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Sample records for anemia burden risk

  1. The Global Burden of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Anemia is an important cause of health loss. We estimated levels and trends of nonfatal anemia burden for 23 distinct etiologies in 188 countries, 20 age groups, and both sexes from 1990 to 2013. All available population-level anemia data were collected and standardized. We estimated mean hemoglobin, prevalence of anemia by severity, quantitative disability owing to anemia, and underlying etiology for each population using the approach of the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries and Risk Factors 2013 Study. Anemia burden is high. Developing countries account for 89% of all anemia-related disability. Iron-deficiency anemia remains the dominant cause of anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... babies are at risk for anemia because of iron deficiency. At-risk infants include those who are born ...

  3. Malaria in patients with sickle cell anemia: burden, risk factors, and outcome at the outpatient clinic and during hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Makani, Julie; Komba, Albert N.; Cox, Sharon E.; Oruo, Julie; Mwamtemi, Khadija; Kitundu, Jesse; Magesa, Pius; Rwezaula, Stella; Meda, Elineema; Mgaya, Josephine; Pallangyo, Kisali; Okiro, Emelda; Muturi, David; Newton, Charles R.; Fegan, Gregory; Marsh, Kevin; Williams, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 280 000 children are born with sickle cell anemia (SCA) in Africa annually, yet few survive beyond childhood. Falciparum malaria is considered a significant cause of this mortality. We conducted a 5-year prospective surveillance study for malaria parasitemia, clinical malaria, and severe malarial anemia (SMA) in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania, between 2004 and 2009. We recorded 10 491 visits to the outpatient clinic among 1808 patients with SCA and 773 visits among 679 patients without SCA. Similarly, we recorded 691 hospital admissions among 497 patients with SCA and 2017 in patients without SCA. Overall, the prevalence of parasitemia was lower in patients with SCA than in patients without SCA both at clinic (0.7% vs 1.6%; OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.32-0.86; P = .008) and during hospitalization (3.0% vs 5.6%; OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.25-0.94; P = .01). Furthermore, patients with SCA had higher rates of malaria during hospitalization than at clinic, the ORs being 4.29 (95% CI, 2.63-7.01; P < .001) for parasitemia, 17.66 (95% CI, 5.92-52.71; P < .001) for clinical malaria, and 21.11 (95% CI, 8.46-52.67; P < .001) for SMA. Although malaria was rare among patients with SCA, parasitemia during hospitalization was associated with both severe anemia and death. Effective treatment for malaria during severe illness episodes and further studies to determine the role chemoprophylaxis are required. PMID:19901265

  4. A systematic analysis of global anemia burden from 1990 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Jasrasaria, Rashmi; Naghavi, Mohsen; Wulf, Sarah K.; Johns, Nicole; Lozano, Rafael; Regan, Mathilda; Weatherall, David; Chou, David P.; Eisele, Thomas P.; Flaxman, Seth R.; Pullan, Rachel L.; Brooker, Simon J.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of anemia epidemiology have been geographically limited with little detail about severity or etiology. Using publicly available data, we estimated mild, moderate, and severe anemia from 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries, both sexes, and 20 age groups. We then performed cause-specific attribution to 17 conditions using data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors (GBD) 2010 Study. Global anemia prevalence in 2010 was 32.9%, causing 68.36 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 40.98 to 107.54) million years lived with disability (8.8% of total for all conditions [95% UI, 6.3% to 11.7%]). Prevalence dropped for both sexes from 1990 to 2010, although more for males. Prevalence in females was higher in most regions and age groups. South Asia and Central, West, and East sub-Saharan Africa had the highest burden, while East, Southeast, and South Asia saw the greatest reductions. Iron-deficiency anemia was the top cause globally, although 10 different conditions were among the top 3 in regional rankings. Malaria, schistosomiasis, and chronic kidney disease–related anemia were the only conditions to increase in prevalence. Hemoglobinopathies made significant contributions in most populations. Burden was highest in children under age 5, the only age groups with negative trends from 1990 to 2010. PMID:24297872

  5. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate.

  6. Risk of infant anemia is associated with exclusive breast-feeding and maternal anemia in a Mexican cohort.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Altaye, Mekibib; Ortega-Gallegos, Hilda; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2006-02-01

    The WHO recommends exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) for the first 6 mo of life to decrease the burden of infectious disease. However, some are concerned about the effect of EBF >6 mo on iron status of children in developing countries in which anemia is prevalent. This study examines the risk of anemia in relation to the duration of EBF and maternal anemia in a birth cohort studied between March 1998 and April 2003. All infant birth weights were >or=2.2 kg. All mothers received home-based peer counseling to promote EBF. Infant feeding data were collected weekly. Nurses measured hemoglobin (Hb) values every 3 mo. Hb was measured in 183 infants at 9 mo of age. Anemia at 9 mo was defined as a Hb value <100 g/L. EBF was defined by WHO criteria and ranged in duration from 0 to 31 wk. At 9 mo, Hb (mean +/- SEM) was 114 +/- 0.9 g/L; 23 children (12.5%) had Hb levels <100 g/L. EBF >6 mo, but not EBF 4-6 mo, was associated with increased risk of infant anemia compared with EBF <4 mo (odds ratio=18.4, 95% CI=1.9, 174.0). Maternal anemia was independently (P=0.03) associated with a 3-fold increased risk of infant anemia. These associations were not explained by confounding with other maternal or infant factors. By linear regression, a lower infant Hb at 9 mo was associated with increased EBF duration among mothers who had a history of anemia (beta=-0.07, P=0.003), but not among mothers with no history of anemia. Infants who are exclusively breast-fed for >6 mo in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia, especially among mothers with a poor iron status; greater attention to this issue is warranted.

  7. Anemia and iron deficiency among school adolescents: burden, severity, and determinant factors in southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Melkam; Yemane, Tilahun; Adisu, Wondimagegn; Asres, Yaregal; Gedefaw, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescence is the period of most rapid growth second to childhood. The physical and physiological changes that occur in adolescents place a great demand on their nutritional requirements and make them more vulnerable to anemia. Anemia in the adolescence causes reduced physical and mental capacity and diminished concentration in work and educational performance, and also poses a major threat to future safe motherhood in girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its associated factors among school adolescents in Bonga Town, southwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 408 school adolescents in Bonga Town, southwest Ethiopia, from March 15, 2014 to May 25, 2014. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic and other data. A total of 7 mL of venous blood and 4 g of stool samples were collected from each study participant. Blood and stool samples were analyzed for hematological and parasitological analyses, respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 20 software for Windows. Results The overall prevalence of anemia was 15.2% (62/408), of which 83.9% comprised mild anemia. The proportion of microcytic, hypochromic anemia was 53% (33/62). Being female (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =3.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.41–6.57), household size ≥5 (AOR =2.58, 95% CI =1.11–5.96), father’s illiteracy (AOR =9.03, 95% CI =4.29–18.87), intestinal parasitic infection (AOR =5.37, 95% CI =2.65–10.87), and low body mass index (AOR =2.54, 95% CI =1.17–5.51) were identified as determinants of anemia among school adolescents. Conclusion This study showed that anemia was a mild public health problem in this population. School-based interventions on identified associated factors are important to reduce the burden of anemia among school adolescents. PMID:26719736

  8. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location. PMID:21960747

  9. Risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location.

  10. A double burden of overall or central adiposity and anemia or iron deficiency is prevalent but with little socioeconomic patterning among Moroccan and Tunisian urban women.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Agnès; El Ati, Jalila; Traissac, Pierre; Bour, Abdellatif; Berger, Jacques; Landais, Edwige; El Hsaïni, Houda; Ben Rayana, Chiheb; Delpeuch, Francis

    2014-01-01

    In North Africa, overnutrition has dramatically increased with the nutrition transition while micronutrient deficiencies persist, resulting in clustering of opposite types of malnutrition that can present a unique difficulty for public health interventions. We assessed the magnitude of the double burden of malnutrition among urban Moroccan and Tunisian women, as defined by the coexistence of overall or central adiposity and anemia or iron deficiency (ID), and explored the sociodemographic patterning of individual double burden. In cross-sectional surveys representative of the region around the capital city, we randomly selected 811 and 1689 nonpregnant women aged 20-49 y in Morocco and Tunisia, respectively. Four double burdens were analyzed: overweight (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) or increased risk abdominal obesity (waist circumference ≥80 cm) and anemia (blood hemoglobin <120 g/L) or ID (C-reactive protein-corrected serum ferritin <15 μg/L). Adjusted associations with 9 sociodemographic factors were estimated by logistic regression. The prevalence of overweight and ID was 67.0% and 45.2% in Morocco, respectively, and 69.5% and 27.0% in Tunisia, respectively, illustrating the population-level double burden. The coexistence of overall or central adiposity with ID was found in 29.8% and 30.1% of women in Morocco, respectively, and in 18.2% and 18.3% of women in Tunisia, respectively, quite evenly distributed across age, economic, or education groups. Generally, the rare, associated sociodemographic factors varied across the 4 subject-level double burdens and the 2 countries and differed from those usually associated with adiposity, anemia, or ID. Any double burden combining adiposity and anemia or ID should therefore be taken into consideration in all women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01844349.

  11. Renal Anemia - Risk Factor for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cană-Ruiu, Daniela; Moţa, E.; Istrate, Natalia; Văduva, Cristina; Trican, Eliza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the influence of anemia on renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease. Were monitored for 12 months 165 patients with chronic kidney disease, 96 patients had anemia and a control group of 69 patients had no anemia. A value of hemoglobin under 120 g/L in women and under 130 g/L in men on admission defined anemia. Anemia was associated with a more severe renal damage, a lower residual diuresis, especially in the presence of other risk factors such as diabetes, inflammation or secondary hyperparathyroidism, so early diagnosis and correction of anemia is important for prognosis and evolution of these patients. PMID:24778860

  12. Nutrient Intake and Anemia Risk in the WHI Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanaway, Jeffrey; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Snetselaar, Linda G.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Arendell, Leslie; Chen, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    were associated with a 21% greater risk of persistent anemia (OR-1.21, 95% CI: 1.05–1.41) and three deficiencies resulted in a 44% increase in risk for persistent anemia (OR-1.44, 95% CI: 1.20–1.73). Conclusion Inadequate nutrient intake, a modifiable condition, is associated with greater risk for anemia in post-menopausal women participating in the WHI-OS. Efforts to identify and update incidence estimates for anemia-associated nutrient deficiencies in aging women should be undertaken. PMID:21443985

  13. Major Burden of Severe Anemia from Non-Falciparum Malaria Species in Southern Papua: A Hospital-Based Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Nicholas M.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Simpson, Julie A.; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R.; Sugiarto, Paulus; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Price, Ric N.

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of anemia attributable to non-falciparum malarias in regions with Plasmodium co-endemicity is poorly documented. We compared the hematological profile of patients with and without malaria in southern Papua, Indonesia. Methods and Findings Clinical and laboratory data were linked for all patients presenting to a referral hospital between April 2004 and December 2012. Data were available on patient demographics, malaria diagnosis, hemoglobin concentration, and clinical outcome, but other potential causes of anemia could not be identified reliably. Of 922,120 patient episodes (837,989 as outpatients and 84,131 as inpatients), a total of 219,845 (23.8%) were associated with a hemoglobin measurement, of whom 67,696 (30.8%) had malaria. Patients with P. malariae infection had the lowest hemoglobin concentration (n = 1,608, mean = 8.93 [95% CI 8.81–9.06]), followed by those with mixed species infections (n = 8,645, mean = 9.22 [95% CI 9.16–9.28]), P. falciparum (n = 37,554, mean = 9.47 [95% CI 9.44–9.50]), and P. vivax (n = 19,858, mean = 9.53 [95% CI 9.49–9.57]); p-value for all comparisons <0.001. Severe anemia (hemoglobin <5 g/dl) was present in 8,151 (3.7%) patients. Compared to patients without malaria, those with mixed Plasmodium infection were at greatest risk of severe anemia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.25 [95% CI 2.99–3.54]); AORs for severe anaemia associated with P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae were 2.11 (95% CI 2.00–2.23), 1.87 (95% CI 1.74–2.01), and 2.18 (95% CI 1.76–2.67), respectively, p<0.001. Overall, 12.2% (95% CI 11.2%–13.3%) of severe anemia was attributable to non-falciparum infections compared with 15.1% (95% CI 13.9%–16.3%) for P. falciparum monoinfections. Patients with severe anemia had an increased risk of death (AOR = 5.80 [95% CI 5.17–6.50]; p<0.001). Not all patients had a hemoglobin measurement, thus limitations of the study include the potential for

  14. Major burden of severe anemia from non-falciparum malaria species in Southern Papua: a hospital-based surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Nicholas M; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Simpson, Julie A; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R; Sugiarto, Paulus; Anstey, Nicholas M; Price, Ric N

    2013-12-01

    The burden of anemia attributable to non-falciparum malarias in regions with Plasmodium co-endemicity is poorly documented. We compared the hematological profile of patients with and without malaria in southern Papua, Indonesia. Clinical and laboratory data were linked for all patients presenting to a referral hospital between April 2004 and December 2012. Data were available on patient demographics, malaria diagnosis, hemoglobin concentration, and clinical outcome, but other potential causes of anemia could not be identified reliably. Of 922,120 patient episodes (837,989 as outpatients and 84,131 as inpatients), a total of 219,845 (23.8%) were associated with a hemoglobin measurement, of whom 67,696 (30.8%) had malaria. Patients with P. malariae infection had the lowest hemoglobin concentration (n = 1,608, mean = 8.93 [95% CI 8.81-9.06]), followed by those with mixed species infections (n = 8,645, mean = 9.22 [95% CI 9.16-9.28]), P. falciparum (n = 37,554, mean = 9.47 [95% CI 9.44-9.50]), and P. vivax (n = 19,858, mean = 9.53 [95% CI 9.49-9.57]); p-value for all comparisons <0.001. Severe anemia (hemoglobin <5 g/dl) was present in 8,151 (3.7%) patients. Compared to patients without malaria, those with mixed Plasmodium infection were at greatest risk of severe anemia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.25 [95% CI 2.99-3.54]); AORs for severe anaemia associated with P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae were 2.11 (95% CI 2.00-2.23), 1.87 (95% CI 1.74-2.01), and 2.18 (95% CI 1.76-2.67), respectively, p<0.001. Overall, 12.2% (95% CI 11.2%-13.3%) of severe anemia was attributable to non-falciparum infections compared with 15.1% (95% CI 13.9%-16.3%) for P. falciparum monoinfections. Patients with severe anemia had an increased risk of death (AOR = 5.80 [95% CI 5.17-6.50]; p<0.001). Not all patients had a hemoglobin measurement, thus limitations of the study include the potential for selection bias, and possible residual confounding in

  15. Anemias.

    PubMed

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia.

  16. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia.There are a few other types of ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia.Foods high in vitamin B12 include:meat ...

  17. Burden and associated factors of anemia among pregnant women attending antenatal care in southern Ethiopia: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Weinshet; Belachew, Tefera; Wolide, Amare Desalegn

    2017-07-14

    Anemia is a condition in which the number of red blood cells or their oxygen-carrying capacity is insufficient to meet physiologic needs, which varies by age, sex, altitude, smoking, and pregnancy status. The study aim is to determine the prevalence and factors associated with anemia among pregnant women attending a hospital in southern Ethiopia using a structured interview administered questionnaire. Facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March 01-April 30 2015 at Butajira General Hospital, Ethiopia. A total of 217 women responded to the questionnaire and provided blood and stool samples for analysis. Data were analyzed using Statistical packages for social sciences version 20 for windows. The overall burden of anemia in this study was 27.6%. Residence, ANC follow up, history of excess menstrual bleeding and interpregnancy interval were statistically associated with anemia among the pregnant women. Therefore, working in the identified gaps could reduce the current burden of anemia among pregnant women in the study area.

  18. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... Lead poisoning in children has been linked to iron-deficiency anemia . Teenagers also are at risk for anemia, ...

  19. The burden and quality of life of caregivers of sickle cell anemia patients taking hydroxyurea versus those not taking hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luiz Bernardino Lima; Ivo, Maria Lúcia; de Souza, Albert Schiaveto; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Pinto, Alexandra Maria Almeida Carvalho; de Araujo, Olinda Maria Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the burden and quality of life of caregivers of patients with sickle cell anemia taking hydroxyurea versus those of patients not taking hydroxyurea. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed of caregivers of outpatients with sickle cell anemia in two public hospitals in Campo Grande, MS, from January through June 2010. The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale and the Caregiver Burden Scale were used. Results Of the 37 caregivers in this study, 81.1% were women, 73.0% were mothers, 59.5% were married, 54.1%were mulattos, 48.6% were housewives, 54.1% had family incomes of up to one minimum wage and 75.7% had onlycompleted elementary education. The mean duration of care provided (time after diagnosis) was 16.08 ± 9.88 yearsand 89.2% reported that they provided 24-hour care. Regarding health, 27.0% of study participants reported having physical and 13.5% emotional problems. There were no significant relationships between these variables either with the different domains or the total score of the WHOQOL-BREF comparing caregivers of patients taking hydroxyurea versusthose of patients not taking hydroxyurea. There was a moderate negative linear correlation between the WHOQOL-BREF and the Caregiver Burden Scale scores (linear correlation test of Pearson: p-value = 0.003, r = -0.477). The burden of caregivers of patients who did not take hydroxyurea was significantly higher than those of patients who took the medication in terms of general tension, disappointment, environment and total score (student t-test: p-value < 0.05). Conclusion In the perception of the caregiver, looking after sickle cell anemia patients represents a moderate negative burden. PMID:23049439

  20. Preoperative anemia in colon cancer: assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; Gannon, Christopher J; Osborn, Tiffany M; Taylor, Michelle D; Malone, Debra L; Napolitano, Lena M

    2002-06-01

    Anemia is common in cancer patients and is associated with reduced survival. Recent studies document that treatment of anemia with blood transfusion in cancer patients is associated with increased infection risk, tumor recurrence, and mortality. We therefore investigated the incidence of preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer and assessed risk factors for anemia. Prospective data were collected on 311 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer over a 6-year period from 1994 through 1999. Patients were stratified by age, gender, presenting complaint, preoperative hematocrit, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and TNM classification. Discrete variables were compared using Pearson's Chi-square analysis. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t test. Differences were considered significant when P < 0.05. The mean age of the study cohort was 67 +/- 9.2 with 98 per cent of the study population being male. The mean AJCC stage was 2.2 +/- 1.2 and the mean preoperative hematocrit was 35 +/- 7.9 with an incidence of 46.1 per cent. The most common presenting complaints were hematochezia (n = 59), anemia (n = 51), heme-occult-positive stool (n = 33), bowel obstruction (n = 26), abdominal pain (n = 21), and palpable mass (n = 13). Preoperative anemia was most common in patients with right colon cancer with an incidence of 57.6 per cent followed by left colon cancer (42.2%) and rectal cancer (29.8%). Patients with right colon cancer had significantly lower preoperative hematocrits compared with left colon cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 36 +/- 7.4; P < 0.01) and rectal cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 38 +/- 6.0; P < 0.0001). Patients with right colon cancer also had significantly increased stage at presentation compared with left colon cancer (2.3 +/- 1.3 vs 2.1 +/- 1.2; P < 0.02). Age was not a significant risk factor for preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer. We conclude that there is a high incidence of anemia in patients with colon cancer. Patients with right colon

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction. ...

  2. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anemia Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  3. The silent burden of anemia in school age children: a community based study in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Soma; Taraphdar, Pranita; Roy, Tapobrata Guha; Haldar, Dibakar; Dey, Sujit Kumar; Purkait, Bulbul

    2012-01-01

    Under nutrition and anemia are common co-morbidities in school age children. Due to transition in dietary habits in developing countries, a paradoxical finding of coexistence of anemia and normal/over nutrition is also a cause of concern. > T o assess the nutritional status and prevalence of anemia among school age children (6 - 16 years) residing in rural and urban areas of a district of West Bengal and also to find out the association between weight status, measured as Body Mass Index(BMI) and anemia. Age, height & weight were measured in 86 rural and 86 urban school age (6 -16 years) children in rural and urban field practice areas of Midnapore Medical College. Their blood was estimated for haemoglobin concentration. Overall prevalence of anemia was 80.2%, and not significantly different between the rural (83.7%) and urban (76.7%) participants and across the genders both in rural (86.4% versus 80.9%) and urban (85.7% versus 72.4%) areas. Thinness was observed to be higher in urban area (48.8% versus 41.9%). However, severe thinness was higher in rural area (18.5% versus 13.9%). Significantly, higher proportion of boys revealed severely low BMI compared to girls in both rural (33.3% versus 4.5%) and urban (17.2% versus 7.1%) areas with no significant differences between the prevalence of anemia across the grades of underweight and normal nutritional status. Poor nutritional status and anemia are still, taking heavy toll and new program strategies are needed, particularly those that improve the overall nutrition status of children.

  4. Plasmodium malariae Infection Associated with a High Burden of Anemia: A Hospital-Based Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Lampah, Daniel A.; Simpson, Julie A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Sugiarto, Paulus; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Price, Ric N.

    2015-01-01

    ). Conclusions/Significance Plasmodium malariae infection is relatively uncommon in Papua, Indonesia but is associated with significant morbidity from anemia and a similar risk of mortality to patients hospitalized with P. falciparum and P. vivax infection. In our large hospital database, one in 200 children under the age of 5 years with P. malariae infection were recorded as having nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26720002

  5. Does anemia affect the predictive ability of bleeding risk scores in patients with acute coronary syndromes?

    PubMed

    Garay, Alberto; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José C; Salazar-Mendiguchía, Joel; Roura, Gerard; Muntané, Guillem; Alegre, Oriol; Fuentes, Lara; Gómez-Hospital, Joan A; Cequier, Angel

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and is associated with higher risk for both bleeding and ischemic complications. We aimed to assess the predictive ability of bleeding risk scores (Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the ACC/AHA guidelines [CRUSADE], Mehran and Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network [ACTION]) in ACS patients with anemia. All consecutive ACS patients were prospectively included. The primary outcome was in-hospital major bleeding according to the CRUSADE, Mehran and ACTION definitions. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <130 g/l in men and <120 g/l in women. The predictive ability of the bleeding risk scores was assessed by binary logistic regression, calculating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their corresponding area under the curve (AUC). We included 2255 patients, mean age 62.4 years. Anemia was present in 550 patients (24.4%). Patients with anemia had a significantly higher prevalence of comorbidities. The three bleeding risk scores adequately predicted major bleeding in the whole cohort. No significant differences were observed regarding the predictive ability of each of the scores in patients with and without anemia (CRUSADE: AUC 0.73 without anemia vs. 0.74 with anemia, p=0.913; ACTION: AUC 0.68 without anemia vs. 0.73 with anemia, p=0.353; Mehran: AUC 0.69 without anemia vs. 0.61 with anemia, p=0.210). Only the Mehran score showed significantly lower predictive ability in patients with hemoglobin <11 g/dl (AUC 0.51, p=0.044). Anemia was a common comorbidity in patients with ACS from our series. Currently available bleeding risk scores showed an adequate predictive ability in patients with mild anemia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Heterogeneity among Fanconi Anemia Heterozygotes and Risk of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Marianne; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Ben-Porat, Leah; Carlson, Ann; Mah, Katherine; Henry, Rashida; Diotti, Raffaella; Milton, Kelly; Pujara, Kanan; Landers, Tom; Batish, Sat Dev; Morales, José; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hromas, Robert; Levran, Orna; Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by a greatly increased risk of cancer among those diagnosed with the syndrome. The question as to whether FA heterozygotes are at increased risk for cancer is of great importance to those at risk for being a carrier. To address this question, we formed a cohort of grandparents of probands identified through the International Fanconi Anemia Registry. We obtained informed consent, a short questionnaire, and either blood or buccal swab DNA. After diagnosis of the proband was confirmed and complementation studies or DNA sequencing on the proband were completed, mutation analyses of the putative carriers and noncarriers was carried out. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated to compare the observed cancer incidence of the grandparents and other relatives with the expected rates of cancer, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries and the Connecticut Cancer registry. In the 944 study subjects who participated (784 grandparents and 160 other relatives), there was no suggestion of an increase in overall cancer incidence. On the other hand, a significantly higher rate of breast cancer than expected was observed among carrier grandmothers [SIR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.1–2.7]. Among the grandmothers, those who were carriers of FANCC mutations were found to be at highest risk (SIR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1–5.2). Overall, there was no increased risk for cancer among FA heterozygotes in this study of Fanconi relatives, although there is some evidence that FANCC mutations are possibly breast cancer susceptibility alleles. PMID:17909071

  7. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Carla Valéria de Alvarenga; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Nascimento, Cristiano Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; Moutinho, Ivana Lúcia Damásio; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Malaguti, Carla; Castro, Antonio Carlos Santana; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological studies of nonwestern IBD populations are limited and may be confounded by demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related influences. This study evaluated the prevalence, risk factors, and etiology of anemia in Brazilian outpatients with IBD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 100 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 100 ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects were assessed. Anemia workup included complete blood count, ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia in IBD was 21%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia between CD subjects (24%) and UC (18%). Moderate disease activity (OR: 3.48, 95% CI, 1.95–9.64, P = 0.002) and elevated CRP levels (OR: 1.8, 95% CI, 1.04–3.11, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anemia. The most common etiologies of anemia found in both groups were iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 10% on CD and 6% on UC) followed by the anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 6% for both groups). Conclusions. In Brazilian IBD outpatients, anemia is highly concurrent condition. Disease moderate activity as well as increased CRP was strongly associated with comorbid anemia. IDA and/or ACD were the most common etiologies. PMID:25705682

  8. Anemia, bleeding, and blood transfusion in the intensive care unit: causes, risks, costs, and new strategies.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Michael T; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-11-01

    The definition of anemia is controversial and varies with the sex, age, and ethnicity of the patient. Anemia afflicts half of hospitalized patients and most elderly hospitalized patients. Acute anemia in the operating room or intensive care unit is associated with increased morbidity as well as other adverse outcomes, including death. The risks of anemia are compounded by the added risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells, the most common treatment for severe anemia. The causes of anemia in hospitalized patients include iron deficiency, suppression of erythropoietin and iron transport, trauma, phlebotomy, coagulopathies, adverse effects of and reactions to medications, and stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding. The types and causes of anemia and the increased health care utilization and costs associated with anemia and undetected internal bleeding are described. The potential benefits and risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells also are explored. Last, the strategies and new tools to help prevent anemia, allow earlier detection of internal bleeding, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusions are discussed.

  9. Anemia after kidney transplantation in adult recipients: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Einollahi, B; Lessan-Pezeshki, M; Rostami, Z; Kalantar, E; Afshar, R; Beiraghdar, F

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of anemia and appraise its risk factors at 6 months after renal transplantation. This retrospective study was performed between 2008 and 2010 in 2713 adult kidney transplant recipients to determine the prevalence of posttransplantation anemia. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration of 12 g/dL or less in women and 13 g/dL or less in men. The prevalence of posttransplantation anemia was 52.7%, with severe anemia (hemoglobin≤11 g/dL) detected in 24.4% of patients. Impaired renal function was the only risk factor associated with anemia (odds ratio, 3.6; P=.047). However, severe anemia after kidney transplantation was correlated with female sex (P=.001), renal allograft dysfunction (P=.00), and cytomegalovirus infection (P=.002). The present study demonstrated a quite high prevalence of posttransplantation anemia, in particular associated with impaired renal allograft function. Severe anemia was correlated with female sex, degree of kidney graft dysfunction, and cytomegalovirus infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  11. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  12. Burden of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Bariatric Surgery Population in the United States.

    PubMed

    Knight, Tyler; D'Sylva, Lynell; Moore, Brad; Barish, Charles F

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is a serious condition affecting more than 35% of adults in the United States. In obese individuals for whom other weight control methods have been ineffective, bariatric surgery is a safe and effective method of weight control. An estimated 150,000 to 160,000 bariatric surgeries are performed in the United States yearly. Iron deficiency anemia is common in patients after bariatric surgery, with incidence rates up to 49%, and may be due to malabsorption of nutrients.  To (a) compare the medical resource utilization (MRU)- both medical care and treatment resources-and associated costs in a sample of commercially insured adult bariatric surgery patients with and without iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and (b) describe anti-anemia treatment patterns in those bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with IDA. Using Truven Health MarketScan claims data, bariatric surgery patients were identified by the ICD-9-CM and CPT procedure codes for bariatric surgery and classified by surgery and IDA diagnosis within 2 years of initial surgery. Intravenous (IV) iron treatment was determined by HCPCS codes, prescription oral iron by NDC numbers, and blood transfusions by CPT and ICD-9-CM codes. Clinical, MRU, and economic outcomes for all-cause health services were compared between IDA and non-IDA patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics on outcomes of complications and hospitalization. Of the 24,344 bariatric surgery patients analyzed, 11.6% received an IDA diagnosis 2 years after surgery (average days to diagnosis = 279). Most IDA patients (78.5%) received a test for iron in the post-index period; only 9.1% received IV iron treatment, with iron dextran (3.8%) and iron sucrose (3.4%) being the most common (average days to IV iron treatment = 403 days). Prescription oral iron was found in 4.9% of all IDA patients (average days to oral iron treatment

  13. Increased Risk of Severe Infant Anemia Following Exposure to Maternal HAART, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Shapiro, Roger L.; Hughes, Michael D.; Powis, Kathleen; Ogwu, Anthony; Moffat, Claire; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Lockman, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT), but may increase the risk for infant anemia. Methods The incidence of first severe anemia (Grade 3 or 4, Division of AIDS 2004 Toxicity Table) was assessed among HIV-uninfected infants in the Mashi and Mma Bana MTCT prevention trials in Botswana. Severe anemia rates were compared between 3 groups: infants exposed to maternal HAART in utero and during breastfeeding and 1 month of postnatal zidovudine (HAART-BF); infants exposed to maternal zidovudine (ZDV) in utero, 6 months of postnatal ZDV, and breastfeeding (ZDV-BF); and infants exposed to maternal ZDV in utero, 1 month of postnatal ZDV, and formula-feeding (ZDV-FF). Results A total of 1719 infants were analyzed— 691 HAART-BF, 503 ZDV-BF, and 525 ZDV-FF. Severe anemia was detected in 118 infants (7.4%). By 6 months, 12.5% of HAART-BF infants experienced severe anemia, compared with 5.3% of ZDV-BF (P<0.001) and 2.5% of ZDV-FF infants (P<0.001). In adjusted analysis, HAART-BF infants were at greater risk of severe anemia than ZDV-BF or ZDV-FF infants (adjusted odds ratios 2.6 and 5.8, respectively; P < 0.001). Most anemias were asymptomatic and improved with iron/multivitamin supplementation and cessation of ZDV exposure. However, 11 infants (0.6% of all infants) required transfusion for symptomatic anemia. Microcytosis and hypochromia were common among infants with severe anemia. Conclusions Exposure to maternal HAART starting in utero was associated with severe infant anemia. Confirmation of this finding and possible strategies to mitigate hematologic toxicity warrant further study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00197587 and NCT00270296. PMID:21266910

  14. Transfusion burden in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients with persistent anemia treated in routine clinical practice: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transfusion patterns are not well characterized in non-dialysis (ND) chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This study describes the proportion of patients transfused, units of blood transfused and trigger-hemoglobin (Hb) levels for transfusions in severe anemic, ND-CKD patients in routine practice. Methods A retrospective cohort study of electronic medical record data from the Henry Ford Health System identified 374 adult, ND-CKD patients with severe anemia (Hb < 10 g/dL and subsequent use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents [ESA] therapy, blood transfusions, or a second Hb < 10 g/dL) between January 2004 and June 2008. Exclusions included those with prior diagnoses of cancer, renal or liver transplant, end-stage renal disease, acute bleeding, trauma, sickle cell disease, or aplastic anemia. A gap of ≥ 1 days between units of blood transfused was counted as a separate transfusion. Results At least 1 transfusion (mean of 2 units; range, 1-4) was administered to 20% (75/374) of ND-CKD patients with mean (± SD) follow-up of 459 (± 427) days. The mean (± SD) Hb level closest and prior to a transfusion was 8.8 (± 1.5) g/dL. Patients who were hospitalized in the 6 months prior to their first anemia diagnosis were 6.3 times more likely to receive a blood transfusion than patients who were not hospitalized (p < 0.0001). Patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were twice as likely to have a transfusion as patients without PVD (p = 0.04). Conclusions Transfusions were prevalent and the trigger hemoglobin concentration was approximately 9 g/dL among ND-CKD patients with anemia. To reduce the transfusion burden, clinicians should consider other anemia treatments including ESA therapy. PMID:22273400

  15. Individual and combined effects of maternal anemia and prenatal infection on risk for schizophrenia in offspring.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Philip R; Meyer, Urs; Mortensen, Preben B

    2016-04-01

    Maternal iron deficiency and infection during pregnancy have individually been associated with increased risk of schizophrenia in the offspring, but possible interactions between the two remain unidentified thus far. Therefore, we determined the individual and combined effects of maternal infection during pregnancy and prepartum anemia on schizophrenia risk in the offspring. We conducted a population-based study with individual record linkage of the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Hospital Register, and the Central Danish Psychiatric Register. In a cohort of Danish singleton births 1,403,183 born between 1977 and 2002, 6729 developed schizophrenia between 1987 and 2012. Cohort members were considered as having a maternal history of anemia if the mother had received a diagnosis of anemia at any time during the pregnancy. Maternal infection was defined based on infections requiring hospital admission during pregnancy. Maternal anemia and infection were both associated with increased risk of schizophrenia in unadjusted analyses (1.45-fold increase for anemia, 95% CI: 1.14-1.82; 1.32-fold increase for infection, 95% CI: 1.17-1.48). The effect of maternal infection remained significant (1.16-fold increase, 95% CI: 1.03-1.31) after adjustment for possible confounding factors. Combined exposure to anemia and an infection increased the effect size to a 2.49-fold increased schizophrenia risk (95% CI: 1.29-4.27). The interaction analysis, however, failed to provide evidence for multiplicative interactions between the two factors. Our findings indicate that maternal anemia and infection have additive but not interactive effects, and therefore, they may represent two independent risk factors of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma total cysteine and cardiovascular risk burden: action and interaction.

    PubMed

    De Chiara, Benedetta; Sedda, Valentina; Parolini, Marina; Campolo, Jonica; De Maria, Renata; Caruso, Raffaele; Pizzi, Gianluigi; Disoteo, Olga; Dellanoce, Cinzia; Corno, Anna Rosa; Cighetti, Giuliana; Parodi, Oberdan

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that redox analysis could provide sensitive markers of the oxidative pathway associated to the presence of an increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (RFs), independently of type. We classified 304 subjects without cardiovascular disease into 4 groups according to the total number of RFs (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, hyperhomocysteinaemia, diabetes, obesity, and their combination). Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring plasma total and reduced homocysteine, cysteine (Cys), glutathione, cysteinylglycine, blood reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde. Twenty-seven percent of subjects were in group 0 RF, 26% in 1 RF, 31% in 2 RF, and 16% in ≥ 3 RF. By multivariable ordinal regression analysis, plasma total Cys was associated to a higher number of RF (OR = 1.068; 95% CI = 1.027-1.110, P = 0.002). Total RF burden is associated with increased total Cys levels. These findings support a prooxidant effect of Cys in conjunction with RF burden, and shed light on the pathophysiologic role of redox state unbalance in preclinical atherosclerosis.

  17. Treating leukemia at the risk of inducing severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wendy S.; Zhu, Helen He; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a frequently observed adverse effect in cancer patients who receive chemotherapy or drugs designed to block specific oncogenic signaling pathways, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. An article first published online (Zhu HH, Luo X, Zhang K, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015;112:13342–13347) presented data indicating that cell type-specific pathway cross-talk is likely an important mechanism to consider. Shp2 and Pten, two master regulators of central cytoplasmic signaling pathways, oppose each other in myeloproliferation and leukemogenesis, but cooperate in promoting erythropoiesis. Thus, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Shp2 suppresses the leukemogenic effect of Pten loss, yet simultaneously induces severe anemia in mice with Pten deficiency in blood cells. PMID:26826310

  18. Prevalence of Anemia and Risk of Adverse Bleeding Effect of Drugs: Implication for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uba Nwose, Ezekiel

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the progress in reduction of prevalence of anemia in rural Australia. It also investigates the prevalence of hypoviscosity in anaemia with a view to determine the fraction of anaemic patients at risk of drug-inducible exacerbation of anemia. Archived clinical pathology data (N = 130, 354) for the period of 1999 to 2008 were utilized. The prevalence of anemia and hypoviscosity was evaluated by working out (i) the number that fell within anemia definition as a percentage of the population and (ii) the number that fell within hypoviscosity definition as a percentage of anemic patients. The prevalence in anemic diabetes and dyslipidaemia was further determined. There was progressive reduction in anemia from 6.1% to 3.2% over the ten years period. Prevalence of anemia is statistically significantly higher in males than in females (P < 0.0001), but protein level is lower in anemic females than in anemic males (P < 0.01). The results further show that up to 75% of anemic patients may benefit from NSAID or salicylates. This paper highlights differences between genders. It suggests more concerted effort in men's health and speculates a new factor to investigate in women's health. PMID:22506109

  19. Environmental lead exposure as a risk for childhood aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, M; Akhtar, M J; Verma, S; Kumar, A; Siddiqui, M K J

    2011-01-01

    Concern about environmental lead exposure as a significant public health threat has increased as evidence has accumulated regarding adverse health effects at successively lower levels. Aplastic anemia is a hematological disorder of unknown etiology with a high lethality rate. Lead is a known toxicant for the hematopoietic system. Oxidative stress appears to be the possible mode of lead toxicity. We evaluated the effects of blood lead level on oxidative stress parameters in children suffering from aplastic anemia disease. Seventeen children with aplastic anemia disease (15 male and 2 female, age 3-12 y) were recruited in the study group. Fifty one healthy children (45 male and 6 female, age 3-12 y) having normal blood profiles and not suffering from any chronic disease(s) were used as controls. Blood lead level and oxidative stress parameters were determined. Mean blood lead level was significantly higher while δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity, a biomarker for lead exposure was significantly lower in the study group as compared to the control group (p < 0.05 for each). Thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), a marker of lipid peroxidation, was significantly higher while the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) level was significantly lower in the study group as compared to the control group (p < 0.05 for each). Activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (p < 0.05). There was a significant negative correlation of blood lead levels with δ-ALAD (r = -0.45; p < 0.05) and GSH (r = -0.32; p < 0.05), and a positive correlation with TBARS (r = 0.41; p < 0.05) and CAT (r = 0.37; p < 0.05). Although a causal pathway cannot be determined from this study, our results indicated that lead induces oxidative stress in children suffering from aplastic anemia. Lead-induced oxidative stress as an underlying mechanism for aplastic anemia warrants further research.

  20. Mortality due to Respiratory Syncytial Virus. Burden and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Erviti, Anabella; Caballero, Mauricio T; Vallone, Fernando; Zanone, Stella M; Losada, Juan Ves; Bianchi, Alejandra; Acosta, Patricio L; Talarico, Laura B; Ferretti, Adrian; Grimaldi, Luciano Alva; Sancilio, Andrea; Dueñas, Karina; Sastre, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Andrea; Ferrero, Fernando; Barboza, Edgar; Gago, Guadalupe Fernández; Nocito, Celina; Flamenco, Edgardo; Perez, Alberto Rodriguez; Rebec, Beatriz; Ferolla, F Martin; Libster, Romina; Karron, Ruth A; Bergel, Eduardo; Polack, Fernando P

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of hospitalization and an important cause of death in infants in the developing world. The relative contribution of social, biologic, and clinical risk factors to RSV mortality in low-income regions is unclear. To determine the burden and risk factors for mortality due to RSV in a low-income population of 84,840 infants. This was a prospective, population-based, cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted between 2011 and 2013. Hospitalizations and deaths due to severe lower respiratory tract illness (LRTI) were recorded during the RSV season. All-cause hospital deaths and community deaths were monitored. Risk factors for respiratory failure (RF) and mortality due to RSV were assessed using a hierarchical, logistic regression model. A total of 2,588 (65.5%) infants with severe LRTI were infected with RSV. A total of 157 infants (148 postneonatal) experienced RF or died with RSV. RSV LRTI accounted for 57% fatal LRTI tested for the virus. A diagnosis of sepsis (odds ratio [OR], 17.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 13.14-21.16 for RF) (OR, 119.39; 95% CI, 50.98-273.34 for death) and pneumothorax (OR, 17.15; 95% CI, 13.07-21.01 for RF) (OR, 65.49; 95% CI, 28.90-139.17 for death) were the main determinants of poor outcomes. RSV was the most frequent cause of mortality in low-income postneonatal infants. RF and death due to RSV LRTI, almost exclusively associated with prematurity and cardiopulmonary diseases in industrialized countries, primarily affect term infants in a developing world environment. Poor outcomes at hospitals are frequent and associated with the cooccurrence of bacterial sepsis and clinically significant pneumothoraxes.

  1. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L) and severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration <70 g/L) and individual-level (age, anthropometric measures, micronutrient deficiencies, malaria, and inflammation) and household-level predictors; we also examined the proportion of anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration <12 μg/L). Countries were grouped into 4 categories on the basis of risk and burden of infectious disease, and a pooled multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted for each group. Results: Iron deficiency, malaria, breastfeeding, stunting, underweight, inflammation, low socioeconomic status, and poor sanitation were each associated with anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by

  2. Incidence and risk factors of aplastic anemia in Latin American countries: the LATIN case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Maluf, Eliane; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Júnior, Álvaro Avezum; Eluf-Neto, José; Falcão, Roberto Passetto; Lorand-Metze, Irene G.; Goldenberg, Daniel; Santana, Cézar Leite; de Oliveira Werneck Rodrigues, Daniela; da Motta Passos, Leny Nascimento; Rosenfeld, Luis Gastão Mange; Pitta, Marimilia; Loggetto, Sandra; Feitosa Ribeiro, Andreza A.; Velloso, Elvira Deolinda; Kondo, Andrea Tiemi; de Miranda Coelho, Erika Oliveira; Pintão, Maria Carolina Tostes; de Souza, Hélio Moraes; Borbolla, José Rafael; Pasquini, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Background Associations between aplastic anemia and numerous drugs, pesticides and chemicals have been reported. However, at least 50% of the etiology of aplastic anemia remains unexplained. Design and Methods This was a case-control, multicenter, multinational study, designed to identify risk factors for agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. The cases were patients with diagnosis of aplastic anemia confirmed through biopsy or bone marrow aspiration, selected through an active search of clinical laboratories, hematology clinics and medical records. The controls did not have either aplastic anemia or chronic diseases. A total of 224 patients with aplastic anemia were included in the study, each case was paired with four controls, according to sex, age group, and hospital where the case was first seen. Information was collected on demographic data, medical history, laboratory tests, medications, and other potential risk factors prior to diagnosis. Results The incidence of aplastic anemia was 1.6 cases per million per year. Higher rates of benzene exposure (≥30 exposures per year) were associated with a greater risk of aplastic anemia (odds ratio, OR: 4.2; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.82–9.82). Individuals exposed to chloramphenicol in the previous year had an adjusted OR for aplastic anemia of 8.7 (CI: 0.87–87.93) and those exposed to azithromycin had an adjusted OR of 11.02 (CI 1.14–108.02). Conclusions The incidence of aplastic anemia in Latin America countries is low. Although the research study centers had a high coverage of health services, the underreporting of cases of aplastic anemia in selected regions can be discussed. Frequent exposure to benzene-based products increases the risk for aplastic anemia. Few associations with specific drugs were found, and it is likely that some of these were due to chance alone. PMID:19734415

  3. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson's disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-07-14

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-1.52, p < 0.001). Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24-1.79, p < 0.001). Furthermore, Iron supplement did not significantly affect the PD risk: the aHRs for PD risk were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.07-1.63, p < 0.01) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.46-2.35, p < 0.001) in IDA patients with and without iron supplementation, respectively. The population-based cohort study indicated newly diagnosed anemia increases PD risk.

  4. Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Soil Transmitted Helminth Burden and Their Correlation with Anemia in Children Attending Primary Schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Matangila, Junior R.; Doua, Joachim Yorokpa; Linsuke, Sylvie; Madinga, Joule; Inocêncio da Luz, Raquel; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Lutumba, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia reduces cognitive potential in school children, retards their growth and predisposes them to other diseases. As there is a paucity of data on the current burden of P. falciparum, S. mansoni and soil transmitted helminths (STH) infections and their correlation with schoolchildren’s anemia in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), we collect these data. Methods This study reports baseline data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating the impact of IPT with SP and SP-PQ on anemia and malaria morbidity in Congolese schoolchildren (Trial registration: NCT01722539; PACTR201211000449323). S. mansoni and STH infections were assessed using kato-katz technique. Malaria infection and hemoglobin concentration were assessed using Blood smear and Hemocontrol device, respectively. Results A total of 616 primary schoolchildren from 4 to 13 years old were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 18.5% (95%CI:15.6–21.9). Amongst those infected, 24 (21%), 40 (35.1%), 40 (35.1%), 10 (8.8%), had light, moderate, heavy, very high malaria parasite density, respectively. Above 9 years of age (p = 0.02), male and history of fever (p = 0.04) were both associated with malaria infection. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 6.4% (95%CI:4.4–9.1). Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04). T. trichiura was the most prevalent STH infection (26.3%), followed by A. lumbricoides (20.1%). Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7–3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4–9.1). The prevalence of anemia was found to be 41.6% (95%CI:37.7–45.6) and anemia was strongly related with Plasmodium ssp infection (aOR:4.1; CI95%:2.6–6.5;p<0.001) and S. mansoni infection (aOR:3.3;CI95%:1.4–7.8;p<0.01). Conclusion Malaria and S. mansoni infection were strongly associated with high prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren. Therefore, specific school

  5. Malaria, schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminth burden and their correlation with anemia in children attending primary schools in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Matangila, Junior R; Doua, Joachim Yorokpa; Linsuke, Sylvie; Madinga, Joule; Inocêncio da Luz, Raquel; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Lutumba, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia reduces cognitive potential in school children, retards their growth and predisposes them to other diseases. As there is a paucity of data on the current burden of P. falciparum, S. mansoni and soil transmitted helminths (STH) infections and their correlation with schoolchildren's anemia in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), we collect these data. This study reports baseline data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating the impact of IPT with SP and SP-PQ on anemia and malaria morbidity in Congolese schoolchildren (Trial registration: NCT01722539; PACTR201211000449323). S. mansoni and STH infections were assessed using kato-katz technique. Malaria infection and hemoglobin concentration were assessed using Blood smear and Hemocontrol device, respectively. A total of 616 primary schoolchildren from 4 to 13 years old were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 18.5% (95%CI:15.6-21.9). Amongst those infected, 24 (21%), 40 (35.1%), 40 (35.1%), 10 (8.8%), had light, moderate, heavy, very high malaria parasite density, respectively. Above 9 years of age (p = 0.02), male and history of fever (p = 0.04) were both associated with malaria infection. The overall prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 6.4% (95%CI:4.4-9.1). Girls were associated with S. mansoni infection (p = 0.04). T. trichiura was the most prevalent STH infection (26.3%), followed by A. lumbricoides (20.1%). Co-infection with malaria-S. mansoni and malaria-STH was, respectively, 1.5% (CI95%:0.7-3.3) and 6.4% (CI95% 4.4-9.1). The prevalence of anemia was found to be 41.6% (95%CI:37.7-45.6) and anemia was strongly related with Plasmodium ssp infection (aOR:4.1; CI95%:2.6-6.5;p<0.001) and S. mansoni infection (aOR:3.3;CI95%:1.4-7.8;p<0.01). Malaria and S. mansoni infection were strongly associated with high prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren. Therefore, specific school-based interventions, such as intermittent preventive treatment or prophylaxis

  6. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Total Bilirubin and Cholelithiasis Risk in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Milton, Jacqueline N.; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Hartley, Stephen W.; Bhatnagar, Pallav; Arking, Dan E.; Dworkis, Daniel A.; Casella, James F.; Barron-Casella, Emily; Bean, Christopher J.; Hooper, W. Craig; DeBaun, Michael R.; Garrett, Melanie E.; Soldano, Karen; Telen, Marilyn J.; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Gladwin, Mark T.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Steinberg, Martin H.; Klings, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Serum bilirubin levels have been associated with polymorphisms in the UGT1A1 promoter in normal populations and in patients with hemolytic anemias, including sickle cell anemia. When hemolysis occurs circulating heme increases, leading to elevated bilirubin levels and an increased incidence of cholelithiasis. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bilirubin levels and cholelithiasis risk in a discovery cohort of 1,117 sickle cell anemia patients. We found 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with total bilirubin levels at the genome-wide significance level (p value <5×10−8). SNPs in UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A6, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10, different isoforms within the UGT1A locus, were identified (most significant rs887829, p = 9.08×10−25). All of these associations were validated in 4 independent sets of sickle cell anemia patients. We tested the association of the 15 SNPs with cholelithiasis in the discovery cohort and found a significant association (most significant p value 1.15×10−4). These results confirm that the UGT1A region is the major regulator of bilirubin metabolism in African Americans with sickle cell anemia, similar to what is observed in other ethnicities. PMID:22558097

  7. Predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Bradley A; Petry, Nicolai; Macdonald, Barbara; Aaron, Grant J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anemia in women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15–49 y) remains a public health problem globally, and reducing anemia in women by 50% by 2025 is a goal of the World Health Assembly. Objective: We assessed the associations between anemia and multiple proximal risk factors (e.g., iron and vitamin A deficiencies, inflammation, malaria, and body mass index) and distal risk factors (e.g., education status, household sanitation and hygiene, and urban or rural residence) in nonpregnant WRA. Design: Cross-sectional, nationally representative data from 10 surveys (n = 27,018) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and pooled by the infection burden and risk in the country. We examined the severity of anemia and measured the bivariate associations between anemia and factors at the country level and by infection burden, which we classified with the use of the national prevalences of malaria, HIV, schistosomiasis, sanitation, and water-quality indicators. Pooled multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for each infection-burden category to identify independent determinants of anemia (hemoglobin concertation <120 g/L). Results: Anemia prevalence was ∼40% in countries with a high infection burden and 12% and 7% in countries with moderate and low infection burdens, respectively. Iron deficiency was consistently associated with anemia in multivariate models, but the proportion of anemic women who were iron deficient was considerably lower in the high-infection group (35%) than in the moderate- and low-infection groups (65% and 71%, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, inflammation, vitamin A insufficiency, socioeconomic status, and age were also significantly associated with anemia, but malaria and vitamin B-12 and folate deficiencies were not. Conclusions: The contribution of iron deficiency to anemia varies according to a country’s infection

  8. Genetic counseling in sickle cell anemia: experiences with couples at risk.

    PubMed Central

    Neal-Cooper, F; Scott, R B

    1988-01-01

    Beginning in 1970, a cohort of 74 sickle trait-carrying couples was identified who risked producing children with sickle cell anemia or other serious hemoglobinopathies. They were counseled concerning the disease and their risk, and their initial reactions, their stated intentions concerning birth control and childbearing, and their subsequent childbearing histories were documented. Initial responses to the risk information varied widely, and stated intentions of birth control or childbearing did not accurately predict subsequent childbearing. Among 25 couples for whom there were complete childbearing data, there were 31 pregnancies with 13 affected children prior to counseling. After counseling, there were 25 pregnancies resulting in 10 affected children. The majority of the subsequent pregnancies occurred in the group who had not borne children or an affected child before counseling. In young couples, concern for producing a child with sickle cell anemia is often offset by a strong desire to have children regardless of risk. PMID:3128834

  9. Chronic and acute anemia and extracranial internal carotid stenosis are risk factors for silent cerebral infarcts in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Bernaudin, Françoise; Verlhac, Suzanne; Arnaud, Cécile; Kamdem, Annie; Vasile, Manuela; Kasbi, Florence; Hau, Isabelle; Madhi, Fouad; Fourmaux, Christine; Biscardi, Sandra; Epaud, Ralph; Pondarré, Corinne

    2015-03-05

    Early transcranial Doppler (TCD) screening of the Créteil sickle cell anemia (SCA)-newborn cohort, and rapid initiation of transfusion programs, resulted in successful prevention of overt strokes, but a high cumulative risk of silent cerebral infarcts (SCI) remained, suggesting that TCD screening does not identify all patients with SCA at risk for SCI. We hypothesized that episodes of hypoperfusion/hypoxia, as observed during acute chest syndromes or acute anemic events (AAE), and extracranial internal carotid artery (eICA) stenoses, detectable via submandibular Doppler sonography and cervical magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), could also be risk factors for SCI. This study includes 189 stroke-free patients with SCA from the Créteil newborn cohort (1992-2010) followed longitudinally by magnetic resonance imaging/MRA, including cervical MRA at the last assessment. All patients with abnormal TCD and/or intracranial stenoses were placed on a transfusion program. Mean follow-up was 9.9 years (range, 2.2-19.9 years; 1844 patient-years). Annual rates of clinical events were calculated. The cumulative risk for SCI was 39.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.5%-54.7%) by age 18 years, with no plateau. We confirm that baseline hemoglobin level lower than 7 g/dL before age 3 years is a highly significant predictive risk factor for SCI (hazard ratio, 2.97; 95% CI, 1.43-6.17; P = .004). Furthermore, we show that AAE rate (odds ratio, 2.64 per unit increase; 95% CI, 1.09-6.38; P = .031) and isolated eICA stenosis (odds ratio, 3.19; 95% CI, 1.18-8.70; P = .023) are significant and independent risk factors for SCI.

  10. Distribution of Major Health Risks: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Anthony; Ezzati, Majid; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Lopez, Alan D; Lin, Ruey-Bin; Murray, Christopher J. L

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Most analyses of risks to health focus on the total burden of their aggregate effects. The distribution of risk-factor-attributable disease burden, for example by age or exposure level, can inform the selection and targeting of specific interventions and programs, and increase cost-effectiveness. Methods and Findings For 26 selected risk factors, expert working groups conducted comprehensive reviews of data on risk-factor exposure and hazard for 14 epidemiological subregions of the world, by age and sex. Age-sex-subregion-population attributable fractions were estimated and applied to the mortality and burden of disease estimates from the World Health Organization Global Burden of Disease database. Where possible, exposure levels were assessed as continuous measures, or as multiple categories. The proportion of risk-factor-attributable burden in different population subgroups, defined by age, sex, and exposure level, was estimated. For major cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, cholesterol, tobacco use, fruit and vegetable intake, body mass index, and physical inactivity) 43%–61% of attributable disease burden occurred between the ages of 15 and 59 y, and 87% of alcohol-attributable burden occurred in this age group. Most of the disease burden for continuous risks occurred in those with only moderately raised levels, not among those with levels above commonly used cut-points, such as those with hypertension or obesity. Of all disease burden attributable to being underweight during childhood, 55% occurred among children 1–3 standard deviations below the reference population median, and the remainder occurred among severely malnourished children, who were three or more standard deviations below median. Conclusions Many major global risks are widely spread in a population, rather than restricted to a minority. Population-based strategies that seek to shift the whole distribution of risk factors often have the potential to produce

  11. Anemia risk in relation to lead exposure in lead-related manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chung, Shun-Hui; Chen, Szu-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Jun; You, Su-Han; Liao, Chung-Min

    2017-05-05

    Lead-exposed workers may suffer adverse health effects under the currently regulated blood lead (BPb) levels. However, a probabilistic assessment about lead exposure-associated anemia risk is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the association between lead exposure and anemia risk among factory workers in Taiwan. We first collated BPb and indicators of hematopoietic function data via health examination records that included 533 male and 218 female lead-exposed workers between 2012 and 2014. We used benchmark dose (BMD) modeling to estimate the critical effect doses for detection of abnormal indicators. A risk-based probabilistic model was used to characterize the potential hazard of lead poisoning for job-specific workers by hazard index (HI). We applied Bayesian decision analysis to determine whether BMD could be implicated as a suitable BPb standard. Our results indicated that HI for total lead-exposed workers was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.50-1.26) with risk occurrence probability of 11.1%. The abnormal risk of anemia indicators for male and female workers could be reduced, respectively, by 67-77% and 86-95% by adopting the suggested BPb standards of 25 and 15 μg/dL. We conclude that cumulative exposure to lead in the workplace was significantly associated with anemia risk. This study suggests that current BPb standard needs to be better understood for the application of lead-exposed population protection in different scenarios to provide a novel standard for health management. Low-level lead exposure risk is an occupational and public health problem that should be paid more attention.

  12. Risk Factors for Anemia among Brazilian Infants from the 2006 National Demographic Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Konstantyner, Tulio; Roma Oliveira, Thais Cláudia; de Aguiar Carrazedo Taddei, José Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important public health problem. An understanding of anemia risk factors is essential to informed health policies. We performed a cross-sectional study of 1,382 infants from the 2006 Brazilian National Survey on Demography and the Health of Women and Children. Mild and moderate anemia was characterised by hemoglobin levels below 11.0 and 9.5 g/dL, respectively. Rates for mild and moderate anemia were 25.9% and 9.9%, respectively. The logistic model included three risk factors for mild anemia—urban residence area (OR = 2.5; P = 0.004), fever in the past 2 weeks (OR = 2.4; P < 0.001), and age less than 12 months (OR = 1.7; P = 0.024). Strategies to control infant anemia should include health promotion and nutritional education for families from all socioeconomic levels. Lifestyle quality improvement based on adequate food consumption must be achieved by communities in all macroregions, and especially in urban areas. PMID:22400108

  13. Risk-Based Questionnaires Fail to Detect Adolescent Iron Deficiency and Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Deepa L; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Schaefer, Eric W; Paul, Ian M

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the predictive ability of screening questionnaires to identify adolescent women at high-risk for iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia who warrant objective laboratory testing. Cross-sectional study of 96 female individuals 12-21 years old seen at an academic medical center. Participants completed an iron deficiency risk assessment questionnaire including the 4 Bright Futures Adolescent Previsit Questionnaire anemia questions, along with depression, attention, food insecurity, and daytime sleepiness screens. Multiple linear regression controlling for age, race, and hormonal contraception use compared the predictive ability of 2 models for adolescent iron deficiency (defined as ferritin <12 mcg/L) and anemia (hemoglobin <12 g/dL). Model 1, the Bright Futures questions, was compared with model 2, which included the 4 aforementioned screens and body mass index percentile. Among participants, 18% (17/96) had iron deficiency and 5% (5/96) had iron deficiency anemia. Model 1 (Bright Futures) poorly predicted ferritin and hemoglobin values (R(2) = 0.03 and 0.08, respectively). Model 2 demonstrated similarly poor predictive ability (R(2) = 0.05 and 0.06, respectively). Mean differences for depressive symptoms (0.3, 95% CI -0.2, 0.8), attention difficulty (-0.1, 95% CI -0.5, 0.4), food insecurity (0.04, 95% CI -0.5, 0.6), daytime sleepiness (0.1, 95% CI -0.1, 0.3), and body mass index percentile (-0.04, 95% CI -0.3, 0.2) were not significantly associated with ferritin in model 2. Mean differences for hemoglobin were also nonsignificant. Risk-based surveys poorly predict objective measures of iron status using ferritin and hemoglobin. Next steps are to establish the optimal timing for objective assessment of adolescent iron deficiency and anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anemia and the onset of gout in a population-based cohort of adults: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing prevalence of gout in the US and worldwide. Gout is a recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is unclear whether other risk factors for CVD are also associated with increased risk of gout. Anemia is one such CVD risk factor. No studies have evaluated the relationship between anemia and gout. We tested whether anemia was associated with incident gout independent of comorbid conditions in Atherosclerosis Risk in the Communities. Methods This population-based cohort recruited 15,792 individuals in 1987 to 1989 from four US communities and contained nine years of follow-up. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <13.5 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women. Using a Cox Proportional Hazards model, we estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and confidence intervals (CI) of incident gout by baseline anemia, adjusted for confounders (sex, race, estimated glomerular filtration rate, body mass index and alcohol intake) and clinical factors (coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, hypertension, diuretic use and serum urate level). Results Among the 10,791 participants, 10% had anemia at baseline. There were 271 cases of incident gout. Patients with anemia had a two-fold increased risk of developing gout over nine years (HR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.46, 2.76). Anemia was associated with incident gout independent of known gout risk factors, confounders and clinical risk factors (HR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.24, 2.41). This association persisted after additionally adjusting for serum urate level (HR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.30, 2.57). Conclusion We identified anemia as a novel risk factor for gout. Anemia was associated with an approximately two-fold increased risk of gout-independent kidney function and serum urate. These findings suggest that anemia is a risk factor for gout on par with other chronic conditions such as obesity and diabetes. The biological mechanism linking anemia to gout remains unclear. PMID:22906142

  15. A Comprehensive Index for Predicting Risk of Anemia from Patients' Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Matthew G; Alemi, Farrokh; Shortle, John F; Avramovic, Sanj; Hesdorffer, Charles

    2017-03-01

    This article demonstrates how time-dependent, interacting, and repeating risk factors can be used to create more accurate predictive medicine. In particular, we show how emergence of anemia can be predicted from medical history within electronic health records. We used the Veterans Affairs Informatics and Computing Infrastructure database to examine a retrospective cohort of 9,738,838 veterans over an 11-year period. Using International Clinical Diagnoses Version 9 codes organized into 25 major diagnostic categories, we measured progression of disease by examining changes in risk over time, interactions in risk of combination of diseases, and elevated risk associated with repeated hospitalization for the same diagnostic category. The maximum risk associated with each diagnostic category was used to predict anemia. The accuracy of the model was assessed using a validation cohort. Age and several diagnostic categories significantly contributed to the prediction of anemia. The largest contributors were health status ([Formula: see text] = -1075, t = -92, p < 0.000), diseases of the endocrine ([Formula: see text] = -1046, t = -87, p < 0.000), hepatobiliary ([Formula: see text] = -1043, t = -72, p < 0.000), kidney ([Formula: see text] = -1125, t = -111, p < 0.000), and respiratory systems ([Formula: see text] = -1151, t = -89, p < 0.000). The AUC for the additive model was 0.751 (confidence interval 74.95%-75.26%). The magnitude of AUC suggests that the model may assist clinicians in determining which patients are likely to develop anemia. The procedures used for examining changes in risk factors over time may also be helpful in other predictive medicine projects.

  16. Mortality risk in hemodialysis patients according to anemia control and erythropoietin dosing.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paulo Roberto; Melo, Antonio Danilo Mourão; Lima, Monique Marie Brito Cortez; Negreiros, Idalina Maria A Holanda; Miranda, Jéssica Silva; Pontes, Larissa Salles; Rabelo, Guilherme Menezes; Viana, Ana Carolina Parente; Alexandrino, Mayara Teixeira; Barros, Francisco Anderson; Neto, Benjamin Ramos; Brito, Alana Alcântara; Da Silva Costa, Anderson

    2011-10-01

    There is no consensus about the toxicity of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents among hemodialysis patients. We aimed to calculate the risk of death according to anemia control and erythropoietin (EPO) dosing among end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis. We retrospectively studied 156 end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis from a single renal unit during 12 months. Participants were classified according to anemia control into four groups: excellent (A), good (B), moderate (C) and bad (D) control. They were also classified according to EPO dosing into two groups: usual and high EPO dosing. The Cox proportional hazards regression model, adjusted for the difference in age, sex, time on dialysis, comorbidity, albumin, and Kt/V index, was performed to calculate the risk of death according to anemia control and EPO dosing profiles. Multivariate analysis by backward stepwise logistic regression was used to calculate the risk of death according to the variables that differed in the comparison between survivors and nonsurvivors. The hazard ratio of death was not significant according to anemia control profile C/D vs. A/B, but hazard ratio was 2.967 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.132-7.777; P = 0.027) for high EPO dosing profile patients. The multivariate analysis showed comorbidity (odds ratio [OR] = 8.958; 95% CI = 2.843-26.223; P < 0.001], high EPO dosing profile (OR = 5.172; 95% CI = 1.663-16,081; P = 0.005), age (OR = 1.056; 95% CI = 1.020-1.094; P = 0.002), and mean hemoglobin (OR = 0.435; 95% CI = 0.267-0.709; P = 0.001) to be predictive of death. Even though we cannot conclude that mortality risk is due to EPO toxicity, hemodialysis patients using high EPO dosing must be seen as at risk.

  17. Risk factors associated with anemia and iron deficiency among Kuwaiti pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faruk; Al-Sumaie, Mona A

    2011-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to identify the risk factors of anemia and iron deficiency in Kuwaiti pregnant women. Pregnant women (n = 465) aged 18-47 years, of 4-39 weeks at gestation were recruited during antenatal visits from six health facilities in Kuwait. Socio-demographic, pregnancy-related and dietary information were collected. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were determined. Logistic regression analysis revealed that iron deficiency and not taking iron-folate tablets or taking them occasionally were the two most important risk factors associated with anemia. Pregnant women with higher gestational age, short birth spacing ( ≤ 2 years), not taking iron-folate tablets or taking them occasionally, not consuming fruit juice, and consuming brown bread, tea and/or coffee were significant risk factors associated with iron deficiency. In conclusion, various factors including dietary habits appeared to be associated with poor iron status, which is the most important risk factor for anemia among Kuwaiti pregnant women.

  18. Bevacizumab did not reduce the risk of anemia associated with chemotherapy: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuo-Pei; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Bao-Li; Wei, Hai-Tao; Guo, Yong-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    The risk of anemia due to bevacizumab-based chemotherapy has not been well described, and new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been reported in recent years. We therefore conducted an up-to-date meta-analysis of RCTs to fully characterize the risk of anemia with bevacizumab. We carried out an electronic search of Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to investigate the effects of RCTs on bevacizumab treatment on cancer patients up to October 2014, and random or fixed-effect meta-analytical models were used to assess the risk ratio (RR) of anemia due to the use of bevacizumab according to the heterogeneity of included studies. A total of 13,173 patients were included in this analysis from 18 RCTs. Among those patients receiving bevacizumab and chemotherapy, the incidences of all-grade and high-grade (grade 3 and above) anemia were 24% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13-41%) and 4.0% (95% CI 3.0-6.0%), respectively. Bevacizumab-containing therapy did not significantly decreased the risk of developing all-grade anemia (RR 0.872, 95% CI 0.739-1.029, P = 0.104) and high-grade anemia (RR 0.850, 95% CI 0.720-1.002, P = 0.053), which is not in agreement with previous meta-analysis. On subgroup analysis, we did not find significant risk differences based on bevacizumab dosage, tumor types, and concomitant drugs. When stratified by dose level, a significantly decreased risk of high-grade anemia with bevacizumab was obtained in a lower dose level (2.5 mg/kg/week, RR 0.773, 95% CI 0.611-0.978, P = 0.031) compared to control group. Bevacizumab did not significantly reduce the risk of anemia with chemotherapy in cancer patients.

  19. Selected major risk factors and global and regional burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, Majid; Lopez, Alan D; Rodgers, Anthony; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Murray, Christopher J L

    2002-11-02

    Reliable and comparable analysis of risks to health is key for preventing disease and injury. Causal attribution of morbidity and mortality to risk factors has traditionally been in the context of individual risk factors, often in a limited number of settings, restricting comparability. Our aim was to estimate the contributions of selected major risk factors to global and regional burden of disease in a unified framework. For 26 selected risk factors, expert working groups undertook a comprehensive review of published work and other sources--eg, government reports and international databases--to obtain data on the prevalence of risk factor exposure and hazard size for 14 epidemiological regions of the world. Population attributable fractions were estimated by applying the potential impact fraction relation, and applied to the mortality and burden of disease estimates from the global burden of disease (GBD) database. Childhood and maternal underweight (138 million disability adjusted life years [DALY], 9.5%), unsafe sex (92 million DALY, 6.3%), high blood pressure (64 million DALY, 4.4%), tobacco (59 million DALY, 4.1%), and alcohol (58 million DALY, 4.0%) were the leading causes of global burden of disease. In the poorest regions of the world, childhood and maternal underweight, unsafe sex, unsafe water, sanitation, and hygiene, indoor smoke from solid fuels, and various micronutrient deficiencies were major contributors to loss of healthy life. In both developing and developed regions, alcohol, tobacco, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol were major causes of disease burden. Substantial proportions of global disease burden are attributable to these major risks, to an extent greater than previously estimated. Developing countries suffer most or all of the burden due to many of the leading risks. Strategies that target these known risks can provide substantial and underestimated public-health gains.

  20. Obesity and iron deficiency anemia as risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Cuttitta, F; Torres, D; Vogiatzis, D; Buttà, C; Bellanca, M; Gueli, D; Lupo, U; Schimmenti, C; Virzì, G; Petrantoni, R; Balistreri, F; Paterna, S; Parrinello, G

    2014-03-01

    Few studies examined the risk factors of asymptomatic bacteriuria, showing contradictory results. Our study aimed to examine the association between different clinical and laboratory parameters and asymptomatic bacteriuria in internal medicine patients. 330 consecutive hospitalized subjects, asymptomatic for urinary tract infections (UTIs), underwent to microscopic examination of urine specimens. 100 subjects were positive for microscopic bacteriuria and were recruited into the study. At the quantitative urine culture 31 subjects of study population were positive while 69 subjects were negative for bacteriuria. The analysis of clinical characteristics showed that the two groups of subjects (positive and negative urine culture for bacteriuria) were significant different (p<0.05) about obesity (76.7% vs 42% respectively), metabolic syndrome (80.6% vs 44,9%), cholelithiasis (35.5% vs 13,2%) and iron deficiency anemia (80.6% vs 53,6%). The univariate analysis showed that only obesity, cholelithiasis and iron deficiency anemia were positively associated with positive urine culture for bacteriuria (Odds Ratios [OR]=3.79, p=0.0003; OR=2,65, p=0.0091; OR=2.63, p=0.0097; respectively). However, the multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that only obesity and iron deficiency anemia, independently associated with positive urine culture for bacteriuria (OR=3.9695, p=0.0075; OR=3.1569, p=0.03420 respectively). This study shows that obesity and iron deficiency anemia are independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differences in Risk Factors for Anemia Between Adolescent and Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Kolb, Laura E.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Weisman, Carol S.; Paul, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) affects 2%–5% of reproductive-age women. Screening is based on risk factors, such as a low-iron diet and menstruation. However, published IDA risk factors fail to consider age-related risks specific to adolescent women, potentially limiting identification of high-risk adolescents for objective testing. The goal of the study was to examine IDA risk factors in a nationally representative sample of younger (12–21 years) and older (22–49 years) reproductive-age women. Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2010. IDA was defined using hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, standard NHANES laboratory measures. Sex-, age-, and race-specific hemoglobin values defined anemia. Iron deficiency was calculated using ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor in the body iron formula. Logistic regression assessed the association of potential risk factors (race, body mass index, poverty, iron intake, tobacco/nicotine exposure, physical activity, menses, and contraceptive use) with IDA in younger and older women. Results: The prevalence of IDA was 2.4% and 5.5% among younger and older women, respectively. Among younger women, contraceptive use was marginally protective from IDA (risk ratio 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25–1.00). Among older women, significant variables included Black race (risk ratio 2.31, 95% CI 1.33–4.02) and increased years menstruating (≥25 years vs. <25 years; risk ratio 1.93, 95% CI 0.99–3.76). Conclusions: Risk factors for IDA among older reproductive-age women do not apply to adolescent women. To better inform the timing and frequency of screening recommendations, further research must identify adolescent-specific IDA risk factors. PMID:26835887

  2. Burden of stroke attributable to selected lifestyle risk factors in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Maredza, Mandy; Bertram, Melanie Y; Gómez-Olivé, Xavier F; Tollman, Stephen M

    2016-02-12

    Rural South Africa (SA) is undergoing a rapid health transition characterized by increases in non-communicable diseases; stroke in particular. Knowledge of the relative contribution of modifiable risk factors on disease occurrence is needed for public health prevention efforts and community-oriented health promotion. Our aim was to estimate the burden of stroke in rural SA that is attributable to high blood pressure, excess weight and high blood glucose using World Health Organization's comparative risk assessment (CRA) framework. We estimated current exposure distributions of the risk factors in rural SA using 2010 data from the Agincourt health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS). Relative risks of stroke per unit of exposure were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. We used data from the Agincourt HDSS to estimate age-, sex-, and stroke specific deaths and disability adjusted life years (DALYs). We estimated the proportion of the years of life lost (YLL) and DALY loss attributable to the risk factors and incorporate uncertainty intervals into these estimates. Overall, 38 % of the documented stroke burden was due to high blood pressure (12 % males; 26 % females). This translated to 520 YLL per year (95 % CI: 325-678) and 540 DALYs (CI: 343-717). Excess Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated as responsible for 20 % of the stroke burden (3.5 % males; 16 % females). This translated to 260 YLLs (CI: 199-330) and 277 DALYs (CI: 211-350). Burden was disproportionately higher in young females when BMI was assessed. High blood pressure and excess weight, which both have effective interventions, are responsible for a significant proportion of the stroke burden in rural SA; the burden varies across age and sex sub-groups. The most effective way forward to reduce the stroke burden requires both population wide policies that have an impact across the age spectra and targeted (health promotion/disease prevention) interventions on women and young people.

  3. Post-renal transplantation anemia at 12 months: prevalence, risk factors, and impact on clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongli; Song, Turun; Fu, Lei; Rao, Zhengsheng; Zeng, Dongyang; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Xianding; Xie, Libo; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Li; Lin, Tao

    2015-09-01

    To investigate any association between post-transplantation anemia (PTA) and clinical outcomes following living donor kidney transplantation. We retrospectively evaluated 887 patients who received living donor kidney transplantations at our medical center between January 2006 and December 2012 to evaluate whether PTA, defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels of <130 g/l in men and <120 g/l in women, at 12 months is associated with post-transplant outcomes, including graft function, death-censored graft survival, or patient survival. The prevalence of PTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months was 84.3, 39.5, 26.2, and 21.6 %, respectively. Donor age [hazard ratio (HR), 1.03; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.05] and acute rejection (HR 2.13; 95 % CI 1.28-3.54) were found to be independent risk factors for PTA at 12 months. Recipient age (HR 0.98; 95 % CI 0.95-1.00), pre-transplantation Hb levels (HR 0.99; 95 % CI 0.98-1.00), and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) at 12 months (HR 0.96; 95 % CI 0.94-0.97) were found to confer slight protection against PTA at 12 months. PTA at 12 months was associated with increased graft loss (HR 1.046; 95 % CI 1.045-1.046). For each increase in anemia degree, there was a 2.77-fold greater risk of graft loss (HR 2.77; 95 % CI 1.50-5.13). When stratified according to eGFR, PTA was found to be a predictor of graft loss in patients with an eGFR of <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (HR 4.57; 95 % CI 1.98-10.56) but not in patients with an eGFR of >60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (HR 1.89; 95 % CI 0.13-27.78). PTA was not found to be a predictor of patient survival. Anemia is common after kidney transplantation, and its prevalence declines with time after transplantation. Presence of anemia at 12 months post-transplant was an independent predictor of graft loss, with higher risk of graft loss in patients with anemia and poorer kidney functions.

  4. Inadequate Riboflavin Intake and Anemia Risk in a Chinese Population: Five-Year Follow Up of the Jiangsu Nutrition Study

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zumin; Zhen, Shiqi; Wittert, Gary A.; Yuan, Baojun; Zuo, Hui; Taylor, Anne W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Riboflavin (vitamin B2) has been shown in animal studies to affect the absorption and metabolism of iron. Cross-sectional population studies show a relationship between riboflavin intake and anemia but prospective population studies are limited. The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between riboflavin intake and the risk of anemia in a Chinese cohort. Method The study used data from 1253 Chinese men and women who participated in two waves of the Jiangsu Nutrition Study (JIN), five years apart, in 2002 and 2007. Riboflavin intake and hemoglobin (Hb) were quantitatively assessed together with dietary patterns, lifestyle, socio-demographic and health-related factors. Results At baseline, 97.2% of participants had inadequate riboflavin intake (below the estimate average requirement). Riboflavin intake was positively associated with anemia at baseline, but low riboflavin intake was associated with an increased risk of anemia at follow-up among those anemic at baseline. In the multivariate model, adjusting for demographic and lifestyle factors and dietary patterns, the relative risk and 95% confidence interval for anemia at follow-up, across quartiles of riboflavin intake were: 1, 0.82(0.54–1.23), 0.56(0.34–0.93), 0.52(0.28–0.98) (p for trend 0.021). There was a significant interaction between riboflavin and iron intake; when riboflavin intake was low, a high iron intake was associated with a lower probability of anemia at follow-up. This association disappeared when riboflavin intake was high. Conclusion Inadequate riboflavin intake is common and increases the risk of anemia in Chinese adults. Given the interaction with iron intake correcting inadequate riboflavin intake may be a priority in the prevention of anemia, and population based measurement and intervention trials are required. PMID:24533156

  5. Depressive disorders and suicide: Epidemiology, risk factors, and burden.

    PubMed

    Miret, Marta; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-12-01

    The social and economic impact of mood disorders and suicide is extremely high and may be even higher in coming years, and yet, research in mental health is largely underfunded. This report summarizes the most recent data concerning the epidemiology and burden of depression and suicide, and underlines the most recent initiatives to identify the barriers to effective treatment and prevention of mood disorders. Global cooperation and networks of research networks are proposed. Progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology and subtypes of depression, technological advances, emphasis on early prediction of response and prevention, and a paradigm shift in drug development are crucial to overcome the current challenges posed by increasing rates of depression and suicide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PLASMODIUM-HELMINTH CO-INFECTION IN AFRICA: POPULATIONS AT RISK, POTENTIAL IMPACT ON ANEMIA AND PROSPECTS FOR COMBINING CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    BROOKER, SIMON; AKHWALE, WILLIS; PULLAN, RACHEL; ESTAMBALE, BENSON; CLARKE, SIÂN E.; SNOW, ROBERT W; HOTEZ, PETER J

    2009-01-01

    Human co-infection with Plasmodium falciparum and helminths is ubiquitous throughout Africa, although its public health significance remains a topic for which there are many unknowns. In this review we have adopted an empirical approach to investigating the geography and epidemiology of co-infection, and associations between patterns of co-infection and haemoglobin in different age groups. Analysis highlights the extensive geographic overlap between P. falciparum and the major human helminth infections in Africa, with the population at coincident risk of infection greatest for hookworm. Age infection profiles indicate that school-age children are at the highest risk of co-infection, and re-analysis of existing data suggests that co-infection with P. falciparum and hookworm has an additive impact on hemoglobin, exacerbating anemia-related malarial disease burden. We suggest that both school-age children and pregnant women – groups among the highest risk of anemia - would benefit from an integrated approach to malaria and helminth control. PMID:18165479

  7. Incidence and risk factors of iron deficiency anemia in term infants.

    PubMed

    Tantracheewathorn, Supapan; Lohajaroensub, Sirin

    2005-01-01

    To compare the incidence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) between breast-fed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants and to identify the risk factors of IDA in these infants. Cohort study. A study of 140 full- term infants (70 BF and 70 FF) was conducted at BMA Medical College and Vajira Hospital from February 2002 to November 2003. All infants were followed at the age of 1, 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months for growth and developmental assessment. Blood samples were analyzed for hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) at 9 - 12 months; and infants with Hb < 11.0 g/dl were further investigated for the cause of anemia. The mean values of Hb, Hct, MCV and serum ferritin of BF infants were 10.8 g/dl, 32.8%, 70.9fl and 16.7 ng/ml respectively, which were significantly lower than those of FF infants (11.4 g/dl, 35.1%, 73.3fl, and 36.9 ng/ml, p < 0. 05). Anemia was found in 27 BF infants (38.6%) compared with 10 FF infants (14.39%). The incidence of IDA in BF infants was significantly higher than FF infants (25.7% vs 2.9%, p < 0.001). Risk factors of IDA included low birth weight, breastfeeding and inadequate complementary food (adjusted RR (95% CI): 3.1(1.1 - 9.1), 6.3(1.5 - 25.0), 7.7(2.8 - 20.0), respectively). IDA is more prevalent in BF than FF infants. Risk factors of IDA are low birth weight, breastfeeding and inadequate complementary food. Prevention of IDA in infants should be achieved through adequate iron-rich complementary food and screening for Hb or Hct at 9 - 12 months of age in high risk infants.

  8. Estimating the Contribution of Selected Risk Factors in Attributable Burden to Stroke in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karami, M; Soori, H; Monfared, A Bahadori

    2012-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the magnitude of avoidable burden by risk factors is needed for health policy, priority setting, and preventing stroke. The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of selected risk factors including hypertension, overweight, obesity, tobacco use, and physical inactivity to the attributable burden of stroke in Iran. Methods: The World Health Organization Comparative Risk Assessment (CRA) methodology was employed to calculate the Potential Impact Fraction (PIF) and percentage of avoidable burden of stroke, which attributed to its risk factors among Iranian adults in 2009. Prevalence of risk factors was obtained from the 5th STEPS survey of chronic disease risk factors which conducted in 2009. PIF was estimated on both theoretical minimum and feasible minimum risk. A simulation procedure incorporating sources of uncertainty was used to estimate the uncertainties for the attributable burden. Results: About 15.7% (95% uncertainty intervals: 5.8- 23.5) of attributable Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) to stroke in adult males and 15.8% (95% uncertainty intervals: 5.8- 23.5) in adult females are avoidable after changing the current prevalence (16.0% and 16.1% for males and females, respectively) of hypertension to 10% in both sexes. Conclusion: This work highlighted the important role of hypertension and overweight. Accordingly, policy makers are advised to consider these risk factors once implementing interventional program in Iran. PMID:23113182

  9. Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection Decision Tree Analysis of Risk Factors for Infant Anemia in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fang; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Jie; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Qin-Ying; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past decades, studies on infant anemia have mainly focused on rural areas of China. With the increasing heterogeneity of population in recent years, available information on infant anemia is inconclusive in large cities of China, especially with comparison between native residents and floating population. This population-based cross-sectional study was implemented to determine the anemic status of infants as well as the risk factors in a representative downtown area of Beijing. Methods: As useful methods to build a predictive model, Chi-squared automatic interaction detection (CHAID) decision tree analysis and logistic regression analysis were introduced to explore risk factors of infant anemia. A total of 1091 infants aged 6–12 months together with their parents/caregivers living at Heping Avenue Subdistrict of Beijing were surveyed from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2014. Results: The prevalence of anemia was 12.60% with a range of 3.47%–40.00% in different subgroup characteristics. The CHAID decision tree model has demonstrated multilevel interaction among risk factors through stepwise pathways to detect anemia. Besides the three predictors identified by logistic regression model including maternal anemia during pregnancy, exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months, and floating population, CHAID decision tree analysis also identified the fourth risk factor, the maternal educational level, with higher overall classification accuracy and larger area below the receiver operating characteristic curve. Conclusions: The infant anemic status in metropolis is complex and should be carefully considered by the basic health care practitioners. CHAID decision tree analysis has demonstrated a better performance in hierarchical analysis of population with great heterogeneity. Risk factors identified by this study might be meaningful in the early detection and prompt treatment of infant anemia in large cities. PMID:27174328

  10. Household Food Security Status Is Associated with Anemia Risk at Age 18 Months among Low-Income Infants in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Metallinos-Katsaras, Elizabeth; Colchamiro, Rachel; Edelstein, Sari; Siu, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Food insecurity and anemia are prevalent among low-income families and infants. Anemia may reflect iron deficiency anemia (IDA) risk. IDA in infancy and early childhood may have long-lasting developmental effects. Few studies have examined food security status (FSS) as a risk factor for anemia. To examine the association between household FSS, sociodemographic and health-related variables, and anemia incidence at age 18 months among low-income infants in the Massachusetts Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (MA/WIC). This was a longitudinal study using data from MA/WIC (August 2001 to November 2009) to assess the relationship between household FSS during the 12 months preceding the 1-year visit (age 9 to 15 months) and anemia at age 18 months. Infants included were not anemic at age 12 months and had complete data on household FSS and the following covariates (N=17,831): race/Hispanic ethnicity, maternal education, breastfeeding duration, household size, and child age. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the association between household FSS during the prior 12 months and anemia at 18 months, controlling for infant age, sex, and race/Hispanic ethnicity, breastfeeding, maternal education, and household size. A majority of infants (56%) were nonwhite, and 19.9% lived in food-insecure households (4.8% in very-low food security). Of the infants who were not anemic at age 12 months, 11.7% became anemic by age 18 months. Infants living in low-food-secure households were 42% more likely (adjusted odds ratio 1.42, 95% CI, 1.27-1.60) to develop anemia at age 18 months than were their food-secure counterparts. Nonwhite race, higher household size, and lower maternal education were also associated with an elevated risk of anemia at age 18 months. Low food security appears to be associated with a significant increased risk of anemia, as do nonwhite ethnicity, lower maternal education, and larger household size. Knowledge of

  11. Pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer risks in relation to occupational history and asbestos lung burden

    PubMed Central

    Gilham, Clare; Rake, Christine; Burdett, Garry; Nicholson, Andrew G; Davison, Leslie; Franchini, Angelo; Carpenter, James; Hodgson, John; Darnton, Andrew; Peto, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background We have conducted a population-based study of pleural mesothelioma patients with occupational histories and measured asbestos lung burdens in occupationally exposed workers and in the general population. The relationship between lung burden and risk, particularly at environmental exposure levels, will enable future mesothelioma rates in people born after 1965 who never installed asbestos to be predicted from their asbestos lung burdens. Methods Following personal interview asbestos fibres longer than 5 µm were counted by transmission electron microscopy in lung samples obtained from 133 patients with mesothelioma and 262 patients with lung cancer. ORs for mesothelioma were converted to lifetime risks. Results Lifetime mesothelioma risk is approximately 0.02% per 1000 amphibole fibres per gram of dry lung tissue over a more than 100-fold range, from 1 to 4 in the most heavily exposed building workers to less than 1 in 500 in most of the population. The asbestos fibres counted were amosite (75%), crocidolite (18%), other amphiboles (5%) and chrysotile (2%). Conclusions The approximate linearity of the dose–response together with lung burden measurements in younger people will provide reasonably reliable predictions of future mesothelioma rates in those born since 1965 whose risks cannot yet be seen in national rates. Burdens in those born more recently will indicate the continuing occupational and environmental hazards under current asbestos control regulations. Our results confirm the major contribution of amosite to UK mesothelioma incidence and the substantial contribution of non-occupational exposure, particularly in women. PMID:26715106

  12. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child may not be able to play contact sports because there's a risk that the spleen could rupture or hemorrhage. Certain forms of anemia (such as sickle cell disease) need other, more specific kinds of care and treatment. How Can I Prevent Iron-Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Many kinds of anemia ...

  13. The burden of blood transfusion: a utilization and economic analysis--a pilot study in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA).

    PubMed

    Reitan, John F; Kudrik, Fred J; Fox, Kayleen; van Breda, Arletta; Shreay, Sanatan; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The objective is to measure the burden of blood transfusion of Packed Red Blood Cells (PRBCs) in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA) on the institutional outpatient transfusion center. This is a retrospective chart review (starting July 1, 2010, working backwards until 120 evaluable patients are accrued) at a single institutional transfusion center in the US. The mean and standard deviation (SD) were calculated for patient's age, pre-transfusion Hgb level, and other transfusion-related activities. One hundred and twenty records were reviewed. The majority included patients who were female (71%), African American (61%), and had either Medicare (48%) or private insurance (39%). The mean patient age was 59 years and the average pre-transfusion Hgb was 7.9 g/dL. The average patient visit to facility ranged from 213 min for one PRBC unit to 411 minutes for three PRBC units. The mean staff time for patient evaluation was 66 minutes. Actual time for transfusion was ∼100 min for each PRBC unit; 90% of patients received two PRBC units. Staff was engaged in direct patient care for an average of 322 min for two PRBC units. The labor cost of transfusion (in 2011 $US) ranged from $46.13-$49.33 per PRBC unit. The estimated fully loaded bundled cost was $596.49 for transfusion of one unit of PRBC. Limitations of the study include: the site included in this study may not be applicable to all sites in practice and the evaluated patient population was varied, with the exception that all patients were treated for some type of malignancy; and the review of blood bank records for 120 patients was not 120 independent events and, as such, may not have adequately captured actual variability. This analysis quantifies expense in terms of time for administration of the transfusion, as well as costs associated with outpatient blood transfusions.

  14. Natural history, definitions, risk factors and burden of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Kong, Kelvin; Coates, Harvey L C

    2009-11-02

    Otitis media remains a major health problem in Australia, with an unacceptably great dichotomy of incidence and severity of otitis media and its complications between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Among most children with acute otitis media, infection resolves rapidly with or without antibiotics, with ongoing middle ear effusion the only sequela. Overcrowding, poor living conditions, exposure to cigarette smoke, and lack of access to medical care are all major risk factors for otitis media. Estimates of the number of cases of otitis media in 2008 vary between 992,000 and 2,430,000 Australians, with a total estimated cost of $100 - $400 million.

  15. Air pollution and anemia as risk factors for pneumonia in ecuadorian children: a retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambient air pollution and malnutrition, particularly anemia, are risk factors for pneumonia, a leading cause of death in children under five. We simultaneously assessed these risk factors in Quito, Ecuador. Methods In 2005, we studied two socioeconomically similar neighborhoods in Quito: Lucha de los Pobres (LP) and Jaime Roldos (JR). LP had relatively high levels of air pollution (annual median PM2.5 = 20.4 μg/m3; NO2 = 29.5 μg/m3) compared to JR (annual median PM2.5 = 15.3 μg/m3; NO2 = 16.6 μg/m3). We enrolled 408 children from LP (more polluted) and 413 children from JR (less polluted). All subjects were aged 18-42 months. We obtained medical histories of prior physician visits and hospitalizations during the previous year, anthropometric nutrition data, hemoglobin levels, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation via oximetry. Results In anemic children, higher pollution exposure was significantly associated with pneumonia hospitalization (OR = 6.82, 95%CI = 1.45-32.00; P = 0.015). In non-anemic children, no difference in hospitalizations by pollution exposure status was detected (OR = 1.04, NS). Children exposed to higher levels of air pollution had more pneumonia hospitalizations (OR = 3.68, 1.09-12.44; P = 0.036), total respiratory illness (OR = 2.93, 95% CI 1.92-4.47; P < 0.001), stunting (OR = 1.88, 1.36-2.60; P < 0.001) and anemia (OR = 1.45, 1.09-1.93; P = 0.013) compared to children exposed to lower levels of air pollution. Also, children exposed to higher levels of air pollution had significantly lower oxygen saturation (92.2% ± 2.6% vs. 95.8% ± 2.2%; P < 0.0001), consistent with air pollution related dyshemoglobinemia. Conclusions Ambient air pollution is associated with rates of hospitalization for pneumonia and with physician's consultations for acute respiratory infections. Anemia may interact with air pollution to increase pneumonia hospitalizations. If confirmed in larger studies, improving nutrition-related anemia, as well as decreasing

  16. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  17. Alcohol consumption as a risk factor for tuberculosis: meta-analyses and burden of disease

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Kevin D.; Roerecke, Michael; Samokhvalov, Andriy V.; Lönnroth, Knut; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses of alcohol use, alcohol dosage and alcohol-related problems as risk factors for tuberculosis incidence were undertaken. The global alcohol-attributable tuberculosis burden of disease was also re-estimated. Systematic searches were conducted, reference lists were reviewed and expert consultations were held to identify studies. Cohort and case-control studies were included if there were no temporal violations of exposure and outcome. Risk relations (RRs) were pooled by using categorical and dose-response meta-analyses. The alcohol-attributable tuberculosis burden of disease was estimated by using alcohol-attributable fractions. 36 of 1108 studies were included. RRs for alcohol use and alcohol-related problems were 1.35 (95% CI 1.09–1.68; I2: 83%) and 3.33 (95% CI 2.14–5.19; 87%), respectively. Concerning alcohol dosage, tuberculosis risk rose as ethanol intake increased, with evidence of a threshold effect. Alcohol consumption caused 22.02 incident cases (95% CI 19.70–40.77) and 2.35 deaths (95% CI 2.05–4.79) per 100 000 people from tuberculosis in 2014. Alcohol-attributable tuberculosis incidence increased between 2000 and 2014 in most high tuberculosis burden countries, whereas mortality decreased. Alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk of tuberculosis in all meta-analyses. It was consequently a major contributor to the tuberculosis burden of disease. PMID:28705945

  18. Projecting Burden of Dementia in Spain, 2010-2050: Impact of Modifying Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Soto-Gordoa, Myriam; Arrospide, Arantzazu; Moreno-Izco, Fermín; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Castilla, Iván; Mar, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Risk and protective factors such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia, physical activity, and hypertension can play a role in the development of dementia. Our objective was to measure the effect of modification of risk and protective factors on the prevalence and economic burden of dementia in the aging Spanish population during 2010-2050. A discrete event simulation model including risk and protective factors according to CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Incidence of Dementia) Risk Score was built to represent the natural history of dementia. Prevalence of dementia was calculated from 2010 to 2050 according to different scenarios of risk factor prevalence to assess the annual social and health care costs of dementia. The model also supplied hazard ratios for dementia. Aging will increase between 49% and 16% each decade in the number of subjects with dementia. The number of working-age individuals per person with dementia will decrease to a quarter by 2050. An intervention leading to a 20% change in risk and protective factors would reduce dementia by 9% , prevent over 100,000 cases, and save nearly 4,900 million euros in 2050. Switching individuals from a group with a specific risk factor to one without it nearly halved the risk of the development of dementia. Dementia prevalence will grow unmanageable if effective prevention strategies are not developed. Interventions aiming to reduce modifiable risk factor prevalence represent valid and effective alternatives to reduce dementia burden. However, further research is needed to identify causal relationships between dementia and risk factors.

  19. Aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Kensuke

    Treatments of aplastic anemia are comprised of supportive therapy and aplastic anemia-specific therapy aimed at restoring hematopoiesis. Supportive therapies include transfusion, G-CSF, and the administration of iron chelation agents, as well as dealing specifically with individual symptoms. Aplastic anemia-specific treatments given with the aim of achieving hematopoietic recovery include immunosuppressive therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and anabolic hormone therapy. Although transplantation provides complete recovery of hematopoiesis (cure), there is a risk of death due to transplant-related complications. The most effective immunosuppressive therapy is a combination of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. This treatment is also effective against the secondary, drug-induced and hepatitis-associated forms of aplastic anemia. In the management of aplastic anemia, a treatment is selected from among these options depending on the disease severity and the age of the individual case. The thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag appears to be effective and to provide tri-lineage recovery of hematopoiesis in some cases. Indications for its use are expected to expand in Japan.

  20. Application of a Novel Method for Assessing Cumulative Risk Burden by County

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Jennifer J.; Shah, Manasi; Abdelbary, Bassent; Gay, Jennifer L.; Sexton, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the Human Security Index (HSI) as a tool to detect social and economic cumulative risk burden at a county-level in the state of Texas. The HSI is an index comprising a network of three sub-components or “fabrics”; the Economic, Environmental, and Social Fabrics. We hypothesized that the HSI will be a useful instrument for identifying and analyzing socioeconomic conditions that contribute to cumulative risk burden in vulnerable counties. We expected to identify statistical associations between cumulative risk burden and (a) ethnic concentration and (b) geographic proximity to the Texas-Mexico border. Findings from this study indicate that the Texas-Mexico border region did not have consistently higher total or individual fabric scores as would be suggested by the high disease burden and low income in this region. While the Economic, Environmental, Social Fabrics (including the Health subfabric) were highly associated with Hispanic ethnic concentration, the overall HSI and the Crime subfabric were not. In addition, the Education, Health and Crime subfabrics were associated with African American racial composition, while Environment, Economic and Social Fabrics were not. Application of the HSI to Texas counties provides a fuller and more nuanced understanding of socioeconomic and environmental conditions, and increases awareness of the role played by environmental, economic, and social factors in observed health disparities by race/ethnicity and geographic region. PMID:22754475

  1. Performance of traditional risk factors in identifying a higher than expected coronary atherosclerotic burden.

    PubMed

    Dores, Hélder; de Araújo Gonçalves, Pedro; Ferreira, António Miguel; Carvalho, Maria Salomé; Sousa, Pedro Jerónimo; Cardim, Nuno; Marques, Hugo; Pereira Machado, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the performance of traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in identifying a higher than expected coronary atherosclerotic burden. We assessed 2069 patients undergoing coronary CT angiography, with assessment of calcium score (CS), for suspected coronary artery disease. A higher than expected atherosclerotic burden was defined as CS >75th percentile (CS >P75) according to age and gender-adjusted monograms. The ability of traditional CV risk factors to predict a CS >P75 was assessed in a customized logistic regression model ("Clinical Score") and by the calculation of SCORE (Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation). The population attributable risk (PAR) of risk factors for CS >P75 was calculated. The median CS was 3.0 (IQR 0.0-98.0); 362 patients had CS >P75. The median SCORE was 3.0 (IQR 1.0-4.0). With the exception of hypertension, all traditional CV risk factors were independent predictors of CS >P75: diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and family history (OR 1.3-2.2, p≤0.026). The areas under the ROC curves for CS >P75 were 0.64 for the Clinical Score (95% CI 0.61-0.67, p<0.001) and 0.53 for SCORE (95% CI 0.50-0.56, p=0.088). About a quarter of patients with CS >P75 were in the two lower quartiles of the Clinical Score. Altogether, the traditional risk factors explain 56% of the prevalence of CS >P75 (adjusted PAR 0.56). Despite the association of CV risk factors with a higher than expected atherosclerotic burden, they appear to explain only half of its prevalence. Even when integrated in scores, the predictive power of these risk factors was modest, exposing the limitations of risk stratification based solely on demographic and clinical risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex- and gender-related risk factor burden in patients with premature acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin; Daskalopoulou, Stella Styliani; Thanassoulis, George; Karp, Igor; Pelletier, Roxanne; Behlouli, Hassan; Pilote, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Few contemporary data exist on traditional (TRF) and non-TRF (NTRF) burden in patients with premature acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Prevalence of TRFs and NTRFs were measured in 1015 young (55 years old or younger) ACS patients recruited from 26 centres in Canada, the United States, and Switzerland. Risk factors were compared across sex and family history categories, and against a sample of the general Canadian population based on the 2000-2001 Canadian Community Health Survey. The 10- and 30-year risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were estimated using Framingham Risk Scores. Risk factors were more prevalent in premature ACS patients compared with the general population. Young women with a family history of coronary artery disease showed the greatest risk factor burden including TRFs of hypertension (67%), dyslipidemia (67%), obesity (53%), smoking (42%), and diabetes (33%), and NTRFs of anxiety (55%), low household income (44%), and depression (37%). The estimated median 10-year risk of CVD was 7% (interquartile range [IQR], 3%-9%) in women and 13% (IQR, 7%-17%) in men, whereas the 30-year risk of CVD was 36% (IQR, 22%-49%) in women and 44% (IQR, 31%-57%) in men. Patients with premature ACS, especially women with a positive family history, are characterized by a very high risk factor burden that is poorly captured by 10-year risk estimates but better captured by 30-year estimates. Consideration of NTRFs and use of 30-year risk estimates might better estimate risk in young individuals and improve the prevention of premature ACS. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterizing the Epidemiological Transition in Mexico: National and Subnational Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Gretchen; Dias, Rodrigo H; Thomas, Kevin J. A; Rivera, Juan A; Carvalho, Natalie; Barquera, Simón; Hill, Kenneth; Ezzati, Majid

    2008-01-01

    Background Rates of diseases and injuries and the effects of their risk factors can have substantial subnational heterogeneity, especially in middle-income countries like Mexico. Subnational analysis of the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors can improve characterization of the epidemiological transition and identify policy priorities. Methods and Findings We estimated deaths and loss of healthy life years (measured in disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) in 2004 from a comprehensive list of diseases and injuries, and 16 major risk factors, by sex and age for Mexico and its states. Data sources included the vital statistics, national censuses, health examination surveys, and published epidemiological studies. Mortality statistics were adjusted for underreporting, misreporting of age at death, and for misclassification and incomparability of cause-of-death assignment. Nationally, noncommunicable diseases caused 75% of total deaths and 68% of total DALYs, with another 14% of deaths and 18% of DALYs caused by undernutrition and communicable, maternal, and perinatal diseases. The leading causes of death were ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, liver cirrhosis, and road traffic injuries. High body mass index, high blood glucose, and alcohol use were the leading risk factors for disease burden, causing 5.1%, 5.0%, and 7.3% of total burden of disease, respectively. Mexico City had the lowest mortality rates (4.2 per 1,000) and the Southern region the highest (5.0 per 1,000); under-five mortality in the Southern region was nearly twice that of Mexico City. In the Southern region undernutrition and communicable, maternal, and perinatal diseases caused 23% of DALYs; in Chiapas, they caused 29% of DALYs. At the same time, the absolute rates of noncommunicable disease and injury burdens were highest in the Southern region (105 DALYs per 1,000 population versus 97 nationally for noncommunicable diseases; 22 versus 19 for injuries

  4. Comparing the population neurodevelopmental burdens associated with children's exposures to environmental chemicals and other risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, David C

    2012-08-01

    To estimate the population burden of an exposure that is associated with neurodevelopmental impairment, it is necessary to consider both the effect size associated with the exposure (i.e., the decrease in function per unit increase in biomarker level) and the prevalence of the exposure. An exposure with a modest effect size might, nevertheless, be associated with a substantial population burden if many children are exposed at levels at which the exposure is known to have a detrimental impact. This illustrates the important distinction between individual risk and population risk. A method is described that can be used to compare different risk factors in terms of their contributions to the population burden of neurodevelopmental impairment. Combining estimates of the incidence/prevalence/distribution of different conditions or exposures with estimates, derived from meta-analyses, for the impact of different risk factors on children's Full-Scale IQ scores (FSIQ), the total FSIQ losses associated with each were calculated for the U.S. population of children less than 5 years of age. The losses associated with non-chemical risk factors ranged widely: 34,000,000 FSIQ points for preterm birth, 17,000,000 for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, 9,000,000 for iron deficiency, 136,000 for acute lymphocytic leukemia, and 37,000 for brain tumors. The FSIQ losses could be estimated for three chemicals: lead, 23,000,000 points; methylmercury, 285,000 points; and organophosphate pesticides, 17,000,000 points. Many caveats attend these calculations, but the findings suggest that in continuing to apply standards appropriate to evaluating the impact of chemical exposures on an individual child rather than on the population as a whole, we risk underestimating the population burdens associated with them. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Moderate to severe, but not mild, maternal anemia is associated with increased risk of small-for-gestational-age outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kozuki, Naoko; Lee, Anne C; Katz, Joanne

    2012-02-01

    Anemia is highly prevalent globally, estimated at 40-50% in women of reproductive age. Prior studies have produced inconclusive evidence as to the association between maternal anemia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). We conducted a systematic review of the literature containing associations between maternal anemia and small for gestational age (SGA) outcomes (as a proxy for IUGR). A meta-analysis was performed to pool associations, categorized by the hemoglobin cutoffs presented by the authors. We identified 12 studies reporting associations between maternal anemia and SGA. For the meta-analysis, there were 7 associations with a hemoglobin cutoff <110 g/L, 7 with a cutoff <100 g/L, and 5 with a cutoff <90 or <80 g/L. Although the <110- and <100-g/L categories showed no significant relationship with SGA, the <90- or <80-g/L category was associated with a 53% increase in risk of the newborn being SGA [pooled OR = 1.53 (95% CI: 1.24-1.87); P < 0.001]. Moderate to severe, but not mild, maternal anemia appears to have an association with SGA outcomes, but the findings must be viewed with caution due to the great heterogeneity of the studies. Further examination should be conducted using datasets with better standardized definitions and measurements of exposure and outcome.

  6. [Resilient or Risk Group? Psychological Burden at Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) in Germany].

    PubMed

    Rücker, Stefan; Büttner, Peter; Lambertz, Birgit; Karpinski, Norbert; Petermann, Franz

    2017-04-01

    Resilient or Risk Group? Psychological Burden at Unaccompanied Refugee Minors (URM) in Germany Unaccompanied minors (umA in German) are considered as a risk group for psychological disorders. In international studies a high prevalence for trauma, anxiety, and depression were reported. A sample of N = 52 unaccompanied minors living in Germany was questioned on symptom severity as well as stress experience with the Refugee Health Screening-15. More than each second unaccompanied minor shows clinically relevant symptom severity and stress experience. In age-specific analyses the highest stress levels were found among the youngest unaccompanied minors. Therefore, specifically adapted settings for care should be applied for this high-risk group.

  7. Comparative risk assessment of the burden of disease from climate change.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid; Woodruff, Rosalie

    2006-12-01

    The World Health Organization has developed standardized comparative risk assessment methods for estimating aggregate disease burdens attributable to different risk factors. These have been applied to existing and new models for a range of climate-sensitive diseases in order to estimate the effect of global climate change on current disease burdens and likely proportional changes in the future. The comparative risk assessment approach has been used to assess the health consequences of climate change worldwide, to inform decisions on mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, and in a regional assessment of the Oceania region in the Pacific Ocean to provide more location-specific information relevant to local mitigation and adaptation decisions. The approach places climate change within the same criteria for epidemiologic assessment as other health risks and accounts for the size of the burden of climate-sensitive diseases rather than just proportional change, which highlights the importance of small proportional changes in diseases such as diarrhea and malnutrition that cause a large burden. These exercises help clarify important knowledge gaps such as a relatively poor understanding of the role of nonclimatic factors (socioeconomic and other) that may modify future climatic influences and a lack of empiric evidence and methods for quantifying more complex climate-health relationships, which consequently are often excluded from consideration. These exercises highlight the need for risk assessment frameworks that make the best use of traditional epidemiologic methods and that also fully consider the specific characteristics of climate change. These include the longterm and uncertain nature of the exposure and the effects on multiple physical and biotic systems that have the potential for diverse and widespread effects, including high-impact events.

  8. Risk burdens of modifiable risk factors incorporating lipoprotein (a) and low serum albumin concentrations for first incident acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qin; He, Yong-Ming; Cai, Dong-Ping; Yang, Xiang-Jun; Xu, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Risk burdens of modifiable risk factors incorporating lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) and low serum albumin (LSA) concentrations for first incident acute myocardial infarction (AMI) haven’t been studied previously. Cross-sectional study of 1552 cases and 6125 controls was performed for identifying the association of risk factors with first incident AMI and their corresponding population attributable risks (PARs). Modifiable risk factors incorporating LSA and Lp(a) accounted for up to 92% of PAR for first incident AMI. Effects of these risk factors were different in different sexes across different age categories. Overall, smoking and LSA were the 2 strongest risk factors, together accounting for 64% of PAR for first incident AMI. After multivariable adjustment, Lp(a) and LSA accounted for 19% and 41%, respectively, and together for more than a half (54%) of PAR for first incident AMI. Modifiable risk factors incorporating LSA and Lp(a) have accounted for an overwhelmingly large proportion of the risk of first incident AMI, indicating most first incident AMI is preventable. The knowledge of risk burdens for first incident AMI incorporating Lp (a) and LSA may be beneficial for further reducing first incident AMI from a new angle. PMID:27748452

  9. Risk factors related to the global burden of disease in Brazil and its Federated Units, 2015.

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos; Machado, Ísis Eloah; Passos, Valéria Maria de Azeredo; Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier de; Ishitani, Lenice Harumi; Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Carneiro, Mariangela; Mooney, Meghan; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the global burden of disease related to disability adjusted life years (DALYs) attributed to selected risk factors in Brazil and its 27 Federated Units. Databases from the Global Burden of Disease study in Brazil and its Federated Units were used, estimating the summary exposure value (SEV) for selected environmental, behavioral, and metabolic risk factors (RFs), and their combinations. The DALYs were used as the main metric. The ranking of major RFs between 1990 and 2015 was compiled, comparing data by sex and states. The analyzed RFs account for 38.8% of the loss of DALYs in the country. Dietary risks was the main cause of DALYs in 2015. In men, dietary risks contributed to 12.2% of DALYs and in women, to 11.1%. Other RFs were high systolic blood pressure, high body mass index, smoking, high fasting plasma glucose and, among men, alcohol and drug use. The main RFs were metabolic and behavioral. In most states, dietary risks was the main RF, followed by high blood pressure. Dietary risks leads the RF ranking for Brazil and its Federated Units. Men are more exposed to behavioral risk factors, and women are more exposed to metabolic ones.

  10. Predicting family burden following childhood traumatic brain injury: a cumulative risk approach.

    PubMed

    Josie, Katherine Leigh; Peterson, Catherine Cant; Burant, Christopher; Drotar, Dennis; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L; Yeates, Keith; Taylor, H Gerry

    2008-01-01

    To examine the utility of a cumulative risk index (CRI) in predicting the family burden of injury (FBI) over time in families of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). One hundred eight children with severe or moderate TBI and their families participated in the study. The measures used in the study include the Socioeconomic Composite Index, Life Stressors and Social Resources Inventory--Adult Form, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Child Behavior Checklist, Children's Depression Inventory, McMaster Family Assessment Device, Brief Symptom Inventory, and Family Burden of Injury Interview. In addition, information on injury-related risk was obtained via medical charts. Participants were assessed immediately, 6, and 12 months postinjury and at a 4-year extended follow-up. Risk variables were dichotomized (ie, high- or low-risk) and summed to create a CRI for each child. The CRI predicted the FBI at all assessments, even after accounting for autocorrelations across repeated assessments. Path coefficients between the outcome measures at each time point were significant, as were all path coefficients from the CRI to family burden at each time point. In addition, all fit indices were above the recommended guidelines, and the chi statistic indicated a good fit to the data. The current study provides initial support for the utility of a CRI (ie, an index of accumulated risk factors) in predicting family outcomes over time for children with TBI. The time period immediately after injury best predicts the future levels of FBI; however, cumulative risk continues to influence the change across successive postinjury assessments. These results suggest that clinical interventions could be proactive or preventive by intervening with identified "at-risk" subgroups immediately following injury.

  11. Obesity and cumulative inflammatory burden: a valuable risk assessment parameter in caring for dental patients.

    PubMed

    Hein, Casey; Batista, Eraldo L

    2014-06-01

    A new model of risk assessment that recognizes the importance of reducing patients' cumulative inflammatory burden by targeting overweight and obesity, in individuals with periodontal disease, may be a valuable risk assessment parameter in caring for dental patients. The growing body of evidence that suggests obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and periodontal disease are interrelated offers an unprecedented opportunity to adopt a new model of risk assessment that has the potential to beneficially influence not only the periodontal health of obese and overweight patients, but simultaneously may also reduce a person's overall risk for developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and perhaps other inflammatory driven disease states. This paper presents an overview of research that builds the case for a new model of risk assessment that focuses on the cumulative inflammatory burden that may be elevated by the presence of periodontal disease in obese patients. In addition, the biological plausibility of the concepts of inflammatory priming and inflammatory loading is discussed, and several simple ideas are suggested for identifying at-risk patients. Given the significant rise in obesity and the impact that obesity has on periodontal health and other inflammatory driven, systemic disease states, adoption of a new model of risk assessment is suggested-one that considers an individual's cumulative inflammatory burden which may be amplified as a result of coexisting obesity and other components of Metabolic Syndrome and periodontal disease. Knowledge gathered thus far combined with further clinical research must be translated into better ways to treat and maintain obese periodontal patients. These measures may pave the way for prevention of metabolic diseases and obesity with a relevant impact on patients' periodontal status. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk of Cancer in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Wen; Hu, Li-Yu; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Teng, Chung-Jen; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, San-Chi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the risk of cancer among patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) by using a nationwide population-based data set. Method Patients newly diagnosed with IDA and without antecedent cancer between 2000 and 2010 were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer types among patients with IDA were calculated. Results Patients with IDA exhibited an increased overall cancer risk (SIR: 2.15). Subgroup analysis showed that patients of both sexes and in all age groups had an increased SIR. After we excluded patients diagnosed with cancer within the first and first 5 years of IDA diagnosis, the SIRs remained significantly elevated at 1.43 and 1.30, respectively. In addition, the risks of pancreatic (SIR: 2.31), kidney (SIR: 2.23), liver (SIR: 1.94), and bladder cancers (SIR: 1.74) remained significantly increased after exclusion of patients diagnosed with cancer within 5 years after IDA diagnosis. Conclusion The overall cancer risk was significantly elevated among patients with IDA. After we excluded patients diagnosed with IDA and cancer within 1 and 5 years, the SIRs remained significantly elevated compared with those of the general population. The increased risk of cancer was not confined to gastrointestinal cancer when the SIRs of pancreatic, kidney, liver, and bladder cancers significantly increased after exclusion of patients diagnosed with IDA and cancer within the first 5 years. This finding may be caused by immune activities altered by IDA. Further study is necessary to determine the association between IDA and cancer risk. PMID:25781632

  13. [Burden of disease, injuries, risk factors and challenges for the health system in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Rafael; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Garrido-Latorre, Francisco; Jiménez-Corona, Aída; Campuzano-Rincón, Julio César; Franco-Marina, Francisco; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Borges, Guilherme; Naghavi, Mohsen; Wang, Haidong; Vos, Theo; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher J L

    2013-12-01

    To present the results of the burden of disease, injuries and risk factors in Mexico from 1990 to 2010 for the principal illnesses, injuries and risk factors by sex. A secondary analysis of the study results published by the Global Burden of Disease 2010 for Mexico performed by IHME. In 2010, Mexico lost 26.2 million of Disability adjusted live years (DALYs), 56 % were in male and 44 % in women. The main causes of DALYs in men are violence, ischemic heart disease and road traffic injuries. In the case of women the leading causes are diabetes, chronic kidney disease and ischemic heart diseases. The mental disorders and musculoskeletal conditions concentrate 18% of health lost. The risk factors that most affect men in Mexico are: alcohol consumption, overweight/obesity, high blood glucose levels and blood pressure and tobacco consumption (35.6 % of DALYs lost). In women, overweight and obesity, high blood sugar and blood pressure, lack of physical activity and consumption of alcohol are responsible for 40 % of DALYs lost. In both sexes the problems with diet contribute 12% of the burden. The epidemiological situation in Mexico, demands an urgent adaptation and modernization of the health system.

  14. Cardiac disease and risk of sudden death in the young: the burden of the phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Sudden cardiovascular death is a rare but catastrophic event in young men and women throughout the world. Sudden death is difficult to study. Factors that need elucidation are (1) the definition of sudden death; (2) diagnosis of the cause of sudden death; (3) the true incidence of sudden death, and (4) age and gender of individuals being studied. The "burden" of sudden death is far-reaching and involves medical, emotional, and economic burdens on the family members at risk, the entire family of the victim, and society in general. The pathologist trying to evaluate a case of sudden death also has a burden to make the correct diagnosis, especially since the cause of the sudden death may determine risk to the victim's family members. Sudden death is difficult to prevent since it may be the first and last manifestation of the cardiovascular disease. Also, paradoxically, the greatest number of deaths occurs in "low-risk" groups. The most common causes of cardiovascular deaths in the young are cardiomyopathy, coronary anomaly, obstructive coronary artery disease, myocarditis, valvular disease, channelopathy, and aortic disease leading to dissection or rupture. Many sudden deaths in the young occur during or shortly after exercise. Appropriate pre-participation screening of competitive athletes can reduce the incidence of sudden cardiovascular death in the young. Which measures to try to prevent these rare deaths are indicated and/or cost effective is a matter of discussion and controversy.

  15. Recurrent stroke risk and cerebral microbleed burden in ischemic stroke and TIA

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Duncan; Charidimou, Andreas; Ambler, Gareth; Fox, Zoe V.; Gregoire, Simone; Rayson, Phillip; Imaizumi, Toshio; Fluri, Felix; Naka, Hiromitsu; Horstmann, Solveig; Veltkamp, Roland; Rothwell, Peter M.; Kwa, Vincent I.H.; Thijs, Vincent; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Young Dae; Huang, Yining; Wong, Ka Sing; Jäger, Hans Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine associations between cerebral microbleed (CMB) burden with recurrent ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) risk after IS or TIA. Methods: We identified prospective studies of patients with IS or TIA that investigated CMBs and stroke (ICH and IS) risk during ≥3 months follow-up. Authors provided aggregate summary-level data on stroke outcomes, with CMBs categorized according to burden (single, 2–4, and ≥5 CMBs) and distribution. We calculated absolute event rates and pooled risk ratios (RR) using random-effects meta-analysis. Results: We included 5,068 patients from 15 studies. There were 115/1,284 (9.6%) recurrent IS events in patients with CMBs vs 212/3,781 (5.6%) in patients without CMBs (pooled RR 1.8 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–2.5). There were 49/1,142 (4.3%) ICH events in those with CMBs vs 17/2,912 (0.58%) in those without CMBs (pooled RR 6.3 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% CI 3.5–11.4). Increasing CMB burden increased the risk of IS (pooled RR [95% CI] 1.8 [1.0–3.1], 2.4 [1.3–4.4], and 2.7 [1.5–4.9] for 1 CMB, 2–4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively) and ICH (pooled RR [95% CI] 4.6 [1.9–10.7], 5.6 [2.4–13.3], and 14.1 [6.9–29.0] for 1 CMB, 2–4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively). Conclusions: CMBs are associated with increased stroke risk after IS or TIA. With increasing CMB burden (compared to no CMBs), the risk of ICH increases more steeply than that of IS. However, IS absolute event rates remain higher than ICH absolute event rates in all CMB burden categories. PMID:27590288

  16. Recurrent stroke risk and cerebral microbleed burden in ischemic stroke and TIA: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Duncan; Charidimou, Andreas; Ambler, Gareth; Fox, Zoe V; Gregoire, Simone; Rayson, Phillip; Imaizumi, Toshio; Fluri, Felix; Naka, Hiromitsu; Horstmann, Solveig; Veltkamp, Roland; Rothwell, Peter M; Kwa, Vincent I H; Thijs, Vincent; Lee, Yong-Seok; Kim, Young Dae; Huang, Yining; Wong, Ka Sing; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Werring, David J

    2016-10-04

    To determine associations between cerebral microbleed (CMB) burden with recurrent ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) risk after IS or TIA. We identified prospective studies of patients with IS or TIA that investigated CMBs and stroke (ICH and IS) risk during ≥3 months follow-up. Authors provided aggregate summary-level data on stroke outcomes, with CMBs categorized according to burden (single, 2-4, and ≥5 CMBs) and distribution. We calculated absolute event rates and pooled risk ratios (RR) using random-effects meta-analysis. We included 5,068 patients from 15 studies. There were 115/1,284 (9.6%) recurrent IS events in patients with CMBs vs 212/3,781 (5.6%) in patients without CMBs (pooled RR 1.8 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-2.5). There were 49/1,142 (4.3%) ICH events in those with CMBs vs 17/2,912 (0.58%) in those without CMBs (pooled RR 6.3 for CMBs vs no CMBs; 95% CI 3.5-11.4). Increasing CMB burden increased the risk of IS (pooled RR [95% CI] 1.8 [1.0-3.1], 2.4 [1.3-4.4], and 2.7 [1.5-4.9] for 1 CMB, 2-4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively) and ICH (pooled RR [95% CI] 4.6 [1.9-10.7], 5.6 [2.4-13.3], and 14.1 [6.9-29.0] for 1 CMB, 2-4 CMBs, and ≥5 CMBs, respectively). CMBs are associated with increased stroke risk after IS or TIA. With increasing CMB burden (compared to no CMBs), the risk of ICH increases more steeply than that of IS. However, IS absolute event rates remain higher than ICH absolute event rates in all CMB burden categories. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Attributable to Major Modifiable Risk Factors in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Peters, Sanne AE; Woodward, Mark; Huxley, Rachel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Indonesia, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are estimated to cause more than 470 000 deaths annually. In order to inform primary prevention policies, we estimated the sex- and age-specific burden of CHD and stroke attributable to five major and modifiable vascular risk factors: cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, elevated total cholesterol, and excess body weight. Methods Population attributable risks for CHD and stroke attributable to these risk factors individually were calculated using summary statistics obtained for prevalence of each risk factor specific to sex and to two age categories (<55 and ≥55 years) from a national survey in Indonesia. Age- and sex-specific relative risks for CHD and stroke associated with each of the five risk factors were derived from prospective data from the Asia-Pacific region. Results Hypertension was the leading vascular risk factor, explaining 20%–25% of all CHD and 36%–42% of all strokes in both sexes and approximately one-third of all CHD and half of all strokes across younger and older age groups alike. Smoking in men explained a substantial proportion of vascular events (25% of CHD and 17% of strokes). However, given that these risk factors are likely to be strongly correlated, these population attributable risk proportions are likely to be overestimates and require verification from future studies that are able to take into account correlation between risk factors. Conclusions Implementation of effective population-based prevention strategies aimed at reducing levels of major cardiovascular risk factors, especially blood pressure, total cholesterol, and smoking prevalence among men, could reduce the growing burden of CVD in the Indonesian population. PMID:27021286

  18. The Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Attributable to Major Modifiable Risk Factors in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Peters, Sanne Ae; Woodward, Mark; Huxley, Rachel R

    2016-10-05

    In Indonesia, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke are estimated to cause more than 470 000 deaths annually. In order to inform primary prevention policies, we estimated the sex- and age-specific burden of CHD and stroke attributable to five major and modifiable vascular risk factors: cigarette smoking, hypertension, diabetes, elevated total cholesterol, and excess body weight. Population attributable risks for CHD and stroke attributable to these risk factors individually were calculated using summary statistics obtained for prevalence of each risk factor specific to sex and to two age categories (<55 and ≥55 years) from a national survey in Indonesia. Age- and sex-specific relative risks for CHD and stroke associated with each of the five risk factors were derived from prospective data from the Asia-Pacific region. Hypertension was the leading vascular risk factor, explaining 20%-25% of all CHD and 36%-42% of all strokes in both sexes and approximately one-third of all CHD and half of all strokes across younger and older age groups alike. Smoking in men explained a substantial proportion of vascular events (25% of CHD and 17% of strokes). However, given that these risk factors are likely to be strongly correlated, these population attributable risk proportions are likely to be overestimates and require verification from future studies that are able to take into account correlation between risk factors. Implementation of effective population-based prevention strategies aimed at reducing levels of major cardiovascular risk factors, especially blood pressure, total cholesterol, and smoking prevalence among men, could reduce the growing burden of CVD in the Indonesian population.

  19. The Burden of Suicide in Rural Bangladesh: Magnitude and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Sharmin Salam, Shumona; Alonge, Olakunle; Islam, Md Irteja; Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Wadhwaniya, Shirin; Ul Baset, Md Kamran; Mashreky, Saidur Rahman; El Arifeen, Shams

    2017-09-09

    The aim of the paper is to quantify the burden and risk factors of fatal and non-fatal suicidal behaviors in rural Bangladesh. A census was carried out in seven sub-districts encompassing 1.16 million people. Face-to-face interviews were conducted at the household level. Descriptive analyses were done to quantify the burden and Poisson regression was run to determine on risk factors. The estimated rates of fatal and non-fatal suicide were 3.29 and 9.86 per 100,000 person years (PY) observed, respectively. The risk of suicide was significantly higher by 6.31 times among 15-17 and 4.04 times among 18-24 olds compared to 25-64 years old. Married adolescents were 22 times more likely to commit suicide compared to never-married people. Compared to Chandpur/Comilla district, the risk of suicide was significantly higher in Narshingdi. Students had significantly lower risk of non-fatal suicidal behavior compared to skilled laborers. The risk of non-fatal suicidal behavior was lower in Sherpur compared to Chandpur/Comilla. Among adolescents, unskilled laborers were 16 times more likely to attempt suicide than students. The common methods for fatal and non-fatal suicidal behaviors were hanging and poisoning. Suicide is a major public health problem in Bangladesh that needs to be addressed with targeted interventions.

  20. Effect of Race and Socioeconomic Status on Cardiovascular Risk Factor Burden: The Cooper Center Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Frierson, Gorita M.; Howard, Erica N.; DeFina, Laura F.; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Willis, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and chronic disease burden among African Americans compared to Caucasians in a population of higher socioeconomic status. Design The current study is a cross-sectional, secondary data analysis of the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study. Setting Patients with a medical examination from 1970-2010 at the Cooper Clinic. Participants 762 African Americans and 40,051 Caucasians who met the criteria. Outcome Measures Racial differences in cardiovascular risk factors/burden of disease between African Americans and Caucasians. Results African Americans had higher prevalence of evaluated cardiovascular risk factors than did Caucasians after controlling for obesity, tobacco use, and physical fitness. Caucasians had greater likelihood of no risk factors while African Americans were more likely to have all three risk factors. Race was typically predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in African Americans compared to Caucasians. Conclusions Findings suggest that health differences persist despite greater socioeconomic status, and further investigations of biopsychosocial causes are warranted. (Ethn Dis. 2013;23[1]:35-42) PMID:23495620

  1. Night work, total occupational burden and cancer/cardiovascular risk factors in physicians.

    PubMed

    Belkić, Karen; Nedić, Olesja

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Lifestyle-related risk factors: smoking, obesity, sedentariness and excess alcohol intake are among the most important known causes of cancer and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between these lifestyle-related risk factors for cancer/cardiovascular disease and working conditions among surgeons/anesthesiologists and other physicians. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study was carried out among physicians aged 35 to 60, without diagnosed coronary heart disease or other structural heart disease, who were employed at the Novi Sad University Hospital. The participation rate was high (> 90%). The physicians completed the Occupational Stress Index. Low lifestyle-related cancer/cardiovascular risk was defined as: not a current smoker, body mass index < 28, regular recreational physical activity and not consuming alcohol every day. Analysis of covariance was performed. RESULTS. Of 191 physicians included in this study only 23 (12.0%) had a low lifestyle-related cancer/cardiovascular risk. Surgeons/anesthesiologists faced a heavier total work stressor burden than physicians in other profiles (87.7 +/- 8.8 versus 74.1 +/- 10.5, p=0.000). Among the 56 surgeons/anesthesiologists, lower nightshift work scores were associated with low lifestyle-related cancer/cardiovascular risk (F=4.19, p=0.046). A lower overall work stressor burden was associated with low risk among the other 135 physicians (F=4.06, p=0.046). CONCLUSION. Specific workplace intervention strategies are urgently needed. Among the surgeons/anesthesiologists these should include reduction in the frequency of night call and improvement of the overall conditions of nightshift work. Among other physicians, the total occupational burden needs to be diminished.

  2. Predicting Family Burden Following Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cumulative Risk Approach

    PubMed Central

    Josie, Katherine Leigh; Peterson, Catherine Cant; Burant, Christopher; Drotar, Dennis; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L.; Yeates, Keith; Taylor, H. Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the utility of a cumulative risk index (CRI) in predicting the family burden of injury (FBI) over time in families of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants One hundred eight children with severe or moderate TBI and their families participated in the study. Measures The measures used in the study include the Socioeconomic Composite Index, Life Stressors and Social Resources Inventory—Adult Form, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Child Behavior Checklist, Children’s Depression Inventory, McMaster Family Assessment Device, Brief Symptom Inventory, and Family Burden of Injury Interview. In addition, information on injury-related risk was obtained via medical charts. Methods Participants were assessed immediately, 6, and 12 months postinjury and at a 4-year extended follow-up. Results Risk variables were dichotomized (ie, high- or low-risk) and summed to create a CRI for each child. The CRI predicted the FBI at all assessments, even after accounting for autocorrelations across repeated assessments. Path coefficients between the outcome measures at each time point were significant, as were all path coefficients from the CRI to family burden at each time point. In addition, all fit indices were above the recommended guidelines, and the χ2 statistic indicated a good fit to the data. Conclusions The current study provides initial support for the utility of a CRI (ie, an index of accumulated risk factors) in predicting family outcomes over time for children with TBI. The time period immediately after injury best predicts the future levels of FBI; however, cumulative risk continues to influence the change across successive postinjury assessments. These results suggest that clinical interventions could be proactive or preventive by intervening with identified “at-risk” subgroups immediately following injury. PMID:19033828

  3. Risk factors for outbreaks of infectious salmon anemia in farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    McClure, Carol A; Hammell, K Larry; Dohoo, Ian R

    2005-12-12

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a viral disease occurring in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that is characterized by lethargy, anorexia, anemia and death. To control the disease in New Brunswick, Canada, 7.5 million fish from outbreak cages have been destroyed since 1997. Despite changes made by farmers, 2002 was the worst year ever for ISA losses in the region. We evaluated the associations between potential risk factors and ISA outbreaks in the Atlantic-salmon sites in New Brunswick. This was a multilevel study in which the site-level design was a retrospective cohort study while the cage-level design was a modified case-cohort study. The questionnaire was divided into site-level questions, cage-level questions and hatchery information. The important factors identified by this study can be categorized as environmental, farmer controlled or industry controlled according to the capacity to change or eliminate them. Environmental risk factors such as increasing the depth of the net (if nets were 3m, OR=3.34) are for the most part dictated by site location. Wild pollock (Pollachius virens) in the cage reflects the number of wild pollock that live in the site location. If there were >or=1000 pollock in the cage, the odds of disease in the cage increased 4.43-fold. Risk factors that are under farm control include increasing the number of times that the salmon are treated for sea lice (OR=3.31 if lice treatments are 99 g) and improving on the adaptation of smolts to seawater to reduce post-transfer mortalities (OR=4.52 if there was at least one cage with post-transfer mortalities >5%). The industry-controlled factors need to be addressed by the industry as a whole. Organizing boat travel to minimize the time and frequency of boats travelling to or by sites

  4. Anemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in diabetes: the impact of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vlagopoulos, Panagiotis T; Tighiouart, Hocine; Weiner, Daniel E; Griffith, John; Pettitt, Dan; Salem, Deeb N; Levey, Andrew S; Sarnak, Mark J

    2005-11-01

    Anemia is a potential nontraditional risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study evaluated whether anemia is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in people with diabetes and whether the risk is modified by the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Persons with diabetes from four community-based studies were pooled: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities, Cardiovascular Health Study, Framingham Heart Study, and Framingham Offspring Study. Anemia was defined as a hematocrit <36% in women and <39% in men. CKD was defined as an estimated GFR of 15 to 60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Study outcomes included a composite of myocardial infarction (MI)/fatal coronary heart disease (CHD)/stroke/death and each outcome separately. Cox regression analysis was used to study the effect of anemia on the risk for outcomes after adjustment for potential confounders. The study population included 3015 individuals: 30.4% were black, 51.6% were women, 8.1% had anemia, and 13.8% had CKD. Median follow-up was 8.6 yr. There were 1215 composite events, 600 MI/fatal CHD outcomes, 300 strokes, and 857 deaths. In a model with a CKD-anemia interaction term, anemia was associated with the following hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) in patients with CKD: 1.70 (1.24 to 2.34) for the composite outcome, 1.64 (1.03 to 2.61) for MI/fatal CHD, 1.81 (0.99 to 3.29) for stroke, and 1.88 (1.33 to 2.66) for all-cause mortality. Anemia was not a risk factor for any outcome in those without CKD (P > 0.2 for all outcomes). In persons with diabetes, anemia is primarily a risk factor for adverse outcomes in those who also have CKD.

  5. Unusual Anemias.

    PubMed

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed.

  6. Burden of genetic risk variants in multiple sclerosis families in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Mescheriakova, Julia Y; Broer, Linda; Wahedi, Simin; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20% of multiple sclerosis patients have a family history of multiple sclerosis. Studies of multiple sclerosis aggregation in families are inconclusive. To investigate the genetic burden based on currently discovered genetic variants for multiple sclerosis risk in patients from Dutch multiple sclerosis multiplex families versus sporadic multiple sclerosis cases, and to study its influence on clinical phenotype and disease prediction. Our study population consisted of 283 sporadic multiple sclerosis cases, 169 probands from multiplex families and 2028 controls. A weighted genetic risk score based on 102 non-human leukocyte antigen loci and HLA-DRB1*1501 was calculated. The weighted genetic risk score based on all loci was significantly higher in familial than in sporadic cases. The HLA-DRB1*1501 contributed significantly to the difference in genetic burden between the groups. A high weighted genetic risk score was significantly associated with a low age of disease onset in all multiple sclerosis patients, but not in the familial cases separately. The genetic risk score was significantly but modestly better in discriminating familial versus sporadic multiple sclerosis from controls. Familial multiple sclerosis patients are more loaded with the common genetic variants than sporadic cases. The difference is mainly driven by HLA-DRB1*1501. The predictive capacity of genetic loci is poor and unlikely to be useful in clinical settings.

  7. Is sickle cell anemia a risk factor for severe dental malocclusion?

    PubMed

    Costa, Cyrene Piazera Silva; Carvalho, Halinna Larissa Cruz Correa; Souza, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between sickle cell anemia (SCA) and the severity of dental malocclusion (MO). This was a retrospective cohort study of 93 individuals with SCA (G1) and 186 individuals without the disease (G2). SCA patients were randomly selected by a simple draw from patients treated in the Centro de Hematologia e Hemoterapia do Maranhão (HEMOMAR) in northeastern Brazil. Patients aged between 16 and 60 were included after being tested for the hemoglobin S gene. G2 consisted of individuals living in the same residence as the patients. The Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), as well as some morphological deviations not included in DAI, were used for the orthodontic evaluation of MO. Poisson regression with robust variance adjustment was employed to estimate relative risk (RR). In the multivariate analysis, SCA was associated with moderate (RR = 1.36) and very severe MO (RR = 8.0). SCA is correlated with anterior tooth loss (RR = 1.94), anterior spacing (RR = 1.66), overjet (RR = 1.87), anterior crossbite (RR = 1.94), and open bite (RR = 1.94). Thus, SCA is a risk factor for moderate and very severe MO.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for Equine Infectious Anemia in Poconé municipality, northern Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alice M C M; Silva, Lucas G; Nogueira, Márcia F; Oliveira, Anderson C S; Segri, Neuber J; Ferreira, Fernando; Witter, Rute; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Serum samples collected from 547 equids in the Pantanal region of Brazil were evaluated for antibodies to Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) by the agar gel immunodiffusion test. Risk factors associated with EIAV seropositivity were evaluated and spatial dependence investigated using a Spatial Lag Model. EIAV prevalence on farms in the Pantanal was 52.0% (13/25) with adjusted prevalence between equids of 31.5% (17.4-48.8% 95% CI). Intra-herd prevalence ranged from 5.0 to 77.0%. Statistical analysis demonstrated that farms and animals in regularly flooded areas had respectively 60 and 146 fold higher chance to be sero-positive than farms and animals located in non-flooded areas. Spatial Lag Model results were generally consistent with this conclusion although there was a negative spatial correlation between farms located within in regularly inundated regions, suggesting that other factors, such as management practices, probably play a significant role in transmission of EIAV. Equids with clinical signs were 3.74-fold more likely to be sero-positive than those without clinical signs. The results of this work reveal a high prevalence of EIAV in the Pantanal area of Brazil demonstrating that equids reared in this region are at great risk of infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of dietary risk factors on the burden of non-communicable diseases in Ethiopia: findings from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013.

    PubMed

    Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Temesgen, Awoke Misganaw; Deribew, Amare; Tessema, Gizachew Assefa; Deribe, Kebede; Sahle, Berhe W; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Bekele, Tolesa; Lemma, Ferew; Amare, Azmeraw T; Seid, Oumer; Endris, Kedir; Hiruye, Abiy; Worku, Amare; Adams, Robert; Taylor, Anne W; Gill, Tiffany K; Shi, Zumin; Afshin, Ashkan; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H

    2016-12-16

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has increased in sub-Saharan countries, including Ethiopia. The contribution of dietary behaviours to the NCD burden in Ethiopia has not been evaluated. This study, therefore, aimed to assess diet-related burden of disease in Ethiopia between 1990 and 2013. We used the 2013 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) data to estimate deaths, years of life lost (YLLs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) related to eight food types, five nutrients and fibre intake. Dietary exposure was estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical meta-regression. The effect size of each diet-disease pair was obtained based on meta-analyses of prospective observational studies and randomized controlled trials. A comparative risk assessment approach was used to quantify the proportion of NCD burden associated with dietary risk factors. In 2013, dietary factors were responsible for 60,402 deaths (95% Uncertainty Interval [UI]: 44,943-74,898) in Ethiopia-almost a quarter (23.0%) of all NCD deaths. Nearly nine in every ten diet-related deaths (88.0%) were from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and 44.0% of all CVD deaths were related to poor diet. Suboptimal diet accounted for 1,353,407 DALYs (95% UI: 1,010,433-1,672,828) and 1,291,703 YLLs (95% UI: 961,915-1,599,985). Low intake of fruits and vegetables and high intake of sodium were the most important dietary factors. The proportion of NCD deaths associated with low fruit consumption slightly increased (11.3% in 1990 and 11.9% in 2013). In these years, the rate of burden of disease related to poor diet slightly decreased; however, their contribution to NCDs remained stable. Dietary behaviour contributes significantly to the NCD burden in Ethiopia. Intakes of diet low in fruits and vegetables and high in sodium are the leading dietary risks. To effectively mitigate the oncoming NCD burden in Ethiopia, multisectoral interventions are required; and nutrition policies and dietary guidelines should be

  10. Sickle cell anemia: intracranial stenosis and silent cerebral infarcts in children with low risk of stroke.

    PubMed

    Arkuszewski, Michal; Krejza, Jaroslaw; Chen, Rong; Ichord, Rebecca; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Bilello, Michel; Zimmerman, Robert; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Melhem, Elias R

    2014-03-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), who have mean blood flow velocities <170 cm/s in the terminal internal carotid (tICA) or middle cerebral (MCA) arteries on transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD), are considered to be at low risk of stroke. The prevalence of intracranial stenosis, which raises the risk of stroke, is not known in these children. Here, we estimated the prevalence of stenosis and explored its association with silent cerebral infarcts determined based on Magnetic Resonance (MR) scans. We studied prospectively a cohort of 67 children with SCA without prior clinically overt stroke or TIA (median age 8.8 years; range limits 2.3-13.1 years; 33 females) and with TCD mean velocity <170 cm/s. They underwent MR imaging of the brain and MR angiography of intracranial arteries. In 7 children (10.5%, 95% CI: 4.9-20.3%) we found 10 stenoses, including 4 with isolated left tICA stenosis and 3 with multiple stenoses. We found silent infarcts in 26 children (37.7%, 95% CI: 27.2-49.5%). The median number of infarcts in an affected child was 2 (range limits: 1-9), median volume of infarcts was 171 mm(3) (range limits: 7-1060 mm(3)), and median infarct volume in relation to total brain volume was 0.020% (range limits: 0.001-0.101%). The number and volume of infarcts were significantly higher in children with arterial stenosis (both p=0.023). The prevalence of intracranial arterial stenosis in children with SCA classified as at low risk of stroke by TCD mean velocity <170 cm/s is high. Children with stenosis are at higher risk of brain parenchymal injury as they have more silent cerebral infarcts. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Microcytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Shine, J W

    1997-05-15

    Because anemia is a condition rather than a disease, an underlying cause must be determined when anemia is identified. Microcytic anemia is a common category of anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of microcytic anemia and is also the most common anemia. The clinical presentation of anemia varies according to its severity. Anemias resulting from chronic disease and thalassemia are also relatively common types of microcytic anemia and should be differentiated from iron deficiency to avoid repeated unnecessary trials of iron therapy. Low serum ferritin is the best single laboratory parameter for the diagnosis of iron deficiency. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity and hemoglobin electrophoresis, if necessary, can help differentiate the type of microcytic anemia in patients with normal or elevated levels of serum ferritin. If the evaluation identifies iron deficiency as the type of anemia, the underlying cause must be investigated.

  12. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  13. The Australian Burden of Disease Study: measuring the loss of health from diseases, injuries and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mathers, C D; Vos, E T; Stevenson, C E; Begg, S J

    2000-06-19

    This is an overview of the first burden of disease and injury studies carried out in Australia. Methods developed for the World Bank and World Health Organization Global Burden of Disease Study were adapted and applied to Australian population health data. Depression was found to be the top-ranking cause of non-fatal disease burden in Australia, causing 8% of the total years lost due to disability in 1996. Mental disorders overall were responsible for nearly 30% of the non-fatal disease burden. The leading causes of total disease burden (disability-adjusted life years [DALYs]) were ischaemic heart disease and stroke, together causing nearly 18% of the total disease burden. Depression was the fourth leading cause of disease burden, accounting for 3.7% of the total burden. Of the 10 major risk factors to which the disease burden can be attributed, tobacco smoking causes an estimated 10% of the total disease burden in Australia, followed by physical inactivity (7%).

  14. Repeated participation in pancreatic cancer surveillance by high-risk individuals imposes low psychological burden.

    PubMed

    Konings, Ingrid C A W; Sidharta, Grace N; Harinck, Femme; Aalfs, Cora M; Poley, Jan-Werner; Kieffer, Jacobien M; Kuenen, Marianne A; Smets, Ellen M A; Wagner, Anja; van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Rens, Anja; Fockens, Paul; Bruno, Marco J; Bleiker, Eveline M A

    2016-08-01

    When assessing the feasibility of surveillance for pancreatic cancer (PC), it is important to address its psychological burden. The aim of this ongoing study is to evaluate the psychological burden of annual pancreatic surveillance for individuals at high risk to develop PC. This is a multicenter prospective study. High-risk individuals who undergo annual pancreatic surveillance with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) were invited to complete questionnaires to assess motivations for participating in surveillance, experiences with participation, perceived PC risk, topics of concern, and psychological distress. Questionnaires were sent after intake for participation (T1), after the first MRI and EUS (T2), and after the MRI and EUS 1 (T3), 2 (T4), and 3 years (T5) after first surveillance. In total, 140 out of 152 individuals returned one or more of the questionnaires (response 92%); 477 questionnaires were analyzed. The most frequently reported motivation for participating in surveillance was the possible early detection of (a precursor stage of) cancer (95-100%). Only a minority of respondents experienced MRI and EUS as uncomfortable (10% and 11%, respectively), and respondents dreaded their next EUS investigation less as surveillance progressed. Respondents' cancer worries decreased significantly over time, and both their anxiety and depression scores remained stable and low over the 3-year period of follow-up. The psychological burden of pancreatic surveillance is low at all assessments. Therefore, from a psychological point of view, participation of high-risk individuals in an annual pancreatic surveillance program is feasible.Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The Burden Attributable to Mental and Substance Use Disorders as Risk Factors for Suicide: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Alize J.; Norman, Rosana E.; Freedman, Greg; Baxter, Amanda J.; Pirkis, Jane E.; Harris, Meredith G.; Page, Andrew; Carnahan, Emily; Degenhardt, Louisa; Vos, Theo; Whiteford, Harvey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010) identified mental and substance use disorders as the 5th leading contributor of burden in 2010, measured by disability adjusted life years (DALYs). This estimate was incomplete as it excluded burden resulting from the increased risk of suicide captured elsewhere in GBD 2010's mutually exclusive list of diseases and injuries. Here, we estimate suicide DALYs attributable to mental and substance use disorders. Methods Relative-risk estimates of suicide due to mental and substance use disorders and the global prevalence of each disorder were used to estimate population attributable fractions. These were adjusted for global differences in the proportion of suicide due to mental and substance use disorders compared to other causes then multiplied by suicide DALYs reported in GBD 2010 to estimate attributable DALYs (with 95% uncertainty). Results Mental and substance use disorders were responsible for 22.5 million (14.8–29.8 million) of the 36.2 million (26.5–44.3 million) DALYs allocated to suicide in 2010. Depression was responsible for the largest proportion of suicide DALYs (46.1% (28.0%–60.8%)) and anorexia nervosa the lowest (0.2% (0.02%–0.5%)). DALYs occurred throughout the lifespan, with the largest proportion found in Eastern Europe and Asia, and males aged 20–30 years. The inclusion of attributable suicide DALYs would have increased the overall burden of mental and substance use disorders (assigned to them in GBD 2010 as a direct cause) from 7.4% (6.2%–8.6%) to 8.3% (7.1%–9.6%) of global DALYs, and would have changed the global ranking from 5th to 3rd leading cause of burden. Conclusions Capturing the suicide burden attributable to mental and substance use disorders allows for more accurate estimates of burden. More consideration needs to be given to interventions targeted to populations with, or at risk for, mental and substance use disorders as an effective strategy for suicide

  16. Contribution of Established Stroke Risk Factors to the Burden of Stroke in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Annette; Grittner, Ulrike; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Siegerink, Bob; Busch, Markus A

    2017-07-01

    As stroke in young adults is assumed to have different etiologies and risk factors than in older populations, the aim of this study was to examine the contribution of established potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factors to the burden of stroke in young adults. A German nationwide case-control study based on patients enrolled in the SIFAP1 study (Stroke In Young Fabry Patients) 2007 to 2010 and controls from the population-based GEDA study (German Health Update) 2009 to 2010 was performed. Cases were 2125 consecutive patients aged 18 to 55 years with acute first-ever stroke from 26 clinical stroke centers; controls (age- and sex-matched, n=8500, without previous stroke) were from a nationwide community sample. Adjusted population-attributable risks of 8 risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, smoking, heavy episodic alcohol consumption, low physical activity, and obesity) and their combinations for all stroke, ischemic stroke, and primary intracerebral hemorrhage were calculated. Low physical activity and hypertension were the most important risk factors, accounting for 59.7% (95% confidence interval, 56.3-63.2) and 27.1% (95% confidence interval, 23.6-30.6) of all strokes, respectively. All 8 risk factors combined explained 78.9% (95% confidence interval, 76.3-81.4) of all strokes. Population-attributable risks of all risk factors were similar for all ischemic stroke subtypes. Population-attributable risks of most risk factors were higher in older age groups and in men. Modifiable risk factors previously established in older populations also account for a large part of stroke in younger adults, with 4 risk factors explaining almost 80% of stroke risk. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00414583. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. The contribution of occupational risks to the global burden of disease: summary and next steps.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Marilyn; Nelson, Deborah Imel; Driscoll, T; Concha-Barrientos, Marisol; Steenland, Kyle; Punnett, Laura; Prüss-Ustün, Annette; Leigh, J; Corvalan, C; Eijkemans, G; Takala, J

    2006-01-01

    The Comparative Risk Assessment (CRA) project of the World Health Organization (WHO) assessed worldwide mortality and morbidity in the year 2000 resulting from exposures to selected occupational hazards. This article summarizes findings of the WHO CRA project, presents the estimates of the International Labor Organization (ILO) for total deaths due to workplace risks, and calls for action. Global burden estimates and counts of deaths assist ministers and other decision and policy makers to make informed decisions and to take action regarding risk reduction. The WHO CRA methodology combined the proportions of the population exposed to five occupational hazards (excluding numerous risks due to inadequate global data) with relative risk measures to estimate attributable fractions of the selected health outcomes for both morbidity and mortality. ILO estimates of total numbers of global work-related injury deaths apply national fatality rates to employment data for the particular country; for disease deaths ILO uses an attributable risk approach. In 2000, the selected occupational risk factors were responsible worldwide for 37% of back pain, 16% of hearing loss, 13% of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 11% of asthma, 8% of injuries, 9% of lung cancer and 2% of leukemia, and about 100% of pneumoconioses and mesothelioma. These selected risks at work resulted in the loss of about 24 million years of healthy life and caused 850,000 deaths worldwide, about 40% of the ILO estimate of 2.2 million total deaths. These global and regional analyses have identified areas where specific preventive actions are required.

  18. Anemia, fatigue and aging.

    PubMed

    Balducci, L

    2010-12-01

    Aging is associated with increased incidence and prevalence of both cancer and anemia. Cancer and aging may conspire in making anemia more frequent and more severe. This article reviews the causes and the consequences of anemia in the older individual. The most common causes include chronic inflammation that is a typical manifestation of aging, iron deficiency that may be due to chronic hemorrhage, malabsorption and Helicobacter pylori infection, cobalamin deficiency from malabsorption and renal insufficiency. Other causes of anemia whose prevalence is not well established include myelodysplasia, copper deficiency, hypothyroidism, and sarcopenia. Anemia is associated with increased risk of mortality, functional dependence, dementia, falls, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. When correcting the anemia of older cancer patients one should remember that the erythropoietic stimulating agents (ESA) may stimulate cancer growth and cause thrombosis. These products may be safe when given exclusively to patients receiving chemotherapy and when the hemoglobin levels are maintained below 12 g/dL.

  19. [Economic burden and economic risk of five major chronic diseases among Chinese urban residents].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Li-hua; Liu, Gordon

    2014-10-18

    To provide scientific evidence for medical insurance and health policies allocating the limited health resources in China. Based on the data of the national household survey by the State Council Pilot Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance Evaluation from Nov.2007 to Nov.2011, a two-step model and the human capital method were used to estimate the economic burden of five major chronic diseases among urban residents in China. According to the economic burden, the relative economic risk (relative risk, RR) and adjusted RR were calculated. The five chronic diseases were hypertension, cardiovascular, diabetes, arthritis or rheumatism and chronic lung diseases. More than 50% of the residents with these five chronic diseases were the over 65-year-old and retired. 90% of the residents with these five chronic diseases had medical insurance except the residents with chronic lung diseases. Average co-pay from the outpatient department and the pharmacy was more than 60%, and about 50% from the inpatient department. Annual total cost per capita was the highest 8 954.29 Yuan among the residents with cardiovascular disease and the second highest 8 914.36 Yuan among the residents with diabetes. The adjusted RR of the residents with cardiovascular and diabetes were greater than 1, respectively 1.36 and 1.15. The retired take up the largest percentage of population with chronic diseases, and the influence of the major five chronic diseases is more serious in north-west China. The main expenditure is from the outpatient department and the pharmacy, in which the availability of drugs reimbursed needs to be improved. The patients with cardiovascular and diabetes experience both higher economic burden and economic risk.

  20. Multiple-Micronutrient Fortified Non-Dairy Beverage Interventions Reduce the Risk of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in School-Aged Children in Low-Middle Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (i-iv).

    PubMed

    Aaron, Grant J; Dror, Daphna K; Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-05-21

    Multiple-micronutrient (MMN) fortification of beverages may be an effective option to deliver micronutrients to vulnerable populations. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the nutritional impacts of MMN fortified beverages in the context of low-middle income countries. A systematic search of published literature yielded 1022 citations, of which 10 randomized controlled trials (nine in school-aged children and one in pregnant women) met inclusion criteria. Results of school-aged children were included in the meta-analysis. Compared to iso-caloric controls, children who received MMN fortified beverages for 8 weeks to 6 months showed significant improvements in hemoglobin (+2.76 g/L, 95% CI [1.19, 4.33], p = 0.004; 8 studies) and serum ferritin (+15.42 pmol/L, [5.73, 25.12], p = 0.007; 8 studies); and reduced risk of anemia (RR 0.58 [0.29, 0.88], p = 0.005; 6 studies), iron deficiency (RR 0.34 [0.21, 0.55], p = 0.002; 7 studies), and iron deficiency anemia (RR 0.17 [0.06, 0.53], p = 0.02; 3 studies). MMN fortified beverage interventions could have major programmatic implications for reducing the burden of anemia and iron deficiency in school-aged children in low-middle income countries. Additional research is needed to investigate effects on other biochemical outcomes and population subgroups.

  1. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most people with a vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia lack intrinsic factor — a protein secreted by the stomach that is necessary for ...

  2. Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products--soil burden and risk to food safety.

    PubMed

    Suominen, K; Verta, M; Marttinen, S

    2014-09-01

    The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP+NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP+NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland. Copyright © 2014

  3. Estimation of the Disease Burden Attributable to 11 Risk Factors in Hubei Province, China: A Comparative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fangfang; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Chuanhua; Hu, Songbo; Zhang, Yunquan

    2016-01-01

    In order to estimate the health losses caused by common risk factors in the Hubei province, China, we calculated the deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to 11 risk factors. We estimated the exposure distributions of risk factors in Hubei Province in 2013 from the monitoring system on chronic disease and related risk factors, combined with relative risk (RR) in order to calculate the population attributable fraction. Deaths and DALYs attributed to the selected risk factors were then estimated together with cause-specific deaths and DALYs. In total, 53.39% of the total deaths and 36.23% of the total DALYs in Hubei were a result of the 11 selected risk factors. The top five risk factors were high blood pressure, smoking, high body mass index, diet low in fruits and alcohol use, accounting for 14.68%, 12.57%, 6.03%, 3.90% and 3.19% of total deaths, respectively, and 9.41%, 7.22%, 4.42%, 2.51% and 2.44% of total DALYs, respectively. These risk factors, especially high blood pressure, smoking and high body mass index, significantly influenced quality of life, causing a large number of deaths and DALYs. The burden of chronic disease could be substantially reduced if these risk factors were effectively controlled, which would allow people to enjoy healthier lives. PMID:27669279

  4. Adult informal caregivers reporting financial burden in Hawaii, Kansas, and Washington: Results from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Claudia T; Bouldin, Erin D; Anderson, Lynda A; McGuire, Lisa C; Salvail, Florentina R; Simmons, Katrina Wynkoop; Andresen, Elena M

    2011-10-01

    Given the unpaid nature of the work, informal caregiving can create a financial burden for caregivers. Little has been done to identify specific predictors of experiencing financial burden. This study investigated demographic and health factors comparing caregivers who reported having or not having financial burden. Data are derived from adult caregivers (N = 3,317) as part of the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in Hawaii, Kansas, and Washington. The adjusted odds ratios for reporting a financial burden were estimated for demographic and other risk factors. Caregivers who reported a financial burden were younger, had lower incomes, were more likely to be current smokers, have had a stroke, and rate their health as fair or poor compared to caregivers who did not report a financial burden. Caregivers who were younger (ages 18-34), resided with care recipients, spent 20-39 hours per week providing care, and reported having a disability were at a statistically significantly higher odds of reporting a financial burden. Given the current economic difficulties faced by many Americans, further insights into the perceived financial burdens experienced by informal caregivers as well as linkages to policy and programs designed to support caregivers are critical for public health professionals to address the expanding needs in states and communities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The Influence of Cardiac Risk Factor Burden on Cardiac Stress Test Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schrock, Jon W; Li, Morgan; Orazulike, Chidubem; Emerman, Charles L

    2011-06-01

    Chest pain is the most common admission diagnosis for observation unit patients. These patients often undergo cardiac stress testing to further risk stratify for coronary artery disease (CAD). The decision of whom to stress is currently based on clinical judgment. We sought to determine the influence of cardiac risk factor burden on cardiac stress test outcome for patients tested from an observation unit, inpatient or outpatient setting. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study for all patients undergoing stress testing in our institution from June 2006 through July 2007. Cardiac risk factors were collected at the time of stress testing. Risk factors were evaluated in a summative fashion using multivariate regression adjusting for age and known coronary artery disease. The model was tested for goodness of fit and collinearity and the c statistic was calculated using the receiver operating curve. A total of 4026 subjects were included for analysis of which 22% had known CAD. The rates of positive outcome were 89 (12.0%), 95 (12.6%), and 343 (16.9%) for the OU, outpatients, and hospitalized patients respectively. While the odds of a positive test outcome increased for additional cardiac risk factors, ROC curve analysis indicates that simply adding the number of risk factors does not add significant diagnostic value. Hospitalized patients were more likely to have a positive stress test, OR 1.41 (1.10 - 1.81). Our study does not support basing the decision to perform a stress test on the number of cardiac risk factors.

  6. Risk factor analysis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wen, Yu-Chuan; Huang, I-Anne; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Tsay, Pei-Kwei

    2016-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a clinically relevant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Currently, there is no established consensus regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Whether AIHA contributes to increased mortality is still somewhat controversial.We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of post-transplant AIHA in 265 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 17-year period. Onset of AIHA was calculated from the first documented detection of AIHA by either clinical symptoms or positive direct agglutinin test. Resolution of AIHA was defined as normalization of hemoglobin and biochemical markers of hemolysis with sustained transfusion independence.We identified 15 cases of AIHA after allo-HSCT (incidence rate, 6%). Ten (67%) of these patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test. Data were obtained for 9 boys and 6 girls after a median follow-up of 53 months (range 4-102). The median age was 5.1 years (range 0.5-15.4) at the time of HSCT and the median time to emergence was 149 days (range 42-273). No significant risk factor for post-transplant AIHA has emerged from our data to date. In the majority (14 of 15; 93%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with 12 of 15 (80%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. No splenectomy was performed in any of our patients.For various reasons, post-transplantation AIHA poses an extraordinary challenge to transplant physicians. Despite the advancements in diagnostic tools, therapeutic challenges remain due to the myriad interacting pathways in AIHA.

  7. Risk factor analysis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Wen, Yu-Chuan; Huang, I-Anne; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Tsay, Pei-Kwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a clinically relevant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Currently, there is no established consensus regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Whether AIHA contributes to increased mortality is still somewhat controversial. We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of post-transplant AIHA in 265 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing allo-HSCT over a 17-year period. Onset of AIHA was calculated from the first documented detection of AIHA by either clinical symptoms or positive direct agglutinin test. Resolution of AIHA was defined as normalization of hemoglobin and biochemical markers of hemolysis with sustained transfusion independence. We identified 15 cases of AIHA after allo-HSCT (incidence rate, 6%). Ten (67%) of these patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test. Data were obtained for 9 boys and 6 girls after a median follow-up of 53 months (range 4–102). The median age was 5.1 years (range 0.5–15.4) at the time of HSCT and the median time to emergence was 149 days (range 42–273). No significant risk factor for post-transplant AIHA has emerged from our data to date. In the majority (14 of 15; 93%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with 12 of 15 (80%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. No splenectomy was performed in any of our patients. For various reasons, post-transplantation AIHA poses an extraordinary challenge to transplant physicians. Despite the advancements in diagnostic tools, therapeutic challenges remain due to the myriad interacting pathways in AIHA. PMID:27861376

  8. Could Testosterone Replacement Therapy in Hypogonadal Men Ameliorate Anemia, a Cardiovascular Risk Factor? An Observational, 54-Week Cumulative Registry Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Tao; Shin, Yu Seob; Kim, Ji Yong; Park, Jong Kwan

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated if testosterone undecanoate attenuates anemia and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with hypogonadism. A registry study consisted of 58 participants with a subnormal total testosterone level (less than 2.35 ng/ml) and at least mild symptoms of testosterone deficiency. All patients received an injection of 1,000 mg testosterone undecanoate at the initial visit, followed by injection at 6, 18, 30, 42 and 54 weeks. Serum hormones, hemoglobin, hematocrit, anemia risk factors, lipid profiles, whole blood viscosity and anthropometry were measured. Total testosterone (from mean ± SD 1.87 ± 1.09 to 5.52 ± 1.92 ng/ml, p <0.001) and free testosterone (from 3.04 ± 2.03 to 7.23 ± 2.90 pg/ml, p <0.001) were restored by testosterone undecanoate therapy. Hemoglobin and hematocrit significantly increased after testosterone undecanoate therapy by an average of 2.46 gm/dl (p <0.001) and 3.03% (p <0.001), respectively. The prevalence of anemia (from 29.6% to 10.0%) significantly decreased (p <0.001) and patients with anemia showed a significant increase in erythropoietin after testosterone undecanoate therapy (p = 0.047). A reduction in total cholesterol (from 165.89 ± 39.16 to 153.80 ± 154.27 mg/dl, p = 0.002), increased whole blood viscosity and increased hematocrit were observed until 54 weeks compared with baseline. However, whole blood viscosity and hematocrit stabilized after 18 weeks. After 54 weeks testosterone undecanoate decreased the prevalence of anemia and components of the metabolic syndrome. A longer duration of testosterone undecanoate therapy of more than 18 weeks may be effective and safe in reducing blood viscosity and improving anemia. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of the risk of foodborne transmission and burden of hepatitis E in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexandra; Collineau, Lucie; Stephan, Roger; Müller, Andrea; Stärk, Katharina D C

    2017-02-02

    The objective of this study was i) to quantify the risk of hepatitis E for Swiss consumers by specified pork products and ii) to estimate the total burden of human food-borne hepatitis E in Switzerland. A quantitative risk assessment from slaughter to consumption was carried out according to the Codex Alimentarius framework. In the hazard characterization, assumptions were made due to the lack of a dose-response relationship for oral exposure to hepatitis E virus (HEV). The prevalence of HEV in 160 pig livers of 40 different Swiss fattening farms was examined and determined to be 1.3% (CI 0.3%; 4.4%). This result was used as input in the risk assessment model, together with data from other published studies. The annual burden of hepatitis E was estimated in terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY), using data about hepatitis E cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 at two major hospitals located in the canton Ticino. Only the risk of foodborne hepatitis E from products containing pork liver was evaluated, as those containing only pork meat could not be evaluated because of lack of data on HEV load in pork. Assuming that successful oral infection occurs in 1% of servings contaminated with high HEV loads (>10(5) genome copies), and that acute illness develops in 5% of susceptible consumers, the most likely annual number of foodborne hepatitis E cases in Switzerland was estimated to be 1481 (95% CI 552; 4488) if all products containing pork liver were considered. If only high-risk products, such as plain pork liver and liver sausages (e.g. Saucisse au Foie), were considered, the annual number of cases was estimated to be 176 (95% CI 64; 498). We were unable to calculate the total burden of hepatitis E in Switzerland due to lack of data. Yet, for the canton Ticino, it was shown that a significant increase had occurred from <5 DALY per 100,000 inhabitants before 2012 to >50 DALY per 100,000 inhabitants in 2015. This change could partly be due to an increased

  10. Burden and risk factors of ambulatory or hospitalized CAP: A population based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kolditz, Martin; Tesch, Falko; Mocke, Luise; Höffken, Gert; Ewig, Santiago; Schmitt, Jochen

    2016-12-01

    Data on incidence, risk factors and outcome of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) including outpatients is sparse. We conducted a cohort study on 1.837.080 adults insured by a German statutory health insurance in 2010-2011. CAP was identified via ICD-10-GM codes, ambulatory cases were validated by antibiotic prescription within 7 days. Primary outcomes were incidence, hospitalisation and 30-day all-cause mortality. Evaluated risk factors included age, sex and comorbidities. Evaluation was done by multivariate regression analysis adjusting for these factors and health care utilization. CAP incidence was 9.7 per 1000 person years, hospitalisation rate 46.5%, and 30-day mortality 12.9%. 30-day mortality of ambulatory cases was 5% (with 27% subsequently hospitalized for another diagnosis before death). 30-day mortality of hospitalized patients was 21.9%, but in-hospital mortality 17.2%. Risk factors for CAP included age, male sex and all evaluated comorbidities with highest risk for neurologic (OR 2.4), lung (OR 2.3) or immunosuppressive (OR 2.1) disease. Mortality risk was highest for neurologic (OR 2.3) and malignant (OR 2.0) disease. CAP constitutes a major burden in terms of incidence, morbidity and all-cause mortality in hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Interventions to raise awareness for disease impact also in ambulatory patients with risk factors are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Construction of an Exome-Wide Risk Score for Schizophrenia Based on a Weighted Burden Test.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2017-09-11

    Polygenic risk scores obtained as a weighted sum of associated variants can be used to explore association in additional data sets and to assign risk scores to individuals. The methods used to derive polygenic risk scores from common SNPs are not suitable for variants detected in whole exome sequencing studies. Rare variants, which may have major effects, are seen too infrequently to judge whether they are associated and may not be shared between training and test subjects. A method is proposed whereby variants are weighted according to their frequency, their annotations and the genes they affect. A weighted sum across all variants provides an individual risk score. Scores constructed in this way are used in a weighted burden test and are shown to be significantly different between schizophrenia cases and controls using a five-way cross-validation procedure. This approach represents a first attempt to summarise exome sequence variation into a summary risk score, which could be combined with risk scores from common variants and from environmental factors. It is hoped that the method could be developed further. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  12. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  13. A comparative risk assessment of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990–2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Stephen S; Vos, Theo; Flaxman, Abraham D; Danaei, Goodarz; Shibuya, Kenji; Adair-Rohani, Heather; Amann, Markus; Anderson, H Ross; Andrews, Kathryn G; Aryee, Martin; Atkinson, Charles; Bacchus, Loraine J; Bahalim, Adil N; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Balmes, John; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Baxter, Amanda; Bell, Michelle L; Blore, Jed D; Blyth, Fiona; Bonner, Carissa; Borges, Guilherme; Bourne, Rupert; Boussinesq, Michel; Brauer, Michael; Brooks, Peter; Bruce, Nigel G; Brunekreef, Bert; Bryan-Hancock, Claire; Bucello, Chiara; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Bull, Fiona; Burnett, Richard T; Byers, Tim E; Calabria, Bianca; Carapetis, Jonathan; Carnahan, Emily; Chafe, Zoe; Charlson, Fiona; Chen, Honglei; Chen, Jian Shen; Cheng, Andrew Tai-Ann; Child, Jennifer Christine; Cohen, Aaron; Colson, K Ellicott; Cowie, Benjamin C; Darby, Sarah; Darling, Susan; Davis, Adrian; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dentener, Frank; Des Jarlais, Don C; Devries, Karen; Dherani, Mukesh; Ding, Eric L; Dorsey, E Ray; Driscoll, Tim; Edmond, Karen; Ali, Suad Eltahir; Engell, Rebecca E; Erwin, Patricia J; Fahimi, Saman; Falder, Gail; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ferrari, Alize; Finucane, Mariel M; Flaxman, Seth; Fowkes, Francis Gerry R; Freedman, Greg; Freeman, Michael K; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Ghosh, Santu; Giovannucci, Edward; Gmel, Gerhard; Graham, Kathryn; Grainger, Rebecca; Grant, Bridget; Gunnell, David; Gutierrez, Hialy R; Hall, Wayne; Hoek, Hans W; Hogan, Anthony; Hosgood, H Dean; Hoy, Damian; Hu, Howard; Hubbell, Bryan J; Hutchings, Sally J; Ibeanusi, Sydney E; Jacklyn, Gemma L; Jasrasaria, Rashmi; Jonas, Jost B; Kan, Haidong; Kanis, John A; Kassebaum, Nicholas; Kawakami, Norito; Khang, Young-Ho; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Khoo, Jon-Paul; Kok, Cindy; Laden, Francine; Lalloo, Ratilal; Lan, Qing; Lathlean, Tim; Leasher, Janet L; Leigh, James; Li, Yang; Lin, John Kent; Lipshultz, Steven E; London, Stephanie; Lozano, Rafael; Lu, Yuan; Mak, Joelle; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mallinger, Leslie; Marcenes, Wagner; March, Lyn; Marks, Robin; Martin, Randall; McGale, Paul; McGrath, John; Mehta, Sumi; Mensah, George A; Merriman, Tony R; Micha, Renata; Michaud, Catherine; Mishra, Vinod; Hanafiah, Khayriyyah Mohd; Mokdad, Ali A; Morawska, Lidia; Mozaff arian, Dariush; Murphy, Tasha; Naghavi, Mohsen; Neal, Bruce; Nelson, Paul K; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Norman, Rosana; Olives, Casey; Omer, Saad B; Orchard, Jessica; Osborne, Richard; Ostro, Bart; Page, Andrew; Pandey, Kiran D; Parry, Charles D H; Passmore, Erin; Patra, Jayadeep; Pearce, Neil; Pelizzari, Pamela M; Petzold, Max; Phillips, Michael R; Pope, Dan; Pope III, C Arden; Powles, John; Rao, Mayuree; Razavi, Homie; Rehfuess, Eva A; Rehm, Jürgen T; Ritz, Beate; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Thomas; Robinson, Carolyn; Rodriguez-Portales, Jose A; Romieu, Isabelle; Room, Robin; Rosenfeld, Lisa C; Roy, Ananya; Rushton, Lesley; Salomon, Joshua A; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Sanchez-Riera, Lidia; Sanman, Ella; Sapkota, Amir; Seedat, Soraya; Shi, Peilin; Shield, Kevin; Shivakoti, Rupak; Singh, Gitanjali M; Sleet, David A; Smith, Emma; Smith, Kirk R; Stapelberg, Nicolas J C; Steenland, Kyle; Stöckl, Heidi; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Straif, Kurt; Straney, Lahn; Thurston, George D; Tran, Jimmy H; Van Dingenen, Rita; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Veerman, J Lennert; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Weintraub, Robert; Weissman, Myrna M; White, Richard A; Whiteford, Harvey; Wiersma, Steven T; Wilkinson, James D; Williams, Hywel C; Williams, Warwick; Wilson, Nicholas; Woolf, Anthony D; Yip, Paul; Zielinski, Jan M; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher J L; Ezzati, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Quantification of the disease burden caused by different risks informs prevention by providing an account of health loss different to that provided by a disease-by-disease analysis. No complete revision of global disease burden caused by risk factors has been done since a comparative risk assessment in 2000, and no previous analysis has assessed changes in burden attributable to risk factors over time. Methods We estimated deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs; sum of years lived with disability [YLD] and years of life lost [YLL]) attributable to the independent effects of 67 risk factors and clusters of risk factors for 21 regions in 1990 and 2010. We estimated exposure distributions for each year, region, sex, and age group, and relative risks per unit of exposure by systematically reviewing and synthesising published and unpublished data. We used these estimates, together with estimates of cause-specific deaths and DALYs from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, to calculate the burden attributable to each risk factor exposure compared with the theoretical-minimum-risk exposure. We incorporated uncertainty in disease burden, relative risks, and exposures into our estimates of attributable burden. Findings In 2010, the three leading risk factors for global disease burden were high blood pressure (7·0% [95% uncertainty interval 6·2–7·7] of global DALYs), tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke (6·3% [5·5–7·0]), and alcohol use (5·5% [5·0–5·9]). In 1990, the leading risks were childhood underweight (7·9% [6·8–9·4]), household air pollution from solid fuels (HAP; 7·0% [5·6–8·3]), and tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke (6·1% [5·4–6·8]). Dietary risk factors and physical inactivity collectively accounted for 10·0% (95% UI 9·2–10·8) of global DALYs in 2010, with the most prominent dietary risks being diets low in fruits and those high in sodium. Several risks that primarily affect

  14. A comparative risk assessment of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    PubMed

    Lim, Stephen S; Vos, Theo; Flaxman, Abraham D; Danaei, Goodarz; Shibuya, Kenji; Adair-Rohani, Heather; Amann, Markus; Anderson, H Ross; Andrews, Kathryn G; Aryee, Martin; Atkinson, Charles; Bacchus, Loraine J; Bahalim, Adil N; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Balmes, John; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Baxter, Amanda; Bell, Michelle L; Blore, Jed D; Blyth, Fiona; Bonner, Carissa; Borges, Guilherme; Bourne, Rupert; Boussinesq, Michel; Brauer, Michael; Brooks, Peter; Bruce, Nigel G; Brunekreef, Bert; Bryan-Hancock, Claire; Bucello, Chiara; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Bull, Fiona; Burnett, Richard T; Byers, Tim E; Calabria, Bianca; Carapetis, Jonathan; Carnahan, Emily; Chafe, Zoe; Charlson, Fiona; Chen, Honglei; Chen, Jian Shen; Cheng, Andrew Tai-Ann; Child, Jennifer Christine; Cohen, Aaron; Colson, K Ellicott; Cowie, Benjamin C; Darby, Sarah; Darling, Susan; Davis, Adrian; Degenhardt, Louisa; Dentener, Frank; Des Jarlais, Don C; Devries, Karen; Dherani, Mukesh; Ding, Eric L; Dorsey, E Ray; Driscoll, Tim; Edmond, Karen; Ali, Suad Eltahir; Engell, Rebecca E; Erwin, Patricia J; Fahimi, Saman; Falder, Gail; Farzadfar, Farshad; Ferrari, Alize; Finucane, Mariel M; Flaxman, Seth; Fowkes, Francis Gerry R; Freedman, Greg; Freeman, Michael K; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Ghosh, Santu; Giovannucci, Edward; Gmel, Gerhard; Graham, Kathryn; Grainger, Rebecca; Grant, Bridget; Gunnell, David; Gutierrez, Hialy R; Hall, Wayne; Hoek, Hans W; Hogan, Anthony; Hosgood, H Dean; Hoy, Damian; Hu, Howard; Hubbell, Bryan J; Hutchings, Sally J; Ibeanusi, Sydney E; Jacklyn, Gemma L; Jasrasaria, Rashmi; Jonas, Jost B; Kan, Haidong; Kanis, John A; Kassebaum, Nicholas; Kawakami, Norito; Khang, Young-Ho; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Khoo, Jon-Paul; Kok, Cindy; Laden, Francine; Lalloo, Ratilal; Lan, Qing; Lathlean, Tim; Leasher, Janet L; Leigh, James; Li, Yang; Lin, John Kent; Lipshultz, Steven E; London, Stephanie; Lozano, Rafael; Lu, Yuan; Mak, Joelle; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mallinger, Leslie; Marcenes, Wagner; March, Lyn; Marks, Robin; Martin, Randall; McGale, Paul; McGrath, John; Mehta, Sumi; Mensah, George A; Merriman, Tony R; Micha, Renata; Michaud, Catherine; Mishra, Vinod; Mohd Hanafiah, Khayriyyah; Mokdad, Ali A; Morawska, Lidia; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Murphy, Tasha; Naghavi, Mohsen; Neal, Bruce; Nelson, Paul K; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Norman, Rosana; Olives, Casey; Omer, Saad B; Orchard, Jessica; Osborne, Richard; Ostro, Bart; Page, Andrew; Pandey, Kiran D; Parry, Charles D H; Passmore, Erin; Patra, Jayadeep; Pearce, Neil; Pelizzari, Pamela M; Petzold, Max; Phillips, Michael R; Pope, Dan; Pope, C Arden; Powles, John; Rao, Mayuree; Razavi, Homie; Rehfuess, Eva A; Rehm, Jürgen T; Ritz, Beate; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Thomas; Robinson, Carolyn; Rodriguez-Portales, Jose A; Romieu, Isabelle; Room, Robin; Rosenfeld, Lisa C; Roy, Ananya; Rushton, Lesley; Salomon, Joshua A; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Sanchez-Riera, Lidia; Sanman, Ella; Sapkota, Amir; Seedat, Soraya; Shi, Peilin; Shield, Kevin; Shivakoti, Rupak; Singh, Gitanjali M; Sleet, David A; Smith, Emma; Smith, Kirk R; Stapelberg, Nicolas J C; Steenland, Kyle; Stöckl, Heidi; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Straif, Kurt; Straney, Lahn; Thurston, George D; Tran, Jimmy H; Van Dingenen, Rita; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Veerman, J Lennert; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Weintraub, Robert; Weissman, Myrna M; White, Richard A; Whiteford, Harvey; Wiersma, Steven T; Wilkinson, James D; Williams, Hywel C; Williams, Warwick; Wilson, Nicholas; Woolf, Anthony D; Yip, Paul; Zielinski, Jan M; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher J L; Ezzati, Majid; AlMazroa, Mohammad A; Memish, Ziad A

    2012-12-15

    Quantification of the disease burden caused by different risks informs prevention by providing an account of health loss different to that provided by a disease-by-disease analysis. No complete revision of global disease burden caused by risk factors has been done since a comparative risk assessment in 2000, and no previous analysis has assessed changes in burden attributable to risk factors over time. We estimated deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs; sum of years lived with disability [YLD] and years of life lost [YLL]) attributable to the independent effects of 67 risk factors and clusters of risk factors for 21 regions in 1990 and 2010. We estimated exposure distributions for each year, region, sex, and age group, and relative risks per unit of exposure by systematically reviewing and synthesising published and unpublished data. We used these estimates, together with estimates of cause-specific deaths and DALYs from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010, to calculate the burden attributable to each risk factor exposure compared with the theoretical-minimum-risk exposure. We incorporated uncertainty in disease burden, relative risks, and exposures into our estimates of attributable burden. In 2010, the three leading risk factors for global disease burden were high blood pressure (7·0% [95% uncertainty interval 6·2-7·7] of global DALYs), tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke (6·3% [5·5-7·0]), and alcohol use (5·5% [5·0-5·9]). In 1990, the leading risks were childhood underweight (7·9% [6·8-9·4]), household air pollution from solid fuels (HAP; 7·0% [5·6-8·3]), and tobacco smoking including second-hand smoke (6·1% [5·4-6·8]). Dietary risk factors and physical inactivity collectively accounted for 10·0% (95% UI 9·2-10·8) of global DALYs in 2010, with the most prominent dietary risks being diets low in fruits and those high in sodium. Several risks that primarily affect childhood communicable diseases, including unimproved

  15. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shanti; Dunlap, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF), and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether anemia is merely a marker of poor prognosis or whether anemia itself confers risk. The pathogenesis of anemia in HF is multifactorial. Iron deficiency also confers risk in HF, either with or without associated anemia, and treatment of iron deficiency improves the functional status of patients with HF. An ongoing large clinical trial studying the use of darbepoetin-alfa in patients with anemia and systolic HF is expected to provide information that should improve our understanding of anemia in HF.

  16. [Refractory anemias].

    PubMed

    Efira, A; Azerad, M-A

    2013-09-01

    Refractory anemia, also known as myelodysplastic syndromes, forms a group of clonal diseases characterized by cytopenias with mostly rich bone marrow. Preferentially reaching an older population, the prognosis depends on both comorbidities and characteristics of the disease, which have been grouped into a score established in 1997 ("IPSS = International Prognostic Scoring System") and revised in 2012 ("R-IPSS = Revised IPSS"). Overall survival and risk of transformation into acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia can now be estimated fairly accurately. Based on these characteristics, the treatment will be mainly supportive or will use several new molecules: growth factors, lenalidomide, 5-azacitidine, etc. A minority of patients may also benefit from allogeneic BMT or sometimes immunosuppressive therapy.

  17. Cardiovascular risk factors are associated with increased lesion burden and brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kappus, Natalie; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Hagemeier, Jesper; Kennedy, Cheryl; Melia, Rebecca; Carl, Ellen; Ramasamy, Deepa P; Cherneva, Mariya; Durfee, Jacqueline; Bergsland, Niels; Dwyer, Michael G; Kolb, Channa; Hojnacki, David; Ramanathan, Murali; Zivadinov, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk factors have been associated with changes in clinical outcomes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the frequency of CV risks in patients with MS and their association with MRI outcomes. In a prospective study, 326 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 163 patients with progressive MS, 61 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and 175 healthy controls (HCs) were screened for CV risks and scanned on a 3T MRI scanner. Examined CV risks included hypertension, heart disease, smoking, overweight/obesity and type 1 diabetes. MRI measures assessed lesion volumes (LVs) and brain atrophy. Association between individual or multiple CV risks and MRI outcomes was examined adjusting for age, sex, race, disease duration and treatment status. Patients with MS showed increased frequency of smoking (51.7% vs 36.5%, p = 0.001) and hypertension (33.9% vs 24.7%, p=0.035) compared with HCs. In total, 49.9% of patients with MS and 36% of HCs showed ≥ 2 CV risks (p = 0.003), while the frequency of ≥ 3 CV risks was 18.8% in the MS group and 8.6% in the HCs group (p = 0.002). In patients with MS, hypertension and heart disease were associated with decreased grey matter (GM) and cortical volumes (p < 0.05), while overweight/obesity was associated with increased T1-LV (p < 0.39) and smoking with decreased whole brain volume (p = 0.049). Increased lateral ventricle volume was associated with heart disease (p = 0.029) in CIS. Patients with MS with one or more CV risks showed increased lesion burden and more advanced brain atrophy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Treatment of anemia in heart failure: potential risks and benefits of intravenous iron therapy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Katz, Stuart D

    2010-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is common in patients with heart failure (HF), but the optimum diagnostic tests to detect iron deficiency and the treatment options to replete iron have not been fully characterized. Recent studies in patients with HF indicate that intravenous iron can rapidly replenish iron stores in patients having iron-deficiency anemia, with resultant increased hemoglobin levels and improved functional capacity. Preliminary data from a subgroup analysis also suggest that supplemental intravenous iron therapy can improve functional capacity even in those subjects without anemia. The mechanisms responsible for this observation are not fully characterized, but may be related to beneficial effects of iron supplementation on mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. The long-term safety of using intravenous iron supplementation in HF populations is not known. Iron is a known pro-oxidant factor that can inhibit nitric oxide signaling and irreversibly injury cells. Increased iron stores are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of coronary heart disease events. Additional clinical trials are needed to more fully characterize the therapeutic potential and safety of intravenous iron in HF patients.

  19. Treatment of Anemia in Heart Failure: Potential Risks and Benefits of Intravenous Iron Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Katz, Stuart D.

    2010-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is common is patients with heart failure (HF), but the optimum diagnostic tests to detect iron deficiency and the treatment options to replete iron have not been fully characterized. Recent studies in patients with HF indicate that intravenous iron can rapidly replenish iron stores in patients having iron-deficiency anemia, with resultant increased hemoglobin levels and improved functional capacity. Preliminary data from a sub-group analysis also suggests that supplemental intravenous iron therapy can improve functional capacity even in those subjects without anemia. The mechanisms responsible for this observation are not fully characterized, but may be related to beneficial effects of iron supplementation on mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. The long-term safety of using intravenous iron supplementation in HF populations is not known. Iron is a known pro-oxidant factor that can inhibit nitric oxide signaling and irreversibly injury cells. Increased iron stores are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of coronary heart disease events. Additional clinical trials are needed to more fully characterize the therapeutic potential and safety of intravenous iron in HF patients. PMID:20699672

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia as a risk factor of poor outcome in patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Aniko; Molnar, Miklos Zsolt; Krenacs, Laszlo; Bagdi, Eniko; Csomor, Judit; Matolcsy, Andras; Demeter, Judit

    2009-12-01

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a rare disease, accounting for 1% of all lymphomas. We reviewed our single center experience of 13 patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL). Based on the prognostic model developed by Intergruppo Italiano Linfomi, 31% (4/13) of our patients had good, 38% (5/13) had intermediate and 31% (4/13) had a poor prognosis. The presence of two out of three prognostic factors (anemia, elevated LDH, low serum albumin) assignes the patient into the high risk category. In patients with anemia and an elevated LDH due to hemolysis, the outcome seems to be especially poor. Three out of 13 (23%) cases were complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia. All patients with autoimmune hemolytic anaemia (AIHA) died 7-28 months after the diagnosis. The mean follow-up time of those nine patients who are still alive is longer than 5 years (36-100 months). Patients with AIHA had significantly (p < 0.001) worse survival than those without AIHA. The main finding of our study is that the presence of AIHA is an adverse prognostic factor in SMZL.

  1. Non-communicable diseases in Mozambique: risk factors, burden, response and outcomes to date

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mozambique is located on the East Coast of Africa bordering South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and Tanzania and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Currently NCDs account for 28% of deaths in Mozambique. Risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use and poor diet are present in both urban and rural settings. Diseases such as hypertension and diabetes affect large proportions of the population, but people are often unaware of their condition or poorly managed. Data from studies on diabetes highlight the financial burden for NCD management in Mozambique for both the individual and health system. The National Strategic Plan for the prevention and control of NCDs in Mozambique has as its aim to create a positive environment to minimise or eliminate the exposure to risk factors and guarantee access to care. The plan has as its overall objective to reduce exposure to risk factors and morbidity and mortality due to NCDs and has 4 areas of intervention: 1) Prevention and health education with regards to NCDs; 2) Access to quality care, treatment and follow-up; 3) Prevention of disability and premature mortality and 4) Surveillance, research, monitoring and evaluation and advocacy for NCDs. The Ministry of Health developed projects for diabetes and hypertension and used these as key lessons that could then be applied to other NCDs. Mozambique, through political commitment from the Ministry of Health and the dedication of local champions, has been able to garner international support to improve care for people with diabetes and then use this to develop its National Plan for NCDs. Despite this increase in attention resources available do not match the challenge of NCDs in Mozambique. Mozambique’s experience provides a practical example of actions that can be undertaken in a resource poor country to tackle the emerging burden of NCDs. PMID:23171496

  2. Non-communicable diseases in Mozambique: risk factors, burden, response and outcomes to date.

    PubMed

    Silva-Matos, Carla; Beran, David

    2012-11-21

    Mozambique is located on the East Coast of Africa bordering South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and Tanzania and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Currently NCDs account for 28% of deaths in Mozambique. Risk factors such as tobacco and alcohol use and poor diet are present in both urban and rural settings. Diseases such as hypertension and diabetes affect large proportions of the population, but people are often unaware of their condition or poorly managed. Data from studies on diabetes highlight the financial burden for NCD management in Mozambique for both the individual and health system. The National Strategic Plan for the prevention and control of NCDs in Mozambique has as its aim to create a positive environment to minimise or eliminate the exposure to risk factors and guarantee access to care. The plan has as its overall objective to reduce exposure to risk factors and morbidity and mortality due to NCDs and has 4 areas of intervention: 1) Prevention and health education with regards to NCDs; 2) Access to quality care, treatment and follow-up; 3) Prevention of disability and premature mortality and 4) Surveillance, research, monitoring and evaluation and advocacy for NCDs. The Ministry of Health developed projects for diabetes and hypertension and used these as key lessons that could then be applied to other NCDs. Mozambique, through political commitment from the Ministry of Health and the dedication of local champions, has been able to garner international support to improve care for people with diabetes and then use this to develop its National Plan for NCDs. Despite this increase in attention resources available do not match the challenge of NCDs in Mozambique. Mozambique's experience provides a practical example of actions that can be undertaken in a resource poor country to tackle the emerging burden of NCDs.

  3. Triple Burden of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Indian Tribes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-cultural transitions among individuals from vulnerable groups introduce epidemiological transition, with a concomitant increase in the prevalence of undernutrition, obesity, and cardiovascular disease risks. An accepted conventional wisdom exists for Indian tribes that they are undernourished and away from lifestyle-related diseases. However, the extent of this triple burden affecting them is unknown. In this study, we assessed this triple burden among the 9 major tribes of India. Methods and Findings During January 2011 to December 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study among 1066 men and 1090 women constituting a total of 2156 adults belonging to the 9 major tribal groups: Santals, Oraons, and Koras (West Bengal); Santals, Bhumijs, and Bathudis (Odisha); and Dhodias, Kuknas, and Chaudharis (Gujarat) to estimate the prevalence of the triple burden (undernutrition, overweight or obesity, and hypertension). A high prevalence of undernutrition and hypertension was observed among the Koras (51.9%and 10.6%, respectively), Bathudis (51.3% and 12.1%, respectively), and Oraons (49.6% and 16.5%, respectively). However, the prevalence of overweight and hypertension among the Bhumijs (17.7% and 14.7%, respectively), Dhodias (23.8% and 12.9%, respectively), Kuknas (15.8% and 11.3%, respectively), and Santals of West Bengal (12.2% and 11.8%, respectively) and Odisha (15% and 9.6%, respectively) was most alarming. The prevalence of overweight or obesity among the women was 10.9% and 1.5%, respectively, with 14.0% hypertensive women. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among the men was 14.8% and 1.7%, respectively, with 9.2% hypertensive men. Undernutrition was highly prevalent among men and women. However, data from the past 30 years on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and body mass index (BMI) revealed that the studied tribes were at a higher risk than the general Indian population. In addition, a vast gender disparity with relation to the disease and

  4. Global burden of aflatoxin-induced hepatocellular carcinoma: a risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Felicia

    2010-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or liver cancer, is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, with prevalence 16-32 times higher in developing countries than in developed countries. Aflatoxin, a contaminant produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus in maize and nuts, is a known human liver carcinogen. We sought to determine the global burden of HCC attributable to aflatoxin exposure. We conducted a quantitative cancer risk assessment, for which we collected global data on food-borne aflatoxin levels, consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevalence. We calculated the cancer potency of aflatoxin for HBV-postive and HBV-negative individuals, as well as the uncertainty in all variables, to estimate the global burden of aflatoxin-related HCC. Of the 550,000-600,000 new HCC cases worldwide each year, about 25,200-155,000 may be attributable to aflatoxin exposure. Most cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and China where populations suffer from both high HBV prevalence and largely uncontrolled aflatoxin exposure in food. Aflatoxin may play a causative role in 4.6-28.2% of all global HCC cases.

  5. Amyloid burden and neural function in people at risk for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sterling C; Christian, Bradley T; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Oh, Jennifer M; Harding, Sandra; Xu, Guofan; Hillmer, Ansel T; Wooten, Dustin W; Murali, Dhanabalan; Barnhart, Todd E; Hall, Lance T; Racine, Annie M; Klunk, William E; Mathis, Chester A; Bendlin, Barbara B; Gallagher, Catherine L; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Rowley, Howard A; Hermann, Bruce P; Dowling, N Maritza; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A

    2014-03-01

    To determine the relationship between amyloid burden and neural function in healthy adults at risk for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), we used multimodal imaging with [C-11]Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography, [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose, positron emission tomography , and magnetic resonance imaging, together with cognitive measurement in 201 subjects (mean age, 60.1 years; range, 46-73 years) from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention. Using a qualitative rating, 18% of the samples were strongly positive Beta-amyloid (Aβ+), 41% indeterminate (Aβi), and 41% negative (Aβ-). Aβ+ was associated with older age, female sex, and showed trends for maternal family history of AD and APOE4. Relative to the Aβ- group, Aβ+ and Aβi participants had increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral thalamus; Aβ+ participants also had increased metabolism in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus. Aβ+ participants exhibited increased gray matter in the lateral parietal lobe bilaterally relative to the Aβ- group, and no areas of significant atrophy. Cognitive performance and self report cognitive and affective symptoms did not differ between groups. Amyloid burden can be identified in adults at a mean age of 60 years and is accompanied by glucometabolic increases in specific areas, but not atrophy or cognitive loss. This asymptomatic stage may be an opportune window for intervention to prevent progression to symptomatic AD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The Influence of Cardiac Risk Factor Burden on Cardiac Stress Test Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Jon W.; Li, Morgan; Orazulike, Chidubem; Emerman, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest pain is the most common admission diagnosis for observation unit patients. These patients often undergo cardiac stress testing to further risk stratify for coronary artery disease (CAD). The decision of whom to stress is currently based on clinical judgment. We sought to determine the influence of cardiac risk factor burden on cardiac stress test outcome for patients tested from an observation unit, inpatient or outpatient setting. Methods We performed a retrospective observational cohort study for all patients undergoing stress testing in our institution from June 2006 through July 2007. Cardiac risk factors were collected at the time of stress testing. Risk factors were evaluated in a summative fashion using multivariate regression adjusting for age and known coronary artery disease. The model was tested for goodness of fit and collinearity and the c statistic was calculated using the receiver operating curve. Results A total of 4026 subjects were included for analysis of which 22% had known CAD. The rates of positive outcome were 89 (12.0%), 95 (12.6%), and 343 (16.9%) for the OU, outpatients, and hospitalized patients respectively. While the odds of a positive test outcome increased for additional cardiac risk factors, ROC curve analysis indicates that simply adding the number of risk factors does not add significant diagnostic value. Hospitalized patients were more likely to have a positive stress test, OR 1.41 (1.10 - 1.81). Conclusions Our study does not support basing the decision to perform a stress test on the number of cardiac risk factors.

  7. Burden of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases in Iran: Estimates Based on the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study, 2010.

    PubMed

    Malekzadeh, Fatemeh; Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Poustchi, Hossein; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Shahraz, Saeid; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal and liver diseases (GILD) constitute a noteworthy portion of causes of death and disability in Iran. However, data on their prevalence and burden is sparse in Iran. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study in 2010 has provided invaluable comprehensive data on the burden of GILD in Iran. METHODS Estimations of death, years of life lost due to premature death (YLL), years of life lost due to disability (YLD), disability-adjusted life years (DALY), life expectancy, and healthy life expectancy have been reported for 291 diseases, 67 risk factors, 1160 sequelae, for both sexes and 19 age groups, form 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries. In the current paper, 5 major categories of gastrointestinal (GI) and liver diseases have been investigated as follows: GI infectious diseases, GI and liver cancers, liver infections, chronic end stage liver disease, and other digestive diseases. RESULTS Among women, 7.6% of all deaths and 3.9% of all DALYs were due to digestive and liver diseases in 2010. The respective figures in men were 7.8% of deaths and 4.6% of DALYs. The most important cause of death among children under 5 is diarrhea. Among adults between 15 to 49 years old, the main causes of death are GI and liver cancers and cirrhosis, while diarrhea still remains a major cause of DALY. Among adults 50 years and above, GI and liver cancers and cirrhosis are the main causes of both deaths and DALYs. Gastritis and duodenitis, diarrheal diseases, gall bladder and bile duct diseases, acute hepatitis A, peptic ulcer disease, appendicitis, and acute hepatitis A mainly cause disability rather than death. CONCLUSION GBD study provides invaluable source of data on burden of GILD in Iran. However, there exist limitations, namely overestimation of burden of liver cancer and underestimation of the burden of GI diseases that are usually diagnosed in outpatient settings. The collaboration of scientists across the world and specifically those from developing countries

  8. Maternal anemia and risk of adverse birth and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mizanur; Abe, Sarah Krull; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Kanda, Mikiko; Narita, Saki; Bilano, Ver; Ota, Erika; Gilmour, Stuart; Shibuya, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is a leading cause of maternal deaths and adverse pregnancy outcomes in developing countries. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the pooled prevalence of anemia, the association between maternal anemia and pregnancy outcomes, and the population-attributable fraction (PAF) of these outcomes that are due to anemia in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the British Nursing Index were searched from inception to May 2015 to identify cohort studies of the association between maternal anemia and pregnancy outcomes. The anemic group was defined as having hemoglobin concentrations <10 or <11 g/dL or hematocrit values <33% or <34% depending on the study. A metaregression and stratified analysis were performed to assess the effects of study and participant characteristics on adverse pregnancy risk. The pooled prevalence of anemia in pregnant women by region and country-income category was calculated with the use of a random-effects meta-analysis. Of 8182 articles reviewed, 29 studies were included in the systematic review, and 26 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, 42.7% (95% CI: 37.0%, 48.4%) of women experienced anemia during pregnancy in low- and middle-income countries. There were significantly higher risks of low birth weight (RR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.13, 1.51), preterm birth (RR: 1.63; 95% CI: 1.33, 2.01), perinatal mortality (RR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.30, 1.76), and neonatal mortality (RR: 2.72; 95% CI: 1.19, 6.25) in pregnant women with anemia. South Asian, African, and low-income countries had a higher pooled anemia prevalence than did other Asian and upper-middle-income countries. Overall, in low- and middle-income countries, 12% of low birth weight, 19% of preterm births, and 18% of perinatal mortality were attributable to maternal anemia. The proportion of adverse pregnancy outcomes attributable to anemia was higher in low-income countries and in the South Asian region. Maternal anemia remains a

  9. Road traffic injuries in Kenya: the health burden and risk factors in two districts.

    PubMed

    Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Koradia, Pranali; Herbert, Hadley K; Mogere, Stephen; Akungah, Daniel; Nyamari, Jackim; Osoro, Eric; Maina, William; Stevens, Kent A

    2012-01-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) contribute to a significant proportion of the burden of disease in Kenya. They also have a significant impact on the social and economic well-being of individuals, their families, and society. However, though estimates quantifying the burden of RTIs in Kenya do exist, most of these studies date back to the early 2000s-more than one decade ago. This article aims to present the current status of road safety in Kenya. Using data from the police and vital registration systems in Kenya, we present the current epidemiology of RTIs in the nation. We also sought to assess the status of 3 well-known risk factors for RTIs-speeding and the use of helmets and reflective clothing. Data for this study were collected in 2 steps. The first step involved the collection of secondary data from the Kenya traffic police as well as the National Vital Registration System to assess the current trends of RTIs in Kenya. Following this, observational studies were conducted in the Thika and Naivasha districts in Kenya to assess the current status of speeding among all vehicles and the use of helmets and reflective clothing among motorcyclists. The overall RTI rate in Kenya was 59.96 per 100,000 population in 2009, with vehicle passengers being the most affected. Notably, injuries to motorcyclists increased at an annual rate of approximately 29 percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27-32; P < .001). The mean age of death due to road traffic crashes was 35 years. Fatalities due to RTIs increased at an annual rate of 7 percent (95% CI: 6-8; P < .001) for the period 2004 to 2009. Observational studies revealed that 69.45 percent of vehicles in Thika and 34.32 percent of vehicles in Naivasha were speeding. Helmets were used by less than one third of motorcycle drivers in both study districts, with prevalence rates ranging between 3 and 4 percent among passengers. This study highlights the significant burden of RTIs in Kenya. A renewed focus on addressing this burden

  10. The state of US health, 1990-2010: burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher J L; Atkinson, Charles; Bhalla, Kavi; Birbeck, Gretchen; Burstein, Roy; Chou, David; Dellavalle, Robert; Danaei, Goodarz; Ezzati, Majid; Fahimi, A; Flaxman, D; Foreman; Gabriel, Sherine; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Kassebaum, Nicholas; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Lim, Stephen; Lipshultz, Steven E; London, Stephanie; Lopez; MacIntyre, Michael F; Mokdad, A H; Moran, A; Moran, Andrew E; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Murphy, Tasha; Naghavi, Moshen; Pope, C; Roberts, Thomas; Salomon, Joshua; Schwebel, David C; Shahraz, Saeid; Sleet, David A; Murray; Abraham, Jerry; Ali, Mohammed K; Atkinson, Charles; Bartels, David H; Bhalla, Kavi; Birbeck, Gretchen; Burstein, Roy; Chen, Honglei; Criqui, Michael H; Dahodwala; Jarlais; Ding, Eric L; Dorsey, E Ray; Ebel, Beth E; Ezzati, Majid; Fahami; Flaxman, S; Flaxman, A D; Gonzalez-Medina, Diego; Grant, Bridget; Hagan, Holly; Hoffman, Howard; Kassebaum, Nicholas; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Leasher, Janet L; Lin, John; Lipshultz, Steven E; Lozano, Rafael; Lu, Yuan; Mallinger, Leslie; McDermott, Mary M; Micha, Renata; Miller, Ted R; Mokdad, A A; Mokdad, A H; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Naghavi, Mohsen; Narayan, K M Venkat; Omer, Saad B; Pelizzari, Pamela M; Phillips, David; Ranganathan, Dharani; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Thomas; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Sanman, Ella; Sapkota, Amir; Schwebel, David C; Sharaz, Saeid; Shivakoti, Rupak; Singh, Gitanjali M; Singh, David; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Wilkinson, James D; Zabetian, Azadeh; Murray; Abraham, Jerry; Ali, Mohammad K; Alvardo, Miriam; Atkinson, Charles; Baddour, Larry M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Bhalla, Kavi; Birbeck, Gretchen; Bolliger, Ian; Burstein, Roy; Carnahan, Emily; Chou, David; Chugh, Sumeet S; Cohen, Aaron; Colson, K Ellicott; Cooper, Leslie T; Couser, William; Criqui, Michael H; Dabhadkar, Kaustubh C; Dellavalle, Robert P; Jarlais; Dicker, Daniel; Dorsey, E Ray; Duber, Herbert; Ebel, Beth E; Engell, Rebecca E; Ezzati, Majid; Felson, David T; Finucane, Mariel M; Flaxman, Seth; Flaxman, A D; Fleming, Thomas; Foreman; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Freedman, Greg; Freeman, Michael K; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Gillum, Richard F; Gonzalez-Medina, Diego; Gosselin, Richard; Gutierrez, Hialy R; Hagan, Holly; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hoffman, Howard; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; James, Spencer L; Jasrasaria, Rashmi; Jayarman, Sudha; Johns, Nicole; Kassebaum, Nicholas; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Lan, Qing; Leasher, Janet L; Lim, Stephen; Lipshultz, Steven E; London, Stephanie; Lopez; Lozano, Rafael; Lu, Yuan; Mallinger, Leslie; Meltzer, Michele; Mensah, George A; Michaud, Catherine; Miller, Ted R; Mock, Charles; Moffitt, Terrie E; Mokdad, A A; Mokdad, A H; Moran, A; Naghavi, Mohsen; Narayan, K M Venkat; Nelson, Robert G; Olives, Casey; Omer, Saad B; Ortblad, Katrina; Ostro, Bart; Pelizzari, Pamela M; Phillips, David; Raju, Murugesan; Razavi, Homie; Ritz, Beate; Roberts, Thomas; Sacco, Ralph L; Salomon, Joshua; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Schwebel, David C; Shahraz, Saeid; Shibuya, Kenji; Silberberg, Donald; Singh, Jasvinder A; Steenland, Kyle; Taylor, Jennifer A; Thurston, George D; Vavilala, Monica S; Vos, Theo; Wagner, Gregory R; Weinstock, Martin A; Weisskopf, Marc G; Wulf, Sarah; Murray

    2013-08-14

    Understanding the major health problems in the United States and how they are changing over time is critical for informing national health policy. To measure the burden of diseases, injuries, and leading risk factors in the United States from 1990 to 2010 and to compare these measurements with those of the 34 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. We used the systematic analysis of descriptive epidemiology of 291 diseases and injuries, 1160 sequelae of these diseases and injuries, and 67 risk factors or clusters of risk factors from 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries developed for the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study to describe the health status of the United States and to compare US health outcomes with those of 34 OECD countries. Years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) were computed by multiplying the number of deaths at each age by a reference life expectancy at that age. Years lived with disability (YLDs) were calculated by multiplying prevalence (based on systematic reviews) by the disability weight (based on population-based surveys) for each sequela; disability in this study refers to any short- or long-term loss of health. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were estimated as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. Deaths and DALYs related to risk factors were based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of exposure data and relative risks for risk-outcome pairs. Healthy life expectancy (HALE) was used to summarize overall population health, accounting for both length of life and levels of ill health experienced at different ages. US life expectancy for both sexes combined increased from 75.2 years in 1990 to 78.2 years in 2010; during the same period, HALE increased from 65.8 years to 68.1 years. The diseases and injuries with the largest number of YLLs in 2010 were ischemic heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and road injury. Age-standardized YLL rates increased

  11. The State of US Health, 1990-2010: Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Importance Understanding the major health problems in the United States and how they are changing over time is critical for informing national health policy. Objectives To measure the burden of diseases, injuries, and leading risk factors in the United States from 1990 to 2010 and to compare these measurements with those of the 34 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. Design We used the systematic analysis of descriptive epidemiology of 291 diseases and injuries, 1160 sequelae of these diseases and injuries, and 67 risk factors or clusters of risk factors from 1990 to 2010 for 187 countries developed for the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study to describe the health status of the United States and to compare US health outcomes with those of 34 OECD countries. Years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs) were computed by multiplying the number of deaths at each age by a reference life expectancy at that age. Years lived with disability (YLDs) were calculated by multiplying prevalence (based on systematic reviews) by the disability weight (based on population-based surveys) for each sequela; disability in this study refers to any short- or long-term loss of health. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) were estimated as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. Deaths and DALYs related to risk factors were based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses of exposure data and relative risks for risk-outcome pairs. Healthy life expectancy (HALE) was used to summarize overall population health, accounting for both length of life and levels of ill health experienced at different ages. Results US life expectancy for both sexes combined increased from 75.2 years in 1990 to 78.2 years in 2010; during the same period, HALE increased from 65.8 years to 68.1 years. The diseases and injuries with the largest number of YLLs in 2010 were ischemic heart disease, lung cancer, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and road injury

  12. Neonatal anemia.

    PubMed

    Aher, Sanjay; Malwatkar, Kedar; Kadam, Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Neonatal anemia and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal anemia can be due to blood loss, decreased RBC production, or increased destruction of erythrocytes. Physiologic anemia of the newborn and anemia of prematurity are the two most common causes of anemia in neonates. Phlebotomy losses result in much of the anemia seen in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW). Accepting a lower threshold level for transfusion in ELBW infants can prevent these infants being exposed to multiple donors.

  13. Cardiovascular disease and hypertension in sub-Saharan Africa: burden, risk and interventions.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Francesco Paolo; Miller, Michelle Avril

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease, including stroke, heart failure and kidney disease, has been common in sub-Saharan Africa for many years, and rapid urbanization is causing an upsurge of ischaemic heart disease and metabolic disorders. At least two-thirds of cardiovascular deaths now occur in low- and middle-income countries, bringing a double burden of disease to poor and developing world economies. High blood pressure (or hypertension) is by far the commonest underlying risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Its prevention, detection, treatment and control in sub-Saharan Africa are haphazard and suboptimal. This is due to a combination of lack of resources and health-care systems, non-existent effective preventive strategies at a population level, lack of sustainable drug therapy, and barriers to complete compliance with prescribed medications. The economic impact for loss of productive years of life and the need to divert scarce resources to tertiary care are substantial.

  14. [Epidemiology of chronic rhinosinusitis, selected risk factors, comorbidities and economic burden].

    PubMed

    Beule, A G

    2015-03-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a relevant and prevalent medical condition in Germany, Europe and the world. If analysed in detail, the prevalence of CRS shows regional and temporary variety. In this review, currently available data regarding the prevalence of CRS is therefore sorted by country and/or region, time point of data collection and the CRS-definition employed. Risk factors like smoking and gastro-oesophageal reflux are discussed regarding their influence on CRS prevalence. Moreover, co-morbidities of CRS, like asthma, conditions of the cardiovascular system and depression are listed and their influence on CRS is discussed. Furthermore, data on CRS prevalence in special cohorts, like immunocompromised patients, are presented. To estimate the economic burden of CRS, current data e.g. from Germany and the USA are included in this review. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Epidemiology of chronic rhinosinusitis, selected risk factors, comorbidities, and economic burden

    PubMed Central

    Beule, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a relevant and prevalent medical condition in Germany, Europe and the world. If analysed in detail, the prevalence of CRS shows regional and temporary variety. In this review, currently available data regarding the prevalence of CRS is therefore sorted by country and/or region, time point of data collection and the CRS-definition employed. Risk factors like smoking and gastroesophageal reflux are discussed regarding their influence on CRS prevalence. Moreover, comorbidities of CRS, like asthma, conditions of the cardiovascular system and depression are listed and their influence on CRS is discussed. Furthermore, data on CRS prevalence in special cohorts, like immunocompromised patients, are presented. To estimate the economic burden of CRS, current data e.g. from Germany and the USA are included in this review. PMID:26770285

  16. Benefits and risks of anemia correction with recombinant human erythropoietin in children maintained by hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Montini, G; Zacchello, G; Baraldi, E; Zanconato, S; Suppiej, A; Fabris, F; Andreetta, B; Pavanello, L; Zacchello, F

    1990-10-01

    Ten children with renal failure (age range 2 years 6 months to 18 years 9 months; median 11 years 10 months), maintained by long-term hemodialysis, had successful correction of their anemia after intravenous administration of recombinant human erythropoietin in a dosage escalating every 2 weeks (75 to 150 to 300 to 450 IU/kg/wk). Mean hemoglobin concentration increased from 6.4 +/- 0.9 to 11.5 +/- 1.0 gm/dl. Blood cell counts used to evaluate the correction of anemia were done after dialysis; this was especially important for children less compliant with water restriction. The higher hemoglobin concentration resulted in improvement of the quality of life, a greater tolerance for physical effort (exercise tolerance doubled and the ventilatory anaerobic threshold increased significantly), correction of some subclinical central nervous system abnormalities detected by evoked potentials testing, and reduction of bleeding time. Few side effects were noted; severe hypertension developed in one patient when postdialysis hematocrit was only 28%, and there were two episodes of hypertransaminasemia with no other evidence of liver dysfunction. We conclude that in children with renal failure the use of recombinant human erythropoietin to correct anemia is safe and strongly advisable, because of the resolution of many of the symptoms correlated with anemia.

  17. Advanced Age, Cardiovascular Risk Burden, and Timed Up and Go Test Performance in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Albin, Roger L.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Studenski, Stephanie; Frey, Kirk A.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2014-01-01

    .32, p = .19) were not. Conclusions. Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and older age may independently exacerbate balance-related disability in Parkinson disease and may exert additive or synergistic pathological effects. The pathophysiology of these impairments cannot be explained completely by nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation or leukoaraiosis burden and may relate to systemic factors seen with accelerated aging. PMID:24864306

  18. Advanced age, cardiovascular risk burden, and timed up and go test performance in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Vikas; Albin, Roger L; Müller, Martijn L T M; Koeppe, Robert A; Studenski, Stephanie; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2014-12-01

    . Modifiable cardiovascular risk factors and older age may independently exacerbate balance-related disability in Parkinson disease and may exert additive or synergistic pathological effects. The pathophysiology of these impairments cannot be explained completely by nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation or leukoaraiosis burden and may relate to systemic factors seen with accelerated aging. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Analysis of risk factors for preeclampsia in pregnancies complicated with chronic aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Yin, Lu-yao; Liang, Mei-ying; Wang, Shan-mi; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Wang, Jian-liu

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the risk factors for preeclampsia(PE) in pregnancies complicated with chronic aplastic anemia (CAA) by analyzing the obstetric management and pregnancy outcome. Retrospectively review the clinical data including the obstetric management, the laboratory findings and the pregnancy outcome of 41 pregnant women complicated with CAA, all of whom were hospitalized in Peking University People's Hospital from May 2002 to February 2011. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore the risk factors associated with PE. (1) Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed before conception while 13 were diagnosed during gestation. Eleven patients including all the 7 who were categorized as severe CAA presented with mild bleeding in the third trimester. (2) The medians of white blood cell counts, hemoglobin concentrations and platelet counts were 5.0×10⁹/L, 66.0 g/L and 12.0×10⁹/L respectively. (3) The obstetric management consisted of strict assessment, intensive surveillance and follow-up, appropriate supportive measures, timely recognition of complications, and delivery when necessary. Twenty-one patients received supportive transfusions. Ten patients developed PE, all of whom were diagnosed as severe PE (SPE). Twelve patients suffered postpartum hemorrhage, and 3 of them had blood loss more than 1000 ml. All were conservatively treated in success. (4) The median gestational age of delivery was 37 weeks. Sixteen cases delivered before 37 weeks and 5 delivered before 34 weeks. Two patients developed SPE at 29 weeks and 30 weeks respectively, and both of the neonates died for severe asphyxia. The birth weight of the live neonates ranged from 1500 to 3660 g. (5) The postpartum follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 7 years. Thirty-three patients got improvement without dependence on transfusions. Four achieved no remission and still needed intermittent transfusions. Four were lost in follow-up. (6) Significant differences were found in the bleeding tendency, the

  20. The double burden of neoliberalism? Noncommunicable disease policies and the global political economy of risk.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Sara; Schrecker, Ted

    2015-07-01

    The growing prevalence of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is now recognized as one of the major global health policy issues of the early 21st century. Current official approaches reflect ambivalence about how health policy should approach the social determinants of health identified by the WHO Commission on the topic that released its report in 2008, and in particular the role of macro-scale economic and social processes. Authoritative framing of options for NCD prevention in advance of the September, 2011 UN high-level meeting on NCDs arguably relied on a selective reading of the scientific (including social scientific) evidence, and foregrounded a limited number of risk factors defined in terms of individual behavior: tobacco use, unhealthy diet, alcohol (ab)use and physical inactivity. The effect was to reproduce at a transnational level the individualization of responsibility for health that characterizes most health promotion initiatives in high-income countries, ignoring both the limited control that many people have over their exposure to these risk factors and the contribution of macro-scale processes like trade liberalization and the marketing activities of transnational corporations to the global burden of NCDs. An alternative perspective focuses on "the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources" described by the WHO Commission, and the ways in which policies that address those inequities can avoid unintentional incorporation of neoliberal constructions of risk and responsibility.

  1. The double burden of neoliberalism? Noncommunicable disease policies and the global political economy of risk.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Sara; Schrecker, Ted

    2016-05-01

    The growing prevalence of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is now recognized as one of the major global health policy issues of the early 21st century. Current official approaches reflect ambivalence about how health policy should approach the social determinants of health identified by the WHO Commission on the topic that released its report in 2008, and in particular the role of macro-scale economic and social processes. Authoritative framing of options for NCD prevention in advance of the September, 2011 UN high-level meeting on NCDs arguably relied on a selective reading of the scientific (including social scientific) evidence, and foregrounded a limited number of risk factors defined in terms of individual behavior: tobacco use, unhealthy diet, alcohol (ab)use and physical inactivity. The effect was to reproduce at a transnational level the individualization of responsibility for health that characterizes most health promotion initiatives in high-income countries, ignoring both the limited control that many people have over their exposure to these risk factors and the contribution of macro-scale processes like trade liberalization and the marketing activities of transnational corporations to the global burden of NCDs. An alternative perspective focuses on "the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources" described by the WHO Commission, and the ways in which policies that address those inequities can avoid unintentional incorporation of neoliberal constructions of risk and responsibility.

  2. Risk of equine infectious anemia virus disease transmission through in vitro embryo production using somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Polejaeva, I

    2009-08-01

    Prevention and regulation of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) disease transmission solely depend on identification, isolation, and elimination of infected animals because of lack of an effective vaccine. Embryo production via the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology uses oocytes collected mainly from untested animals, which creates a potential risk of EIAV transmission through infected embryos. The current review examines the risk of EIAV disease transmission through SCNT embryo production and transfer. Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus from the family Retroviridae. Because of a lack of direct reports on this subject, relevant information gathered from close relatives of EIAV, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), is summarized and used to predict the biological plausibility of EIAV disease transmission through transfers of the equine SCNT embryos. Based on published information regarding interaction of oocytes with lentiviruses and the sufficiency of oocyte and embryo washing procedures to prevent lentivirus transmission from in vitro-produced embryos of various species, we predicted the risk of EIAV transmission through SCNT embryo production and transfer to be very small or absent.

  3. The co-occurrence of anemia and cardiometabolic disease risk demonstrates sex-specific sociodemographic patterning in an urbanizing rural region of southern India

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew D.; Hayter, Arabella K.M.; Baker, Chris P.; Prabhakaran, Poornima; Gupta, Vipin; Kulkarni, Bharati; Davey Smith, George; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Radha Krishna, K.V.; Kumar, P. Uday; Kinra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives To determine the extent and sociodemographic determinants of anemia, overweight, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the co-occurrence of anemia with cardiometabolic disease risk factors among a cohort of Indian adults. Subject/Methods Cross-sectional survey of adult men (n=3,322) and non-pregnant women (n=2,895) aged 18 y and older from the third wave of the Andhra Pradesh Children and Parents Study that assessed anemia, overweight based on Body Mass Index, and prevalence of MetS based on abdominal obesity, hypertension, and blood lipid and fasting glucose measures. We examined associations of education, wealth and urbanicity with these outcomes and their co-occurrence. Results The prevalence of anemia and overweight was 40% and 29% among women, respectively, and 10% and 25% among men (P<0.001), respectively, while the prevalence of MetS was the same across sexes (15%) (P=0.55). The prevalence of concurrent anemia and overweight (9%), and anemia and MetS (4.5%) was highest among women. Household wealth was positively associated with overweight and MetS across sexes (P<0.05). Independent of household wealth, higher education was positively correlated with MetS among men (OR (95% CI): MetS: 1.4 (0.99, 2.0)) and negatively correlated with MetS among women (MetS: 0.54 (0.29, 0.99)). Similar sex-specific associations were observed for the co-occurrence of anemia with overweight and MetS. Conclusion Women in this region of India may be particularly vulnerable to co-occurring anemia and cardiometabolic risk, and associated adverse health outcomes as the nutrition transition advances in India. PMID:26508461

  4. High Serum Adiponectin Level Is a Risk Factor for Anemia in Japanese Men: A Prospective Observational Study of 1,029 Japanese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Kei; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Shiono, Yosuke; Suzuki, Ikuko; Kato, Yuichi; Sho, Ri; Otani, Katsumi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Kubota, Isao; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Takeo; Fukao, Akira; Kayama, Takamasa

    2016-01-01

    Erythroid abnormalities including anemia and polycythemia are often observed in the general clinical setting. Because recent studies reported that adiponectin negatively affects hematopoiesis, we performed a prospective observational study to assess the relationship between anemia and adiponectin, as well as other parameters, in 1029 Japanese subjects (477 men and 552 women) 40 years of age and older. Body measurements, blood tests, and nutrition intake studies were performed at baseline, and 5 to 7 years later (follow-up). Hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) levels in men with high serum adiponectin levels were lower at follow-up than at baseline. Multiple regression analysis showed that age, body mass index, adiponectin, and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase were significantly associated with erythroid-related variables (red blood cells, Hb, and Hct) in both men and women (P <0.05). In a logistic regression analysis, adiponectin, fasting blood glucose, and β-natriuretic peptide were significant risk factors for anemia in men, and blood urea nitrogen and amylase were significant risk factors in women. Physical features and nutrient intake were not risk factors for anemia. Our study demonstrates, both clinically and epidemiologically, that a high serum adiponectin level decreases the amounts of erythroid-related variables and is a risk factor for anemia in Japanese men. PMID:27918575

  5. Global burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for young people's health during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, Ali H; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Daoud, Farah; Mokdad, Arwa A; El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Kyu, Hmwe Hmwe; Barber, Ryan M; Wagner, Joseph; Cercy, Kelly; Kravitz, Hannah; Coggeshall, Megan; Chew, Adrienne; O'Rourke, Kevin F; Steiner, Caitlyn; Tuffaha, Marwa; Charara, Raghid; Al-Ghamdi, Essam Abdullah; Adi, Yaser; Afifi, Rima A; Alahmadi, Hanan; AlBuhairan, Fadia; Allen, Nicholas; AlMazroa, Mohammad; Al-Nehmi, Abdulwahab A; AlRayess, Zulfa; Arora, Monika; Azzopardi, Peter; Barroso, Carmen; Basulaiman, Mohammed; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Bonell, Chris; Breinbauer, Cecilia; Degenhardt, Louisa; Denno, Donna; Fang, Jing; Fatusi, Adesegun; Feigl, Andrea B; Kakuma, Ritsuko; Karam, Nadim; Kennedy, Elissa; Khoja, Tawfik A M; Maalouf, Fadi; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; Mattoo, Amitabh; McGovern, Terry; Memish, Ziad A; Mensah, George A; Patel, Vikram; Petroni, Suzanne; Reavley, Nicola; Zertuche, Diego Rios; Saeedi, Mohammad; Santelli, John; Sawyer, Susan M; Ssewamala, Fred; Taiwo, Kikelomo; Tantawy, Muhammad; Viner, Russell M; Waldfogel, Jane; Zuñiga, Maria Paola; Naghavi, Mohsen; Wang, Haidong; Vos, Theo; Lopez, Alan D; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Patton, George C; Murray, Christopher J L

    2016-06-11

    Young people's health has emerged as a neglected yet pressing issue in global development. Changing patterns of young people's health have the potential to undermine future population health as well as global economic development unless timely and effective strategies are put into place. We report the past, present, and anticipated burden of disease in young people aged 10-24 years from 1990 to 2013 using data on mortality, disability, injuries, and health risk factors. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) includes annual assessments for 188 countries from 1990 to 2013, covering 306 diseases and injuries, 1233 sequelae, and 79 risk factors. We used the comparative risk assessment approach to assess how much of the burden of disease reported in a given year can be attributed to past exposure to a risk. We estimated attributable burden by comparing observed health outcomes with those that would have been observed if an alternative or counterfactual level of exposure had occurred in the past. We applied the same method to previous years to allow comparisons from 1990 to 2013. We cross-tabulated the quantiles of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) by quintiles of DALYs annual increase from 1990 to 2013 to show rates of DALYs increase by burden. We used the GBD 2013 hierarchy of causes that organises 306 diseases and injuries into four levels of classification. Level one distinguishes three broad categories: first, communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders; second, non-communicable diseases; and third, injuries. Level two has 21 mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive categories, level three has 163 categories, and level four has 254 categories. The leading causes of death in 2013 for young people aged 10-14 years were HIV/AIDS, road injuries, and drowning (25·2%), whereas transport injuries were the leading cause of death for ages 15-19 years (14·2%) and 20-24 years (15·6%). Maternal disorders were the highest cause of death

  6. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia , for example, red blood cells usually are ...

  7. Incremental increases in economic burden parallels cardiometabolic risk factors in the US

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, R Brett; Ghushchyan, Vahram; Olufade, Temitope; Sheehan, John J; Nair, Kavita V; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Estimate the economic burden associated with incremental increases in the number of cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs) in the US. Methods We used the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2010 to 2012 to create a retrospective cohort of people based on the number of CMRFs (one, two, and three or four), and a comparison cohort of people with zero CMRFs. CMRFs included abdominal obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, and elevated glucose and were defined using diagnostic codes, prescribed medications, and survey responses. Adjusted regression analysis was developed to compare health expenditures, utilization, and lost-productivity differences between the cohorts. Generalized linear regression was used for health care expenditures, and negative binomial regression was used for utilization and productivity, controlling for individual characteristics. Results The number of CMRFs was associated with significantly more annual utilization, health care expenditures, and reduced productivity. As compared with people with zero CMRFs, people with one, two, and three or four CMRFs had 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06, 1.24), 1.37 (95% CI: 1.25, 1.51), and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.57) times higher expected rate of emergency room visits, respectively. Compared with people with zero CMRFs, people with one, two, and three or four CMRFs had increased incremental health care expenditures of US$417 (95% CI: $70, $763), US$2,326 (95% CI: $1,864, $2,788), and US$4,117 (95% CI: $3,428, $4,807), respectively. Those with three or four CMRFs reported employment of 60%, compared with 80% in patients with zero CMRFs. People with three or four CMFRs had 1.75 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.17) times higher expected rate of days missed at work due to illness, compared with people with zero CMRFs. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a direct association between economic burden and number of CMRFs. Although this was expected, the increase in burden

  8. Burden of Liver Abscess and Survival Risk Score in Thailand: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Poovorawan, Kittiyod; Pan-Ngum, Wirichada; Soonthornworasiri, Ngamphol; Kulrat, Chotipa; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Wilairatana, Polrat; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat; Kitsahawong, Bubpha; Phaosawasdi, Kamthorn

    2016-09-07

    In Thailand, the burden of liver abscess, a life-threatening infectious disease, has not been thoroughly evaluated. We developed a predictive scoring system to estimate survival of patients with liver abscess using information from the 2008-2013 Nationwide Hospital Admission Data to evaluate the burden of liver abscess in Thailand. All patients with primary diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) and amoebic liver abscess (ALA) were included. Epidemiological data, baseline characteristics, hospital course, and survival were analyzed. Overall, 11,296 admissions comprising 8,423 patients from 844 hospitals across Thailand were eligible for analysis. The mean age was 52 ± 17 years and 66.1% of patients were male. ALA was significantly prevalent in southern and western border regions of Thailand, and PLA occurred nationwide. The highest incidence of liver abscess occurred in the rainy season (June-November, P < 0.01). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (interquartile range = 4-13 days), and mean direct cost of hospitalization was 846 ± 1,574 USD. The overall inhospital mortality rate was 2.8%. Incidence of ALA decreased over the 5-year study period, whereas PLA incidence increased (P < 0.01). Using multivariable Cox regression methods with stepwise variable selection, we developed a final model with five highly significant baseline parameters associated with increased 60-day mortality: older age, PLA, underlying chronic kidney disease, cirrhosis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection. Range of estimated probability of 60-day survival was 95-16% at cumulative risk score 0-13. This simplified score is practical, and may help clinicians prioritize patients requiring more intensive care. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  9. The burden of hypertension and its risk factors in Malawi: nationwide population-based STEPS survey.

    PubMed

    Msyamboza, Kelias P; Kathyola, Damson; Dzowela, Titha; Bowie, Cameron

    2012-12-01

    Hypertension is the most common cause of cardiovascular diseases, accounting for at least half of haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes, heart failure and renal failure in sub-Saharan Africa. However, population-based data to inform policies are scarce. Using the WHO STEPwise approach to chronic disease risk factor surveillance, a population-based nationwide survey was conducted on participants aged 25-64 years in Malawi. Detailed findings on the burden of hypertension are presented in this paper. Blood pressure (BP) was measured in 3727 participants. The age-standardised prevalence of hypertension (BP ≥140/90 mmHg) was 33.2% (95% CI 30.9-35.6%). Hypertension was more frequent in males than females (36.9% vs 29.9%), alcohol drinkers than non-drinkers (40.9% vs 31.6%), overweight than non-overweight (41.5% vs 30.7%) and increased with increasing age (21.4% in 25-34 years old vs 59.2% in 55-64 years old). Three-quarters of the participants said they never had their BP measured before and 94.9% of those with hypertension said they were not aware that they had such a medical problem. High prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors calls for the implementation of primary healthcare approaches such as the WHO package for essential non-communicable diseases to promote healthy lifestyles, early detection, treatment and control.

  10. Lessons learned from implementation of a demonstration program to reduce the burden of anemia and hookworm in women in Yen Bai Province, Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Phuc, Tran Q; Mihrshahi, Seema; Casey, Gerard J; Phu, Luong B; Tien, Nong T; Caruana, Sonia R; Thach, Tran D; Montresor, Antonio; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2009-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency, anemia and hookworm disease are important public health problems for women of reproductive age living in developing countries and affect the health of newborns and infants. Iron supplementation and deworming treatment are effective in addressing these problems in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. Daily iron supplementation and deworming after the first trimester is recommended for pregnant women although these programs usually do not operate efficiently or effectively. Weekly iron-folic acid supplementation and regular deworming for non-pregnant women may be a viable approach for improving iron status and preventing anemia during the reproductive years. Addressing these diseases at a population level before women become pregnant could significantly improve women's health before and during pregnancy, as well as their infants' growth and development. Methods and Results This paper describes the major processes undertaken in a demonstration intervention of preventive weekly iron-folic acid supplementation with regular deworming for all 52,000 women aged 15–45 years in two districts of Yen Bai province, in northern Viet Nam. The intervention strategy included extensive consultation with community leaders and village, commune, district and provincial health staff, and training for village health workers. Distribution of the drugs was integrated with the existing health service infrastructure and the village health workers were the direct point of contact with women. Iron-folic acid tablets and deworming treatment were provided free of charge from May 2006. An independent Vietnamese NGO was commissioned to evaluate compliance and identify potential problems. The program resulted in effective distribution of iron-folic acid tablets and deworming treatment to all villages in the target districts, with full or partial compliance of 85%. Conclusion Training for health staff, the strong commitment of all partners and the use of appropriate

  11. A cross sectional study of anemia and iron deficiency as risk factors for arsenic-induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Kile, Molly L; Faraj, Joycelyn M; Ronnenberg, Alayne G; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmudar; Mostofa, Golam; Afroz, Sakila; Christiani, David C

    2016-02-16

    In the Ganges Delta, chronic arsenic poisoning is a health concern affecting millions of people who rely on groundwater as their potable water source. The prevalence of anemia is also high in this region, particularly among women. Moreover, arsenic is known to affect heme synthesis and erythrocytes and the risk of arsenic-induced skin lesions appears to differ by sex. We conducted a case-control study in 147 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi women to assess the association between anemia and arsenic-induced skin lesions. We observed that the odds of arsenic-related skin lesions were approximately three times higher among women who were anemic (hemoglobin < 120 g/L) compared to women with normal hemoglobin levels [Odds Ratio (OR) = 3.32, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 1.29, 8.52] after adjusting for arsenic levels in drinking water and other covariates. Furthermore, 75% of the women with anemia had adequate iron stores (serum ferritin ≥ 12 μg/L), suggesting that the majority of anemia detected in this population was unrelated to iron depletion. Considering the magnitude of arsenic exposure and prevalence of anemia in Bangladeshi women, additional research is warranted that identifies the causes of anemia so that effective interventions can be implemented while arsenic remediation efforts continue.

  12. [Iron deficiency and anemia in female athletes--causes and risks].

    PubMed

    Portal, Shawn; Epstein, Muli; Dubnov, Gal

    2003-10-01

    Iron deficiency is probably the most common nutrient deficiency in the western world. Low levels of iron in the body are caused by several mechanisms, and become symptomatic with the onset of iron deficiency anemia. Athletes are a special group with additional reasons for iron or blood loss, such as plasma expansion, increase perspiration, 'foot strike hemolysis, and occasionally--malnutrition. Female athletes have yet another source of blood loss--menstruation. However, the most common cause for low hemoglobin levels in an athlete is dilutional pseudoanemia, which is caused by exercise-induced fluid retention. Athletes are more sensitive to the effects of anemia and iron deficiency, as exercise performance depends on maximal oxygen carrying capacity to the active muscle, and efficient oxygen utilization. Iron deficiency without anemia can also reduce athletic performance. Diagnosis is ultimately made by a blood count and red blood cell parameters, with ferritin serving as an index of body iron stores. Treatment requires iron supplements, as it is nearly impossible to refill the iron stores through diet alone.

  13. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis in countries with high tuberculosis burdens: individual risks and social determinants.

    PubMed

    Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D; Jeon, Christie Y; Cohen, Ted; Murray, Megan B

    2011-04-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the role of type 2 diabetes as an individual-level risk factor for tuberculosis (TB), though evidence from developing countries with the highest TB burdens is lacking. In developing countries, TB is most common among the poor, in whom diabetes may be less common. We assessed the relationship between individual-level risk, social determinants and population health in these settings. We performed individual-level analyses using the World Health Survey (n = 124,607; 46 countries). We estimated the relationship between TB and diabetes, adjusting for gender, age, body mass index, education, housing quality, crowding and health insurance. We also performed a longitudinal country-level analysis using data on per-capita gross domestic product and TB prevalence and incidence and diabetes prevalence for 1990-95 and 2003-04 (163 countries) to estimate the relationship between increasing diabetes prevalence and TB, identifying countries at risk for disease interactions. In lower income countries, individuals with diabetes are more likely than non-diabetics to have TB [univariable odds ratio (OR): 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.84-3.10; multivariable OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.37-2.39]. Increases in TB prevalence and incidence over time were more likely to occur when diabetes prevalence also increased (OR: 4.7; 95% CI: 1.0-22.5; OR: 8.6; 95% CI: 1.9-40.4). Large populations, prevalent TB and projected increases in diabetes make countries like India, Peru and the Russia Federation areas of particular concern. Given the association between diabetes and TB and projected increases in diabetes worldwide, multi-disease health policies should be considered.

  14. Estimation of the burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to modifiable risk factors and cost-effectiveness analysis of preventative interventions to reduce this burden in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the primary cause of mortality and morbidity in Argentina representing 34.2% of deaths and 12.6% of potential years of life lost (PYLL). The aim of the study was to estimate the burden of acute coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke and the cost-effectiveness of preventative population-based and clinical interventions. Methods An epidemiological model was built incorporating prevalence and distribution of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, hyperglycemia, overweight and obesity, smoking, and physical inactivity, obtained from the Argentine Survey of Risk Factors dataset. Population Attributable Fraction (PAF) of each risk factor was estimated using relative risks from international sources. Total fatal and non-fatal events, PYLL and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) were estimated. Costs of event were calculated from local utilization databases and expressed in international dollars (I$). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) were estimated for six interventions: reducing salt in bread, mass media campaign to promote tobacco cessation, pharmacological therapy of high blood pressure, pharmacological therapy of high cholesterol, tobacco cessation therapy with bupropion, and a multidrug strategy for people with an estimated absolute risk > 20% in 10 years. Results An estimated total of 611,635 DALY was lost due to acute CHD and stroke for 2005. Modifiable risk factors explained 71.1% of DALY and more than 80% of events. Two interventions were cost-saving: lowering salt intake in the population through reducing salt in bread and multidrug therapy targeted to persons with an absolute risk above 20% in 10 years; three interventions had very acceptable ICERs: drug therapy for high blood pressure in hypertensive patients not yet undergoing treatment (I$ 2,908 per DALY saved), mass media campaign to promote tobacco cessation amongst smokers (I$ 3,186 per DALY saved), and lowering cholesterol with statin drug therapy

  15. Association of increased travel distance to dialysis units with the risk of anemia in rural chronic hemodialysis elderly.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lai, Chun-Fu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Sheng-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Geographic remoteness has been found to influence health-related outcomes negatively. As reported in the literature, rural dialysis patients have a higher risk of mortality with increasing travel distance to dialysis units. However, few studies have focused on the impact of travel distances on the development of dialysis complications. We utilized a prospectively collected chronic hemodialysis patient cohort from a rural regional hospital for analysis. Data on demographics, comorbidities, and serum laboratory results were obtained. Correlation analyses between travel distance to dialysis units and dialysis complications were conducted, and significantly correlated parameters were entered into multivariate logistic regression models to determine their exact associations. A total of 46 rural chronic hemodialysis patients were enrolled, with an average age higher than others in the literature. Significant correlation was found between travel distance and serum hemoglobin levels (R(2) = -0.34, P value = 0.029). Multivariate logistic regression found that every 1 km increase in travel distance was associated with an increased risk of anemia (hemoglobin <9 g/dL) (odds ratio 1.46; P value = 0.01). Sensitivity analyses further showed that the associated risk was partially attenuated by serum albumin (odds ratio 1.83; P value = 0.07) and ferritin (odds ratio 1.39; P value = 0.08) levels. This is the first study to demonstrate the association between increased travel distance to dialysis units and the risk of anemia in chronic dialysis patients, especially elderly. Malnutrition, inflammation, and atherosclerosis syndrome could be partially responsible for the observed association. Further research is required to confirm our findings. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... aplastic anemia and are pregnant or want to get pregnant, find an aplastic anemia specialist and an obstetrician (OB) who specializes in high-risk births. Every person and every pregnancy is different. Make sure you ...

  17. Multiple-Micronutrient Fortified Non-Dairy Beverage Interventions Reduce the Risk of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in School-Aged Children in Low-Middle Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (i–iv)

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Grant J.; Dror, Daphna K.; Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-micronutrient (MMN) fortification of beverages may be an effective option to deliver micronutrients to vulnerable populations. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to evaluate the nutritional impacts of MMN fortified beverages in the context of low-middle income countries. A systematic search of published literature yielded 1022 citations, of which 10 randomized controlled trials (nine in school-aged children and one in pregnant women) met inclusion criteria. Results of school-aged children were included in the meta-analysis. Compared to iso-caloric controls, children who received MMN fortified beverages for 8 weeks to 6 months showed significant improvements in hemoglobin (+2.76 g/L, 95% CI [1.19, 4.33], p = 0.004; 8 studies) and serum ferritin (+15.42 pmol/L, [5.73, 25.12], p = 0.007; 8 studies); and reduced risk of anemia (RR 0.58 [0.29, 0.88], p = 0.005; 6 studies), iron deficiency (RR 0.34 [0.21, 0.55], p = 0.002; 7 studies), and iron deficiency anemia (RR 0.17 [0.06, 0.53], p = 0.02; 3 studies). MMN fortified beverage interventions could have major programmatic implications for reducing the burden of anemia and iron deficiency in school-aged children in low-middle income countries. Additional research is needed to investigate effects on other biochemical outcomes and population subgroups. PMID:26007336

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Iron Deficiency Anemia and Iron Depletion During Pregnancy: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Costa, Ana; Vargas, Sara; Clode, Nuno; M Graça, Luís

    2016-09-01

    Introdução: A anemia e a carência de ferro são problemas de saúde globais e são mais frequentes em grávidas, mulheres em idade reprodutiva e crianças. O objetivo deste trabalho consistiu na avaliação da prevalência de anemia ferropénica e dos fatores de risco associados à ferropénia, na primeira metade da gravidez, numa amostra da população portuguesa. Material e Métodos: Estudo prospetivo, conduzido num hospital terciário, que incluiu grávidas até à 20ª semana de gestação. Foram coletados dados demográficos, relativos à gravidez e foram determinados os níveis séricos de hemoglobina e de ferritina no sangue materno. Recorreu-se à análise de regressão logística de variáveis múltiplas para identificar potenciais fatores de risco para ferropénia. Resultados: Foram incluídas 201 grávidas, das quais cinco (2,49%) tinham anemia. Para além disso, 77 grávidas (38,3%) tinham carência de ferro e 22 (10,9%) apresentaram ferropénia grave. A idade materna foi o único fator de risco identificado. O odds ratio foi de 12,99 (95% IC 2,41 - 70,0) para grávidas com idade inferior a 20 anos e de 2,09 (95% IC 1,05 - 4,14), para grávidas com idade superior a 30 anos. Discussão e Conclusão: Na nossa amostra, a prevalência de anemia na primeira metade da gravidez foi inferior à reportada noutros estudos. No entanto, mais de 30% das grávidas apresentaram carência de ferro. A idade materna foi o único fator de risco identificado.

  19. Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane burden and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the epidemiologic evidence.

    PubMed Central

    López-Cervantes, Malaquías; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; Tobías, Aurelio; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2004-01-01

    The relationship of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure and breast cancer risk has received increasing attention since the beginning of the 1990s. Contradicting published results regarding the relationship between body burden levels of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDE)--the main DDT metabolite--and breast cancer, we argue that such differences stem from methodologic differences among those studies. We performed a meta-analysis of 22 articles using DerSimonian and Laird's method for random effects models. The Q-statistic was used to identify heterogeneity in the outcome variable across studies. The gradient of p,p'-DDE exposure in epidemiologic studies was homogenized to serum lipid bases (nanograms per gram). The potential for publication bias was examined by means of the Begg's test. We discuss methodologic features of the studies in an attempt to reconcile the findings. The summary odds ratio (OR) for selected studies was 0.97 (95% confidence interval, 0.87-1.09) and the gradient of exposure ranged from 84.37 to 12,948 ng/g. No overall heterogeneity in the OR was observed (chi-squared = 27.93; df = 23; p = 0.218). Neither the study design nor the lack of breast-feeding control or the type of biologic specimen used to measure p,p'-DDE levels were the causes of heterogeneity throughout the studies. Evidence for publication bias was not found (p = 0.253). Overall, these results should be regarded as a strong evidence to discard the putative relationship between p,p'-DDE and breast cancer risk. Nevertheless, the exposure to DDT during critical periods of human development--from conception to adolescence--and individual variations in metabolizing enzymes of DDT or its derivatives are still important areas to be researched in regard to breast cancer development in adulthood. PMID:14754575

  20. Anemia and heart failure.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Eileen; Murphy, Clare; McMurray, John J V

    2004-12-01

    Over the past few years, anemia has emerged as a powerful independent predictor of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). It affects up to 50% of patients with CHF, depending on the definition of anemia used and on the population studied. Even small reductions in hemoglobin are associated with worse outcome. However, the causes of anemia in CHF remain unclear, although impairment of renal function and inflammatory cytokines are proposed mechanisms. Both may act through impairment of the synthesis or action of erythropoietin. Preliminary studies have demonstrated improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance, quality of life, and reductions in hospitalizations when patients with severe CHF were treated with erythropoietin. The benefits and the potential risks of such therapies will be further addressed in upcoming larger randomized trials. The recent interest in anemia reflects a new perspective in heart failure therapy, focusing on non-cardiovascular comorbidities.

  1. The risk of introduction of equine infectious anemia virus into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada.

    PubMed

    Asseged, B D; Habtemariam, T; Tameru, B; Nganwa, D

    2012-01-15

    Deriving horse oocytes in the USA is hampered by the lack of abattoirs processing horse carcasses which could provide abundant quantities of ovaries from slaughtered mares. Therefore, several cloning industries in the USA are attempting to import cloned horse embryos from Canada. Like any agricultural commodity, cloned embryos pose a risk of introduction of exotic animal diseases into the importing country. Under such circumstances, risk assessment could provide an objective, transparent, and internationally accepted means for evaluating the risk. This quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was initiated to determine the risk of introduction of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) into the USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada. In assessing the risk, a structured knowledge base regarding cloning in relation to Equine infectious anemia (EIA) was first developed. Based on the knowledge base, a scenario tree was developed to determine conditions (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of EIAV along the cloning pathway. Parameters for the occurrence of the event at each node were estimated using published literature. Using @Risk software and setting Monte Carlo simulation at 50,000 iterations, the probability of importing an EIAV-infected cloned horse embryo was 1.8 × 10(-9) (R = 1.5 × 10(-12) to 2.9 × 10(-8)). Taking into account the current protocol for equine cloning and assuming the yield of 5 to 30 clones per year, the possible number of EIAV-infected cloned horse embryos ranged from 2.0 × 10(-10) to 9.1 × 10(-5) (Mean = 1.4×10(-6)) per year. Consequently, it would take up to 1.5 × 10(7) (R = 1.6 × 10(4) to 5.1 × 10(10)) years for EIAV to be introduced into the USA. Based on the knowledge base and our critical pathway analysis, the biological plausibility of introducing EIAV into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada is extremely low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fungal burden in waste industry: an occupational risk to be solved.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Carla; Faria, Tiago; dos Santos, Mateus; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Anita Quintal; Sabino, Raquel; Viegas, Susana

    2015-04-01

    High loads of fungi have been reported in different types of waste management plants. This study intends to assess fungal contamination in one waste-sorting plant before and after cleaning procedures in order to analyze their effectiveness. Air samples of 50 L were collected through an impaction method, while surface samples, taken at the same time, were collected by the swabbing method and subject to further macro- and microscopic observations. In addition, we collected air samples of 250 L using the impinger Coriolis μ air sampler (Bertin Technologies) at 300 L/min airflow rate in order to perform real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) amplification of genes from specific fungal species, namely Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus complexes, as well as Stachybotrys chartarum species. Fungal quantification in the air ranged from 180 to 5,280 CFU m(-3) before cleaning and from 220 to 2,460 CFU m(-3) after cleaning procedures. Surfaces presented results that ranged from 29×10(4) to 109×10(4) CFU m(-2) before cleaning and from 11×10(4) to 89×10(4) CFU m(-2) after cleaning. Statistically significant differences regarding fungal load were not detected between before and after cleaning procedures. Toxigenic strains from A. flavus complex and S. chartarum were not detected by qPCR. Conversely, the A. fumigatus species was successfully detected by qPCR and interestingly it was amplified in two samples where no detection by conventional methods was observed. Overall, these results reveal the inefficacy of the cleaning procedures and that it is important to determine fungal burden in order to carry out risk assessment.

  3. Burden of human metapneumovirus infections in patients with cancer: Risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    El Chaer, Firas; Shah, Dimpy P; Kmeid, Joumana; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Hosing, Chitra M; Mulanovich, Victor E; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-06-15

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) causes upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URIs and LRIs, respectively) in healthy and immunocompromised patients; however, its clinical burden in patients with cancer remains unknown. In a retrospective study of all laboratory-confirmed hMPV infections treated at the authors' institution between April 2012 and May 2015, clinical characteristics, risk factors for progression to an LRI, treatment, and outcomes in patients with cancer were determined. In total, 181 hMPV infections were identified in 90 patients (50%) with hematologic malignancies (HMs), in 57 (31%) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients, and in 34 patients (19%) with solid tumors. Most patients (92%) had a community-acquired infection and presented with URIs (67%), and 43% developed LRIs (59 presented with LRIs and 19 progressed from a URI to an LRI). On multivariable analysis, an underlying HM (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-8.64; P = .029), nosocomial infection (aOR, 26.9; 95% CI, 2.79-259.75; P = .004), and hypoxia (oxygen saturation [SpO2], ≤ 92%) at presentation (aOR, 9.61; 95% CI, 1.98-46.57; P = .005) were identified as independent factors associated with LRI. All-cause mortality at 30 days from hMPV diagnosis was low (4%), and patients with LRIs had a 10% mortality rate at day 30 from diagnosis; whereas patients with URIs had a 0% mortality rate. hMPV infections in patients with cancer may cause significant morbidity, especially for those with underlying HM who may develop an LRI. Despite high morbidity and the lack of directed antiviral therapy for hMPV infections, mortality at day 30 from this infection remained low in this studied population. Cancer 2017;123:2329-2337. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Burden of Cardio- and Cerebro-vascular Diseases and the Conventional Risk Factors in South Asian Population.

    PubMed

    Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Shahana, Nahid; Wangchuk, Lungten Z; Specogna, Adrian V; Al Mamun, Mohammad; Khan, Mudassir Azeez; Choudhury, Sohel Reza; Zaman, M Mostafa; Rumana, Nahid

    2013-06-01

    Similar to most populations, South Asian countries are also witnessing the dramatic transitions in health during the last few decades with the major causes of adverse health shifting from a predominance of nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases to chronic diseases such as cardio and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). We summarized the available information of the burden of CVD and risk factors in the South Asian populations. The prevalence of conventional cardiovascular has been increasing among all South Asian populations. Extensive urbanization, shift in dietary pattern and sedentary daily life style is contributing towards the worsening of the CVD risk factor scenario. The burdens of the chronic cardiovascular risk factors are much prevalent in the South Asian populations. These are also rising alarmingly which ought to influence the already existed heavy CVD burden. Similar to the rest of the world, management for the conventional cardiovascular risk factors is very important for the prevention of CVD in South Asia. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2008-03-01

    Anemia can result from deficient erythropoiesis [aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease (ACD), thalassemia, megaloblastic anemia, chronic renal failure, hematological malignancies, etc.], excessive RBC destruction [hereditary spherocytosis, inherited enzyme deficiency, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), etc.], and blood loss. Based on the measured red cell size(MCV), anemia is classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron parameters (serum iron, serum ferritin, etc.), reticulocyte count, bone marrow examination, Coombs test, serum vitamin B12 level, and Ham test are also useful in the differential diagnosis of anemia. Novel treatment of anemia includes lenalidomide for 5q(-)MDS, azacitidine for high-risk MDS, and eculizumab for PNH. Oral iron chelator(deferasirox) developed for the treatment of transfusional iron overload is also very useful for the management of patients with bone marrow failure syndromes.

  6. Underlying Factors Associated with Anemia in Amazonian Children: A Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Marly A.; Scopel, Kézia K.G.; Muniz, Pascoal T.; Villamor, Eduardo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although iron deficiency is considered to be the main cause of anemia in children worldwide, other contributors to childhood anemia remain little studied in developing countries. We estimated the relative contributions of different factors to anemia in a population-based, cross-sectional survey. Methodology We obtained venous blood samples from 1111 children aged 6 months to 10 years living in the frontier town of Acrelândia, northwest Brazil, to estimate the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency by measuring hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Children were simultaneously screened for vitamin A, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies; intestinal parasite infections; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; and sickle cell trait carriage. Multiple Poisson regression and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were used to describe associations between anemia and the independent variables. Principal Findings The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and iron-deficiency anemia were 13.6%, 45.4%, and 10.3%, respectively. Children whose families were in the highest income quartile, compared with the lowest, had a lower risk of anemia (aPR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.37–0.98). Child age (<24 months, 2.90; 2.01–4.20) and maternal parity (>2 pregnancies, 2.01; 1.40–2.87) were positively associated with anemia. Other associated correlates were iron deficiency (2.1; 1.4–3.0), vitamin B12 (1.4; 1.0–2.2), and folate (2.0; 1.3–3.1) deficiencies, and C-reactive protein concentrations (>5 mg/L, 1.5; 1.1–2.2). Conclusions Addressing morbidities and multiple nutritional deficiencies in children and mothers and improving the purchasing power of poorer families are potentially important interventions to reduce the burden of anemia. PMID:22574149

  7. Age of Complementary Foods Introduction and Risk of Anemia in Children Aged 4–6 years: A Prospective Birth Cohort in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fenglei; Liu, Huijuan; Wan, Yi; Li, Jing; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Jusheng; Huang, Tao; Li, Duo

    2017-01-01

    Age of complementary foods introduction is associated with childhood anemia, but the ideal age for the introduction of complementary foods to infants is a continuing topic of debate. We examined the longitudinal association between complementary foods introduction age and risk of anemia in 18,446 children from the Jiaxing Birth Cohort, who had detailed complementary feeding records at 3 and 6 months of age and had hemoglobin concentrations measured at 4–6 years. Early introduction of complementary foods at 3–6 months of age was significantly associated with a higher risk of anemia (odds ratio = 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.28) and a lower hemoglobin concentration of −0.84 g/L (95% confidence interval: −1.33 to −0.35) in children aged 4–6 years, compared with those fed complementary foods starting at 6 months of age. When it comes to the specific type of complementary foods, early introduction of all plant-based foods was associated with increased anemia risks and lower hemoglobin concentrations, while early introduction of most animal-based foods was not. These findings may be informative regarding the appropriate time to introduce complementary foods in infants. PMID:28333130

  8. Age of Complementary Foods Introduction and Risk of Anemia in Children Aged 4-6 years: A Prospective Birth Cohort in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenglei; Liu, Huijuan; Wan, Yi; Li, Jing; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Jusheng; Huang, Tao; Li, Duo

    2017-03-23

    Age of complementary foods introduction is associated with childhood anemia, but the ideal age for the introduction of complementary foods to infants is a continuing topic of debate. We examined the longitudinal association between complementary foods introduction age and risk of anemia in 18,446 children from the Jiaxing Birth Cohort, who had detailed complementary feeding records at 3 and 6 months of age and had hemoglobin concentrations measured at 4-6 years. Early introduction of complementary foods at 3-6 months of age was significantly associated with a higher risk of anemia (odds ratio = 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.28) and a lower hemoglobin concentration of -0.84 g/L (95% confidence interval: -1.33 to -0.35) in children aged 4-6 years, compared with those fed complementary foods starting at 6 months of age. When it comes to the specific type of complementary foods, early introduction of all plant-based foods was associated with increased anemia risks and lower hemoglobin concentrations, while early introduction of most animal-based foods was not. These findings may be informative regarding the appropriate time to introduce complementary foods in infants.

  9. Anemia among indigenous women in Brazil: findings from the First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria Carolina; Buffarini, Romina; Santos, Ricardo V; Cardoso, Andrey M; Welch, James R; Garnelo, Luiza; Coimbra, Carlos E A; Horta, Bernardo L

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is recognized as a major public health problem that disproportionately affects vulnerable populations. Indigenous women of reproductive age in Brazil are thought to be at high risk, but lack of nationwide data limits knowledge about the burden of disease and its main determinants. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anemia and associated factors in this population using data from The First National Survey of Indigenous People's Health and Nutrition in Brazil. Data were collected from Indigenous women between 15 and 49 years old based on a nationwide sample of villages. The outcomes of interest were hemoglobin levels (g/dL) and anemia (< 12 g/dL for nonpregnant and < 11 g/dL for pregnant women). Multilevel models were used to explore associations with contextual (village) and individual (household/woman) level variables. Based on data for 6692 Indigenous women, the nationwide mean hemoglobin level was 12.39 g/dL (95% CI: 12.29-12.50). Anemia prevalence was high (33.0%; 95% CI: 30.40-35.61%) and showed pronounced regional disparities. No village-level characteristics were associated with anemia or hemoglobin levels in the multilevel model. Even after controlling for upper level variables, socioeconomic status, parity, body mass index, and having been treated for malaria were associated with anemia and hemoglobin levels. The prevalence of anemia in Brazilian Indigenous women was 12% greater than the national estimates for women of reproductive age. Anemia prevalence and mean hemoglobin levels among Indigenous women appear to be partly explained by some previously recognized risk factors, such as socioeconomic status, body mass index, and malaria; however, part of the variability in these outcomes remains unexplained. Knowledge of health status and its potential determinants is essential to guide public policies aimed at controlling anemia burden in Indigenous communities.

  10. The contribution of major depression to the global burden of ischemic heart disease: a comparative risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease and mental health both hold enormous public health importance, both ranking highly in results of the recent Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 (GBD 2010). For the first time, the GBD 2010 has systematically and quantitatively assessed major depression as an independent risk factor for the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD) using comparative risk assessment methodology. Methods A pooled relative risk (RR) was calculated from studies identified through a systematic review with strict inclusion criteria designed to provide evidence of independent risk factor status. Accepted case definitions of depression include diagnosis by a clinician or by non-clinician raters adhering to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) or International Classification of Diseases (ICD) classifications. We therefore refer to the exposure in this paper as major depression as opposed to the DSM-IV category of major depressive disorder (MDD). The population attributable fraction (PAF) was calculated using the pooled RR estimate. Attributable burden was calculated by multiplying the PAF by the underlying burden of IHD estimated as part of GBD 2010. Results The pooled relative risk of developing IHD in those with major depression was 1.56 (95% CI 1.30 to 1.87). Globally there were almost 4 million estimated IHD disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), which can be attributed to major depression in 2010; 3.5 million years of life lost and 250,000 years of life lived with a disability. These findings highlight a previously underestimated mortality component of the burden of major depression. As a proportion of overall IHD burden, 2.95% (95% CI 1.48 to 4.46%) of IHD DALYs were estimated to be attributable to MDD in 2010. Eastern Europe and North Africa/Middle East demonstrate the highest proportion with Asia Pacific, high income representing the lowest. Conclusions The present work comprises the most robust systematic review of its

  11. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  12. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  13. Rheumatoid anemia.

    PubMed

    Masson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid anemia is a typical example of anemia of chronic disease. It differs from other forms of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia or iatrogenic anemia. Rheumatoid anemia is normochromic, normocytic or, less often, microcytic, aregenerative, and accompanied with thrombocytosis. Serum transferrin levels are normal or low, transferrin saturation is decreased, serum ferritin levels are normal or high, the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is not increased (a distinguishing feature with iron deficiency anemia), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio is lower than 1. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of rheumatoid anemia based on a review of the literature. Iron metabolism, absorption, diffusion, storage, and use by the bone marrow are described using published data on transferrin, ferritin, and hepcidin. Hepcidin is now recognized as a key factor in rheumatoid anemia, in conjunction with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Hepcidin is a hormone that lowers serum iron levels and regulates iron transport across membranes, preventing iron from exiting the enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes. In addition, hepcidin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes. The action of hepcidin is mediated by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin expression in the liver is dependent on the protein hemojuvelin. Inflammation leads to increased hepcidin production via IL-6, whereas iron deficiency and factors associated with increased erythropoiesis (hypoxia, bleeding, hemolysis, dyserythropoiesis) suppress the production of hepcidin. Data from oncology studies and the effects of recombinant human IL-6 support a causal link between IL-6 production and the development of anemia in patients with chronic disease. IL-6 diminishes the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow and lowers the serum iron level, and these abnormalities can be corrected by administering an IL-6 antagonist. IL-6 stimulates

  14. Russia-specific relative risks and their effects on the estimated alcohol-attributable burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Shield, Kevin D; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-05-10

    Alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for the burden of disease globally. This burden is estimated using Relative Risk (RR) functions for alcohol from meta-analyses that use data from all countries; however, for Russia and surrounding countries, country-specific risk data may need to be used. The objective of this paper is to compare the estimated burden of alcohol consumption calculated using Russia-specific alcohol RRs with the estimated burden of alcohol consumption calculated using alcohol RRs from meta-analyses. Data for 2012 on drinking indicators were calculated based on the Global Information System on Alcohol and Health. Data for 2012 on mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived with Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) lost by cause were obtained by country from the World Health Organization. Alcohol Population-Attributable Fractions (PAFs) were calculated based on a risk modelling methodology from Russia. These PAFs were compared to PAFs calculated using methods applied for all other countries. The 95% Uncertainty Intervals (UIs) for the alcohol PAFs were calculated using a Monte Carlo-like method. Using Russia-specific alcohol RR functions, in Russia in 2012 alcohol caused an estimated 231,900 deaths (95% UI: 185,600 to 278,200) (70,800 deaths among women and 161,100 deaths among men) and 13,295,000 DALYs lost (95% UI: 11,242,000 to 15,348,000) (3,670,000 DALYs lost among women and 9,625,000 DALYs lost among men) among people 0 to 64 years of age. This compares to an estimated 165,600 deaths (95% UI: 97,200 to 228,100) (29,700 deaths among women and 135,900 deaths among men) and 10,623,000 DALYs lost (95% UI: 7,265,000 to 13,754,000) (1,783,000 DALYs lost among women and 8,840,000 DALYs lost among men) among people 0 to 64 years of age caused by alcohol when non-Russia-specific alcohol RRs were used. Results indicate that if the Russia-specific RRs are used when estimating the health burden attributable to alcohol consumption in

  15. Analysis of Risk and Burden of Dysentery Associated with Floods from 2004 to 2010 in Nanning, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhidong; Ding, Guoyong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Xin; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery and to quantify the burden of dysentery due to floods in Nanning, China. A generalized additive mixed model was conducted to assess the relationship between monthly morbidity of dysentery and floods from 2004 to 2010. The years lived with disability (YLDs) of dysentery attributable to floods were then estimated based on the WHO framework of the burden of disease study for calculating the potential impact fraction. The relative risk (RR) of floods on the morbidity of dysentery was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18–1.75). The models suggest that a potential 1-day rise in flood duration may lead to 8% (RR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04–1.12) increase in the morbidity of dysentery. The average attributable YLD per 1,000 of dysentery caused by floods were 0.013 in males, 0.005 in females, and 0.009 in persons. Our study confirms that floods have significantly increased the risk and the burden of dysentery in the study area. Public health action should be taken to prevent and control the potential risk of dysentery after floods. Vulnerable groups such as males and children should be paid more attention. PMID:26416103

  16. Analysis of Risk and Burden of Dysentery Associated with Floods from 2004 to 2010 in Nanning, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhidong; Ding, Guoyong; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Xin; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between floods and the morbidity of dysentery and to quantify the burden of dysentery due to floods in Nanning, China. A generalized additive mixed model was conducted to assess the relationship between monthly morbidity of dysentery and floods from 2004 to 2010. The years lived with disability (YLDs) of dysentery attributable to floods were then estimated based on the WHO framework of the burden of disease study for calculating the potential impact fraction. The relative risk (RR) of floods on the morbidity of dysentery was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-1.75). The models suggest that a potential 1-day rise in flood duration may lead to 8% (RR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.12) increase in the morbidity of dysentery. The average attributable YLD per 1,000 of dysentery caused by floods were 0.013 in males, 0.005 in females, and 0.009 in persons. Our study confirms that floods have significantly increased the risk and the burden of dysentery in the study area. Public health action should be taken to prevent and control the potential risk of dysentery after floods. Vulnerable groups such as males and children should be paid more attention. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  17. Significance of Travel to Rural Areas as a Risk Factor for Malarial Anemia in an Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Siri, Jose G.; Wilson, Mark L.; Murray, Susan; Rosen, Daniel H.; Vulule, John M.; Slutsker, Laurence; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of malaria in urban environments is poorly characterized, yet increasingly problematic. We conducted an unmatched case–control study of risk factors for malarial anemia with high parasitemia in urban Kisumu, Kenya, from June 2002 through February 2003. Cases (n = 80) were hospital patients with a hemoglobin level ≤ 8 g/dL and a Plasmodium parasite density ≥ 10,000/μL. Controls (n = 826) were healthy respondents to a concurrent citywide knowledge, attitude, and practice survey. Children who reported spending at least one night per month in a rural area were especially at risk (35% of cases; odds ratio = 9.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.4–19.7, P < 0.0001), and use of mosquito coils, bed net ownership, and house construction were non-significant, potentially indicating that malaria exposure during rural travel comprises an important element of risk. Control of severe malaria in an urban setting may be complicated by Plasmodium infections acquired elsewhere. Epidemiologic studies of urban malaria in low transmission settings should take travel history into account. PMID:20207862

  18. Prevalence and clinical significance of visible oral lesions in patients with Fanconi Anemia at risk for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Frohnmayer, Amy; Pomjanski, Natalia; Hays, Laura E; Biesterfeld, Stefan

    2017-05-24

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic bone marrow failure syndrome, variably associated with congenital anomalies and a sharply increased risk for epithelial malignancies. During the past 20 years, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has dramatically improved survival. However, compared to the general population, FA patients are at greatly increased risk, and at a much younger age, for squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the oral cavity, esophagus and the anogenital region. The relative risk and age of onset appears to negatively correlate with HSCT in FA patients. Due to the underlying defect in DNA crosslink repair, standard chemotherapy protocols cannot be used in FA patients with SCCs. Therefore, early detection of precancerous lesions is the most promising option for long-term cure and survival. Based on oral screenings of 300 patients, we report here on the prevalence of visible oral lesions as potential precursors of oral SCCs in FA patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. An assessment of medical resource utilization and hospitalization cost associated with a diagnosis of anemia in women with obstetrical bleeding in the United States.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H; Patel, Snehal T; Watson, Wendy; Zaidi, Qasim R; Mangione, Antoinette; Goss, Thomas F

    2008-10-01

    Anemia during pregnancy has been associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Although women with obstetrical bleeding are at increased risk for developing anemia, little is known about the prevalence and burden associated with anemia in hospitalized women with this condition. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence, demographic characteristics, medical resource utilization, and hospitalization cost associated with a diagnosis of anemia in hospitalized women with obstetrical bleeding in the United States. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2003) was queried using ICD-9-CM codes to identify all pregnancy-related discharges as well as discharges with diagnosis codes for conditions associated with obstetrical bleeding. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate demographic characteristics, medical resource utilization components and hospitalization cost for two groups: patients with a diagnosis of anemia and patients without a diagnosis of anemia. Of the estimated 4,525,714 pregnancy-related discharges in the United States in 2003, more than 250,000 recorded diagnosis codes associated with obstetrical bleeding. Nearly 1 in 5 of these women had an anemia diagnosis. A diagnosis of anemia in hospitalized women with obstetrical bleeding was associated with a 9-fold increase in blood transfusion (p < 0.0001), 33% longer average length of stay (p < 0.0001), and 50% higher average total cost per hospitalization (p < 0.0001). Anemia and blood transfusion are frequently observed in hospitalized women with obstetrical bleeding. To improve outcomes in these patients and alleviate the adverse impact of anemia on postpartum health status, greater provider awareness of the prevalence and burden of illness associated with a diagnosis of anemia in hospitalized women with obstetrical bleeding is warranted.

  20. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab reduced the risk of anemia associated with chemotherapy-A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sher, Amna; Wu, Shenhong

    2011-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may play a role in erythropoiesis. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) to determine the effect of the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab on anemia in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Databases from PUBMED, the Web of Science, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conferences until May 2010 were searched to identify relevant studies. Eligible studies included prospective RCTs in which the combination of bevacizumab and chemotherapy was compared with chemotherapy alone. Summary incidence rate, relative risk (RR), and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. A total of 6439 patients with a variety of solid tumors were included for analysis from 11 RCTs. Among those patients receiving bevacizumab and chemotherapy, the incidences of all-grade and high-grade (grade 3 and above) anemia were 17.8% (95% CI: 11.1-27.1%) and 2.8% (95% CI: 1.6-5.0%) respectively. In comparison with chemotherapy alone, bevacizumab significantly reduced all-grade (RR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.66-1.0, p = 0.007) and high-grade anemia (RR, 0.72; 95% CI: 0.57-0.90, p = 0.005). The effect did not vary significantly among bevacizumab doses (p = 0.88), tumor types (p = 0.75) or chemotherapy regimens (p = 0.98). Bevacizumab may significantly reduce the risk of anemia with chemotherapy in cancer patients.

  1. [Genetic burden of psychosomatic diseases and exogenous risk-factors of cardiovascular diseases in healthy students with different physiological and psychological adaptation abilities].

    PubMed

    Tsitsiashvili, Kh Sh; Kavtaradze, G V; Bakradze, N M; Gvenetadze, R N; Makharadze, T G

    2005-03-01

    Exogenous risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and genetic burden of psychosomatic pathologies have been studied in practically healthy students with various physiological and psychological adaptation abilities for differential analysis of the risk for development of cardiological diseases. The complex of genetic burden of psychosomatic pathologies and exogenous risk factors was significantly more frequent in practically healthy students with strong profile of adaptation mechanisms, increased circadian profile, zero type and weak persistence of fixated set.

  2. Anemia, Blood Transfusion Requirements and Mortality Risk in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults Requiring Acute Medical Admission to Hospital in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Andrew D.; Lawn, Stephen D.; Schutz, Charlotte; Burton, Rosie; Boulle, Andrew; Cobelens, Frank J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background. Morbidity and mortality remain high among hospitalized patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa despite widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy. Severe anemia is likely one important driver, and some evidence suggests that blood transfusions may accelerate HIV progression and paradoxically increase short-term mortality. We investigated the relationship between anemia, blood transfusions, and mortality in a South African district hospital. Methods. Unselected consecutive HIV-infected adults requiring acute medical admission to a Cape Town township district hospital were recruited. Admission hemoglobin concentrations were used to classify anemia severity according to World Health Organization/AIDS Clinical Trials Group criteria. Vital status was determined at 90 days, and Cox regression analyses were used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Results. Of 585 HIV-infected patients enrolled, 578 (98.8%) were included in the analysis. Anemia was detected in 84.8% of patients and was severe (hemoglobin, 6.5–7.9 g/dL) or life-threatening (hemoglobin, <6.5 g/dL) in 17.3% and 13.3%, respectively. Within 90 days of the date of admission, 13.5% (n = 78) patients received at least 1 blood transfusion with red cell concentrate and 77 (13.3%) patients died. In univariable analysis, baseline hemoglobin and receipt of blood transfusion were associated with increased mortality risk. However, in multivariable analysis, neither hemoglobin nor receipt of a blood transfusion were independently associated with greater mortality risk. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining illnesses other than tuberculosis and impaired renal function independently predicted mortality. Conclusions. Newly admitted HIV-infected adults had a high prevalence of severe or life-threatening anemia and blood transfusions were frequently required. However, after adjustment for confounders, blood transfusions did not confer an

  3. Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED): Protocol for a Prospective Study of Stroke Risk and Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Neelum D; Sánchez, Luisanna M; Urcuyo, Gabriela S; Bergés, Melissa E; Luden, Judy P; Stuber, Susan E; Latham, Teresa S; Mena, Rafael; Nieves, Rosa M; Ware, Russell E

    2017-06-02

    In the Dominican Republic, where the burden of sickle cell anemia (SCA) is high, many children lack access to routine screening and preventative care. Children with SCA are at risk for stroke, an event that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, screening via transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies children with SCA at highest stroke risk, allowing early intervention with blood transfusions. The need for indefinite transfusions for primary stroke prevention limits their practicality in limited-resource countries. Hydroxyurea has been shown to lower TCD velocities and to prevent conversion from conditional (170 to 199 cm/sec) to abnormal (greater than or equal to 200 cm/sec) velocities. In resource-limited settings, implementation of a TCD screening program, coupled with hydroxyurea therapy, could reduce the burden of SCA and stroke. The aims of the Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED) trial are (1) to screen children with SCA for stroke risk using TCD and to determine the prevalence of elevated velocities in a cross-sectional sample; (2) to identify clinical and laboratory correlates of elevated velocities; and (3) to obtain longitudinal data on the natural history of TCD velocities and to measure therapeutic effects of hydroxyurea. This prospective trial, designed and conducted by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and Hospital Infantil Robert Reid Cabral (HIRRC) with Centro de Obstetricia y Ginecología, includes a baseline cross-sectional epidemiological survey of the distribution of TCD velocities across a large cohort of children with SCA in the Dominican Republic. Children with conditional velocities are eligible to begin protocol-directed hydroxyurea if laboratory criteria are met. The treatment schedule begins with a fixed-dose of approximately 20 mg/kg/day for 6 months, after which it escalates to maximum tolerated dose (MTD). All participants undergo longitudinal annual TCD

  4. Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED): Protocol for a Prospective Study of Stroke Risk and Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Luisanna M; Urcuyo, Gabriela S; Bergés, Melissa E; Luden, Judy P; Stuber, Susan E; Latham, Teresa S; Mena, Rafael; Nieves, Rosa M; Ware, Russell E

    2017-01-01

    Background In the Dominican Republic, where the burden of sickle cell anemia (SCA) is high, many children lack access to routine screening and preventative care. Children with SCA are at risk for stroke, an event that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, screening via transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies children with SCA at highest stroke risk, allowing early intervention with blood transfusions. The need for indefinite transfusions for primary stroke prevention limits their practicality in limited-resource countries. Hydroxyurea has been shown to lower TCD velocities and to prevent conversion from conditional (170 to 199 cm/sec) to abnormal (greater than or equal to 200 cm/sec) velocities. In resource-limited settings, implementation of a TCD screening program, coupled with hydroxyurea therapy, could reduce the burden of SCA and stroke. Objective The aims of the Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED) trial are (1) to screen children with SCA for stroke risk using TCD and to determine the prevalence of elevated velocities in a cross-sectional sample; (2) to identify clinical and laboratory correlates of elevated velocities; and (3) to obtain longitudinal data on the natural history of TCD velocities and to measure therapeutic effects of hydroxyurea. Methods This prospective trial, designed and conducted by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and Hospital Infantil Robert Reid Cabral (HIRRC) with Centro de Obstetricia y Ginecología, includes a baseline cross-sectional epidemiological survey of the distribution of TCD velocities across a large cohort of children with SCA in the Dominican Republic. Children with conditional velocities are eligible to begin protocol-directed hydroxyurea if laboratory criteria are met. The treatment schedule begins with a fixed-dose of approximately 20 mg/kg/day for 6 months, after which it escalates to maximum tolerated dose (MTD). All participants undergo

  5. Risk factor burden in middle age and lifetime risks for cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular death (Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry).

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Dyer, Alan R; Wang, Renwei; Daviglus, Martha L; Greenland, Philip

    2007-02-15

    Few data exist regarding the association of risk factor burden in middle age with lifetime risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-CVD death. In this study, participants in the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry aged 40 to 59 years in 1967 to 1973 were stratified into 5 groups on the basis of risk factor burden: favorable risk factor profile (untreated blood pressure or=1 unfavorable; or any 1, any 2, or >or=3 elevated (systolic >or=140 mm Hg or diastolic >or=90 mm Hg or treated hypertension; total cholesterol >or=240 mg/dl; current smoking; or body mass index >or=30 kg/m2). Remaining lifetime risks for CVD and non-CVD death were estimated through the age of 85 years. Eight thousand thirty-three men and 6,493 women were followed for 409,987 person-years; 2,582 died of CVD, and 3,955 died of non-CVD causes. A greater risk factor burden was associated with a higher incidence of CVD and non-CVD death. Compared with participants with >or=3 risk factors, those with favorable profiles had substantially lower lifetime risks for CVD death (20.5% vs 35.2% in men, 6.7% vs 31.9% in women) and markedly longer median Kaplan-Meier survival (>35 vs 26 years in men, >35 vs 28 years in women). In conclusion, having favorable risk factors in middle age is associated with a lower lifetime risk for CVD death and markedly longer survival. These results should encourage efforts aimed at preventing the development of risk factors in younger subjects to decrease CVD mortality and promote longevity.

  6. Describing the burden of non-communicable disease risk factors among adults with diabetes in Wallis and Futuna

    PubMed Central

    Brostrom, R.; Ram, S.; McKenzie, J.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Roseveare, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The South Pacific Territory of Wallis and Futuna has a high burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD): 18% of adults have diabetes mellitus (DM) and 87% are classified as overweight or obese. Objective: To characterise the burden of additional World Health Organization (WHO) recognised NCD risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, eating less than five fruit or vegetable servings per day and a sedentary lifestyle, among adults with DM. Design: Re-analysis of cross-sectional data from a 2009 national survey. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: Of 487 adults sampled, 87 (18%) had DM. Nearly 99% of individuals with DM had at least one additional NCD risk factor, and 62% had three or more concurrent NCD risk factors. Individuals with DM were more likely to be obese (OR 1.66, 95%CI 1.01–2.74) and had a much higher prevalence of high blood pressure (OR 3.02, 95%CI 1.87–4.86). Conclusion: DM is rarely identified in the absence of other NCD risk factors. We recommend an integrated approach to the management of DM and other NCD risk factors in routine care rather than a disease-specific approach. PMID:26477286

  7. Association of HLA Genetic Risk Burden With Disease Phenotypes in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Noriko; Keshavan, Anisha; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Zhu, Alyssa H.; Datta, Esha; Schlaeger, Regina; Caillier, Stacy J.; Santaniello, Adam; Lizée, Antoine; Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Hollenbach, Jill; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Henry, Roland G.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although multiple HLA alleles associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk have been identified, genotype-phenotype studies in the HLA region remain scarce and inconclusive. OBJECTIVES To investigate whether MS risk-associated HLA alleles also affect disease phenotypes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cross-sectional, case-control study comprising 652 patients with MS who had comprehensive phenotypic information and 455 individuals of European origin serving as controls was conducted at a single academic research site. Patients evaluated at the Multiple Sclerosis Center at University of California, San Francisco between July 2004 and September 2005 were invited to participate. Spinal cord imaging in the data set was acquired between July 2013 and March 2014; analysis was performed between December 2014 and December 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cumulative HLA genetic burden (HLAGB) calculated using the most updated MS-associated HLA alleles vs clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, including age at onset, disease severity, conversion time from clinically isolated syndrome to clinically definite MS, fractions of cortical and subcortical gray matter and cerebral white matter, brain lesion volume, spinal cord gray and white matter areas, upper cervical cord area, and the ratio of gray matter to the upper cervical cord area. Multivariate modeling was applied separately for each sex data set. RESULTS Of the 652 patients with MS, 586 had no missing genetic data and were included in the HLAGB analysis. In these 586 patients (404 women [68.9%]; mean [SD] age at disease onset, 33.6 [9.4] years), HLAGB was higher than in controls (median [IQR], 0.7 [0–1.4] and 0 [−0.3 to 0.5], respectively; P = 1.8 × 10−27). A total of 619 (95.8%) had relapsing-onset MS and 27 (4.2%) had progressive-onset MS. No significant difference was observed between relapsing-onset MS and primary progressive MS. A higher HLAGB was associated with younger age at onset

  8. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system attacks the actual intrinsic factor protein or the cells in the lining of ...

  9. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, or high rates of red blood cell destruction. ...

  10. Nutritional anemias.

    PubMed

    Oski, F A

    1979-10-01

    The role of the metals, iron and copper, and the vitamins E, folic acid, and B12 in the genesis of nutritional anemias in infancy have been reviewed. All are preventable. The precise requirements for each of these trace elements and vitamins in the small premature infant remain to be defined. The nonhematologic consequences of these nutritional deficiencies require further study. Anemia may prove to be the least important manifestation of the deficiency states.

  11. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  12. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically.

  13. The risk of introduction of equine infectious anemia virus into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada

    PubMed Central

    Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Tameru, Berhanu; Nganwa, David

    2011-01-01

    Deriving horse oocytes in the USA is hampered by the lack of abattoirs processing horse carcasses which could provide abundant quantities of ovaries from slaughtered mares. Therefore, several cloning industries in the USA are attempting to import cloned horse embryos from Canada. Like any agricultural commodity, cloned embryos pose a risk of introduction of exotic animal diseases into the importing country. Under such circumstances, risk assessment could provide an objective, transparent, and internationally accepted means for evaluating the risk. This quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was initiated to determine the risk of introduction of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada. In assessing the risk, a structured knowledge base regarding cloning in relation to EIA was first developed. Based on the knowledge base, a scenario tree was developed to determine conditions (with mathematical probabilities) that could lead to the introduction and maintenance of EIAV along the cloning pathway. Parameters for the occurrence of the event at each node were estimated using published literature. Using @RISK software and setting Monte Carlo simulation at 50 000 iterations, the probability of importing an EIAV-infected cloned horse embryo was 1.8×10−9 (R = 1.5×10−12 to 2.9×10−8). Taking into account the current protocol for equine cloning and assuming the yield of 5 to 30 clones per year, the possible number of EIAV-infected cloned horse embryos ranged from 2.0×10−10 to 9.1×10−5 (Mean = 1.4×10−6) per year. Consequently, it would take up to 1.5×107 (R = 1.6×104 to 5.1×1010) years for EIAV to be introduced into the USA. Based on the knowledge base and our critical pathway analysis, the biological plausibility of introducing EIAV into USA via cloned horse embryos imported from Canada is extremely low. PMID:21958631

  14. Polymorphisms of the TGF-β1 gene and the risk of acquired aplastic anemia in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hong; Rong, Liucheng; He, Guangsheng; He, Hailong; Lin, Shengyun; Yang, Yan; Xue, Yao; Fang, Yongjun

    2017-03-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a hematological disease characterized by failure of bone marrow hematopoiesis resulting in pancytopenia. While immune-mediated destruction of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of acquired AA, the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is crucial in adjusting the immune system. The aim of our study was to investigate the role of TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms rs1800469 and rs2317130 in susceptibility to acquired AA. Via the approach of SNaPshot, we genotyped rs1800469 and rs2317130 in 101 patients with acquired AA and 165 controls. It derived us to the conclusion that the genotype TT of rs1800469 (C/T) was significantly associated with decreased risk of acquired AA (adjusted OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.18-0.83, P = 0.014). Furthermore, this decreased risk was more pronounced among male patients (adjusted OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.13-0.95, P = 0.038) and SAA/vSAA (severe AA/very severe AA) patients (adjusted OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.12-0.77, P = 0.02) compared with controls in subgroup analysis. However, a significant increased risk was observed in the genotype distributions of rs2317130 for TT genotype (adjusted OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 1.03-6.19, P = 0.04) compared with the CC genotype among the SAA/vSAA patients and controls in the severity stratification analysis. Our results indicated that TGF-β1 gene polymorphisms might be involved in the munity of acquired AA in a Chinese population. This initial analysis provides valuable clues for further study of TGF-β1 pathway genes in acquired AA.

  15. Balancing the benefits and risks of public-private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Kraak, Vivica I; Harrigan, Paige B; Lawrence, Mark; Harrison, Paul J; Jackson, Michaela A; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-03-01

    Transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies, and their corporate foundations, may be potential collaborators to help address complex public health nutrition challenges. While UN system guidelines are available for private-sector engagement, non-governmental organizations (NGO) have limited guidelines to navigate diverse opportunities and challenges presented by partnering with these companies through public-private partnerships (PPP) to address the global double burden of malnutrition. We conducted a search of electronic databases, UN system websites and grey literature to identify resources about partnerships used to address the global double burden of malnutrition. A narrative summary provides a synthesis of the interdisciplinary literature identified. We describe partnership opportunities, benefits and challenges; and tools and approaches to help NGO engage with the private sector to address global public health nutrition challenges. PPP benefits include: raising the visibility of nutrition and health on policy agendas; mobilizing funds and advocating for research; strengthening food-system processes and delivery systems; facilitating technology transfer; and expanding access to medications, vaccines, healthy food and beverage products, and nutrition assistance during humanitarian crises. PPP challenges include: balancing private commercial interests with public health interests; managing conflicts of interest; ensuring that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments; complying with ethical codes of conduct; assessing partnership compatibility; and evaluating partnership outcomes. NGO should adopt a systematic and transparent approach using available tools and processes to maximize benefits and minimize risks of partnering with transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies to effectively target the global double burden of malnutrition.

  16. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  17. Anemia after kidney transplantation; its prevalence, risk factors, and independent association with graft and patient survival: a time-varying analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heather; Talwar, Manish; Nogueira, Joseph M; Ugarte, Richard; Cangro, Charles; Rasheed, Hassaan; Klassen, David K; Weir, Matthew R; Haririan, Abdolreza

    2012-05-15

    Posttransplant anemia and its association with transplant outcomes have not been properly studied. We examined 530 renal allograft recipients transplanted at our center and followed up for 31.0±14.1 months. Hemoglobin (Hb), serum bicarbonate, and creatinine; use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and iron; and immunosuppressive regimen data were obtained at multiple time points during 24-month posttransplant. The overall prevalence of anemia was 89.4% at the time of transplant, dropping to 49.2% at 1 year and 44.3% at 2 years. ESA use decreased from 25.6% at 1 month to 8.23% at 24 months, only in 30.9% to 51.2% with severe anemia; 21.0% to 29.2% received iron supplements. Factors independently predictive of Hb included male gender (β=0.64, P<0.001, confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.82), estimated glomerular filtration rate (β=0.21 per 10 mL/min/1.73 m, P<0.001; CI: 0.16-0.27), bicarbonate (β=0.4 per 10 mmol/L increase, P<0.001; CI: 0.31-0.85), using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (β=0.36, P<0.001; CI: 0.16-0.55), African American race (β=-0.34, P=0.001, CI:-0.54 to -0.14), iron (β=-0.28, P=0.003, CI:-0.47 to -0.09) and ESA use (β=-0.73, P<0.001, CI:-0.93 to -0.52), and prednisone (β=-0.46, P<0.001, CI:-0.71 to -0.22 for >10 mg/day vs. none). Using a competing-risk regression model, Hb less than 9 in men and less than 8 in women, was associated with 5.25-fold higher risk of death-censored graft loss compared with no anemia (adjusted, P=0.005, CI: 1.7-16.7). Degree of anemia also remained significantly associated with risk of death (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.2, P<0.1, CI: 0.9-5.6 for grade 2; HR: 3.9, P=0.009, CI: 1.4-10.8 for grade 3; and HR: 4.8, P=0.08, CI: 1.5-15.4 for grade 4, all vs. grade 0). We showed that posttransplant anemia is common, and ESA/iron use remains suboptimal, and Hb is independently associated with graft failure and mortality.

  18. An official American Thoracic Society public policy statement: Novel risk factors and the global burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Mark D; Anthonisen, Nicholas; Coultas, David; Kuenzli, Nino; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Postma, Dirkje; Romieu, Isabelle; Silverman, Edwin K; Balmes, John R

    2010-09-01

    Although cigarette smoking is the most important cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a substantial proportion of COPD cases cannot be explained by smoking alone. To evaluate the risk factors for COPD besides personal cigarette smoking. We constituted an ad hoc subcommittee of the American Thoracic Society Environmental and Occupational Health Assembly. An international group of members was invited, based on their scientific expertise in a specific risk factor for COPD. For each risk factor area, the committee reviewed the literature, summarized the evidence, and developed conclusions about the likelihood of it causing COPD. All conclusions were based on unanimous consensus. The population-attributable fraction for smoking as a cause of COPD ranged from 9.7 to 97.9%, but was less than 80% in most studies, indicating a substantial burden of disease attributable to nonsmoking risk factors. On the basis of our review, we concluded that specific genetic syndromes and occupational exposures were causally related to the development of COPD. Traffic and other outdoor pollution, secondhand smoke, biomass smoke, and dietary factors are associated with COPD, but sufficient criteria for causation were not met. Chronic asthma and tuberculosis are associated with irreversible loss of lung function, but there remains uncertainty about whether there are important phenotypic differences compared with COPD as it is typically encountered in clinical settings. In public health terms, a substantive burden of COPD is attributable to risk factors other than smoking. To prevent COPD-related disability and mortality, efforts must focus on prevention and cessation of exposure to smoking and these other, less well-recognized risk factors.

  19. Special Education: Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Teramura; Mizoguchi

    1996-01-01

    WHAT IS HYPOPLASTIC ANEMIA? Aplastic anemia is a hematological disease characterized by pancytopenia and bone marrow hypoplasia. Acquired cases of aplastic anemia are almost all idiopathic and arise from unknown causes. Other cases of aplastic anemia are secondary and are caused by radiation, chemicals or viruses. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY: Aplastic anemia is manifested as a marked reduction in the number of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, but why this occurs is still uncertain. Some of the proposed causes include abnormalities of the hematopoietic stem cells, abnormalities in the hematopoietic microenvironment, and immunologically mediated damage to the hematopoietic stem cells (Figure 1). ABNORMALTIES OF THE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS: Patients with aplastic anemia, and long-term survivors in particular, are at increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute myelocytic leukemia. This suggests that, in at least some of these patients, the hematopoietic stem cells themselves are abnormal. It also suggests that in some of these patients the blood cells are clonal (that is, all the blood cells are derived from a single pluripotent stem cell). In short, what these findings imply is that aplastic anemia may be caused by the emergence of an abnormal clone. Clonal hematopoiesis, however, can also be considered nothing more than a consequence. In other words, it is possible that hematopoiesis in this kind of patient is performed by a lone pluripotent stem cell that somehow managed to survive eradication. No definitive interpretation of clonal hematopoiesis has been agreed upon, and it is still a topic for future research. ABNORMAL HEMATOPOIETIC MICROENVIRONMENT: The presence of stromal cells, which form the microenvironment of bone marrow, is very important in hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells proliferate and differentiate either by adhering to stromal cells or by being stimulated by the various

  20. A probabilistic quantitative microbial risk assessment model of norovirus disease burden from wastewater irrigation of vegetables in Shepparton, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hoi-Fei; Barker, S Fiona; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater can be an important resource for water-scarce regions of the world, but a major barrier to its use is the associated health risk. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a probabilistic modeling technique used to determine the health risks from wastewater reuse, but only a handful of QMRA studies have examined the norovirus health risks from consumption of vegetables irrigated with human wastewater, even though norovirus is a, if not the most, significant microbial cause of diarrheal disease world-wide. Furthermore, the majority of these studies have focused only on risks from lettuce consumption. To meet the knowledge gap in health risks for other vegetables, a QMRA model was constructed for agricultural wastewater irrigation in the regional city of Shepparton, Australia, using fecal shedding rates to estimate norovirus concentration in raw sewage. Annual norovirus disease burden was estimated for the consumption of lettuce, broccoli, cabbage, Asian vegetables, and cucumber after irrigation with treated wastewater. Results indicate that the waste stabilization pond treatment did not have sufficient virus removal to meet the World Health Organization (WHO) threshold for acceptable level of risk for wastewater reuse, but addition of disinfection treatments provided acceptable results for consumption of cucumber and broccoli. This is the first QMRA study to incorporate virus accumulation from previous wastewater irrigation events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Burden of typhoid fever in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic, literature-based update with risk-factor adjustment.

    PubMed

    Mogasale, Vittal; Maskery, Brian; Ochiai, R Leon; Lee, Jung Seok; Mogasale, Vijayalaxmi V; Ramani, Enusa; Kim, Young Eun; Park, Jin Kyung; Wierzba, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    No access to safe water is an important risk factor for typhoid fever, yet risk-level heterogeneity is unaccounted for in previous global burden estimates. Since WHO has recommended risk-based use of typhoid polysaccharide vaccine, we revisited the burden of typhoid fever in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) after adjusting for water-related risk. We estimated the typhoid disease burden from studies done in LMICs based on blood-culture-confirmed incidence rates applied to the 2010 population, after correcting for operational issues related to surveillance, limitations of diagnostic tests, and water-related risk. We derived incidence estimates, correction factors, and mortality estimates from systematic literature reviews. We did scenario analyses for risk factors, diagnostic sensitivity, and case fatality rates, accounting for the uncertainty in these estimates and we compared them with previous disease burden estimates. The estimated number of typhoid fever cases in LMICs in 2010 after adjusting for water-related risk was 11·9 million (95% CI 9·9-14·7) cases with 129 000 (75 000-208 000) deaths. By comparison, the estimated risk-unadjusted burden was 20·6 million (17·5-24·2) cases and 223 000 (131 000-344 000) deaths. Scenario analyses indicated that the risk-factor adjustment and updated diagnostic test correction factor derived from systematic literature reviews were the drivers of differences between the current estimate and past estimates. The risk-adjusted typhoid fever burden estimate was more conservative than previous estimates. However, by distinguishing the risk differences, it will allow assessment of the effect at the population level and will facilitate cost-effectiveness calculations for risk-based vaccination strategies for future typhoid conjugate vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Mogasale et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY-NC-SA. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  2. Elevated Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Level as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Patients with Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tatsuyoshi; Fujii, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Studies on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as an iron-regulatory protein are limited. This study investigated the relationships between plasma NGAL levels and indices of anemia in 187 patients with systemic inflammation. Plasma NGAL levels were significantly higher in patients with anemia versus in patients without anemia (185 ng/mL versus 98 ng/mL; P < 0.001). Serum iron levels were lower in patients with NGAL > 156 ng/mL than in those with NGAL ≤ 156 ng/mL (27.4 ± 25.3 µg/dL versus 58.1 ± 43.5 µg/dL; P < 0.001). In a receiver operating characteristic curve, the diagnostic ability of NGAL to identify anemia was superior to that of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [0.712 (95% CI, 0.618–0.787) versus 0.649 (95% CI, 0.573–0.744); P < 0.01]. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the elevated NGAL level was significantly associated with the presence of anemia after adjusting for potential confounders [odds ratio, 1.30 (95% CI, 1.07–2.58); P = 0.010]. In conclusion, enhanced NGAL production may contribute to the development of anemia in patients with systemic inflammation. PMID:28127551

  3. Renal disease in adult Nigerians with sickle cell anemia: a report of prevalence, clinical features and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bolarinwa, R A; Akinlade, K S; Kuti, M A O; Olawale, O O; Akinola, N O

    2012-01-01

    Renal abnormalities in adult Nigerians with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have not been extensively studied. To determine the prevalence, pattern and the associated risk factors of renal disease, 72 subjects with SCA from two centers in the southwestern Nigeria were investigated. Socio-demographic data, body mass index and clinical findings were documented. The urine analysis, serum bio-chemistry, hemogram and renal factors attributable to SCA were determined. Presence of albuminuria of at least 1+ or microalbuminuria in those negative with dipstick; and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the Cockcroft-Gault formula categorized subjects to various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects with and without albuminuria were compared to determine the relative risk associated with renal disease. Four (5.6%) subjects had macro-albuminuria, while 32 (44.4%) had micro-albuminuria and 30 (41.7%) had hemoglobinuria. In the subjects with albuminuria, age, hematocrit, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, urea and creatinine clearance were numerically higher while the eGFR was numerically lower. There was no significant difference in the clinical parameters studied in the two groups of subjects. The diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the albuminuric group. Based on eGFR, 22 (30.6%) subjects had hyperfiltration (GFR > 140 mL/min/1.73 m2), of whom 36.4% had albuminuria, 18 (25.0%) had stage 1 CKD, 30 (41.7%) had stage 2 CKD and two (2.7%) subjects had stage 3 CKD with albuminuria. None had stage 4 and 5 CKD. We conclude that renal abnormalities, importantly albuminuria, is common in adult Nigerians with SCA and the pattern and incidence are similar to those reported from other parts of the world. Regular blood pressure monitoring, early diagnosis and active intervention are advocated to delay progression to end-stage kidney disease in view of poor outcomes of renal replacement therapy in SCA patients with nephropathy.

  4. Dietary diversity during pregnancy is associated with reduced risk of maternal anemia, preterm delivery, and low birth weight in a prospective cohort study in rural Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Zerfu, Taddese A; Umeta, Melaku; Baye, Kaleab

    2016-06-01

    Anemia during pregnancy is a leading nutritional disorder with serious short- and long-term consequences for both the mother and the fetus. The objective was to investigate the association between dietary diversity during pregnancy and maternal anemia, low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth (PTB), and stillbirth in rural Ethiopia. We conducted a prospective cohort study and enrolled 432 pregnant women in their first antenatal care visit (24-28 gestational weeks); 374 women completed the follow-up. By using the FAO Women's Dietary Diversity Scores (WDDSs), subjects were categorized into "inadequate" (WDDS <4) and "adequate" (WDDS ≥4) groups and were followed until delivery. Primary outcomes were maternal anemia, birth weight, term delivery, and stillbirth. The attrition rate was 13.7% and was balanced across the 2 groups. The proportion of women consuming dairy, animal-source foods, fruits, and vegetables including vitamin A-rich ones was higher in the adequate than in the inadequate WDDS group (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of maternal anemia increased from 28.6% to 32.4% during the follow-up period. The overall proportion of LBW, PTB, and stillbirth were 9.1%, 13.6%, and 4.5%, respectively. After control for baseline differences, women in the inadequate group had a higher risk of anemia [adjusted RR (ARR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.62, 3.24], LBW (ARR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.03, 4.11), and PTB (ARR: 4.61; 95% CI: 2.31, 9.19) but not of stillbirth (ARR: 2.71; 95% CI: 0.88, 8.36) than women in the adequate group (P < 0.05). A WDDS of ≥4 food groups during pregnancy was shown to be associated with lower risk of maternal anemia, LBW, and PTB. Population-based controlled trials of various options to improve dietary diversity are needed before conclusive recommendations can be made. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02620943. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mortality burden of cardio-metabolic risk factors between 1980 and 2010: comparative risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Elevated blood pressure and glucose, serum cholesterol, and body mass index (BMI) are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs); some of these factors also increase the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. We estimated CVD, CKD, and diabetes mortality attributable to these four cardio-metabolic risk factors for all countries and regions between 1980 and 2010. Methods We used data on risk factor exposure by country, age group, and sex from pooled analysis of population-based health surveys. Relative risks for cause-specific mortality were obtained from pooling of large prospective studies. We calculated the population attributable fractions (PAF) for each risk factor alone, and for the combination of all risk factors, accounting for multi-causality and for mediation of the effects of BMI by the other three risks. We calculated attributable deaths by multiplying the cause-specific PAFs by the number of disease-specific deaths from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2010 Study. We propagated the uncertainties of all inputs to the final estimates. Findings In 2010, high blood pressure was the leading risk factor for dying from CVDs, CKD, and diabetes in every region, causing over 40% of worldwide deaths from these diseases; high BMI and glucose were each responsible for about 15% of deaths; and cholesterol for 10%. After accounting for multi-causality, 63% (10.8 million deaths; 95% confidence interval 10.1–11.5) of deaths from these diseases were attributable to the combined effect of these four metabolic risk factors, compared with 67% (7.1 million deaths; 6.6–7.6) in 1980. The mortality burden of high BMI and glucose nearly doubled between 1980 and 2010. At the country level, age-standardised death rates attributable to these four risk factors surpassed 925 deaths per 100,000 among men in Belarus, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan, but were below 130 deaths per 100,000 for women and below 200 for men in some

  6. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ( ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ...

  7. [Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia and risk indicators in children from 12 to 18 months attended at the outpatient clinic of Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, C R; Motta, S S; Cordeiro, A A; Lacerda, E M; Reichenheim, M E

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia and the associated risk indicators were studied in children from 12 to 18 months at the outpatient unit of IPPMG, in order to evaluate and monitor the service. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 288 children seen at the outpatient unit of IPPMG, from January to December 1993. Anemia was diagnosed by dosage of seric hemoglobin. The studied risk indicators were: prenatal care, birth weight, pediatric follow-up, socio-economic aspects, breast-feeding pattern, nutritional status, and iron prescription. Data were computerized and analyzed by EPIINFO and EGRET softwares. Statistical analysis was performed by Pearson chi(2), and breast-feeding pattern was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Fifty percent of all children had anemia and 13.2% had severe anemia. Children had an early entry to follow-up at the clinic, and the number of consultations was adequate, according to the recommendations of the Ministry of Health. Only 27% of families had a "per capita" income above one minimum salary, although most had adequate housing and environmental conditions. The median duration of breast-feeding was 7.8 and of exclusive breast-feeding was 3.2 months. No association between anemia and income, early weaning, low-birth weight or undernutrition was found. The prevalence of anemia was extremely high, indicating the need for a specific monitoring system for the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia in this service.

  8. Prevalence, incidence, and lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation in China: new insights into the global burden of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yutao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Hao; Si, Quanjin; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Much of the epidemiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) is based on data from Western populations. Despite the huge population of Asia, data on the clinical epidemiology of AF in Asian countries are limited. The current study aimed to investigate the prevalence and incidence of newly diagnosed (ie, incident) AF, as well as lifetime risk, in China and to determine the clinical risk factors contributing to its development. Using a medical insurance database involving > 10 million individuals for the years 2001 to 2012 in the southwest of China, trends in incident AF were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. The usefulness of the CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age, diabetes, stroke [doubled]) and CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 [doubled], diabetes, stroke [doubled], vascular disease, age 65-74, and sex category [female]) scores was tested in predicting the occurrence of incident AF. A total of 471,446 individuals (aged ≥ 20 years) were studied, with 1,924,975 person-years of experience. We identified 921 patients with incident AF (62% male; mean age, 62 years). The prevalence of incident AF in subjects aged ≥ 20 years was 0.2 per 100 people, with an incidence of AF of 0.05 per 100 person-years overall. Over an 11-year period, the prevalence of AF increased 20-fold, whereas AF-related stroke increased 13-fold. The lifetime risk of AF was approximately one in five among Chinese adults, and it increased with advancing age. The CHA2DS2-VASc score was superior to the CHADS2 score in predicting the risk of incident AF in our Chinese population (DeLong test, Z = 6.621, P < .001). The AF burden, as well as the risk of AF-related stroke, has increased significantly over the past 11 years in the southwest of China. The public health burden of AF and its complications are greatest in the very elderly, with major implications for health-care systems given the global burden of this common arrhythmia.

  9. Risk and burden associated with the acquisition of viral hepatitis A and B in the corporate traveler.

    PubMed

    Bunn, William B

    2008-08-01

    As the number of international business travelers continues to grow, so does the list of destinations, many of which are endemic for both hepatitis A and B. Generally, travelers are unaware of the risks of acquiring viral hepatitis when traveling; many are unsure of modes of transmission and do not seek pretravel advice or do not follow the recommendations of travel health professionals. Infected employees can result in increased health care costs and reduced productivity in the workplace. Safe and efficacious monovalent vaccines and a combined hepatitis A and B vaccine are available. Successful corporate health and immunization programs can prevent hepatitis A and B when employees are abroad on business. This article examines the distribution, risks, costs, burden, and prevention of hepatitis A and B in the international business traveler.

  10. Patterns and Risk Factors of Helminthiasis and Anemia in a Rural and a Peri-urban Community in Zanzibar, in the Context of Helminth Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Knopp, Stefanie; Mohammed, Khalfan A.; Stothard, J. Russell; Khamis, I. Simba; Rollinson, David; Marti, Hanspeter; Utzinger, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    Background The control of helminth infections and prevention of anemia in developing countries are of considerable public health importance. The purpose of this study was to determine patterns and risk factors of helminth infections and anemia in a rural and a peri-urban community of Zanzibar, Tanzania, in the context of national helminth control programs. Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a community-based cross-sectional study in 454 individuals by examining at least two stool samples with different methods for soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura) and one urine sample for Schistosoma haematobium. Finger-prick blood was taken to estimate anemia levels and to detect antibody reactions against ascariasis, strongyloidiasis and schistosomiasis, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) approach. Parasitological methods determined a helminth prevalence of 73.7% in the rural, and 48.9% in the peri-urban setting. Most helminth infections were of light intensity with school-aged children showing the highest intensities. Multiple helminth species infections were pervasive in rural dwellers regardless of age. More than half of the participants were anemic, with a particularly high prevalence in the peri-urban setting (64.7%). Risk factors for helminth infections were age, sex, consumption of raw vegetables or salad, recent travel history, and socio-economic status. Conclusion/Significance After several years of chemotherapy-based morbidity control efforts in Zanzibar, helminth prevalences are still high and anemia is common, but helminth infection intensities are low. Hence, chemotherapy should be continued, and complemented with improved access to clean water, adequate sanitation, and health education, along with poverty alleviation measures for a more enduring impact. PMID:20485491

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Risk, Asthma Burden and Lower Airway Inflammation in Adults in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) II

    PubMed Central

    Teodorescu, Mihaela; Broytman, Oleg; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Sorkness, Ronald L.; Crisafi, Gina; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Erzurum, Serpil; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may worsen asthma, but large studies are lacking and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Objective Determine the prevalence of OSA risk among patients with asthma of different severity compared to normal controls (NC), and among asthmatics, test the relationship of OSA risk with asthma burden and airway inflammation. Methods Subjects with severe (SA, n=94) and non-severe asthma (NSA, n=161), and NC (n=146) were recruited in an add-on sub-study, to the observational Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) II; subjects completed sleep quality, sleepiness and OSA risk (Sleep Apnea scale of the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire [SA-SDQ]) questionnaires and clinical assessments. Sputum was induced in a subset of asthmatics. Results Relative to NC, despite similar sleep duration, the SA and NSA subjects had worse sleep quality, were sleepier and had higher SA-SDQ scores. Among asthmatics, higher SA-SDQ was associated with increased asthma symptoms, β-agonist use, health care utilization, and worse asthma quality of life. Significant association of SA-SDQ with sputum polymorphonuclear cells% was noted: each increase in SA-SDQ by its standard deviation (6.85 units) was associated with a rise in % sputum neutrophils of 7.78 (95 % CI 2.33-13.22, p = 0.0006), independent of obesity and other confounders. Conclusions OSA symptoms are more prevalent among asthmatics, in whom they are associated with higher disease burden. OSA risk is associated with a neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma, suggesting that OSA may be an important contributor to the neutrophilic asthma. Further studies are necessary to confirm these findings and better understand the mechanistic underpinnings of this relationship. PMID:26004304

  12. Lower Airway Rhinovirus Burden and the Seasonal Risk of Asthma Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Sorkness, Ron L.; Lee, Wai-Ming; Evans, Michael D.; Wolff, Michele J.; Mathur, Sameer K.; Crisafi, Gina M.; Gaworski, Katie L.; Pappas, Tressa E.; Vrtis, Rose F.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Gern, James E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Most asthma exacerbations are initiated by viral upper respiratory illnesses. It is unclear whether human rhinovirus (HRV)–induced exacerbations are associated with greater viral replication and neutrophilic inflammation compared with HRV colds. Objectives: To evaluate viral strain and load in a prospective asthma cohort during a natural cold. Methods: Adults were enrolled at the first sign of a cold, with daily monitoring of symptoms, medication use, and peak expiratory flow rate until resolution. Serial nasal lavage and induced sputum samples were assessed for viral copy number and inflammatory cell counts. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 52 persons with asthma and 14 control subjects without atopy or asthma were studied for over 10 weeks per subject on average; 25 participants developed an asthma exacerbation. Detection of HRVs in the preceding 5 days was the most common attributable exposure related to exacerbation. Compared with other infections, those by a minor group A HRV were 4.4-fold more likely to cause exacerbation (P = 0.038). Overall, sputum neutrophils and the burden of rhinovirus in the lower airway were similar in control subjects without atopy and the asthma group. However, among HRV-infected participants with asthma, exacerbations were associated with greater sputum neutrophil counts (P = 0.005). Conclusions: HRV infection is a frequent cause of exacerbations in adults with asthma and a cold, and there may be group-specific differences in severity of these events. The absence of large differences in viral burden among groups suggests differential lower airway sensitization to the effects of neutrophilic inflammation in the patients having exacerbations. PMID:21816938

  13. A new method for IVUS-based coronary artery disease risk stratification: A link between coronary & carotid ultrasound plaque burdens.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Shukla, Devarshi; Londhe, Narendra D; Shrivastava, Vimal K; Banchhor, Sumit K; Saba, Luca; Nicolaides, Andrew; Shafique, Shoaib; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-02-01

    Interventional cardiologists have a deep interest in risk stratification prior to stenting and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is most commonly adapted for screening, but current tools lack the ability for risk stratification based on grayscale plaque morphology. Our hypothesis is based on the genetic makeup of the atherosclerosis disease, that there is evidence of a link between coronary atherosclerosis disease and carotid plaque built up. This novel idea is explored in this study for coronary risk assessment and its classification of patients between high risk and low risk. This paper presents a strategy for coronary risk assessment by combining the IVUS grayscale plaque morphology and carotid B-mode ultrasound carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) - a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Support vector machine (SVM) learning paradigm is adapted for risk stratification, where both the learning and testing phases use tissue characteristics derived from six feature combinational spaces, which are then used by the SVM classifier with five different kernels sets. These six feature combinational spaces are designed using 56 novel feature sets. K-fold cross validation protocol with 10 trials per fold is used for optimization of best SVM-kernel and best feature combination set. IRB approved coronary IVUS and carotid B-mode ultrasound were jointly collected on 15 patients (2 days apart) via: (a) 40MHz catheter utilizing iMap (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) with 2865 frames per patient (42,975 frames) and (b) linear probe B-mode carotid ultrasound (Toshiba scanner, Japan). Using the above protocol, the system shows the classification accuracy of 94.95% and AUC of 0.95 using optimized feature combination. This is the first system of its kind for risk stratification as a screening tool to prevent excessive cost burden and better patients' cardiovascular disease management, while validating our two hypotheses

  14. An overview of cardiovascular risk factor burden in sub-Saharan African countries: a socio-cultural perspective

    PubMed Central

    BeLue, Rhonda; Okoror, Titilayo A; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Taylor, Kelly D; Degboe, Arnold N; Agyemang, Charles; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2009-01-01

    Background Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries are currently experiencing one of the most rapid epidemiological transitions characterized by increasing urbanization and changing lifestyle factors. This has resulted in an increase in the incidence of non-communicable diseases, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD). This double burden of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases has long-term public health impact as it undermines healthcare systems. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the socio-cultural context of CVD risk prevention and treatment in sub-Saharan Africa. We discuss risk factors specific to the SSA context, including poverty, urbanization, developing healthcare systems, traditional healing, lifestyle and socio-cultural factors. Methodology We conducted a search on African Journals On-Line, Medline, PubMed, and PsycINFO databases using combinations of the key country/geographic terms, disease and risk factor specific terms such as "diabetes and Congo" and "hypertension and Nigeria". Research articles on clinical trials were excluded from this overview. Contrarily, articles that reported prevalence and incidence data on CVD risk and/or articles that report on CVD risk-related beliefs and behaviors were included. Both qualitative and quantitative articles were included. Results The epidemic of CVD in SSA is driven by multiple factors working collectively. Lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise and smoking contribute to the increasing rates of CVD in SSA. Some lifestyle factors are considered gendered in that some are salient for women and others for men. For instance, obesity is a predominant risk factor for women compared to men, but smoking still remains mostly a risk factor for men. Additionally, structural and system level issues such as lack of infrastructure for healthcare, urbanization, poverty and lack of government programs also drive this epidemic and hampers proper prevention, surveillance and treatment efforts

  15. Determinants of anemia among 6-59 months aged children in Bangladesh: evidence from nationally representative data.

    PubMed

    Khan, Jahidur Rahman; Awan, Nabil; Misu, Farjana

    2016-01-11

    Anemia is a global public health problem but the burden of anemia is disproportionately borne among children in developing countries. Anemia in early stages of life has serious consequences on the growth and development of the children. We examine the prevalence of anemia, possible association between anemia and different socio-economic, demographic, health and other factors among children with ages from 6 to 59 months from the nationally representative 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS). Data on hemoglobin (Hb) concentration among the children aged 6-59 months from the most recent BDHS (2011) were used. This nationally representative survey allowed a multistage stratified cluster sampling design and provided data on a wide range of indicators such as fertility, mortality, women and child health, nutrition and other background characteristics. Anemia status was determined using hemoglobin level (<11.0 g/dl), and weighted prevalence of childhood anemia along with 95 % confidence intervals were provided. We also examined the distribution of weighted anemia prevalence across different groups and performed logistic regression to assess the association of anemia with different factors. A total of 2171 children aged 6-59 months were identified for this analysis, with weighted prevalence of anemia being 51.9 % overall- 47.4 % in urban and 53.1 % in rural regions. Results of a multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that, children below 24 months of age (odds ratio, [OR] 3.01; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 2.38-3.81), and those from an anemic mother (OR 1.80; 95 % CI 1.49-2.18) were at higher risk of anemia. Childhood anemia was significantly associated with chronic malnutrition of child, source of drinking water, household wealth and geographical location (defined by division). A high prevalence of anemia among 6-59 months aged children was observed in Bangladesh. Given the negative impact of anemia on the development of children in

  16. Gestational anemia.

    PubMed

    Wahed, F; Latif, S A; Nessa, A; Bhuiyan, M R; Hossain, M B; Akther, A; Mahmud, M M

    2010-07-01

    Gestational anemia is a common public health problem in our country. Most anemia during pregnancy results from an increased need for iron as her body is making more blood. Often dietary supplementation does not provide enough iron to meet the extra needs. Also the growing baby takes all the iron it needs from mother, regardless of how much iron is stored in mother's blood. Gestational Anemia contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, IUGR, preterm delivery and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high proportion of women in both industrialized and developing countries become anemic during pregnancy. The most important cause of gestational anemia due to iron deficiency, because high iron requirements during pregnancy are not easily fulfilled by dietary intake. Adequate iron stores can help a pregnant women replace lost red blood cells. So, iron supplementation is strongly recommended for all pregnant women in developing countries. Oral iron intake is the treatment of choice and almost all pregnant women can be treated effectively with oral iron preparation during their pregnancy period.

  17. The burden of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular risk factors among adult Malawians in HIV care: consequences for integrated services.

    PubMed

    Divala, Oscar H; Amberbir, Alemayehu; Ismail, Zahra; Beyene, Teferi; Garone, Daniela; Pfaff, Colin; Singano, Victor; Akello, Harriet; Joshua, Martias; Nyirenda, Moffat J; Matengeni, Alfred; Berman, Josh; Mallewa, Jane; Chinomba, Gift S; Kayange, Noel; Allain, Theresa J; Chan, Adrienne K; Sodhi, Sumeet K; van Oosterhout, Joep J

    2016-12-12

    Hypertension and diabetes prevalence is high in Africans. Data from HIV infected populations are limited, especially from Malawi. Integrating care for chronic non-communicable co-morbidities in well-established HIV services may provide benefit for patients by preventing multiple hospital visits but will increase the burden of care for busy HIV clinics. Cross-sectional study of adults (≥18 years) at an urban and a rural HIV clinic in Zomba district, Malawi, during 2014. Hypertension and diabetes were diagnosed according to stringent criteria. Proteinuria, non-fasting lipids and cardio/cerebro-vascular disease (CVD) risk scores (Framingham and World Health Organization/International Society for Hypertension) were determined. The association of patient characteristics with diagnoses of hypertension and diabetes was studied using multivariable analyses. We explored the additional burden of care for integrated drug treatment of hypertension and diabetes in HIV clinics. We defined that burden as patients with diabetes and/or stage II and III hypertension, but not with stage I hypertension unless they had proteinuria, previous stroke or high Framingham CVD risk. Nine hundred fifty-two patients were enrolled, 71.7% female, median age 43.0 years, 95.9% on antiretroviral therapy (ART), median duration 47.7 months. Rural and urban patients' characteristics differed substantially. Hypertension prevalence was 23.7% (95%-confidence interval 21.1-26.6; rural 21.0% vs. urban 26.5%; p = 0.047), of whom 59.9% had stage I (mild) hypertension. Diabetes prevalence was 4.1% (95%-confidence interval 3.0-5.6) without significant difference between rural and urban settings. Prevalence of proteinuria, elevated total/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio and high CVD risk score was low. Hypertension diagnosis was associated with increasing age, higher body mass index, presence of proteinuria, being on regimen zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine and inversely with World Health

  18. Epidemiological burden of invasive pneumococcal disease in children and adolescents with predisposing risk factors.

    PubMed

    Falleiros-Arlant, Luiza Helena; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Avila-Aguero, Maria Luisa; Pirez, Maria Catalina; Gentile, Angela; Richardson, Vesta; Brea, Jose; Mariño, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Some medical conditions constitute important risk factors for the development of invasive pneumococcal diseases in children and adolescents aged from 5 to 19 years. Conjugate vaccines have potential efficacy in this scenario, but are not available in many Latin American public healthcare systems for this age group. This study aimed to estimate the preventable fraction of invasive pneumococcal diseases among individuals aged from 5 to 19 years with associated risk factors for its development. Data regarding the Latin America population, risk factors prevalence and conjugate vaccines efficacy were obtained from the literature. Total population at risk ranged from 17.3 to 64.6 million of individuals and asthma was the most impacting risk factor. According to SIREVA, PCV13 provided a 62.9% serotypes coverage in individuals from 5 to 29 years in 2012, potentially increasing the covered population from [8,338,457-31,057,620] with PCV10 to [10,906,356-40,622,078] with PCV13. To date, according to available efficacy data, the hypothetically immunized population ranged from 11.4 to 42.4 million, representing 7.0% to 26.0% of the total population in this age group. Vaccination in risk groups should be encouraged, as it potentially contributes to the reduction in the number of cases of invasive pneumococcal disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Demonstration of the Effect of Generic Anatomical Divisions versus Clinical Protocols on Computed Tomography Dose Estimates and Risk Burden

    PubMed Central

    Moorin, Rachael E.; Gibson, David A. J.; Forsyth, Rene K.; Fox, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Choosing to undertake a CT scan relies on balancing risk versus benefit, however risks associated with CT scanning have generally been limited to broad anatomical locations, which do not provided adequate information to evaluate risk against benefit. Our study aimed to determine differences in radiation dose and risk estimates associated with modern CT scanning examinations when computed for clinical protocols compared with those using anatomical area. Methods Technical data were extracted from a tertiary hospital Picture Archiving Communication System for random samples of 20–40 CT examinations per adult clinical CT protocol. Organ and whole body radiation dose were calculated using ImPACT Monte Carlo simulation software and cancer incidence and mortality estimated using BEIR VII age and gender specific lifetime attributable risk weights. Results Thirty four unique CT protocols were identified by our study. When grouped according to anatomic area the radiation dose varied substantially, particularly for abdominal protocols. The total estimated number of incident cancers and cancer related deaths using the mean dose of anatomical area were 86 and 69 respectively. Using more specific protocol doses the estimates rose to 214 and 138 incident cancers and cancer related deaths, at least doubling the burden estimated. Conclusions Modern CT scanning produces a greater diversity of effective doses than much of the literature describes; where a lack of focus on actual scanning protocols has produced estimates that do not reflect the range and complexity of modern CT practice. To allow clinicians, patients and policy makers to make informed risk versus benefit decisions the individual and population level risks associated with modern CT practices are essential. PMID:24878841

  20. Cardiovascular Risk Factor Burden in Africa and the Middle East: The Africa Middle East Cardiovascular Epidemiological (ACE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Omar, Mohamed I.; Raal, Frederick J.; Rashed, Wafa; Hamoui, Omar; Kane, Abdoul; Alami, Mohamed; Abreu, Paula; Mashhoud, Walid M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased urbanization in the developing world parallels a rising burden of chronic diseases. Developing countries account for ∼80% of global cardiovascular (CV) deaths, but contribute a paucity of systematic epidemiological data on CV risk factors. Objective To estimate the prevalence of CV risk factors in rural and urban cohorts attending general practice clinics in the Africa and Middle East (AfME) region. Methods In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, the presence of CV risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus (diabetes), dyslipidemia, obesity, smoking and abdominal obesity) were evaluated in stable adult outpatients attending general practice primary care clinics. A rural population was defined as isolated (>50 km or lack of easy access to commuter transportation) from urban centers. Results 4,378 outpatients were systematically recruited from 94 clinics across 14 AfME countries. Mean age was 46±14 years and 52% of outpatients were female. A high prevalence of dyslipidemia (70%) and abdominal obesity (68%) were observed, followed by hypertension (43%) and diabetes (25%). The vast majority of outpatients (92%) had at least one modifiable CV risk factor, many (74%) had more than one, and half (53%) had 3 or more. These findings were observed in both genders and across urban and rural centers. Among outpatients with pre-existing hypertension or dyslipidemia, many were not at their target blood pressure or LDL-cholesterol goals. Conclusion Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among relatively young, stable outpatients attending general practice clinics across AfME. The findings support opportunistic screening for CV risk factors whenever outpatients visit a general practitioner and provide an opportunity for early identification and management of CV risk factors, including lifestyle interventions. PMID:25090638

  1. Napping in older people 'at risk' of dementia: relationships with depression, cognition, medical burden and sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Cross, Nathan; Terpening, Zoe; Rogers, Naomi L; Duffy, Shantel L; Hickie, Ian B; Lewis, Simon J G; Naismith, Sharon L

    2015-10-01

    Sleep disturbance is prevalent in older adults, particularly so in those at a greater risk of dementia. However, so far the clinical, medical and neuropsychological correlates of daytime sleep have not been examined. The aims of this study were to investigate the characteristics and effects of napping using actigraphy in older people, particularly in those 'at risk' of dementia. The study used actigraphy and sleep diaries to measure napping habits in 133 older adults 'at risk' of dementia (mean age = 65.5 years, SD = 8.4 years), who also underwent comprehensive medical, psychiatric and neuropsychological assessment. When defined by actigraphy, napping was present in 83.5% (111/133) of participants; however, duration and timing varied significantly among subjects. Nappers had significantly greater medical burden and body mass index, and higher rates of mild cognitive impairment. Longer and more frequent naps were associated with poorer cognitive functioning, as well as higher levels of depressive symptoms, while the timing of naps was associated with poorer nocturnal sleep quality (i.e. sleep latency and wake after sleep onset). This study highlights that in older adults 'at risk' of dementia, napping is associated with underlying neurobiological changes such as depression and cognition. Napping characteristics should be more routinely monitored in older individuals to elucidate their relationship with psychological and cognitive outcomes.

  2. Research Synthesis Methods in an Age of Globalized Risks: Lessons from the Global Burden of Foodborne Disease Expert Elicitation.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    We live in an age that increasingly calls for national or regional management of global risks. This article discusses the contributions that expert elicitation can bring to efforts to manage global risks and identifies challenges faced in conducting expert elicitation at this scale. In doing so it draws on lessons learned from conducting an expert elicitation as part of the World Health Organizations (WHO) initiative to estimate the global burden of foodborne disease; a study commissioned by the Foodborne Disease Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG). Expert elicitation is designed to fill gaps in data and research using structured, transparent methods. Such gaps are a significant challenge for global risk modeling. Experience with the WHO FERG expert elicitation shows that it is feasible to conduct an expert elicitation at a global scale, but that challenges do arise, including: defining an informative, yet feasible geographical structure for the elicitation; defining what constitutes expertise in a global setting; structuring international, multidisciplinary expert panels; and managing demands on experts' time in the elicitation. This article was written as part of a workshop, "Methods for Research Synthesis: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach" held at the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis on October 13, 2013.

  3. Predictions Burden of Diabetes and Economics Cost: Contributing Risk Factors of Changing Disease Prevalence and its Pandemic Impact to Qatar.

    PubMed

    Bener, A; Al-Hamaq, A O A A

    2016-09-01

    Background: The Middle East region is predicted to have one of the highest prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in the world. The risk of diabetes continues to increase worldwide and its public health burden is unevenly distributed across socioeconomic strata. This burden is not only related to health care costs, but also to indirect costs caused by loss of productivity from disability and premature mortality. Aim: This study aims to estimate the economics cost of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus [T2DM] among adults in Qatar using national data, and to quantify the potential effect of a suggested preventive intervention program. Design: It is an observational cohort study. Setting: The survey was based on registry at the Hamad General Hospital and Primary Health Care (PHC) centers in the State of Qatar. Subject: This study consisted of patients above 25 years of age with diagnosed diabetes mellitus registered at Hamad General Hospital and Primary Health Care (PHC) centers during January 2004 to July 2014. Methods: We developed a dynamic model in which actual incidence, prevalence, and life expectancy data are used and alternative assumptions about future trends in these parameters can be incorporated. Linear regression model has been performed to forecast the burden of diabetes in oil-rich country. Results: According to the dynamic model, a 10% increased in the number of diabetic patients in the State of Qatar from 33 610 in 2005 to 122 000 in 2012 (about 1% annually). The annual diabetes incidence rate was higher in women than in men during a period between 2005 to 2015 years. The static model forecasted as 10% increase over 10 years. The relative increase in prevalence of diabetes and number of diabetic people are higher in women than in men (16.6%; 17.5% and 18.4% in men vs. 22.6%; 23.8% and 25.1% in women). Most of the increase in prevalence of diabetes is projected to occur in younger age groups where it is estimated to increase among age groups of 50-59 years and

  4. The role of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flare and cumulative burden of RA severity in the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, Elena; Chandran, Arun; Ilhan, Birkan; Major, Brittny T; Michet, C John; Matteson, Eric L; Crowson, Cynthia S

    2016-03-01

    To examine the role of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) flare, remission and RA severity burden in cardiovascular disease (CVD). In a population-based cohort of patients with RA without CVD (age ≥30 years; 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria met in 1988-2007), we performed medical record review at each clinical visit to estimate flare/remission status. The previously validated RA medical Records-Based Index of Severity (RARBIS) and Claims-Based Index of RA Severity (CIRAS) were applied. Age- and sex-matched non-RA subjects without CVD comprised the comparison cohort. Cox models were used to assess the association of RA activity/severity with CVD, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year of RA, CVD risk factors and antirheumatic medications. Study included 525 patients with RA and 524 non-RA subjects. There was a significant increase in CVD risk in RA per time spent in each acute flare versus remission (HR 1.07 per 6-week flare, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.15). The CVD risk for patients with RA in remission was similar to the non-RA subjects (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.59). Increased cumulative moving average of daily RARBIS (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.30) and CIRAS (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.70) was associated with CVD. CVD risk was higher in patients with RA who spent more time in medium (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.20) and high CIRAS tertiles (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.31) versus lower tertile. Our findings show substantial detrimental role of exposure to RA flare and cumulative burden of RA disease severity in CVD risk in RA, suggesting important cardiovascular benefits associated with tight inflammation control and improved flare management in patients with RA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. The Burden of Hard Atherosclerotic Plaques Does Not Promote Endoleak Development After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Risk Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Johannes Glodny, Bernhard

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To objectify the influence of the atherosclerotic burden in the proximal landing zone on the development of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) or thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) using objective aortic calcium scoring (ACS). Materials and Methods: This retrospective observation study included 267 patients who received an aortic endograft between 1997 and 2010 and for whom preoperative computed tomography (CT) was available to perform ACS using the CT-based V600 method. The mean follow-up period was 2 {+-} 2.3 years. Results: Type I endoleaks persisted in 45 patients (16.9%), type II in 34 (12.7%), type III in 8 (3%), and type IV or V in 3 patients, respectively (1.1% each). ACS in patients with type I endoleaks was not increased: 0.029 {+-} 0.061 ml compared with 0.075 {+-} 0.1349 ml in the rest of the patients, (p > 0.05; Whitney-Mann U-Test). There were significantly better results for the indication 'traumatic aortic rupture' than for the other indications (p < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, age was an independent risk factor for the development of type I endoleaks in the thoracic aorta (Wald 9.5; p = 0.002), whereas ACS score was an independent protective factor (Wald 6.9; p = 0.009). In the abdominal aorta, neither age nor ACS influenced the development of endoleaks. Conclusion: Contrary to previous assumptions, TEVAR and EVAR can be carried out without increasing the risk of an endoleak of any type, even if there is a high atherosclerotic 'hard-plaque' burden of the aorta. The results are significantly better for traumatic aortic.

  6. Population-based burden of COPD-related visits in the ED: return ED visits, hospital admissions, and comorbidity risks.

    PubMed

    Yeatts, Karin B; Lippmann, Steven J; Waller, Anna E; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Travers, Debbie; Weinberger, Morris; Donohue, James F

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the population-based burden of ED care for COPD. We analyzed statewide ED surveillance system data to quantify the frequency of COPD-related ED visits, hospital admissions, and comorbidities. In 2008 to 2009 in North Carolina, 97,511 COPD-related ED visits were made by adults ≥ 45 years of age, at an annual rate of 13.8 ED visits/1,000 person-years. Among patients with COPD (n = 33,799), 7% and 28% had a COPD-related return ED visit within a 30- and 365-day period of their index visit, respectively. Compared with patients on private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, and noninsured patients were more likely to have a COPD-related return visit within 30 and 365 days and have three or more COPD-related visits within 365 days. There were no differences in return visits by sex. Fifty-one percent of patients with COPD were admitted to the hospital from the index ED visit. Subsequent hospital admission risk in the cohort increased with age, peaking at 65 to 69 years (risk ratio [RR], 1.41; 95% CI, 1.26-1.57); there was no difference by sex. Patients with congestive heart failure (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.22-1.37), substance-related disorders (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.60), or respiratory failure/supplemental oxygen (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.19-1.31) were more likely to have a subsequent hospital admission compared with patients without these comorbidities. The population-based burden of COPD-related care in the ED is significant. Further research is needed to understand variations in COPD-related ED visits and hospital admissions.

  7. JAK2 p.V617F allele burden in myeloproliferative neoplasms one month after allogeneic stem cell transplantation significantly predicts outcome and risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Thoralf; Edelmann, Anja; Siebolts, Udo; Krahl, Rainer; Nehring, Claudia; Jäkel, Nadja; Cross, Michael; Maier, Jacqueline; Niederwieser, Dietger; Wickenhauser, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The risk profile and prognosis of patients with myelofibrosis is well described by the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System risk categorization. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is considered for intermediate-2/high risk disease. However, indicators of prognosis after transplantation are still lacking. Seventy simultaneously collected pairs of trephine and blood samples were quantified for JAK2 p.V617F allele burden to compare test sensitivity. The course of 30 patients with JAK2 p.V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasia was correlated with allele burden after transplantation. Monitoring can be performed on full blood samples as well as trephine biopsies, provided that techniques with ample sensitivity (0.01% to 0.001%) are available. Measurement of allele burden on day 28 after transplantation discriminates two prognostic groups: patients with a JAK2 p.V617F allele burden >1% have a significantly higher risk of relapse of JAK2 p.V617F positive neoplasia (P=0.04) and a poorer overall survival (P<0.01). In conclusion, measurement of JAK2 p.V617F allele burden early after transplantation is an important predictive parameter in monitoring patients following this treatment. As this might provide an important tool in early management of imminent early relapse it will be important to define consensus guidelines for optimal monitoring. PMID:23300178

  8. An Integrated Risk Function for Estimating the Global Burden of Disease Attributable to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pope, C. Arden; Ezzati, Majid; Olives, Casey; Lim, Stephen S.; Mehta, Sumi; Shin, Hwashin H.; Singh, Gitanjali; Hubbell, Bryan; Brauer, Michael; Anderson, H. Ross; Smith, Kirk R.; Balmes, John R.; Bruce, Nigel G.; Kan, Haidong; Laden, Francine; Prüss-Ustün, Annette; Turner, Michelle C.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Cohen, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Background: Estimating the burden of disease attributable to long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in ambient air requires knowledge of both the shape and magnitude of the relative risk (RR) function. However, adequate direct evidence to identify the shape of the mortality RR functions at the high ambient concentrations observed in many places in the world is lacking. Objective: We developed RR functions over the entire global exposure range for causes of mortality in adults: ischemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer (LC). We also developed RR functions for the incidence of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) that can be used to estimate mortality and lost-years of healthy life in children < 5 years of age. Methods: We fit an integrated exposure–response (IER) model by integrating available RR information from studies of ambient air pollution (AAP), second hand tobacco smoke, household solid cooking fuel, and active smoking (AS). AS exposures were converted to estimated annual PM2.5 exposure equivalents using inhaled doses of particle mass. We derived population attributable fractions (PAFs) for every country based on estimated worldwide ambient PM2.5 concentrations. Results: The IER model was a superior predictor of RR compared with seven other forms previously used in burden assessments. The percent PAF attributable to AAP exposure varied among countries from 2 to 41 for IHD, 1 to 43 for stroke, < 1 to 21 for COPD, < 1 to 25 for LC, and < 1 to 38 for ALRI. Conclusions: We developed a fine particulate mass–based RR model that covered the global range of exposure by integrating RR information from different combustion types that generate emissions of particulate matter. The model can be updated as new RR information becomes available. Citation: Burnett RT, Pope CA III, Ezzati M, Olives C, Lim SS, Mehta S, Shin HH, Singh G, Hubbell B, Brauer M, Anderson HR

  9. Housing as a Social Determinant of Health: Exploring the Relationship between Rent Burden and Risk Behaviors for Single Room Occupancy Building Residents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Elizabeth A; Mitchell, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of health determinants research recognizes that housing and health are intimately linked. This study explores the relationship between rent burden (the ratio of rent to income) and health risk behaviors among a sample of single room occupancy (SRO) building residents. Cross-sectional data were gathered from a sample of 162 residents living in privately owned, for-profit SROs in Chicago. Findings indicated that participants who had full rental subsidies and thus were designated in a no-rent-burden category were more likely to engage in risk behaviors including illicit drug use, having multiple sexual partners, and having sex without a condom, in comparison to participants with moderate or high-rent burdens. These findings suggest that interventions to increase housing stability and affordability and bolster reliable income sources (in addition to rental subsidies) may be key in reducing risk behaviors and improving health for vulnerably housed populations such as SRO residents.

  10. US Commercial Air Tour Crashes, 2000–2011: Burden, Fatal Risk Factors, and FIA Score Validation

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Beaty, Leland P.; Baker, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study provides new public health data concerning the US commercial air tour industry. Risk factors for fatality in air tour crashes were analyzed to determine the value of the FIA score in predicting fatal outcomes. Methods Using the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) General Aviation and Air Taxi Survey and National Transportation Safety Board data, the incidence of commercial air tour crashes from 2000 through 2010 was calculated. Fatality risk factors for crashes occurring from 2000 through 2011 were analyzed using regression methods. The FIA score, Li and Baker’s fatality risk index, was validated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results The industry-wide commercial air tour crash rate was 2.7 per 100,000 flight hours. The incidence rates of Part 91 and 135 commercial air tour crashes were 3.4 and 2.3 per 100,000 flight hours, respectively (relative risk [RR] 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–2.1, P=0.015). Of the 152 air tour crashes that occurred from 2000 through 2011, 30 (20%) involved at least one fatality and, on average, 3.5 people died per fatal crash. Fatalities were associated with three major risk factors: fire (Adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.1, 95% CI 1.5–16.7, P=0.008), instrument meteorological conditions (AOR 5.4, 95% CI 1.1–26.4, P=0.038), and off-airport location (AOR 7.2, 95% CI 1.6–33.2, P=0.011). The area under the FIA Score’s ROC curve was 0.79 (95% CI 0.71–0.88). Discussion Commercial air tour crash rates were high relative to similar commercial aviation operations. Disparities between Part 91 and 135 air tour crash rates reflect regulatory disparities that require FAA action. The FIA Score appeared to be a valid measurement of fatal risk in air tour crashes. The FIA should prioritize interventions that address the three major risk factors identified by this study. PMID:23631935

  11. Schizophrenia-associated methylomic variation: molecular signatures of disease and polygenic risk burden across multiple brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Joana; Hannon, Eilis; Dempster, Emma; Pidsley, Ruth; Macdonald, Ruby; Knox, Olivia; Spiers, Helen; Troakes, Claire; Al-Saraj, Safa; Turecki, Gustavo; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Genetic association studies provide evidence for a substantial polygenic component to schizophrenia, although the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the disorder remain largely undefined. Building on recent studies supporting a role for developmentally regulated epigenetic variation in the molecular aetiology of schizophrenia, this study aimed to identify epigenetic variation associated with both a diagnosis of schizophrenia and elevated polygenic risk burden for the disease across multiple brain regions. Genome-wide DNA methylation was quantified in 262 post-mortem brain samples, representing tissue from four brain regions (prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum) from 41 schizophrenia patients and 47 controls. We identified multiple disease-associated and polygenic risk score-associated differentially methylated positions and regions, which are not enriched in genomic regions identified in genetic studies of schizophrenia and do not reflect direct genetic effects on DNA methylation. Our study represents the first analysis of epigenetic variation associated with schizophrenia across multiple brain regions and highlights the utility of polygenic risk scores for identifying molecular pathways associated with aetiological variation in complex disease. PMID:28011714

  12. Intrinsic bacterial burden associated with intensive care unit hospital beds: effects of disinfection on population recovery and mitigation of potential infection risk.

    PubMed

    Attaway, Hubert H; Fairey, Sarah; Steed, Lisa L; Salgado, Cassandra D; Michels, Harold T; Schmidt, Michael G

    2012-12-01

    Commonly touched items are likely reservoirs from which patients, health care workers, and visitors may encounter and transfer microbes. A quantitative assessment was conducted of the risk represented by the intrinsic bacterial burden associated with bed rails in a medical intensive care unit (MICU), and how disinfection might mitigate this risk. Bacteria present on the rails from 36 patient beds in the MICU were sampled immediately before cleaning and at 0.5, 2.5, 4.5, and 6.5 hours after cleaning. Beds were sanitized with either a bottled disinfectant (BD; CaviCide) or an automated bulk-diluted disinfectant (ABDD; Virex II 256). The majority of bacteria recovered from the bed rails in the MICU were staphylococci, but not methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci were recovered from 3 beds. Bottled disinfectant reduced the average bacterial burden on the rails by 99%. However, the burden rebounded to 30% of that found before disinfection by 6.5 hours after disinfection. ABDD reduced the burden by an average of 45%, but levels rebounded within 2.5 hours. The effectiveness of both disinfectants was reflected in median reductions to burden of 98% for BD and 95% for ABDD. Cleaning with hospital-approved disinfectants reduced the intrinsic bacterial burden on bed rail surfaces by up to 99%, although the population, principally staphylococci, rebounded quickly to predisinfection levels. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Sideroblastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Matthes, T

    2006-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by the presence of sideroblasts in the bone marrow aspirate. Current classification schemes distinguish between diseases of the heme synthesis pathway and diseases of other mitochondrial pathways which can either be of primary origin (defects in mitochondrial DNA) or of secondary origin (defects in nuclear DNA). Although several distinct hereditary forms exist, sideroblastic anemias are most frequently acquired diseases and belong to the group of myelodysplastic syndromes with the propensity to develop into overt leukemia. Treatment is mainly supportive (vitamins, blood transfusions, cytokines) and only rarely are bone marrow transplantations performed. The molecular defects of a few hereditary forms have already been elucidated, but the genes involved in the acquired forms are still largely unknown.

  14. Addressing the road trauma burden in China: Exploring attitudes, behaviours, risk perceptions and cultural uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Fleiter, Judy J; Watson, Barry

    2016-10-01

    As China continues to motorise rapidly, solutions are needed to reduce the burden of road trauma that is spread inequitably across the community. Little is currently known about how new drivers are trained to deal with on-road challenges, and little is also known about the perceptions, behaviours and attitudes of road users in China. This paper reports on a pilot study conducted in a driver retraining facility in one Chinese city where people who have had their licence suspended for accrual of 12 demerit points in a one year period must attend compulsory retraining in order to regain their licence. A sample of 239 suspended drivers responded to an anonymous questionnaire that sought information about preferred driving speeds and perceptions of safe driving speeds across two speed zones. Responses indicated that speeds higher than the posted limits were commonly reported, and that there was incongruence between preferred and safe speeds, such that a greater proportion of drivers reported preferred speeds that were substantially faster than what were reported as safe speeds. Participants with more driving experience reported significantly fewer crashes than newly licensed drivers (less than 2 years licensed) but no differences were found in offences when compared across groups with different levels of driving experience. Perceptions of risky behaviours were assessed by asking participants to describe what they considered to be the most dangerous on-road behaviours. Speeding and drink driving were the most commonly reported by far, followed by issues such as fatigue, ignoring traffic rules, not obeying traffic rules, phone use while driving, and non-use of seatbelts, which attracted an extremely low response which seems consistent with previously reported low belt wearing rates, unfavourable attitudes towards seatbelt use, and low levels of enforcement. Finally, observations about culturally specific considerations are made from previous research conducted by the

  15. [Therapeutic approach to postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Moltó, L

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative anemia is a common finding in patients who undergo major surgery, and it can affect early rehabilitation and the return to daily activities. Allogeneic blood transfusion is still the most widely used method for restoring hemoglobin levels rapidly and effectively. However, the potential risks of transfusions have led to the review of this practice and to a search for alternative measures for treating postoperative anemia. The early administration of intravenous iron appears to improve the evolution of postoperative hemoglobin levels and reduce allogeneic transfusions, especially in patients with significant iron deficiency or anemia. What is not clear is whether this treatment heavily influences rehabilitation and quality of life. There is a lack of well-designed, sufficiently large, randomized prospective studies to determine whether postoperative or perioperative intravenous iron treatment, with or without recombinant erythropoietin, has a role in the recovery from postoperative anemia, in reducing transfusions and morbidity rates and in improving exercise capacity and quality of life.

  16. Travel Burden to Breast MRI and Utilization: Are Risk and Sociodemographics Related?

    PubMed

    Onega, Tracy; Lee, Christoph I; Benkeser, David; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Haas, Jennifer S; Tosteson, Anna N A; Hill, Deirdre; Shi, Xun; Henderson, Louise M; Hubbard, Rebecca A

    2016-06-01

    Mammography, unlike MRI, is relatively geographically accessible. Additional travel time is often required to access breast MRI. However, the amount of additional travel time and whether it varies on the basis of sociodemographic or breast cancer risk factors is unknown. The investigators examined screening mammography and MRI between 2005 and 2012 in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium by (1) travel time to the closest and actual mammography facility used and the difference between the two, (2) women's breast cancer risk factors, and (3) sociodemographic characteristics. Logistic regression was used to examine the odds of traveling farther than the closest facility in relation to women's characteristics. Among 821,683 screening mammographic examinations, 76.6% occurred at the closest facility, compared with 51.9% of screening MRI studies (n = 3,687). The median differential travel time among women not using the closest facility for mammography was 14 min (interquartile range, 8-25 min) versus 20 min (interquartile range, 11-40 min) for breast MRI. Differential travel time for both imaging modalities did not vary notably by breast cancer risk factors but was significantly longer for nonurban residents. For non-Hispanic black compared with non-Hispanic white women, the adjusted odds of traveling farther than the closest facility were 9% lower for mammography (odds ratio, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.87-0.95) but more than two times higher for MRI (odds ratio, 2.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-5.13). Breast cancer risk factors were not related to excess travel time for screening MRI, but sociodemographic factors were, suggesting the possibility that geographic distribution of advanced imaging may exacerbated disparities for some vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for iron deficiency anemia in the korean population: results of the fifth KoreaNational Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Ju Hyun; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Jin Won; Chang, Hyun; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jong Seok

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of, and risk factors for, iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among participants of the fifth Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010. Of 8,958 participants, 6,758 individuals ≥10 yr had sufficient data for the analysis of anemia and iron status. ID was defined as a transferrin saturation <10% or serum ferritin <15 µg/L. The prevalence of ID and IDA was 2.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3%-2.6%) and 0.7% (95% CI, 0.3%-1.0%), respectively, in males, and 22.4% (95% CI, 20.7%-24.2%) and 8.0% (95% CI, 6.8%-9.2%), respectively, in females. In reproductive age females, the prevalence of ID and IDA was 31.4% (95% CI, 28.9%-33.8%) and 11.5% (95% CI, 9.6%-13.4%), respectively. Compared to the prevalence of IDA in adult males 18-49 yr, the relative risks of IDA in adults ≥65 yr, lactating females, premenopausal females, and pregnant females were 8.1, 35.7, 42.8, and 95.5, respectively. Low income, underweight, iron- or vitamin C-poor diets were also associated with IDA. For populations with defined risk factors in terms of age, gender, physiological state and socioeconomic and nutritional status, national health policy to reduce IDA is needed.

  18. Reticulocyte count is the most important predictor of acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk transcranial Doppler in a newborn cohort of 395 children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Belisário, André Rolim; Sales, Rahyssa Rodrigues; Toledo, Nayara Evelin; Muniz, Maristela Braga de Sousa Rodrigues; Velloso-Rodrigues, Cibele; Silva, Célia Maria; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a severe clinical manifestation of sickle cell anemia (SCA). Despite the prognostic relevance of transcranial Doppler (TCD), more accurate tools to assess stroke risk in children with SCA are required. Here, we describe the effect of clinical, laboratory, and molecular features on the risk of stroke and high-risk TCD in children from the newborn cohort of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Outcomes studied were acute cerebral ischemia and high-risk TCD. Clinical and hematological data were retrieved from children's records. Genetic markers, which were known for their association with stroke risk, were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing. The cumulative incidence of acute cerebral ischemia by the age of 8 years was 7.4 % and that of high-risk TCD by the age of 11.5 years was 14.2 %. The final multivariate model for acute cerebral ischemia risk included high white blood cell count and reticulocyte count, acute chest syndrome rate, and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) TEK rs489347 and TNF-α rs1800629. The model for high-risk TCD included high reticulocyte count and the SNPs TEK rs489347 and TGFBR3 rs284875. Children with risk factors should be considered for intensive risk monitoring and for intervention therapy.

  19. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  20. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  1. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  2. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... role in their lives. Welcome to the Cooley's Anemia Foundation Website The Cooley's Anemia Foundation is dedicated to serving people afflicted with ... major form of this genetic blood disease, Cooley's anemia/thalassemia major. Our mission is advancing the treatment ...

  3. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a drug or toxin. Anemia From Destruction of Red Blood Cells When the body destroys red blood cells (a ... but can affect all races. continue Anemia From Red Blood Cell Loss Blood loss can cause anemia — whether from ...

  4. Age- and Sex-Specific Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Attributable to 5 Major and Modifiable Risk Factors in 10 Asian Countries of the Western Pacific Region.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Rachel R; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Wang, Xin; Peters, Sanne A E; Mamun, Abdullah; Woodward, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing an estimated 18 million deaths annually. Much of the burden of CVD resides in lower- and middle-income countries, particularly those Asian countries comprising the Western Pacific Region. Epidemiological studies have convincingly shown that up to 90% of all CVD can be explained by a small number of modifiable risk factors, including blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, total cholesterol and excess body weight. However, the relationship between these risk factors and coronary artery disease and stroke often differ by age and sex, and yet these differences are often overlooked in burden of disease estimations. As such, that can result in either an over- or under-estimation of the disease burden in specific population subgroups, which may affect resource allocation of healthcare. In this review, we derive the most reliable and previously unpublished estimates of the age- and sex-specific burden of vascular disease attributable to the aforementioned risk factors for 10 of the most populous Asian countries in the Western Pacific Region. Understanding how the burden of vascular disease is distributed within and between populations is crucial for developing appropriate health policies and effective treatment strategies, particularly in resource-poor settings.

  5. Comparison of obstetric outcome in terms of the risk of low birth weight, preterm delivery, cesarean section rate and anemia in primigravid adolescents and older primigravida.

    PubMed

    Naz, Uzma

    2014-02-01

    To compare the obstetric outcome in terms of risk of low birth weight, preterm delivery, cesarean section rate and anemia in primigravid adolescents and older primigravida. Cohort study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Lahore, from July to December 2012. Three hundred primigravid women presenting to department of obstetrics and gynecology of Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Lahore, having live singleton pregnancy, including 150 adolescents (² 19 years) and 150 adults (³ 20 years) were studied. Obstetric outcome in terms of gestational age at delivery, infant's birth weight, presence of anemia and cesarean section rate was compared between two groups. Results were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16. Chi-square test was applied with 0.05 as level of significance. The mean age of adolescent subjects was 17.3 + 1.5 years and of adults 25.6 + 3.4 years. Mean gestational age at delivery was similar in two groups (39.2 weeks and 39.4 weeks, p = 0.37). Adolescents were more likely to have a preterm delivery (11.2% vs. 4.9%, p = 0.04) and low birth weight infants (19.3% vs. 8.2%, p = 0.005) than adults. Adolescents were more likely to be anemic (46% vs. 32%, p = 0.01) than adults. However, cesarean section rate was not statistically different between two groups. This study showed that primiparous adolescents have significantly higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, low birth weight infants and anemia as compared to adult primiparas.

  6. Reticulocytosis and anemia are associated with an increased risk of death and stroke in the newborn cohort of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Meier, Emily Riehm; Wright, Elizabeth C; Miller, Jeffery L

    2014-09-01

    Prior analyses of the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease (CSSCD) newborn cohort identified elevated white blood cell (WBC) count, low baseline hemoglobin and dactylitis between the ages of 1 and 2 years as markers of severe disease. Reticulocytosis was also associated with severe disease. Here, we further analyzed data collected on enrolled CSSCD infants for the predictive value of those markers for stroke and death later in life. Three hundred fifty-four CSSCD subjects were identified who had absolute reticulocyte counts (ARC) measured during infancy (2 to 6 months of age). Infants with higher ARC had significantly increased risk of stroke or death during childhood; lower hemoglobin levels also increased the risk but to a lesser degree than ARC. WBC levels and dactylitis were not predictive of death or stroke. These data suggest that reticulocytosis among asymptomatic infants with sickle cell anemia is associated with an increased risk of death or stroke during childhood.

  7. An integrated risk function for estimating the global burden of disease attributable to ambient fine particulate matter exposure.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Richard T; Pope, C Arden; Ezzati, Majid; Olives, Casey; Lim, Stephen S; Mehta, Sumi; Shin, Hwashin H; Singh, Gitanjali; Hubbell, Bryan; Brauer, Michael; Anderson, H Ross; Smith, Kirk R; Balmes, John R; Bruce, Nigel G; Kan, Haidong; Laden, Francine; Prüss-Ustün, Annette; Turner, Michelle C; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Cohen, Aaron

    2014-04-01

    Estimating the burden of disease attributable to long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in ambient air requires knowledge of both the shape and magnitude of the relative risk (RR) function. However, adequate direct evidence to identify the shape of the mortality RR functions at the high ambient concentrations observed in many places in the world is lacking. We developed RR functions over the entire global exposure range for causes of mortality in adults: ischemic heart disease (IHD), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung cancer (LC). We also developed RR functions for the incidence of acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) that can be used to estimate mortality and lost-years of healthy life in children < 5 years of age. We fit an integrated exposure-response (IER) model by integrating available RR information from studies of ambient air pollution (AAP), second hand tobacco smoke, household solid cooking fuel, and active smoking (AS). AS exposures were converted to estimated annual PM2.5 exposure equivalents using inhaled doses of particle mass. We derived population attributable fractions (PAFs) for every country based on estimated worldwide ambient PM2.5 concentrations. The IER model was a superior predictor of RR compared with seven other forms previously used in burden assessments. The percent PAF attributable to AAP exposure varied among countries from 2 to 41 for IHD, 1 to 43 for stroke, < 1 to 21 for COPD, < 1 to 25 for LC, and < 1 to 38 for ALRI. We developed a fine particulate mass-based RR model that covered the global range of exposure by integrating RR information from different combustion types that generate emissions of particulate matter. The model can be updated as new RR information becomes available.

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors underestimate atherosclerotic burden in chronic kidney disease: usefulness of non-invasive tests in cardiovascular assessment.

    PubMed

    Coll, Blai; Betriu, Angels; Martínez-Alonso, Montserrat; Borràs, Mercè; Craver, Lourdes; Amoedo, Maria Luisa; Marco, Ma Paz; Sarró, Felipe; Junyent, Mireia; Valdivielso, Jose Manuel; Fernández, Elvira

    2010-09-01

    Cardiovascular risk scoring (Score) does not specifically address chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The aim of our study is to quantify atherosclerosis using carotid ultrasound and ankle-brachial index (ABI) and to assess its additional value in risk scoring. In this cross-sectional, observational study, patients were studied according to a standardized protocol including carotid ultrasound and ABI to determine the atherosclerosis score (AS), ranging from absence of to severe atherosclerosis (AS 0 to AS 3). We included 409 CKD-affected patients (231 on dialysis, 99 in CKD Stages IV-V and 79 in CKD Stages I-III) and 851 subjects with normal renal function. The presence and severity of atherosclerosis was significantly higher in the CKD group than in the controls at every decade of age studied. Among the CKD-affected subjects, the prevalence of carotid plaques was significantly higher in the dialysis group (78.3%) than in the group in CKD Stages I-III (55.6%, P < 0.001). We identified 174 patients at low-intermediate risk. Among them, 110 (63.2%) presented either moderate (AS 2) or severe (AS 3) atherosclerosis. Variables significantly (P < 0.05) and positively related to atherosclerosis were being on dialysis [OR = 3.40, 95% CI (1.73, 6.78) vs CKD Stages I-III], age [OR = 1.08, 95% CI (1.06-1.11)] and C-reactive protein [OR = 1.04, 95% CI (1.01-1.08)]. Conversely, female sex was negatively related to atherosclerosis [OR = 0.40, 95% CI (0.23-0.71), P = 0.002]. The use of carotid ultrasound and ABI identifies atherosclerosis in a population of CKD patients in which risk scoring underestimates atherosclerosis burden.

  9. Diabetes mellitus in Jamaica: sex differences in burden, risk factors, awareness, treatment and control in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Myrie, Colette; Younger-Coleman, Novie; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall; McFarlane, Shelly; Francis, Damian; Ferguson, Trevor; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana; Wilks, Rainford

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide valid estimates of the burden of and risk factors for diabetes mellitus by sex in Jamaica, a predominantly Black, middle-income and developing country. The Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008 examined a nationally representative sample of 2848 Jamaicans aged 15-74. Parameter estimates and 95% confidence intervals [CI] were weighted for non-response as well as age and sex of the source population. Sex differences in risk factors and diabetes prevalence, awareness, treatment and control were estimated in multivariable models. Population-attributable fractions (PAFs) of obesity on diabetes mellitus were estimated in both sexes. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 7.9% (95% CI: 6.7-9.1%), significantly higher in women than men 9.3% vs. 6.4% (P = 0.02) and increasing with age. Seventy-six percentage of persons with diabetes mellitus were aware of their status; urban women and rural men were less likely to be aware. Diabetes control (43% overall) was less common in higher-income men, but more common in higher-income women. Persons without health insurance were less likely to control their diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes risk factors was higher in women than men. Increased waist circumference (≥94 cm [men]/≥80 cm [women]), overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and low physical activity/inactivity were associated with PAFs for diabetes mellitus of 27%, 37% and 15%, respectively, in men and 77%, 54% and 24%, respectively, in women. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and its risk factors is high in Jamaica, especially among women, and national programmes to stem the diabetes mellitus epidemic should take these sex differences into consideration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  11. The double burden of malnutrition and its risk factors in school children in Tunja.

    PubMed

    Galiano, Lirios Pastor; Abril, Fred Manrique; Ernert, Andrea; Bau, Anne-Madeleine

    2012-06-01

    Undernutrition and overnutrition are relevant Public Health problems in Colombia. We conducted a nutritional survey in the municipality of Tunja to quantify the problem in order to guide government interventions and serve as baseline for future evaluations. Schoolchildren were randomly selected among all private and public schools. Information on health status, socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of their families was collected using questionnaires, which also included the Colombian Household Food Security Scale. Anthropometric measurements of 1168 schoolchildren (5 to 19 years old) were obtained, analyzed with WHO Anthro-Plus, and associated with the mentioned variables by further statistic analysis. The overall prevalences of stunting, thinness and overweight were 11.3%, 1.7% and 17.6%, respectively. The highest prevalence of stunting was found in rural areas (23%). Children from rural areas, attending public schools and in female-headed households had higher risks of stunting. Overweight reached a percentage of 26.9% in children attending private schools, where the risk of overweight was double than in public ones. Within the studied households 48.6% had some level of food insecurity. In Tunja the prevalence of undernutrition was low, which could be an effect of government nutrition programs. However, it continues to be a problem in vulnerable population groups, mainly in rural areas. On the other hand, the rising prevalence of overweight, following the trend of countries in nutritional transition, is a new Public Health problem which should be addressed. Periodic controls are also needed to evaluate the impact of government nutrition programs on the nutritional status of the children.

  12. Association of Light-Intensity Physical Activity With Lower Cardiovascular Disease Risk Burden in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Samannaaz S; Almeida, Gustavo J; Chester Wasko, Mary; Terhorst, Lauren; Piva, Sara R

    2016-04-01

    To characterize physical activity (PA) in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to determine the associations between PA participation at light to moderate intensities and cardiovascular disease risk factors, disability, and disease activity. The cross-sectional study used data from 2 RA cohorts. PA was measured using an accelerometry-based activity monitor, recording minutes/day spent in sedentary (≤1 metabolic equivalent [MET]), very light (1.1-1.9 METs), light (2-2.9 METs), and moderate activities (≥3 METs). Cardiovascular markers included body mass index, blood pressure, insulin resistance, and lipid profile. Disability and disease activity were measured using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), respectively. Associations between PA at each intensity level and health markers were assessed by multiple linear regression models, adjusted for age, sex, and cohort. Ninety-eight subjects (mean ± SD age 58 ± 9 years, 85% female) were included. Subjects spent 9.8 hours/day being sedentary, 3.5 hours/day engaged in very light PA, 2.1 hours/day engaged in light PA, and 35 minutes/day engaged in moderate PA. Only 17% were physically active (≥150 minutes/week of moderate PA in 10-minute bouts). Regression models showed that very light, light, and moderate PA were inversely associated with most cardiovascular disease risk factors and HAQ and DAS28 scores (R(2) Δ range 0.04-0.52, P < 0.05). The associations between PA and cardiovascular disease markers were either equivalent or stronger at very light and light intensities, as compared to moderate intensity. Individuals with RA are mostly active at very light and light intensities. PA at these intensity levels associates favorably with cardiovascular markers and lower disability and disease activity in RA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. [Anemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  14. Genetic Risk as a Marker of Amyloid-β and Tau Burden in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Voyle, Nicola; Patel, Hamel; Folarin, Amos; Newhouse, Stephen; Johnston, Caroline; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Dobson, Richard J.B.; Kiddle, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The search for a biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology (amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau) is ongoing, with the best markers currently being measurements of Aβ and tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and via positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. These methods are relatively invasive, costly, and often have high screening failure rates. Consequently, research is aiming to elucidate blood biomarkers of Aβ and tau. Objective: This study aims to investigate a case/control polygenic risk score (PGRS) as a marker of tau and investigate blood markers of a combined Aβ and tau outcome for the first time. A sub-study also considers plasma tau as markers of Aβ and tau pathology in CSF. Methods: We used data from the EDAR*, DESCRIPA**, and Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts in a logistic regression analysis to investigate blood markers of Aβ and tau in CSF. In particular, we investigated the extent to which a case/control PGRS is predictive of CSF tau, CSF amyloid, and a combined amyloid and tau outcome. The predictive ability of models was compared to that of age, gender, and APOE genotype (‘basic model’). Results: In EDAR and DESCRIPA test data, inclusion of a case/control PGRS was no more predictive of Aβ, and a combined Aβ and tau endpoint than the basic models (accuracies of 66.0%, and 73.3% respectively). The tau model saw a small increase in accuracy compared to basic models (59.6%). ADNI 2 test data also showed a slight increase in accuracy for the Aβ model when compared to the basic models (61.4%). Conclusion: We see some evidence that a case/control PGRS is marginally more predictive of Aβ and tau pathology than the basic models. The search for predictive factors of Aβ and tau pathologies, above and beyond demographic information, is still ongoing. Better understanding of AD risk alleles, development of more sensitive assays, and studies of larger sample size are three avenues that may provide such factors

  15. Adaptation and analysis of psychometric features of the Caregiver Risk Screen: a tool for detecting the risk of burden in family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rodriguez, Silvia; Ortiz-Marqués, Nuria; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Carrasco, María; Miguel, José J

    2013-05-01

    There are a limited number of scales available in the Spanish language that can be used to detect burden among individuals who care for a dependent family member. The purpose of this work was to adapt and validate the Caregiver Risk Screen (CRS) scale developed by Guberman et al. (2001) (Guberman, N., Keefe, J., Fancey, P., Nahmiash, D. and Barylak, L. (2001). Development of Screening and Assessment Tools for Family Caregivers: Final Report. Montreal, Canada: Health Transition Fund). The sample was made up of 302 informal caregivers of dependent family members (average age 57.3 years, and 78.9% were women). Scale structure was subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent and convergent validity were assessed by correlation with validated questionnaires for measuring burden (Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI)) and psychological health (SCL-90-R). The results show a high level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86), suitable fit of the one-dimensional model tested via confirmatory factor analysis (GFI = 0.91; CFI = 0.91; RMSEA = 0.097), and appropriate convergent validity with similar constructs (r = 0.77 with ZBI; and r-values between 0.45 and 0.63 with SCL-90-R dimensions). The findings are promising in terms of their adaptation of the CRS to Spanish, and the results enable us to draw the conclusion that the CRS is a suitable tool for assessing and detecting strain in family caregivers. Nevertheless, new research is required that explores all the psychometric features on the scale.

  16. Gastrointestinal parasitic burdens in UK tortoises: a survey of tortoise owners and potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Hedley, J; Eatwell, K; Shaw, D J

    2013-11-30

    Despite gastrointestinal parasites being commonly diagnosed in captive tortoises throughout the UK, there is a lack of data regarding the prevalence. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in tortoises in the UK, and to investigate the factors affecting the prevalence of these parasites. Owners were invited to submit a faecal sample from their tortoise in conjunction with a completed questionnaire covering details of signalment and husbandry. Data from the questionnaires were analysed at the end of the study. Faecal analysis was performed on samples from Testudo hermanni, Testudo graeca and Testudo horsfieldii. This involved examination of direct wet preparations, a modified McMaster technique, passive NaCl flotation and Cryptosporidium staining. Of the 142 samples used, 130 were examined by the first three methods. 49 per cent were positive for one or more parasites. Of the positive samples, 67 per cent were positive for oxyurids, 28 per cent were positive for ascarids and 28 per cent were positive for protozoa (Balantidium, Nyctotherus or flagellates). Only 1/113 (0.8 per cent) samples was positive for Cryptosporidium. The most important risk factors for parasites were sex (F) and length of time (<5 years) in owner's possession. This survey showed that gastrointestinal parasites are frequently detected in the faecal samples of captive tortoises in the UK, but their prevalence may be influenced by various factors including sex, length of time owned, age and species.

  17. Diabetic nephropathy--a review of the natural history, burden, risk factors and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ayodele, Olugbenga E.; Alebiosu, C. Olutayo; Salako, Babatunde L.

    2004-01-01

    The earliest clinical evidence of diabetic nephropathy is microalbuminuria. Progression from microalbuminuria to overt nephropathy occurs in 20-40% within a 10-year period with approximately 20% of these patients progressing to end-stage renal disease. End-stage renal disease develops in 50% of type-1 diabetes patients with overt nephropathy within 10 years and in more than 75% by 20 years in the absence of treatment. In type-2 diabetes, a greater proportion of patients have microalbuminuria and overt nephropathy at or shortly after diagnosis of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with subsequent increase in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy. The risk factors identified in the development of DN from longitudinal and cross-sectional studies include race, genetic susceptibility, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperfiltration, smoking, advanced age, male sex, and high-protein diet. Treatment interventions in diabetic nephropathy include glycemic control, treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cessation of smoking, protein restriction, and renal replacement therapy. Multifactorial approach includes combined therapy targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, microalbuminuria, and dyslipidemia. PMID:15586648

  18. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  19. Frequency of nutritional anemia among female medical students of Faisalabad.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Shireen; Tariq, Sundus; Tariq, Saba; Kamal, Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a common health problem worldwide. This problem is most commonly faced by 18 to 25 years of females. Medical students especially female hostelites poses high risk of anemia because of their poor eating habits, breakfast skipping, long schedule in college, burden of medical studies, clinical postings, and extra-curricular activities. Therefore the current study was designed to determine the hemoglobin status in young female medical students. We also elucidate its association with BMI. A cross sectional study was conducted at The University of Faisalabad during December 2015 to February 2016. A total of 221 female students were recruited by convenient sampling technique. All relevant information about participants was taking by administering structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized as hostelities and day scholars for comparison. Study subjects were also sub grouped on the bases of their BMI. Hemoglobin, MCV, MCH and MCHC were estimated at Madina Teaching Hospital Faisalabad. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS 20. Mean age of the study subjects was 19.92 ±0.93. 33.4% of the students were found to be anemic. Significantly high number of hostelites (39.2%) were anemic as compared to day scholars (23.1%) (P value= 0.015*). On analyzing by BMI categories, greater number of underweight subjects was found to be anemic as compared to normal and overweight subjects. Anemia is more prevalent in hostelites as compared to day scholar female medical students which might also affect the efficiency of these students.

  20. Hypertension burden in Luxembourg: Individual risk factors and geographic variations, 2013 to 2015 European Health Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Castell, Maria; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Kuemmerle, Andrea; Schritz, Anna; Barré, Jessica; Delagardelle, Charles; Krippler, Serge; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Stranges, Saverio

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but it remains the main cause of death in Luxembourg. We aimed to estimate the current prevalence of hypertension, associated risk factors, and its geographic variation in Luxembourg.Cross-sectional, population-based data on 1497 randomly selected Luxembourg residents aged 25 to 64 years were collected as part of the European Health Examination Survey from 2013 to 2015. Hypertension was defined as systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg, self-report of a physician diagnosis or on antihypertensive medication. Standard and Bayesian regressions were used to examine associations between hypertension and covariates, and also geographic distribution of hypertension across the country.Nearly 31% of Luxembourg residents were hypertensive, and over 70% of those were either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled. The likelihood of hypertension was lower in men more physically active (odds ratio [95% credible region] 0.6 [0.4, 0.9]) and consuming alcohol daily (0.3 [0.1, 0.8]), and higher in men with a poor health perception (1.6 [1.0, 2.7]) and in women experiencing depressive symptoms (1.8 [1.3, 2.7]). There were geographic variations in hypertension prevalence across cantons and municipalities. The highest odds ratio was observed in the most industrialized region (South-West) (1.2 [0.9, 1.6]) with a positive effect at 90% credible region.In Luxembourg, the vast majority of people with hypertension are either unaware of their condition or not adequately controlled, which constitutes a major, neglected public health challenge. There are geographic variations in hypertension prevalence in Luxembourg, hence the role of individual and regional risk factors along with public health initiatives to reduce disease burden should be considered.

  1. Identifying at-risk dementia caregivers following institutionalization: the nursing home admission-burden and nursing home admission-depression prognostic tools.

    PubMed

    Gaugler, Joseph E; Mittelman, Mary S; Hepburn, Kenneth; Newcomer, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The current study developed prognostic tools to identify dementia caregivers at-risk for clinically relevant burden or depressive symptoms following nursing home admission (NHA) of their family members. A retrospective, longitudinal design was used that included 1,610 dementia caregivers who provided data prior to and up to 6 months following nursing home admission. Response operant characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to test and validate two prognostic tools: the NHA-Burden and NHA-Depression tools. An ROC curve yielded a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 62.5% at a cutoff score of 5.41 for the NHA-Burden Prognostic tool. A second ROC curve indicated a sensitivity of 75.4% and a specificity of 62.5% at a cutoff score of 7.45 for the NHA-Depression tool. Clinicians may wish to utilize cutpoints on the NHA-Burden and NHA-Depression tools to ensure that more persons who are at-risk for clinically significant burden or depression during NHA are identified.

  2. The Burden of Hypertension and Associated Risk for Cardiovascular Mortality in China.

    PubMed

    Lewington, Sarah; Lacey, Ben; Clarke, Robert; Guo, Yu; Kong, Xiang Ling; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Junshi; Meng, Jinhuai; Xiong, Youping; He, Tianyou; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Shuo; Collins, Rory; Peto, Richard; Li, Liming; Chen, Zhengming

    2016-04-01

    associated with relative risks for CVD mortality of 4.1 (95% CI, 3.7-4.6), 2.6 (95% CI, 2.4-2.9) and 1.9 (95% CI, 1.8-2.0) at ages 35 to 59, 60 to 69, and 70 to 79 years, respectively, and accounted for about one-third of deaths due to CVD (approximately 750 000) at 35 to 79 years of age in 2010. About one-third of Chinese adults in this national cohort population had hypertension. The levels of diagnosis, treatment, and control were much lower than in Western populations, and were associated with significant excess mortality.

  3. Risk analysis of quarantine station performance: a case study of the importation of equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses into California.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, T E; McBride, M D; Hird, D W

    1998-01-01

    We examined the risk of importing and mistakenly releasing equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-infected horses into California. A computer simulation model was constructed to evaluate current and alternative quarantine station procedures; 150,000 iterations were performed to simulate 15 different scenarios of 10,000 horses imported into the state over a 14-year period. Simulation results showed that under current conditions of low EIAV prevalence in exporting countries, increasing the quarantine period would not decrease the number of EIAV-infected horses mistakenly released from quarantine. In a worst case scenario of high EIAV prevalence in exporting countries, the model predicted 10 EIAV-infected horses would be imported, of these 1 or none would escape detection and would be released mistakenly if quarantine duration were 3 or 14 days, respectively. This model may be applied to other quarantine station situations for evaluating the importation risk for EIAV and other diseases.

  4. [Differential diagnosis of anemias].

    PubMed

    Szerafin, László; Jakó, János

    2005-02-13

    The authors describe the factors influencing of normal hemoglobin level, pathogenetic and morphological classification of anemias and the possibilities to distinguish their different types. They highlight features of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. They summarise in tables the basis of laboratory diagnosis and possibility of identification of different types of anemias.

  5. Iron deficiency anemia at admission for labor and delivery is associated with an increased risk for Cesarean section and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Drukker, Lior; Hants, Yael; Farkash, Rivka; Ruchlemer, Rosa; Samueloff, Arnon; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina

    2015-12-01

    Maternal iron deficiency anemia (IDA) impacts placenta and fetus. We evaluated effects of IDA at admission for delivery on cesarean rates, and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Medical records from Jerusalem (2005-2012) identified women with a live-birth singleton fetus in cephalic presentation of any gestational age and excluded planned cesarean, chronic/gestational diseases identified with anemia. Study population was divided into anemic and non-anemic women using WHO criteria. cesarean rate, and adverse outcomes (maternal: packed cells transfusion, early post-partum hemorrhage, preterm delivery; and neonatal: 5' Apgar < 7, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit [NICU] admission, extreme birthweights). Continuous variable analysis and multivariate backward step-wise logistic regression models were prepared with Odds Ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). In all, 96,066 deliveries were registered, of which 75,660 (78.8%) were included. IDA was present in 7,977 women (10.5%). Anemia at birth was significantly associated with cesarean section (OR 1.30; 95%CI, 1.13-1.49, p < 0.001), packed cells transfusion (OR 5.48; 95%CI, 4.57-6.58, p < 0.001), preterm delivery (OR 1.54; 95%CI, 1.36-1.76, p < 0.001), macrosomia (OR 1.23; 95%CI, 1.12-1.35, p < 0.001), Large for Gestational Age (OR 1.29; 95%CI, 1.20-1.39, p < 0.001), Apgar 5' < 7 (OR 2.21; 95%CI, 1.84-2.64, p < 0.001), and NICU admission (OR 1.28; 95%CI, 1.04-1.57, p = 0.018). Iron deficiency anemia at delivery is associated with an increased risk for cesarean section and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in otherwise healthy women. Monitoring/correction of hemoglobin concentrations even in late pregnancy may prevent these adverse events. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  7. Identifying risk factors for household burdens of road traffic fatalities: regression results from a cross-sectional survey in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lanying

    2016-11-29

    Road traffic fatalities (RTF) are among the top ten causes of deaths in the world. The risk factors for RTF fatal victims have been extensively characterized, but studies of household burden of RTF have been very few in number. Accordingly, this article investigates post-crash impacts on RTF victims' family members, including the adverse impacts of lost income, occupational disruption, unfavorable family dynamics, and residential relocation. Survey data from 1291 RTF family members interviewed in Taiwan in 2012 provide the evidence of impact used in this article. Twelve variables related to the family member's socio-demographic background were used to predict the scope of the adverse impact of a fatal crash in regression models developed for this analysis. RTF victims' spouses with relatively low personal incomes and strong dependence upon the crash victims were found to be most likely to experience a marked decrease in post- crash quality of life. RTF victims' family members who lived with few other adult cohabitants and had more juvenile dependents and were emotionally dependent on the victims were found to be quite likely to experience post- crash setbacks in occupational stability. RTF victims' family members who were emotionally dependent on the victims were found to be more likely to experience major family life disruptions. The younger the RTF victims' family members, and the more years since the crash, the higher the likelihood of residential relocation taking place. The results noted help identify those RTF victims' families that will most likely be adversely affected by the crash. The true societal costs of RTF crashes should include the adversities suffered by the fatal crash victims' families. Social welfare policies, mental health support, and timely supplemental resources should be made available to those surviving families most at risk of major life disruptions.

  8. Blood cadmium burden and the risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a case-control study in Chinese Chaoshan population.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lin; Wang, Xiaoling; Huo, Xia; Xu, Xijin; Lin, Kun; Zhang, Jingwen; Huang, Yue; Wu, Kusheng

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium is a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects. Both observational and experimental studies have suggested associations between cadmium and the rates of many types of cancers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether cadmium exposure is associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in a population with a relatively high prevalence in southeast China. Hospital-based 134 NPC cases and 132 cancer-free controls were recruited from a cancer hospital in Chaoshan area, southeast of China. Basic clinical data and information of lifetime styles, smoking, and drinking as well as other demographic characteristics were also collected from medical records. Blood cadmium levels (BCLs) were detected by graphite-furnace atomizer absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS). BCLs and over-limit ratios between cases and controls were compared. The relationships between BCLs and NPC were explored by comparing BCLs differences between/among different characteristics of related factors and logistic regression analysis. In addition, BCLs within cases were also compared in relation to the disease clinical stages, pathological types, and metastasis. The median concentration of blood cadmium in cases (3.84, interquartile range 2.21-6.10) was significantly higher than that of controls (2.28, interquartile range 1.79-3.45). The over-limit ratio (≥5 μg/L) in cases was also higher than that in controls (35.1 vs. 13.6%, χ(2) = 16.55, p < 0.001). Smokers tended to have high levels of cadmium burden, and smokers with longer smoking pack-years in cases had relatively higher BCLs (p = 0.001). NPC patients with diseases history presented lower cadmium burden (p = 0.020). In the NPC cases, BCLs were positively associated with clinical stages and N classification (r = 0.193, 0.187, respectively, p < 0.05). Cadmium seems to be a risk factor of NPC, and high cadmium exposure may promote the occurrence and development of NPC.

  9. Polygenic Risk Score Identifies Subgroup with Higher Burden of Atherosclerosis and Greater Relative Benefit from Statin Therapy in the Primary Prevention Setting.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Young, Robin; Stitziel, Nathan O; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Sartori, Samantha; Fuster, Valentin; Reilly, Dermot F; Butterworth, Adam S; Rader, Daniel J; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-02-21

    Background -Relative risk reduction with statin therapy has been consistent across nearly all subgroups studied to date. However, in analyses of two randomized controlled primary prevention trials (ASCOT and JUPITER), statin therapy led to a greater relative risk reduction among a subgroup at high genetic risk. Here, we sought to confirm this observation in a third primary prevention randomized controlled trial. Additionally, we assessed if those at high genetic risk had a greater burden of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Methods -We studied participants from a randomized controlled trial of primary prevention with statin therapy (WOSCOPS, n=4,910) and two observational cohort studies (CARDIA and BioImage, n=1,154 and 4,392). For each participant, we calculated a polygenic risk score (PRS) derived from up to 57 common DNA sequence variants previously associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). We compared the relative efficacy of statin therapy in those at high genetic risk (top quintile of PRS) versus all others (WOSCOP)S as well as the association between the PRS and coronary artery calcification (CARDIA) and carotid artery plaque burden (BioImage). Results -Among WOSCOPS trial participants at high genetic risk, statin therapy was associated with a relative risk reduction of 44% (95% CI, 22%-60%; P < 0.001) whereas in all others, relative risk reduction was 24% (95% CI 8%-37%; P = 0.004) despite similar LDL cholesterol lowering. In a study-level meta-analysis across the WOSCOPS, ASCOT, and JUPITER primary prevention, relative risk reduction in those at high genetic risk was 46% versus 26% in all others (P for heterogeneity = 0.05). Across all three studies, the absolute risk reduction with statin therapy was 3.6% (95% CI, 2.0%-5.1%) among those in the high genetic risk group and was 1.3% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.9%) in all others. Each standard deviation increase in the polygenic risk score was associated with 1.32-fold (95% CI, 1.04-1.68) greater likelihood of

  10. The epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors 2010 Study.

    PubMed

    Moran, Andrew; Forouzanfar, Mohammad; Sampson, Uchechukwu; Chugh, Sumeet; Feigin, Valery; Mensah, George

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa is unique among world regions, with about half of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) due to causes other than atherosclerosis. CVD epidemiology data are sparse and of uneven quality in sub-Saharan Africa. Using the available data, the Global Burden of Diseases, Risk Factors, and Injuries (GBD) 2010 Study estimated CVD mortality and burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa in 1990 and 2010. The leading CVD cause of death and disability in 2010 in sub-Saharan Africa was stroke; the largest relative increases in CVD burden between 1990 and 2010 were in atrial fibrillation and peripheral arterial disease. CVD deaths constituted only 8.8% of all deaths and 3.5% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in sub-Sahara Africa, less than a quarter of the proportion of deaths and burden attributed to CVD in high income regions. However, CVD deaths in sub-Saharan Africa occur at younger ages on average than in the rest of the world. It remains uncertain if increased urbanization and life expectancy in some parts of sub-Saharan African nations will transition the region to higher CVD burden in future years. © 2013.

  11. Nutritional anemias.

    PubMed

    Hoffbrand, A V; Herbert, V

    1999-10-01

    Folate, vitamin B12, and iron are the subjects of active biochemical and molecular research so that further understanding of their metabolism in health and in a wide variety of Inherited and acquired diseases can be achieved. The roles of folate and vitamin B12 in cardiovascular and neurologic diseases and in neural tube defects (NTDs) will be further explored in the next decade. The effects of prophylactic therapy and of food fortification with the vitamins on these diseases remain to be established. Iron deficiency is a public health problem in all countries and prevention or treatment, particularly in children in developing countries, are major goals. The increased recent understanding of iron metabolism and absorption may clarify the etiology of diseases of iron metabolism and of dietary iron overload. Improved iron chelation therapy for transfusion-dependent patients with refractory anemias will continue to be actively researched over the next decades.

  12. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  13. Healthcare Burden, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Mucosal Barrier Injury Laboratory-Confirmed Bloodstream Infections after Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dandoy, Christopher E; Haslam, David; Lane, Adam; Jodele, Sonata; Demmel, Kathy; El-Bietar, Javier; Flesch, Laura; Myers, Kasiani C; Pate, Abigail; Rotz, Seth; Daniels, Paulina; Wallace, Gregory; Nelson, Adam; Waters, Heather; Connelly, Beverly; Davies, Stella M

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infections (MBI-LCBIs) lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare resource utilization in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. Determination of the healthcare burden of MBI-LCBIs and identification of patients at risk of MBI-LCBIs will allow researchers to identify strategies to reduce MBI-LCBI rates. The objective of our study was to describe the incidence, risk factors, timing, and outcomes of MBI-LCBIs in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of 374 patients who underwent HSCT at a large free-standing academic children's hospital to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of patients that developed a bloodstream infection (BSI) including MBI-LCBI, central line-associated BSI (CLABSI), or secondary BSI in the first year after HSCT. Outcome measures included nonrelapse mortality (NRM), central venous catheter removal within 7 days of positive culture, shock, admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) within 48 hours of positive culture, and death within 10 days of positive culture. One hundred seventy BSIs were diagnosed in 100 patients (27%): 80 (47%) MBI-LCBIs, 68 (40%) CLABSIs, and 22 (13%) secondary infections. MBI-LCBIs were diagnosed at a significantly higher rate in allogeneic HSCT patients (18% versus 7%, P = .007). Reduced-intensity conditioning (OR, 1.96; P = .015) and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (OR, 2.94; P = .0004) were associated with MBI-LCBI. Nearly 50% of all patients with a BSI developed septic shock, 10% died within 10 days of positive culture, and nearly 25% were transferred to the PICU. One-year NRM was significantly increased in patients with 1 (34%) and more than 1 (56%) BSIs in the first year post-HSCT compared with those who did not develop BSIs (14%) (P ≤ .0001). There was increased 1-year NRM in patients with at least 1 MBI-LCBI (OR, 1.94; P

  14. Long-term results using hydroxyurea/phlebotomy for reducing secondary stroke risk in children with sickle cell anemia and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Anthea; Ware, Russell E; Thornburg, Courtney D

    2011-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and a primary overt stroke are at high risk of recurrent (secondary) stroke. Chronic transfusion therapy dramatically reduces but does not eliminate this high risk, and inevitably results in transfusion-related hemosiderosis. We previously reported the use of hydroxyurea/phlebotomy as an alternative to transfusions to reduce the risk of secondary stroke and improve management of iron overload in 35 children with SCA. To report long-term results, we retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data through October 2008. With a median of 5.6 years and total of 219 patient-years of follow-up, 10 of 35 patients (29%) had recurrent stroke after switching to hydroxyurea; seven were previously reported and three new strokes occurred during extended follow-up. The overall secondary stroke event rate was 4.6 per 100 patient-years. Children on hydroxyurea received serial phlebotomy and had lower mean serum ferritin values than children on transfusions (591 ng/mL vs. 3410 ng/mL, P = 0.02). In this cohort, long-term hydroxyurea treatment reduced but did not eliminate the risk of stroke recurrence and, uniquely, allowed phlebotomy to reduce iron overload. Long-term assessments of this therapy should evaluate risk factors for secondary stroke and assessments of hemosiderosis, neurocognitive outcome, and health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016.

    PubMed

    2017-09-16

    The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of risk factor exposure and attributable burden of disease. By providing estimates over a long time series, this study can monitor risk exposure trends critical to health surveillance and inform policy debates on the importance of addressing risks in context. We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of GBD to estimate levels and trends in exposure, attributable deaths, and attributable disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), by age group, sex, year, and location for 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2016. This study included 481 risk-outcome pairs that met the GBD study criteria for convincing or probable evidence of causation. We extracted relative risk (RR) and exposure estimates from 22 717 randomised controlled trials, cohorts, pooled cohorts, household surveys, census data, satellite data, and other sources, according to the GBD 2016 source counting methods. Using the counterfactual scenario of theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL), we estimated the portion of deaths and DALYs that could be attributed to a given risk. Finally, we explored four drivers of trends in attributable burden: population growth, population ageing, trends in risk exposure, and all other factors combined. Since 1990, exposure increased significantly for 30 risks, did not change significantly for four risks, and decreased significantly for 31 risks. Among risks that are leading causes of burden of disease, child growth failure and household air pollution showed the most significant declines, while metabolic risks, such as body-mass index and high fasting plasma glucose, showed significant increases. In 2016, at Level 3 of the hierarchy, the three leading risk factors in terms of attributable DALYs at the global level for men were smoking (124·1 million

  16. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of risk factor exposure and attributable burden of disease. By providing estimates over a long time series, this study can monitor risk exposure trends critical to health surveillance and inform policy debates on the importance of addressing risks in context. Methods We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of GBD to estimate levels and trends in exposure, attributable deaths, and attributable disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), by age group, sex, year, and location for 84 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2016. This study included 481 risk-outcome pairs that met the GBD study criteria for convincing or probable evidence of causation. We extracted relative risk (RR) and exposure estimates from 22 717 randomised controlled trials, cohorts, pooled cohorts, household surveys, census data, satellite data, and other sources, according to the GBD 2016 source counting methods. Using the counterfactual scenario of theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL), we estimated the portion of deaths and DALYs that could be attributed to a given risk. Finally, we explored four drivers of trends in attributable burden: population growth, population ageing, trends in risk exposure, and all other factors combined. Findings Since 1990, exposure increased significantly for 30 risks, did not change significantly for four risks, and decreased significantly for 31 risks. Among risks that are leading causes of burden of disease, child growth failure and household air pollution showed the most significant declines, while metabolic risks, such as body-mass index and high fasting plasma glucose, showed significant increases. In 2016, at Level 3 of the hierarchy, the three leading risk factors in terms of attributable DALYs at the global level for

  17. The burden of cancer risk in Canada’s indigenous population: a comparative study of known risks in a Canadian region

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Brenda; Kliewer, Erich V; Hall, Madelyn; Demers, Alain A; Turner, Donna; Martens, Patricia; Hong, Say P; Hart, Lyna; Chartrand, Caroline; Munro, Garry

    2011-01-01

    Background Canadian First Nations, the largest of the Aboriginal groups in Canada, have had lower cancer incidence and mortality rates than non-Aboriginal populations in the past. This pattern is changing with increased life expectancy, a growing population, and a poor social environment that influences risk behaviors, metabolic conditions, and disparities in screening uptake. These factors alone do not fully explain differences in cancer risk between populations, as genetic susceptibility and environmental factors also have significant influence. However, genetics and environment are difficult to modify. This study compared modifiable behavioral risk factors and metabolic-associated conditions for men and women, and cancer screening practices of women, between First Nations living on-reserve and a non-First Nations Manitoba rural population (Canada). Methods The study used data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Manitoba First Nations Regional Longitudinal Health Survey to examine smoking, binge drinking, metabolic conditions, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, and cancer-screening practices. Results First Nations on-reserve had significantly higher rates of smoking (P < 0.001), binge drinking (P < 0.001), obesity (P < 0.001) and diabetes (P < 0.001), and less leisure-time physical activity (P = 0.029), and consumption of fruits and vegetables (P < 0.001). Sex differences were also apparent. In addition, First Nations women reported significantly less uptake of mammography screening (P < 0.001) but similar rates for cervical cancer screening. Conclusions Based on the findings of this retrospective study, the future cancer burden is expected to be high in the First Nations on-reserve population. Interventions, utilizing existing and new health and social authorities, and long-term institutional partnerships, are required to combat cancer risk disparities, while governments address economic disparities. PMID:22069372

  18. Disease burden and risk factors for hospitalizations associated with rotavirus infection among children in New York State, 1989 through 2000.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hwa-Gan H; Glass, Roger I; Smith, Perry F; Cicirello, Helen G; Holman, Robert C; Morse, Dale L

    2003-09-01

    To examine trends in hospitalizations for pediatric diarrhea, ascertain the disease burden and risk factors for hospitalizations associated with rotavirus and assess the accuracy of coding for rotavirus hospitalizations in New York State. For 1989 through 2000, data were obtained for all diarrhea-associated hospitalizations in New York State among children 1 month through 4 years of age. Characteristics of patients hospitalized with rotavirus were compared with those for hospitalizations with diarrhea from other causes. Medical charts coded as rotavirus diarrhea were reviewed for patients who were discharged during 1997 to determine whether these diagnoses were supported with laboratory results. Diarrhea was reported as a discharge diagnosis in approximately 13% of all hospitalizations for an annual incidence of 83 per 10 000 children. Viruses were the most common etiologic agents reported. Since 1993, when a rotavirus-specific code was introduced, rotavirus infection was coded for 8.7% of all diarrhea-associated hospitalizations. A total of 136 patients with diarrhea died during their hospitalization (hospital fatality rate, 1.6 per 1000), and the 12 deaths among patients with rotavirus had a distinct winter pattern. During 1997 only 46% of the hospitals reporting diarrhea in children used the specific code for rotavirus, and 12% of hospitals reported rotavirus in >30% of all diarrhea-associated hospitalizations. Infants <4 months of age were more likely than older children to be nosocomially infected with rotavirus and had a higher proportion of congenital malformations. In New York State diarrhea is a common hospital discharge diagnosis and contributes approximately 13% of all hospitalizations among children <5 years of age. When hospitals with maximum recording were used as a reference point, >30% of diarrhea hospitalizations were recorded as likely the result of rotavirus.

  19. Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular and Diabetes Mortality in South Asia: Analysis From the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Mohammad Y; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Singh, Gitanjali M; Shi, Peilin; Ahsan, Habibul; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Brahmam, Ginnela N V; Chen, Yu; Afshin, Ashkan; Fahimi, Saman; Danaei, Goodarz; Powles, John W; Ezzati, Majid; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-12-01

    To quantify cardiovascular disease and diabetes deaths attributable to dietary and metabolic risks by country, age, sex, and time in South Asian countries. We used the 2010 Global Burden of Disease national surveys to characterize risk factor levels by age and sex. We derived etiological effects of risk factors-disease endpoints, by age, from meta-analyses. We defined optimal levels. We combined these inputs with cause-specific mortality rates to compute population-attributable fractions as a percentage of total cardiometabolic deaths. Suboptimal diet was the leading cause of cardiometabolic mortality in 4 of 5 countries, with population-attributable fractions from 40.7% (95% uncertainty interval = 37.4, 44.1) in Bangladesh to 56.9% (95% uncertainty interval = 52.4, 61.5) in Pakistan. High systolic blood pressure was the second leading cause, except in Bangladesh, where it superseded suboptimal diet. This was followed in all nations by high fasting plasma glucose, low fruit intake, and low whole grain intake. Other prominent burdens were more variable, such as low intake of vegetables, low omega-3 fats, and high sodium intake in India, Nepal, and Pakistan. Important similarities and differences are evident in cardiometabolic mortality burdens of modifiable dietary and metabolic risks across these countries, informing health policy and program priorities.

  20. Water- and wastewater-related disease and infection risks: what is an appropriate value for the maximum tolerable additional burden of disease?

    PubMed

    Mara, Duncan

    2011-06-01

    The maximum additional burden of water- and wastewater-related disease of 10-6 disability-adjusted life year (DALY) loss per person per year (pppy), used in the WHO Drinking-water Quality Guidelines and the WHO Guidelines for Wastewater Use in Agriculture, is based on US EPA'S acceptance of a 70-year lifetime waterborne cancer risk of 10(-5) per person, equivalent to an annual risk of 1.4x10(-7) per person which is four orders of magnitude lower than the actual all-cancer incidence in the USA in 2009 of 1.8x10(-3) pppy. A maximum additional burden of 10(-4) DALY loss pppy would reduce this risk to a more cost-effective, but still low, risk of 1.4x10(-5) pppy. It would increase the DALY loss pppy in low- and middle-income countries due to diarrhoeal diseases from the current level of 0.0119 pppy to 0.0120 pppy, and that due to ascariasis from 0.0026 pppy to 0.0027 pppy, but neither increase is of public-health significance. It is therefore recommended that the maximum additional burden of disease from these activities be increased to a DALY loss of 10(-4) pppy as this provides an adequate margin of public-health safety in relation to waterborne-cancer deaths, diarrhoeal disease and ascariasis in all countries.

  1. Association of anticholinergic burden with cognitive and functional status in a cohort of hospitalized elderly: comparison of the anticholinergic cognitive burden scale and anticholinergic risk scale: results from the REPOSI study.

    PubMed

    Pasina, Luca; Djade, Codjo D; Lucca, Ugo; Nobili, Alessandro; Tettamanti, Mauro; Franchi, Carlotta; Salerno, Francesco; Corrao, Salvatore; Marengoni, Alessandra; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Violi, Francesco; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-02-01

    Drugs with anticholinergic effects are associated with adverse events such as delirium and falls as well as cognitive decline and loss of independence. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between anticholinergic burden and both cognitive and functional status, according to the hypothesis that the cumulative anticholinergic burden, as measured by the Anticholinergic Cognitive Burden (ACB) Scale and Anticholinergic Risk Scale (ARS), increases the risk of cognitive decline and impairs activities of daily living. This cross-sectional, prospective study (3-month telephone follow-up) was conducted in 66 Italian internal medicine and geriatric wards participating in the Registry of Polytherapies SIMI (Società Italiana di Medicina Interna) (REPOSI) study during 2010. The sample included 1,380 inpatients aged 65 years or older. Cognitive status was rated with the Short Blessed Test (SBT) and physical function with the Barthel Index. Each patient's anticholinergic burden was evaluated using the ACB and ARS scores. The mean SBT score for patients treated with anticholinergic drugs was higher than that for patients receiving no anticholinergic medications as also indicated by the ACB scale, even after adjustment for age, sex, education, stroke and transient ischaemic attack [9.2 (95 % CI 8.6-9.9) vs. 8.5 (95 % CI 7.8-9.2); p = 0.05]. There was a dose-response relationship between total ACB score and cognitive impairment. Patients identified by the ARS had more severe cognitive and physical impairment than patients identified by the ACB scale, and the dose-response relationship between this score and ability to perform activities of daily living was clear. No correlation was found with length of hospital stay. Drugs with anticholinergic properties identified by the ACB scale and ARS are associated with worse cognitive and functional performance in elderly patients. The ACB scale might permit a rapid identification of drugs potentially associated with cognitive

  2. The relationship between the severity of hemolysis, clinical manifestations and risk of death in 415 patients with sickle cell anemia in the US and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Lee, Janet S.; Zhang, Yingze; Kanias, Tamir; Zhao, Xuejun; Xiong, Zeyu; Oriss, Timothy B.; Zeng, Qilu; Kato, Gregory J.; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Hildesheim, Mariana E.; Sachdev, Vandana; Barst, Robyn J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Little, Jane A.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Novelli, Enrico; Girgis, Reda E.; Morris, Claudia R.; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Badesch, David B.; Lanzkron, Sophie; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of hemolytic anemia has been proposed as an independent risk factor for the development of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease, such as pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia and cutaneous leg ulceration. A composite variable derived from several individual markers of hemolysis could facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of hemolysis. In this study, we assessed the association of hemolysis with outcomes in sickle cell anemia. A hemolytic component was calculated by principal component analysis from reticulocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin concentrations in 415 hemoglobin SS patients. Association of this component with direct markers of hemolysis and clinical outcomes was assessed. As primary validation, both plasma red blood cell microparticles and cell-free hemoglobin concentration were higher in the highest hemolytic component quartile compared to the lowest quartile (P≤0.0001 for both analyses). The hemolytic component was lower with hydroxyurea therapy, higher hemoglobin F, and alpha-thalassemia (P≤0.0005); it was higher with higher systemic pulse pressure, lower oxygen saturation, and greater values for tricuspid regurgitation velocity, left ventricular diastolic dimension and left ventricular mass (all P<0.0001). Two-year follow-up analysis showed that a high hemolytic component was associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, HR 3.44; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2–9.5; P=0.02). The hemolytic component reflects direct markers of intravascular hemolysis in patients with sickle cell disease and allows for adjusted analysis of associations between hemolytic severity and clinical outcomes. These results confirm associations between hemolytic rate and pulse pressure, oxygen saturation, increases in Doppler-estimated pulmonary systolic pressures and mortality (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00492531). PMID:22983573

  3. The relationship between the severity of hemolysis, clinical manifestations and risk of death in 415 patients with sickle cell anemia in the US and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Lee, Janet S; Zhang, Yingze; Kanias, Tamir; Zhao, Xuejun; Xiong, Zeyu; Oriss, Timothy B; Zeng, Qilu; Kato, Gregory J; Gibbs, J Simon R; Hildesheim, Mariana E; Sachdev, Vandana; Barst, Robyn J; Machado, Roberto F; Hassell, Kathryn L; Little, Jane A; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Novelli, Enrico; Girgis, Reda E; Morris, Claudia R; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Badesch, David B; Lanzkron, Sophie; Castro, Oswaldo L; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Gordeuk, Victor R; Gladwin, Mark T

    2013-03-01

    The intensity of hemolytic anemia has been proposed as an independent risk factor for the development of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease, such as pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia and cutaneous leg ulceration. A composite variable derived from several individual markers of hemolysis could facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of hemolysis. In this study, we assessed the association of hemolysis with outcomes in sickle cell anemia. A hemolytic component was calculated by principal component analysis from reticulocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin concentrations in 415 hemoglobin SS patients. Association of this component with direct markers of hemolysis and clinical outcomes was assessed. As primary validation, both plasma red blood cell microparticles and cell-free hemoglobin concentration were higher in the highest hemolytic component quartile compared to the lowest quartile (P≤0.0001 for both analyses). The hemolytic component was lower with hydroxyurea therapy, higher hemoglobin F, and alpha-thalassemia (P≤0.0005); it was higher with higher systemic pulse pressure, lower oxygen saturation, and greater values for tricuspid regurgitation velocity, left ventricular diastolic dimension and left ventricular mass (all P<0.0001). Two-year follow-up analysis showed that a high hemolytic component was associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, HR 3.44; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2-9.5; P=0.02). The hemolytic component reflects direct markers of intravascular hemolysis in patients with sickle cell disease and allows for adjusted analysis of associations between hemolytic severity and clinical outcomes. These results confirm associations between hemolytic rate and pulse pressure, oxygen saturation, increases in Doppler-estimated pulmonary systolic pressures and mortality (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00492531).

  4. An update on the burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors in Jamaica: findings from the Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T S; Francis, D K; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Younger, N O M; McFarlane, S R; Wilks, R J

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have documented a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Jamaica and suggest that mortality from CVD may be increasing. This paper provides an update on the burden of CVD risk factors in Jamaica using data from the most recent national health survey and evaluates the impact of obesity and physical activity on other CVD risk factors. The Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007-2008 (JHLS-2) recruited a nationally representative sample of 2848 Jamaicans, 15-74 years old between November 2007 and March 2008. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to obtain data on demographic characteristics, medical history and health behaviour Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were made using standardized protocols and capillary blood samples were obtained to measure fasting glucose and total cholesterol. Prevalence estimates for the various CVD risk factors were obtained within and across sex and other demographic categories. Data were weighted for the complex survey design, nonresponse to questionnaire items or failure to complete some segments of the evaluation. Prevalence estimates for traditional CVD risk factors were: hypertension, 25%; diabetes, 8%; hypercholesterolaemia, 12%; obesity, 25%; smoking 15%. In addition, 35% of Jamaicans had prehypertension, 3% had impaired fasting glucose and 27% were overweight. A higher proportion of women had diabetes, obesity and hypercholesterolaemia while the prevalence of prehypertension and cigarette smoking was higher in men. Approximately 50% of persons with hypertension, 25% of persons with diabetes and 86% of persons with hypercholesterolaemia were unaware of their risk status. In multivariate analysis, obesity was associated with increased odds of hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia while physical inactivity was associated with higher odds of diabetes. The burden of CVD risk factors in Jamaica remains very high and warrants interventions to reduce CVD risk.

  5. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics.

  6. Associated risk factors for silent cerebral infarcts in sickle cell anemia: low baseline hemoglobin, sex, and relative high systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Sarnaik, Sharada A; Rodeghier, Mark J; Minniti, Caterina P; Howard, Thomas H; Iyer, Rathi V; Inusa, Baba; Telfer, Paul T; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Quinn, Charles T; Bernaudin, Françoise; Airewele, Gladstone; Woods, Gerald M; Panepinto, Julie Ann; Fuh, Beng; Kwiatkowski, Janet K; King, Allison A; Rhodes, Melissa M; Thompson, Alexis A; Heiny, Mark E; Redding-Lallinger, Rupa C; Kirkham, Fenella J; Sabio, Hernan; Gonzalez, Corina E; Saccente, Suzanne L; Kalinyak, Karen A; Strouse, John J; Fixler, Jason M; Gordon, Mae O; Miller, J Phillip; Noetzel, Michael J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Casella, James F

    2012-04-19

    The most common form of neurologic injury in sickle cell anemia (SCA) is silent cerebral infarction (SCI). In the Silent Cerebral Infarct Multi-Center Clinical Trial, we sought to identify risk factors associated with SCI. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the clinical history and baseline laboratory values and performed magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in participants with SCA (HbSS or HbSβ° thalassemia) between the ages of 5 and 15 years with no history of overt stroke or seizures. Neuroradiology and neurology committees adjudicated the presence of SCI. SCIs were diagnosed in 30.8% (251 of 814) participants who completed all evaluations and had valid data on all prespecified demographic and clinical covariates. The mean age of the participants was 9.1 years, with 413 males (50.7%). In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, lower baseline hemoglobin concentration (P < .001), higher baseline systolic blood pressure (P = .018), and male sex (P = .030) were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of an SCI. Hemoglobin concentration and systolic blood pressure are risk factors for SCI in children with SCA and may be therapeutic targets for decreasing the risk of SCI. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00072761.

  7. Anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Kari M; Ingardia, Charles J; Borgida, Adam F

    2013-06-01

    Hemodynamic changes occur in pregnancy to prepare for expected blood loss at delivery. Physiologic anemia occurs in pregnancy because plasma volume increases more quickly than red cell mass. Anemia is most commonly classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron deficiency anemia accounts for 75% of all anemias in pregnancy. Oral iron supplementation is the recommended treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Parenteral iron and erythropoietin can also be used in severe or refractory cases. Outcomes and treatments for other forms of inherited and acquired anemias in pregnancy vary by disease, and include nutritional supplementation, corticosteroids, supportive transfusions, and splenectomy.

  8. [Anemia in candidates for heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Yanes Vidal, G J

    2015-06-01

    Heart surgery patients have a high prevalence of anemia. Its etiology is multifactorial, and iron deficiency is one of the most common correctable causes. Anemia is an independent risk factor for postsurgical morbidity and mortality. It also predisposes patients to a greater need for transfusions, which increases the associated complications and the use of resources. The etiological diagnosis of anemia is no different from that of other surgical procedures, but the time available for correcting it before surgery is shorter. Studies have been conducted on therapeutic regimens with iron deficiency replenishment with total dose and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which enable the rapid correction of anemia and reduce transfusion requirements. There is considerable variability in terms of dosage, adverse effects, administration time and routes, drug combinations and results. New studies are needed to investigate the most ideal regimens for correcting anemia in these patients.

  9. The long-term spatial-temporal trends and burden of esophageal cancer in one high-risk area: A population-registered study in Feicheng, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiubin; Zhao, Deli; Liu, Yi; Liu, Yunxia; Yuan, Zhongshang; Wang, Jialin; Xue, Fuzhong

    2017-01-01

    Background Feicheng County is a high-risk area for esophageal cancer in Shandong province, China. It is important to determine the long-term spatio-temporal trends in epidemiological characteristics and the burden of esophageal cancer, especially since the implementation of the national esophageal cancer screening program for early detection and treatment in 2005. Methods The data collected in Feicheng County from 2001 to 2012 was extracted from the whole-population cancer registry system. The incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALY) and changing trends in esophageal cancer according to age and sex were calculated and described. Results The incidence rate of esophageal cancer in Feicheng was consistently high, and increased significantly for male, but not for female from 2001 to 2012, according to the joinpoint regression analysis. The highest and lowest yearly crude incidence rates were 160.78 and 95.97 per 100000 for males, and 81.36 and 52.17 per 100000 for females. The highest and lowest crude yearly mortality rates were 122.26 and 94.40 per 100000 for males, and 60.75 and 49.35 per 100000for females. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was the main pathology type and the tumor location changed significantly from 2001 to 2012. Overall, the DALY remained roughly stable and was estimated as 11.50 for males and 4.90 for females per 1000 people. The burden was mainly caused by premature death. There is an obvious spatial pattern in the distribution of incidence density and burden. Conclusion Esophageal cancer remains a public health issue in Feicheng County with a high incidence, mortality and disease burden. The incidence and burden have obvious spatial heterogeneity, and further studies should be conducted to identify geographical risk factors for precise local prevention and control measures. PMID:28267769

  10. Risk of Symptomatic Intracerebral Hemorrhage After Intravenous Thrombolysis in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and High Cerebral Microbleed Burden: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Zand, Ramin; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Turc, Guillaume; Nolte, Christian H; Jung, Simon; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fiebach, Jochen B; Scheitz, Jan F; Klinger-Gratz, Pascal P; Oppenheim, Catherine; Goyal, Nitin; Safouris, Apostolos; Mattle, Heinrich P; Alexandrov, Anne W; Schellinger, Peter D; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) have been established as an independent predictor of cerebral bleeding. There are contradictory data regarding the potential association of CMB burden with the risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). To investigate the association of high CMB burden (>10 CMBs on a pre-IVT magnetic image resonance [MRI] scan) with the risk of sICH following IVT for AIS. Eligible studies were identified by searching Medline and Scopus databases. No language or other restrictions were imposed. The literature search was conducted on October 7, 2015. This meta-analysis has adopted the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and was written according to the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) proposal. Eligible prospective study protocols that reported sICH rates in patients with AIS who underwent MRI for CMB screening prior to IVT. The reported rates of sICH complicating IVT in patients with AIS with pretreatment MRI were extracted independently for groups of patients with 0 CMBs (CMB absence), 1 or more CMBs (CMB presence), 1 to 10 CMBs (low to moderate CMB burden), and more than 10 CMBs (high CMB burden). An individual-patient data meta-analysis was also performed in the included studies that provided complete patient data sets. Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage based on the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study-II definition (any intracranial bleed with ≥4 points worsening on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score). We included 9 studies comprising 2479 patients with AIS. The risk of sICH after IVT was found to be higher in patients with evidence of CMB presence, compared with patients without CMBs (risk ratio [RR], 2.36; 95% CI, 1.21-4.61; P = .01). A higher risk for sICH after IVT was detected in patients with high CMB burden (>10 CMBs) when compared with

  11. Burden of Outdoor Air Pollution in Kerala, India—A First Health Risk Assessment at State Level.

    PubMed

    Tobollik, Myriam; Razum, Oliver; Wintermeyer, Dirk; Plass, Dietrich

    2015-08-28

    Ambient air pollution causes a considerable disease burden, particularly in South Asia. The objective of the study is to test the feasibility of applying the environmental burden of disease method at state level in India and to quantify a first set of disease burden estimates due to ambient air pollution in Kerala. Particulate Matter (PM) was used as an indicator for ambient air pollution. The disease burden was quantified in Years of Life Lost (YLL) for the population (30 + years) living in urban areas of Kerala. Scenario analyses were performed to account for uncertainties in the input parameters. 6108 (confidence interval (95% CI): 4150-7791) of 81,636 total natural deaths can be attributed to PM, resulting in 96,359 (95% CI: 65,479-122,917) YLLs due to premature mortality (base case scenario, average for 2008-2011). Depending on the underlying assumptions the results vary between 69,582 and 377,195 YLLs. Around half of the total burden is related to cardiovascular deaths. Scenario analyses show that a decrease of 10% in PM concentrations would save 15,904 (95% CI: 11,090-19,806) life years. The results can be used to raise awareness about air quality standards at a local level and to support decision-making processes aiming at cleaner and healthier environments.

  12. Burden of Outdoor Air Pollution in Kerala, India—A First Health Risk Assessment at State Level

    PubMed Central

    Tobollik, Myriam; Razum, Oliver; Wintermeyer, Dirk; Plass, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Ambient air pollution causes a considerable disease burden, particularly in South Asia. The objective of the study is to test the feasibility of applying the environmental burden of disease method at state level in India and to quantify a first set of disease burden estimates due to ambient air pollution in Kerala. Particulate Matter (PM) was used as an indicator for ambient air pollution. The disease burden was quantified in Years of Life Lost (YLL) for the population (30 + years) living in urban areas of Kerala. Scenario analyses were performed to account for uncertainties in the input parameters. 6108 (confidence interval (95% CI): 4150–7791) of 81,636 total natural deaths can be attributed to PM, resulting in 96,359 (95% CI: 65,479–122,917) YLLs due to premature mortality (base case scenario, average for 2008–2011). Depending on the underlying assumptions the results vary between 69,582 and 377,195 YLLs. Around half of the total burden is related to cardiovascular deaths. Scenario analyses show that a decrease of 10% in PM concentrations would save 15,904 (95% CI: 11,090–19,806) life years. The results can be used to raise awareness about air quality standards at a local level and to support decision-making processes aiming at cleaner and healthier environments. PMID:26343701

  13. Anemia in older persons.

    PubMed

    Bross, Michael H; Soch, Kathleen; Smith-Knuppel, Teresa

    2010-09-01

    Anemia in older persons is commonly overlooked despite mounting evidence that low hemoglobin levels are a significant marker of physiologic decline. Using the World Health Organization definition of anemia (hemoglobin level less than 13 g per dL [130 g per L] in men and less than 12 g per dL [120 g per L] in women), more than 10 percent of persons older than 65 years are anemic. The prevalence increases with age, approaching 50 percent in chronically ill patients living in nursing homes. There is increasing evidence that even mild anemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anemia warrants evaluation in all older persons, except those at the end of life or who decline interventions. About one third of persons have anemia secondary to a nutritional deficiency, one third have anemia caused by chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease, and one third have unexplained anemia. Nutritional anemia is effectively treated with vitamin or iron replacement. Iron deficiency anemia often is caused by gastrointestinal bleeding and requires further investigation in most patients. Anemia of chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease may respond to treatment of the underlying disease and selective use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The treatment of unexplained anemia is difficult, and there is little evidence that treatment decreases morbidity and mortality, or improves quality of life. Occasionally, anemia may be caused by less common but potentially treatable conditions, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, malignancy, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

  14. Vulnerable pregnant women in antenatal practice: Caregiver's perception of workload, associated burden and agreement with objective caseload, and the influence of a structured organisation of antenatal risk management.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Nynke; Venekamp, Angélica A; Torij, Hanneke W; Lambregtse-Van den Berg, Mijke P; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2016-09-01

    pregnancy care for vulnerable women is often perceived as a burden by caregivers as vulnerable clients require complex case management, additional time, and more often show adverse perinatal outcomes. Vulnerable clients bring about additional work strain for the caregiver, especially when the workload is high. We define client vulnerability as coexistence of psychopathology, psychosocial problems or substance use, together with features of deprivation. We investigated, as part of a national programme, whether the subjective caregiver's perception of workload and the objective registry-based caseload of vulnerable clients are in agreement, and whether a structured organisation of antenatal risk management reduces the burden associated with the perceived workload, in particular if the objective caseload is high. we combined three data sources: (1) at the unit level (i.e. midwifery practice, obstetric unit) interview data from caregivers, from which we derived a) the (subjective) caregiver's perception of workload, b) the associated burden and c) organisational structure of antenatal risk management, (2) at the unit level perinatal registry data, from which we derived a) unit characteristics and b) (objective) unit specific caseload, and (3) at the individual client level survey data collected during the first antenatal visit, from which the prevalence of vulnerable clients was derived. The study area was the South-West Netherlands (2.5 million inhabitants), containing areas with varying degrees of urbanisation and deprivation. sixteen units had complete data on all measures. Generally, subjective workload and objective caseload were only weakly related, the relation being modified by the organisation of antenatal risk management. If the organisational structure of antenatal risk management was low, the experienced burden was high, even if the objective caseload was low. Highly structured antenatal risk management was associated with a medium to low burden. our

  15. A probabilistic assessment of the contribution of wastewater-irrigated lettuce to Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection risk and disease burden in Kumasi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Seidu, Razak; Abubakari, Amina; Dennis, Isaac Amoah; Heistad, Arve; Stenstrom, Thor Axel; Larbi, John A; Abaidoo, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Wastewater use for vegetable production is widespread across the cities of many developing countries. Studies on the microbial health risks associated with the practice have largely depended on faecal indicator organisms with potential underestimation or overestimation of the microbial health risks and disease burdens. This study assessed the Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection risk and diarrhoeal disease burden measured in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) associated with the consumption of wastewater-irrigated lettuce in Kumasi, Ghana using data on E. coli O157:H7 in ready-to-harvest, wastewater-irrigated lettuce. Two exposure scenarios - best case and worst case - associated with a single consumption of wastewater-irrigated lettuce were assessed. The assessment revealed wastewater-irrigated lettuce is contributing to the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 in Kumasi, Ghana. The mean E. coli O157:H7 infection risk and DALYs in the wet and dry seasons, irrespective of the exposure scenario, were above the World Health Organization tolerable daily infection risk of 2.7 × 10⁻⁷ per person per day and 10⁻⁶ DALYs per person per year. It is recommended that legislation with clear monitoring indicators and penalties is implemented to ensure that farmers and food sellers fully implement risk mitigating measures.

  16. Risk of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death in patients with Fanconi anemia who did and did not receive transplants.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Philip S; Socié, Gerard; Alter, Blanche P; Gluckman, Eliane

    2005-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) is currently the only therapy that can restore normal hematopoiesis in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). Patients with FA have a high baseline risk of squamous cell cancers (SCCs) of the head, neck, and esophagus, and SCT conditioning may increase SCC incidence. We evaluated the risks of SCC and death in 145 patients with FA in the North American Survey (NAS) cohort who did not receive transplants, and 117 patients with FA in the Hôpital Saint Louis (SLH) cohort who did receive transplants. The age-specific hazard of SCC was 4.4-fold higher in patients who received transplants than in those who did not (P = .003), and SCCs occurred at significantly younger ages in the former (respective medians, 18 and 33 years, P = .004). Survival after SCC was similarly poor in both cohorts (P = .135, median, 13 months). The hazard of SCC increased at a greater than linear rate, to 4.4% per year by age 40 in NAS and 4.7% per year by 10 years after transplant in SLH. In SLH, the hazard of non-SCC death was biphasic, declining significantly (P = .004) from 7.1% per month during the first 6 months after transplant to 0.13% per month (1.6% per year) after the first year. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host diseases were significant SCC risk factors. Adverse event rates in these cohorts provide historical control rates to assess emerging therapies for FA.

  17. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  18. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  19. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  20. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anemia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  1. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    PubMed

    2016-10-08

    The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 provides an up-to-date synthesis of the evidence for risk factor exposure and the attributable burden of disease. By providing national and subnational assessments spanning the past 25 years, this study can inform debates on the importance of addressing risks in context. We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of the Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate attributable deaths, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and trends in exposure by age group, sex, year, and geography for 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2015. This study included 388 risk-outcome pairs that met World Cancer Research Fund-defined criteria for convincing or probable evidence. We extracted relative risk and exposure estimates from randomised controlled trials, cohorts, pooled cohorts, household surveys, census data, satellite data, and other sources. We used statistical models to pool data, adjust for bias, and incorporate covariates. We developed a metric that allows comparisons of exposure across risk factors-the summary exposure value. Using the counterfactual scenario of theoretical minimum risk level, we estimated the portion of deaths and DALYs that could be attributed to a given risk. We decomposed trends in attributable burden into contributions from population growth, population age structure, risk exposure, and risk-deleted cause-specific DALY rates. We characterised risk exposure in relation to a Socio-demographic Index (SDI). Between 1990 and 2015, global exposure to unsafe sanitation, household air pollution, childhood underweight, childhood stunting, and smoking each decreased by more than 25%. Global exposure for several occupational risks, high body-mass index (BMI), and drug use increased by more than 25% over the same period. All risks jointly evaluated in 2015 accounted for 57·8% (95% CI 56

  2. Estimating change in cardiovascular disease and diabetes burdens due to dietary and metabolic factors in Korea 1998–2011: a comparative risk assessment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoonsu; Cudhea, Frederick; Park, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Tae; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Singh, Gitanjali

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Over the past 10 years, the burden of chronic diseases in Korea has increased. However, there are currently no quantitative estimates of how changes in diet and metabolic factors have contributed to these shifting burdens. This study aims to evaluate the contributions of dietary and metabolic risk factors to death from cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) such as cardiovascular conditions, strokes and diabetes in Korea, and to estimate how these contributions have changed over the past 10 years (1998–2011). Design and methods We used data on 6 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors by sex, age and year from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The relative risks for the effects of the risk factors on CMD mortality were obtained from meta-analyses. The population-attributable fraction attributable to the risk factors was calculated by using a comparative risk assessment approach across sex and age strata (males and females, age groups 25–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, 65–74 and 75+ years) from 1998 to 2011. Results The results showed that a suboptimal diet and high blood pressure were the main risk factors for CMD mortality in Korea. High blood pressure accounted for 127 096 (95% uncertainty interval (UI): 121 907 to 132 218) deaths from CMD. Among the individual dietary risk factors, a high intake of sodium (42 387 deaths; 95% UI: 42 387 to 65 094) and a low intake of fruit (50 244 deaths; 95% UI: 40 981 to 59 178) and whole grains (54 248 deaths; 95% UI: 47 020 to 61 343) were responsible for the highest number of CMD deaths in Korea. Conclusions Indicating the relative importance of risk factors in Korea, the results suggest that metabolic and dietary risk factors were major contributors to CMD mortality. PMID:28003293

  3. Myeloma and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Perillie, P E

    1978-01-01

    Four cases of pernicious anemia developing in association with multiple myeloma are described. The description now of 14 cases demonstrating the association of these two disorders suggest a causative relationship. These observations, in addition to the previously well-documented increased coincidence of pernicious anemia and benign monoclonal gammopathy and pernicious anemia and hypoglobulinemia, suggest that screening for vitamine B12 deficiency in patients with gammopathies and for protein abnormalities in patients with pernicious anemia is indicated.

  4. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't get enough iron in their diets. Iron Deficiency Anemia Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia ... when a person's diet is lacking in iron. Iron deficiency — when the body's stores of iron are reduced — ...

  5. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Lulu; Narayanadas, K; Sunil, G

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a female child with thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (Rogers syndrome), presenting with anemia and diabetes mellitus responding to thiamine. She also had retinitis pigmentosa. The anemia improved and blood sugar was controlled with daily oral thiamine. Previously unreported olfactory abnormalities, as described in Wolfram syndrome, were also present in our patient.

  6. Accuracy of Pooled-Cohort Equation and SCORE cardiovascular risk calculators to identify individuals with high coronary atherosclerotic burden - implications for statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Tralhão, António; Ferreira, António M; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Rodrigues, Rita; Costa, Cátia; Guerreiro, Sara; Cardim, Nuno; Marques, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Different cardiovascular risk calculators and risk-based thresholds for initiating statin therapy are currently in use. Using coronary computed tomography angiography, we sought to compare the Pooled-Cohort Equation [atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) score] with the Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) in the identification of patients with high coronary atherosclerotic burden. In a single-center prospective registry of patients undergoing coronary computed tomography angiography, we identified individuals aged 40-75 years without diabetes or known cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular risk and eligibility for statin therapy were determined individually on the basis of the two calculators and the guidelines that endorse them. Coronary atherosclerotic burden was assessed by coronary calcium score, presence of stenosis greater than or equal to 50%, and several measures of plaque severity and extension. In the 327 patients assessed (181 men, mean age 59±9 years), the median SCORE and ASCVD values were 2.6 and 9.7%, respectively. Compared with SCORE, the ASCVD calculator showed greater discriminative power to identify patients with calcium score greater than or equal to 300 [C-statistic 0.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.82 vs. 0.69, 95% CI 0.61-0.78, P=0.008] and showed a trend toward better identification of patients with obstructive stenosis (C-statistic 0.72, 95% CI 0.64-0.80 vs. 0.68, 95% CI 0.60-0.76, P=0.053). The proportion of statin-eligible patients would be higher with the SCORE-based criteria, particularly among individuals with little or no detectable coronary atherosclerosis. The SCORE calculator seems to be less discriminative than the ASCVD equation in identifying patients with high atherosclerotic burden. Current SCORE-based criteria would assign statin therapy to a larger proportion of patients with low-risk features, which could result in a lower yield of cholesterol-reducing strategies.

  7. Child and Adolescent Health From 1990 to 2015: Findings From the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2015 Study.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, Nicholas; Kyu, Hmwe Hmwe; Zoeckler, Leo; Olsen, Helen Elizabeth; Thomas, Katie; Pinho, Christine; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Dandona, Lalit; Ferrari, Alize; Ghiwot, Tsegaye Tewelde; Hay, Simon I; Kinfu, Yohannes; Liang, Xiaofeng; Lopez, Alan; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Mokdad, Ali H; Naghavi, Mohsen; Patton, George C; Salomon, Joshua; Sartorius, Benn; Topor-Madry, Roman; Vollset, Stein Emil; Werdecker, Andrea; Whiteford, Harvey A; Abate, Kalkidan Hasen; Abbas, Kaja; Damtew, Solomon Abrha; Ahmed, Muktar Beshir; Akseer, Nadia; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Alemayohu, Mulubirhan Assefa; Altirkawi, Khalid; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu; Amare, Azmeraw T; Antonio, Carl A T; Arnlov, Johan; Artaman, Al; Asayesh, Hamid; Avokpaho, Euripide Frinel G Arthur; Awasthi, Ashish; Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Bacha, Umar; Betsu, Balem Demtsu; Barac, Aleksandra; Bärnighausen, Till Winfried; Baye, Estifanos; Bedi, Neeraj; Bensenor, Isabela M; Berhane, Adugnaw; Bernabe, Eduardo; Bernal, Oscar Alberto; Beyene, Addisu Shunu; Biadgilign, Sibhatu; Bikbov, Boris; Boyce, Cheryl Anne; Brazinova, Alexandra; Hailu, Gessessew Bugssa; Carter, Austin; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos A; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Charlson, Fiona J; Chitheer, Abdulaal A; Choi, Jee-Young Jasmine; Ciobanu, Liliana G; Crump, John; Dandona, Rakhi; Dellavalle, Robert P; Deribew, Amare; deVeber, Gabrielle; Dicker, Daniel; Ding, Eric L; Dubey, Manisha; Endries, Amanuel Yesuf; Erskine, Holly E; Faraon, Emerito Jose Aquino; Faro, Andre; Farzadfar, Farshad; Fernandes, Joao C; Fijabi, Daniel Obadare; Fitzmaurice, Christina; Fleming, Thomas D; Flor, Luisa Sorio; Foreman, Kyle J; Franklin, Richard C; Fraser, Maya S; Frostad, Joseph J; Fullman, Nancy; Gebregergs, Gebremedhin Berhe; Gebru, Alemseged Aregay; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Gibney, Katherine B; Gidey Yihdego, Mahari; Ginawi, Ibrahim Abdelmageem Mohamed; Gishu, Melkamu Dedefo; Gizachew, Tessema Assefa; Glaser, Elizabeth; Gold, Audra L; Goldberg, Ellen; Gona, Philimon; Goto, Atsushi; Gugnani, Harish Chander; Jiang, Guohong; Gupta, Rajeev; Tesfay, Fisaha Haile; Hankey, Graeme J; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hijar, Martha; Horino, Masako; Hosgood, H Dean; Hu, Guoqing; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B; Jayaraman, Sudha P; Jha, Vivekanand; Jibat, Tariku; Johnson, Catherine O; Jonas, Jost; Kasaeian, Amir; Kawakami, Norito; Keiyoro, Peter N; Khalil, Ibrahim; Khang, Young-Ho; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Ahmad Kiadaliri, Aliasghar A; Kieling, Christian; Kim, Daniel; Kissoon, Niranjan; Knibbs, Luke D; Koyanagi, Ai; Krohn, Kristopher J; Kuate Defo, Barthelemy; Kucuk Bicer, Burcu; Kulikoff, Rachel; Kumar, G Anil; Lal, Dharmesh Kumar; Lam, Hilton Y; Larson, Heidi J; Larsson, Anders; Laryea, Dennis Odai; Leung, Janni; Lim, Stephen S; Lo, Loon-Tzian; Lo, Warren D; Looker, Katharine J; Lotufo, Paulo A; Magdy Abd El Razek, Hassan; Malekzadeh, Reza; Markos Shifti, Desalegn; Mazidi, Mohsen; Meaney, Peter A; Meles, Kidanu Gebremariam; Memiah, Peter; Mendoza, Walter; Abera Mengistie, Mubarek; Mengistu, Gebremichael Welday; Mensah, George A; Miller, Ted R; Mock, Charles; Mohammadi, Alireza; Mohammed, Shafiu; Monasta, Lorenzo; Mueller, Ulrich; Nagata, Chie; Naheed, Aliya; Nguyen, Grant; Nguyen, Quyen Le; Nsoesie, Elaine; Oh, In-Hwan; Okoro, Anselm; Olusanya, Jacob Olusegun; Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Ortiz, Alberto; Paudel, Deepak; Pereira, David M; Perico, Norberto; Petzold, Max; Phillips, Michael Robert; Polanczyk, Guilherme V; Pourmalek, Farshad; Qorbani, Mostafa; Rafay, Anwar; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Ram, Usha; Rankin, Zane; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Renzaho, Andre M N; Roba, Hirbo Shore; Rojas-Rueda, David; Ronfani, Luca; Sagar, Rajesh; Sanabria, Juan Ramon; Kedir Mohammed, Muktar Sano; Santos, Itamar S; Satpathy, Maheswar; Sawhney, Monika; Schöttker, Ben; Schwebel, David C; Scott, James G; Sepanlou, Sadaf G; Shaheen, Amira; Shaikh, Masood Ali; She, June; Shiri, Rahman; Shiue, Ivy; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Singh, Jasvinder; Silpakit, Naris; Smith, Alison; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar; Stanaway, Jeffrey D; Stein, Dan J; Steiner, Caitlyn; Sufiyan, Muawiyyah Babale; Swaminathan, Soumya; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Tabb, Karen M; Tadese, Fentaw; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Taye, Bineyam; Teeple, Stephanie; Tegegne, Teketo Kassaw; Temam Shifa, Girma; Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Thomas, Bernadette; Thomson, Alan J; Tobe-Gai, Ruoyan; Tonelli, Marcello; Tran, Bach Xuan; Troeger, Christopher; Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Uthman, Olalekan; Vasankari, Tommi; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weintraub, Robert; Gebrehiwot, Solomon Weldemariam; Westerman, Ronny; Williams, Hywel C; Wolfe, Charles D A; Woodbrook, Rachel; Yano, Yuichiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Younis, Mustafa Z; Yu, Chuanhua; Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Zegeye, Elias Asfaw; Zuhlke, Liesl Joanna; Murray, Christopher J L; Vos, Theo

    2017-06-01

    , neonatal disorders, congenital birth defects, and hemoglobinopathies) and complications of a variety of infections and nutritional deficiencies. Anemia, developmental intellectual disability, hearing loss, epilepsy, and vision loss are important contributors to childhood disability that can arise from multiple causes. Maternal and reproductive health remains a key cause of disease burden in adolescent females, especially in lower-SDI countries. In low-SDI countries, mortality is the primary driver of health loss for children and adolescents, whereas disability predominates in higher-SDI locations; the specific pattern of epidemiological transition varies across diseases and injuries. Consistent international attention and investment have led to sustained improvements in causes of health loss among children and adolescents in many countries, although progress has been uneven. The persistence of infectious diseases in some countries, coupled with ongoing epidemiologic transition to injuries and noncommunicable diseases, require all countries to carefully evaluate and implement appropriate strategies to maximize the health of their children and adolescents and for the international community to carefully consider which elements of child and adolescent health should be monitored.

  8. Tuberculosis and mass gatherings-opportunities for defining burden, transmission risk, and the optimal surveillance, prevention, and control measures at the annual Hajj pilgrimage.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Saeed, Abdulaziz Bin; Alotaibi, Badriah; Yezli, Saber; Dar, Osman; Bieh, Kingsley; Bates, Matthew; Tayeb, Tamara; Mwaba, Peter; Shafi, Shuja; McCloskey, Brian; Petersen, Eskild; Azhar, Esam I

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is now the most common infectious cause of death worldwide. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million people developed active TB. There were an estimated three million people with active TB including 360000 with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) who were not diagnosed, and such people continue to fuel TB transmission in the community. Accurate data on the actual burden of TB and the transmission risk associated with mass gatherings are scarce and unreliable due to the small numbers studied and methodological issues. Every year, an estimated 10 million pilgrims from 184 countries travel to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) to perform the Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages. A large majority of pilgrims come from high TB burden and MDR-TB endemic areas and thus many may have undiagnosed active TB, sub-clinical TB, and latent TB infection. The Hajj pilgrimage provides unique opportunities for the KSA and the 184 countries from which pilgrims originate, to conduct high quality priority research studies on TB under the remit of the Global Centre for Mass Gatherings Medicine. Research opportunities are discussed, including those related to the definition of the TB burden, transmission risk, and the optimal surveillance, prevention, and control measures at the annual Hajj pilgrimage. The associated data are required to develop international recommendations and guidelines for TB management and control at mass gathering events.

  9. HUMAN KIDNEY AND SKELETON URANIUM BURDEN, RADIATION DOSE AND HEALTH RISKS FROM HIGH URANIUM CONTENTS IN DRINKING WATER OF BATHINDA DISTRICT (MALWA REGION) OF PUNJAB STATE, INDIA.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nisha; Singh, Jaspal

    2017-01-23

    Uranium concentration has been measured in drinking water samples from the Bathinda district. It ranges from 2.4 to 529 µg/l with a mean value of 120 µg/l. The mean uranium kidney burden for children and adults is 0.0838 and 0.059 µg U/g, respectively, which crosses the safe limit of 0.02 µg U/g. The mean values for skeleton burden are 1925.7 µg for children and 4108.2 µg for an adult. These values are 32 and 69 times higher than the skeleton burden of 59.4 µg for a normal adult. Radiological and chemical risk is also found to be higher than the recommended values. The mean effective ingestion dose for different age groups and genders is 188.2 µSv/y, while the safety limit is 100 µSv/y. The dose to the kidney, bone surface and bone marrow has also been evaluated. The observed values of the studied parameters show that people of this area may be at higher health risks corresponding to the intake of water; children may be the most affected.

  10. Anemia Among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang Cojulun, Alicia; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Sutherland, Laura J; Mungai, Peter L; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H

    2015-11-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9-11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia.

  11. Anemia among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cojulun, Alicia Chang; Bustinduy, Amaya L.; Sutherland, Laura J.; Mungai, Peter L.; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9–11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  12. Determinants of Anemia among Preschool Children in Rural, Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Ruth, Laird J.; Oremo, Jared; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Williams, Thomas N.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2013-01-01

    Although anemia in preschool children is most often attributed to iron deficiency, other nutritional, infectious, and genetic contributors are rarely concurrently measured. In a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 858 children 6–35 months of age in western Kenya, we measured hemoglobin, malaria, inflammation, sickle cell, α-thalassemia, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, anthropometry, and socio-demographic characteristics. Anemia (Hb < 11 g/dL) and severe anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL) prevalence ratios (PRs) for each exposure were determined using multivariable modeling. Anemia (71.8%) and severe anemia (8.4%) were common. Characteristics most strongly associated with anemia were malaria (PR: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5–1.9), iron deficiency (1.3; 1.2–1.4), and homozygous α-thalassemia (1.3; 1.1–1.4). Characteristics associated with severe anemia were malaria (10.2; 3.5–29.3), inflammation (6.7; 2.3–19.4), and stunting (1.6; 1.0–2.4). Overall 16.8% of anemia cases were associated with malaria, 8.3% with iron deficiency, and 6.1% with inflammation. Interventions should address malaria, iron deficiency, and non-malarial infections to decrease the burden of anemia in this population. PMID:23382166

  13. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2014-04-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with poor prognosis. Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, confers increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Along with the altered iron metabolism in HF patients, inflammation creates challenges in the interpretation of laboratory parameters used to diagnose anemia in HF. Since the RED-HF trial failed to demonstrate any benefit from the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) on mortality or morbidity in HF patients, ESAs are no longer considered a treatment option, although intravenous iron has potential as therapy for anemic and nonanemic HF patients.

  14. Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Patients with a Diagnosis of Pernicious Anemia: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Almario, Christopher V.; Metz, David C.; Haynes, Kevin; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pernicious anemia (PA) is an autoimmune disease that causes achlorhydria or profound hypochlorhydria. We conducted a population-based study to determine whether individuals with PA are at increased risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using The Health Improvement Network (THIN) from the United Kingdom (1993 to 2009). The eligible study cohort included individuals 18 years of age or older and with at least 1 year of THIN follow-up. The exposed group consisted of individuals with a diagnosis code for PA. The unexposed group consisted of individuals without a diagnosis of PA and was frequency matched with the exposed group with respect to age, sex, and practice site. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for CAP associated with PA, accounting for a comprehensive list of potential confounders. Results The study included 13,605 individuals with PA and 50,586 non-PA subjects. The crude incidence rate of CAP was 9.4 per 1000 person-years for those with PA, versus 6.4 per 1000 person-years for those without PA. The multivariable adjusted HR for CAP associated with PA was 1.18, 95% CI 1.08 – 1.29. Conclusions In this large population-based cohort study, individuals with PA and presumed chronic achlorhydria were at increased risk for CAP. PMID:26225868

  15. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Alexander, Lily; Anderson, H Ross; Bachman, Victoria F; Biryukov, Stan; Brauer, Michael; Burnett, Richard; Casey, Daniel; Coates, Matthew M; Cohen, Aaron; Delwiche, Kristen; Estep, Kara; Frostad, Joseph J; Astha, K C; Kyu, Hmwe H; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Ng, Marie; Slepak, Erica Leigh; Thomas, Bernadette A; Wagner, Joseph; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Abbafati, Cristiana; Abbasoglu Ozgoren, Ayse; Abd-Allah, Foad; Abera, Semaw F; Aboyans, Victor; Abraham, Biju; Abraham, Jerry Puthenpurakal; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M E; Aburto, Tania C; Achoki, Tom; Adelekan, Ademola; Adofo, Koranteng; Adou, Arsène K; Adsuar, José C; Afshin, Ashkan; Agardh, Emilie E; Al Khabouri, Mazin J; Al Lami, Faris H; Alam, Sayed Saidul; Alasfoor, Deena; Albittar, Mohammed I; Alegretti, Miguel A; Aleman, Alicia V; Alemu, Zewdie A; Alfonso-Cristancho, Rafael; Alhabib, Samia; Ali, Raghib; Ali, Mohammed K; Alla, François; Allebeck, Peter; Allen, Peter J; Alsharif, Ubai; Alvarez, Elena; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson; Amankwaa, Adansi A; Amare, Azmeraw T; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Ameli, Omid; Amini, Heresh; Ammar, Walid; Anderson, Benjamin O; Antonio, Carl Abelardo T; Anwari, Palwasha; Argeseanu Cunningham, Solveig; Arnlöv, Johan; Arsenijevic, Valentina S Arsic; Artaman, Al; Asghar, Rana J; Assadi, Reza; Atkins, Lydia S; Atkinson, Charles; Avila, Marco A; Awuah, Baffour; Badawi, Alaa; Bahit, Maria C; Bakfalouni, Talal; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Balalla, Shivanthi; Balu, Ravi Kumar; Banerjee, Amitava; Barber, Ryan M; Barker-Collo, Suzanne L; Barquera, Simon; Barregard, Lars; Barrero, Lope H; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh; Basto-Abreu, Ana C; Basu, Arindam; Basu, Sanjay; Basulaiman, Mohammed O; Batis Ruvalcaba, Carolina; Beardsley, Justin; Bedi, Neeraj; Bekele, Tolesa; Bell, Michelle L; Benjet, Corina; Bennett, Derrick A; Benzian, Habib; Bernabé, Eduardo; Beyene, Tariku J; Bhala, Neeraj; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Bikbov, Boris; Bin Abdulhak, Aref A; Blore, Jed D; Blyth, Fiona M; Bohensky, Megan A; Bora Başara, Berrak; Borges, Guilherme; Bornstein, Natan M; Bose, Dipan; Boufous, Soufiane; Bourne, Rupert R; Brainin, Michael; Brazinova, Alexandra; Breitborde, Nicholas J; Brenner, Hermann; Briggs, Adam D M; Broday, David M; Brooks, Peter M; Bruce, Nigel G; Brugha, Traolach S; Brunekreef, Bert; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Bui, Linh N; Bukhman, Gene; Bulloch, Andrew G; Burch, Michael; Burney, Peter G J; Campos-Nonato, Ismael R; Campuzano, Julio C; Cantoral, Alejandra J; Caravanos, Jack; Cárdenas, Rosario; Cardis, Elisabeth; Carpenter, David O; Caso, Valeria; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos A; Castro, Ruben E; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Cavalleri, Fiorella; Çavlin, Alanur; Chadha, Vineet K; Chang, Jung-Chen; Charlson, Fiona J; Chen, Honglei; Chen, Wanqing; Chen, Zhengming; Chiang, Peggy P; Chimed-Ochir, Odgerel; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christophi, Costas A; Chuang, Ting-Wu; Chugh, Sumeet S; Cirillo, Massimo; Claßen, Thomas K D; Colistro, Valentina; Colomar, Mercedes; Colquhoun, Samantha M; Contreras, Alejandra G; Cooper, Cyrus; Cooperrider, Kimberly; Cooper, Leslie T; Coresh, Josef; Courville, Karen J; Criqui, Michael H; Cuevas-Nasu, Lucia; Damsere-Derry, James; Danawi, Hadi; Dandona, Lalit; Dandona, Rakhi; Dargan, Paul I; Davis, Adrian; Davitoiu, Dragos V; Dayama, Anand; de Castro, E Filipa; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; De Leo, Diego; de Lima, Graça; Degenhardt, Louisa; del Pozo-Cruz, Borja; Dellavalle, Robert P; Deribe, Kebede; Derrett, Sarah; Des Jarlais, Don C; Dessalegn, Muluken; deVeber, Gabrielle A; Devries, Karen M; Dharmaratne, Samath D; Dherani, Mukesh K; Dicker, Daniel; Ding, Eric L; Dokova, Klara; Dorsey, E Ray; Driscoll, Tim R; Duan, Leilei; Durrani, Adnan M; Ebel, Beth E; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Elshrek, Yousef M; Endres, Matthias; Ermakov, Sergey P; Erskine, Holly E; Eshrati, Babak; Esteghamati, Alireza; Fahimi, Saman; Faraon, Emerito Jose A; Farzadfar, Farshad; Fay, Derek F J; Feigin, Valery L; Feigl, Andrea B; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Ferrari, Alize J; Ferri, Cleusa P; Flaxman, Abraham D; Fleming, Thomas D; Foigt, Nataliya; Foreman, Kyle J; Paleo, Urbano Fra; Franklin, Richard C; Gabbe, Belinda; Gaffikin, Lynne; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Gamkrelidze, Amiran; Gankpé, Fortuné G; Gansevoort, Ron T; García-Guerra, Francisco A; Gasana, Evariste; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Gessner, Bradford D; Gething, Pete; Gibney, Katherine B; Gillum, Richard F; Ginawi, Ibrahim A M; Giroud, Maurice; Giussani, Giorgia; Goenka, Shifalika; Goginashvili, Ketevan; Gomez Dantes, Hector; Gona, Philimon; Gonzalez de Cosio, Teresita; González-Castell, Dinorah; Gotay, Carolyn C; Goto, Atsushi; Gouda, Hebe N; Guerrant, Richard L; Gugnani, Harish C; Guillemin, Francis; Gunnell, David; Gupta, Rahul; Gupta, Rajeev; Gutiérrez, Reyna A; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Hagan, Holly; Hagstromer, Maria; Halasa, Yara A; Hamadeh, Randah R; Hammami, Mouhanad; Hankey, Graeme J; Hao, Yuantao; Harb, Hilda L; Haregu, Tilahun Nigatu; Haro, Josep Maria; Havmoeller, Rasmus; Hay, Simon I; Hedayati, Mohammad T; Heredia-Pi, Ileana B; Hernandez, Lucia; Heuton, Kyle R; Heydarpour, Pouria; Hijar, Martha; Hoek, Hans W; Hoffman, Howard J; Hornberger, John C; Hosgood, H Dean; Hoy, Damian G; Hsairi, Mohamed; Hu, Guoqing; Hu, Howard; Huang, Cheng; Huang, John J; Hubbell, Bryan J; Huiart, Laetitia; Husseini, Abdullatif; Iannarone, Marissa L; Iburg, Kim M; Idrisov, Bulat T; Ikeda, Nayu; Innos, Kaire; Inoue, Manami; Islami, Farhad; Ismayilova, Samaya; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Jansen, Henrica A; Jarvis, Deborah L; Jassal, Simerjot K; Jauregui, Alejandra; Jayaraman, Sudha; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Jensen, Paul N; Jha, Vivekanand; Jiang, Fan; Jiang, Guohong; Jiang, Ying; Jonas, Jost B; Juel, Knud; Kan, Haidong; Kany Roseline, Sidibe S; Karam, Nadim E; Karch, André; Karema, Corine K; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Kaul, Anil; Kawakami, Norito; Kazi, Dhruv S; Kemp, Andrew H; Kengne, Andre P; Keren, Andre; Khader, Yousef S; Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali Hassan; Khan, Ejaz A; Khang, Young-Ho; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Khonelidze, Irma; Kieling, Christian; Kim, Daniel; Kim, Sungroul; Kim, Yunjin; Kimokoti, Ruth W; Kinfu, Yohannes; Kinge, Jonas M; Kissela, Brett M; Kivipelto, Miia; Knibbs, Luke D; Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Kose, M Rifat; Kosen, Soewarta; Kraemer, Alexander; Kravchenko, Michael; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Kromhout, Hans; Ku, Tiffany; Kuate Defo, Barthelemy; Kucuk Bicer, Burcu; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kulkarni, Chanda; Kulkarni, Veena S; Kumar, G Anil; Kwan, Gene F; Lai, Taavi; Lakshmana Balaji, Arjun; Lalloo, Ratilal; Lallukka, Tea; Lam, Hilton; Lan, Qing; Lansingh, Van C; Larson, Heidi J; Larsson, Anders; Laryea, Dennis O; Lavados, Pablo M; Lawrynowicz, Alicia E; Leasher, Janet L; Lee, Jong-Tae; Leigh, James; Leung, Ricky; Levi, Miriam; Li, Yichong; Li, Yongmei; Liang, Juan; Liang, Xiaofeng; Lim, Stephen S; Lindsay, M Patrice; Lipshultz, Steven E; Liu, Shiwei; Liu, Yang; Lloyd, Belinda K; Logroscino, Giancarlo; London, Stephanie J; Lopez, Nancy; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Lotufo, Paulo A; Lozano, Rafael; Lunevicius, Raimundas; Ma, Jixiang; Ma, Stefan; Machado, Vasco M P; MacIntyre, Michael F; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Mahdi, Abbas A; Majdan, Marek; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mangalam, Srikanth; Mapoma, Christopher C; Marape, Marape; Marcenes, Wagner; Margolis, David J; Margono, Christopher; Marks, Guy B; Martin, Randall V; Marzan, Melvin B; Mashal, Mohammad T; Masiye, Felix; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Matzopoulos, Richard; Mayosi, Bongani M; Mazorodze, Tasara T; McKay, Abigail C; McKee, Martin; McLain, Abigail; Meaney, Peter A; Medina, Catalina; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Mejia-Rodriguez, Fabiola; Mekonnen, Wubegzier; Melaku, Yohannes A; Meltzer, Michele; Memish, Ziad A; Mendoza, Walter; Mensah, George A; Meretoja, Atte; Mhimbira, Francis Apolinary; Micha, Renata; Miller, Ted R; Mills, Edward J; Misganaw, Awoke; Mishra, Santosh; Mohamed Ibrahim, Norlinah; Mohammad, Karzan A; Mokdad, Ali H; Mola, Glen L; Monasta, Lorenzo; Montañez Hernandez, Julio C; Montico, Marcella; Moore, Ami R; Morawska, Lidia; Mori, Rintaro; Moschandreas, Joanna; Moturi, Wilkister N; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Mueller, Ulrich O; Mukaigawara, Mitsuru; Mullany, Erin C; Murthy, Kinnari S; Naghavi, Mohsen; Nahas, Ziad; Naheed, Aliya; Naidoo, Kovin S; Naldi, Luigi; Nand, Devina; Nangia, Vinay; Narayan, K M Venkat; Nash, Denis; Neal, Bruce; Nejjari, Chakib; Neupane, Sudan P; Newton, Charles R; Ngalesoni, Frida N; Ngirabega, Jean de Dieu; Nguyen, Grant; Nguyen, Nhung T; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Nisar, Muhammad I; Nogueira, José R; Nolla, Joan M; Nolte, Sandra; Norheim, Ole F; Norman, Rosana E; Norrving, Bo; Nyakarahuka, Luke; Oh, In-Hwan; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Omer, Saad B; Opio, John Nelson; Orozco, Ricardo; Pagcatipunan, Rodolfo S; Pain, Amanda W; Pandian, Jeyaraj D; Panelo, Carlo Irwin A; Papachristou, Christina; Park, Eun-Kee; Parry, Charles D; Paternina Caicedo, Angel J; Patten, Scott B; Paul, Vinod K; Pavlin, Boris I; Pearce, Neil; Pedraza, Lilia S; Pedroza, Andrea; Pejin Stokic, Ljiljana; Pekericli, Ayfer; Pereira, David M; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Perico, Norberto; Perry, Samuel A L; Pervaiz, Aslam; Pesudovs, Konrad; Peterson, Carrie B; Petzold, Max; Phillips, Michael R; Phua, Hwee Pin; Plass, Dietrich; Poenaru, Dan; Polanczyk, Guilherme V; Polinder, Suzanne; Pond, Constance D; Pope, C Arden; Pope, Daniel; Popova, Svetlana; Pourmalek, Farshad; Powles, John; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Prasad, Noela M; Qato, Dima M; Quezada, Amado D; Quistberg, D Alex A; Racapé, Lionel; Rafay, Anwar; Rahimi, Kazem; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rahman, Sajjad Ur; Raju, Murugesan; Rakovac, Ivo; Rana, Saleem M; Rao, Mayuree; Razavi, Homie; Reddy, K Srinath; Refaat, Amany H; Rehm, Jürgen; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Riccio, Patricia M; Richardson, Lee; Riederer, Anne; Robinson, Margaret; Roca, Anna; Rodriguez, Alina; Rojas-Rueda, David; Romieu, Isabelle; Ronfani, Luca; Room, Robin; Roy, Nobhojit; Ruhago, George M; Rushton, Lesley; Sabin, Nsanzimana; Sacco, Ralph L; Saha, Sukanta; Sahathevan, Ramesh; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Salomon, Joshua A; Salvo, Deborah; Sampson, Uchechukwu K; Sanabria, Juan R; Sanchez, Luz Maria; Sánchez-Pimienta, Tania G; Sanchez-Riera, Lidia; Sandar, Logan; Santos, Itamar S; Sapkota, Amir; Satpathy, Maheswar; Saunders, James E; Sawhney, Monika; Saylan, Mete I; Scarborough, Peter; Schmidt, Jürgen C; Schneider, Ione J C; Schöttker, Ben; Schwebel, David C; Scott, James G; Seedat, Soraya; Sepanlou, Sadaf G; Serdar, Berrin; Servan-Mori, Edson E; Shaddick, Gavin; Shahraz, Saeid; Levy, Teresa Shamah; Shangguan, Siyi; She, Jun; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Shibuya, Kenji; Shin, Hwashin H; Shinohara, Yukito; Shiri, Rahman; Shishani, Kawkab; Shiue, Ivy; Sigfusdottir, Inga D; Silberberg, Donald H; Simard, Edgar P; Sindi, Shireen; Singh, Abhishek; Singh, Gitanjali M; Singh, Jasvinder A; Skirbekk, Vegard; Sliwa, Karen; Soljak, Michael; Soneji, Samir; Søreide, Kjetil; Soshnikov, Sergey; Sposato, Luciano A; Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T; Stapelberg, Nicolas J C; Stathopoulou, Vasiliki; Steckling, Nadine; Stein, Dan J; Stein, Murray B; Stephens, Natalie; Stöckl, Heidi; Straif, Kurt; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Sturua, Lela; Sunguya, Bruno F; Swaminathan, Soumya; Swaroop, Mamta; Sykes, Bryan L; Tabb, Karen M; Takahashi, Ken; Talongwa, Roberto T; Tandon, Nikhil; Tanne, David; Tanner, Marcel; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Te Ao, Braden J; Teixeira, Carolina M; Téllez Rojo, Martha M; Terkawi, Abdullah S; Texcalac-Sangrador, José Luis; Thackway, Sarah V; Thomson, Blake; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L; Thrift, Amanda G; Thurston, George D; Tillmann, Taavi; Tobollik, Myriam; Tonelli, Marcello; Topouzis, Fotis; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Toyoshima, Hideaki; Traebert, Jefferson; Tran, Bach X; Trasande, Leonardo; Trillini, Matias; Trujillo, Ulises; Dimbuene, Zacharie Tsala; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Tuzcu, Emin Murat; Uchendu, Uche S; Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Uzun, Selen B; van de Vijver, Steven; Van Dingenen, Rita; van Gool, Coen H; van Os, Jim; Varakin, Yuri Y; Vasankari, Tommi J; Vasconcelos, Ana Maria N; Vavilala, Monica S; Veerman, Lennert J; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Venketasubramanian, N; Vijayakumar, Lakshmi; Villalpando, Salvador; Violante, Francesco S; Vlassov, Vasiliy Victorovich; Vollset, Stein Emil; Wagner, Gregory R; Waller, Stephen G; Wallin, Mitchell T; Wan, Xia; Wang, Haidong; Wang, JianLi; Wang, Linhong; Wang, Wenzhi; Wang, Yanping; Warouw, Tati S; Watts, Charlotte H; Weichenthal, Scott; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weintraub, Robert G; Werdecker, Andrea; Wessells, K Ryan; Westerman, Ronny; Whiteford, Harvey A; Wilkinson, James D; Williams, Hywel C; Williams, Thomas N; Woldeyohannes, Solomon M; Wolfe, Charles D A; Wong, John Q; Woolf, Anthony D; Wright, Jonathan L; Wurtz, Brittany; Xu, Gelin; Yan, Lijing L; Yang, Gonghuan; Yano, Yuichiro; Ye, Pengpeng; Yenesew, Muluken; Yentür, Gökalp K; Yip, Paul; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Yoon, Seok-Jun; Younis, Mustafa Z; Younoussi, Zourkaleini; Yu, Chuanhua; Zaki, Maysaa E; Zhao, Yong; Zheng, Yingfeng; Zhou, Maigeng; Zhu, Jun; Zhu, Shankuan; Zou, Xiaonong; Zunt, Joseph R; Lopez, Alan D; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J

    2015-12-05

    The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution. Attributable deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) have been estimated for 79 risks or clusters of risks using the GBD 2010 methods. Risk-outcome pairs meeting explicit evidence criteria were assessed for 188 countries for the period 1990-2013 by age and sex using three inputs: risk exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the first level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail provided at levels 3 and 4 of the hierarchy. Compared with GBD 2010, six new risk factors have been added: handwashing practices, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, childhood wasting, childhood stunting, unsafe sex, and low glomerular filtration rate. For most risks, data for exposure were synthesised with a Bayesian meta-regression method, DisMod-MR 2.0, or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. Relative risks were based on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks such as high body-mass index (BMI) through other risks such as high systolic blood pressure and high cholesterol. All risks combined account for 57·2% (95% uncertainty interval

  16. Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

    2015-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia.

  17. Global, regional, and national comparative risk assessment of 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks in 188 countries, 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution. Methods Attributable deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) have been estimated for 79 risks or clusters of risks using the GBD 2010 methods. Risk–outcome pairs meeting explicit evidence criteria were assessed for 188 countries for the period 1990–2013 by age and sex using three inputs: risk exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the first level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail provided at levels 3 and 4 of the hierarchy. Compared with GBD 2010, six new risk factors have been added: handwashing practices, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, childhood wasting, childhood stunting, unsafe sex, and low glomerular filtration rate. For most risks, data for exposure were synthesised with a Bayesian meta-regression method, DisMod-MR 2.0, or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. Relative risks were based on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks such as high body-mass index (BMI) through other risks such as high systolic blood pressure and high cholesterol. Findings All risks combined account

  18. Diarrheal Disease in Rural Mozambique: Burden, Risk Factors and Etiology of Diarrheal Disease among Children Aged 0–59 Months Seeking Care at Health Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Nhampossa, Tacilta; Mandomando, Inacio; Acacio, Sozinho; Quintó, Llorenç; Vubil, Delfino; Ruiz, Joaquin; Nhalungo, Delino; Sacoor, Charfudin; Nhabanga, Arnaldo; Nhacolo, Ariel; Aide, Pedro; Machevo, Sónia; Sigaúque, Betuel; Nhama, Abel; Kotloff, Karen; Farag, Tamer; Nasrin, Dilruba; Bassat, Quique; Macete, Eusebio; Levine, Myron M.; Alonso, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrheal disease remains a leading cause of illness and death, particularly in low-income countries. Its burden, microbiological causes and risk factors were examined in children aged 0–59 months living in Manhiça, rural southern Mozambique. Methods Trends of diarrhea-related burden of disease were estimated during the period 2001–2012. A prospective, age-stratified and matched (by age, gender and geographical origin), case-control study was conducted during 2007–2011. Clinical, epidemiology, anthropometric measurement and fecal samples obtained from recruited children were used to estimate moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) weighted attributable fractions. Results Over the last decade the incidence of acute diarrhea has dropped by about 80%. Incidence of MSD per 100 child years at risk for the period 2007–2011 was 9.85, 7.73 and 2.10 for children aged 0–11, 12–23 and 24–59 months respectively. By adjusted population attributable fractions, most cases of MSD were due to rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, ETEC ST (ST only or ST/LT), Shigella and Adenovirus 40/41. Washing hands and having facilities to dispose child’s stools were associated with a reduced risk of MSD, while giving stored water to the child was associated with an increased risk of MSD. Conclusions Despite the predominantly decreasing trends observed throughout the last decade, diarrheal diseases remain today a major cause of morbidity among children aged 0–59 months living in this rural Mozambican area. Rotavirus, cryptosporidium, Shigella, ETEC ST and Adenovirus 40/41 were the most important aetiologies of MSD. Thus, well-known preventive strategies such as washing hands, improving the treatment of stored water, having facilities to dispose children stools, and accelerating the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine should be promoted on a wider scale to reduce the current burden of diarrheal diseases. PMID:25973880

  19. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  20. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia.

  1. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  3. Management of anemia in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tim Goodnough, Lawrence; Comin-Colet, Josep; Leal-Noval, Santiago; Ozawa, Sherri; Takere, Jacqueline; Henry, David; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Hohmuth, Benjamin; Bisbe, Elvira; Gross, Irwin; Shander, Aryeh

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is an independent risk factor for adverse patient outcomes. There are no guidelines for management of anemia in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), despite its high incidence. Four objectives were defined by the International Anemia Management and Clinical Outcomes Expert Panel (AMCO), a multinational group of interdisciplinary experts identified by the Society for the Advancement of Blood Management (SABM) to: determine the prevalence of anemia in outpatients; to determine the prevalence of hospital-acquired anemia; to assess the impact of anemia management on clinical outcomes such as quality of life and functional status; and to provide recommendations for primary care physicians and specialists for the diagnosis, evaluation, and management of anemia in patients with CHF. Anemia and iron deficiency were confirmed to be highly prevalent in patients with CHF. Intravenous iron therapy improves anemia, cardiac function and exercise tolerance, leading to improvement in quality of life. Anemia management has been demonstrated to be cost-effective. Clinical care pathways to manage anemia in patients with CHF are recommended as best practices in order to improve patient outcomes. Am. J. Hematol. 92:88-93, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of nutritionally at-risk young children is predicted by malaria, anemia, and stunting in Pemba, Zanzibar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutritionally at-risk children suffer delays in physical growth and motor and language development. Infectious diseases such as malaria pose an additional risk. We examined the cross-sectional relationships among malaria infection, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, length-for-age Z-scores (LAZ), motor ...

  5. The Myth of “The Vulnerable Plaque”: Transitioning from a Focus on Individual Lesions to Atherosclerotic Disease Burden for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular science community has pursued the quest to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in patients for decades, hoping to prevent acute coronary events. However, despite major advancements in imaging technology that allow visualization of rupture-prone plaques, clinical studies have not demonstrated improved risk prediction compared to traditional approaches. Considering the complex relationship between plaque rupture and acute coronary event risk suggested by pathology studies and confirmed by clinical investigations, these results are not surprising. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a multifaceted hypothesis of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Managing patients at risk of suffering acute coronary events mandates a greater focus on the atherosclerotic disease burden, rather than on features of individual plaques. PMID:25601032

  6. Fanconi anemia: current management.

    PubMed

    Kook, Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosomal instability disorder, characterized by congenital anomalies, defective hematopoiesis and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia and certain solid tumors. All racial and ethnic groups are at risk, and at least 11 complementation groups have been identified and the genes defective in eight of these have been identified (FANCA, C, D2, E, F, G, L and BRCA2). FA-A is the most common complementation group, accounting for approximately 65% of all affected individuals. The gold-standard screening test for FA is based on the characteristic hypersensitivity of FA cells to the crosslinking agents, such as mitomicin C or diepoxybutane. Recent progress has been made in identifying the genes bearing pathogenetically relevant mutations, but slower progress has been made in defining the precise functions of the proteins in normal cells, in part because that the proteins are multifunctional. Molecular studies have established that a common pathway exist, both between the FA proteins and other proteins involved in DNA repair such as NBS1, ATM, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only option for establishing normal hematopoiesis. To reduce undue toxicities due to inherent hypersensitivity, nonmyeloablative conditioning for transplants has been advocated. This review summarizes the general clinical and hematologic features and the current management of FA. Fanconi anemia (FA) is the commonest type of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with the birth incidence of around three per million. The inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive with the estimated heterozygote frequency being one in 300 in Europe and the US.

  7. The risks and benefits of long-term use of hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia: A 17.5 year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Martin H; McCarthy, William F; Castro, Oswaldo; Ballas, Samir K; Armstrong, F Danny; Smith, Wally; Ataga, Kenneth; Swerdlow, Paul; Kutlar, Abdullah; DeCastro, Laura; Waclawiw, Myron A

    2010-06-01

    A randomized, controlled clinical trial established the efficacy and safety of short-term use of hydroxyurea in adult sickle cell anemia. To examine the risks and benefits of long-term hydroxyurea usage, patients in this trial were followed for 17.5 years during which they could start or stop hydroxyurea. The purpose of this follow-up was to search for adverse outcomes and estimate mortality. For each outcome and for mortality, exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated, or tests were conducted at alpha = 0.05 level (P-value <0.05 for statistical significance). Although the death rate in the overall study cohort was high (43.1%; 4.4 per 100 person-years), mortality was reduced in individuals with long-term exposure to hydroxyurea. Survival curves demonstrated a significant reduction in deaths with long-term exposure. Twenty-four percent of deaths were due to pulmonary complications; 87.1% occurred in patients who never took hydroxyurea or took it for <5 years. Stroke, organ dysfunction, infection, and malignancy were similar in all groups. Our results, while no longer the product of a randomized study because of the ethical concerns of withholding an efficacious treatment, suggest that long-term use of hydroxyurea is safe and might decrease mortality.

  8. Mouth self-examination as a screening tool for oral cancer in a high-risk group of patients with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Furquim, Camila Pinheiro; Pivovar, Allana; Cavalcanti, Laura Grein; Araújo, Renata Fuentes; Sales Bonfim, Carmem Maria; Torres-Pereira, Cassius Carvalho

    2014-10-01

    Oral cancer usually occurs at accessible sites, enabling early detection by visual inspection. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive disorder associated with a high risk of developing head and neck solid tumors. The aim of this study was to assess the ability to perform mouth self-examination (MSE) in these patients. A total of 44 patients with FA, aged ≥ 18 years, were given a self-reported questionnaire to collect sociodemographic data and information about health-related behaviors and oral cancer awareness. They were asked to perform MSE, which was evaluated using criteria for mucosal visualization and retracting ability. Subsequently, an oral medicine specialist clinically examined all participants, and these findings were considered to be the gold standard. The sensitivity and specificity values of MSE were 43% and 44%, respectively. The MSE accuracy was 43%. Most patients (73%) reported that MSE was easy or very easy, although 75% showed insufficient performance. The accuracy of MSE alone is not sufficient to indicate whether MSE should be recommended as a strategy to prevent oral cancer in patients with FA. Nevertheless, the present results indicate that this inexpensive technique could be used as a tool for early detection of cancer in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency of nutritional anemia among female medical students of Faisalabad

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Shireen; Tariq, Sundus; Tariq, Saba; Kamal, Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Anemia is a common health problem worldwide. This problem is most commonly faced by 18 to 25 years of females. Medical students especially female hostelites poses high risk of anemia because of their poor eating habits, breakfast skipping, long schedule in college, burden of medical studies, clinical postings, and extra-curricular activities. Therefore the current study was designed to determine the hemoglobin status in young female medical students. We also elucidate its association with BMI. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at The University of Faisalabad during December 2015 to February 2016. A total of 221 female students were recruited by convenient sampling technique. All relevant information about participants was taking by administering structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized as hostelities and day scholars for comparison. Study subjects were also sub grouped on the bases of their BMI. Hemoglobin, MCV, MCH and MCHC were estimated at Madina Teaching Hospital Faisalabad. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS 20. Results: Mean age of the study subjects was 19.92 ±0.93. 33.4% of the students were found to be anemic. Significantly high number of hostelites (39.2%) were anemic as compared to day scholars (23.1%) (P value= 0.015*). On analyzing by BMI categories, greater number of underweight subjects was found to be anemic as compared to normal and overweight subjects. Conclusion: Anemia is more prevalent in hostelites as compared to day scholar female medical students which might also affect the efficiency of these students. PMID:28523045

  10. Total Effective Xenoestrogen Burden in Serum Samples and Risk for Breast Cancer in a Population-Based Multicase–Control Study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Fernández, Mariana F.; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Whelan, Denis; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Llorca, Javier; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Guevara, Marcela; Molina-Molina, José-Manuel; Artacho-Cordón, Francisco; Barriuso-Lapresa, Laura; Tusquets, Ignasi; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Aragonés, Nuria; Olea, Nicolás; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pollán, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most studies on endocrine-disrupting chemicals and breast cancer have focused on single compounds and have produced inconclusive findings. Objectives: We assessed the combined estrogenic effects of mixtures of xenoestrogens in serum and their relationship to breast cancer risk. Methods: A total of 186 incident pretreatment breast cancer cases and 196 frequency-matched controls were randomly sampled from a large population-based multicase–control study in Spain. The total effective xenoestrogen burden attributable to organohalogenated xenoestrogens (TEXB-α) and endogenous hormones and more polar xenoestrogens (TEXB-β) was determined in serum samples using high-performance liquid chromatography and E-Screen bioassay. Odds ratios for breast cancer comparing tertiles of serum TEXB-α and TEXB-β were estimated using logistic models, and smooth risk trends were obtained using spline models. Results: Cases had higher geometric mean TEXB-α and TEXB-β levels (8.32 and 9.94 Eeq pM/mL, respectively) than controls (2.99 and 5.96 Eeq pM/mL, respectively). The fully adjusted odds ratios for breast cancer (95% confidence intervals) comparing the second and third tertiles of TEXB-α with the first tertile were 1.77 (0.76, 4.10) and 3.45 (1.50, 7.97), respectively, and those for TEXB-β were 2.35 (1.10, 5.03) and 4.01 (1.88, 8.56), respectively. A steady increase in risk was evident across all detected TEXB-α levels and a sigmoidal trend was observed for TEXB-β. Individual xenoestrogens showed weak and opposing associations with breast cancer risk. Conclusions: This is the first study to show a strong positive association between serum total xenoestrogen burden and breast cancer risk, highlighting the importance of evaluating xenoestrogen mixtures, rather than single compounds, when studying hormone-related cancers. Citation: Pastor-Barriuso R, Fernández MF, Castaño-Vinyals G, Whelan D, Pérez-Gómez B, Llorca J, Villanueva CM, Guevara M, Molina-Molina JM

  11. Risks and Population Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases Associated with Diabetes in China: A Prospective Study of 0.5 Million Adults.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Fiona; Li, Liming; Yang, Ling; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yiping; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Junshi; Collins, Rory; Peto, Richard; Wang, Chunmei; Dong, Caixia; Pan, Rong; Zhou, Jinyi; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhengming

    2016-07-01

    In China, diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, but little is known about the associated risks and population burden of cardiovascular diseases. We assess associations of diabetes with major cardiovascular diseases and the relevance of diabetes duration and other modifiable risk factors to these associations. A nationwide prospective study recruited 512,891 men and women aged 30-79 y between 25 June 2004 and 15 July 2008 from ten diverse localities across China. During ~7 y of follow-up, 7,353 cardiovascular deaths and 25,451 non-fatal major cardiovascular events were recorded among 488,760 participants without prior cardiovascular disease at baseline. Cox regression yielded adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) comparing disease risks in individuals with diabetes to those without. Overall, 5.4% (n = 26,335) of participants had self-reported (2.7%) or screen-detected (2.7%) diabetes. Individuals with self-reported diabetes had an adjusted HR of 2.07 (95% CI 1.90-2.26) for cardiovascular mortality. There were significant excess risks of major coronary event (2.44, 95% CI 2.18-2.73), ischaemic stroke (1.68, 95% CI 1.60-1.77), and intracerebral haemorrhage (1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.44). Screen-detected diabetes was also associated with significant, though more modest, excess cardiovascular risks, with corresponding HRs of 1.66 (95% CI 1.51-1.83), 1.62 (95% CI 1.40-1.86), 1.48 (95% CI 1.40-1.57), and 1.17 (95% CI 1.01-1.36), respectively. Misclassification of screen-detected diabetes may have caused these risk estimates to be underestimated, whilst lack of data on lipids may have resulted in residual confounding of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disease risks. Among individuals with diabetes, cardiovascular risk increased progressively with duration of diabetes and number of other presenting modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Assuming a causal association, diabetes now accounts for ~0.5 million (489,676, 95% CI 335,777-681,202) cardiovascular deaths annually in China

  12. Risks and Population Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases Associated with Diabetes in China: A Prospective Study of 0.5 Million Adults

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, Fiona; Li, Liming; Yang, Ling; Guo, Yu; Chen, Yiping; Bian, Zheng; Chen, Junshi; Collins, Rory; Peto, Richard; Dong, Caixia; Pan, Rong; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhengming

    2016-01-01

    Background In China, diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, but little is known about the associated risks and population burden of cardiovascular diseases. We assess associations of diabetes with major cardiovascular diseases and the relevance of diabetes duration and other modifiable risk factors to these associations. Methods and Findings A nationwide prospective study recruited 512,891 men and women aged 30–79 y between 25 June 2004 and 15 July 2008 from ten diverse localities across China. During ~7 y of follow-up, 7,353 cardiovascular deaths and 25,451 non-fatal major cardiovascular events were recorded among 488,760 participants without prior cardiovascular disease at baseline. Cox regression yielded adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) comparing disease risks in individuals with diabetes to those without. Overall, 5.4% (n = 26,335) of participants had self-reported (2.7%) or screen-detected (2.7%) diabetes. Individuals with self-reported diabetes had an adjusted HR of 2.07 (95% CI 1.90–2.26) for cardiovascular mortality. There were significant excess risks of major coronary event (2.44, 95% CI 2.18–2.73), ischaemic stroke (1.68, 95% CI 1.60–1.77), and intracerebral haemorrhage (1.24, 95% CI 1.07–1.44). Screen-detected diabetes was also associated with significant, though more modest, excess cardiovascular risks, with corresponding HRs of 1.66 (95% CI 1.51–1.83), 1.62 (95% CI 1.40–1.86), 1.48 (95% CI 1.40–1.57), and 1.17 (95% CI 1.01–1.36), respectively. Misclassification of screen-detected diabetes may have caused these risk estimates to be underestimated, whilst lack of data on lipids may have resulted in residual confounding of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disease risks. Among individuals with diabetes, cardiovascular risk increased progressively with duration of diabetes and number of other presenting modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Assuming a causal association, diabetes now accounts for ~0.5 million (489,676, 95% CI 335,777

  13. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Firehiwot; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included randomly selected primary school students. Hemoglobin concentration was measured using a Hemocue haemoglobinometer. A child was identified as anemic if the hemoglobin concentration was <11.5 g/dl for children (5-11 yrs) and < 12 g/dl for child older than 12 years age. Poisson regression model with robust variance was used to calculate prevalence ratios. The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.1% (95% CI: 24.98, 29.14): 13.8% had mild, 10.8% moderate, and 2.3% severe anemia. Children with in the age group of 5-9 years (APR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.044-1.124) were at higher risk for anemia. Paternal education (Illiterate, 1.109; 1.044-1.178) was positively associated with anemia. Children who had irregular legume consumption (APR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.022-1.118) were at higher risk for anemia. About a quarter of school children suffer from anemia and their educational potential is likely to be affected especially for those with moderate and severe anemia. Child age, irregular legume consumption, and low paternal schooling were associated with anemia. Intervention programmes aimed to reduce anemia among school children are crucial to ensure proper growth and development of children.

  14. The burden of drinking water-associated cryptosporidiosis in China: the large contribution of the immunodeficient population identified by quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shumin; An, Wei; Chen, Zhimin; Zhang, Dongqing; Yu, Jianwei; Yang, Min

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) of Cryptosporidium infection, considering pathogen removal efficiency, different exposure pathways and different susceptible subpopulations, was performed based on the result of a survey of source water from 66 waterworks in 33 major cities across China. The Cryptosporidium concentrations in source water were 0-6 oocysts/10 L, with a mean value of 0.7 oocysts/10 L. The annual diarrhea morbidity caused by Cryptosporidium in drinking water was estimated to be 2701 (95% confidence interval (CI): 138-9381) cases per 100,000 immunodeficient persons and 148 (95% CI: 1-603) cases per 100,000 immunocompetent persons, giving an overall rate of 149.0 (95% CI: 1.3-606.4) cases per 100,000 population. The cryptosporidiosis burden associated with drinking water treated with the conventional process was calculated to be 8.31 × 10(-6) (95% CI: 0.34-30.93 × 10(-6)) disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) per person per year, which was higher than the reference risk level suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO), but lower than that suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Sixty-six percent of the total health burden due to cryptosporidiosis that occurred in the immunodeficient subpopulation, and 90% of the total DALYs was attributed to adults aged 15-59 years. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the great importance of stability of the treatment process and the importance of watershed protection. The results of this study will be useful in better evaluating and reducing the burden of Cryptosporidium infection.

  15. [Fatigue and anemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Zeller, A

    2009-12-02

    We herein report on an 80-year old male patient with a history of muscle weakness, fatigue and weight loss since several months. Because of a pathologic synacthen test in combination with decreased levels of ACTH, we diagnosed a secondary chronic adrenal insufficiency. Because of a normochromic, normocytic, and hypo-proliferative anemia, bone marrow puncture was performed, showing an anemia of chronic disease. We initiated hydrocortisone and anemia and patients' symptoms were fully reconstituted.

  16. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-08-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI, also called anemia of chronic disease) is a common, typically normocytic, normochromic anemia that is caused by an underlying inflammatory disease. It is diagnosed when serum iron concentrations are low despite adequate iron stores, as evidenced by serum ferritin that is not low. In the setting of inflammation, it may be difficult to differentiate AI from iron deficiency anemia, and the 2 conditions may coexist. Treatment should focus on the underlying disease. Recent advances in molecular understanding of AI are stimulating the development of new pathophysiologically targeted experimental therapies.

  17. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated.

  18. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  19. Excess Cardiovascular Risk Burden in Jamaican Women Does Not Influence Predicted 10-Year CVD Risk Profiles of Jamaica Adults: An Analysis of the 2007/08 Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey.

    PubMed

    Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Ferguson, Trevor S; Francis, Damian K; Abdulkadri, Abdullahi O; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana M; McFarlane, Shelly R; Cunningham-Myrie, Colette A; Wilks, Rainford J; Anderson, Simon G

    2013-01-01

    Black Caribbean women have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors than their male counterparts. Whether this results in a difference in incident cardiovascular events is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the 10 year World Health Organization/International Society for Hypertension (WHO/ISH) CVD risk score for Jamaica and explore the effect of sex as well as obesity, physical activity and socioeconomic status on these estimates. Data from 40-74 year old participants in the 2007/08 Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey were used. Trained interviewers administered questionnaires and measured anthropometrics, blood pressure, fasting glucose and cholesterol. Education and occupation were used to assess socioeconomic status. The Americas B tables were used to estimate the WHO/ISH 10 year CVD risk scores for the population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated. Data from 1,432 (450 men, 982 women) participants were analysed, after excluding those with self-reported heart attack and stroke. The women had a higher prevalence of diabetes (19%W;12%M), hypertension (49%W;47%M), hypercholesterolemia (25%W;11%M), obesity (46%W;15%M) and physical inactivity (59%W;29%M). More men smoked (6%W;31%M). There was good agreement between the 10-year cardiovascular risk estimates whether or not cholesterol measurements were utilized for calculation (kappa -0.61). While 90% had a 10 year WHO/ISH CVD risk of less than 10%, approximately 2% of the population or 14,000 persons had a 10 year WHO/ISH CVD risk of ≥30%. As expected CVD risk increased with age but there was no sex difference in CVD risk distribution despite women having a greater risk factor burden. Women with low socioeconomic status had the most adverse CVD risk profile. Despite women having a higher prevalence of CVD risk factors there was no sex difference in 10-year WHO/ISH CVD risk in Jamaican adults.

  20. Addition of a novel, protective family history category allows better profiling of cardiovascular risk and atherosclerotic burden in the general population. The Asklepios Study.

    PubMed

    Van daele, Caroline M; De Meyer, Tim; De Buyzere, Marc L; Gillebert, Thierry C; Denil, Simon L I J; Bekaert, Sofie; Chirinos, Julio A; Segers, Patrick; De Backer, Guy G; De Bacquer, Dirk; Rietzschel, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the importance of family history (FH) is widely recognized in cardiovascular risk assessment, its full potential could be underutilized, when applied with its current simple guidelines-based definition (cFH): presence of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a first-degree relative. We tested the added value of a new, extended family history definition (eFH), also taking into account later onset of disease, second-degree relatives and number of affected relatives, on profiling cardiovascular risk and atherosclerotic burden in the general population. Longitudinal population study. Random, representative population sample from Erpe-Mere and Nieuwerkerken (Belgium, primary care). 2524 male/female volunteers, aged 35-55 years, free from overt CVD. Subjects were extensively phenotyped including presence of atherosclerosis (ultrasound) and a newly developed FH questionnaire (4 generations). Compared to cFH, eFH was superior in predicting an adverse risk profile (glycemic state, elevated blood pressure, lipid abnormalities, presence of metabolic syndrome components) and presence of atherosclerosis (all age & sex-adjusted p<0.05). Unlike cFH, eFH remained a significant predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis after adjusting for confounders. Most relations with eFH were not graded but showed clear informational breakpoints, with absence of CVD (including late onset) in any first-degree relative being a negative predictor of atherosclerosis, and a particularly interesting phenotype for further study. A novel, extended FH definition is superior to the conventional definition in profiling cardiovascular risk and atherosclerotic burden in the general population. There remain clear opportunities to refine and increase the performance and informational content of this simple, readily-available inexpensive tool.

  1. Addition of a Novel, Protective Family History Category Allows Better Profiling of Cardiovascular Risk and Atherosclerotic Burden in the General Population. The Asklepios Study

    PubMed Central

    Van daele, Caroline M.; De Meyer, Tim; De Buyzere, Marc L.; Gillebert, Thierry C.; Denil, Simon L. I. J.; Bekaert, Sofie; Chirinos, Julio A.; Segers, Patrick; De Backer, Guy G.; De Bacquer, Dirk; Rietzschel, Ernst R.; on behalf of the Asklepios Investigators

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Whereas the importance of family history (FH) is widely recognized in cardiovascular risk assessment, its full potential could be underutilized, when applied with its current simple guidelines-based definition (cFH): presence of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a first-degree relative. We tested the added value of a new, extended family history definition (eFH), also taking into account later onset of disease, second-degree relatives and number of affected relatives, on profiling cardiovascular risk and atherosclerotic burden in the general population. Design longitudinal population study. Setting random, representative population sample from Erpe-Mere and Nieuwerkerken (Belgium, primary care). Subjects 2524 male/female volunteers, aged 35–55 years, free from overt CVD. Main outcome measures Subjects were extensively phenotyped including presence of atherosclerosis (ultrasound) and a newly developed FH questionnaire (4 generations). Results Compared to cFH, eFH was superior in predicting an adverse risk profile (glycemic state, elevated blood pressure, lipid abnormalities, presence of metabolic syndrome components) and presence of atherosclerosis (all age & sex-adjusted p<0.05). Unlike cFH, eFH remained a significant predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis after adjusting for confounders. Most relations with eFH were not graded but showed clear informational breakpoints, with absence of CVD (including late onset) in any first-degree relative being a negative predictor of atherosclerosis, and a particularly interesting phenotype for further study. Conclusions A novel, extended FH definition is superior to the conventional definition in profiling cardiovascular risk and atherosclerotic burden in the general population. There remain clear opportunities to refine and increase the performance and informational content of this simple, readily-available inexpensive tool. PMID:23658806

  2. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  3. A comparison of the burden and resultant risk associated with occupational falls from a height and on the same level in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mangharam, Jean; Moorin, Rachael; Straker, Leon

    2016-12-01

    Occupational falls are one of the leading causes of occupational injury and death internationally. This study described the nature of occupational falls following an analysis of workers compensation data in Western Australia. Frequencies, proportions and incidence rates were calculated following mechanism, gender, age and industry stratification. The natures of injury and bodily locations affected were compared between mechanisms of fall. Industry incidence rates were ranked and their corresponding proportions reported. Cost and lost time were described and risk scores for each burden type (incapacity, cost and lost time) were calculated and compared between fall mechanisms. Of all occupational falls, the proportion, incidence rates and risk scores of falls on same level were consistently greater compared to falls from a height. Gender, age and industry groups that appear to be at highest risk vary with the measure used and mechanism of incident. This study translates epidemiological information into a risk score that can aid in prioritisation. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents an in-depth analysis of Worker's Compensation claims for falls in Western Australia. Calculated proportion, incidence rates and formulated risk scores for falls on the level were consistently greater compared to falls from a height. Limitations associated with the analysis of large-scale data-sets are described.

  4. The state of health in the Arab world, 1990-2010: an analysis of the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, Ali H; Jaber, Sara; Aziz, Muna I Abdel; AlBuhairan, Fadia; AlGhaithi, Abduljabbar; AlHamad, Nawal M; Al-Hooti, Suad N; Al-Jasari, Adel; AlMazroa, Mohammad A; AlQasmi, Ahmed Mohamed; Alsowaidi, Shirina; Asad, Majed; Atkinson, Charles; Badawi, Alaa; Bakfalouni, Talal; Barkia, AbdelAziz; Biryukov, Stan; El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Daoud, Farah; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Hossein; Gonzalez-Medina, Diego; Hamadeh, Randah R; Hsairi, Mohamed; Hussein, Seifeddin Saleh; Karam, Nadim; Khalifa, Shams Eldin Ali Hassan; Khoja, Tawfik A M; Lami, Faris; Leach-Kemon, Katherine; Memish, Ziad A; Mokdad, Ali A; Naghavi, Mohsen; Nasher, Jamal; Qasem, M Bassam Hijawi; Shuaib, Mohammad; Al Thani, Al Anoud M; Al Thani, Mohamed H; Zamakhshary, Mohammed; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher J L

    2014-01-25

    The Arab world has a set of historical, geopolitical, social, cultural, and economic characteristics and has been involved in several wars that have affected the burden of disease. Moreover, financial and human resources vary widely across the region. We aimed to examine the burden of diseases and injuries in the Arab world for 1990, 2005, and 2010 using data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010). We divided the 22 countries of the Arab League into three categories according to their gross national income: low-income countries (LICs; Comoros, Djibouti, Mauritania, Yemen, and Somalia), middle-income countries (MICs; Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, occupied Palestinian territory, Sudan, Syria, and Tunisia), and high-income countries (HICs; Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates). For the whole Arab world, each income group, and each individual country, we estimated causes of death, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), DALY-attributable risk factors, years of life lived with disability (YLDs), years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs), and life expectancy by age and sex for 1990, 2005, and 2010. Ischaemic heart disease was the top cause of death in the Arab world in 2010 (contributing to 14·3% of deaths), replacing lower respiratory infections, which were the leading cause of death in 1990 (11·0%). Lower respiratory infections contributed to the highest proportion of DALYs overall (6·0%), and in female indivduals (6·1%), but ischaemic heart disease was the leading cause of DALYs in male individuals (6·0%). DALYs from non-communicable diseases--especially ischaemic heart disease, mental disorders such as depression and anxiety, musculoskeletal disorders including low back pain and neck pain, diabetes, and cirrhosis--increased since 1990. Major depressive disorder was ranked first as a cause of YLDs in 1990, 2005, and 2010, and lower respiratory

  5. A review of environmental fate, body burdens, and human health risk assessment of PCDD/Fs at two typical electronic waste recycling sites in China.

    PubMed

    Chan, Janet Kit Yan; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    This paper reviews the levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in different environmental media, human body burdens and health risk assessment results at e-waste recycling sites in China. To provide an indication of the seriousness of the pollution levels in the e-waste recycling sites in China, the data are compared with guidelines and available existing data for other areas. The comparison clearly shows that PCDD/Fs derived from the recycling processes lead to serious pollution in different environmental compartments (such as air, soil, sediment, dust and biota) and heavy body burdens. Of all kinds of e-waste recycling operations, open burning of e-waste and acid leaching activities are identified as the major sources of PCDD/Fs. Deriving from the published data, the estimated total exposure doses via dietary intake, inhalation, soil/dust ingestion and dermal contact are calculated for adults, children and breast-fed infants living in two major e-waste processing locations in China. The values ranged from 5.59 to 105.16 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day, exceeding the tolerable daily intakes recommended by the WHO (1-4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day). Dietary intake is the most important exposure route for infants, children and adults living in these sites, contributing 60-99% of the total intakes. Inhalation is the second major exposure route, accounted for 12-30% of the total exposure doses of children and adults. In order to protect the environment and human health, there is an urgent need to control and monitor the informal e-waste recycling operations. Knowledge gaps, such as comprehensive dietary exposure data, epidemiological and clinical studies, body burdens of infants and children, and kinetics about PCDD/Fs partitions among different human tissues should be addressed.

  6. Environmental risk factors for iron deficiency anemia in children 12-24 months old in the area of Thessalia in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tympa-Psirropoulou, E; Vagenas, C; Dafni, O; Matala, A; Skopouli, F

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common problem all over the world, which attacks mainly pregnant women, infants and children. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of IDA in children 12-24 months old in a specific area of Thessalia, located in the central part of Greece, and to identify the environmental risk factors associated with it. In the first part of this cross-sectional and case-control study, the hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 938 children were estimated by a mobile photometer analyzer. In the second part of the study, children with Hb<11 gr/dl were compared with matched random selected controls in hematological, anthropometric and environmental parameters. The estimated laboratory values were Hb, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, zinc protoporphyrin, serum iron, serum ferritin, transferring saturation, total iron binding capacity and Hb electrophoresis. Finally 75 children (34 boys, 41 girls, mean age 17.51+/-3.5 months), who were found with IDA, constituted the case group while 75 healthy children constituted the control group. The prevalence of IDA in the region was 7.99%. At the same time, a number of children with stigma of bthalassaemia (2.13%) was discovered, something that had escaped identification. There were no differences due to the method of determination (mobile or laboratory) in the values of Hb between the two groups. Significant differences were recorded (p<0.001) in all hematological and anthropometric parameters except for head circumference. Regarding environmental factors, significant differences were found in the following parameters: ratio rooms/number of family members (p=0.01), number of family members (p=0.01), number of children in the family (p<0.001), birth rate (p<0.001), education and profession of the parents (p<0.001), source of drinking water and sewage system (p<0.001), duration of breast feeding (p<0.001), milk consumption by the child

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They don' ... problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two sickle cell genes, one ...

  8. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  9. Advancements in anemias related to chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lechi Santonastaso, Clara

    2010-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD), the most frequent anemia among hospitalized patients, occurs in chronic inflammatory disorders, such as chronic infections, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Different causes contribute to ACD including diversion of iron traffic, diminished erythropoiesis, blunted response to erythropoietin, erythrophagocytosis, hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. A particular case of ACD is represented by anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACD is characterized by hyposideremia and altered iron transport. Cytokines are implicated in the ACD by reducing erythropoiesis and increasing iron sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The regulation of iron absorption across the epithelium of the proximal small intestine is essential for maintaining body iron concentrations within a physiologically defined range. Hepcidin controls cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export protein ferroportin, causing ferroportin to be phosphorylated and degraded in lysosomes. Finally, hepcidin inhibits iron release from the reticulo-endothelial system. Increased expression of hepcidin leads to decreased iron absorption and iron deficient anemia. Hepcidin, therefore, is a negative regulator of iron transport in plasma. Causes of anemia in patients with CKD are multifactorial, but the most well-known cause is inadequate erythropoietin production. In these patients, anemia increases the risk of either cardiovascular disease or renal failure.

  10. The Increasing Burden and Risk Factors for Bronchiolitis-related Medical Visits in Infants Enrolled in a State Healthcare Insurance Plan

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kecia N.; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Griffin, Marie R.; Wu, Pingsheng; Dupont, William D.; Mitchel, Edward F.; Enriquez, Rachel; Hartert, Tina V.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the year-round burden of healthcare visits attributable to bronchiolitis and identify risk factors for bronchiolitis in term, healthy infants. PATIENTS AND METHODS We conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study of 103,670 term, non-low birth weight infants enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid, 1995 to 2003. We followed infants through the first year of life. Risk factors for bronchiolitis during infancy and rates of inpatient, emergency department, and outpatient visits during the study period were calculated using claims data. RESULTS Over the 9 study years, rates of bronchiolitis visits per 1000 infant years were: 238 (outpatient), 77 (emergency department), and 71 (hospitalization). Average annual rates of bronchiolitis visits increased 41% from 188 to 265/1000 infant years from 1996-1997 to 2002-2003 (test of trend, p<.001). Analysis of the linear trend in 500 gram increments demonstrated a negative association between increasing birth weight and bronchiolitis diagnosis (p<0.0001). There was a significant, negative trend between maternal age and infant bronchiolitis diagnosis. Compared to infants of mothers aged 20-29 years, infants of mothers aged 15-19 had a small increase in risk of having a bronchiolitis visit (Hazard ratio 1.05, 95% Confidence Interval 1.01-1.09), while infants of older mothers were less likely to have a visit including women aged 30-39 (Hazard ratio 0.76, 95% Confidence Interval 0.72-0.79) and 40-44 (Hazard ratio 0.54, 95% CI 0.43-0.68). CONCLUSIONS The disease burden of bronchiolitis is substantial with increasing rates of all types of visits among term, otherwise healthy infants enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid from 1995 to 2003. Protective factors in this cohort of term infants included higher birth weight and older maternal age. PMID:18595987

  11. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  12. Cardiovascular disease risk burden in primary Sjögren's syndrome: results of a population-based multicentre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bartoloni, E; Baldini, C; Schillaci, G; Quartuccio, L; Priori, R; Carubbi, F; Bini, V; Alunno, A; Bombardieri, S; De Vita, S; Valesini, G; Giacomelli, R; Gerli, R

    2015-08-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases, in particular systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, are characterized by a high risk of premature cardiovascular (CV) events. Disease-related characteristics and traditional CV disease risk factors may contribute to atherosclerotic damage. However, there are limited data on the risk of overt CV events in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). We retrospectively analysed a cohort of patients with 1343 pSS. Disease-related clinical and laboratory data, traditional CV disease risk factors and overt CV events were recorded. Prevalence of traditional CV disease risk factors and of major CV events was compared between a subgroup of 788 female patients with pSS aged from 35 to 74 years and 4774 age-matched healthy women. Hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia were more prevalent, whereas smoking, obesity and diabetes mellitus were less prevalent, in women with pSS than in control subjects. Cerebrovascular events (2.5% vs. 1.4%, P = 0.005) and myocardial infarction (MI) (1.0% vs. 0.4%, P = 0.002) were more common in patients with pSS. In the whole population, central nervous system involvement (odds ratio (OR) 5.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-23.7, P = 0.02) and use of immunosuppressive therapy (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.04-3.70, P = 0.04) were associated with a higher risk of CV events. Patients with leucopenia had a higher risk of angina (P = 0.01). pSS is associated with an increased risk of cerebrovascular events and MI. Disease-related clinical and immunological markers may have a role in promoting CV events. © 2015 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  13. High burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors in Mexico: An epidemic of ischemic heart disease that may be on its way?

    PubMed

    Acosta-Cázares, Benjamín; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge

    2010-08-01

    Whereas developed nations have witnessed a drop in the occurrence and mortality of ischemic heart disease, developing nations have recorded a constant rise. The burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors may explain this increase. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in the population protected by the Mexican Social Security Institute. A total of 20,062 Mexicans, aged >or=20 years, 43.5% (8,727) male and 56.5% (11,335) female, randomly selected in a 4-stage stratified population-based sampling process were included. The most prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in men was smoking (31.9%), whereas in women, it was obesity (26.6%) and central obesity (49.7%). A similar high age-adjusted prevalence was observed in women and men for hypertension (29.7% and 28.8%), diabetes (12.94% and 12.66%), and hypercholesterolemia (13.81% and 12.36%). There was a clear age effect on the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, with increasing prevalence with aging. Smoking also had an age effect, but its prevalence increases as age diminishes. More than half of the subjects in reproductive age (20-44 years old) have at least 1 cardiovascular risk factor, mainly smoking. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent in the Mexican population, which seems to be between the second and third stages of the tobacco epidemic. The increased prevalence of risk factors clustering indicates the need for comprehensive integrated management of cardiovascular risk factors in Mexicans, with special emphasis on individuals at younger ages. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk of Adverse Infant Outcomes Associated with Maternal Tuberculosis in a Low Burden Setting: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    LaCourse, Sylvia M.; Greene, Sharon A.; Dawson-Hahn, Elizabeth E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Maternal tuberculosis (TB) may be associated with increased risk of adverse infant outcomes. Study Design. We examined the risk of low birth weight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA), and preterm birth (<37 weeks) associated with maternal TB in a retrospective population-based Washington State cohort using linked infant birth certificate and maternal delivery hospitalization discharge records. We identified 134 women with births between 1987 and 2012 with TB-associated ICD-9 diagnosis codes at hospital delivery discharge and 536 randomly selected women without TB, frequency matched 4 : 1 on delivery year. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to compare the risk of LBW, SGA, and preterm birth between infants born to mothers with and without TB. Results. Infants born to women with TB were 3.74 (aRR 95% CI 1.40–10.00) times as likely to be LBW and 1.96 (aRR 95% CI 0.91–4.22) as likely to be SGA compared to infants born to mothers without TB. Risk of prematurity was similar (aRR 1.01 95% CI 0.39–2.58). Conclusion. Maternal TB is associated with poor infant outcomes even in a low burden setting. A better understanding of the adverse infant outcomes associated with maternal TB, reflecting recent trends in US TB epidemiology, may inform potential targeted interventions in other low prevalence settings. PMID:26989338

  15. Fanconi anemia proteins in telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jaya; Liu, Yie

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres. Telomeres ensure genome stability by preventing chromosome termini from being recognized as DNA damage. Telomere length homeostasis is inevitable for telomere maintenance because critical shortening or over-lengthening of telomeres may lead to DNA damage response or delay in DNA replication, and hence genome instability. Due to their repetitive DNA sequence, unique architecture, bound shelterin proteins, and high propensity to form alternate/secondary DNA structures, telomeres are like common fragile sites and pose an inherent challenge to the progression of DNA replication, repair, and recombination apparatus. It is conceivable that longer the telomeres are, greater is the severity of such challenges. Recent studies have linked excessively long telomeres with increased tumorigenesis. Here we discuss telomere abnormalities in a rare recessive chromosomal instability disorder called Fanconi Anemia and the role of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in telomere biology. Reports suggest that Fanconi Anemia proteins play a role in maintaining long telomeres, including processing telomeric joint molecule intermediates. We speculate that ablation of the Fanconi Anemia pathway would lead to inadequate aberrant structural barrier resolution at excessively long telomeres, thereby causing replicative burden on the cell. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Urbanicity Gradients Are Associated with the Household- and Individual-Level Double Burden of Malnutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew D; Acharya, Yubraj; Galway, Lindsay P

    2016-06-01

    The nutrition transition is advancing throughout sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, the nutritional risk across urbanicity gradients associated with this transition is not clear. We aimed to determine 1) the extent to which overweight and anemia in women of childbearing age (WCBA) and stunting in preschool-age children (PSC) are spatially correlated within countries of SSA; and 2) the association of urbanicity with the individual-level nutritional double burden (i.e., concurrent overweight and anemia within an individual WCBA), the household-level double burden (i.e., overweight WCBA and stunted PSC in the same household), and the 3 components of these double burdens (i.e., overweight, anemia, and stunting). We used Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) data for 30 countries in SSA from 2006-2012. We calculated overweight [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) ≥25] and anemia (hemoglobin concentration <120 g/L) in WCBA, and stunting in PSC aged 12-59 mo (height-for-age z score <-2). We used population density, measured using a high-resolution population distribution dataset, to define gradients of urbanicity. We used geolocated DHS data to calculate cluster-level mean population densities and the Moran's I statistic to assess spatial autocorrelation. Cluster-level BMI values and hemoglobin concentrations for WCBA were spatially correlated. The odds of overweight in WCBA were higher in periurban and urban areas than in rural areas (periurban, OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.16; urban, OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.36), as were the odds of stunting in PSC in periurban areas (OR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.22). The odds of both double burden conditions were higher in periurban and urban areas than in rural areas (individual-level-periurban, OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.33; urban, OR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.27, 1.61; household-level-periurban, OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.44; urban, OR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.46). Urban and periurban areas in SSA may be particularly vulnerable to the nutritional

  17. Clinical and economic burden of postoperative pulmonary complications: patient safety summit on definition, risk-reducing interventions, and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Fleisher, Lee A; Barie, Philip S; Bigatello, Luca M; Sladen, Robert N; Watson, Charles B

    2011-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are a major contributor to the overall risk of surgery. We convened a patient safety summit to discuss ways to enhance physician awareness of postoperative pulmonary complications, advance postoperative pulmonary complications as a substantive public health concern demanding national attention, recommend strategies to reduce the deleterious impact of postoperative pulmonary complications on clinical outcomes and healthcare costs, and establish an algorithm that will help identify patients who are at increased risk for postoperative pulmonary complications. We conducted PubMed searches for relevant literature on postoperative pulmonary complications in addition to using the summit participants' experience in the management of patients with postoperative pulmonary complications. Postoperative pulmonary complications are common, are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and adversely affect financial outcomes in health care. A multifaceted approach is necessary to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Identifying a measurable marker of risk will facilitate the targeted implementation of risk-reduction strategies. The most practicable marker that identifies patients at highest risk for postoperative pulmonary complications is the need for postoperative mechanical ventilation of a cumulative duration >48 hrs.

  18. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40–49 years and 80–85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80–85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003–2004 to 2011–2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention. PMID:27846276

  19. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Ramaswamy; Ezhilarasi, S; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Rajajee, Sarala

    2009-03-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is a clinical triad characterized by thiamine-responsive anemia, diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness. We report a 4-year-old girl with TRMA whose anemia improved following administration of thiamine and this case report sensitizes the early diagnosis and treatment with thiamine in children presenting with anemia, diabetes and deafness.

  20. Global and local health burden trade-off through the hybridisation of quantitative microbial risk assessment and life cycle assessment to aid water management.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yumi; Peters, Greg M; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Heimersson, Sara; Svanström, Magdalena; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) and quantitative risk assessment (QRA) are commonly used to evaluate potential human health impacts associated with proposed or existing infrastructure and products. Each approach has a distinct objective and, consequently, their conclusions may be inconsistent or contradictory. It is proposed that the integration of elements of QRA and LCA may provide a more holistic approach to health impact assessment. Here we examine the possibility of merging LCA assessed human health impacts with quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) for waterborne pathogen impacts, expressed with the common health metric, disability adjusted life years (DALYs). The example of a recent large-scale water recycling project in Sydney, Australia was used to identify and demonstrate the potential advantages and current limitations of this approach. A comparative analysis of two scenarios - with and without the development of this project - was undertaken for this purpose. LCA and QMRA were carried out independently for the two scenarios to compare human health impacts, as measured by DALYs lost per year. LCA results suggested that construction of the project would lead to an increased number of DALYs lost per year, while estimated disease burden resulting from microbial exposures indicated that it would result in the loss of fewer DALYs per year than the alternative scenario. By merging the results of the LCA and QMRA, we demonstrate the advantages in providing a more comprehensive assessment of human disease burden for the two scenarios, in particular, the importance of considering the results of both LCA and QRA in a comparative assessment of decision alternatives to avoid problem shifting. The application of DALYs as a common measure between the two approaches was found to be useful for this purpose.

  1. Seasonality, risk factors and burden of community-acquired pneumonia in COPD patients: a population database study using linked health care records

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nicholas P; Coombs, Ngaire A; Johnson, Matthew J; Josephs, Lynn K; Rigge, Lucy A; Staples, Karl J; Thomas, Mike; Wilkinson, Tom MA

    2017-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is more common in patients with COPD than in the adult general population, with studies of hospitalized CAP patients consistently reporting COPD as a frequent comorbidity. However, despite an increasing recognition of its importance, large studies evaluating the incidence patterns over time, risk factors and burden of CAP in COPD are currently lacking. Methods A retrospective observational study using a large UK-based database of linked primary and secondary care records was conducted. Patients with a diagnosis of COPD aged ≥40 years were followed up for 5 years from January 1, 2010. CAP and exacerbation episodes were identified from hospital discharge data and primary care coding records, and rates were calculated per month, adjusting for mortality, and displayed over time. In addition, baseline factors predicting future risk of CAP and hospital admission with CAP were identified. Results A total of 14,513 COPD patients were identified: 13.4% (n=1,938) had ≥1 CAP episode, of whom 18.8% suffered from recurrent (≥2) CAP. Highest rates of both CAP and exacerbations were seen in winter. A greater proportion of frequent, compared to infrequent, exacerbators experienced recurrent CAP (5.1% versus 2.0%, respectively, P<0.001); 75.6% of CAP episodes were associated with hospital admission compared to 22.1% of exacerbations. Older age and increasing grade of airflow limitation were independently associated with increased odds of CAP and hospital admission with CAP. Other independent predictors of future CAP included lower body mass index, inhaled corticosteroid use, prior frequent exacerbations and comorbidities, including ischemic heart disease and diabetes. Conclusion CAP in COPD demonstrates clear seasonal patterns, with patient characteristics predictive of the odds of future CAP and hospital admission with CAP. Highlighting this burden of COPD-associated CAP during the winter period informs us of the likely triggers

  2. The disproportionate risk burden of CT scanning on females and younger adults in Australia: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, David A; Moorin, Rachael E; Semmens, James; Holman, D'Arcy J

    2014-10-01

    To explore the interaction of computed tomography (CT) use, dose and radiation risk of Australian Medicare-funded CT scanning and the impact on cancer incidence and mortality. This retrospective cohort study used records of Medicare subsidised CT scans in Australia (2006/07 to 2011/12) and Australian CT dosimetry. The annual number, rate and adjusted likelihood of CT were determined for gender, age and examination type. Incident cancer and cancer-related mortality attributable to CT in Australia were estimated using lifetime attributable risk coefficients, dosimetry and scan numbers. The number of CT scans increased by 36% from 2006/07 to 2011/12. Only patients aged 0-4 years did not present an increase in CT scanning rates. Females were 11% more likely to be scanned than males. Head, abdomen/pelvis and spine CT scans were the most likely areas scanned. Females were attributed 61% of both incident cancers and cancer-related mortality from 55% of scans performed. Patients aged 15-44 years were attributed 37% of incident cancers and 30% of cancer-related mortality from 26% of CT scans. CT in Australia is increasing, including in groups at higher risk from ionising radiation. This presents a complex set of risk/benefit considerations for clinicians and policy makers. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. Triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography with 256-slice computed tomography scanners: patient-specific assessment of radiation burden and associated cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E; Damilakis, John

    2012-02-01

    Risk-benefit analysis of triple-rule-out 256-slice computed tomography angiography (TRO-CTA) requires data on associated cancer risks, currently not available. The aim of the current study was to provide estimates of patient radiation burden and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of radiation-induced cancer in patients undergoing typical 256-slice TRO-CTA. Standard step-and-shoot 256-slice TRO-CTA exposures were simulated on 31 male and 31 female individual-specific voxelized phantoms using a Monte Carlo CT dosimetry software. Dose images were generated depicting the dose deposition on the exposed body region of the patient. Organ doses were obtained for all primarily irradiated radiosensitive organs. Organ doses were correlated to patient body size. TRO-CTA effective dose was estimated from (a) organ doses and (b) dose-length product data. Recently published sex-, age-, and organ-specific cancer risk factors were used to estimate the total LAR of radiation-induced cancer. The theoretical risks of radiation-induced cancer to the lung and breast following a 256-slice TRO-CTA were compared with the corresponding nominal risks for each of the studied patients. The highest organ doses were observed for the breast, heart, esophagus, and lung. Mean effective dose estimated using organ dose data was found to be 6.5 ± 1.0 mSv for female and 3.8 ± 0.7 mSv for male individuals subjected to 256-slice TRO-CTA. The associated mean LARs of cancer was found to be 41 per 10 female and 17 per 10 male patients. The total radiation-induced cancer risk was found to markedly decrease with patient age. TRO-CTA exposure was found to increase the intrinsic risks of developing lung or breast cancer during the remaining lifetime by less than 0.5% and 0.1%, respectively. The mean theoretical risk of radiation-induced cancer for a patient cohort subjected to step-and-shoot 256-slice TRO-CTA may be considered to be low compared with the intrinsic risk of developing cancer.

  4. Management and prevention of neonatal anemia: current evidence and guidelines.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, Jeannette S; Lopriore, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal anemia is a common disorder, particularly in (very) preterm neonates. Management of neonatal anemia is based principally on red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Although the use of blood products is nowadays widespread in neonatal medicine, evidence on the potential benefit is extremely limited. Recent studies suggest that RBC transfusions in newborns may be associated with an increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, transfer of infectious agents and negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. Whether the benefits of RBC transfusions outweigh the risks is controversial and requires further studies. In this review, we summarize the current evidence on the management of neonatal anemia and compare the various international guidelines. In addition, we discuss the various strategies to prevent neonatal anemia and reduce the need for RBC transfusions and discuss important trials currently enrolling patients to improve the management in neonatal anemia.

  5. Burden of acute infections (except respiratory and diarrheal) and its risk factors among under-five children in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Enakshi; Sharma, Pawan K; Bunker, Clareann H

    2016-01-01

    Context Acute infections of eyes, ears, skin, and others are a common cause of morbidity in under-five children. The overall burden of other infections and their risk factors is not known. Evidence Acquisition Available literature was searched comprehensively using PubMed for acute infections (except acute respiratory and diarrheal diseases) using the relevant medical subject heading terms. Extracted articles were independently reviewed against inclusion/exclusion criteria and rated for quality. 10 articles were abstracted and reviewed to identify the reported prevalence and risk factors for acute infections among children. Results The pooled prevalence of infections (not including acute respiratory and diarrhea) between 2002 and 2013 was 18.42 (95% confidence interval: 9.30–30.62), with reported range of 3.7–50.8%. The significantly positively associated factors reported in single studies were young age of the child, malnutrition, poor breastfeeding, low socio-economic status, animal rearing near household and mothers’ illiteracy for independent morbidities. Conclusion The evidence on risk factors including breastfeeding, vaccination, age, and sex that predispose under-five Indian children to different infections is inconclusive. There is a need to conduct more studies on acute infections other than acute respiratory and diarrhea, to establish their determinants in Indian children. PMID:27170943

  6. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history.

  7. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  8. Anemia Causes Hypoglycemia in Intensive Care Unit Patients Due to Error in Single-Channel Glucometers: Methods of Reducing Patient Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    hematocrit, low oxygen tension, acetaminophen, uric acid, ascorbic acid, maltose , galactose, xy- lose, lactose, operator inexperience, age of strips, heat...Biomedical, Waltham, MA) that corrects for the effects of anemia, low oxygen tension, acetaminophen, uric acid, ascorbic acid, maltose , galactose, xylose, and... maltose , galactose, xylose, lactose) and low oxygen tension were eliminated as signifi- cant contributors to error by comparison of glucometer results

  9. Consistent condom use reduces the genital human papillomavirus burden among high-risk men: the HPV infection in men study.

    PubMed

    Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William; Papenfuss, Mary R; Salmerón, Jorge J; Quiterio, Manuel M; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Villa, Luisa L; Giuliano, Anna R

    2013-08-01

    Data supporting the efficacy of condoms against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in males are limited. Therefore, we examined the effect of consistent condom use on genital HPV acquisition and duration of infection. A prospective analysis was conducted within the HPV Infection in Men Study, a multinational HPV cohort study. Men who were recently sexually active (n = 3323) were stratified on the basis of sexual risk behaviors and partnerships. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, type-specific incidence of HPV infection and clearance were modeled for each risk group to assess independent associations with condom use. The risk of HPV acquisition was 2-fold lower among men with no steady sex partner who always used condoms, compared with those who never used condoms (hazard ratio, 0.54), after adjustment for country, age, race, education duration, smoking, alcohol, and number of recent sex partners. The probability of clearing an oncogenic HPV infection was 30% higher among nonmonogamous men who always used condoms with nonsteady sex partners, compared with men who never used condoms (hazard ratio, 1.29), after adjustment for country, age, race, education duration, marital status, smoking, alcohol, and number of recent sex partners. No protective effects of condom use were observed among monogamous men. Condoms should be promoted in combination with HPV vaccination to prevent HPV infection in men.

  10. Burden of cancer mortality and differences attributable to demographic aging and risk factors in Argentina, 1986-2011.

    PubMed

    Pou, Sonia Alejandra; Tumas, Natalia; Coquet, Julia Becaria; Niclis, Camila; Román, María Dolores; Díaz, María Del Pilar

    2017-03-09

    The world faces an aging population that implies a large number of people affected with chronic diseases. Argentina has reached an advanced stage of demographic transition and presents a comparatively high rate of cancer mortality within Latin America. The objectives of this study were to examine cancer mortality trends in the province of Córdoba, Argentina, between 1986 and 2011, and to analyze the differences attributable to risk variations and demographic changes. Longitudinal series of age-standardized mortality rates for overall, breast and prostate cancers were modeled by Joinpoint regression to estimate the annual percent change. The Bashir & Estève method was used to split crude mortality rate variation into three components: mortality risk, population age structure and population size. A decreasing cancer age-standardized mortality rates trend was observed (1986-2011 annual percent change: -1.4, 95%CI: -1.6, -1.2 in men; -0.8, 95%CI: -1.0, -0.6 in women), with a significant shift in 1996. There were positive crude mortality rate net changes for overall female cancer, breast and prostate cancers, which were primarily attributable to demographic changes. Inversely, overall male cancer crude mortality rate showed a 9.15% decrease, mostly due to mortality risk. Despite favorable age-standardized mortality rates trends, the influence of population aging reinforces the challenge to control cancer in populations with an increasingly aged demographic structure.

  11. The Impact of Risk Burden Differences between Men and Women on the Clinical Course of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Stróżyńska, Ewa; Fiszer, Urszula; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Zaborski, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Our objective is to assess the impact of varying risk profiles in men and women on the clinical picture of ischemic stroke. The study involved 185 patients, 100 women and 85 men. We assessed the patients' neurological status upon admission, 1 and 2 weeks following stroke onset, using the Scandinavian Stroke Scale and the Barthel Index; stroke syndromes according to the Oxfordshire Classification; their etiology and pathogenesis according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment; and the prevalence of vascular risk factors. We used cranial magnetic resonance imaging to locate infarcts. Women had more total anterior circulation infarct subtype strokes, whereas men had more posterior circulation infarct and lacunar infarct. On neuroimaging, women had more infarcts in the middle cerebral artery circulation, whereas men had more in the brain stem and/or cerebellum. Women had a higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease, whereas men were more likely to smoke and abuse alcohol. Women had more cases of cardioembolism, whereas men had more strokes caused by atherosclerosis of large vessels. In the present study, heart diseases, such as coronary artery disease and AF, were more prevalent among women. It seems that AF is a risk factor with significant impact on the epidemiological differences regarding ischemic stroke in men and women. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  13. Socio-economic and demographic determinants of childhood anemia.

    PubMed

    Goswmai, Sankar; Das, Kishore K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate socio-economic and demographic determinants of anemia among Indian children aged 6-59 months. Statistical analysis was performed on the cross-sectional weighted sample of 40,885 children from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey by using multinomial logistic regression to assess the significance of some risk factors in different degrees of child anemia. Anemia was diagnosed by World Health Organization (WHO) cut-off points on hemoglobin level. Pearson's chi-squared test was applied to justify the associations of anemia with different categories of the study population. The prevalence of anemia was 69.5%; 26.2% mild, 40.4% moderate, and 2.9% severe anemia. Overall prevalence rate, along with mild and moderate cases, showed an increasing trend up to 2 years of age and then decreased. Rural children had a higher prevalence rate. Of 28 Indian states in the study, 10 states showed very high prevalence, the highest being Bihar (77.9%). Higher birth order, high index of poverty, low level of maternal education, mother's anemia, non-intake of iron supplements during pregnancy, and vegetarian mother increased the risks of all types of anemia among children (p<0.05). Christian population was at lower risk; and Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, and Other Backward Class categories were at higher risk of anemia. The results suggest a need for proper planning and implementation of preventive measures to combat child anemia. Economically under-privileged groups, maternal nutrition and education, and birth control measures should be priorities in the programs. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Hepcidin and sports anemia.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Na; Gao, Guofen; Chang, Yan-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin's function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed.

  15. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chinese, Filipino, Mediterranean, or African origin or descent. Hereditary Spherocytosis In this condition, a defect in the ... hemolytic anemia among people of Northern European descent. Hereditary Elliptocytosis (Ovalocytosis) Like hereditary spherocytosis, this condition also ...

  16. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cause anemia. Lack of Red Blood Cell Production Both acquired and inherited conditions and factors can ... damage the red blood cells' ability to carry oxygen. If the bone marrow is damaged, it can' ...

  17. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants ... November 1, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  19. Micronutrient Fortified Condiments and Noodles to Reduce Anemia in Children and Adults—A Literature Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Sascha; Tecklenburg, Linda; Eichler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies impose a considerable burden of disease on many middle and low income countries. Several strategies have been shown to be effective in improving micronutrient deficiencies. However, the impact of fortified condiments as well as fortified noodles is less well documented. We aimed to investigate existing evidence on the impact of micronutrient fortified condiments and noodles on hemoglobin, anemia, and functional outcomes in children and adults (age: 5 to 50 years). We conducted a literature review in electronic databases. In addition, we screened the homepages of relevant organizations and journals. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT). Of 1046 retrieved studies, 14 RCT provided data for the meta-analysis. Micronutrient fortification of condiments and noodles increased hemoglobin concentrations by 0.74 g/dL (95%-confidence intervals (95%-CI): 0.56 to 0.93; 12 studies) and 0.3 g/dL (95%-CI: 0.12 to 0.48; 1 study), respectively. Micronutrient fortification also led to a reduced risk of having anemia (risk ratio 0.59 (95%-CI 0.44 to 0.80)). Ferritin concentrations increased with fortified condiments. Functional outcomes were rarely assessed and showed mixed results. The use of micronutrient fortified condiments can be a strategy to reduce anemia in children and adults due to micronutrient deficiencies. The effect of fortified noodles seems to be smaller. PMID:26891319

  20. Micronutrient Fortified Condiments and Noodles to Reduce Anemia in Children and Adults--A Literature Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hess, Sascha; Tecklenburg, Linda; Eichler, Klaus

    2016-02-15

    Micronutrient deficiencies impose a considerable burden of disease on many middle and low income countries. Several strategies have been shown to be effective in improving micronutrient deficiencies. However, the impact of fortified condiments as well as fortified noodles is less well documented. We aimed to investigate existing evidence on the impact of micronutrient fortified condiments and noodles on hemoglobin, anemia, and functional outcomes in children and adults (age: 5 to 50 years). We conducted a literature review in electronic databases. In addition, we screened the homepages of relevant organizations and journals. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT). Of 1046 retrieved studies, 14 RCT provided data for the meta-analysis. Micronutrient fortification of condiments and noodles increased hemoglobin concentrations by 0.74 g/dL (95%-confidence intervals (95%-CI): 0.56 to 0.93; 12 studies) and 0.3 g/dL (95%-CI: 0.12 to 0.48; 1 study), respectively. Micronutrient fortification also led to a reduced risk of having anemia (risk ratio 0.59 (95%-CI 0.44 to 0.80)). Ferritin concentrations increased with fortified condiments. Functional outcomes were rarely assessed and showed mixed results. The use of micronutrient fortified condiments can be a strategy to reduce anemia in children and adults due to micronutrient deficiencies. The effect of fortified noodles seems to be smaller.

  1. Predicting frequent hospital admission risk in Singapore: a retrospective cohort study to investigate the impact of comorbidities, acute illness burden and social determinants of health

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Wang, Sijia; Thumboo, Julian; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Lee, Kheng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of comorbidities, acute illness burden and social determinants of health on predicting the risk of frequent hospital admissions. Design Multivariable logistic regression was used to associate the predictive variables extracted from electronic health records and frequent hospital admission risk. The model's performance of our predictive model was evaluated using a 10-fold cross-validation. Setting A single tertiary hospital in Singapore. Participants All adult patients admitted to the hospital between 1 January 2013 and 31 May 2014 (n=25 244). Main outcome measure Frequent hospital admissions, defined as 3 or more inpatient admissions within 12 months of discharge. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the predictive model, and the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values for various cut-offs. Results 4322 patients (17.1%) met the primary outcome. 11 variables were observed as significant predictors and included in the final regression model. The strongest independent predictor was treatment with antidepressants in the past 1 year (adjusted OR 2.51, 95% CI 2.26 to 2.78). Other notable predictors include requiring dialysis and treatment with intravenous furosemide during the index admission. The predictive model achieved an AUC of 0.84 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.85) for predicting frequent hospital admission risk, with a sensitivity of 73.9% (95% CI 72.6% to 75.2%), specificity of 79.1% (78.5% to 79.6%) and positive predictive value of 42.2% (95% CI 41.1% to 43.3%) at the cut-off of 0.235. Conclusions We have identified several predictors for assessing the risk of frequent hospital admissions that achieved high discriminative model performance. Further research is necessary using an external validation cohort. PMID:27742630

  2. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  3. The Burden and Determinants of Non Communicable Diseases Risk Factors in Nepal: Findings from a Nationwide STEPS Survey

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Sushhama; Vaidya, Abhinav; Dhimal, Meghnath; Dhakal, Purushottam; Rana, Sangeeta; Bhusal, Chop Lal; Lohani, Guna Raj; Paulin, Frank Herbert; Garg, Renu Madanlal; Guthold, Regina; Cowan, Melanie; Riley, Leanne Margaret; Karki, Khem Bahadur

    2015-01-01

    Background World Health Organization (WHO) estimates for deaths attributed to Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) in Nepal have risen from 51% in 2010 to 60% in 2014. This study assessed the distribution and determinants of NCD risk factors among the Nepalese adult population. Methods and Findings A nationally representative cross-sectional survey was conducted from Jan to June 2013 on the prevalence of NCD risk factors using the WHO NCD STEPS instrument. A multistage cluster sampling method was used to randomly select the 4,200 respondents. The adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) was used to assess the determinants of NCD risk factors using a Poisson regression model. The prevalence of current smoking (last 30 days) was 19% (95%CI:16.6-20.6), and harmful alcohol consumption (≥60 g of pure alcohol for men and ≥40 g of pure alcohol for women on an average day) was 2% (95%CI:1.4-2.9). Almost all (99%, 95%CI:98.3-99.3) of the respondents consumed less than five servings of fruits and vegetables combined on an average day and 3% (95%CI:2.7-4.3) had low physical activity. Around 21% (95%CI:19.3-23.7) were overweight or obese (BMI≥25). The prevalence of raised blood pressure (SBP≥140 mm of Hg or DBP≥90 mm of Hg) and raised blood glucose (fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl), including those on medication were 26% (95%CI:23.6-28.0) and 4% (95%CI:2.9-4.5) respectively. Almost one quarter of respondents, 23% (95%CI:20.5-24.9), had raised total cholesterol (total cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl or under current medication for raised cholesterol). he study revealed a lower prevalence of smoking among women than men (APR:0.30; 95%CI:0.25-0.36), and in those who had higher education levels compared to those with no formal education (APR:0.39; 95%CI:0.26-0.58). Harmful alcohol use was also lower in women than men (APR:0.26; 95%CI:0.14-0.48), and in Terai residents compared to hill residents (APR:0.16; 95%CI:0.07-0.36). Physical inactivity was lower among women than men (APR:0.55; 95

  4. Environmental exposures to lead, mercury, and cadmium among South Korean teenagers (KNHANES 2010-2013): Body burden and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Soo; Ahn, Jaeouk; Lee, Byung-Kook; Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho

    2017-07-01

    Limited information is available on the association of age and sex with blood concentrations of heavy metals in teenagers. In addition, factors such as a shared family environment may have an association. We analyzed data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2010-2013) to determine whether blood levels of heavy metals differ by risk factors such as age, sex, and shared family environment in a representative sample of teenagers. This study used data obtained in the KNHANES 2010-2013, which had a rolling sampling design that involved a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the non-institutionalized civilian population in South Korea. Our cross-sectional analysis was restricted to teenagers and their parents who completed the health examination survey, and for whom blood measurements of cadmium, lead, and mercury were available. The final analytical sample consisted of 1585 teenagers, and 376 fathers and 399 mothers who provided measurements of blood heavy metal concentrations. Male teenagers had greater blood levels of lead and mercury, but sex had no association with blood cadmium level. There were age-related increases in blood cadmium, but blood lead decreased with age, and age had little association with blood mercury. The concentrations of cadmium and mercury declined from 2010 to 2013. The blood concentrations of lead, cadmium, and mercury in teenagers were positively associated with the levels in their parents after adjustment for covariates. Our results show that blood heavy metal concentrations differ by risk factors such as age, sex, and shared family environment in teenagers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Energy balance, glucose and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular risk and liver disease burden in adult patients with type 1 Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Fabio; Dalla Salda, Annalisa; Carubbi, Francesca

    2016-10-20

    Gaucher disease (GD), the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease, is characterized by systemic accumulation of macrophages engorged with glycosphingolipid-laden lysosomes. Even though both lysosomes and sphingolipids play a pivotal role in metabolic homeostasis, little is known on metabolic abnormalities associated with GD. In this review, we discuss the peculiarity of energy balance and glucose and lipid metabolism in adult type 1 GD patients. Moreover, we evaluate the potential relationship between these metabolic derangements, cardiovascular risk and chronic liver disease. The limited data available show that adult type 1 GD is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, peripheral insulin resistance and hypolipidemia with markedly reduced HDL-cholesterol levels, partially reverted by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) or substrate reduction therapy (SRT). Although this unfavorable metabolic profile has not been associated with increased incidence of type 2 diabetes and premature atherosclerosis, a natural history study has shown that cardio-cerebrovascular events and malignancy are the leading causes of death in treated type 1 GD patients. Hepatomegaly is frequently observed in GD and ERT/SRT are highly effective in reducing liver volume. Nevertheless, patients with GD may be at increased risk of long-term liver complications including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role that ERT/SRT and/or lifestyle habits may have on such metabolic features of GD patients, and subsequently on long-term prognosis, deserves further investigations. To gain more insights into the peculiarity of GD metabolism may serve both surveillance and treatment purposes by helping to identify new markers of disease severity and define an updated natural history of GD.

  6. Prevalence of anemia in a Hispanic population with decompensated congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Del Río-Santiago, Valentín; Santiago-Trinidad, Ricardo; Espinell-González, Nelson; Valentín-Nieves, Julio; Giugliano, Robert P; Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Vicenty-Rivera, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in patients with heart failure (HF is a frequent event, commonly associated with worse prognosis. Despite the high incidence and adverse outcomes associated with anemia no studies have been conducted amongst Hispanics with HF. The study aims to determine the prevalence, predictors and outcomes of anemia in Hispanics admitted to Veteran Affairs Caribbean Healthcare System with diagnosis of Decompensated Congestive Heart Failure (D-CHF). Retrospective review of 617 patient medical charts that had been previously discharged with a diagnosis of HF as per International Classification of Diseases-9 code. The clinical, demographic, laboratory and echocardiographic data was assessed for a total of 148 male patient electronic medical records that met the study inclusion criteria. The re-hospitalization and mortality rates were determined from the admission date until April 2010. The burden of anemia with HF is substantial, with anemia present in 68.2% of patients. Anemia was associated with hypoalbuminemia, higher New York Heart Association classification, elevated pro-BNP level at discharge, renal insufficiency and diastolic dysfunction, all of which demonstrated statistical significance. Anemia had 2.18 and 2.95 times likelihood of any-cause mortality (p = 0.003) and cardiovascular deaths (p = 0.02) when compared with HF patients without anemia. Anemia is a very frequent and serious finding in patients with D-CHF. The study reveals a higher prevalence of anemia in HF patients among Hispanics in comparison with formerly reported studies covering non-Hispanic populations.

  7. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia ...

  8. Clinical considerations and practical recommendations for the primary care practitioner in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan N

    2007-12-01

    Anemia is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a risk factor for poor disease outcome. Anemia acts as a risk multiplier, significantly increasing the risk of death in anemic versus nonanemic CKD patients with similar comorbidities. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are a mainstay for the treatment of anemia in renal patients on dialysis, but recent data suggests that earlier treatment of anemia in CKD may delay the onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and decrease mortality. Nonetheless, anemia of CKD is under-recognized and undertreated during the period before initiation of dialysis, when anemia correction may have the greatest impact on disease outcome. This report describes anemia in CKD and its association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and poor disease outcome, and offers suggestions for the recognition and treatment of anemia of CKD in the primary care setting.

  9. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Prevalence of anemia in heart failure and its effects on prognosis.

    PubMed

    Belziti, César A

    2009-02-01

    Anemia is common in heart failure patients but its prevalence varies widely according to various sources. There is no agreement regarding the definition of anemia to be used and several risk factors have been found to be associated with higher prevalence of anemia in heart failure patients. The prevalence of anemia depends on its definition and the clinical characteristics of the patients included in the studies. Anemia is associated with adverse prognosis in the general population, in patients with end-stage renal disease, chronic diseases, coronary artery disease and also in patients with heart failure; however, despite all the information available, the issue of whether anemia is an independent predictor of mortality and the nature of the risk between anemia and mortality in heart failure patients are not yet fully understood.

  11. Associations of chronic stress burden, perceived stress, and traumatic stress with cardiovascular disease prevalence and risk factors in the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Linda C.; Roesch, Scott C.; Fortmann, Addie L.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Penedo, Frank J.; Perreira, Krista; Birnbaum-Weitzman, Orit; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Daviglus, Martha L.; Schneiderman, Neil; Isasi, Carmen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study examined multiple stress indicators (chronic, perceived, traumatic) in relation to prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (i.e., diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, current smoking) in the multi-site Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study (2010–2011). Methods Participants were 5313 men and women, 18–74 years old, representing diverse Hispanic/Latino ethnic backgrounds, who underwent a comprehensive baseline clinical exam and sociocultural exam with measures of stress. Results Chronic stress burden was related to a higher prevalence of CHD after adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioral and biological risk factors [OR (95% CI) = 1.22, (1.10–1.36)] and related to stroke prevalence in the model adjusted for demographic and behavioral factors [OR (95% CI) = 1.26, (1.03–1.55∂)]. Chronic stress was also related to a higher prevalence of diabetes [OR=1.20, (1.11–1.31)] and hypertension [OR=1.10 (1.02–1.19)] in individuals free from CVD (N=4926). Perceived stress [OR=1.03 (1.01–1.05)] and traumatic stress [OR=1.15 (1.05–1.26)] were associated with a higher prevalence of smoking. Participants who reported a greater number of lifetime traumatic events also unexpectedly showed a lower prevalence of diabetes [OR=.89 (.83–.97)] and hypertension [OR=.88 (.82–.93)]. Effects were largely consistent across age and sex groups. Conclusions The study underscores the utility of examining multiple indicators of stress in relation to health, since the direction and consistency of associations may vary across distinct stress conceptualizations. In addition, the study suggests that chronic stress is related to higher CVD risk and prevalence in Hispanics/Latinos, the largest U.S. ethnic minority group. PMID:24979579

  12. Association of inflammation of the left anterior descending coronary artery with cardiovascular risk factors, plaque burden and pericardial fat volume: a PET/CT study.

    PubMed

    Saam, Tobias; Rominger, Axel; Wolpers, Sarah; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Rist, Carsten; Greif, Martin; Cumming, Paul; Becker, Alexander; Foerster, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F; Bartenstein, Peter; Hacker, Marcus

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake as a potential marker of the inflammatory activity of the vessel wall could be useful to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The purpose of this study was to correlate the FDG uptake in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) with cardiovascular risk factors, pericardial fat volume (PFV) and calcified plaque burden (CPB). A total of 292 consecutive tumour patients were examined by whole-body FDG PET and contrast-enhanced CT. The blood pool-corrected standardized uptake value (target to background ratio, TBR) was measured in the LAD, and the contrast-enhanced CT images were used to measure the PFV and the CPB. The Spearman correlation coefficient and the unpaired t test were used for statistical comparison between image-based results and cardiovascular risk factors. Vascular FDG uptake could be measured for 161 of 292 (55%) patients without myocardial uptake, but the vessel uptake could not be distinguished in the other patients, due to pervasive myocardial uptake. The TBR of the LAD showed significant correlations with hypertension (R = 0.18; p < 0.05), coronary heart disease (R = 0.19; p < 0.05), body mass index (BMI) (R = 0.19; p < 0.05), CPB (R = 0.36; p < 0.001) and PFV (R = 0.20; p < 0.05), but not with other risk factors. Patients with a TBR in the upper tertile had a larger CPB and a higher PFV than patients with a TBR in the lower tertile (9.1 vs 3.5; p < 0.001 for CPB and 92.2 vs 71.5 mm(3); p < 0.05 for PVF). FDG uptake measurement in the LAD correlates with hypertension, coronary heart disease, BMI, PFV and CPB. However, due to myocardial FDG uptake these measurements are only feasible in one half of the patients.

  13. Disappearance of association in diabetic patients on hemodialysis between anemia and mortality risk: the Japan dialysis outcomes and practice pattern study.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Masaaki; Hayashino, Yasuaki; Shoji, Tetsuo; Akiba, Takashi; Akizawa, Tadao; Saito, Akira; Kurokawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that anemia was not associated with mortality in hemodialysis patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerates CVD, the influence of DM on the relationship between anemia and mortality was examined using the data obtained from 1,385 DM patients and 2,583 non-DM hemodialysis patients recruited into the Dialysis Outcomes Practice Pattern Study in Japan (J-DOPPS). When all patients were stratified into four groups on their hematocrit levels, mortality rate was significantly and steadily lower in the subgroups with the higher levels of hematocrit by the Kaplan-Meier method (p = 0.0003 by log-rank test). When DM and non-DM patients were analyzed separately, a significant association of lower hematocrit levels with higher mortality disappeared in DM patients (p = 0.6280), in contrast with its retention in non-DM counterparts (p < 0.0001). Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant association between hematocrit with all-cause mortality in non-DM patients after adjustment for age, gender, BMI, hemodialysis duration, SBP, DBP, albumin, total cholesterol, calcium, phosphorus, and intact PTH (p = 0.046), whereas this association disappeared in DM patients in the same model (p = 0.583). In conclusion, these results suggested that the association between anemia and higher mortality disappeared in DM hemodialysis patients, in contrast with non-DM counterparts. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [Evaluation of treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    O'Farrill-Santoscoy, Fernando; O'Farrill-Cadena, Marcela; Fragoso-Morales, Lilia Esperanza

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy is a condition that predisposes women to anemia, a problem which is easily solved with the identification of susceptible patients and with proper treatment. To determine the prevalence of anemia in the study group, the characteristics of the patients, and assess the impact of iron therapy in anemic pregnant women. A retrospective study was done in 98 pregnant patients who attended a medical office in San Luis Potosi, S.L.P, between 2010 and 2011. The studied variables were: hemoglobin and hematocrit concentration for anemia diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info-7 for the association between variables. The prevalence of anemia found in the study was 4.08% in the first weeks of gestation. 75% of those patients were overweight or obese, and as the pregnancy progressed prevalence increased to 16.32%. The patients whose anemia was detected between weeks 28-33 of gestation had 4.58 times the risk of having it than those who were detected in the first trimester (p < .05). While anemia was more frequent among women with overweight or obesity 5% (n = 3), no statistically significant difference with normal weight women was observed in early pregnancy. The prevalence of anemia increased as pregnancy progressed, therefore It is necessary that the physician requests the patient 3 or 4 blood studies to keep adequate prenatal care and have the opportunity for early detection of anemia.

  15. An Etiologic Profile of Anemia in 405 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  16. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. American Journal of Hematology. 2006;81(1):65–67. [3] Sekeres M. ... KA, Leporrier M, Rinder HM. Marrow-Damage Anemia: Hematology in Clinical Practice. 5th ed. China: The McGraw- ...

  17. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen ... HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of ...

  18. Red Blood Cell Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inversely Relates to MRI-Assessed Carotid Plaque Lipid Core Burden in Elders at High Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Bargalló, Núria; Gilabert, Rosa; Romero-Mamani, Edwin-Saúl; Cofán, Montserrat; Calder, Philip C; Fitó, Montserrat; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi;