:26034121

  6. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaini, Ramesh R.; Hu, Chien-An A.

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Cholesterol overload impairing cerebellar function: the promise of natural products.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I H

    2015-05-01

    The cerebellum is the part of the brain most involved in controlling motor and cognitive function. The surface becomes convoluted, forming folia that have a characteristic internal structure of three layers including molecular, Purkinje cell, and granular layer. This complex neural network gives rise to a massive signal-processing capability. Cholesterol is a major constituent, derived by de novo synthesis and the blood-brain barrier. Cholesterol is tightly regulated between neurons and glia-that is, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes-and is essential for normal brain development. The axon is wrapped by myelin (cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycosphingolipids) and made up of membranes of oligodendrocytes, separated by periodic gaps in the myelin sheath, called nodes of Ranvier. Hypercholesterolemia is associated with increased oxidative stress and the development of neurotoxicity and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment with natural products has been found to support improved brain function and reduce low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol level. Fish oil is one such product; among the many plant products are: Morus alba leaves, fruit, and bark; pomegranate fruit and peel; Barley β - glucans; date palm; and Allium sativum. The therapeutic potential was discussed in relation with the antilipidemic drugs, statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors).

  8. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L

    1997-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 212 to 272. We have expanded the database: (i) by adding a large amount of new data on somatic mutations in prostatic cancer tissue; (ii) by defining a new constitutional phenotype, mild androgen insensitivity (MAI); (iii) by placing additional relevant information on an internet site (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/ ). The database has allowed us to examine the contribution of CpG sites to the multiplicity of reports of the same mutation in different families. The database is also available from EMBL (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker Pro or Word file (MC33@musica,mcgill.ca)

  9. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ashley G.; Zhao, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of androgen deficiency in MetS is multifactorial, and consists of inflammatory, enzymatic, and endocrine derangements. Many options for the concomitant treatment of both disorders exist. Direct treatment of MetS, whether by diet, exercise, or surgery, may improve T levels. Conversely, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to improve MetS parameters in multiple randomized controlled trials (RTCs). PMID:26816752

  10. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  11. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Presenting with Gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Won; Kwak, Dong Shin; Jung, In Sub; Kwak, Joo Hee; Park, Jung Hwan; Hong, Sang Mo; Lee, Chang Bum; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Dong Sun; Choi, Woong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast caused by the proliferation of glandular breast tissue. Determining the various causes of gynecomastia such as physiological causes, drugs, systemic diseases, and endocrine disorders is important. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a rare endocrine disorder presenting with gynecomastia and is a disorder of male sexual differentiation caused by mutations within the androgen receptor gene. All individuals with AIS have the 46 XY karyotype, although AIS phenotypes can be classified as mild, partial or complete and can differ among both males and females including ambiguous genitalia or infertility in males. We experienced a case of partial AIS presenting with gynecomastia and identified the androgen receptor gene mutation. PMID:25433660

  12. Pathological changes in anabolic androgenic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-07-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have additional effects on the heart and vasculature, which may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality in chronic users. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to anabolic androgenic steroid use. The role these hormones may play in their occurrence of sudden cardiac death is also investigated. 98 medico-legal cases including 6 anabolic androgenic steroid users were retrospectively reviewed. Autopsies, histology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as fibroadipous metaplasia and perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, our results appear to confirm former observations on this topic and suggest anabolic androgenic steroid's potential causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac deaths in chronic users.

  13. IN VIVO CONFIRMATION OF THE ANTI-ANDROGENIC NATURE OF FLUTAMIDE IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term reproduction assay with the fathead minnow has been developed to detect chemicals with the potential to disrupt reproductive endocrine function controlled by estrogen- and androgen-mediated pathways. As part of characterizing the assay, tests have been conducted wit...

  14. Obesity and gonadal function of women.

    PubMed

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Kandarakis, Helen A

    2004-08-01

    Excessive visceral adiposity is associated with metabolic and reproductive abnormalities. Adipose tissue is an active endocrine gland and participates in multiple mechanisms in the reproductive function of women. The nature of the complex interaction of obesity with the female reproductive function remains a challenge. Several links have been implicated in the gonadal dysfunction of obese women, like insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, via which ovarian androgen production is stimulated resulting in hyperandrogenemia, increased peripheral aromatization of androgens to estrogens, altered gonadotrophin secretion, decreased sex hormone binding globulin, decreased GH and IGFBPs, increased leptin levels and altered neuroregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The impact of obesity in these mechanisms and their influence on female reproductive function are discussed in this article.

  15. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Fank, J.

    2012-04-01

    The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the mentioned procedure with a focus on process modelling. It deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences. A soil function modelling with an adapted model parameterisation based on data of ground penetration radar (GPR) and conductivity (EM38) was realized. This study shows an approach to handle heterogeneity of soil properties with geophysical data used for biomass production modelling. The Austrian field site Wagna is characterised by highly heterogenic soil with fluvioglacial gravel sediments. The variation of thickness of topsoil above a sandy subsoil with gravels strongly influences the soil water balance. EM38, mounted on a mobile platform, enables to rapidly scan large areas whereas GPR requires a greater logistical effort. However, GPR can detect exact soil horizon depth between topsoil and subsoil, the combination of both results in a detailed large scale soil map. The combined plot-specific GPR and field site EM38 measurements extends the soil input data and improves the model performance of CANDY PLUS for plant biomass production (Krüger et al. 2011). The example demonstrates how geophysics provides a surplus of data for agroecosystem modelling which identifies and contributes alternative options for agricultural management decisions. iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission

  16. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  17. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  18. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  19. Functional cereals for production in new and variable climates.

    PubMed

    Henry, Robert J; Rangan, Parimalan; Furtado, Agnelo

    2016-04-01

    Adaptation of cereal crops to variable or changing climates requires that essential quality attributes are maintained to deliver food that will be acceptable to human consumers. Advances in cereal genomics are delivering insights into the molecular basis of nutritional and functional quality traits in cereals and defining new genetic resources. Understanding the influence of the environment on expression of these traits will support the retention of these essential functional properties during climate adaptation. New cereals for use as whole grain or ground to flour for other food products may be based upon the traditional species such as rice and wheat currently used in these food applications but may also include new options exploiting genomics tools to allow accelerated domestication of new species. PMID:26828379

  20. Milk Fat Globule structure & function; nanosciece comes to milk production

    PubMed Central

    Argov, Nurit; Lemay, Danielle G; German, J Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The biological process of fat globule assembly and secretion produces highly complex globule compositions and structures with many properties now recognized to be the direct result of these structures. During homogenization, fat globules are broken down and subsequently structures and surfaces different than the native state are formed. This process alters the milk fat globule unique macrostructure and the effects associated to their structure would be expected to be lost. In the present overview, the need for continued research of the fundamental aspects of the mechanism involved in milk fat globules synthesis secretion and size distribution, as well as establishing ways to regulate those processes are highlighted. Ultimately these insights will guide food technology to developing a new generation of structure based functional foods and as highlighted in this overview, dairy functional products should be the pioneering commodity. PMID:24363495

  1. Relationships between yolk androgens and nest density, laying date, and laying order in Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welty, J.L.; Belthoff, J.R.; Egbert, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in yolk androgens within and among avian clutches have been correlated with decreased incubation time, increased aggression within a nest, increased begging behaviour, decreased immune response, and decreased life span. Although the mechanisms that lead to variability in yolk androgens within and between clutches are not completely known, yolk androgens can be a function of both social and environmental conditions. We were interested in if and how nesting density, laying date, and laying order influenced yolk androgens in Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea (Bonaparte, 1825)) in which nest density varies considerably. In 2006 and 2007, we used radioimmunoassay to quantify the concentrations of testosterone, 5a-dihydrotestosterone, and androstenedione in the egg yolks from one early and one latelaid egg in 47 nests of Burrowing Owls located in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area in southern Idaho. Nesting density had no detectable effect on yolk androgens. Yolk androgens varied temporally and peaked in the middle of the laying season while being low before and after this time period. Within nests, late-laid eggs had higher testosterone and dihydrotestosterone than early-laid eggs; adrostendione exhibited a similar pattern in one but not both years of our study. It is possible that the seasonal pattern in yolk androgens that we observed is related to aspects of mate quality for females or declining chances of fledging success for later nesting females, whereas rises in egg androgens between early and late eggs within clutches could reflect a mechanism to assist nestlings from late-laid eggs that hatch one to several days after their siblings to better compete for resources within the nest or promote survival in the presence of larger siblings.

  2. Megalin and androgen receptor gene expression in young and old human skeletal muscle before and after three sequential exercise bouts.

    PubMed

    Poole, Chris N; Roberts, Michael D; Dalbo, Vincent J; Sunderland, Kyle L; Kerksick, Chad M

    2011-02-01

    Androgen signaling occurs primarily via the androgen receptor. Megalin, a low-density lipoprotein endocytic receptor located in various mammalian tissues, has been recently shown to facilitate sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) steroid complexes across cell membranes. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if the megalin gene is expressed in human skeletal muscle and if present to determine how megalin and androgen receptor mRNA expression change in response to sequential exercise bouts with respect to aging. Ten younger (age: 18-25 years) and 10 older (age: 60-75 years) men completed 3 workouts (M, W, F) each consisting of 9 sets of lower-body exercises with 10 repetitions per set at 80% 1 repetition maximum. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were extracted at baseline (T1), 48 hours after workout 1 (T2) and 2 (T3), and 24 hours after workout 3 (T4), and blood samples were collected before and 5 minutes after each workout. Muscle was analyzed for megalin and androgen receptor expression using gene-specific primers and SYBR green chemistry, and blood was analyzed for serum testosterone, SHBG, and the free androgen index. Megalin was expressed in both young and old subjects across all time points, although no between- or within-group mean differences were detected at any time point. Androgen receptor was expressed higher in young men at all time points compared to in old men (p < 0.05), and a significant correlation (p < 0.05; r = 0.506) was found between serum testosterone and androgen receptor after workout 1. Based on our data, the gene coding for megalin is expressed inside skeletal muscle, but its role, if any, in steroid cellular transport cannot be determined. This finding could lay the groundwork for more mechanistic investigations to better delineate its functional role and its potential as a therapeutic adjunct for androgen-related disorders in healthy and aged populations. PMID:21322835

  3. Role of androgens in sex differences in cardiac damage during myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Y L; Ashton, Anthony W; Mardini, Mahidi; Stanton, Peter G; Funder, John W; Handelsman, David J; Mihailidou, Anastasia S

    2014-02-01

    Age-specific incidence of ischemic heart disease in men is higher than in women, although women die more frequently without previous symptoms; the molecular mechanism(s) are poorly understood. Most studies focus on protection by estrogen, with less attention on androgen receptor-mediated androgen actions. Our aim was to determine the role of androgens in the sex differences in cardiac damage during myocardial infarction. Mature age-matched male and female Sprague Dawley rats, intact or surgically gonadectomized (Gx), received testosterone (T) or 17β-estradiol (E2) via subdermal SILASTIC (Dow Corning Corp.) implants; a subset of male rats received dihydrotestosterone. After 21 days, animals were anesthetized, and hearts were excised and subjected to ex vivo regional ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). Hearts from intact males had larger infarcts than those from females following I-R; Gx produced the opposite effect, confirming a role for sex steroids. In Gx males, androgens (dihydrotestosterone, T) and E2 aggravated I-R-induced cardiac damage, whereas in Gx females, T had no effect and E2 reduced infarct area. Increased circulating T levels up-regulated androgen receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, which resulted in enhanced apoptosis aggravating cardiac damage in both males and females. In conclusion, our study demonstrates, for the first time, that sex steroids regulate autophagy during myocardial infarction and shows that a novel mechanism of action for androgens during I-R is down-regulation of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL (B cell lymphoma-extra large), a key controller for cross talk between autophagy and apoptosis, shifting the balance toward apoptosis and leading to aggravated cardiac damage.

  4. The androgen-binding protein gene is expressed in male and female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Petrusz, P; Joseph, D R

    1990-12-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in liver, are encoded by the same gene. We have now found that the ABP-SHBG gene is also expressed in male and female rat brain. Immunoreactive ABP was found to be present in neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain as well as in fibers of the hypothalamic median eminence. The highest concentrations of immunoreactive cell bodies were located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Likewise, ABP mRNA was present in all brain regions examined. Analysis of cDNA clones representing brain ABP mRNAs revealed amino acid sequence differences in brain and testicular ABPs. The protein encoded by an alternatively processed RNA has sequence characteristics suggesting that the protein could act as a competitior of ABP binding to cell surface receptors. These data and gene-sequencing experiments indicate that a specific ABP gene promoter is used for transcription initiation in brain. ABP may function in brain as an androgen carrier protein; however, in view of the widespread presence of ABP and ABP mRNA in brain, the protein may have a much broader, yet unknown, function. PMID:1701136

  5. Migratory constraints on yolk precursors limit yolk androgen deposition and underlie a brood reduction strategy in rockhopper penguins

    PubMed Central

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Poisbleau, Maud; Demongin, Laurent; Chastel, Olivier; Williams, Tony D.; Eens, Marcel; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Hormonally mediated maternal effects link maternal phenotype and environmental conditions to offspring phenotype. The production of lipid-rich maternal yolk precursors may provide a mechanism by which lipophilic steroid hormones can be transported to developing yolks, thus predicting a positive correlation between yolk precursors in mothers and androgen levels in eggs. Using rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome), which produce a two-egg clutch characterized by extreme egg-size dimorphism, reversed hatching asynchrony and brood-reduction, we examined correlations between circulating concentrations of the primary yolk-precursor vitellogenin (VTG) and levels of yolk androgens. Previous work in Eudyptes penguins has shown that egg-size dimorphism is the product of migratory constraints on yolk precursor production. We predicted that if yolk precursors are constrained, androgen transport to developing yolks would be similarly constrained. We reveal positive linear relationships between maternal VTG and androgens in small A-eggs but not larger B-eggs, which is consistent with a migratory constraint operating on the A-egg. Results suggest that intra-clutch variation in total yolk androgen levels depends on the production and uptake of yolk precursors. The brood reduction strategy common to Eudyptes might thus be best described as the result of a migratory constraint. PMID:22809718

  6. Androgen insensitive male rats display increased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Hamson, Dwayne K; Jones, Bryan A; Csupity, Attila S; Ali, Faezah M; Watson, Neil V

    2014-02-01

    Male rats carrying the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm-affected males) are insensitive to androgens, resulting in a female-typical peripheral phenotype despite possession of inguinal testes that are androgen secretory. Androgen-dependent neural and behavioral processes may likewise show atypical sexual differentiation. Interestingly, these mutant rats display elevated serum corticosterone, suggesting a chronic anxiety phenotype and dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In order to understand if elevated anxiety-like behavior is a possible mediating variable affecting the display of certain androgen-dependent behaviors, we compared the performance of Tfm-affected males to wild type males and females in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Two well-established indicators of anxiety-like behavior in the EPM were analyzed: total percentage of time spent on the open arms, and the percentage of open arm entries. We also analyzed the total number of open arm entries. Interestingly, Tfm-affected males spent less percentage of time on the open arms than both males and females, suggesting increased anxiety-like behavior. Percentage of open arm entries and the total number of arm entries was comparable between the groups, indicating that the observed decrease in the percentage of time spent on the open arms was not due to a global reduction in exploratory behavior. These data, in contrast to earlier reports, thus implicate androgen receptor-mediated functions in the expression of anxiety behaviors in male rats. Given that anxiety is widely reported as a precipitating factor in depression, studying the role of the androgen receptor in anxiety may give insights into the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder.

  7. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promotes ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Kasina, Sathish; Macoska, Jill A

    2012-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the transition of some prostate cancers from androgen ligand-dependent to androgen ligand-independent are incompletely established. Molecules that are ligands for G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been implicated in ligand-independent androgen receptor (AR) activation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CXCL12, the ligand for the GPCR, CXCR4, might mediate prostate cancer cell proliferation through AR-dependent mechanisms involving functional transactivation of the AR in the absence of androgen. The results of these studies showed that activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promoted: The nuclear accumulation of both wild-type and mutant AR in several prostate epithelial cell lines; AR-dependent proliferative responses; nuclear accumulation of the AR co-regulator SRC-1 protein; SRC-1:AR protein:protein association; co-localization of AR and SRC-1 on the promoters of AR-regulated genes; AR- and SRC-1 dependent transcription of AR-regulated genes; AR-dependent secretion of the AR-regulated PSA protein; P13K-dependent phosphorylation of AR; MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of SRC-1, and both MAPK- and P13K-dependent secretion of the PSA protein, in the absence of androgen. Taken together, these studies identify CXCL12 as a novel, non-steroidal growth factor that promotes the growth of prostate epithelial cells through AR-dependent mechanisms in the absence of steroid hormones. These findings support the development of novel therapeutics targeting the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis as an ancillary to those targeting the androgen/AR axis to effectively treat castration resistant/recurrent prostate tumors.

  8. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  9. Probiotics and its functionally valuable products-a review.

    PubMed

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Satish Kumar, R; Yuvaraj, N; Paari, K A; Pattukumar, V; Arul, Venkatesan

    2013-01-01

    During the past two decades probiotic bacteria have been increasingly proposed as health promoting bacteria in variety of food system, because of its safety, functional, and technological characteristics. Commonly, Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microorganisms have been considered as probiotic strains. Possibly these bacterial strains exerted several beneficial effects into gastrointestinal tract of host while administered with variety of food system. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) usually produce antimicrobial substances like bacteriocin which have broad spectrum of antagonist effect against closely related Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens. LAB strains often produce polymeric substances such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) which increase the colonization of probiotic bacteria by cell-cell interactions in gastrointestinal tract. LAB also produces biosurfactant which showed that the wide range of antimicrobial activity against bacterial pathogen as well as its antiadhesive properties reduces the adhesion of pathogens into gastric wall membrane. Furthermore, LAB strains have also been reported for production of antioxidants which are ability to scavenge the free radicals such as superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. For this sense, this review article is mainly focused on the ecology, biosynthesis, genetics, target sites, and applications of bacteriocins and EPS from LAB strains. Moreover, this review discusses about the production and functions of nutritive essential element folate and iron chelating agent such as siderophores from LAB.

  10. Design of smart functional apparel products for moxa moxibustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Au, Wai-man; Ding, Feng; Wong, Kwok-shing

    2013-08-01

    Moxa Moxibustion is a common traditional Chinese therapy in which burning Moxa is applied to affected body areas. This method has been employed for thousands of years to achieve certain medical objectives, such as pain relief or antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. Its therapeutic effectiveness has been demonstrated successfully both in research and clinical studies. However, this traditional approach may cause undesirable side effects, for example: 1) burning of Moxa produces by-products such as smoke and ash; 2) patients are at risk of being burnt; 3) the active ingredients of the Moxa leaf oil are volatile, odorous, unstable in air and easy to dissipate, and difficult to store and transport; 4) it is inconvenient to operate. These side effects limit its further high-potential and high-value applications. This study is aimed at developing a multi-functional smart textile system that will adopt smart fabrics containing encapsulated Moxa oil integrated with thermally conductive materials to replace the conventional Moxa products. This will efficiently deliver the active ingredients of Moxa to a human body at optimum conditions, i.e., in a precise and controllable way, with maximum convenience and a high level of comfort. Doing so would solve the existing problems mentioned above. Both garment design skill and textile technology will be applied to Moxa Moxibustion textile to enhance the aesthetics and functionality. The smart garment performance will be assessed subjectively in a clinical trial and objectively by a number of instrumental methods.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA determines androgen dependence in prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, M; Kudo, T; Suzuki, S; Evans, TT; Sasaki, R; Wada, Y; Shirakawa, T; Sawyer, JR; Gotoh, A

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer progresses from an androgen-dependent to androgen-independent stage after androgen ablation therapy. Mitochondrial DNA plays a role in cell death and metastatic competence. Further, heteroplasmic large-deletion mitochondrial DNA is verycommon in prostate cancer. To investigate the role of mitochondrial DNA in androgen dependence of prostate cancers, we tested the changes of normal and deleted mitochondrial DNA in accordance with the progression of prostate cancer. We demonstrated that the androgen-independent cell line C4-2, established byinoculation of the androgen-dependent LNCaP cell line into castrated mice, has a greatlyreduced amount of normal mitochondrial DNA and an accumulation of large-deletion DNA. Strikingly, the depletion of mitochondrial DNA from androgen-dependent LNCaP resulted in a loss of androgen dependence. Reconstitution of normal mitochondrial DNA to the mitochondrial DNA-depleted clone restored androgen dependence. These results indicate that mitochondrial DNA determines androgen dependence of prostate cancer cell lines. Further, mitochondrial DNA-deficient cells formed tumors in castrated athymic mice, whereas LNCaP did not. The accumulation of large deletion and depletion of mitochondrial DNA maythus playa role in the development of androgen independence, leading to progression of prostate cancers. PMID:16278679

  12. Transcripts of genes encoding reproductive neuroendocrine hormones and androgen receptor in the brain and testis of goldfish exposed to vinclozolin, flutamide, testosterone, and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Golshan, Mahdi; Habibi, Hamid R; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi

    2016-08-01

    Vinclozolin (VZ) is a pesticide that acts as an anti-androgen to impair reproduction in mammals. However, VZ-induced disruption of reproduction is largely unknown in fish. In the present study, we have established a combination exposure in which adult goldfish were exposed to VZ (30 and 100 μg/L), anti-androgen flutamide (Flu, 300 μg/L), and androgen testosterone (T, 1 μg/L) to better understand effects of VZ on reproductive endocrine system. mRNA levels of kisspeptin (kiss-1 and kiss-2) and its receptor (gpr54), salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (gnrh3) and androgen receptor (ar) in the mid-brain, and luteinizing hormone receptor (lhr) in the testis were analyzed and compared with those of control following 10 days of exposure. kiss-1 mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to 100 µg/L VZ and to Flu, while kiss-2 mRNA level was increased following exposure to Flu and to combinations of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu, 100 µg/L VZ with T, and Flu with T. gpr54 mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to Flu and to combination of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu and 100 µg/L VZ with T. gnrh3 mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to 100 µg/L VZ, to Flu, and to combinations of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu, 100 µg/L VZ with T, and Flu with T. The mid-brain ar mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to Flu and to combinations of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu, 100 µg/L VZ with T, and Flu with T. Testicular lhr mRNA level was increased in goldfish exposed to Flu and to combination of 30 µg/L VZ with Flu. These results suggest that VZ and Flu are capable of interfering with kisspeptin and GnRH systems to alter pituitary and testicular horonal functions in adult goldfish and the brain ar mediates VZ-induced disruption of androgen production. PMID:26899179

  13. Androgen receptor modulators: a marriage of chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Iain J

    2013-06-01

    Androgenic steroids are important for male development in utero and secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. In addition, androgens play a role in non-reproductive tissues, such as bone and muscle in both sexes. The actions of the androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated by a single receptor protein, the androgen receptor. Over the last 60-70 years there has been considerable research interest in the development of inhibitors of androgen receptor for the management of diseases such as prostate cancer. However, more recently, there is also a growing appreciation of the need for selective androgen modulators that would demonstrate tissue-selective agonist or antagonist activity. The chemistry and biology of selective agonists, antagonists and selective androgen receptor modulators will be discussed in this review.

  14. Inhibition of constitutive aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling attenuates androgen independent signaling and growth in (C4-2) prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cindy; Richmond, Oliver; Aaron, LaTayia; Powell, Joann B.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. AhR mediates the biochemical and toxic effects of a number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as 2,3,7,8,-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). AhR is widely known for regulating the transcription of drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the xenobiotic metabolism of carcinogens and therapeutic agents, such as cytochrome P450-1B1 (CYP1B1). Additionally, AhR has also been reported to interact with multiple signaling pathways during prostate development. Here we investigate the effect of sustained AhR signaling on androgen receptor function in prostate cancer cells. Immunoblot analysis shows that AhR expression is increased in androgen independent (C4-2) prostate cancer cells when compared to androgen sensitive (LNCaP) cells. RT-PCR studies revealed constitutive AhR signaling in C4-2 cells without the ligand induced activation required in LNCaP cells. A reduction of AhR activity by short RNA mediated silencing in C4-2 cells reduced expression of both AhR and androgen responsive genes. The decrease in androgen responsive genes correlates to a decrease in phosphorylated androgen receptor and androgen receptor expression in the nucleus. Furthermore, the forced decrease in AhR expression resulted in a 50% decline in the growth rate of C4-2 cells. These data indicates that AhR is required to maintain hormone independent signaling and growth by the androgen receptor in C4-2 cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence of a direct role for AhR in androgen independent signaling and provides insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for sustained androgen receptor signaling in hormone refractory prostate cancer. PMID:23266674

  15. Clinical outcomes of anti-androgen withdrawal and subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy for advanced prostate cancer following failure of initial maximum androgen blockade

    PubMed Central

    MOMOZONO, HIROYUKI; MIYAKE, HIDEAKI; TEI, HIROMOTO; HARADA, KEN-ICHI; FUJISAWA, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the significance of anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) who relapsed after initial maximum androgen blockade (MAB). The present study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 272 consecutive advanced PC patients undergoing anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide following the failure of initial MAB using bicalutamide. With the exception of 41 patients (15.1%) who did not undergo anti-androgen withdrawal due to the characteristics of PC suggesting aggressive diseases, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) declined from the baseline value in 83 patients (35.9%), including 18 (7.8%) with PSA decline >50%, but not in the remaining 148 (64.1%). No significant difference in the overall survival (OS) or cancer-specific survival (CSS) among the three groups was observed based on the response to anti-androgen withdrawal. Following the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide, PSA decline was observed in 185 patients (68.0%), including 103 (37.9%) who achieved a PSA reduction of >50%; however, the PSA level continued to elevate in the remaining 87 (32.0%). Furthermore, of the numerous factors examined, only the duration of the initial MAB therapy was shown to be significantly correlated with the PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy. Multivariate analysis of several factors identified revealed that only PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy was an independent predictor of CSS and OS. If initial MAB is effective, the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy may be considered; however, anti-androgen withdrawal should be omitted, irrespective of the characteristics of advanced PC. PMID:27123292

  16. Androgen receptor antagonists (antiandrogens): structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Gauthier, S; Labrie, F

    2000-02-01

    Prostate cancer, acne, seborrhea, hirsutism, and androgenic alopecia are well recognized to depend upon an excess or increased sensitivity to androgens or to be at least sensitive to androgens. It thus seems logical to use antiandrogens as therapeutic agents to prevent androgens from binding to the androgen receptor. The two predominant naturally occurring androgens are testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT is the more potent androgen in vivo and in vitro. All androgen-responsive genes are activated by androgen receptor (AR) bound to either T or DHT and it is believed that AR is more transcriptionally active when bound to DHT than T. The two classes of antiandrogens, presently available, are the steroidal derivatives, all of which possess mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities, and the pure non-steroidal antiandrogens of the class of flutamide and its derivatives. The intrinsic androgenic, estrogenic and glucocorticoid activities of steroidal derivatives have limited their use in the treatment of prostate cancer. The non-steroidal flutamide and its derivatives display pure antiandrogenic activity, without exerting agonistic or any other hormonal activity. Flutamide (89) and its derivatives, Casodex (108) and Anandron (114), are highly effective in the treatment of prostate cancer. The combination of flutamide and Anandron with castration has shown prolongation of life in prostate cancer. Furthermore, combined androgen blockade in association with radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy are very effective in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Such an approach certainly raises the hope of a further improvement in prostate cancer therapy. However, all antiandrogens, developed so-far display moderate affinity for the androgen receptor, and thus moderate efficacy in vitro and in vivo. There is thus a need for next-generation antiandrogens, which could display an equal or even higher affinity for AR compared to the natural androgens, and at the

  17. Annual cycles of steroid hormone production, gonad development, and reproductive behavior in the Atlantic stingray.

    PubMed

    Tricas, T C; Maruska, K P; Rasmussen, L E

    2000-05-01

    The mating season of the Atlantic stingray (Dasyatis sabina), which begins in August and continues through April, is the longest documented for any elasmobranch fish. Despite this protracted mating period, female stingrays ovulate synchronously at the end of the mating season and there is no evidence for sperm storage by females. Thus, the proximate causal factors and ultimate function of this extended preovulatory mating are unknown. Annual cycles of the gonadal steroids testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 17beta-estradiol (E2), and progesterone (P4) were measured for 26 months in a wild estuarine population of Atlantic stingrays to test for associations with their reproductive biology, gametogenesis, and sexual behavior. Serum androgen levels in males showed four phases within an annual cycle: (1) androgen suppression between reproductive seasons (April-July), (2) primary androgen increase during the onset of spermatocyte development (August-October), (3) androgen decrease following maximum testis growth and spermatocyte development (November-December), and (4) secondary androgen increase during the peak of sperm maturation (January-March). Increases in male E2 and P4 were correlated with spermatocyte/spermatocyst formation, maximum testis weight, and the primary (but not secondary) androgen surge. We propose that the production of male androgens across the full seven-month preovulatory mating period promotes their aggressive reproductive behavior and drives the protracted mating season of this species. In females, serum T and DHT showed relatively brief increases near ovulation, whereas E2 and P4 showed brief increases near both ovulation and parturition. The increase in female androgens near ovulation may increase female aggression when they are impregnable by courting males and enhance their choice of mates. This estuary sample population shows higher absolute steroid levels and distinct differences in temporal cycles compared to another Florida fresh

  18. The effect of anabolic-androgenic steroids on aromatase activity and androgen receptor binding in the rat preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Roselli, C E

    1998-05-11

    The level of aromatase in the preoptic area of rats is transcriptionally regulated through a specific androgen-receptor mediated mechanism and can be used as a measure of central androgenic effect. Therefore, several commonly abused anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) were tested for their ability to induce aromatase activity in the preoptic area of castrated rats. In addition, we determined the relative binding affinities of these compounds for the androgen receptor, as well as their ability to bind androgen receptor in vivo following subcutaneous injections. All of the AAS compounds tested significantly stimulated POA aromatase activity above castrate levels. The compounds that produced the greatest stimulation of aromatase activity were those that bound most avidly to the androgen receptor in vitro (i.e., testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and nandrolone). In contrast, the 17alpha-alkylated compounds that were tested (stanozolol, danazol, methandrostenolone) modestly stimulated aromatase and were weak competitors for the androgen receptor. The subcutaneous injection of AAS compounds increased the concentrations of occupied nuclear androgen receptors in the brain, but the magnitude of effect was not related to their potency for inducing aromatase or their relative binding affinity for the androgen receptor suggesting that androgen receptor occupancy in POA is not correlated with the action of androgen on aromatase. The present results help explain the behavioral effects of AAS compounds in rats. PMID:9593936

  19. Androgen Resistance in Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Katherine L; Westberry, Jenne M; Hubler, Tina R; Sadosky, Patti W; Singh, Ravinder J; Taylor, Robert L; Scammell, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to understand the basis for high androgen levels in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.). Mass spectrometry was used to analyze serum testosterone, androstenedione, and dihydrotestosterone of male squirrel monkeys during the nonbreeding (n = 7) and breeding (n = 10) seasons. All hormone levels were elevated compared with those of humans, even during the nonbreeding season; the highest levels occurred during the breeding season. The ratio of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone in squirrel monkeys is high during the breeding season compared to man. Squirrel monkeys may have high testosterone to compensate for inefficient metabolism to dihydrotestosterone. We also investigated whether squirrel monkeys have high androgens to compensate for low-activity androgen receptors (AR). The response to dihydrotestosterone in squirrel monkey cells transfected with AR and AR-responsive reporter plasmids was 4-fold, compared with 28-fold in human cells. This result was not due to overexpression of cellular FKBP51, which causes glucocorticoid and progestin resistance in squirrel monkeys, because overexpression of FKBP51 had no effect on dihydrotestosterone-stimulated reporter activity in a human fibroblast cell line. To test whether the inherently low levels of FKBP52 in squirrel monkeys contribute to androgen insensitivity, squirrel monkey cells were transfected with an AR expression plasmid, an AR-responsive reporter plasmid, and a plasmid expressing FKBP52. Expression of FKBP52 decreased the EC50 or increased the maximal response to dihydrotestosterone. Therefore, the high androgen levels in squirrel monkeys likely compensate for their relatively low 5α-reductase activity during the breeding season and AR insensitivity resulting from low cellular levels of FKBP52. PMID:18724781

  20. Critical role of androgen receptor in the postnatal period in male sexual behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunji; Ohoya, Miku; Takanami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-16

    Gonadal hormones have a developmental role in organization of the nervous system that regulates sexually dimorphic behavior. It is well known that androgen secreted from testes in the perinatal period is converted to estrogen by aromatase in rodent brain, and that estrogen and its receptor play a pivotal role in masculinization of brain structure and function. Treatment with flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, during the perinatal period inhibits development of malespecific brain structure and function, suggesting that androgen signaling via AR also influences brain masculinization. In this study, we investigated which stage during the postnatal period is critical for androgen signaling in brain masculinization. The postnatal period was designated as postnatal days (PD) 0-22, and divided into stages I (PD 0-7), II (PD 8-14), and III (PD 15-22). Newborn male rats were given flutamide subcutaneously in each stage. After adulthood, the effects of postnatal flutamide treatment on brain masculinization were evaluated byanalysis of male sexual behavior. Continuous inhibition of AR throughout stages I and II caused a robust reduction of the intromission ratio and ejaculation frequency compared with other groups. AR inhibition in stage I, II, or III did not cause any change. AR inhibition had no effect onmount behavior. These results show that stage-specific AR activation in the first two postnatal weeks may contribute to brain masculinization mediating male sexual behavior in adulthood.

  1. Critical role of androgen receptor in the postnatal period in male sexual behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunji; Ohoya, Miku; Takanami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-16

    Gonadal hormones have a developmental role in organization of the nervous system that regulates sexually dimorphic behavior. It is well known that androgen secreted from testes in the perinatal period is converted to estrogen by aromatase in rodent brain, and that estrogen and its receptor play a pivotal role in masculinization of brain structure and function. Treatment with flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, during the perinatal period inhibits development of malespecific brain structure and function, suggesting that androgen signaling via AR also influences brain masculinization. In this study, we investigated which stage during the postnatal period is critical for androgen signaling in brain masculinization. The postnatal period was designated as postnatal days (PD) 0-22, and divided into stages I (PD 0-7), II (PD 8-14), and III (PD 15-22). Newborn male rats were given flutamide subcutaneously in each stage. After adulthood, the effects of postnatal flutamide treatment on brain masculinization were evaluated byanalysis of male sexual behavior. Continuous inhibition of AR throughout stages I and II caused a robust reduction of the intromission ratio and ejaculation frequency compared with other groups. AR inhibition in stage I, II, or III did not cause any change. AR inhibition had no effect onmount behavior. These results show that stage-specific AR activation in the first two postnatal weeks may contribute to brain masculinization mediating male sexual behavior in adulthood. PMID:26493607

  2. [Structure and function of neural plasticity-related gene products].

    PubMed

    Yamagata, K; Sugiura, H; Suzuki, K

    1998-08-01

    We have isolated novel immediate early genes (IEGs) from the hippocampus by differential cloning techniques. These mRNAs are induced by synaptic activity and translated into proteins that may affect neural function. We have analyzed a variety of "effector" immediate early genes. These mRNAs encode: 1) cytoplasmic proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2, a small G protein, Rheb, and a cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc; 2) membrane-bound proteins, such as the cell adhesion protein Arcadlin, and a neurite-outgrowth protein, Neuritin; and 3) a secreted protein, Narp. We hypothesize that physiological stimulation induces "effector" proteins that might strengthen synaptic connections of activated synapses. In contrast, pathological conditions such as epilepsy or drug addiction may accelerate overproduction of these gene products, which cause abnormal synapse formation. Gene targeting and in vivo gene transfer techniques are required to prove this hypothesis. PMID:9866829

  3. Natural Product Discovery through Improved Functional Metagenomics in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Hala A; Low-Beinart, Lila; Obiajulu, Joseph U; Brady, Sean F

    2016-08-01

    Because the majority of environmental bacteria are not easily culturable, access to many bacterially encoded secondary metabolites will be dependent on the development of improved functional metagenomic screening methods. In this study, we examined a collection of diverse Streptomyces species for the best innate ability to heterologously express biosynthetic gene clusters. We then optimized methods for constructing high quality metagenomic cosmid libraries in the best Streptomyces host. An initial screen of a 1.5 million-membered metagenomic library constructed in Streptomyces albus, the species that exhibited the highest propensity for heterologous expression of gene clusters, led to the identification of the novel natural product metatricycloene (1). Metatricycloene is a tricyclic polyene encoded by a reductive, iterative polyketide-like gene cluster. Related gene clusters found in sequenced genomes appear to encode a largely unexplored collection of structurally diverse, polyene-based metabolites. PMID:27447056

  4. Negative Modulation of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity by Daxx

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ding-Yen; Fang, Hsin-I; Ma, Ai-Hong; Huang, Yen-Sung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Jenster, Guido; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Shih, Hsiu-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) modulated by positive or negative regulators plays a critical role in controlling the growth and survival of prostate cancer cells. Although numerous positive regulators have been identified, negative regulators of AR are less well understood. We report here that Daxx functions as a negative AR coregulator through direct protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of Daxx suppressed AR-mediated promoter activity in COS-1 and LNCaP cells and AR-mediated prostate-specific antigen expression in LNCaP cells. Conversely, downregulation of endogenous Daxx expression by RNA interference enhances androgen-induced prostate-specific antigen expression in LNCaP cells. In vitro and in vivo interaction studies revealed that Daxx binds to both the amino-terminal and the DNA-binding domain of the AR. Daxx proteins interfere with the AR DNA-binding activity both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, sumoylation of AR at its amino-terminal domain is involved in Daxx interaction and trans-repression. Together, these findings not only provide a novel role of Daxx in controlling AR transactivation activity but also uncover the mechanism underlying sumoylation-dependent transcriptional repression of the AR. PMID:15572661

  5. Behavioral and physiological responses to anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ann S; Henderson, Leslie P

    2003-08-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone originally designed for therapeutic uses to provide enhanced anabolic potency with negligible androgenic effects. Although AAS continue to be used clinically today, the medical benefits of low therapeutic doses of AAS stand in sharp contrast to the potential health risks associated with the excessive doses self-administered not only by elite athletes and body builders, but by a growing number of recreational users, including adolescent boys and girls. The deleterious effects of AAS on peripheral organs and the incidence of altered behaviors in AAS abusers have been well documented in a number of excellent current reviews for clinical populations. However, a comparable synthesis of nonclinical studies has not been made. Our purpose in this review is to summarize the literature for animal models of the effects of supraphysiological doses of AAS (e.g. those that mimic human abuse regimes) on behaviors and on the neural circuitry for these behaviors. In particular, we have focused on studies in rodents that have examined how AAS alter aggression, sexual behaviors, anxiety, reward, learning, and locomotion and how AAS alter the expression and function of neurotransmitter systems and other signaling molecules that underlie these behaviors.

  6. Sarcopenia and Androgens: A Link between Pathology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Basualto-Alarcón, Carla; Varela, Diego; Duran, Javier; Maass, Rodrigo; Estrada, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is becoming more prevalent as the lifespan continues to increase in most populations. As sarcopenia is highly disabling, being associated with increased risk of dependence, falls, fractures, weakness, disability, and death, development of approaches to its prevention and treatment are required. Androgens are the main physiologic anabolic steroid hormones and normal testosterone levels are necessary for a range of developmental and biological processes, including maintenance of muscle mass. Testosterone concentrations decline as age increase, suggesting that low plasma testosterone levels can cause or accelerate muscle- and age-related diseases, as sarcopenia. Currently, there is increasing interest on the anabolic properties of testosterone for therapeutic use in muscle diseases including sarcopenia. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this muscle syndrome and its relationship with plasma level of androgens are not completely understood. This review discusses the recent findings regarding sarcopenia, the intrinsic, and extrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this disease and the treatment approaches that have been developed based on testosterone deficiency and their implications. PMID:25566189

  7. Sarcopenia and Androgens: A Link between Pathology and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Basualto-Alarcón, Carla; Varela, Diego; Duran, Javier; Maass, Rodrigo; Estrada, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is becoming more prevalent as the lifespan continues to increase in most populations. As sarcopenia is highly disabling, being associated with increased risk of dependence, falls, fractures, weakness, disability, and death, development of approaches to its prevention and treatment are required. Androgens are the main physiologic anabolic steroid hormones and normal testosterone levels are necessary for a range of developmental and biological processes, including maintenance of muscle mass. Testosterone concentrations decline as age increase, suggesting that low plasma testosterone levels can cause or accelerate muscle- and age-related diseases, as sarcopenia. Currently, there is increasing interest on the anabolic properties of testosterone for therapeutic use in muscle diseases including sarcopenia. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this muscle syndrome and its relationship with plasma level of androgens are not completely understood. This review discusses the recent findings regarding sarcopenia, the intrinsic, and extrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this disease and the treatment approaches that have been developed based on testosterone deficiency and their implications.

  8. Brain Oscillations and Functional Connectivity during Overt Language Production.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Arne; Aristei, Sabrina; Nolte, Guido; Abdel Rahman, Rasha

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we investigate the communication of different large scale brain sites during an overt language production task with state of the art methods for the estimation of EEG functional connectivity. Participants performed a semantic blocking task in which objects were named in semantically homogeneous blocks of trials consisting of members of a semantic category (e.g., all objects are tools) or in heterogeneous blocks, consisting of unrelated objects. The classic pattern of slower naming times in the homogeneous relative to heterogeneous blocks is assumed to reflect the duration of lexical selection. For the collected data in the homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions the imaginary part of coherency (ImC) was evaluated at different frequencies. The ImC is a measure for detecting the coupling of different brain sites acting on sensor level. Most importantly, the ImC is robust to the artifact of volume conduction. We analyzed the ImC at all pairs of 56 EEG channels across all frequencies. Contrasting the two experimental conditions we found pronounced differences in the theta band at 7 Hz and estimated the most dominant underlying brain sources via a minimum norm inverse solution based on the ImC. As a result of the source localization, we observed connectivity between occipito-temporal and frontal areas, which are well-known to play a major role in lexical-semantic language processes. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of investigating interactive brain activity during overt language production.

  9. Impact of bioenergy production on carbon storage and soil functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prays, Nadia; Franko, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    An important renewable energy source is methane produced in biogas plants (BGPs) that convert plant material and animal excrements to biogas and a residue (BGR). If the plant material stems from crops produced specifically for that purpose, a BGP have a 'footprint' that is defined by the area of arable land needed for the production of these energy crops and the area for distributing the BGRs. The BGR can be used to fertilize these lands (reducing the need for carbon and nitrogen fertilizers), and the crop land can be managed to serve as a carbon sink, capturing atmospheric CO2. We focus on the ecological impact of different BGPs in Central Germany, with a specific interest in the long-term effect of BGR-fertilization on carbon storage within the footprint of a BGP. We therefore studied nutrient fluxes using the CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model, which processes site-specific information on soils, crops, weather, and land management to compute stocks and fluxes of carbon and nitrogen for agricultural fields. We used CANDY to calculated matter fluxes within the footprints of BGPs of different sizes, and studied the effect of the substrate mix for the BGP on the carbon dynamics of the soil. This included the land requirement of the BGR recycling when used as a fertilizer: the footprint of a BGP required for the production of the energy crop generally differs from its footprint required to take up its BGR. We demonstrate how these findings can be used to find optimal cropping choices and land management for sustainable soil use, maintaining soil fertility and other soil functions. Furthermore, site specific potentials and limitations for agricultural biogas production can be identified and applied in land-use planning.

  10. Mold-Ripened Soft Cheeses Fortified with Date Palm Fruit Product as Functional Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Mutlag M; Haddadin, Jamal S; Haddadin, Malik S Y

    2016-01-01

    Date fruit based products are gaining popularity among the consumers in almost all date growing countries due to its added nutritional value. Therefore, novel products were developed by combining two types of foods i.e., soft ripened cheeses and date fruit syrups or date powder. This study is the first to report the surface mold-ripened cheese production with date syrup and date powder. Model cheeses were prepared from pasteurized milk inoculated with Streptococcus thermophilus, Penicillium camemberti and Geotrichum candidum. Date syrup-1, date syrup-2, date powder or the date mixture were added at the stage of curdling. Based on the kinetic growth of the microbial groups in all the treatments, there was no change in the growth of these in various date palm product. On the contrary It may be said that addition of the date fruit product supports their growth. After 35 days, the amounts of total poly phenols were 128.3 ± 1.01, 81.8 ± 1.11, 33.5 ± 2.19, 156.23 ± 1.27 mg GAE/100 g in the cheeses support with date syrup-1, date syrup-2, date powder or the date mixture, respectively. Antioxidant activity of date fruits ranged from 80.13 IC50 (date syrup-2) to 82.23 IC50 (date syrup-1). Based on the chemical characteristics and sensory analysis, the study results showed the potential for innovative application of date products for developing new functional dairy products as an ideal medium for the delivery of biological active compounds with beneficial health effects over. PMID:26930796

  11. Mold-Ripened Soft Cheeses Fortified with Date Palm Fruit Product as Functional Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Mutlag M; Haddadin, Jamal S; Haddadin, Malik S Y

    2016-01-01

    Date fruit based products are gaining popularity among the consumers in almost all date growing countries due to its added nutritional value. Therefore, novel products were developed by combining two types of foods i.e., soft ripened cheeses and date fruit syrups or date powder. This study is the first to report the surface mold-ripened cheese production with date syrup and date powder. Model cheeses were prepared from pasteurized milk inoculated with Streptococcus thermophilus, Penicillium camemberti and Geotrichum candidum. Date syrup-1, date syrup-2, date powder or the date mixture were added at the stage of curdling. Based on the kinetic growth of the microbial groups in all the treatments, there was no change in the growth of these in various date palm product. On the contrary It may be said that addition of the date fruit product supports their growth. After 35 days, the amounts of total poly phenols were 128.3 ± 1.01, 81.8 ± 1.11, 33.5 ± 2.19, 156.23 ± 1.27 mg GAE/100 g in the cheeses support with date syrup-1, date syrup-2, date powder or the date mixture, respectively. Antioxidant activity of date fruits ranged from 80.13 IC50 (date syrup-2) to 82.23 IC50 (date syrup-1). Based on the chemical characteristics and sensory analysis, the study results showed the potential for innovative application of date products for developing new functional dairy products as an ideal medium for the delivery of biological active compounds with beneficial health effects over.

  12. The aging male: androgens, erectile dysfunction, and depression.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N

    2003-01-01

    In contrast to women, men do not experience a sudden cessation of gonadal function comparable to menopause. However, there is a progressive reduction in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis activity in aging men: testosterone levels decline and there is a loss of the circadian rhythm of testosterone secretion. Such progressive HPG-axis hypofunctioning is thought to be responsible for some signs and symptoms that are common in elderly men such as fatigue, reduced muscle and bone mass, sexual dysfunction, and depression. Yet, such presumed hypogonadal sequelae have not been correlated with testosterone levels. Unlike the profound effects of replacement therapy in young men with frank hypogonadism, testosterone replacement in men with age-related mild hypogonadism is not apparently effective in reversing these symptoms. This article reviews the relationship between androgens, sexual function, and depression in aging men.

  13. Partial Androgen Deficiency, Depression, and Testosterone Supplementation in Aging Men

    PubMed Central

    Amore, Mario; Innamorati, Marco; Costi, Sara; Sher, Leo; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on the correlation between depressive symptoms with a syndrome called partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) and on the potential benefits of testosterone (T) treatment on mood. Despite, the causative nature of the relationship between low T levels and depression is uncertain, many hypogonadal men suffer from depression and vice versa several depressed patients are affected by hypogonadism. Supplementation with testosterone failed to show sound evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of depression. Nevertheless, testosterone supplementation has proved to be effective on some domains significant for the quality of life of aged patients with PADAM (sexual function and cognitive functions, muscular strengths). PMID:22719760

  14. Economic values for production and functional traits of Small East African goat using profit functions.

    PubMed

    Mbuku, Samuel; Kosgey, Isaac; Okeyo, Mwai; Kahi, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Economic values for production traits (milk yield, MY, g; 12-month live weight, yLW, kg; consumable meat percentage, CM, %) and functional traits (mature doe live weight, DoLW, kg; mature buck live weight, LWb, kg; kidding frequency, KF; pre-weaning survival rate, PrSR, %; post-weaning survival rate, PoSR,%; doe survival rate, DoSR, %; and residual feed intake, RFI, kg) were estimated using profit functions for the Small East African goat. The scenario evaluated was a fixed flock size, and the resultant economic values (Kes per doe per year) were 34.46 (MY), 62.35 (yLW), 40.69 (CM), 0.15 (DoLW), 2.84 (LWb), 8.69 (KF), 17.38 (PrSR), 16.60 (PoSR), 16.69 (DoSR) and -3.00 (RFI). Similarly, the economic values decreased by -14.7 % (MY), -2.7 % (yLW), -23.9 % (CM), -6.6 % (DoLW), -98 % (LWb), -8.6 % (KF), -8.2 % (PrSR), -8.9 % (PoSR), -8.1 % (DoSR) and 0 % (RFI) when they were risk rated. The economic values for production and functional traits, except RFI, were positive, which implies that genetic improvement of these traits would have a positive effect on the profitability in the pastoral production systems. The application of an Arrow-Pratt coefficient of absolute risk aversion (λ) at the level of 0.02 resulted in a decrease on the estimated economic values, implying that livestock keepers who were risk averse were willing to accept lower expected returns. The results indicate that there would be improvement in traits of economic importance, and, therefore, easy-to-manage genetic improvement programmes should be established.

  15. Comparative Study of Antioxidant Status in Androgenic Embryos of Aesculus hippocastanum and Aesculus flava

    PubMed Central

    Štajner, Dubravka; Popović, Boris M.; Ćalić, Dušica; Štajner, Marijana

    2014-01-01

    In vivo (leaves and seed embryos) and in vitro (androgenic embryos) antioxidant scavenging activity of Aesculus hippocastanum and Aesculus flava medical plants was examined. Here we report antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione quantity, flavonoids, soluble protein contents, quantities of malondialdehyde, and •OH radical presence in the investigated plant samples. Total antioxidant capacity of all the samples of A. hippocastanum and A. flava was determined using FRAP, DPPH, and NO• radical scavenger capacity. The leaves of A. flava collected from the botanical garden exhibited stronger antioxidant activity (higher activities of SOD, and higher quantities of GSH, TSH, TPC, and scavenging abilities of DPPH and NO•, and higher FRAP values and lowest quantities of •OH and MDA) than in vitro obtained cultures. However, the leaves of A. flava showed higher antioxidant activity than the leaves of A. hippocastanum, and therefore they have a stronger tolerance of oxidative stress. Androgenic embryos of both species had low amount of antioxidants due to controlled in vitro environmental conditions (T, photoperiod, humidity, nutritive factors, and pathogen-free). Our results confirmed that we found optimal in vitro conditions for producing androgenic embryos of both Aesculus species. Also, we assume that horse chestnut androgenic embryos can be used as an alternative source for large-scale aescin production. PMID:24672369

  16. Relationships Between Androgens, Serotonin Gene Expression and Innervation in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Coleman, Kristine; Phu, Kenny; Reddy, Arubala P.; Phu, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Androgen administration to castrated individuals was purported to decrease activity in the serotonin system. However, we found that androgen administration to castrated male macaques increased fenfluramine-induced serotonin release as reflected by increased prolactin secretion. In this study, we sought to define the effects of androgens and aromatase inhibition on serotonin-related gene expression in the dorsal raphe, as well as serotonergic innervation of the LC. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5–7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non- aromatizable androgen) and ATD (steroidal aromatase inhibitor), or [4] Flutamide (FLUT; androgen antagonist) and ATD (n=5/group). This study reports the expression of serotonin-related genes: tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the serotonin 1A autoreceptor (5HT1A) using digoxigenin-ISH and image analysis. To examine the production of serotonin and the serotonergic innervation of a target area underlying arousal and vigilance, we measured the serotonin axon density entering the LC with ICC and image analysis. TPH2 and SERT expression were significantly elevated in T- and DHT+ATD- treated groups over placebo- and FLUT+ATD- treated groups in the dorsal raphe (p<0.007). There was no difference in 5HT1A expression between the groups. There was a significant decrease in the pixel area of serotonin axons and in the number of varicosities in the LC across the treatment groups with T > placebo >DHT+ATD = FLUT+ATD treatments. Comparatively, T- and DHT+ATD -treated groups had elevated TPH2 and SERT gene expression, but the DHT+ATD group had markedly suppressed serotonin axon density relative to the T-treated group. Further comparison with previously published data indicated that TPH2 and SERT expression reflected yawning and basal prolactin secretion. The serotonin axon density in the LC agreed with the

  17. Hydrazinobenzoylcurcumin inhibits androgen receptor activity and growth of castration-resistant prostate cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Datta, Indrani; Levin, Albert; Dyson, Gregory; Li, Jing; Kaypee, Stephanie; Swamy, M. Mahadeva; Gupta, Nilesh; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Menon, Mani; Kundu, Tapas K.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need for therapeutic agents that can target the amino-terminal domain (NTD) of androgen receptor (AR) for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Calmodulin (CaM) binds to the AR NTD and regulates AR activity. We discovered that Hydrazinobenzoylcurcumin (HBC), which binds exclusively to CaM, inhibited AR activity. HBC abrogated AR interaction with CaM, suppressed phosphorylation of AR Serine81, and blocked the binding of AR to androgen-response elements. RNA-Seq analysis identified 57 androgen-regulated genes whose expression was significantly (p ≤ 0.002) altered in HBC treated cells as compared to controls. Oncomine analysis revealed that genes repressed by HBC are those that are usually overexpressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and genes stimulated by HBC are those that are often down-regulated in PCa, suggesting a reversing effect of HBC on androgen-regulated gene expression associated with PCa. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed a role of HBC affected genes in cellular functions associated with proliferation and survival. HBC was readily absorbed into the systemic circulation and inhibited the growth of xenografted CRPC tumors in nude mice. These observations demonstrate that HBC inhibits AR activity by targeting the AR NTD and suggest potential usefulness of HBC for effective treatment of CRPC. PMID:25704883

  18. Ectoparasite-modulated deposition of maternal androgens in great tit eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Tschirren, Barbara; Richner, Heinz; Schwabl, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    Maternal yolk androgens can promote growth and competitive abilities of nestling birds but are also suggested to increase susceptibility to parasites or suppress immune function. We tested the hypothesis that females exposed to ectoparasites during egg formation will adjust the content of androgens in the yolk. We predicted that when anticipating high levels of parasitism, females deposit (i) less androgens into all eggs of their clutch and (ii) smaller amounts of androgens in eggs late in the laying sequence to facilitate brood reduction. In a field experiment we exposed female great tits (Parus major) to hen fleas (Ceratophyllus gallinae), or kept them free of ectoparasites prior to egg laying. We collected the eggs and measured yolk concentrations of androstenedione (A4), testosterone (T) and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by radioimmunoassay. Among clutches, eggs of ectoparasite-exposed females contained significantly less A4 and tended to contain less T, whereas DHT content was unaffected. Within clutches, content of A4 and T increased significantly with laying order whereas DHT content significantly decreased. These patterns were unaffected by ectoparasites. In summary, our results provide no evidence for hormone-based facilitation of brood reduction under ectoparasite exposure but support the hypothesis that females exposed to ectoparasites reduce levels of T and its precursor A4 in yolk and might thereby reduce the negative effects of parasites on offspring. PMID:15306335

  19. The functional role of some tomato products on lipid profile and liver function in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hoda Salama; Ahmed, Lamiaa Ali; El-din, Maha Mohamed Essam

    2008-09-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the functional role of lycopene obtained from powder prepared from fresh tomato, tomato paste, and ketchup that contained equal amounts of lycopene based on levels of intake on body weight gain (BWG), feed intake, feed efficiency ratio (FER), lipid profiles, atherogenic index, and liver enzymes of hyperlipidemic rats. Forty-eight male albino rats were divided into two main groups: the first group (n = 6 rats) was kept on the basal diet as a normal control, while the second group (n = 42 rats) was fed a hyperlipidemic diet for 5 weeks to induce hyperlipidemia. The latter group was divided into seven subgroups: the first subgroup was the positive control group, while the others were supplemented with one of the tomato products at one of two levels (10 or 20 mg of lycopene/kg of diet). BWG, feed intake, and FER were calculated, and blood samples were collected to determine total lipids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein fractions, atherogenic index, and liver function in sera. Relative organ weights were also calculated. Results revealed that administration of various tomato products produced a significant reduction in feed intake except for the hyperlipidemic group that supplemented with the lower lycopene level from tomato paste. In addition, BWG and FER were not influenced by addition of tomato products at any level of intake. Hyperlipidemic rats supplemented with tomato powder, tomato paste, or ketchup showed significant improvement in almost all the parameters studied compared to the positive control group. Results showed that the higher lycopene level from tomato paste produced significant improvement in all lipid parameters, followed by 10 mg of lycopene/kg from tomato paste, which caused significant elevation in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol comparable to that of the negative control group. The lowest atherogenic index was achieved by addition of the lower lycopene level from tomato paste followed by

  20. Molecular cloning of canine co-chaperone small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) and investigation of its ability to suppress androgen receptor signalling in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuiko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Michishita, Masaki; Azakami, Daigo; Nakahira, Rei; Morimatsu, Masami; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Kobayashi, Masato; Bonkobara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Masanori; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Watanabe, Masami; Omi, Toshinori

    2015-11-01

    Although the morbidity of canine prostate cancer is low, the majority of cases present with resistance to androgen therapy and poor clinical outcomes. These pathological conditions are similar to the signs of the terminal stage of human androgen-independent prostate cancer. The co-chaperone small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) is known to be overexpressed in human androgen-independent prostate cancer. However, there is little information about the structure and function of canine SGTA. In this study, canine SGTA was cloned and analysed for its ability to suppress androgen receptor signalling. The full-length open reading frame (ORF) of the canine SGTA gene was amplified by RT-PCR using primers designed from canine-expressed sequence tags that were homologous to human SGTA. The canine SGTA ORF has high homology with the corresponding human (89%) and mouse (81%) sequences. SGTA dimerisation region and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains are conserved across the three species. The ability of canine SGTA to undergo homodimerisation was demonstrated by a mammalian two-hybrid system and a pull-down assay. The negative impact of canine SGTA on androgen receptor (AR) signalling was demonstrated using a reporter assay in androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell lines. Pathological analysis showed overexpression of SGTA in canine prostate cancer, but not in hyperplasia. A reporter assay in prostate cells demonstrated suppression of AR signalling by canine SGTA. Altogether, these results suggest that canine SGTA may play an important role in the acquisition of androgen independence by canine prostate cancer cells.

  1. Mental rotation in intellectually gifted boys is affected by the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Lakatošová, Silvia; Kubranská, Aneta; Laznibatová, Jolana; Ficek, Andrej; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone was shown to organize brain and modulate cognitive functions. It is currently unknown whether mental rotation is also associated with prenatal testosterone exposure and testosterone-related genetic polymorphisms. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between mental rotation performance, the actual testosterone levels, the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in intellectually gifted boys. One hundred forty-seven boys aged 10-18 years with IQ>130 were enrolled. Saliva samples were collected and used for ELISA of actual levels of salivary testosterone. The 2D:4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was measured on both hands and averaged. Amthauer mental rotation test was used for the assessment of this spatial ability. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene was analyzed using PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Linear regression revealed that 2D:4D finger length ratio and the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene were associated with mental rotation. Actual levels of testosterone did not correlate significantly with mental rotation. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that after adjustment of age as a confounding variable, only the effect of the genetic polymorphism was significant. The results are in line with our previous genetic analysis of intellectually gifted boys showing the importance of CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene. Details of the interactions between androgen signaling, testosterone levels and its metabolism especially during the prenatal development of brain function remain to be elucidated.

  2. Global analysis of transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells uncovers active enhancers and direct androgen receptor targets

    PubMed Central

    Toropainen, Sari; Niskanen, Einari A.; Malinen, Marjo; Sutinen, Päivi; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a male sex steroid-activated transcription factor (TF) that plays a critical role in prostate cancers, including castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) that typically express amplified levels of the AR. CRPC-derived VCaP cells display an excessive number of chromatin AR-binding sites (ARBs) most of which localize to distal inter- or intragenic regions. Here, we analyzed direct transcription programs of the AR in VCaP cells using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and integrated the GRO-seq data with the ARB and VCaP cell-specific TF-binding data. Androgen immediately activated transcription of hundreds of protein-coding genes, including IGF-1 receptor and EGF receptor. Androgen also simultaneously repressed transcription of a large number of genes, including MYC. As functional enhancers have been postulated to produce enhancer-templated non-coding RNAs (eRNAs), we also analyzed the eRNAs, which revealed that only a fraction of the ARBs reside at functional enhancers. Activation of these enhancers was most pronounced at the sites that also bound PIAS1, ERG and HDAC3, whereas binding of HDAC3 and PIAS1 decreased at androgen-repressed enhancers. In summary, our genome-wide data of androgen-regulated enhancers and primary target genes provide new insights how the AR can directly regulate cellular growth and control signaling pathways in CPRC cells. PMID:27641228

  3. Global analysis of transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells uncovers active enhancers and direct androgen receptor targets.

    PubMed

    Toropainen, Sari; Niskanen, Einari A; Malinen, Marjo; Sutinen, Päivi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a male sex steroid-activated transcription factor (TF) that plays a critical role in prostate cancers, including castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPC) that typically express amplified levels of the AR. CRPC-derived VCaP cells display an excessive number of chromatin AR-binding sites (ARBs) most of which localize to distal inter- or intragenic regions. Here, we analyzed direct transcription programs of the AR in VCaP cells using global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and integrated the GRO-seq data with the ARB and VCaP cell-specific TF-binding data. Androgen immediately activated transcription of hundreds of protein-coding genes, including IGF-1 receptor and EGF receptor. Androgen also simultaneously repressed transcription of a large number of genes, including MYC. As functional enhancers have been postulated to produce enhancer-templated non-coding RNAs (eRNAs), we also analyzed the eRNAs, which revealed that only a fraction of the ARBs reside at functional enhancers. Activation of these enhancers was most pronounced at the sites that also bound PIAS1, ERG and HDAC3, whereas binding of HDAC3 and PIAS1 decreased at androgen-repressed enhancers. In summary, our genome-wide data of androgen-regulated enhancers and primary target genes provide new insights how the AR can directly regulate cellular growth and control signaling pathways in CPRC cells. PMID:27641228

  4. A role of junction-mediated interactions in cells of the male reproductive tract: impact of prenatal, neonatal, and prepubertal exposure to anti-androgens on adult reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hejmej, Anna; Bilinska, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Male sexual development and male reproductive functions are dependent on the normal action of androgens, and an unbalanced ratio of the active androgens can lead to varying degrees of structural and functional abnormalities within the reproductive organs. Endocrine balance can be disturbed by environmental and pharmaceutical anti-androgens (i.e. vinclozolin, phthalates, procymidone, and flutamide) that antagonize normal androgen action. Such chemical compounds enter the cell, bind to the receptor and inactivate transcription leading to disruption of androgen-mediated signaling. Assembling and functioning of cell junctions in hormone-dependent tissues, such as testis, epididymis and prostate appeared to be controlled by steroid hormones, predominantly by androgens. This review presents recent findings on the tight junction proteins mainly responsible for normal functioning of the barrier within the testis, epididymis and prostate, anchoring junction proteins that play a crucial role in normal cell-cell adhesion, and gap junction proteins through which intercellular communication takes place in the male reproductive tract. The review gives examples of animal models that are used in endocrine disruption studies with a focus on the author's own data from studies in the pig.

  5. Structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein products.

    PubMed

    Malomo, Sunday A; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-08-01

    The effects of pH and protein concentration on some structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein isolate (HPI, 84.15% protein content) and defatted hemp seed protein meal (HPM, 44.32% protein content) were determined. The HPI had minimum protein solubility (PS) at pH 4.0, which increased as pH was decreased or increased. In contrast, the HPM had minimum PS at pH 3.0, which increased at higher pH values. Gel electrophoresis showed that some of the high molecular weight proteins (>45 kDa) present in HPM were not well extracted by the alkali and were absent or present in low ratio in the HPI polypeptide profile. The amino acid composition showed that the isolation process increased the Arg/Lys ratio of HPI (5.52%) when compared to HPM (3.35%). Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism data indicate that the HPI proteins had a well-defined structure at pH 3.0, which was lost as pH value increased. The differences in structural conformation of HPI at different pH values were reflected as better foaming capacity at pH 3.0 when compared to pH 5.0, 7.0, and 9.0. At 10 and 25 mg/mL protein concentrations, emulsions formed by the HPM had smaller oil droplet sizes (higher quality), when compared to the HPI-formed emulsions. In contrast at 50 mg/mL protein concentration, the HPI-formed emulsions had smaller oil droplet sizes (except at pH 3.0). We conclude that the functional properties of hemp seed protein products are dependent on structural conformations as well as protein concentration and pH.

  6. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-09-01

    Androgen receptor genes (AR) have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ) in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species. PMID:26236645

  7. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  8. Anabolic-androgenic steroids: use and abuse in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Julie M; Congeni, Joseph A

    2007-08-01

    The "win at all costs" mentality fuels athletes to seek performance-enhancing substances, such as anabolic-androgenic steroids, to gain an advantage over their opponents. Nonathletes espouse this same attitude to "win" the battle of attractiveness. An enhanced understanding of anabolic-androgenic steroids and the motivations behind their abuse will arm pediatricians with the ability to engage their patients in a balanced discussion of the benefits and costly risks of anabolic-androgenic steroids and successfully deter further use.

  9. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host.

  10. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  11. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    PubMed Central

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  12. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  13. Position stand on androgen and human growth hormone use.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Kraemer, William J; Bhasin, Shalender; Storer, Thomas; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Haff, G Gregory; Willoughby, Darryn S; Rogol, Alan D

    2009-08-01

    Hoffman, JR, Kraemer, WJ, Bhasin, S, Storer, T, Ratamess, NA, Haff, GG, Willoughby, DS, and Rogol, AD. Position stand on Androgen and human growth hormone use. J Strength Cond Res 23(5): S1-S59, 2009-Perceived yet often misunderstood demands of a sport, overt benefits of anabolic drugs, and the inability to be offered any effective alternatives has fueled anabolic drug abuse despite any consequences. Motivational interactions with many situational demands including the desire for improved body image, sport performance, physical function, and body size influence and fuel such negative decisions. Positive countermeasures to deter the abuse of anabolic drugs are complex and yet unclear. Furthermore, anabolic drugs work and the optimized training and nutritional programs needed to cut into the magnitude of improvement mediated by drug abuse require more work, dedication, and preparation on the part of both athletes and coaches alike. Few shortcuts are available to the athlete who desires to train naturally. Historically, the NSCA has placed an emphasis on education to help athletes, coaches, and strength and conditioning professionals become more knowledgeable, highly skilled, and technically trained in their approach to exercise program design and implementation. Optimizing nutritional strategies are a vital interface to help cope with exercise and sport demands (). In addition, research-based supplements will also have to be acknowledged as a strategic set of tools (e.g., protein supplements before and after resistance exercise workout) that can be used in conjunction with optimized nutrition to allow more effective adaptation and recovery from exercise. Resistance exercise is the most effective anabolic form of exercise, and over the past 20 years, the research base for resistance exercise has just started to develop to a significant volume of work to help in the decision-making process in program design (). The interface with nutritional strategies has been less

  14. Modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Bart L; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on significant recent findings regarding modulators of androgen and estrogen receptor activity. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) interact with androgen receptors (ARs), and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) interact with estrogen receptors (ERs), with variable tissue selectivity. SERMs, which interact with both ERб and ERв in a tissue-specific manner to produce diverse outcomes in multiple tissues, continue to generate significant interest for clinical application. Development of SARMs for clinical application has been slower to date because of potential adverse effects, but these diverse compounds continue to be investigated for use in disorders in which modulation of the AR is important. SARMs have been investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level to date, with few human clinical trials published. These compounds have been evaluated mostly for application in different stages of prostate cancer to date, but they hold promise for multiple other applications. Publication of the large STAR and RUTH clinical trials demonstrated that the SERMs tamoxifen and raloxifene have interesting similarities and differences in tissues that contain ERs. Lasofoxifene, bazedoxifene, and arzoxifene are newer SERMs that have been demonstrated in clinical trials to more potently increase bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values than tamoxifen or raloxifene. Both SARMs and SERMs hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple disorders in which tissue-specific effects are mediated by their respective receptors.

  15. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns. PMID:23770638

  16. When color fails: illicit blue tablets containing anabolic androgen steroids.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Castagna, Franca; Maietti, Sergio; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2013-09-01

    The necessity of specific, confirmatory tests in the identification of seized illicit products was highlighted by the analysis of eighteen heart shaped, blue tablets confiscated by Police at a street control in the North East of Italy. The tablets responded as amphetamines to a preliminary color test (Marquis); a subsequent, confirmatory assay by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the presence of two anabolic androgen steroids (AAS), methandienone and methyltestosterone, in concentration of 1.7 and 1.5mg respectively per tablet; no trace of amphetamine-like or nitrogen containing compounds was found. The observed orange coloration was due to the reaction of concentrated sulphuric acid, contained in the Marquis reagent, with the Δ(4) C-3 keto group of steroids. The two AAS, banned under the world antidoping code, are not considered as psychoactive drugs of abuse in most countries, although their trafficking may entangle severe public health concerns.

  17. Study on Capturing Functional Requirements of the New Product Based on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Song, Liya; Bai, Zhonghang; Zhang, Peng

    In order to exist in an increasingly competitive global marketplace, it is important for corporations to forecast the evolutionary direction of new products rapidly and effectively. Most products in the world are developed based on the design of existing products. In the product design, capturing functional requirements is a key step. Function is continuously evolving, which is driven by the evolution of needs and technologies. So the functional requirements of new product can be forecasted based on the functions of existing product. Eight laws of function evolution are put forward in this paper. The process model of capturing the functional requirements of new product based on function evolution is proposed. An example illustrates the design process.

  18. Bioactive androgens and glucuronidated androgen metabolites are associated with subcutaneous and ectopic skeletal muscle adiposity among older black men.

    PubMed

    Miljkovic, Iva; Cauley, Jane A; Dressen, Amy S; Gordon, Christopher L; Goodpaster, Bret H; Kuller, Lewis H; Bunker, Clareann H; Patrick, Alan L; Wheeler, Victor W; Orwoll, Eric S; Zmuda, Joseph M

    2011-08-01

    Aging is associated with declining serum levels of androgenic hormones and with increased skeletal muscle fat infiltration, an emerging risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Androgens regulate fat mass and glucose homeostasis, but the effect of androgenic hormones on skeletal muscle fat infiltration is largely unknown. Thus, the aim of the current study was to examine the association of serum androgens and their precursors and metabolites with skeletal muscle fat infiltration and T2DM in a black male population group at high risk of T2DM. Serum androgens, estrogens, and androgen precursors and metabolites were measured using mass spectrometry; and calf skeletal muscle fat distribution (subcutaneous and intermuscular fat; skeletal muscle density) was measured using quantitative computed tomography in 472 Afro-Caribbean men 65 years and older. Bioactive androgens, testosterone, free testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone were associated with less skeletal muscle fat infiltration (r = -0.14 to -0.18, P < .05) and increased skeletal muscle density (r = 0.10 to 0.14, P < .05), independent of total adiposity. In addition, glucuronidated androgen metabolites were associated with less subcutaneous fat (r = -0.11 to -0.15, P < .05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified an increased level of 3α-diol-3 glucuronide (odds ratio = 1.38, P < .01) and a decreased level of dihydrotestosterone (odds ratio = 0.66, P < .01) to be significantly associated with T2DM. Our findings suggest that, in elderly black men, independent of total adiposity, bioactive androgens and glucuronidated androgen metabolites may play previously unrecognized role in skeletal muscle fat distribution. Longitudinal studies are needed to further evaluate the relationship between androgens and androgen metabolites with changes in skeletal muscle fat distribution with aging and the incidence of T2DM. PMID:21353258

  19. Assessing the transferability of ecosystem service production estimates and functions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of ecosystem service (ES) production, and their responses to stressors or policy actions, may be obtained by direct measurement, other empirical studies, or modeling. Direct measurement is costly and often impractical, and thus many studies transfer ES production estim...

  20. Role of androgen and vitamin D receptors in endothelial cells from benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ivy; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Buttyan, Ralph; Johnson, Candace S.; Smith, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, Judah Folkman (Folkman. N Engl J Med 285: 1182–1186, 1971) proposed that tumor growth might be controlled by limiting formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) needed to supply a growing tumor with oxygen and nutrients. To this end, numerous “antiangiogenic” agents have been developed and tested for therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients, including prostate cancer (CaP) patients, with limited success. Despite the lack of clinical efficacy of lead anti-angiogenic therapeutics in CaP patients, recent published evidence continues to support the idea that prostate tumor vasculature provides a reasonable target for development of new therapeutics. Particularly relevant to antiangiogenic therapies targeted to the prostate is the observation that specific hormones can affect the survival and vascular function of prostate endothelial cells within normal and malignant prostate tissues. Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that both androgen(s) and vitamin D significantly impact the growth and survival of endothelial cells residing within prostate cancer and that systemic changes in circulating androgen or vitamin D drastically affect blood flow and vascularity of prostate tissue. Furthermore, recent evidence will be discussed about the expression of the receptors for both androgen and vitamin D in prostate endothelial cells that argues for direct effects of these hormone-activated receptors on the biology of endothelial cells. Based on this literature, we propose that prostate tumor vasculature represents an unexplored target for modulation of tumor growth. A better understanding of androgen and vitamin D effects on prostate endothelial cells will support development of more effective angiogenesis-targeting therapeutics for CaP patients. PMID:23548616

  1. Pharmacological characterization of an imidazolopyrazole as novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuqing; Allan, George F; Tannenbaum, Pamela; Sbriscia, Tifanie; Linton, Olivia; Lai, Muh-Tsann; Haynes-Johnson, Donna; Bhattacharjee, Sheela; Lundeen, Scott G; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgens with tissue-selective activity. SARMs that have anabolic activity on muscle while having minimal stimulatory activity on prostate are classified as SARM agonists. They can be used to prevent the loss of lean body mass that is associated with cancer, immunodeficiency, renal disease and aging. They may also have anabolic activity on bone; thus, unlike estrogens, they may reverse the loss of bone strength associated with aging or hypogonadism. Our in-house effort on SARM program discovers a nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligand with a unique imidazolopyrazole moiety in its structure. In vitro, this compound is a weak androgen receptor binder and a weak androgen agonist. Despite this, in orchidectomized mature rats it is an effective SARM agonist, with an ED(50) on levator ani muscle of 3.3mg/kg and an ED(50) on ventral prostate of >30mg/kg. It has its maximal effect on muscle at the dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, this compound has mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities on prostate, reducing the weight of that tissue in intact rats by 22% at 10mg/kg. The compound does not have significant effect on gonadotropin levels or testosterone levels in both orchidectomized and intact male rats. It does not have notable progestin, estrogen or glucocorticoid agonistic or antagonistic activity in rats. In a female sexual behavior model, it improves the sexual desire of ovariectomized female rats for sexually mature intact males over nonsexually ovariectomized females. Overall, the imidazolopyrazole is a potent prostate-sparing candidate for development as a SARM agonist with an appropriate pharmacological profile for clinical benefit in muscle-wasting conditions and female sexual function disorders.

  2. Androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene and the effect of a SNP in an androgen response element.

    PubMed

    Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Helsen, Christine; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank

    2013-12-01

    More than 50% of prostate cancers have undergone a genomic reorganization that juxtaposes the androgen-regulated promoter of TMPRSS2 and the protein coding parts of several ETS oncogenes. These gene fusions lead to prostate-specific and androgen-induced ETS expression and are associated with aggressive lesions, poor prognosis, and early-onset prostate cancer. In this study, we showed that an enhancer at 13 kb upstream of the TMPRSS2 transcription start site is crucial for the androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene when tested in bacterial artificial chromosomal vectors. Within this enhancer, we identified the exact androgen receptor binding sequence. This newly identified androgen response element is situated next to two binding sites for the pioneer factor GATA2, which were identified by DNase I footprinting. Both the androgen response element and the GATA-2 binding sites are involved in the enhancer activity. Importantly, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs8134378) within this androgen response element reduces binding and transactivation by the androgen receptor. The presence of this SNP might have implications on the expression and/or formation levels of TMPRSS2 fusions, because both have been shown to be influenced by androgens.

  3. Bioactive peptides from meat muscle and by-products: generation, functionality and application as functional ingredients.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; Hayes, Maria

    2014-10-01

    Bioactive peptides are sequences of between 2-30 amino acids in length that impart a positive health effect to the consumer when ingested. They have been identified from a range of foods, including milk and muscle sources including beef, chicken, pork and marine muscles. The myriad of peptides identified from these sources have known antihypertensive, opioid, antioxidant, antithrombotic and other bioactivities. Indeed, bioactive peptides could play a role in the prevention of diseases associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and mental health diseases. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the bioactive peptides identified in muscle proteins and by-products generated during the processing of meat. The paper looks at the isolation, enrichment and characterisation strategies that have been employed to date to generate bioactive peptides and the potential future applications of these peptides in functional foods for the prevention of heart and mental health problems and obesity.

  4. Androgen Receptor Increases CD133 Expression and Progenitor-Like Population That Associate With Cisplatin Resistance in Endometrial Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lumin; Chang, Wei-Chun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chang, Ying-Yi; Bao, Bo-Yin; Huang, Hsin-Ching; Chung, Wei-Min; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EMC) is a sex steroid hormone-related female malignancy. Androgen and androgen receptor (androgen/AR) signals have been implicated in EMC progression. Cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs) are suspected to link to chemoresistance in patients with EMC. In this study, we examined the androgen/AR roles in cisplatin resistance and CSPC population. We found AR expression increased naive EMC side population, CSPC population, cell migration, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Meanwhile, it decreased cisplatin cytotoxic effect on EMC cells. Collaterally, endogenous AR expressions in EMC cells were upregulated in the cisplatin-resisting state. Moreover, AR expression could further enhance CD133 expression, CSPC-related markers, and drug-resistance gene messenger RNA expression in EMC cells. Finally, the AR-associated gene expression might go through indirect regulation. This is the first report revealing AR function on EMC cells’ CSPC and cisplatin resistance. PMID:23962788

  5. Substituted 6-(1-pyrrolidine)quinolin-2(1H)-ones as novel selective androgen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Martinborough, Esther; Shen, Yixing; Oeveren, Arjan van; Long, Yun Oliver; Lau, Thomas L S; Marschke, Keith B; Chang, William Y; López, Francisco J; Vajda, Eric G; Rix, Peter J; Viveros, O Humberto; Negro-Vilar, Andrés; Zhi, Lin

    2007-10-18

    The androgen receptor is a ligand inducible transcription factor that is involved in a broad range of physiological functions. Here we describe the discovery of a new class of orally available selective androgen receptor modulators. The lead compound, 6-[(2R,5R)-2-methyl-5-((R)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-hydroxyethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]-4-trifluoromethylquinolin-2(1H)-one (6a), showed excellent anabolic activity in muscle with reduced effect on the prostate in a rat model of hypogonadism. The compound also improved bone strength in a rat model of post-menopausal osteoporosis.

  6. Do androgen deprivation drugs affect the immune cross-talk between mononuclear and prostate cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Salman, Hertzel; Bergman, Michael; Blumberger, Naava; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of androgen deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide on the immune cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cells from PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer lines. PBMC, PC-3 and LNCaP were separately incubated without and with two androgen-deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide, and the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10 was examined. In addition, the effect of both drugs on the production of those cytokines was carried out after 24 hours incubation of PBMC with both types of cancer cells. Leuprolide or bicalutamide did not affect the production of the cytokines by PBMC or by the prostate cancer cells from the two lines. Incubation of PBMC with PC-3 or LNCaP cells caused increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 as compared with PBMC incubated without malignant cells. While 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M of leuprolide caused a decreased secretion of IL-1β by PBMC previously incubated with prostate cancer cells without the drug, bicalutamide did not affect this PBMC activity at any drug concentration. This observation suggests the existence of an additional mechanism explaining the effect of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  7. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    PubMed

    Hornig, Nadine C; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  8. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5’UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation

    PubMed Central

    Hornig, Nadine C.; de Beaufort, Carine; Denzer, Friederike; Cools, Martine; Wabitsch, Martin; Ukat, Martin; Kulle, Alexandra E.; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Werner, Ralf; Hiort, Olaf; Audi, Laura; Siebert, Reiner; Ammerpohl, Ole; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2016-01-01

    A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5’ untranslated region (5’-UTR) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5′UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5′UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general. PMID:27110943

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kwilas, Anna R; Donahue, Renee N; Hodge, James W

    2014-10-15

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone render prostate tumor cells more sensitive to T cell-mediated lysis through immunogenic modulation, and that these immunomodulatory activities are androgen receptor (AR)-dependent. In studies reported here, the NAIP gene was significantly down-regulated in human prostate tumor cells treated in vitro and in vivo with enzalutamide. Functional analysis revealed that NAIP played a critical role in inducing CTL sensitivity. Amplification of AR is a major mechanism of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Here, we show that enzalutamide enhances sensitivity to immune-mediated killing of prostate tumor cells that overexpress AR. The immunomodulatory properties of enzalutamide and abiraterone provide a rationale for their use in combination with immunotherapeutic agents in CRPC, especially for patients with minimal response to enzalutamide or abiraterone alone, or for patients who have developed resistance to ADT. PMID:25344864

  10. A role for selective androgen response elements in the development of the epididymis and the androgen control of the 5α reductase II gene.

    PubMed

    Kerkhofs, Stefanie; Dubois, Vanessa; De Gendt, Karel; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Schuit, Frans; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Saunders, Philippa T K; Verhoeven, Guido; Claessens, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) recognizes two types of DNA elements that are dimers of 5'-AGAACA-3'-like hexamers, either organized as inverted or direct repeats. We developed a mouse model [(specificity affecting AR knock-in (SPARKI)] in which the AR DNA-binding domain was mutated such that it lost binding to direct repeats but not to inverted elements. The impaired fertility of the male SPARKI mice correlates with the reduced motility of the spermatozoa, a characteristic that is developed during transit through the epididymis. Comparative transcriptome analyses revealed that the expression of 39 genes is changed in SPARKI epididymis. Remarkably, the expression of the steroid 5α-reductase type II (Srd5α2) gene, which metabolizes testosterone into the more potent dihydrotestosterone, is reduced 4-fold in SPARKI vs. wild type. The comparison of the SPARKI phenotype with that of Srd5α2-knockout mice shows, however, that the reduced Srd5α2 expression cannot explain all defects of the SPARKI epididymis. Moreover, we describe three new selective androgen response elements (AREs), which control the androgen responsiveness of the Srd5α2 gene. We conclude that the SPARKI model can be considered a knockout model for AR functioning via selective AREs and that this has a dramatic effect on sperm maturation in the epididymis.

  11. Increased androgenic sensitivity in the hind limb muscular system marks the evolution of a derived gestural display

    PubMed Central

    Mangiamele, Lisa A.; Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Schuppe, Eric R.; Taylor, Rebecca S.; Hödl, Walter; Preininger, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Physical gestures are prominent features of many species’ multimodal displays, yet how evolution incorporates body and leg movements into animal signaling repertoires is unclear. Androgenic hormones modulate the production of reproductive signals and sexual motor skills in many vertebrates; therefore, one possibility is that selection for physical signals drives the evolution of androgenic sensitivity in select neuromotor pathways. We examined this issue in the Bornean rock frog (Staurois parvus, family: Ranidae). Males court females and compete with rivals by performing both vocalizations and hind limb gestural signals, called “foot flags.” Foot flagging is a derived display that emerged in the ranids after vocal signaling. Here, we show that administration of testosterone (T) increases foot flagging behavior under seminatural conditions. Moreover, using quantitative PCR, we also find that adult male S. parvus maintain a unique androgenic phenotype, in which androgen receptor (AR) in the hind limb musculature is expressed at levels ∼10× greater than in two other anuran species, which do not produce foot flags (Rana pipiens and Xenopus laevis). Finally, because males of all three of these species solicit mates with calls, we accordingly detect no differences in AR expression in the vocal apparatus (larynx) among taxa. The results show that foot flagging is an androgen-dependent gestural signal, and its emergence is associated with increased androgenic sensitivity within the hind limb musculature. Selection for this novel gestural signal may therefore drive the evolution of increased AR expression in key muscles that control signal production to support adaptive motor performance. PMID:27143723

  12. The Historical Role of the Production Function in Economics and Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David; Vaughan, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The production function explains a basic technological relationship between scarce resources, or inputs, and output. This paper offers a brief overview of the historical significance and operational role of the production function in business and economics. The origin and development of this function over time is initially explored. Several…

  13. Discovery of BMS-641988, a Novel Androgen Receptor Antagonist for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    BMS-641988 (23) is a novel, nonsteroidal androgen receptor antagonist designed for the treatment of prostate cancer. The compound has high binding affinity for the AR and acts as a functional antagonist in vitro. BMS-641988 is efficacious in multiple human prostate cancer xenograft models, including CWR22-BMSLD1 where it displays superior efficacy relative to bicalutamide. Based on its promising preclinical profile, BMS-641988 was selected for clinical development. PMID:26288692

  14. N-aryl-oxazolidin-2-imine muscle selective androgen receptor modulators enhance potency through pharmacophore reorientation.

    PubMed

    Nirschl, Alexandra A; Zou, Yan; Krystek, Stanley R; Sutton, James C; Simpkins, Ligaya M; Lupisella, John A; Kuhns, Joyce E; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Golla, Rajasree; Sleph, Paul G; Beehler, Blake C; Grover, Gary J; Egan, Donald; Fura, Aberra; Vyas, Viral P; Li, Yi-Xin; Sack, John S; Kish, Kevin F; An, Yongmi; Bryson, James A; Gougoutas, Jack Z; DiMarco, John; Zahler, Robert; Ostrowski, Jacek; Hamann, Lawrence G

    2009-05-14

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) scaffold was discovered as a byproduct obtained during synthesis of our earlier series of imidazolidin-2-ones. The resulting oxazolidin-2-imines are among the most potent SARMs known, with many analogues exhibiting sub-nM in vitro potency in binding and functional assays. Despite the potential for hydrolytic instability at gut pH, compounds of the present class showed good oral bioavailability and were highly active in a standard rodent pharmacological model.

  15. N-Aryl-oxazolidin-2-imine Muscle Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators Enhance Potency through Pharmacophore Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Nirschl, Alexandra A.; Zou, Yan; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Sutton, James C.; Simpkins, Ligaya M.; Lupisella, John A.; Kuhns, Joyce E.; Seethala, Ramakrishna; Golla, Rajasree; Sleph, Paul G.; Beehler, Blake C.; Grover, Gary J.; Egan, Donald; Fura, Aberra; Vyas, Viral P.; Li, Yi-Xin; Sack, John S.; Kish, Kevin F.; An, Yongmi; Bryson, James A.; Gougoutas, Jack Z.; DiMarco, John; Zahler, Robert; Ostrowski, Jacek; Hamann, Lawrence G.

    2010-11-09

    A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) scaffold was discovered as a byproduct obtained during synthesis of our earlier series of imidazolidin-2-ones. The resulting oxazolidin-2-imines are among the most potent SARMs known, with many analogues exhibiting sub-nM in vitro potency in binding and functional assays. Despite the potential for hydrolytic instability at gut pH, compounds of the present class showed good oral bioavailability and were highly active in a standard rodent pharmacological model.

  16. Adverse cardiovascular effects from the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids as ergogenic resources.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marcos Antonio Pereira dos; Oliveira, Caio Victor Coutinho de; Silva, Alexandre Sérgio

    2014-07-01

    This review evaluates the documented cardiovascular functioning among anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) users. AAS users manifest a reduction in HDL cholesterol, increased inflammatory markers, and oxidative stress. Strong evidence associating AAS use with blood pressure at hypertensive levels, as well as hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction has also been reported. Both epidemiological and autopsy studies attest the relationship between AAS use and early mortality. The review's limitations are noted.

  17. Identification of a novel androgen receptor agonist (or “androgen mimic”) of environmental concern: spironolactone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in humans to treat certain conditions such as hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female pattern hair loss. The drug is also used to treat hypertension as a diuretic. With this commo...

  18. A physiological role for androgen actions in the absence of androgen receptor DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tammy P S; Clarke, Michele V; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Lee, Nicole K L; Davey, Rachel A; MacLean, Helen E

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that androgens have physiological actions via non-DNA binding-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathways in males, using our genetically modified mice that express a mutant AR with deletion of the 2nd zinc finger of the DNA binding domain (AR(ΔZF2)) that cannot bind DNA. In cultured genital skin fibroblasts, the mutant AR(ΔZF2) has normal ligand binding ability, phosphorylates ERK-1/2 in response to 1 min DHT treatment (blocked by the AR antagonist bicalutamide), but has reduced androgen-dependent nuclear localization compared to wildtype (WT). AR(ΔZF2) males have normal baseline ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, with a 1.5-fold increase in Akt phosphorylation in AR(ΔZF2) muscle vs WT. To identify physiological actions of non-DNA binding-dependent AR signaling, AR(ΔZF2) males were treated for 6 weeks with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Cortical bone growth was suppressed by DHT in AR(ΔZF2) mice (6% decrease in periosteal and 7% decrease in medullary circumference vs untreated AR(ΔZF2) males). In conclusion, these data suggest that non-DNA binding dependent AR actions suppress cortical bone growth, which may provide a mechanism to fine-tune the response to androgens in bone.

  19. Mars: New Determination of Impact Crater Production Function Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2006-12-01

    Several authors have questioned our knowledge of Martian impact crater production function size-frequency distribution (PFSFD), especially at small diameters D. Plescia (2005) questioned whether any area of Mars shows size distributions used for estimating crater retention ages on Mars. McEwen et al. (2005) and McEwen and Bierhaus (2006) suggested existing PFSFD’s are hopelessly confused by the presence of secondaries, and that my isochrons give primary crater densities off by factors of several thousand at small D. In 2005, I addressed some of these concerns, noting my curves do not estimate primary crater densities per se, but show total numbers of primaries + semi-randomly “distant secondaries” (negating many McEwen et al. critiques). In 2006 I have conducted new crater counts on a PFSFD test area suggested by Ken Tanaka. This area shows young lava flows of similar crater density, west of Olympus Mons (around 30 deg N, 100 deg W). Multiple crater counts were made on several adjacent Odyssey THEMIS images and MGS MOC images, giving the SFD over a range of 11m

  20. ASSESSMENT OF IN VITRO ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY IN KRAFT MILL EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detection of In Vitro Androgenic Activity in Feedlot Effluent. Lambright, CS 1 , Guillette, LJ, Jr.2, Gray, LE, Jr.1 , 1USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC, 2 University of Florida, Dept. of Zoology, Gainesville FL

    Recent studies have shown the presence of androgenic activity in water...

  1. Illicit Use of Androgens and Other Hormones: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Pope, Harrison G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent advances in studies of illicit use of androgens and other hormones. Recent findings Androgens and other appearance- and performance-enhancing substances are widely abused worldwide. Three notable clusters of findings have emerged in this field in recent years. First, studies almost unanimously find that androgen users engage in polypharmacy, often ingesting other hormones (e.g., human growth hormone, thyroid hormones, and insulin), ergo/thermogenic drugs (e.g., caffeine, ephedrine, clenbuterol), and classical drugs of abuse (e.g., cannabis, opiates, and cocaine). Second, reports of long-term psychiatric and medical adverse effects of androgens continue to accumulate. In cardiovascular research particularly, controlled studies have begun to supersede anecdotal evidence, strengthening the case that androgens (possibly acting synergistically with other abused drugs) may cause significant morbidity and even mortality. Third, it is increasingly recognized that androgen use may lead to a dependence syndrome with both psychological and physiological origins. Androgen dependence likely affects some millions of individuals worldwide, and arguably represents the least studied major class of illicit drug dependence. Summary Given mounting evidence of the adverse effects of androgens and associated polypharmacy, this topic will likely represent an expanding area of research and an issue of growing public-health concern. PMID:22450858

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  3. Novel structures in secreting the androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Negishi, S; Hasegawa, Y; Nakajima, Y

    2001-12-01

    The secretory granules in the androgenic gland of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare, which have been indistinct for long time because of vulnerable structures, were revealed by using the rapid-freezing and freeze-substitution method. The fine structure of the androgenic gland is conspicuous by the distribution of numerous particular organelles in the cytoplasm consisting of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex, and by having a number of highly organized structures developed between the androgenic gland cells. The structures connect to the intercellular space, which is seen as intercellular canaliculi for exporting the androgenic gland hormone. The plasma membranes near the particular structure of the intercellular canaliculi in the androgenic gland are often specialized to form cellular junctions. The secretory granules including the electron-dense materials, which are supposed to be peptides of androgenic gland hormone, are distributed beside the particular structure of the intercellular canaliculi. Some of the granules are seen to fuse with the plasma membranes. This observation suggests that, in the Armadillidium vulgare, the secretory granules containing androgenic gland hormone are transferred to the extracellular space through the intercellular canaliculi particularly developed for exporting the peptide hormone. This is the first evidence to show the secretory mechanism of the androgenic gland hormone in the Isopoda. PMID:11911080

  4. Motivation and Productivity as a Function of Corporate Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellweg, Susan A.

    The current status of productivity and motivation research, particularly as they relate to communication studies and climate studies, is delineated in this paper, largely by a review of literature in these areas. In the section following the introduction, the problems of defining productivity and its relation to performance and communication are…

  5. 17β-trenbolone, an anabolic–androgenic steroid as well as an environmental hormone, contributes to neurodegeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Fucui; Liu, Daicheng

    2015-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to neurodegenerative disorders. In a large number of neurodegenerative diseases (for example, Alzheimer's disease (AD)), patients do not carry the mutant genes. Other risk factors, for example the environmental factors, should be evaluated. 17β-trenbolone is a kind of environmental hormone as well as an anabolic–androgenic steroid. 17β-trenbolone is used as a growth promoter for livestock in the USA. Also, a large portion of recreational exercisers inject 17β-trenbolone in large doses and for very long time to increase muscle and strength. 17β-trenbolone is stable in the environment after being excreted. In the present study, 17β-trenbolone was administered to adult and pregnant rats and the primary hippocampal neurons. 17β-trenbolone's distribution and its effects on serum hormone levels and Aβ42 accumulation in vivo and its effects on AD related parameters in vitro were assessed. 17β-trenbolone accumulated in adult rat brain, especially in the hippocampus, and in the fetus brain. It altered Aβ42 accumulation. 17β-trenbolone induced apoptosis of primary hippocampal neurons in vitro and resisted neuroprotective function of testosterone. Presenilin-1 protein expression was down-regulated while β-amyloid peptide 42 (Aβ42) production and caspase-3 activities were increased. Both androgen and estrogen receptors mediated the processes. 17β-trenbolone played critical roles in neurodegeneration. Exercisers who inject large doses of trenbolone and common people who are exposed to 17β-trenbolone by various ways are all influenced chronically and continually. Identification of such environmental risk factors will help us take early prevention measure to slow down the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: • The widely used anabolic–androgenic steroid 17β-trenbolone has neurotoxicity. • 17β-trenbolone crosses the blood brain barrier and placental barrier. • Rat has high level of 17

  6. [Recent aspects of therapy with androgenic and anabolic steroids].

    PubMed

    Schambach, H; Nitschke, U; Kröhne, H J

    1983-11-15

    From the pharmacology of the therapeutically available androgen preparations and the clinical experience results that a highly dosed androgen long-term therapy is effectively possible only by testosterone esters which are to be injected intramuscularly (e.g. testosterone oenanthate). It is indicated in all forms of endocrine hypogonadism, certain aplastic anaemias and if necessary in extreme male high growth. In partial androgen deficiency (pubertas tarda, Klinefelter's syndrome, climacterium virile and others) orally applicable androgens such as testosterone-undecanoate (Andriol) and mesterolone (Vistimon) can be used. The latter is to be preferred when a hyperoestrogenism is present, e.g. in liver cirrhosis. When 17-alpha-alkylated oral androgens are used, their often not sufficiently confirmed anabolic effect and their potential liver toxicity should more be taken into consideration. PMID:6666179

  7. Identification of Androgen Receptor Antagonists in Fish Using a Simple Bioassay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas .

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable effort has been expended on the development of bioassays to detect chemicals that affect endocrine function controlled by the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis via different mechanisms/modes of action (MOA). Antagonism of the androgen receptor (AR)...

  8. Regulation of brain androgen receptor immunoreactivity by androgen in prepubertal male ferrets.

    PubMed

    Kashon, M L; Hayes, M J; Shek, P P; Sisk, C L

    1995-05-01

    During pubertal maturation, there is an increase in the number of androgen receptor-immunoreactive (AR-IR) cells in the preoptic area (POA), arcuate nucleus (ARC), medial amygdala (mAMY), and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) of the male ferret brain. In contrast, the number of AR-IR cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) or lateral septum (ISEP) does not change with pubertal development. This experiment tested the hypothesis that the pubertal increase in AR-IR cells in certain brain regions is the result of the pubertal increase in circulating androgens. Prepubertal male ferrets were left intact or were castrated and treated daily (10 days) with s.c. injections of either oil, testosterone (T; 5 mg/kg), dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 5 mg/kg), or estradiol (E; 10 micrograms/kg). Brains were processed for AR immunocytochemistry, and the number of immunopositive cells was quantified in POA, ARC, mAMY, VMH, BNST, and ISEP. Overall, castration reduced the number of AR-IR cells below that seen in intact animals, and E administration did not restore AR-IR cell number. Treatment of castrates with androgens restored numbers of AR-IR cells to those of intact animals in the BNST, ISEP, and VMH. However, AR-IR cell numbers were significantly greater in androgen-treated castrates than in intact animals in POA, mAMY, and ARC. These data show that AR-IR cells in prepubertal male ferrets are sensitive to circulating levels of androgens, supporting the hypothesis that the pubertal rise in T is responsible for the pubertal increase in the number of AR-IR cells in the POA, mAMY, and ARC. PMID:7626721

  9. Androgens regulate Hedgehog signalling and proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Sirab, Nanor; Terry, Stéphane; Giton, Frank; Caradec, Josselin; Chimingqi, Mihelaiti; Moutereau, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; de la Taille, Alexandre; Kouyoumdjian, Jean-Claude; Loric, Sylvain

    2012-09-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen sensitive in its development and progression to metastatic disease. Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation is important in the initiation and growth of various carcinomas including PCa. We and others have observed aberrations of Hh pathway during the progression of PCa to the castration-resistant state. The involvement of androgen signalling in Hh pathway activation, however, remains largely elusive. Here we investigate the direct role of androgen signalling on Hh pathway. We examined the effect of Dihydrosterone (DHT), antiandrogen, bicalutamide, and Hh pathway inhibitor, KAAD-cyclopamine in four human prostate cell lines (two cancerous: LNCaP, VCaP, and two normal: PNT2 and PNT2-ARm which harbours a mutant version of androgen receptor (AR) that is commonly found in LNCaP). Cell proliferation as well as Hh pathway members (SHH, IHH, DHH, GLI, PTCH) mRNA expression levels were assessed. We showed that KAAD-cyclopamine decreased cell proliferation of DHT-stimulated LNCaP, VCaP and PNT2-ARm cells. SHH expression was found to be downregulated by DHT in all AR posititve cells. The negative effect of DHT on SHH expression was counteracted when cells were treated by bicalutamide. Importantly, KAAD-cyclopamine treatment seemed to inhibit AR activity. Moreover, bicalutamide as well as KAAD-cyclopamine treatments induced GLI and PTCH expression in VCaP and PNT2-ARm. Our results suggest that Hh pathway activity can be regulated by androgen signalling. Specifically, we show that the DHT-induced inhibition of Hh pathway is AR dependent. The mutual interaction between these two pathways might be important in the regulation of cell proliferation in PCa.

  10. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-05-15

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy.