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Sample records for anemia disease locus

  1. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  2. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease.

  3. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  4. The Lbw2 locus promotes autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scatizzi, John C; Haraldsson, Maria K; Pollard, K Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Kono, Dwight H

    2012-04-01

    The lupus-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4; however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. In this study, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of New Zealand White (NZW) on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate its role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants.

  5. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  6. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  7. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  9. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old. PMID:22796620

  10. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  11. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  12. [Comparison of bone marrow and blood cell morphology between refractory anemia and other anemia disease].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hong; Jiang, Ming; DU, Wei; Zhong, Di; Hao, Jian-Ping; Li, Ling

    2012-12-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the cell morphological features of bone marrow and peripheral blood in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, mainly with refractory anemia, and to compare them with other anemia diseases including chronic aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia and megaloblastic anemia. The bone marrow and peripheral blood were taken from patients for preparing the smears with Wright staining. 500 karyocytes in bone marrow and 100 karyocytes in peripheral blood were detected, and the features of morbid cells of erythrocyte, granulocyte and megakaryocytic series were observed. The results showed that differences between refractory anemia, chronic aplastic anemias and hemolytic anemia as well as megaloblastic anemia were statistically significant (P < 0.05) in the granules scarce and absence in the intracytoplasm of segmented neutrocyte in peripheral blood, Pelger dyskaryosis, the numbers and detected rate of immature granulocytes, monocyte detected rate, the granules scarce in all stage of granulocytic series in bone marrow, odd number and prolification of nucleolus in erythrocytic series, little macronucleus and single circle nucleus macronucleus. It is concluded that cell morphology is the foundation of diagnosing the MDS, the abnormality morphology both in peripheral blood and bone marrow play the consequence role in the diagnosis of MDS. PMID:23257446

  13. Anemia, costs and mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Michael T; Zilberberg, Marya D; Schmier, Jordana K; Lau, Edmund C; Shorr, Andrew F

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about cost implications of anemia and its association with mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This claims analysis addresses these questions. Methods Using the the US Medicare claims database (1997–2001), this study identified Medicare enrollees with an ICD-9 diagnosis of COPD. Concomitant anemia was identified based on ICD-9 codes or receipt of transfusions. Persons with anemia secondary to another disease state, a nutritional deficiency or a hereditary disease were excluded. Medicare claims and payments, resource utilization and mortality were compared between COPD patients with and without anemia. Results Of the 132,424 enrollees with a COPD diagnosis, 21% (n = 27,932) had concomitant anemia. At baseline, anemic patients were older, had more co-morbidities and higher rates of health care resource use than non-anemic individuals with COPD. In a univariate analysis annual Medicare payments for persons with anemia were more than double for those without anemia ($1,466 vs. $649, p < 0.001), the direction maintained in all categories of payments. Adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, and other markers of disease severity revealed that anemia was independently associated with $3,582 incremental increase per patient (95% CI: $3,299 to $3,865) in Medicare annual reimbursements. The mortality rate among COPD patients with anemia was 262 vs. 133 deaths per 1,000 person-years among those without anemia (p < 0.001). Conclusion Anemia was present in 21% of COPD patients. Although more prevalent in more severely ill COPD patients, anemia significantly and independently contributes to the costs of care for COPD and is associated with increased mortality. PMID:17042950

  14. Anemias.

    PubMed

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia.

  15. [New insights on hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Dan; Zhou, Dao-Bin

    2009-12-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is normocytic and normochromic. One of the mechanisms is misbalance of iron metabolism. Hepcidin, a kind of protein secreted by liver is considered to be the hormone regulating iron metabolism. It binds to ferroportin and induces the latter one's internalization. Thus, iron transportation from iron storage cells to serum is reduced. Cytokines are elevated in chronic disease. They stimulate hepcidin expression in liver through JAK2/STAT3 pathway. As a result, iron absorption and reabsorption is blocked, which leads to the misbalance of iron metabolism in anemia of chronic disease. In this article, the hepcidin and its relation to iron metabolism and anemia in chronic disease are reviewed.

  16. Hypomutability in Fanconi anemia cells is associated with increased deletion frequency at the HPRT locus

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulo, D.; Guillouf, C.; Moustacchi, E. ); Mohrenweiser, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited human disorder associated with a predisposition to cancer and characterized by anomalies in the processing of DNA cross-links and certain monoadducts. The authors reported previously that the frequency of psoralen-photoinduced mutations at the HPRT locus is lower in FA cells than in normal cells. This hypomutability is shown here to be associated with an increased frequency of deletions in the HPRT gene when either a mixture of cross-links and monoadducts or monoadducts alone are induced. Molecular analysis of mutants in the HPRT gene was carried out. In normal cells the majority of spontaneous and induced mutants are point mutations whereas in FA deletion mutations predominate. In that case a majority of mutants were found to lack individual exons or small clusters of exons whereas in normal cells large (complete or major gene loss) and small deletions are almost equally represented. Thus they propose that the FA defect lies in a mutagenic pathway that, in normal cells, involves by passing lesions and subsequent gap filling by a recombinational process during replication.

  17. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  18. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: an under-estimated problem?

    PubMed

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10 years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and "anemia of chronic diseases" has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

  19. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  20. Anemia and bone disease of chronic kidney disease: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Shemin, Douglas

    2014-12-02

    Anemia and metabolic bone disease accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD), and worsen as CKD progresses. It is likely that both processes contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality seen in CKD. This paper briefly reviews the pathogenesis and diagnosis of anemia and bone disease in CKD, and summarizes recent consensus guidelines for treatment.

  1. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  2. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein inside red blood cells. It gives red blood cells their color. People with anemia do not have enough hemoglobin. The body needs certain vitamins, minerals, and nutrients to make enough red blood cells. Iron, vitamin B12, and folic acid are ...

  4. Periodontal disease and anemias associated with Crohn's disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Swati; Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath L

    2012-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease with oral findings, including periodontal manifestations. Anemias, such as iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), are the most common hematologic complications of CD. Periodontitis has systemic effects, and may tend toward anemia, which can be explained by depressed erythropoiesis. In the report presented here, the authors review a case of Crohn's disease diagnosed 10 years previous to the patient presenting with a changing anemic profile and periodontal disease. A discussion of patient and disease management is included.

  5. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  6. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  7. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD.

  8. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  9. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  10. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  11. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  12. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia associated with gastrointestinal tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Bayraktar, Soley

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a common site of bleeding that may lead to iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Treatment of IDA depends on severity and acuity of patients’ signs and symptoms. While red blood cell transfusions may be required in hemodynamically unstable patients, transfusions should be avoided in chronically anemic patients due to their potential side effects and cost. Iron studies need to be performed after episodes of GI bleeding and stores need to be replenished before anemia develops. Oral iron preparations are efficacious but poorly tolerated due to non-absorbed iron-mediated GI side effects. However, oral iron dose may be reduced with no effect on its efficacy while decreasing side effects and patient discontinuation rates. Parenteral iron therapy replenishes iron stores quicker and is better tolerated than oral therapy. Serious hypersensitive reactions are very rare with new intravenous preparations. While data on worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity by oral iron therapy are not conclusive, parenteral iron therapy still seems to be advantageous in the treatment of IDA in patients with IBD, because oral iron may not be sufficient to overcome the chronic blood loss and GI side effects of oral iron which may mimic IBD exacerbation. Finally, we believe the choice of oral vs parenteral iron therapy in patients with IBD should primarily depend on acuity and severity of patients’ signs and symptoms. PMID:20533591

  13. Localization of the congenital dyserythropoietic anemia II locus to chromosome 20q11.2 by genomewide search.

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, P; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Delaunay, J; Totaro, A; Granatiero, M; Melchionda, S; Zelante, L; Iolascon, A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA) are genetic disorders characterized by anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis. Three main types of CDA have been distinguished: CDA I and CDA III, whose loci have been already mapped, and CDA II (MIM 224100), the most frequent among CDAs, which is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait and is known also as "HEMPAS" (hereditary erythroblast multinuclearity with positive acidified serum). We have recruited a panel of well-characterized CDA II families and have used them to search for the CDA II gene by linkage analysis. After the exclusion of three candidate genes, we ob-tained conclusive evidence for linkage of CDA II to microsatellite markers on the long arm of chromosome 20 (20q11.2). A maximum two-point LOD score of 5.4 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained with marker D20S863. Strong evidence of allelic association with the disease was detected with the same marker. Some recombinational events established a maximum candidate interval of approximately 5 cM. PMID:9345103

  14. Clinical considerations and practical recommendations for the primary care practitioner in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan N

    2007-12-01

    Anemia is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a risk factor for poor disease outcome. Anemia acts as a risk multiplier, significantly increasing the risk of death in anemic versus nonanemic CKD patients with similar comorbidities. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are a mainstay for the treatment of anemia in renal patients on dialysis, but recent data suggests that earlier treatment of anemia in CKD may delay the onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and decrease mortality. Nonetheless, anemia of CKD is under-recognized and undertreated during the period before initiation of dialysis, when anemia correction may have the greatest impact on disease outcome. This report describes anemia in CKD and its association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and poor disease outcome, and offers suggestions for the recognition and treatment of anemia of CKD in the primary care setting.

  15. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Gorin, Michael B; Strom, Samuel P; Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Boone, Philip M; Yuan, Bo; Ayyagari, Radha; Nagy, Peter L; Tsang, Stephen H; Gouras, Peter; Collison, Frederick T; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-12-20

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known ABCA4 exonic mutation revealing, on average, 200 intronic variants per sample. Filtering of these data resulted in 141 candidates for new mutations. Two variants were detected in four samples, two in three samples, and 20 variants in two samples, the remaining 117 new variants were detected only once. Multimodal analysis suggested 12 new likely pathogenic intronic ABCA4 variants, some of which were specific to (isolated) ethnic groups. No copy number variation (large deletions and insertions) was detected in any patient suggesting that it is a very rare event in the ABCA4 locus. Many variants were excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches. PMID:25082829

  16. [Causes, diagnostics and course of disease in 194 cats with anemia].

    PubMed

    Merten, Nina; Weingart, Christiane; Kohn, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common hematological alteration in cats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of different types of anemia and the course of disease in cats with a hematocrit (hct) < 0.26 l/l. In a period of 18 months 194 cats were included and assigned to different anemia groups based on history, physical examination and laboratory parameters. Most cats had acute blood loss anemia (BA; 75/194; 38.7%). Frequent causes were trauma (39/75), hematuria (13/75) and hemostatic disorders (9/75). Anemia of inflammatory and neoplastic disease (AID) occurred in 22.2% (43/194) and hemolytic anemia (HA) in 18% (35/194). Half of those were presumptively immune-mediated (IHA). Four cats were diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma infection. Rare causes of anemia included anemia of renal disease (ARD; 18/194; 9.3%) and intramedullary non-regenerative anemia (INR; 13/194; 6.7%). The latter either had retroviral infection (6/13) or neoplasia (6/13). In cats with HA and INR anemia was often severe and very severe (Hct < 0.14 l/l) and in cats with AID and ARD usually mild (Hct 0.20-0.25 l/l). Cats with BA had significantly lower total protein concentrations than those with INR (p = 0,001), HA, AID and CNE (p < 0,001) and those with HA most often had hyperbilirubinemia (21/27). Blood transfusions were primarily given to cats with BA (37/75) and HA (19/35), especially those with IHA (13/17). 69% of the patients survived the first 14 days after the anemia was detected for the first time. Cats with HA had the highest survival rate.

  17. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: examination of phylogenetically conserved sequences within the locus control region but outside the cores of hypersensitive sites 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, M S; Steinberg, M H

    1997-08-01

    Regulatory elements linked to the beta-globin gene cluster modulates gamma-globin gene expression. The location of all of these elements and their mechanisms of action are still incompletely defined. Phylogenetically conserved DNA within the beta-globin gene cluster locus control region (LCR), but outside the core sequences of its hypersensitive sites (HS), were identified and we searched for any differences between HS 3 and HS 2, and HS 2 and HS 1, among patients with sickle cell anemia with different levels of Hb F who were homozygous for the common haplotypes. DNA was amplified with and without GC clamps, digested with restriction endonucleases, and examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We found limited fragment size diversity. However, the type of differences found and their distribution among haplotypes did not suggest that they represented distinctive changes that might explain the differential expression of the gamma-globin genes in sickle cell anemia.

  18. Sideroblastic anemia as a preleukemic event in patients treated for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, M.; Cosgriff, T.M.; Eyre, H.J.

    1980-05-01

    Sideroblastic anemia after treatment for Hodgkin's disease was seen in two patients 3 years after completion of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. This was followed in both by the development of myelomonoblastic leukemia. No evidence of recurrent Hodgkin's disease was present in either patient. Our observation suggests that development of sideroblastic anemia in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease is probably secondary to the treatment and is a preleukemic event.

  19. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Sung; Bang, Ki Bae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Quality of life is closely related to anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several studies have reported on anemia in patients with IBD in Western countries. This study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with IBD. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 92 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who were followed regularly at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between January 2003 and December 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds used to define anemia were <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women according to the World Health Organization criteria. We chose the lowest Hb level in each year as a representative value because Hb levels changed at each examination and anemia was associated with disease deterioration. The relationship between clinical variables and lowest Hb level was assessed. Results The prevalence of anemia was 36.3% in patients with UC and 41.6% in patients with CD. Anemia in patients with CD was associated with hospital admission, 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) and infliximab treatment in men. Anemia in patients with UC was associated with hospital admission, oral steroid use, thiopurine and infliximab treatment in men. Conclusions The prevalence of anemia in Korean patients with IBD was comparable to that of patients in Western countries. Anemia was associated with male patients with CD who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including 5-ASA and infliximab, and men with UC who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including oral steroids, thiopurine and infliximab. PMID:26884734

  20. Hemolytic anemia as first presentation of Wilson's disease with uncommon ATP7B mutation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xing-Nong; Mao, Li-Ping; Lou, Yin-Jun; Tong, Hong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare inherited disorder of copper metabolism and the main manifestations are liver and brain disorders. Hemolytic anemia is an unusual complication of WD. We describe a 15-year-old girl who developed hemolytic anemia as the first manifestation of Wilson's disease. An Arg952Lys mutation was found in exon 12 of the ATP7B gene, which is uncommon among Chinese Han individuals. From this case and reviews, we can achieve a better understanding of WD. Besides, we may conclude that the probable diagnosis of WD should be considered in young patients with unexplained hemolytic anemia, especially in patients with hepatic and/or neurologic disorder.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia: focus on infectious diseases in lesser developed countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia G; Friedman, Jennifer F

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed.

  2. [Hepcidin as a central mediator of anemia of chronic diseases associated with obesity].

    PubMed

    Villarroel H, Pía; Arredondo O, Miguel; Olivares G, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that obesity-related inflammation may play a central role in hepcidin regulation. Hepcidin is a key regulator ofiron homeostasis and has now been suggested as a central mediator ofiron metabolism disorders involved in the pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease. In this review, we focus on subclinical inflammation in obesity and its effect on hepcidin levels, as the most plausible explanation for the relationship between anemia of chronic disease and obesity.

  3. Advancing a vaccine to prevent hookworm disease and anemia.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A human hookworm vaccine is under development and in clinical trials in Africa and the Americas. The vaccine contains the Na-APR-1 and Na-GST-1 antigens. It elicits neutralizing antibodies that interfere with establishment of the adult hookworm in the gut and the ability of the parasite to feed on blood. The vaccine target product profile is focused on the immunization of children to prevent hookworm infection and anemia caused by Necator americanus. It is intended for use in low- and middle-income countries where hookworm is highly endemic and responsible for at least three million disability-adjusted life years. So far, the human hookworm vaccine is being developed in the non-profit sector through the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (PDP), in collaboration with the HOOKVAC consortium of European and African partners. We envision the vaccine to be incorporated into health systems as part of an elimination strategy for hookworm infection and other neglected tropical diseases, and as a means to reduce global poverty and address the Sustainable Development Goals.

  4. Advancing a vaccine to prevent hookworm disease and anemia.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2016-06-01

    A human hookworm vaccine is under development and in clinical trials in Africa and the Americas. The vaccine contains the Na-APR-1 and Na-GST-1 antigens. It elicits neutralizing antibodies that interfere with establishment of the adult hookworm in the gut and the ability of the parasite to feed on blood. The vaccine target product profile is focused on the immunization of children to prevent hookworm infection and anemia caused by Necator americanus. It is intended for use in low- and middle-income countries where hookworm is highly endemic and responsible for at least three million disability-adjusted life years. So far, the human hookworm vaccine is being developed in the non-profit sector through the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (PDP), in collaboration with the HOOKVAC consortium of European and African partners. We envision the vaccine to be incorporated into health systems as part of an elimination strategy for hookworm infection and other neglected tropical diseases, and as a means to reduce global poverty and address the Sustainable Development Goals. PMID:27040400

  5. Managing dialysis patients who develop anemia caused by chronic kidney disease: focus on peginesatide

    PubMed Central

    Valliant, Amanda; Hofmann, R Michael

    2013-01-01

    Anemia in chronic kidney disease is a prevalent and expensive problem in the United States, and it is well documented that anemia worsens as glomerular filtration rates decline. The complications of severe anemia in this patient population contribute significantly to their overall morbidity with increased cardiovascular complications, decreased quality of life, and increased dependence on transfusions to maintain adequate hemoglobin levels. Erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) have revolutionized the treatment of anemia in this population, but there has been a great deal of controversy surrounding the quest for the ideal hemoglobin target. In addition, there are economic and practice management implications where anemia treatment is concerned, with ongoing refinement of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-bundled payments. One of the newest additions to the arsenal used to fight anemia in end-stage renal disease patients is peginesatide (Omontys), a synthetic, PEGylated, peptide-based ESA that acts by stimulating the erythropoietin receptor. The role of peginesatide in the future treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease remains uncertain, with new safety concerns being brought to attention as it emerges on the market, prompting a national recall. PMID:24023516

  6. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  7. Treating anemia of chronic kidney disease in the primary care setting: cardiovascular outcomes and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Rebecca J; Dalton, Cheryl L

    2007-10-02

    Anemia is an underrecognized but characteristic feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD), associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality. Since their inception nearly two decades ago, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have revolutionized the care of patients with renal anemia, and their use has been associated with improved quality of life and reduced hospitalizations, inpatient costs, and mortality. Hemoglobin targets >/=13 g/dL have been linked with adverse events in recent randomized trials, raising concerns over the proper hemoglobin range for ESA treatment. This review appraises observational and randomized studies of the outcomes of erythropoietic treatment and offers recommendations for managing renal anemia in the primary care setting.

  8. Aplastic anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2010.

    PubMed

    Malcovati, Luca; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Risitano, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of rare hematological disorders belonging to the Bone Marrow Failure (BMF) syndromes. The Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes International Foundation (AA&MDSIF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting patients and families living with a BMF disease. They work to bring investigators together in a collaborative manner. This article summarizes key presentations from the last AA&MDSIF scientific symposium held in Bethesda, Maryland on March 2010.

  9. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  10. A guide to diagnosis of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Fernando; García-López, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID), with or without anemia, is often caused by digestive diseases and should always be investigated, except in very specific situations, as its causes could be serious diseases, such as cancer. Diagnosis of ID is not always easy. Low serum levels of ferritin or transferrin saturation, imply a situation of absolute or functional ID. It is sometimes difficult to differentiate ID anemia from anemia of chronic diseases, which can coexist. In this case, other parameters, such as soluble transferrin receptor activity can be very useful. After an initial evaluation by clinical history, urine analysis, and serological tests for celiac disease, gastroscopy and colonoscopy are the key diagnostic tools for investigating the origin of ID, and will detect the most important and prevalent diseases. If both tests are normal and anemia is not severe, treatment with oral iron can be indicated, along with stopping any treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In the absence of response to oral iron, or if the anemia is severe or clinical suspicion of important disease persists, we must insist on diagnostic evaluation. Repeat endoscopic studies should be considered in many cases and if both still show normal results, investigating the small bowel must be considered. The main techniques in this case are capsule endoscopy, followed by enteroscopy. PMID:19787826

  11. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron.

  12. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia. Results There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25453653

  13. Evaluation of erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters to identify three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, inflammation, and hemoglobinopathies as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β-thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic erythrocytes, hypochromic erythrocytes, and the levels of hemoglobin in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating anemia. Results There was no difference between the groups of iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency for any of the parameters. The percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes was the best parameter to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909 with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic erythrocyte count minus hypochromic erythrocyte count was very accurate to differentiate iron deficiency anemia from heterozygous β-thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005 with a sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices are moderately good to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25818816

  14. Anemia and end-stage renal disease in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Maïz, Hédi Ben; Abderrahim, Ezzeddine; Zouaghi, Karim

    2002-09-01

    In developing countries, multiple comorbidities such as malnutrition, parasitoses, and hemoglobinopathies contribute to the aggravation of anemia observed in patients with end-stage renal diseases. We analyze here the results of a retrospective evaluation of red-cells indices and iron parameters conducted at the end of December 2000 in 304 prevalent Tunisian patients (sex ratio, 1.05; mean age, 53.7 years) receiving chronic hemodialysis for a median duration of 49.6 months (range, 1.6 to 278). Anemia, observed in 87.8% of patients, was normochromic and normocytic in 73% of cases. Only 2% of patients had microcytic and hypochromic anemia. Iron deficiency was observed in 21.6% of anemic patients. The mean rate of hemoglobin was significantly higher in men and in patients with polycystic kidney disease as the cause of renal failure. There was a positive correlation between hemoglobin values and the quality of dialysis. Only 10.8% of patients were on recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) and 38% required regular transfusions. We conclude that anemia observed in our patients had, in most cases, the characteristics of renal anemia and could be attributed to a deficit of renal production of erythropoietin. However, for financial reasons, prescription of rHuEPO is rather restrictive and blood transfusion remains largely used. The nephrology community and dialysis providers should increase their efforts to improve the anemia care of dialyzed patients in developing countries.

  15. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18–75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χ2trend = 675.14, P < 0.001). Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P < 0.001). Only 39.8% of the anemic patients received treatment with erythropoietin and 27.1% patients received iron products; furthermore, 22.7% of the patients started receiving treatment when their Hb level reached 7 g/dL. The target-achieving rate (Hb at 11–12 g/dL) was only 8.2%. Of the 1246 anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure. PMID:27310973

  16. Anemia, chronic renal disease and congestive heart failure--the cardio renal anemia syndrome: the need for cooperation between cardiologists and nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Donald S; Wexler, Dov; Iaina, Adrian; Steinbruch, Shoshana; Wollman, Y; Schwartz, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Many patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) fail to respond to maximal CHF therapy and progress to end stage CHF with many hospitalizations, poor quality of life (QoL), progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) which can lead to end stage kidney disease (ESKD), or die of cardiovascular complications within a short time. One factor that has generally been ignored in many of these people is the fact that they are often anemic. The anemia in CHF is due mainly to the frequently-associated CKD but also to the inhibitory effects of cytokines on erythropoietin production and on bone marrow activity, as well as to their interference with iron absorption from the gut and their inhibiting effect on the release of iron from iron stores. Anemia itself may further worsen cardiac and renal function and make the patients resistant to standard CHF therapy. Indeed anemia in CHF has been associated with increased severity of CHF, increased hospitalization, worse cardiac function and functional class, the need for higher doses of diuretics, progressive worsening of renal function and reduced QoL. In both controlled and uncontrolled studies of CHF, the correction of the anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) and oral or intravenous (IV) iron has been associated with improvement in many cardiac and renal parameters and an increased QoL. EPO itself may also play a direct role in improving the heart unrelated to the improvement of the anemia--by reducing apoptosis of cardiac and endothelial cells, increasing the number of endothelial progenitor cells, and improving endothelial cell function and neovascularization of the heart. Anemia may also play a role in the worsening of acute myocardial infarction and chronic coronary heart disease (CHD) and in the cardiovascular complications of renal transplantation. Anemia, CHF and CKD interact as a vicious circle so as to cause or worsen each other- the so-called cardio renal anemia syndrome. Only adequate treatment of all three conditions can

  17. [Anemia and iron deficiency in children with chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Barja, Salesa; Capo, Eduardo; Briceño, Lilian; Jakubson, Leticia; Méndez, Mireya; Becker, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: Los niños con enfermedades respiratorias crónicas (ERC) tienen mayor riesgo de desarrollar anemia ferropriva, sin embargo, la ferropenia está infradiagnosticada. Objetivos: Describir el status de hierro (Fe) en niños con ERC y evaluar la respuesta a su suplementación profiláctica. Método: Estudio prospectivo de niños con ERC y adecuada ingesta de Fe en la dieta: se realizó hemograma, velocidad de eritro-sedimentación, proteína Creactiva y perfil de Fe. Posteriormente, aquellos con hemoglobina plasmática (Hb) normal no se suplementaron con Fe (Grupo A) y los que presentaban anemia ferropriva o factores de riesgo sí lo fueron (grupo B). Se evaluaron al 3º mes, después se suplementaron todos y se re-evaluaron al 4ºmes. Resultados: De 40 pacientes, con mediana de edad 30 meses (0,5 a 178), 60% eran hombres, 80% eutróficos. Requerían ventilación prolongada u oxigenoterapia 45%. Diagnósticos: 50% Bronquiolitis Obliterante post-infecciosa, 17,5% enfermedades de la vía aérea, 10% Displasia Broncopulmonar, 7,5% Fibrosis Quística y 15% otros. Basalmente 12,5% tuvo bajos depósitos de Fe y 20% anemia (la mayoría ferropriva). Completaron el estudio 25 niños: el grupo A disminuyó la ferritina sérica al 3ºmes (- 22,9 ± 30) y aumentó al 4ºmes (+12,8 ± 26) μg/L, (p = 0,013), sin cambio en la Hb. El grupo B tuvo ascenso de la Hb (91 ± 12 a 102 ± 12% del promedio para la edad, p = 0,04). Conclusión: La anemia ferropriva y la ferropenia son frecuentes en niños con ERC, quienes deterioran reversiblemente sus depósitos si no son suplementados. Sugerimos monitorizar con perfil de Fe y tratar precozmente, o suplementarlos en forma profiláctica.

  18. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  19. Association and heterogeneity at the GAPDH locus in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mariet; Cox, Claire; Belbin, Olivia; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina D; Wilcox, Samantha L; Howell, Chanley C; Hunter, Talisha A; Culley, Oliver; Walker, Louise P; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GAPDH) and its paralogs were implicated in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), although the strength and direction of association have not been consistent. We genotyped 3 previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs3741916-GAPDH 5' UTR, rs2029721-pGAPD, and rs4806173-GAPDHS) in 3 case-control series (2112 cases and 3808 controls). Rs3741916 showed the strongest LOAD association (p = 0.003). The minor allele of rs3741916 showed a protective effect in our combined series (odds ratio [OR] = 0.87%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.79-0.96). This is consistent with results from the 2 published follow-up studies and in opposite direction of the original report. Meta-analysis of the published series with ours suggests presence of heterogeneity (Breslow-Day p < 0.0001). Meta-analysis of only the follow-up series including ours revealed a significant protective effect for the minor allele of rs3741916 (OR = 0.85%, 95% CI = 0.76-0.96, p = 0.009). Our results support the presence of LOAD variants and heterogeneity at the GAPDH locus. The most promising rs3741916 variant is unlikely to be functional given opposing effects in different series. Identification of functional variant(s) in this region likely awaits deep sequencing.

  20. [Peripheral blood monocyte hepcidin in patients with multiple myeloma is associated with anemia of chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Zhou, Dao-Bin; Duan, Ming-Hui; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Jie-Ping; Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Shen, Ti; Wu, Yong-Ji

    2013-04-01

    Disorders of iron utilization caused by abnormal elevation of hepcidin levels are the main mechanism of anemia of chronic disease. Hepcidin is mainly produced by the liver. Recently it has been found that monocytes are another source of hepcidin. The increased hepcidin in serum and urine of multiple myeloma patients may be one cause of anemia of chronic disease (ACD). However it is unclear whether the peripheral blood monocyte hepcidin is involved in the pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease. This study was purposed to investigate the role of monocyte hepcidin in multiple myeloma patients with anemia of chronic disease. The clinical data and peripheral venous blood of multiple myeloma patients were collected.Serum concentration of IL-6 and TNF-α was detected by ELISA. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated by CD14(+) magnetic beads. Hepcidin, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA of monocytes were detected by real time quantitative PCR. The results showed that the expression level of monocyte hepcidin mRNA in myeloma patients was higher than that in normal controls. In untreated patients, the expression level of monocyte hepcidin mRNA was negatively correlated with hemoglobin, and positively correlated with serum ferritin and IL-6 levels, but unrelated with TNF-α levels.It is concluded that the increased monocyte hepcidin levels in multiple myeloma patients may play an etiologic role in ACD.

  1. Two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Takagishi, Katsushige; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) associated with megaloblastic anemia in Japanese elderly patients. Case 1 was a 67-year-old male and Case 2 was a 55-year-old male. Both patients were diagnosed with primary CAD, with continuously high cold agglutinin titers (1 : >8,192 and 1 : 16,834, resp.), monoclonal IgM-kappa light chains, and no underlying disease. In addition, both patients had megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. One patient received rituximab and both received vitamin 12 supplementation. To date, no cooccurrence of primary CAD and megaloblastic anemia has been emphasized. Thus, the association of these hematological diseases may be incidental; however, given that CAD is an autoimmune disease which may show antibodies against intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cells, this association was thought to be probably not a coincidence. Clinicians should be aware of the possible simultaneous presence of autoimmune hemolytic/megaloblastic anemia in patients with primary CAD. PMID:25918651

  2. New expectations in the treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Juan M; Abad, Soraya; Vega, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The new drugs developed for the treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease patients, together with their mechanisms of action are reviewed. At present, many of them are already in advanced stages of clinical trials and is expected to be incorporated into the therapeutic arsenal in the coming years. The potential benefits and possible limitations are also described.

  3. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): bone marrow failure disease scientific symposium 2012.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Pulsipher, Michael A; Romano, Alessandra; Berlyne, Deborah

    2013-07-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) are rare disorders of bone marrow failure. Once considered distinct entities, these three diseases are now believed to have overlapping pathophysiologies. The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports patients and families living with bone marrow failure disorders, sponsored a scientific symposium in Bethesda, MD, in March 2012. This report summarizes the symposium presentations by 30 of the world's leading AA, MDS, and PNH researchers on recent findings, current areas of controversy, and recommendations for basic and clinical research to advance the field.

  4. Postoperative Recurrence of Invasive Thymoma with Cold Agglutinin Disease and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Taro; Koba, Hayato; Tanimura, Kota; Ogawa, Naohiko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hara, Johsuke; Abo, Miki; Sone, Takashi; Kimura, Hideharu; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital in 1995. Invasive thymoma was diagnosed and extended thymectomy and left upper lobe partial resection were performed. In 2013, he complained of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma. Several chemotherapies were administered. Severe anemia and an increase in the total bilirubin level were observed with chemotherapies. In additional, an examination showed that the direct Coombs test was positive. Cold agglutinin was also high. We herein experienced a rare case of postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma with cold agglutinin disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:27629968

  5. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... over time as the disease progresses. Low red cell count (anemia) can cause: Fatigue Pallor (paleness) Rapid heart ... with exercise Weakness Lightheadedness upon standing Low white cell count (leukopenia) causes an increased risk for infection. Low ...

  6. Hepcidin in anemia of chronic kidney disease: review for the pediatric nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Meredith A; White, Colin T

    2012-01-01

    Anemia coincident with hyporesponsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents is an ongoing and prevalent problem in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The recently identified iron-regulatory protein hepcidin appears likely to play a significant role in this problem. Hepcidin up-regulation in the setting of CKD, with subsequent increased serum levels, results in impaired iron absorption from the intestine and decreased iron release from body storage sites. Ultimately, in the setting of such elevated levels, a state of functional iron deficiency may develop and lead to anemia due to iron-restricted erythropoiesis. Elevated hepcidin levels are expected in the face of decreased glomerular filtration rate and inflammation. Based on current evidence, it seems likely that hepcidin represents a potentially modifiable mediator of anemia of CKD and is thus a potential target for future anemia therapy. Currently, increased removal via intensified dialysis and-/or blockade of the inflammatory pathway appear to be two viable generic strategies for reducing hepcidin levels. Goals of directly manipulating the hepcidin pathway should offer the pediatric clinician new options for treating the complex anemia associated with CKD.

  7. Treating anemia of chronic kidney disease in the primary care setting: cardiovascular outcomes and management recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Rebecca J; Dalton, Cheryl L

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is an underrecognized but characteristic feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD), associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality. Since their inception nearly two decades ago, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have revolutionized the care of patients with renal anemia, and their use has been associated with improved quality of life and reduced hospitalizations, inpatient costs, and mortality. Hemoglobin targets ≥13 g/dL have been linked with adverse events in recent randomized trials, raising concerns over the proper hemoglobin range for ESA treatment. This review appraises observational and randomized studies of the outcomes of erythropoietic treatment and offers recommendations for managing renal anemia in the primary care setting. PMID:17910755

  8. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  9. Role of Anemia in Home Oxygen Therapy in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Fulambarker, Ashok; Molnar, Janos; Nadeem, Rashid; McCormack, Charles; Ganesh, Aarthi; Kheir, Fayez; Hamon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a known comorbidity found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Hypoxemia is common and basically due to ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in COPD. Anemia, by decreasing arterial oxygen content, may be a contributing factor for decreased delivery of oxygen to tissues. The objective of this study is to determine if anemia is a factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen therapy. The study was designed as a retrospective, cross-sectional, observational chart review. Patients who were referred for home oxygen therapy evaluation were selected from the computerized patient record system. Demographic data, oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise, pulmonary function test results, hemoglobin level, medications, reason for anemia, comorbid diseases, and smoking status were recorded. The χ tests, independent sample t tests, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Only 356 of total 478 patient referrals had a diagnosis of COPD over a 2-year period. Although 39 of them were excluded, 317 patients were included in the study. The overall rate of anemia was 38% in all COPD patients. Anemia was found significantly more frequent in COPD patients on home oxygen therapy (46%) than those not on home oxygen therapy (18.5%) (P < 0.0001). Mean saturation of peripheral oxygen values were significantly lower in anemic COPD patients both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001). Also, in COPD patients, age, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease class, smoking status, hemoglobin level, hematocrit, percent of forced expiratory volume in first second, forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity, residual volume/total lung volume, percent of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity were significantly different between home oxygen therapy and those not on home oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression showed that anemia remained a strong predictor for long-term oxygen therapy use in

  10. Hemoptysis in patients of celiac disease with disproportionately severe anemia: tip of the iceberg?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis (IPH) is characterized by the triad of iron deficiency anemia, pulmonary infiltrates and haemoptysis with no recognizable cause. Since the first description of its association with Celiac Disease (CD) by Lane and Hamilton in 1971, only a few isolated cases have been reported in literature. Although it has been considered an uncommon association of two disease entities, recent reports indicate that prevalence of celiac disease is as high as one percent. Further, individually both celiac disease and IPH are known to present as refractory anemia only. We are reporting a young adult with Lane Hamilton Syndrome, who realized that he was having significant gastrointestinal complaints only when they disappeared on gluten free diet (GFD). This case report reiterates the fact that celiac disease should be considered in all patients of IPH because of the therapeutic implications. Further on review of literature, we believe that covert hemoptysis may be responsible for disproportionately severe anemia in patients of celiac disease. Thus, prevalence of this association may be more than currently believed. Further research in this regard may improve our understanding of pathogenesis of celiac disease. PMID:23514358

  11. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency (malabsorption); Anemia - intrinsic factor; Anemia - IF; Anemia - atrophic gastritis ... causes of pernicious anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune ...

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  13. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send ... develop during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid (folate) and changes in the ...

  14. Dental Perspective of Rare Disease of Fanconi Anemia: Case Report with Review

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Bhushan, Urvashi; Goswami, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an extremely rare genetic disease characterized by chromosomal instability that induces congenital alterations in individuals. It causes defective hemopoiesis ultimately leading to bone marrow failure. Patients are susceptible to recurrent infections and increased risk of hemorrhage, as well as delayed and poor wound healing. Herein, we report a case of Fanconi anemia in which various classical signs of the disease were present. The patient has been on regular follow-up since three and a half years for management of dental problems. The different aspects of this rare disorder are discussed with emphasis on oral manifestations and their influence on the general health of affected patients. Due to an increased susceptibility to developing cancers in this specific population, it is imperative for pediatric dentists to know about the common oral manifestations and potentially cancerous lesions, in order to make an early diagnosis and provide comprehensive care and maintenance of oral health in affected individuals. PMID:27013901

  15. The Cost-Effectiveness of Anemia Treatment for Persons with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarnoff, Benjamin O.; Hoerger, Thomas J.; Simpson, Siobhan A.; Pavkov, Meda E.; Burrows, Nilka R.; Shrestha, Sundar S.; Williams, Desmond E.; Zhuo, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Background Although major guidelines uniformly recommend iron supplementation and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) for managing chronic anemia in persons with chronic kidney disease (CKD), there are differences in the recommended hemoglobin (Hb) treatment target and no guidelines consider the costs or cost-effectiveness of treatment. In this study, we explored the most cost-effective Hb target for anemia treatment in persons with CKD stages 3–4. Methods and Findings The CKD Health Policy Model was populated with a synthetic cohort of persons over age 30 with prevalent CKD stages 3–4 (i.e., not on dialysis) and anemia created from the 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), computed as incremental cost divided by incremental quality adjusted life years (QALYs), were assessed for Hb targets of 10 g/dl to 13 g/dl at 0.5 g/dl increments. Targeting a Hb of 10 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,111 compared with no treatment and targeting a Hb of 10.5 g/dl resulted in an ICER of $32,475 compared with a Hb target of 10 g/dl. QALYs increased to 4.63 for a Hb target of 10 g/dl and to 4.75 for a target of 10.5 g/dl or 11 g/dl. Any treatment target above 11 g/dl increased medical costs and decreased QALYs. Conclusions In persons over age 30 with CKD stages 3–4, anemia treatment is most cost-effective when targeting a Hb level of 10.5 g/dl. This study provides important information for framing guidelines related to treatment of anemia in persons with CKD. PMID:27404556

  16. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    PubMed

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS. PMID:26415323

  17. Anemia in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and the Potential Role of Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Amber; Logomarsino, John V

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the role of anemia on patient outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the potential contribution that low iron stores may play in this process, and possible treatment considerations. A review of research studies found that anemia is associated with declining functional outcomes, increased health care utilization and costs, and increased mortality in COPD. Associations exist between reduced iron intake and progression of COPD and in reduction of iron status with declining lung function. Currently data are limited on the effects of either treating anemia or utilizing iron supplementation in anemic COPD patients. If iron supplementation might therefore reverse some of the declines that patients experience, then routine screening and treatment may turn out to be an effective, simple and inexpensive intervention. Iron supplementation models utilized in other inflammatory-related disease states were reviewed as a possible starting point to evaluate treatment options in COPD. Future research can be directed to establish best practice standards for the use of iron supplementation in COPD.

  18. [Treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease--position statement of the Croatian Society for Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation and review of the KDIGO and ERPB guidelines].

    PubMed

    Rački, Sanjin; Bašić-Jukić, Nikolina; Kes, Petar; Ljutić, Dragan; Lovčić, Vesna; Prkačin, Ingrid; Radić, Josipa; Vujičić, Božidar; Bubić, Ivan; Jakić, Marko; Belavić, Žarko; Sefer, Siniša; Pehai, Mario; Klarić, Dragan; Gulin, Marijana

    2014-04-01

    Renal anemia is the result of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and deteriorates with disease progression. Anemia may be the first sign of kidney disease. In all patients with anemia and CKD, diagnostic evaluation is required. Prior to diagnosing renal anemia, it is necessary to eliminate the other possible causes. Direct correlation between the concentration of hemoglobin and the stage of renal failure is well known. Early development of anemia is common in diabetic patients. Correction of anemia may slow the progression of CKD. Anemia is an independent risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD. Treatment of anemia in patients with CKD is based on current guidelines. Recently, the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group has produced comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia in CKD patients and ERBP (European Renal Best Practice) group its position statement and comments on the KDIGO guidelines. The Croatian Society of Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation (HDNDT) has already published its own guidelines based on the recommendations and positive experience of European and international professional societies, as well as on own experience. The latest version of Croatian guidelines was published in 2008. Since then, on the basis of research and clinical practice, there have been numerous changes in the modern understanding of the treatment of anemia in CKD. Consequently, HDNDT hereby publishes a review of the recent recommendations of international professional societies, expressing the attitude about treating anemia in CKD as a basis for new guidelines tailored to the present time.

  19. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-12-25

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy.

  20. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF.

  1. Resistance to Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Disease Associated Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms explaining the persistence of anemia and resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD)-associated anemia with formation of anti-rHuEPO antibodies. The remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy was used to test a long-term (nine weeks) high dose of rHuEPO (200 UI/kg bw/week) treatment. Hematological and biochemical parameters were evaluated as well as serum and tissue (kidney, liver and/or duodenum) protein and/or gene expression of mediators of erythropoiesis, iron metabolism and tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and fibrosis. Long-term treatment with a high rHuEPO dose is associated with development of resistance to therapy as a result of antibodies formation. In this condition, serum EPO levels are not deficient and iron availability is recovered by increased duodenal absorption. However, erythropoiesis is not stimulated, and the resistance to endogenous EPO effect and to rHuEPO therapy results from the development of a hypoxic, inflammatory and fibrotic milieu in the kidney tissue. This study provides new insights that could be important to ameliorate the current therapeutic strategies used to treat patients with CKD-associated anemia, in particular those that become resistant to rHuEPO therapy. PMID:26712750

  2. Origin and maintenance of a broad-spectrum disease resistance locus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shunyuan; Emerson, Brent; Ratanasut, Kumrop; Patrick, Elaine; O'Neill, Carmel; Bancroft, Ian; Turner, John G

    2004-09-01

    The broad-spectrum mildew resistance genes RPW8.1 and RPW8.2 define a unique type of plant disease resistance (R) gene, and so far homologous sequences have been found in Arabidopsis thaliana only, which suggests a recent origin. In addition to RPW8.1 and RPW8.2, the RPW8 locus contains three homologs of RPW8, HR1, HR2, and HR3, which do not contribute to powdery mildew resistance. To investigate whether RPW8 has originated recently, and if so the processes involved, we have isolated and analyzed the syntenic RPW8 loci from Arabidopsis lyrata, and from Brassica rapa and B. oleracea. The A. lyrata locus contains four genes orthologous to HR1, HR2, HR3, and RPW8.2, respectively. Two syntenic loci have been characterized in Brassica; one locus contains three genes and is present in both B. oleracea and B. rapa, and the other locus contains a single gene and is detected in B. rapa only. The Brassica homologs have highest similarity to HR3. Sequence analyses suggested that the RPW8 gene family in Brassicaceae originated from an HR3-like ancestor gene through a series of duplications and that RPW8.1 and RPW8.2 evolved from functional diversification through positive selection several MYA. Examination of the sequence polymorphism of 32 A. thaliana accessions at the RPW8 locus and their disease reaction phenotypes revealed that the polymorphic RPW8 locus defines a major source of resistance to powdery mildew diseases. A possible evolutionary mechanism by which functional polymorphism at the AtRPW8 locus has been maintained in contemporary populations of A. thaliana is discussed.

  3. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  4. Association of anemia and erythropoiesis stimulating agents with inflammatory biomarkers in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Keithi-Reddy, Sai Ram; Addabbo, Francesco; Patel, Tejas V.; Mittal, Bharati V.; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Singh, Ajay K.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important predictors of cardiovascular mortality especially in patients with chronic kidney disease. Here we explored the relationship of anemia and epoetin treatment to inflammatory cytokine levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. One hundred non-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease over 18 years of age were evenly split into anemic and non-anemic cohorts. Of the 50 anemic patients, 23 were receiving erythropoiesis stimulating agents treatments. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were found to be significantly higher and serum albumin was significantly lower with trends towards higher interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in anemic compared to non-anemic patients. Further analysis by multiple logistic regression found that anemic patients treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents had significantly higher odds for the upper two quartiles for IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α compared to non-anemic patients. Our study found that the anemia of chronic kidney disease was associated with up regulation of TNF-α, and possibly IL-6 and IL-8 along with increased levels of these proinflammatory cytokines in patients treated with epoetin. PMID:18547996

  5. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  6. Newly Diagnosed Anemia Increases Risk of Parkinson’s disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chien Tai; Huang, Yao Hsien; Liu, Hung Yi; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chan, Lung; Chien, Li-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and low hemoglobin have been identified to increase Parkinson’s disease (PD) risk. This population-based cohort study investigated PD risk in newly diagnosed anemic patients by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. All newly diagnosed anemic patients (n = 86,334) without a history of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, major operations, or blood loss diseases were enrolled. A cohort of nonanemic controls, 1:1 matched with anemic patients on the basis of the demographics and pre-existing medical conditions, was also included. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate PD risk in anemic patients compared with that in their matched controls. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of PD risk in the anemic patients was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22–1.52, p < 0.001). Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) patients tended to exhibit a higher PD risk (aHR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.24–1.79, p < 0.001). Furthermore, Iron supplement did not significantly affect the PD risk: the aHRs for PD risk were 1.32 (95% CI: 1.07–1.63, p < 0.01) and 1.86 (95% CI: 1.46–2.35, p < 0.001) in IDA patients with and without iron supplementation, respectively. The population-based cohort study indicated newly diagnosed anemia increases PD risk. PMID:27412825

  7. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF): Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2014.

    PubMed

    Visconte, Valeria; Lindsley, R Coleman; Berlyne, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by a failure of the hematopoietic stem cells to produce adequate blood cells, resulting in either cytopenia (defect in one or more blood cell lineages) or pancytopenia (defect in all blood cell lineages). BMFS can be inherited or acquired. The pathogenesis of these diseases is very heterogeneous. Research efforts have been made all over the world to improve the basic knowledge of these diseases. The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation (AA&MDSIF) is an independent nonprofit organization whose mission is to help patients and family members cope with BMFS. Here, we summarize novel scientific discoveries in several BMFS that were presented at the 4th International Bone Marrow Failure Disease Scientific Symposium 2014 that AA&MDSIF sponsored on March 27-28, 2014, in Rockville, MD.

  8. Prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in Chinese patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease: First multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Shi, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming; Peng, Ai; Jiang, Geng-Ru; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Ni, Zhao-Hui; He, Li-Qun; Niu, Jian-Ying; Wang, Nian-Song; Mei, Chang-Lin; Xu, Xu-Dong; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Wei-Jie; Yan, Hai-Dong; Deng, Yue-Yi; Yu, Chen; Cen, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Nan

    2016-06-01

    This was the first multicenter, cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of anemia, patient awareness, and treatment status in China. Data of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; age, 18-75 years; both out- and inpatients) from 25 hospitals in Shanghai, seeking medical treatment at the nephrology department, were collected between July 1, 2012 and August 31, 2012. The prevalence, awareness, and treatment of anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD (ND-CKD) were assessed. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin (Hb) levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. A total of 2420 patients with ND-CKD were included. Anemia was established in 1246 (51.5%) patients: 639 (51.3%) men and 607 (48.7%) women. The prevalence of anemia increased with advancing CKD stage (χtrend = 675.14, P < 0.001). Anemia was more prevalent in patients with diabetic nephropathy (68.0%) than in patients with hypertensive renal damage (56.6%) or chronic glomerulonephritis (46.1%, both P < 0.001). Only 39.8% of the anemic patients received treatment with erythropoietin and 27.1% patients received iron products; furthermore, 22.7% of the patients started receiving treatment when their Hb level reached 7 g/dL. The target-achieving rate (Hb at 11-12 g/dL) was only 8.2%. Of the 1246 anemia patients, only 7.5% received more effective and recommended intravenous supplementation. Anemia is highly prevalent in patients with ND-CKD in China, with a low target-achieving rate and poor treatment patterns. The study highlights the need to improve multiple aspects of CKD management to delay the progression of renal failure. PMID:27310973

  9. Interstitial lung disease in an adult with Fanconi anemia: Clues to the pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, W.S.; Wenger, S.L.; Hoffman, R.M.

    1997-03-31

    We have studied a 38-year-old man with a prior diagnosis of Holt-Oram syndrome, who presented with diabetes mellitus. He had recently taken prednisone for idiopathic interstitial lung disease and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for sinusitis. Thrombocytopenia progressed to pancytopenia. The patient had skeletal, cardiac, renal, cutaneous, endocrine, hepatic, neurologic, and hematologic manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). Chest radiographs showed increased interstitial markings at age 25, dyspnea began in his late 20s, and he stopped smoking at age 32. At age 38, computerized tomography showed bilateral upper lobe fibrosis, lower lobe honeycombing, and bronchiectasis. Pulmonary function tests, compromised at age 29, showed a moderately severe obstructive and restrictive pattern by age 38. Serum alpha-1 antitrypsin level was 224 (normal 85-213) mg/dL and PI phenotype was M1. Karyotype was 46,X-Y with a marked increase in chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by diepoxybutane. The early onset and degree of pulmonary disease in this patient cannot be fully explained by environmental or known genetic causes. The International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) contains no example of a similar pulmonary presentation. Gene-environment (ecogenetic) interactions in FA seem evident in the final phenotype. The pathogenic mechanism of lung involvement in FA may relate to oxidative injury and cytokine anomalies. 49 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Moran, L J; Carey, P; Johnson, C A

    1992-06-01

    The cost-effectiveness of epoetin alfa therapy for anemia in 20 patients with end-stage renal disease was retrospectively studied. Ten patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) were given subcutaneous epoetin alfa as part of a multicenter, protocol-controlled study of the efficacy of epoetin alfa. Ten patients on in-center hemodialysis were given intravenous epoetin alfa as part of their routine clinical care. Change in hematocrit was used as the measure of effectiveness of epoetin alfa. Medication, laboratory, and transfusion costs were monitored for the six months preceding the initiation of epoetin alfa and the first six months of treatment. The cost of therapy increased for all patients by an average of $2722 +/- 1118; transfusion costs decreased, whereas medication and laboratory costs increased. Laboratory costs were significantly greater in CAPD patients than in hemodialysis patients during epoetin alfa therapy; no significant differences in medication costs or transfusion costs were noted between the groups. The mean increase in hematocrit for all patients was 7.4 volume percent. Following the initial change in hematocrit, further therapeutic response did not appear to be determined by increasing expenditures. Epoetin alfa was shown to be effective in treating anemia in patients with end-stage renal disease, but it was associated with higher costs of therapy.

  12. [George H. Whipple. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1934. Whipple's disease, pernicious anemia, and other contributions to medicine].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    George Hoyot Whipple (1878-1976) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1934, along with Minot and Murphy for their studies in pernicious anemia. Whipple's name has been given to the bacterial disease which he describes in 1907 that we know today as Whipple's disease or intestinal lipodystrophy. He gave the name of thalasemia to the Mediterranean anemia of Cooley, and made diverse contributions to hematology and general pathology. He worked with William Welch in the Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and later became director of the University of Rochester. He died in 1976 at the age of 98.

  13. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  14. The Huntington disease locus is most likely within 325 kilobases of the chromosome 4p telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, N.A.; Cheng, J.F.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1989-12-01

    The genetic defect responsible for Huntington disease was originally localized near the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 by genetic linkage to the locus D4S10. Several markers closer to Huntington disease have since been isolated, but these all appear to be proximal to the defect. A physical map that extends from the most distal of these loci, D4S90, to the telomere of chromosome 4 was constructed. This map identifies at least two CpG islands as markers for Huntington disease candidate genes and places the most likely location of the Huntington disease defect remarkably close (within 325 kilobases) to the telomere.

  15. Exclusion mapping of the hereditary dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy gene from the Huntington's disease locus.

    PubMed

    Kondo, I; Ohta, H; Yazaki, M; Ikeda, J E; Gusella, J F; Kanazawa, I

    1990-02-01

    Hereditary dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. Clinical and genetic findings in hereditary DRPLA are very similar to those of Huntington's disease (HD). However, it can be differentiated from HD by the pathological findings of dentatorubral and pallidoluysian atrophies and by a lack of prominent atrophy of the striatum at necropsy. The hereditary DRPLA gene has not been localised and the possibility that the two disease loci are allelic has been suggested. We have searched for linkage between the locus for hereditary DRPLA and D4S10 using the G8 probe, which is a genetic marker linked to HD. In four families, there were negative scores at all recombination fractions and the lod score was -2.215 at recombination fraction theta = 0.15. These data indicate that the locus for hereditary DRPLA is not closely linked to D4S10 and that hereditary DRPLA is a distinct disease from HD.

  16. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities. PMID:26861098

  17. [Maternal Crohn's disease-related vitamin B12 deficient megaloblastic anemia in an infant].

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Wataru; Yamaoka, Masayoshi; Yokoi, Kentaro; Iwahashi, Megumi; Inage, Yuka; Arihiro, Seiji; Koganei, Kazutaka; Sugita, Akira; Ida, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We report an 11-month-old breast-fed boy with feeding difficulties, lethargy, and developmental delay. Blood examination showed pancytopenia and decreased serum levels of vitamin B12. Anisocytosis and poikilocytes were detected in his peripheral blood, and increased megaloblastosis without leukemic cells was detected in his bone marrow. After the diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency, symptoms were improved by vitamin B12 administration. Further investigation of the mother identified Crohn's disease and suggested that the supply of vitamin B12 from the mother to the infant, via the placenta during pregnancy and via breast milk after birth, was decreased due to impaired absorption of vitamin B12 in the mother's small intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging of the boy's brain on admission showed cerebral cortex atrophy which had improved by the age of 1 year and 10 months after vitamin B12 treatment, though developmental delay was still evident at the age of 3 years. Infantile vitamin B12 deficiency often presents with nonspecific manifestations, such as developmental delay and failure to thrive, in addition to anemia and is thus not easily diagnosed. To prevent severe neurological sequelae, this condition must be rapidly diagnosed, because a prolonged duration increases the risk of permanent disabilities.

  18. A study of human leukocyte D locus related antigens in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Farid, N R; Sampson, L; Noel, E P; Barnard, J M; Mandeville, R; Larsen, B; Marshall, W H; Carter, N D

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them.

  19. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Relation to Respiratory Disease and Social Behaviors In Low-Income Infants in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Examined a sample of 177 infants (age 9 through 12 months) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from low-income French, African, and North African Muslim families in Paris. Found a higher than normal incidence of otitis media and respiratory diseases such as bronchitis among the infants. Also examined the relationship between infant IDA and child…

  20. Evaluation of Anemia Management by Algorithms in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Who Are Not Receiving Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jenelle; Leung, Marianna; Beaulieu, Monica; Levin, Adeera; Burnett, Shelley; Zienkiewicz, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anemia commonly develops in patients with chronic kidney disease and is strongly associated with adverse clinical outcomes. There are currently no published studies evaluating the efficacy of a nurse-driven anemia-management protocol for patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of an anemia-management protocol in terms of achieving hemoglobin and transferrin saturation levels within the target range, as well as associated utilization of medications, relative to individualized dosing of medications by nephrologists. Methods: An algorithm for nurse-driven management of anemia was introduced in April 2009 at a kidney function clinic in a large urban centre. The charts of patients with chronic kidney disease who were not undergoing dialysis were reviewed before (July to December 2007) and after (July to December 2009) implementation of the protocol. Patients’ data for hemoglobin, transferrin saturation, and doses of iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were collected for each of the 6-month study periods. Results: In total, 390 patients were treated for anemia before and 434 patients after introduction of the protocol. The anemia-management protocol was non-inferior to individualized dosing for maintenance of hemoglobin levels within the target range of 110–120 g/L: percentage of measured levels within target range 33.3% (485/1456) before versus 34.2% (504/1472) after (absolute difference 0.9 percentage points, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.5 to 4.4). The criteria for non-inferiority were not met for maintenance of transferrin saturation within the target range of 22%–50%: percentage of levels within target range 58.8% (374/636) before versus 56.9% (403/708) after (absolute difference 1.9 percentage points, 95% CI −3.4 to 7.2). There were no statistically significant differences in mean doses of epoetin alfa, darbepoetin, or iron before and after introduction of the protocol

  1. Allelic association at the D14S43 locus in early onset Alzheimer`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, A.; Tardieu, S.; Campion, D.; Martinez, M.

    1995-04-24

    The D14S43 marker is closely linked to the major gene for early onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer`s disease on chromosome 14. Allelic frequencies at the D14S43 locus were compared in 113 familial and isolated cases of early onset Alzheimer`s disease (<60 years of age at onset) (EOAD) and 109 unaffected individuals of the same geographic origin. Allele 7 was significantly (P = 0.033) more frequent in type 1 EOAD patients (13.2%), defined by the presence of at least another first degree relative with EOAD, than in controls (4.1%). Since an autosomal dominant gene is probably responsible for type 1 patients, allelic association may reflect linkage disequilibrium at the D14S43 locus. This would mean that some patients share a common ancestral mutation. However, since multiple tests were carried out, this result must be interpreted with caution, and needs confirmation in an independent sample. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Design and sample-size considerations in the detection of linkage disequilibrium with a disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.M.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of linkage disequilibrium between closely linked loci can aid in the fine mapping of disease loci. The authors investigate the power of several designs for sampling individuals with different disease genotypes. As expected, haplotype data provide the greatest power for detecting disequilibrium, but, in the absence of parental information to resolve the phase of double heterozygotes, the most powerful design samples only individuals homozygous at the trait locus. For rare diseases, such a scheme is generally not feasible, and the authors also provide power and sample-size calculations for designs that sample heterozygotes. The results provide information useful in planning disequilibrium studies. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  4. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  5. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  6. Polyvinylpyrrolidone storage disease presenting as pathologic fracture and anemia: report of a case with imprint cytology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chih; Chang, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Chien-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) storage disease can be caused by local injection and systemic parenteral administration of PVP-containing solutions. PVP has been used as plasma expander, a retardant in certain medicines, components of food additive, and hair care products. High-molecular-weight PVP polymers are prevented from renal excretion and are retained in the reticuloendothelial system. The clinical manifestations include skin lesions and hematologic and orthopedic complications because of bone marrow failure and bony destruction with infiltration of PVP storage histiocytes. Herein, we report a 65-year-old female patient with PVP storage disease presenting as femoral fracture and anemia. In our case, some gelatinous material was noted atthe fracture site, and the initial clinical impression was bony tumor or metastatic lesion. Imprint cytology showed some atypical cells exhibiting foamy cytoplasm and vacuoles. The biopsy specimen revealed that some blue-grayish, vacuolated cells infiltrate in the bone marrow spaces and regional soft tissue near fracture site. The unusual morphology caused a diagnostic dilemma, with the differential diagnosis, including metastatic carcinoma, chordoma, liposarcoma, and hereditary storage disease. The vacuolated cells were positive for CD68, mucicarmine, and Congo red stains, but negative for CK (AE1/AE3) and S-100 protein. Combing the patient's history with long-term intravenous supplement of PVP-containing blood solutions, PVP storage disease involving the bone and regional soft tissue was diagnosed.

  7. Lafora disease is not linked to the Unverricht-Lundborg locus

    SciTech Connect

    Labauge, P.; Beck, C.; Bellet, H.; Baldy-Moulinier, M.; Malafosse, A.

    1995-02-27

    Lafora disease and Unverricht-Lundborg disease are two forms of progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PME). Recently the gene for Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1) was mapped to chromosome 21q22.3. Using three highly polymorphic DNA markers (D21S212, PFKL, and D21S171) which flank the EPM1 locus, we performed linkage analysis to investigate whether or not the EPM1 gene is also implicated in Lafora disease. Linkage was excluded in three North-African pedigrees each comprising at least two affected individuals. This result suggests that differential diagnosis of Lafora disease and Unverricht-Lundborg disease may be facilitated by molecular genetic analysis. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agents and Anemia in Patients with Non-dialytic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Moon; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is common in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Though erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have been strongly endorsed in guidelines, it is of particular financial interest. Recently, the reimbursement of ESAs in non-dialytic patients was started by the Korean National Health Insurance System. Thus, we investigated the impact of the reimbursement of ESAs on the anemia care in non-dialytic CKD patients. Medical records of patients with advanced CKD (estimated GFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) were reviewed. Use of ESAs, blood transfusion, and hemoglobin concentrations were analyzed from one year prior to reimbursement to three years following. We used multivariable modified Poisson regression to estimate the utilization prevalence ratio (PRs). A total of 1,791 medical records were analyzed. The proportion of patients receiving ESAs increased from 14.8% before reimbursement to a peak 33.6% in 1 yr after reimbursement; thereafter, ESA use decreased to 22.4% in 3 yr after reimbursement (compared with baseline; PR, 2.19 [95% CI, 1.40-3.42]). In patients with Hb <10 g/dL, the proportion of receiving ESAs increased from 32.1% before reimbursement to 66.7% in 3 yr after reimbursement (compared with baseline; PR, 2.04 [95% CI, 1.25-3.32]). Mean hemoglobin concentrations were 10.06±1.54 g/dL before reimbursement and increased to 10.78±1.51 g/dL in 3 yr after the reimbursement change (P=0.001). However, the requirement of blood transfusion was not changed over time. With the reimbursement of ESAs, the advanced CKD patients were more likely to be treated with ESAs, and the hemoglobin concentrations increased.

  9. Oxidative stress during erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness anemia at end stage renal disease: Molecular and biochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Samar K.M.; Amer, H.A.; El Behairy, Adel M.; Warda, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are two faces of one coin in end stage renal disease patients (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis. Their interconnection induces anemia complicated with erythropoietin hyporesponsiveness. The biochemical bases behind the resistance to erythropoietin therapy with frequent hemoglobinemia, oxidative stress and iron status have not been fully understood. Here two equal groups (40 patients each) of responders and non-responders to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy (higher than 300 IU/kg/wk of epoetin) were investigated. Hematological and biochemical analyses of collected blood and serum samples were performed along with serum electrophoretic protein footprinting. The leukocytic DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate the degree of oxidative insult. The good responders showed lower erythrocyte malondialdehyde (E-MDA) level and less DNA fragmentation of circulating leukocytes than poor responders with elevated hemoglobin, albumin, A/G ratio, total iron, and ferritin levels. Contrariwise, lower erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and catalase activities in EPO poor responder group were noticed. Neither other serum constituents nor electrophoretic protein pattern showed any difference between the two groups. There were higher levels of inflammatory markers, interleukin-6 (IL6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in EPO poor responder than good responder. The negative correlations between Hb and both IL6 and CRP levels in the present data remotely indicate a positive correlation between inflammatory markers and severity of anemia. A direct correlation between Hb and antioxidant enzymes (E-SOD and catalase) was noticed, while inverse correlation with E-MDA was recorded. The study proved that oral supplementation of vitamin C to ESRD patients might mitigate the previously elevated serum MDA level in these patients. PMID:27222740

  10. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  11. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  13. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  14. Presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease. A case complicated by recombination within the D4S10 locus.

    PubMed

    Curtis, A; Millan, F; Holloway, S; Mennie, M; Crosbie, A; Raeburn, J A; Brock, D J

    1989-01-01

    Presymptomatic testing for Huntington's disease (HD) is possible through the use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) at the closely linked D4S10 locus. Recombination between the HD and D4S10 loci will occur in 4%-5% of meioses, and is a well-recognised complication of predictive testing. Recombination between RFLPs within the D4S10 locus is a rare event and can usually be ignored. We report a case where such an intra-locus recombination frustrated attempts to predict the chance of a high-risk individual inheriting the HD gene.

  15. CD33 Alzheimer's disease locus: altered monocyte function and amyloid biology.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Chibnik, Lori B; Keenan, Brendan T; Ottoboni, Linda; Raj, Towfique; Tang, Anna; Rosenkrantz, Laura L; Imboywa, Selina; Lee, Michelle; Von Korff, Alina; Morris, Martha C; Evans, Denis A; Johnson, Keith; Sperling, Reisa A; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A; De Jager, Philip L

    2013-07-01

    In our functional dissection of the CD33 Alzheimer's disease susceptibility locus, we found that the rs3865444(C) risk allele was associated with greater cell surface expression of CD33 in the monocytes (t50 = 10.06, P(joint) = 1.3 × 10(-13)) of young and older individuals. It was also associated with diminished internalization of amyloid-β 42 peptide, accumulation of neuritic amyloid pathology and fibrillar amyloid on in vivo imaging, and increased numbers of activated human microglia.

  16. Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Ovarian Cancer: A Marker of Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kah Poh; Kansagra, Ankit; Asik, Armen; Ali, Syed; Dahiya, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome associated with ovarian malignancies. We report a case of a 77 year-old female with metastatic ovarian carcinoma who presented with worsening anemia from her baseline, and was found to have a warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We performed a literature review and analyzed all 10 cases (including our patient) that have been reported to date, and incorporated the clinical presentation, histology and stage of underlying malignancies, types, treatment, prognosis and mechanisms of AIHA in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:25918604

  17. The genetic locus for free sialic acid storage disease maps to the long arm of chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Haataja, L.; Schleutker, J.; Laine, A.P.; Savontaus, M.L.; Aula, P. ); Renlund, M. ); Dib, C.; Weissenbach, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-06-01

    Salla disease (SD), or adult-type free sialic acid storage disease, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lysosomal membrane and severe psychomotor retardation. Random linkage analysis of a sample of 27 Finnish families allowed localization of the SD locus to the long arm of chromosome 6. The highest lod score of 8.95 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S286 at [theta] - .00. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was observed between the SD locus and the alleles of three closely linked markers, suggesting that the length of the critical region for the SD locus is in the order of 190 kb. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Dose-finding Study of Peginesatide for Anemia Correction in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Andrzej; Tucker, Beatriz; Yaqoob, Magdi; Mikhail, Ashraf; Nowicki, Michal; MacPhee, Iain; Mysliwiec, Michal; Smolenski, Olgierd; Sułowicz, Władysław; Mayo, Martha; Francisco, Carol; Polu, Krishna R.; Schatz, Peter J.; Duliege, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Peginesatide is a synthetic, PEGylated, investigational, peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent. We report the first assessment of its efficacy and safety in correcting renal anemia in a population of 139 nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Chronic kidney disease patients who were not on dialysis and not receiving treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in the 12 weeks before study drug administration were sequentially assigned to one of 10 cohorts; cohorts differed in starting peginesatide dose (different body weight-based or absolute doses), route of administration (intravenous or subcutaneous), and frequency of administration (every 4 or 2 weeks). Results Across all cohorts, 96% of patients achieved a hemoglobin response. A dose-response relationship was evident for hemoglobin increase. Comparable subcutaneous and intravenous peginesatide doses produced similar hemoglobin responses. Rapid rates of hemoglobin rise and hemoglobin excursions >13 g/dl tended to occur more frequently with every-2-weeks dosing than they did with every-4-weeks dosing. The range of final median doses in the every-4-weeks dosing groups was 0.019 to 0.043 mg/kg. Across all cohorts, 20% of patients reported serious adverse events (one patient had a possibly drug-related serious event) and 81% reported adverse events (11.5% reported possibly drug-related events); these events were consistent with those routinely observed in this patient population. Conclusions This study suggests that peginesatide administered every 4 weeks can increase and maintain hemoglobin in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. Additional long-term data in larger groups of patients are required to further elucidate the efficacy and safety of this peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent. PMID:21940838

  19. microRNA miR-144 modulates oxidative stress tolerance and associates with anemia severity in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sangokoya, Carolyn; Telen, Marilyn J; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2010-11-18

    Although individuals with homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS) share the same genetic mutation, the severity and manifestations of this disease are extremely heterogeneous. We have previously shown that the microRNA expression in normal and HbSS erythrocytes exhibit dramatic differences. In this study, we identify a subset of HbSS patients with higher erythrocytic miR-144 expression and more severe anemia. HbSS erythrocytes are known to have reduced tolerance for oxidative stress, yet the basis for this phenotype remains unknown. This study reveals that miR-144 directly regulates nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2, a central regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress, and modulates the oxidative stress response in K562 cell line and primary erythroid progenitor cells. We further demonstrate that increased miR-144 is associated with reduced NRF2 levels in HbSS reticulocytes and with decreased glutathione regeneration and attenuated antioxidant capacity in HbSS erythrocytes, thereby providing a possible mechanism for the reduced oxidative stress tolerance and increased anemia severity seen in HbSS patients. Taken together, our findings suggest that erythroid microRNAs can serve as genetic modifiers of HbS-related anemia and can provide novel insights into the clinical heterogeneity and pathobiology of sickle cell disease.

  20. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  1. Oral manifestations compatible with chronic graft-versus-host disease in patients with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Grein Cavalcanti, Laura; Fuentes Araújo, Renata L; Bonfim, Carmem; Torres-Pereira, Cassius C

    2015-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease that is characterized by several congenital abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure and is associated with an increased susceptibility to malignant disorders. Currently, the only potential cure for hematological disorders is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, 1 of the most common complications after HSCT is the development of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), which is also a risk factor for the development of cancer, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of oral manifestations compatible with cGVHD in patients diagnosed with FA according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria. A total of 96 patients (51 females, 45 males; median age, 16 years) with FA, who were in medical follow-up after HSCT at the outpatient clinic of the bone marrow transplantation unit (Hospital de Clínicas from the Universidade Federal do Paraná) underwent an oral evaluation between January 2013 and December 2013. Post-HSCT periods varied from 1 to 261 months and were divided into 3 periods: immediate post-HSCT period; intermediate post-HSC period, and late post-HSCT period. Among the evaluated patients, 40 of 96 (42%) presented with oral manifestations of cGVHD, with 29 of 40 (73%) of these patients in the late post-HSCT period. NIH scale scores varied from 0 to 10, and lichenoid and hyperkeratotic lesions were the abnormalities most frequently observed (100%). Overall, a high prevalence of oral manifestations was observed for cGVHD patients with FA. These data highlight the importance of monitoring oral manifestations compatible with cGVHD to identify and treat individuals with a higher risk of developing oral cancer.

  2. Positional cloning of the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.F.; Korenblat, K.M.; Goate, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage analysis had indicated a locus for familial early-onset Alzheimer`s disease (FAD) on chromosome 14 at q24.3. The FAD locus has been shown previously to lie between the dinucleotide markers D14S61 and D14S63, a genetic distance of approximately 13 cM. We are currently attempting to identify the gene using a positional cloning strategy. The first step towards the isolation and characterization of this locus was the construction of an overlapping YAC contig covering the entire region. Over forty YACs which map to this region have been isolated from the St. Louis and CEPH libraries by a combination of YAC end sequence walking and sequence tagged site mapping. Our contig fully spans the complete domain, encompassing all genetic markers non-recombinant with FAD (i.e. D14S76, D14S43, D14S71, D14S77) and the two nearest flanking FAD-recombinant markers. With restriction mapping of the domain, we can determine the exact size of the region. As a second step, the YACs in this contig are currently being inspected for expressed sequences by exon trapping, initially on those YACs known to be nonchimeric. We have currently made exon-trapped libraries from YACs that have the markers D14S76 and D14S43. Sequence analysis of these libraries indicates that a trapped exon is identified on average for each 30 kb of YAC DNA. The trapped exons are being screened to identify likely candidate genes, which will be examined for mutations in FAD families.

  3. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  4. Prevalence and determinants of anemia in adults with complex congenital heart disease and ventricular dysfunction (subaortic right ventricle and single ventricle physiology).

    PubMed

    Collins, Nicholas; Piran, Sanaz; Harrison, Jeanine; Azevedo, Eduardo; Oechslin, Erwin; Silversides, Candice K

    2008-09-01

    Anemia is well recognized as a marker of poor prognosis in patients with acquired heart disease and heart failure. Adults with complex congenital heart disease and ventricular dysfunction (subaortic right ventricle or single-ventricle physiology) represent a different population, because they are typically much younger and have less co-morbidity compared with patients with acquired forms of heart disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of anemia in this population. Baseline hemoglobin levels were recorded at the time of the initial clinic visit, and final hemoglobin levels were those recorded before death or transplantation or at study completion. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <135 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women. One hundred sixty-seven patients (100 men, mean age 34 +/- 8 years, mean ejection fraction 35 +/- 9%) were included, 66 with atrial switch operations, 42 with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, and 59 with Fontan physiology. The mean hemoglobin level at baseline was 149 +/- 22 g/L and at follow-up was 139 +/- 29 g/L. The overall prevalence of anemia was 29% at completion. Hyponatremia, decreased renal function, and the use of warfarin were independent predictors of anemia. In conclusion, anemia is common in patients with complex congenital heart disease and ventricular dysfunction, in particular those with Fontan physiology.

  5. Linkage disequilibrium utilized to establish a refined genetic position of the Salla disease locus on 6q14-q15

    SciTech Connect

    Schleutker, J.; Laine, A.P.; Haataja, L. |

    1995-05-20

    Salla disease (SD), an inherited free sialic acid storage disorder, is caused by impaired transport of free sialic acid across the lyosomal membrane. Clinical characteristics of the disease include severe psychomotor retardation and some neurological abnormalities. The authors report detailed linkage analyses of 50 Finnish SD families that localize the SD disease gene to a refined chromosomal area on 6q14-q15. The highest lod score of 17.30 was obtained with a microsatellite marker of locus D6S280. When linkage disequilibrium was adopted in the linkage analyses, they could further assign the SD locus to the immediate vicinity of marker locus D6S406. Linkage disequilibrium facilitated further restriction of the critical chromosomal region to approximately 80 kb, well within the limits of positional cloning techniques. 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Treatment of Anemia in Heart Failure: Potential Risks and Benefits of Intravenous Iron Therapy in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Katz, Stuart D.

    2010-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is common is patients with heart failure (HF), but the optimum diagnostic tests to detect iron deficiency and the treatment options to replete iron have not been fully characterized. Recent studies in patients with HF indicate that intravenous iron can rapidly replenish iron stores in patients having iron-deficiency anemia, with resultant increased hemoglobin levels and improved functional capacity. Preliminary data from a sub-group analysis also suggests that supplemental intravenous iron therapy can improve functional capacity even in those subjects without anemia. The mechanisms responsible for this observation are not fully characterized, but may be related to beneficial effects of iron supplementation on mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. The long-term safety of using intravenous iron supplementation in HF populations is not known. Iron is a known pro-oxidant factor that can inhibit nitric oxide signaling and irreversibly injury cells. Increased iron stores are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of coronary heart disease events. Additional clinical trials are needed to more fully characterize the therapeutic potential and safety of intravenous iron in HF patients. PMID:20699672

  7. Linkage of Thomsen disease to the T-cell-receptor beta (TCRB) locus on chromosome 7q35

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, J.A.; Casley, W.L.; Cousin, H.K.; Hudson, A.J.; Hashimoto, L.; Ebers, G.C. ); Murphy, E.G. ); Cornelis, F.C. )

    1992-09-01

    The chromosomal localization of the gene for Thomsen disease, an autosomal dominant form of myotonia congenita, is unknown. Electrophysiologic data in Thomsen disease point to defects in muscle-membrane ion-channel function. A mouse model of myotonia congenita appears to result from transposon inactivation of a muscle chloride-channel gene which maps to a region of mouse chromosome 6. The linkage group containing this gene includes several loci which have human homologues on human chromosome 7q31-35 (synteny), and this is a candidate region for the Thomsen disease locus. Linkage analysis of Thomsen disease to the T-cell-receptor beta (TCRB) locus at 7q35 was carried out in four pedigrees (25 affected and 23 unaffected individuals) by using a PCR-based dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the TCRB gene. Two-point linkage analysis between Thomsen disease and TCRB showed a maximum cumulative lod score of 3.963 at a recombination fraction of .10 (1-lod support interval .048-.275). The authors conclude that the Thomsen disease locus is linked to the TCRB locus in these families. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. High-Dose Aspirin Is Associated with Anemia and Does Not Confer Benefit to Disease Outcomes in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is also known as multiple mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome of systemic vasculitis and is a leading cause of coronary artery lesions (CAL) in childhood. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been proven to effectively reduce the incidence of CAL, but the role and effect dose of aspirin in KD is still unclear. Moreover, overt bleeding and anemia are associated with the use of aspirin, and anemia is common in patients with KD. Thus, the aim of this study was conducted to compare the treatment efficacy, degree of anemia and inflammation, and changes in serum hepcidin in children who received a combination of high-dose aspirin and IVIG in the acute stage of KD, and those who received IVIG alone. Materials and Methods KD patients from two medical centers were retrospectively analyzed from 1999–2009. All patients were initially treated with a single dose of IVIG (2 g/kg) as the standard care of treatment. In group 1, high-dose aspirin was prescribed (> 30 mg/kg/day) until the fever subsided, and then low-dose aspirin (3–5 mg/kg/day) was prescribed until all the inflammation signs had resolved. In group 2, low-dose aspirin was prescribed without high-dose aspirin. Laboratory data were collected for analysis in both groups. Results A total of 851 KD patients (group 1, N = 305, group 2, N = 546) were enrolled in this study. There were no significant differences between group 1 and group 2 in terms of gender (p = 0.51), IVIG resistance rate (31/305 vs. 38/546, p = 0.07), CAL formation (52/305 vs. 84/546, p = 0.67), and duration of hospitalization (6.3 ± 0.2 vs. 6.7 ± 0.2 days, p = 0.13). There were also initially no significant differences in total white blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count, and CRP before IVIG treatment between groups (all p>0.1). After IVIG treatment, group 1 had significantly lower levels of hemoglobin (p = 0.006) and higher CRP (p<0.001) as well as a smaller decrease in CRP level (p = 0

  9. PARK10 is a major locus for sporadic neuropathologically confirmed Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Gary W.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Scott, William K.; Martin, Eden R.; Schellenberg, Gerard; Nuytemans, Karen; Larson, Eric B.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Hurtig, Howard I.; Mash, Deborah C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pletnikova, Olga; Frosch, Matthew P.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Honig, Lawrence S.; Marder, Karen; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Goldman, Samuel M.; Vinters, Harry V.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Wang, Liyong; Dykxhoorn, Derek M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Leverenz, James B.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To minimize pathologic heterogeneity in genetic studies of Parkinson disease (PD), the Autopsy-Confirmed Parkinson Disease Genetics Consortium conducted a genome-wide association study using both patients with neuropathologically confirmed PD and controls. Methods: Four hundred eighty-four cases and 1,145 controls met neuropathologic diagnostic criteria, were genotyped, and then imputed to 3,922,209 variants for genome-wide association study analysis. Results: A small region on chromosome 1 was strongly associated with PD (rs10788972; p = 6.2 × 10−8). The association peak lies within and very close to the maximum linkage peaks of 2 prior positive linkage studies defining the PARK10 locus. We demonstrate that rs10788972 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs914722, the single nucleotide polymorphism defining the PARK10 haplotype previously shown to be significantly associated with age at onset in PD. The region containing the PARK10 locus was significantly reduced from 10.6 megabases to 100 kilobases and contains 4 known genes: TCEANC2, TMEM59, miR-4781, and LDLRAD1. Conclusions: We confirm the association of a PARK10 haplotype with the risk of developing idiopathic PD. Furthermore, we significantly reduce the size of the PARK10 region. None of the candidate genes in the new PARK10 region have been previously implicated in the biology of PD, suggesting new areas of potential research. This study strongly suggests that reducing pathologic heterogeneity may enhance the application of genetic association studies to PD. PMID:25663231

  10. Feline porphyria associated with anemia, severe hepatic disease, and renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Schnier, Jonathan J; Hanna, Paul

    2010-10-01

    A 13-year-old, neutered male domestic cat presented with signs of weight loss, anemia, and hepatomegaly. Pathognomonic signs of porphyria were identified. Charcoal-like renal calculi and severe liver changes were observed, neither of which has been previously reported in association with feline porphyria.

  11. The Safety of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents for the Treatment of Anemia Resulting from Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) anemia treatment was revolutionized in the late 1980s with the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin. This and related erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) greatly benefited patients by decreasing debilitating symptoms, improving their quality of life, and freeing them from dependence on blood transfusions with their associated complications such as infections, sensitization impeding transplantation, and secondary iron overload. However, even in the initial studies, untoward effects were noted in patients receiving ESAs, including worsening hypertension, seizures, and dialysis access clotting. Later, increased mortality, malignancy progression and even stroke were reported in renal patients. This review focuses on the safety issues of ESAs in CKD patients.

  12. The Safety of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents for the Treatment of Anemia Resulting from Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) anemia treatment was revolutionized in the late 1980s with the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin. This and related erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) greatly benefited patients by decreasing debilitating symptoms, improving their quality of life, and freeing them from dependence on blood transfusions with their associated complications such as infections, sensitization impeding transplantation, and secondary iron overload. However, even in the initial studies, untoward effects were noted in patients receiving ESAs, including worsening hypertension, seizures, and dialysis access clotting. Later, increased mortality, malignancy progression and even stroke were reported in renal patients. This review focuses on the safety issues of ESAs in CKD patients. PMID:26894799

  13. Severity of Anemia Predicts Hospital Length of Stay but Not Readmission in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Garlo, Katherine; Williams, Deanna; Lucas, Lee; Wong, Rocket; Botler, Joel; Abramson, Stuart; Parker, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of severe anemia to hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3-5. Compared with the general population, patients with moderate CKD have a higher hospital readmission rate and LOS. Anemia in patients with moderate CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The influence of anemia on hospital outcomes in patients with moderate CKD has not been characterized.We conducted a retrospective cohort study at Maine Medical Center, a 606-bed academic tertiary care hospital. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 and not on dialysis admitted during February 2013 to January 2014 were eligible. Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplant, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, active malignancy, pregnancy, and surgery were excluded. The cohort was split into severe anemia (hemoglobin ≤9  g/dL) versus a comparison group (hemoglobin >9 g /dL), and examined for differences in 30-day hospital readmission and LOS.In this study, the data of 1141 patients were included, out of which 156 (13.7%) had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, SD 0.8). Severe anemia was associated with increased hospital LOS (mean 6.4 (SD 6.0) days vs mean 4.5 (SD 4.0) days, P < 0.001). The difference was 1.7 day longer (95% CI 0.94, 2.45). There was no difference in readmission rate (mean 11.5% vs 10.2%, P = 0.7).Patients with moderate CKD and severe anemia are at risk for increased hospital LOS. Interventions targeting this high-risk population, including outpatient management of anemia, may benefit patient care and save costs through improved hospital outcomes.

  14. Information Needs of Cancer Patients and Perception of Impact of the Disease, of Self-Efficacy, and Locus of Control.

    PubMed

    Keinki, C; Seilacher, E; Ebel, M; Ruetters, D; Kessler, I; Stellamanns, J; Rudolph, I; Huebner, J

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between information needs and cancer patients' perceptions of the impact of the disease, self-efficacy, and locus of control. Using a standardized questionnaire, we obtained data from patients who attended a series of lectures. The questionnaire included questions on their information needs, sources of information, satisfaction with information, and short questionnaires on self-efficacy, perception of the disease, and locus of control of reinforcement. Data was obtained from 185 patients. Our results showed that the sources of information that were most often used were physicians (84 %), print media (68 %), and the Internet (59 %); online fora (7.5 %), non-medical practitioners (9.7 %), and telephone-based counseling (8.6 %) were only used by a minority. Patients with a high perception of their own control over the disease more often used any source of information available to them and were more often interested in acquiring additional information. Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with the need for information on all topics. Patients with a higher external locus of control significantly more often used sources of information and had significantly more need for additional information. By contrast, there were no associations with an internal locus of control. Neither external nor internal locus of control showed any associations with satisfaction with information. Information needs seem to be higher in patients with a high external locus of control and low self-efficacy. Physicians, other professionals, and institutions that provide information may take these relationships into consideration for tailoring their services to patients.

  15. Hepcidin as a predictive factor and therapeutic target in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment for anemia of chronic disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Theurl, Milan; Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Asshoff, Malte; Haschka, David; Seifert, Markus; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Wilflingseder, Doris; Posch, Wilfried; Murphy, Anthony T; Witcher, Derrick R; Theurl, Igor; Weiss, Günter

    2014-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is a multifactorial disorder, resulting mainly from inflammation-driven reticuloendothelial iron retention, impaired erythropoiesis, and reduced biological activity of erythropoietin. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been used for the treatment of anemia of chronic disease, although with varying response rates and potential adverse effects. Serum concentrations of hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis, are increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease and linked to the pathogenesis of this disease, because hepcidin blocks cellular iron egress, thus limiting availability of iron for erythropoiesis. We tested whether serum hepcidin levels can predict and affect the therapeutic efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent treatment using a well-established rat model of anemia of chronic disease. We found that high pre-treatment hepcidin levels correlated with an impaired hematologic response to an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent in rats with anemia of chronic disease. Combined treatment with an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and an inhibitor of hepcidin expression, LDN-193189, significantly reduced serum hepcidin levels, mobilized iron from tissue stores, increased serum iron levels and improved hemoglobin levels more effectively than did the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent or LDN-193189 monotherapy. In parallel, both the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent/LDN-193189 combined reduced the expression of cytokines known to inhibit erythropoiesis. We conclude that serum hepcidin levels can predict the hematologic responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy in anemia of chronic disease. Pharmacological inhibition of hepcidin formation improves the erythropoiesis-stimulating agent's therapeutic efficacy, which may favor a reduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dosages, costs and side effects.

  16. Whole-genome conditional two-locus analysis identifies novel candidate genes for late-onset Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, A; Gayán, J; Marín, J; Galán, J J; Sáez, M E; Real, L M; Antúnez, C; Ruiz, A

    2009-07-01

    Whole-genome epistasis analysis may add a new layer of knowledge to whole-genome association studies, permitting the identification of new candidate genes which are completely transparent during conventional single-locus analysis. We present the first whole-genome conditional two-locus analysis in Parkinson's disease (PD). We scanned the entire genome and selected markers that interacted with a set of well-known loci previously associated to PD (SNCA, Parkin, LRRK2, UCHL1, DJ-1, PINK and MAPT). Our work describes several loci potentially related to PD risk which interact with SNCA, PARK1 and LRRK2 markers. We propose conditional whole-genome two-locus association analysis as a valuable method that might be helpful in re-analysing and re-interpreting data from whole-genome association studies.

  17. PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium Database: a database for disease-producing and other allelic variation at the human PAH locus.

    PubMed

    Hoang, L; Byck, S; Prevost, L; Scriver, C R

    1996-01-01

    The PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium (81 investigators, 26 countries) is engaged in mutation detection at the human PAH locus. Ascertainment of probands occurs largely through newborn screening for hyperphenylalaninemia. A relational database records allelic variation (disease-producing and polymorphic) at the locus. Information is distributed by Newsletter, diskette (WINPAHDB software stand-alone executable on IBM compatible hardware), and at a 'real' site on the Worldwide Web (http://www.mcgill.ca/pahdb). The database presently records (Sept. 27, 1995) 248 alleles in 798 different associations (with polymorphic haplotype, geographic region and population) along with additional information. The database, as a record of human genetic diversity, at a particular locus, contributes to the study of human evolution and demic expansion; it also has medical relevance.

  18. Thalassemia and sickle cell anemia in Swedish immigrants: Genetic diseases have become global

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Li, Xinjun; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Some 15% of the Swedish population is born outside Sweden, originating from all continents of the world. Thalassemia and sickle cell anemia constitute the most common inherited recessive disorders globally and they are endemic in areas of Africa and Asia, origins of many immigrants to Sweden. We aimed at investigating the origins of the Swedish sickle cell and thalassemia patients. Methods: Patients were identified using data from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register since 1987 and from the Outpatient Register since 2001 up to year 2010. Results: A total of 3064 persons were diagnosed with thalassemia. The incidence was highest, 62.9/100,000 for immigrants from Thailand, followed by Iraqis (47.1/100,000); the rate was 0.7/100,000 among those born in Sweden. The total number of sickle cell anemia patients was 584 and the highest rate of 13.0/100,000 was found for Sub-Saharan immigrants. For thalassemia, 363 of the patients were siblings, while for sickle cell anemia, 180 were siblings. Conclusions: The data showed that >90% of sickle cell and thalassemia patients were first- or second-generation immigrants to Sweden and the endemic regions for these were the origins of immigrants with the highest incidence. Global immigration provides global challenges to national health care systems. PMID:27092253

  19. The co-occurrence of anemia and cardiometabolic disease risk demonstrates sex-specific sociodemographic patterning in an urbanizing rural region of southern India

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Andrew D.; Hayter, Arabella K.M.; Baker, Chris P.; Prabhakaran, Poornima; Gupta, Vipin; Kulkarni, Bharati; Davey Smith, George; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Radha Krishna, K.V.; Kumar, P. Uday; Kinra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives To determine the extent and sociodemographic determinants of anemia, overweight, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the co-occurrence of anemia with cardiometabolic disease risk factors among a cohort of Indian adults. Subject/Methods Cross-sectional survey of adult men (n=3,322) and non-pregnant women (n=2,895) aged 18 y and older from the third wave of the Andhra Pradesh Children and Parents Study that assessed anemia, overweight based on Body Mass Index, and prevalence of MetS based on abdominal obesity, hypertension, and blood lipid and fasting glucose measures. We examined associations of education, wealth and urbanicity with these outcomes and their co-occurrence. Results The prevalence of anemia and overweight was 40% and 29% among women, respectively, and 10% and 25% among men (P<0.001), respectively, while the prevalence of MetS was the same across sexes (15%) (P=0.55). The prevalence of concurrent anemia and overweight (9%), and anemia and MetS (4.5%) was highest among women. Household wealth was positively associated with overweight and MetS across sexes (P<0.05). Independent of household wealth, higher education was positively correlated with MetS among men (OR (95% CI): MetS: 1.4 (0.99, 2.0)) and negatively correlated with MetS among women (MetS: 0.54 (0.29, 0.99)). Similar sex-specific associations were observed for the co-occurrence of anemia with overweight and MetS. Conclusion Women in this region of India may be particularly vulnerable to co-occurring anemia and cardiometabolic risk, and associated adverse health outcomes as the nutrition transition advances in India. PMID:26508461

  20. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... have genetic counseling to better understand their risk. Vaccination can reduce certain complications, including pneumococcal pneumonia, hepatitis, and varicella infections. People with Fanconi anemia should avoid cancer- ...

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  2. Prevalence of anemia and its impact on mortality in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a developing country setting.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein; Sadighi, Tannaz; Rabieepour, Masomeh; Dinparast, Reza; RahimiRad, Shagayegh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is going to be the third most common cause of death worldwide. The natural course of COPD is interrupted by acute exacerbations (AECOPD) with an overall mortality rate of 10%. Anemia is a well-known independent predictor of mortality in several chronic diseases. Little is known about the impact of anemia on mortality in AECOPD. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia in AECOPD patients and its impact on mortality in a developing country setting. We retrospectively studied 200 hospitalized patients with AECOPD (100 died in hospital and 100 survived) in Imam Khomeini teaching hospital, Urmia, Iran. Prevalence of anemia between deceased and surviving patients compared by using x-square test. Mean admission day Hb and Hct level were compared between the two groups by using Student t-test. Anemia was defined according to WHO criteria: Hb<13 g/dl in males; Hb<12 g/dl in females. The prevalence of anemia was significantly higher in patients who died in hospital compared to those who survived (72% vs. 49%, p=0.001 and OR=2.68). The mean ±SD Hb level was 11.5±2.7 g/dl among deceased patients vs. 13.0±2.0 g/dl among survivors (p value<0.001). The duration of hospitalization was significantly higher (p<0,001) in anemic patients (mean 13.28 days in anemic vs. 7.0 days in non-anemic patients). In bivariate correlation analysis, Hb was positively correlated with FEV1 (r=+0.210, p=0.011) and negatively with duration of hospitalization (r=-0.389, p=0.000). Anemia was common in AECOPD patients in this developing country setting and was significantly associated with in hospital mortality.

  3. Association and heterogeneity at the GAPDH locus in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Allen, M.; Cox, C.; Belbin, O.; Ma, L.; Bisceglio, G. D.; Wilcox, S. L.; Howell, C. C.; Hunter, T. A.; Culley, O.; Walker, L. P.; Carrasquillo, M. M.; Dickson, D. W.; Petersen, R. C.; Graff-Radford, N. R.; Younkin, S. G.; Ertekin-Taner, N.

    2010-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GAPDH) and its paralogues were implicated in late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), although the strength and direction of association have not been consistent. We genotyped three previously reported SNPs (rs3741916-GAPDH 5’UTR, rs2029721-pGAPD and rs4806173-GAPDHS) in three case-control series (2112 cases and 3808 controls). Rs3741916 showed the strongest LOAD association (p=0.003). The minor allele of rs3741916 showed a protective effect in our combined series (OR=0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.79–0.96). This is consistent with results from the two published follow-up studies and in opposite direction of the original report. Meta-analysis of the published series with ours suggests presence of heterogeneity (Breslow-Day p<0.0001). Meta-analysis of only the follow-up series including ours revealed a significant protective effect for the minor allele of rs3741916 (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.76–0.96, p=0.009). Our results support the presence of LOAD variants and heterogeneity at the GAPDH locus. The most promising rs3741916 variant is unlikely to be functional given opposing effects in different series. Identification of functional variant(s) in this region likely awaits deep sequencing. PMID:20864222

  4. Mutations at the lysosomal acid cholesteryl ester hydrolase gene locus in Wolman disease.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R A; Byrum, R S; Coates, P M; Sando, G N

    1994-01-01

    The genomic sequences encoding the human lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (sterol esterase; EC 3.1.1.13) have been isolated and sequenced, and the information has been used to identify mutations in both alleles of the gene from a patient with Wolman disease, an autosomal recessive lysosomal lipid storage disorder. The genomic locus consists of 10 exons spread over 36 kb. The 5' flanking region is G+C-rich and has characteristics of a "housekeeping" gene promoter. One of the identified mutations involves the insertion of a T residue after position 634, resulting in the appearance of an in-frame translation stop signal 13 codons downstream. The second mutation is a T-to-C transition at nucleotide 638. This results in a leucine-to-proline substitution at amino acid 179 and is predicted to lead to the disruption of the alpha-helical structure in a highly conserved region of the protein. These mutations are each capable of completely disrupting the catalytic function of the lysosomal acid cholesteryl ester hydrolase; their presence can account for the extreme phenotype of the lysosomal lipid storage disorder manifested in members of this patient's family. Images PMID:8146180

  5. Meta-analysis of Parkinson disease: Identification of a novel locus, RIT2

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Beecham, Gary W.; DeStefano, Anita L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Factor, Stewart A.; Hamza, Taye H.; Hung, Albert Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Ivinson, Adrian J.; Krainc, Dmitri; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Marder, Karen; Martin, Eden R.; Mayeux, Richard; Ross, Owen A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Simon, David K.; Tanner, Caroline; Vance, Jeffery M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Myers, Richard H.; Payami, Haydeh; Scott, William K.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association (GWAS) methods have identified genes contributing to Parkinson disease (PD); we sought to identify additional genes associated with PD susceptibility. Methods A two stage design was used. First, individual level genotypic data from five recent PD GWAS (Discovery Sample: 4,238 PD cases and 4,239 controls) were combined. Following imputation, a logistic regression model was employed in each dataset to test for association with PD susceptibility and results from each dataset were meta-analyzed. Second, 768 SNPs were genotyped in an independent Replication Sample (3,738 cases and 2,111 controls). Results Genome-wide significance was reached for SNPs in SNCA (rs356165, G: odds ratio (OR)=1.37; p=9.3 × 10−21), MAPT (rs242559, C: OR=0.78; p=1.5 × 10−10), GAK/DGKQ (rs11248051, T:OR=1.35; p=8.2 × 10−9/ rs11248060, T: OR=1.35; p=2.0×10−9), and the HLA region (rs3129882, A: OR=0.83; p=1.2 × 10−8), which were previously reported. The Replication Sample confirmed the associations with SNCA, MAPT, and the HLA region and also with GBA (E326K OR=1.71; p=5 × 10−8 Combined Sample) (N370 OR=3.08; p=7 × 10−5 Replication sample). A novel PD susceptibility locus, RIT2, on chromosome 18 (rs12456492; p=5 × 10−5 Discovery Sample; p=1.52 × 10−7 Replication sample; p=2 × 10−10 Combined Sample) was replicated. Conditional analyses within each of the replicated regions identified distinct SNP associations within GBA and SNCA, suggesting that there may be multiple risk alleles within these genes. Interpretation We identified a novel PD susceptibility locus, RIT2, replicated several previously identified loci, and identified more than one risk allele within SNCA and GBA. PMID:22451204

  6. Association of Increased Serum Leptin with Ameliorated Anemia and Malnutrition in Stage 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients after Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Jingjing; Yuan, Yanggang; Zha, Xiaoming; Xing, Changying; Shen, Chong; Shen, Zhixiang; Qin, Chao; Zeng, Ming; Yang, Guang; Mao, Huijuan; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Xiangbao; Sun, Bin; Ouyang, Chun; Xu, Xueqiang; Ge, Yifei; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lina; Cheng, Chen; Yin, Caixia; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Huimin; Ma, Haoyang; Wang, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates various metabolism, but its association with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), a clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), remains obscure. Parathyroidectomy (PTX) is recommended for severe SHPT patients. Here, the associations between circulating leptin and clinical characteristics in CKD patients were investigated. Effects of PTX on leptin production were analyzed in vivo and in vitro. Controls and CKD patients had approximate serum leptin levels in that a larger proportion of CKD patients with body mass index (BMI) <23 kg/m2. Serum leptin was related to anemia, albumin, and bone metabolism disorders in CKD patients. Lower intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) was related with higher leptin in PTX patients group. Severe SHPT inhibited uremia-enhanced leptin production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which was attenuated after PTX. High levels of PTH were found to reduce Akt phosphorylation and leptin production in vitro but high levels of calcium and phosphorus were not. Successful PTX was found to improve anemia and malnutrition in severe SHPT patients, and this was correlated with increased circulating leptin levels via up-regulated Akt signaling in adipocytes. These findings indicated the therapeutic potential of leptin and related target pathway for improving survival and quality of life in CKD. PMID:27307101

  7. Artificial intelligence for optimal anemia management in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brier, Michael E; Gaweda, Adam E

    2016-08-01

    Computational intelligence for the prediction of hemoglobin to guide the selection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dose results in improved anemia management. The models used for the prediction result from the use of individual patient data and help to increase the number of hemoglobin observations within the target range. The benefits of using these modeling techniques appear to be a decrease in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use and a decrease in the number of transfusions. This study confirms the results of previous smaller studies and suggests that additional beneficial results may be achieved. PMID:27418093

  8. Artificial intelligence for optimal anemia management in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Brier, Michael E; Gaweda, Adam E

    2016-08-01

    Computational intelligence for the prediction of hemoglobin to guide the selection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent dose results in improved anemia management. The models used for the prediction result from the use of individual patient data and help to increase the number of hemoglobin observations within the target range. The benefits of using these modeling techniques appear to be a decrease in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use and a decrease in the number of transfusions. This study confirms the results of previous smaller studies and suggests that additional beneficial results may be achieved.

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity.

  10. CUBN as a novel locus for end-stage renal disease: insights from renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reznichenko, Anna; Snieder, Harold; van den Born, Jacob; de Borst, Martin H; Damman, Jeffrey; van Dijk, Marcory C R F; van Goor, Harry; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Niesing, Jan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Seelen, Marc; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder. As genome-wide association studies identified cubilin gene CUBN as a locus for albuminuria, and urinary protein loss is a risk factor for progressive CKD, we tested the hypothesis that common genetic variants in CUBN are associated with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and proteinuria. First, a total of 1142 patients with ESRD, admitted for renal transplantation, and 1186 donors were genotyped for SNPs rs7918972 and rs1801239 (case-control study). The rs7918972 minor allele frequency (MAF) was higher in ESRD patients comparing to kidney donors, implicating an increased risk for ESRD (OR 1.39, p = 0.0004) in native kidneys. Second, after transplantation recipients were followed for 5.8 [3.8-9.2] years (longitudinal study) documenting ESRD in transplanted kidneys--graft failure (GF). During post-transplant follow-up 92 (9.6%) cases of death-censored GF occurred. Donor rs7918972 MAF, representing genotype of the transplanted kidney, was 16.3% in GF vs 10.7% in cases with functioning graft. Consistently, a multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that donor rs7918972 is a predictor of GF, although statistical significance was not reached (HR 1.53, p = 0.055). There was no association of recipient rs7918972 with GF. Rs1801239 was not associated with ESRD or GF. In line with an association with the outcome, donor rs7918972 was associated with elevated proteinuria levels cross-sectionally at 1 year after transplantation. Thus, we identified CUBN rs7918972 as a novel risk variant for renal function loss in two independent settings: ESRD in native kidneys and GF in transplanted kidneys. PMID:22574174

  11. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig encompassing the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.; Bonnycastle, L.; Poorkai, P.

    1994-09-01

    We have constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of chromosome 14q24.3 which encompasses the chromosome 14 Alzheimer`s disease locus (AD3). Determined by linkage analysis of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease kindreds, this interval is bounded by the genetic markers D14S61-D14S63 and spans approximately 15 centimorgans. The contig consists of 29 markers and 74 YACs of which 57 are defined by one or more sequence tagged sites (STSs). The STS markers comprise 5 genes, 16 short tandem repeat polymorphisms and 8 cDNA clones. An additional number of genes, expressed sequence tags and cDNA fragments have been identified and localized to the contig by hybridization and sequence analysis of anonymous clones isolated by cDNA direct selection techniques. A minimal contig of about 15 YACs averaging 0.5-1.5 megabase in length will span this interval and is, at first approximation, in rough agreement with the genetic map. For two regions of the contig, our coverage has relied on L1/THE fingerprint and Alu-PCR hybridization data of YACs provided by CEPH/Genethon. We are currently developing sequence tagged sites from these to confirm the overlaps revealed by the fingerprint data. Among the genes which map to the contig are transforming growth factor beta 3, c-fos, and heat shock protein 2A (HSPA2). C-fos is not a candidate gene for AD3 based on the sequence analysis of affected and unaffected individuals. HSPA2 maps to the proximal edge of the contig and Calmodulin 1, a candidate gene from 4q24.3, maps outside of the region. The YAC contig is a framework physical map from which cosmid or P1 clone contigs can be constructed. As more genes and cDNAs are mapped, a highly resolved transcription map will emerge, a necessary step towards positionally cloning the AD3 gene.

  12. Unraveling Genomic Complexity at a Quantitative Disease Resistance Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Jamann, Tiffany M.; Poland, Jesse A.; Kolkman, Judith M.; Smith, Laurie G.; Nelson, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple disease resistance has important implications for plant fitness, given the selection pressure that many pathogens exert directly on natural plant populations and indirectly via crop improvement programs. Evidence of a locus conditioning resistance to multiple pathogens was found in bin 1.06 of the maize genome with the allele from inbred line “Tx303” conditioning quantitative resistance to northern leaf blight (NLB) and qualitative resistance to Stewart’s wilt. To dissect the genetic basis of resistance in this region and to refine candidate gene hypotheses, we mapped resistance to the two diseases. Both resistance phenotypes were localized to overlapping regions, with the Stewart’s wilt interval refined to a 95.9-kb segment containing three genes and the NLB interval to a 3.60-Mb segment containing 117 genes. Regions of the introgression showed little to no recombination, suggesting structural differences between the inbred lines Tx303 and “B73,” the parents of the fine-mapping population. We examined copy number variation across the region using next-generation sequencing data, and found large variation in read depth in Tx303 across the region relative to the reference genome of B73. In the fine-mapping region, association mapping for NLB implicated candidate genes, including a putative zinc finger and pan1. We tested mutant alleles and found that pan1 is a susceptibility gene for NLB and Stewart’s wilt. Our data strongly suggest that structural variation plays an important role in resistance conditioned by this region, and pan1, a gene conditioning susceptibility for NLB, may underlie the QTL. PMID:25009146

  13. Finding genetic contributions to sporadic disease: a recessive locus at 12q24 commonly contributes to patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Mani, Arya; Meraji, Seyed-Mahmoud; Houshyar, Roozbeh; Radhakrishnan, Jayaram; Mani, Alaleh; Ahangar, Mehrabeh; Rezaie, Tayebeh M; Taghavinejad, Mohammad-Ali; Broumand, Behrooz; Zhao, Hongyu; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Lifton, Richard P

    2002-11-12

    The causes of many sporadic diseases are unexplained; the contribution of recessive loci with reduced penetrance is one possibility that has been difficult to explore. We describe an approach to this problem by first searching for diseases with higher prevalence in populations with high rates of consanguinity, then determining whether disease cases are more commonly the product of consanguinous union than controls in such populations, followed by analysis of genetic linkage in consanguinous cases. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by investigation of congenital heart disease in Iran. We found that patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), a common congenital heart disease, accounts for a higher fraction of congenital heart disease in Iran (15%) than in the United States (2-7%). Moreover, Iranian PDA cases demonstrated a marked increase of parental consanguinity (63%), compared with the general Iranian population (25%) or control cases with tetralogy of Fallot (30%). The recurrence of PDA among siblings was 5%. A genomewide analysis of linkage in 21 unrelated consanguinous PDA cases demonstrated a multipoint logarithm of odds score of 6.27 in favor of linkage of PDA to a 3-centimorgan interval of chromosome 12q24, with 53% of kindreds linked. These findings together establish a recessive component to PDA and implicate a single locus, PDA1, in one third or more of all PDA cases in Iran; they further suggest a role for this locus in PDA worldwide. Finally, these results suggest a general approach to the identification of recessive contributions to sporadic diseases.

  14. Evidence that the APOE locus influences rate of disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.; Crawford, F.; Osborne, A.; Diaz, P.

    1995-02-27

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s Disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosome 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and non-stringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease free survival age within late onset families. One explanation for the age dependent association reported by other groups, and our results, is that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease process in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause the disease. We suggest this hypothesis is compatible with the current literature regarding APOE and AD. 19 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Koduru, Pramoda; Abraham, Bincy P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of nutritional anemia worldwide. Iron plays a pivotal role in vital functioning of almost every organ system. IDA affects both physical and psychological functioning of humans. Oral iron is considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of IDA due to low cost, good safety profile and ease of administration. However, the absorption of oral iron is affected by several factors and incidence of gastrointestinal side effects can lead to lack of adherence to therapy as well as poor efficacy. This has led to the emergence of intravenous iron therapy which is clearly superior to oral iron with higher increment of hemoglobin levels and rapid replenishment of iron stores. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a novel non-dextran intravenous iron form which has been approved for use in patients with iron deficiency who have had inadequate response to oral iron therapy, intolerance to oral iron, or nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The safety and efficacy of using FCM for the treatment of IDA has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. One dose can provide a large amount of iron and has a very short infusion time. It should be considered as first-line therapy in patients with active inflammation like inflammatory bowel disease when gastrointestinal absorption of oral iron may be compromised. It should also be given to patients who have inadequate response to oral iron therapy. It has been shown to be noninferior to other intravenous iron formulations with a good safety profile and produced fewer anaphylactic reactions. PMID:26770269

  16. Enhanced catecholamine transporter binding in the locus coeruleus of patients with early Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies in animals suggest that the noradrenergic system arising from the locus coeruleus (LC) and dopaminergic pathways mutually influence each other. Little is known however, about the functional state of the LC in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical and imaging data of 94 subjects with PD at an early clinical stage (Hoehn and Yahr stage 1-2) who underwent single photon computed tomography imaging with FP-CIT ([123I] N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) tropane). FP-CIT binding values from the patients were compared with 15 healthy subjects: using both a voxel-based whole brain analysis and a volume of interest analysis of a priori defined brain regions. Results Average FP-CIT binding in the putamen and caudate nucleus was significantly reduced in PD subjects (43% and 57% on average, respectively; p < 0.001). In contrast, subjects with PD showed an increased binding in the LC (166% on average; p < 0.001) in both analyses. LC-binding correlated negatively with striatal FP-CIT binding values (caudate: contralateral, ρ = -0.28, p < 0.01 and ipsilateral ρ = -0.26, p < 0.01; putamen: contralateral, ρ = -0.29, p < 0.01 and ipsilateral ρ = -0.29, p < 0.01). Conclusions These findings are consistent with an up-regulation of noradrenaline reuptake in the LC area of patients with early stage PD, compatible with enhanced noradrenaline release, and a compensating activity for degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal projections. PMID:21777421

  17. Major hematologic diseases in the developing world- new aspects of diagnosis and management of thalassemia, malarial anemia, and acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, P L; Gordeuk, V; Issaragrisil, S; Siritanaratkul, N; Fucharoen, S; Ribeiro, R C

    2001-01-01

    The three presentations in this session encompass clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of hematologic diseases which impact most heavily on developing world countries. Dr. Victor Gordeuk discusses new insights regarding the multi-faceted pathogenesis of anemia in the complicated malaria occurring in Africa. He describes recent investigations indicating the possible contribution of immune dysregulation to this serious complication and the implications of these findings for disease management. Dr. Surapol Issaragrisil and colleagues describe epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the thalassemic syndromes. In addition to being considered a major health problem in Southeast Asia, the migration throughout the world of people from this region has caused the disease to have global impact. A unique thalassemia variant, Hb Ebeta-thalassemia, with distinctive clinical features, has particular relevance for this demographic issue. Special focus will be reported regarding recent prenatal molecular screening methods in Thailand which have proven useful for early disease detection and disease control strategies. Dr. Raul Ribeiro describes a clinical model for providing effective treatment for a complex malignancy (childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia) in countries with limited resources. With the multidisciplinary approach in Central American of the joint venture between St. Jude Children's Research Hospital International Outreach Program and indigenous health care personnel, major therapeutic advances for this disease have been achieved. Given the major demographic population shifts occurring worldwide, these illnesses also have important clinical implications globally. These contributions demonstrate that lessons learned within countries of disease prevalence aid our understanding and management of a number of disorders prominently seen in developed countries. They will show how effective partnerships between hematologists in more and less developed

  18. Fanconi anemia: a model disease for studies on human genetics and advanced therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bogliolo, Massimo; Surrallés, Jordi

    2015-08-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by bone marrow failure, malformations, and chromosome fragility. We review the recent discovery of FA genes and efforts to develop genetic therapies for FA in the last five years. Because current data exclude FANCM as an FA gene, 15 genes remain bona fide FA genes and three (FANCO, FANCR and FANCS) cause an FA like syndrome. Monoallelic mutations in 6 FA associated genes (FANCD1, FANCJ, FANCM, FANCN, FANCO and FANCS) predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. The products of all these genes are involved in the repair of stalled DNA replication forks by unhooking DNA interstrand cross-links and promoting homologous recombination. The genetic characterization of patients with FA is essential for developing therapies, including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a savior sibling donor after embryo selection, gene therapy, or genome editing using genetic recombination or engineered nucleases. Newly acquired knowledge about FA promises to provide therapeutic strategies in the near future.

  19. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  20. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children.

  1. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison’s Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anna L.; Bøe Wolff, Anette; MacArthur, Katie; Weaver, Jolanta U.; Vaidya, Bijay; Erichsen, Martina M.; Darlay, Rebecca; Husebye, Eystein S.; Cordell, Heather J.; Pearce, Simon H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Autoimmune Addison’s disease (AAD) is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered. Methods DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls) were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18), on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls). The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach. Results In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7). A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene. Conclusion This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis. PMID:26042420

  2. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families. PMD Clinical Group.

    PubMed Central

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Melki, J.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Pham Dinh, D.; Dastugue, B.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-01-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, we have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. We observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. PMID:7915877

  3. Genetic homogeneity of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Tight linkage to the proteolipoprotein locus in 16 affected families

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug-Tanguy, O.; Mimault, C.; Cavagna, A.; Giraud, G.; Dastugue, B.; Melki, J.; Dinh, D.P.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-09-01

    Among the numerous leukodystrophies that have an early onset and no biochemical markers, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is one that can be identified using strict clinical criteria and demonstrating an abnormal formation of myelin that is restricted to the CNS in electrophysiological studies and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In PMD, 12 different base substitutions and one total deletion of the genomic region containing the PLP gene have been reported, but, despite extensive analysis, PLP exon mutations have been found in only 10%-25% of the families analyzed. To test the genetic homogeneity of this disease, the authors have carried out linkage analysis with polymorphic markers of the PLP genomic region in 16 families selected on strict diagnostic criteria of PMD. They observed a tight linkage of the PMD locus with markers of the PLP gene (cDNA PLP, exon IV polymorphism) and of the Xq22 region (DXS17, DXS94, and DXS287), whereas the markers located more proximally (DXYS1X and DXS3) or distally (DXS11) were not linked to the PMD locus. Multipoint analysis gave a maximal location score for the PMD locus (13.98) and the PLP gene (8.32) in the same interval between DXS94 and DXS287, suggesting that in all families PMD is linked to the PLP locus. Mutations of the extraexonic PLP gene sequences or of another unknown close gene could be involved in PMD. In an attempt to identify molecular defects of this genomic region that are responsible for PMD, these results meant that RFLP analysis could be used to improve genetic counseling for the numerous affected families in which a PLP exon mutation could not be demonstrated. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. IgG4-related Lung Disease Associated with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Jinbo, Mitsutaka; Yamada, Sohsuke; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Yamasaki, Kei; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of IgG4-related lung disease (IgG4-RLD) associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). A 73-year-old Japanese female visited our hospital for an examination following an abnormal chest X-ray in 1999. She was diagnosed with bronchiolitis and AIHA, and treatment with prednisolone was started. After seven years, she visited our department due to a cough. Chest computed tomography (CT) demonstrated focal consolidation with ground-glass attenuations and thickened bronchial walls in the bilateral lungs. She was clinically diagnosed and treated for bronchial asthma. CT findings had shown no changes, and a lung biopsy was performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery at eleven years from the first diagnosis of AIHA. The pathological findings demonstrated the presence of peribronchovascular lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with stromal fibrotic changes, admixed with many IgG4-positive plasma cells. Furthermore, the patient's serum IgG4 level was high, and her CT findings did not show any obvious abnormal findings in the any organs other than the lungs. She was diagnosed with IgG4-RLD based on the findings. We believe that this case report of IgG4-RLD associated with AIHA is clinically helpful for a better understanding of these diseases, although there are five reported cases of IgG4-related disease associated with AIHA. PMID:27580552

  5. Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 is decreased in intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to the anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Song, Yang; He, Chong; Liu, Changqin; Wu, Ruijin; Fang, Leilei; Cong, Yingzi; Miao, Yinglei; Liu, Zhanju

    2015-11-17

    Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) has been found to play an important role in the iron metabolism and hemogenesis. However, little is known about the potential role of DMT1 in the pathogenesis of anemia from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we investigated expression of DMT1 in the intestinal mucosa by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, and found that DMT1 was significantly decreased in the inflamed mucosa of active IBD patients compared with that in those patients at remission stage and healthy controls. To further study the mechanism, we cultured HCT 116 cell line in vitro. Expression of DMT1 in HCT116 was demonstrated to be markedly decreased under stimulation with TNF for 24 and 48 h, while JNK inhibitor (JNK-IN-7) could significantly reverse the decrease. Interestingly, anti-TNF therapy successfully improved anemia in clinical responsive Crohn's disease patients, and DMT1 was found to be markedly up-regulated in intestinal mucosa. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that decreased expression of DMT1 in intestinal mucosa leads to compromised absorption and transportation of iron and that blockade of TNF could rescue anemia and promote DMT1 expression in gut mucosa. This work provides a therapeutic approach in the management of anemia in IBD.

  6. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  7. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  8. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  9. About Anemia (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes About Anemia KidsHealth > For Kids > About Anemia Print A A ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia occurs when a person doesn't have ...

  10. Pathological and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin therapy in the remnant kidney rat model of chronic kidney disease associated anemia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra; Garrido, Patrícia; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Costa, Elísio; Belo, Luís; Reis, Flávio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2016-06-01

    Anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be corrected by treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO); however, some patients become hyporesponsive. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to study hyporesponsiveness to rHuEPO therapy using the remnant kidney rat model of anemia associated with CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. At starting, male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups, for a 3-week protocol: Sham, CRF (vehicle) and two rHuEPO (200 k/kg body weight [BW]/week) treated groups; at the end of protocol, the rHuEPO treated rats were subdivided in responders (CRF200) and non-responders (CRF200NR), according to their hematologic response; blood, cellular and tissue studies were performed. The CRF200 group achieved correction of anemia, while the CRF200NR group developed anemia, after an initial response (1st week) to rHuEPO therapy. CRF and CRF200NR groups presented a trend to higher serum CRP levels; CRF200NR showed also high levels of renal inflammatory markers, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, nuclear factor kappa B, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1); no changes were found in iron metabolism. Our data suggest that the development of anemia/rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness is associated with a higher systemic and renal inflammatory condition, favoring hypoxia and triggering an increase in renal expression of HIF-1α, TGF-β1 and CTGF that will further aggravate renal fibrosis, which will enhance the inflammatory response, creating a cycle that promotes disease progression. New therapeutic strategies to reduce inflammation in CKD patients could improve the response to rHuEPO therapy and reduce hyporesponsiveness. PMID:27039028

  11. Iron Indices in Patients with Functional Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, G. Chinnapu; Rao, Pragna

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite high ferritin level, HDCKD patients may have functional iron deficiency even after intravenous iron (iv) therapy. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that lowered serum transferrin level may contribute to functional anemia and erythropoietin hypo responsiveness by the failure to transport accumulated tissue iron to the relevant target tissue. Materials and methods The study subjects were divided into four groups. Group-A: HDCKD Patients receiving iv iron (n=290). Group-B: Patients not initiated on to hemodialysis (NDCKD), and received oral iron (n=38). Group-C: HDCKD patients with erythropoietin hypo responsiveness (n=9). Group-D: Healthy controls (n=36). The group-A, patients were sub-divided into five groups (A-1 to A-5) based on their serum ferritin levels. Results Serum ferritin and tissue iron levels in group-A and C patients were significantly greater than the group-D(p<0.0001) and group-B patients(p<0.001). Transferrin level of group-A and C showed lowered values and consequently a higher %TSAT when compared to group-D. The percent of patients with iron overload was 2.6%, 31%, and 44% in group-B, group-A and group-C respectively. Serum transferrin level significantly correlated with TIBC in group-A and B patients (p<0.0001;p<0.05 respectively). Transferrin level significantly correlated with TIBC in all subgroups of HDCKD(p<0.05) with the exception in subgroup-A2 and with hemoglobin in subgroups A3 (p<0.05) and A5(p<0.01) respectively. Conclusions The lowered transferrin level prevents the proper transport of the iron to the hematopoietic sites, which may be a reason for the low hemoglobin synthesis and also for the development of erythropoietin hypo responsiveness in some of the dialysis patients.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the effects of treatment with tocilizumab and TNF-α inhibitors on serum hepcidin, anemia response and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anemia of inflammation (AI) is a common complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and has a negative impact on RA symptoms and quality of life. Upregulation of hepcidin by inflammatory cytokines has been implicated in AI. In this study, we evaluated and compared the effects of IL-6 and TNF-α blocking therapies on anemia, disease activity, and iron-related parameters including serum hepcidin in RA patients. Methods Patients (n = 93) were treated with an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab) or TNF-α inhibitors for 16 weeks. Major disease activity indicators and iron-related parameters including serum hepcidin-25 were monitored before and 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the initiation of treatment. Effects of tocilizumab and infliximab (anti-TNF-α antibody) on cytokine-induced hepcidin expression in hepatoma cells were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Anemia at base line was present in 66% of patients. Baseline serum hepcidin-25 levels were correlated positively with serum ferritin, C-reactive protein (CRP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28). Significant improvements in anemia and disease activity, and reductions in serum hepcidin-25 levels were observed within 2 weeks in both groups, and these effects were more pronounced in the tocilizumab group than in the TNF-α inhibitors group. Serum hepcidin-25 reduction by the TNF-α inhibitor therapy was accompanied by a decrease in serum IL-6, suggesting that the effect of TNF-α on the induction of hepcidin-25 was indirect. In in vitro experiments, stimulation with the cytokine combination of IL-6+TNF-α induced weaker hepcidin expression than did with IL-6 alone, and this induction was completely suppressed by tocilizumab but not by infliximab. Conclusions Hepcidin-mediated iron metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA-related anemia. In our cohort, tocilizumab was more effective than TNF-α inhibitors for improving anemia and

  13. A novel Alzheimer disease locus located near the gene encoding tau protein.

    PubMed

    Jun, G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Vronskaya, M; Lambert, J-C; Chung, J; Naj, A C; Kunkle, B W; Wang, L-S; Bis, J C; Bellenguez, C; Harold, D; Lunetta, K L; Destefano, A L; Grenier-Boley, B; Sims, R; Beecham, G W; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Ikram, M A; Fievet, N; Denning, N; Martin, E R; Schmidt, H; Kamatani, Y; Dunstan, M L; Valladares, O; Laza, A R; Zelenika, D; Ramirez, A; Foroud, T M; Choi, S-H; Boland, A; Becker, T; Kukull, W A; van der Lee, S J; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Beekly, D; Fitzpatrick, A L; Hanon, O; Gill, M; Barber, R; Gudnason, V; Campion, D; Love, S; Bennett, D A; Amin, N; Berr, C; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, J D; Lopez, O L; Deramecourt, V; Fox, N C; Cantwell, L B; Tárraga, L; Dufouil, C; Hardy, J; Crane, P K; Eiriksdottir, G; Hannequin, D; Clarke, R; Evans, D; Mosley, T H; Letenneur, L; Brayne, C; Maier, W; De Jager, P; Emilsson, V; Dartigues, J-F; Hampel, H; Kamboh, M I; de Bruijn, R F A G; Tzourio, C; Pastor, P; Larson, E B; Rotter, J I; O'Donovan, M C; Montine, T J; Nalls, M A; Mead, S; Reiman, E M; Jonsson, P V; Holmes, C; St George-Hyslop, P H; Boada, M; Passmore, P; Wendland, J R; Schmidt, R; Morgan, K; Winslow, A R; Powell, J F; Carasquillo, M; Younkin, S G; Jakobsdóttir, J; Kauwe, J S K; Wilhelmsen, K C; Rujescu, D; Nöthen, M M; Hofman, A; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Psaty, B M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Holmans, P; Launer, L J; Mayeux, R; Lathrop, M; Goate, A M; Escott-Price, V; Seshadri, S; Pericak-Vance, M A; Amouyel, P; Williams, J; van Duijn, C M; Schellenberg, G D; Farrer, L A

    2016-01-01

    APOE ɛ4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ɛ4+ (10 352 cases and 9207 controls) and APOE ɛ4- (7184 cases and 26 968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and APOE ɛ4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1 × 10(-4)) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4203 subjects (APOE ɛ4+: 1250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ɛ4-: 718 cases and 1699 controls). Among APOE ɛ4- subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 data sets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8 × 10(-9)). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100-kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ɛ4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ɛ4- subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6 × 10(-7)) is noteworthy, because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-8)), frontal cortex (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-9)) and temporal cortex (P⩽1.2 × 10(-11)). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe

  14. A NOVEL ALZHEIMER DISEASE LOCUS LOCATED NEAR THE GENE ENCODING TAU PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Gyungah; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Vronskaya, Maria; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Chung, Jaeyoon; Naj, Adam C.; Kunkle, Brian W.; Wang, Li-San; Bis, Joshua C.; Bellenguez, Céline; Harold, Denise; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Destefano, Anita L.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Sims, Rebecca; Beecham, Gary W.; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Fievet, Nathalie; Denning, Nicola; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Helena; Kamatani, Yochiro; Dunstan, Melanie L; Valladares, Otto; Laza, Agustin Ruiz; Zelenika, Diana; Ramirez, Alfredo; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Boland, Anne; Becker, Tim; Kukull, Walter A.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Pasquier, Florence; Cruchaga, Carlos; Beekly, Duane; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Hanon, Oliver; Gill, Michael; Barber, Robert; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Campion, Dominique; Love, Seth; Bennett, David A.; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Fox, Nick C; Cantwell, Laura B.; Tárraga, Lluis; Dufouil, Carole; Hardy, John; Crane, Paul K.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Hannequin, Didier; Clarke, Robert; Evans, Denis; Mosley, Thomas H.; Letenneur, Luc; Brayne, Carol; Maier, Wolfgang; De Jager, Philip; Emilsson, Valur; Dartigues, Jean-François; Hampel, Harald; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; de Bruijn, Renee F.A.G.; Tzourio, Christophe; Pastor, Pau; Larson, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; O’Donovan, Michael C; Montine, Thomas J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Mead, Simon; Reiman, Eric M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Holmes, Clive; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Boada, Mercè; Passmore, Peter; Wendland, Jens R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Morgan, Kevin; Winslow, Ashley R.; Powell, John F; Carasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven G.; Jakobsdóttir, Jóhanna; Kauwe, John SK; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Rujescu, Dan; Nöthen, Markus M; Hofman, Albert; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Holmans, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Mayeux, Richard; Lathrop, Mark; Goate, Alison M.; Escott-Price, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2015-01-01

    APOE ε4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ε4+ (10,352 cases and 9,207 controls) and APOE ε4− (7,184 cases and 26,968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a SNP and APOE ε4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1x10−4) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4,203 subjects (APOE ε4+: 1,250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ε4-: 718 cases and 1,699 controls). Among APOE ε4− subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 datasets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8x10−9). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100 kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ε4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ε4− subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/ MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6x10−7) is noteworthy because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P≤1.3x10−8), frontal cortex (P≤1.3x10−9), and temporal cortex (P≤1.2x10−11). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe that targets transcription of alternatively

  15. A novel Alzheimer disease locus located near the gene encoding tau protein.

    PubMed

    Jun, G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Vronskaya, M; Lambert, J-C; Chung, J; Naj, A C; Kunkle, B W; Wang, L-S; Bis, J C; Bellenguez, C; Harold, D; Lunetta, K L; Destefano, A L; Grenier-Boley, B; Sims, R; Beecham, G W; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Ikram, M A; Fievet, N; Denning, N; Martin, E R; Schmidt, H; Kamatani, Y; Dunstan, M L; Valladares, O; Laza, A R; Zelenika, D; Ramirez, A; Foroud, T M; Choi, S-H; Boland, A; Becker, T; Kukull, W A; van der Lee, S J; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Beekly, D; Fitzpatrick, A L; Hanon, O; Gill, M; Barber, R; Gudnason, V; Campion, D; Love, S; Bennett, D A; Amin, N; Berr, C; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, J D; Lopez, O L; Deramecourt, V; Fox, N C; Cantwell, L B; Tárraga, L; Dufouil, C; Hardy, J; Crane, P K; Eiriksdottir, G; Hannequin, D; Clarke, R; Evans, D; Mosley, T H; Letenneur, L; Brayne, C; Maier, W; De Jager, P; Emilsson, V; Dartigues, J-F; Hampel, H; Kamboh, M I; de Bruijn, R F A G; Tzourio, C; Pastor, P; Larson, E B; Rotter, J I; O'Donovan, M C; Montine, T J; Nalls, M A; Mead, S; Reiman, E M; Jonsson, P V; Holmes, C; St George-Hyslop, P H; Boada, M; Passmore, P; Wendland, J R; Schmidt, R; Morgan, K; Winslow, A R; Powell, J F; Carasquillo, M; Younkin, S G; Jakobsdóttir, J; Kauwe, J S K; Wilhelmsen, K C; Rujescu, D; Nöthen, M M; Hofman, A; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Psaty, B M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Holmans, P; Launer, L J; Mayeux, R; Lathrop, M; Goate, A M; Escott-Price, V; Seshadri, S; Pericak-Vance, M A; Amouyel, P; Williams, J; van Duijn, C M; Schellenberg, G D; Farrer, L A

    2016-01-01

    APOE ɛ4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ɛ4+ (10 352 cases and 9207 controls) and APOE ɛ4- (7184 cases and 26 968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and APOE ɛ4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1 × 10(-4)) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4203 subjects (APOE ɛ4+: 1250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ɛ4-: 718 cases and 1699 controls). Among APOE ɛ4- subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 data sets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8 × 10(-9)). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100-kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ɛ4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ɛ4- subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6 × 10(-7)) is noteworthy, because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-8)), frontal cortex (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-9)) and temporal cortex (P⩽1.2 × 10(-11)). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe

  16. Development of severe anemia during fever episodes in patients with hemoglobin E trait and hemoglobin H disease combinations.

    PubMed

    Jetsrisuparb, Arunee; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan; Wiangnon, Surapon; Jetsrisuparb, Charoon; Sirijirachai, Jittima; Chansoong, Kanchana

    2006-04-01

    Globin chain imbalance and tissue hypoxia are important determinants of the clinical severity of thalassemias. Phenotypic expression may be further modified by interactions between alpha- and beta-thalassemia defects. We retrospectively and prospectively studied the clinical and hematologic features in children and adults with hemoglobin (Hb) E trait/Hb H disease (SEA/Paksé) (seven cases) and Hb E trait/Hb H disease (SEA/Constant Spring) (29 cases) and found that they had similar presentations. The severity of these two intermediate thalassemic manifestations ranged from very mild to severe. Severe anemia developed in accordance with very high fever, whereupon the range of Hb and hematocrit (Hct) levels declined to 5.2-5.8 g/dL and 13%-19%, respectively. In one case, during a hemoconcentrated state as occurs in dengue hemorrhagic fever, the Hb and Hct were 10 g/dL and 31%; the latter rose to 35% after fluid therapy. In some patients, the range of Hb and Hct levels was constantly low (4.3-5.8 g/dL and 15%-19%, respectively). (If dengue hemorrhagic fever is misdiagnosed, a fatal outcome may occur for thalassemic patients.) After a hemodiluted condition as in acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, the respective Hb and Hct were 5.4 g/dL and 19%. These observations suggest that the instability of Hb E, especially during fever, may play an important role in the clinical manifestations of Hb E trait/Hb H disease with Hb Paksé and with Hb Constant Spring.

  17. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  18. Association analysis revealed one susceptibility locus for vitiligo with immune-related diseases in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Yao, Weiyi; Pan, Qian; Tang, Xianfa; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Wenjun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Gao, Jinping; Sheng, Yujun; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Anping

    2015-07-01

    Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin and hair, and is associated with an elevated risk of other immune-related diseases. However, there is no reported study on the associations between immune susceptibility polymorphisms and the risk of vitiligo with immune-related diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential influence of 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 18q21.31 (rs10503019), 4p16.1 (rs11940117), 3q28 (rs1464510), 14q12 (rs2273844), 12q13.2 (rs2456973), 16q12.2 (rs3213758), 10q25.3 (rs4353229), 3q13.33 (rs59374417), and 10p15.1 (rs706779 and rs7090530) on vitiligo with immune-related diseases in the Chinese Han population. All SNPs were genotyped in 552 patients with vitiligo-associated immune-related diseases and 1656 controls using the Sequenom MassArray system. Data were analyzed with PLINK 1.07 software. The C allele of rs2456973 at 12q13.2 was observed to be significantly associated with vitiligo-associated immune-related diseases (autoimmune diseases and allergic diseases) (P = 0.0028, odds ratio (OR) = 1.27). In subphenotype analysis, the rs2456973 C allele was also significantly associated with early-onset vitiligo by comparing with controls (P = 0.0001) and in the case-only analysis (P = 0.0114). We confirmed that 12q13.2 was an important candidate locus for vitiligo with immune-related diseases (autoimmune diseases and allergic diseases) and affected disease phenotypes with early onset.

  19. Abnormal expression of inflammatory genes in placentas of women with sickle cell anemia and sickle hemoglobin C disease.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Letícia C; Costa, Maria Laura; Ferreira, Regiane; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia M; Lanaro, Carolina; Fertrin, Kleber Y; Surita, Fernanda G; Parpinelli, Mary A; Costa, Fernando F; Melo, Mônica Barbosa de

    2016-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a complex disease that is characterized by the polymerization of deoxyhemoglobin S, altered red blood cell membrane biology, endothelial activation, hemolysis, a procoagulant state, acute and chronic inflammation, and vaso-occlusion. Among the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy, oxygen is consumed by fetal growth, and pregnant women with SCD are more frequently exposed to low oxygen levels. This might lead to red blood cells sickling, and, consequently, to vaso-occlusion. The mechanisms by which SCD affects placental physiology are largely unknown, and chronic inflammation might be involved in this process. This study aimed to evaluate the gene expression profile of inflammatory response mediators in the placentas of pregnant women with sickle cell cell anemia (HbSS) and hemoglobinopathy SC (HbSC). Our results show differences in a number of these genes. For the HbSS group, when compared to the control group, the following genes showed differential expression: IL1RAP (2.76-fold), BCL6 (4.49-fold), CXCL10 (-2.12-fold), CXCR1 (-3.66-fold), and C3 (-2.0-fold). On the other hand, the HbSC group presented differential expressions of the following genes, when compared to the control group: IL1RAP (4.33-fold), CXCL1 (3.05-fold), BCL6 (4.13-fold), CXCL10 (-3.32-fold), C3 (-2.0-fold), and TLR3 (2.38-fold). Taken together, these data strongly suggest a differential expression of several inflammatory genes in both SCD (HbSS and HbSC), indicating that the placenta might become an environment with hypoxia, and increased inflammation, which could lead to improper placental development. PMID:27546026

  20. Mapping of the chromosome 1p36 region surrounding the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A locus

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, P.; Gere, S.; Wolpert, C.

    1994-09-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy. Although CMT2 is clinically indistinguishable from CMT1, the two forms can be differentiated by pathological and neurophysiological methods. We have established one locus, CMT2A on chromosome 1p36, and have established genetic heterogeneity. This locus maps to the region of the deletions associated with neuroblastoma. We have now identified an additional 11 CMT2 families. Three families are linked to chromosome 1p36 while six families are excluded from this region. Another six families are currently under analysis and collection. To date the CMT2A families represent one third of those CMT2 families examined. We have established a microdissection library of the 1p36 region which is currently being characterized for microsatellite repeats and STSs using standard hybridization techniques and a modified degenerate primer method. In addition, new markers (D1S253, D1S450, D1S489, D1S503, GATA27E04, and GATA4H04) placed in this region are being mapped using critical recombinants in the CEPH reference pedigrees. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been used to confirm mapping. A YAC contig is being assembled from the CEPH megabase library using STSs to isolate key YACs which are extended by vectorette end clone and Alu-PCR. These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrates further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  1. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  2. Safety of total dose iron dextran infusion in geriatric patients with chronic kidney disease and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Dossabhoy, Neville R; Turley, Steven; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Tapolyai, Mihaly; Sulaiman, Karina

    2014-08-01

    There are limited data on total dose infusion (TDI) using iron dextran in geriatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Our goal was to evaluate the safety of TDI in this setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review spanning a 5 year period (2002-2007), including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran TDI. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin and iron stores were recorded pre- and post-dose. TDI diluted in normal saline was administered intravenously over 4-6 hours after an initial test dose. One hundred fifty-three patients received a total of 250 doses of TDI (mean ± SD=971 ± 175 mg); age was 69 ± 12 years and creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All stages of CKD were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hemoglobin and iron stores improved post-TDI (P<0.001). None of the patients experienced an anaphylactic reaction or death. Adverse events (AEs) were noted in 8 out of 250 administered doses (3.2%). The most common AEs were itching, chills and back pain. One hundred and ten doses of high molecular weight (HMW) iron dextran produced 6 AEs (5.45%), whereas 140 doses of low molecular weight (LMW) iron dextran produced 2 AEs (1.43%), a non-significant trend (P=0.1433 by Fishers Exact Test). Iron dextran TDI is relatively safe and effective in correcting IDA in geriatric CKD patients. Fewer AEs were noted with the LMW compared to the HMW product. LMW iron dextran given as TDI can save both cost and time, helping to alleviate issues of non-compliance and patient scheduling.

  3. Transduction of Photoreceptors With Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Lentiviral Vectors: Safety and Biodistribution of StarGen for Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Binley, Katie; Widdowson, Peter; Loader, Julie; Kelleher, Michelle; Iqball, Sharifah; Ferrige, Georgina; de Belin, Jackie; Carlucci, Marie; Angell-Manning, Diana; Hurst, Felicity; Ellis, Scott; Miskin, James; Fernandes, Alcides; Wong, Paul; Allikmets, Rando; Bergstrom, Christopher; Aaberg, Thomas; Yan, Jiong; Kong, Jian; Gouras, Peter; Prefontaine, Annick; Vezina, Mark; Bussieres, Martin; Naylor, Stuart; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. StarGen is an equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vector that expresses the photoreceptor-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABCA4) protein that is mutated in Stargardt disease (STGD1), a juvenile macular dystrophy. EIAV vectors are able to efficiently transduce rod and cone photoreceptors in addition to retinal pigment epithelium in the adult macaque and rabbit retina following subretinal delivery. The safety and biodistribution of StarGen following subretinal delivery in macaques and rabbits was assessed. Methods. Regular ophthalmic examinations, IOP measurements, ERG responses, and histopathology were carried out in both species to compare control and vector-treated eyes. Tissue and fluid samples were obtained to evaluate the persistence, biodistribution, and shedding of the vector following subretinal delivery. Results. Ophthalmic examinations revealed a slightly higher level of inflammation in StarGen compared with control treated eyes in both species. However, inflammation was transient and no overt toxicity was observed in StarGen treated eyes and there were no abnormal clinical findings. There was no StarGen-associated rise in IOP or abnormal ERG response in either rabbits or macaques. Histopathologic examination of the eyes did not reveal any detrimental changes resulting from subretinal administration of StarGen. Although antibodies to StarGen vector components were detected in rabbit but not macaque serum, this immunologic response did not result in any long-term toxicity. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the StarGen vector was restricted to the ocular compartment. Conclusions. In summary, these studies demonstrate StarGen to be well tolerated and localized following subretinal administration. PMID:23620430

  4. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Study of large inbred Friedreich ataxia families reveals a recombination between D9S15 and the disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Belal, S.; Ben Hamida, C.; Hentati, F.; Ben Hamida, M. ); Panayides, K.; Ioannou, P.; MIddleton, L.T. ); Sirugo, G.; Koenig, S.; Mandel, J.L ); Beckmann, J. )

    1992-12-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. Precise linkage mapping of the Friedreich ataxia locus (FRDA) in 9q13-q21 should lead to the isolation of the defective gene by positional cloning. The two closest DNA markers, D9S5 and D9S15, show very tight linkage to FRDA, making difficult the ordering of the three loci. The authors present a linkage study of three large Friedreich ataxia families of Tunisian origin, with several multiallelic markers around D9S5 and D9S15. Haplotype data were used to investigate genetic homogeneity of the disease in these geographically related families. A meiotic recombination was found in a nonaffected individual, which excludes a 150-kb segment, including D9S15, as a possible location for the Freidreich ataxia gene and which should orient the search in the D9S5 region. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Identification of a locus on mouse chromosome 3 involved in differential susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed Central

    Melvold, R W; Jokinen, D M; Miller, S D; Dal Canto, M C; Lipton, H L

    1990-01-01

    Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease results from a chronic infection in the white matter of the central nervous system and provides an excellent model for human multiple sclerosis. Like multiple sclerosis, there are genetic risk factors in disease development, including genes associated with the major histocompatibility complex and with those encoding the beta chain of the T-cell receptor. Comparisons of the susceptible DBA/2 and resistant C57BL/6 strains have indicated an important role for the H-2D locus and for a non-H-2 gene (not involving the beta chain of the T-cell receptor) in differential susceptibility. In the present report, analysis of recombinant-inbred strains (BXD) between the DBA/2 and C57BL/6 strains indicated that this non-H-2 locus is located at the centromeric end of chromosome 3 near (4 +/- 4 centimorgans) the carbonic anhydrase-2 (Car-2) enzyme locus. PMID:2296080

  7. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  8. Detection of Slipped-DNAs at the Trinucleotide Repeats of the Myotonic Dystrophy Type I Disease Locus in Patient Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Axford, Michelle M.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Nakamori, Masayuki; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria; Thornton, Charles A.; Pearson, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Slipped-strand DNAs, formed by out-of-register mispairing of repeat units on complementary strands, were proposed over 55 years ago as transient intermediates in repeat length mutations, hypothesized to cause at least 40 neurodegenerative diseases. While slipped-DNAs have been characterized in vitro, evidence of slipped-DNAs at an endogenous locus in biologically relevant tissues, where instability varies widely, is lacking. Here, using an anti-DNA junction antibody and immunoprecipitation, we identify slipped-DNAs at the unstable trinucleotide repeats (CTG)n•(CAG)n of the myotonic dystrophy disease locus in patient brain, heart, muscle and other tissues, where the largest expansions arise in non-mitotic tissues such as cortex and heart, and are smallest in the cerebellum. Slipped-DNAs are shown to be present on the expanded allele and in chromatinized DNA. Slipped-DNAs are present as clusters of slip-outs along a DNA, with each slip-out having 1–100 extrahelical repeats. The allelic levels of slipped-DNA containing molecules were significantly greater in the heart over the cerebellum (relative to genomic equivalents of pre-IP input DNA) of a DM1 individual; an enrichment consistent with increased allelic levels of slipped-DNA structures in tissues having greater levels of CTG instability. Surprisingly, this supports the formation of slipped-DNAs as persistent mutation products of repeat instability, and not merely as transient mutagenic intermediates. These findings further our understanding of the processes of mutation and genetic variation. PMID:24367268

  9. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  10. Targeted sequencing of the Paget's disease associated 14q32 locus identifies several missense coding variants in RIN3 that predispose to Paget's disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Mahéva; Soares, Dinesh C.; Wani, Sachin; Sophocleous, Antonia; Warner, Jon; Salter, Donald M.; Ralston, Stuart H.; Albagha, Omar M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a common disorder with a strong genetic component characterized by increased but disorganized bone remodelling. Previous genome-wide association studies identified a locus on chromosome 14q32 tagged by rs10498635 which was significantly associated with susceptibility to PDB in several European populations. Here we conducted fine-mapping and targeted sequencing of the candidate locus to identify possible functional variants. Imputation in 741 PDB patients and 2699 controls confirmed that the association was confined to a 60 kb region in the RIN3 gene and conditional analysis adjusting for rs10498635 identified no new independent signals. Sequencing of the RIN3 gene identified a common missense variant (p.R279C) that was strongly associated with the disease (OR = 0.64; P = 1.4 × 10−9), and was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs10498635. A further 13 rare missense variants were identified, seven of which were novel and detected only in PDB cases. When combined, these rare variants were over-represented in cases compared with controls (OR = 3.72; P = 8.9 × 10−10). Most rare variants were located in a region that encodes a proline-rich, intrinsically disordered domain of the protein and many were predicted to be pathogenic. RIN3 was expressed in bone tissue and its expression level was ∼10-fold higher in osteoclasts compared with osteoblasts. We conclude that susceptibility to PDB at the 14q32 locus is mediated by a combination of common and rare coding variants in RIN3 and suggest that RIN3 may contribute to PDB susceptibility by affecting osteoclast function. PMID:25701875

  11. Unique β-Glucuronidase Locus in Gut Microbiomes of Crohn’s Disease Patients and Unaffected First-Degree Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Gloux, Karine; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease, an incurable chronic inflammatory bowel disease, has been attributed to both genetic predisposition and environmental factors. A dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, observed in numerous patients but also in at least one hundred unaffected first-degree relatives, was proposed to have a causal role. Gut microbiota β-D-glucuronidases (EC 3.2.1.33) hydrolyse β-D-glucuronate from glucuronidated compounds. They include a GUS group, that is homologous to the Escherichia coli GusA, and a BG group, that is homologous to metagenomically identified H11G11 BG and has unidentified natural substrates. H11G11 BG is part of the functional core of the human gut microbiota whereas GusA, known to regenerate various toxic products, is variably found in human subjects. We investigated potential risk markers for Crohn’s disease using DNA-sequence-based exploration of the β-D-glucuronidase loci (GUS or Firmicute H11G11-BG and the respective co-encoded glucuronide transporters). Crohn’s disease-related microbiomes revealed a higher frequency of a C7D2 glucuronide transporter (12/13) compared to unrelated healthy subjects (8/32). This transporter was in synteny with the potential harmful GUS β-D-glucuronidase as only observed in a Eubacterium eligens plasmid. A conserved NH2-terminal sequence in the transporter (FGDFGND motif) was found in 83% of the disease-related subjects and only in 12% of controls. We propose a microbiota-pathology hypothesis in which the presence of this unique β-glucuronidase locus may contribute to an increase risk for Crohn’s disease. PMID:26824357

  12. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  13. Child with aplastic anemia: Anesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Gupta, Babita; Sharma, Aanchal; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare heterogeneous disorder of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia with the depletion of all types of blood cells. This results in anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which pose a challenge to both surgical and anesthetic management of such cases. We report a child with aplastic anemia who sustained traumatic ulcer on the arm and underwent split-thickness skin grafting under general anesthesia. There are only two case reports on anesthetic considerations in aplastic anemia patients in the literature. The anesthetic management is challenging because of the rarity of the disease, associated pancytopenia and immunosuppression. PMID:23162410

  14. High-resolution genetic localization of a modifying locus affecting disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidneys (jck) mouse model of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a locus on proximal Chr 4 modifies disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidney (jck) mouse, a model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) that carries a mutation of the Nek8 serine-threonine kinase. In this study we used QTL analysis of independently constructed B6.D2 congenic lines to confirm this and showed that this locus has a highly significant effect. We constructed sub-congenic lines to more specifically localize the modifier and have determined it resides in a 3.2 Mb interval containing 28 genes. These include Invs and Anks6, which are both excellent candidates for the modifier as mutations in these genes result in PKD and both genes are known to genetically and physically interact with Nek8. However, examination of strain-specific DNA sequence and kidney expression did not reveal clear differences that might implicate either gene as a modifier of PKD severity. The fact that our high-resolution analysis did not yield an unambiguous result highlights the challenge of establishing the causality of strain-specific variants as genetic modifiers, and suggests that alternative strategies be considered. PMID:27114383

  15. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  16. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  17. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  18. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  19. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  20. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Suk; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyoung Sook; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Park, Sue Kyung; Lee, Joongyub; Hyun, Young Youl; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Ahn, Curie; Choi, Kyu Hun

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD). Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR. Results Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR < 30 mg/g as a reference group; 30–299 mg/g, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.88–2.33; ≥300 mg/g, adjusted OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.12–3.10). In addition, graded associations were observed in cross-categorized groups of a higher ACR and eGFR compared to the reference group with an ACR <30 mg/g and eGFR ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that albuminuria was a significant risk factor for anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR. PMID:26430892

  1. A putative quantitative trait locus on chromosome 20 associated with bovine pathogenic disease incidence.

    PubMed

    Casas, E; Snowder, G D

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to detect QTL associated with the incidence of multiple pathogenic diseases in offspring from half-sib bovine families. Four F(1) sires were used to produce offspring: Brahman x Hereford (BH; n = 547), Piedmontese x Angus (PA; n = 209), Brahman x Angus (n = 176), and Belgian Blue x MARC III (n = 246). Treatment records for bovine respiratory disease, infectious keratoconjunctivitis (pinkeye), and infectious pododermatitis (footrot) were available for all of the offspring from birth to slaughter. The incidences of these 3 microbial pathogenic diseases were combined into a single binary trait to represent an overall pathogenic disease incidence. Offspring diagnosed and treated for 1 or more of the previously mentioned pathogenic diseases were coded as a 1 for affected. Cattle with no treatment record were coded as 0 for healthy. A putative QTL for pathogenic disease incidence was detected in the family derived from the BH sire at the genome-wise suggestive level. This was supported by evidence, in the same chromosomal region, of a similar QTL in the family derived from the PA sire. The maximum F-statistic (F = 13.52; P = 0.0003) was located at cM 18. The support interval of the QTL spanned from cM 9 to 28. Further studies should explore this QTL by using other bovine populations to further confirm the QTL and refine the QTL support interval. Offspring inheriting the Hereford allele, in the family from the BH sire, and the Angus allele, in the family from the PA sire, were less susceptible to incidence of pathogenic diseases, when compared with those inheriting the Brahman allele and Piedmontese allele, from the BH and PA sires, respectively. PMID:18502878

  2. A radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11q22-q23 containing the ataxia-telangiectasia disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, C.W. III; Cox, D.R.; Kapp, L.; Murnane, J. ); Cornelis, F.; Julier, C.; Lathrop, M.; James, M.R. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a high-resolution radiation hybrid map of human chromosome 11q22-q23 containing the ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) disease gene loci. The order and intermarker distances of 32 chromosome 11q22-q23 markers were determined by a multipoint maximum likelihood method analysis of the cosegregation of markers in 100 radiation hybrids. The radiation hybrid map of polymorphic loci was consistent with genetic linkage maps of common markers. Several genes, including [alpha]B-crystallin, adrenal ferrodoxin, CBL2, collagenase, dopamine receptor type 2, neural cell adhesion molecule, progesterone receptor, and stromelysins 1 and 2, were placed in relation to previously ordered, genetically mapped polymorphic loci. Five new markers ([alpha]B-crystallin, adrenal ferrodoxin, CJ52.114, CJ52.3, and D11S535) were ordered within the current published flanking markers for the AT group A and group C disease loci. A candidate AT group D gene (ATDC) identified by Kapp et al. was mapped telomeric to THY1, outside the flanking markers identified by multipoint linkage analysis for the major AT locus. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Correlates of Anemia in American Blacks and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Zakai, Neil A.; McClure, Leslie A.; Prineas, Ronald; Howard, George; McClellan, William; Holmes, Chris E.; Newsome, Britt B.; Warnock, David G.; Audhya, Paul

    2009-01-01

    For unclear reasons, anemia is more common in American blacks than whites. The authors evaluated anemia prevalence (using World Health Organization criteria) among 19,836 blacks and whites recruited in 2003–2007 for the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Renal Ancillary study and characterized anemia by 3 anemia-associated conditions (chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and microcytosis). They used multivariable models to assess potential causes of race differences in anemia. Anemia was 3.3-fold more common in blacks than whites, with little attenuation after adjusting for demographic variables, socioeconomic factors, and comorbid conditions. Increasing age, residence in the US southeast, lower income, vascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and never smoking were associated with anemia. Age, diabetes, and vascular disease were stronger correlates of anemia among whites than blacks (P < 0.05). Among those with anemia, chronic kidney disease was less common among blacks than whites (22% vs. 34%), whereas inflammation (18% vs. 14%) and microcytosis (22% vs. 11%) were more common. In this large, geographically diverse cohort, anemia was 3-fold more common in blacks than whites with different characteristics and correlates. Race differences in anemia prevalence were not explained by the factors studied. Future research into the causes and consequences of anemia in different racial groups is needed. PMID:19066309

  4. Parenteral Fish Oil-Associated Burr Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mallah, Husam S.; Brown, Marilyn R.; Rossi, Thomas M.; Block, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of burr cell anemia in an infant with short bowel syndrome who received parenteral fish oil (Omegaven, Fresenius-Kabi, Graz, Austria) after development of total parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease. Parenteral fish oil was discontinued, and the burr cell anemia disappeared, suggesting that parenteral fish oil might be associated with hemolytic anemia. PMID:20105643

  5. Contemporary use of the disease concept: III. A pedantic failure to change behavior regarding the problem of anemia.

    PubMed

    Sapira, J D

    1991-02-01

    The frequency with which house staff noticed their patients to be anemic, the frequency with which they tried to find out why the patients were anemic, and the diagnostic accuracy of such endeavors were measured. Next, an intervention was conducted in which the teams were lectured on the subject of anemia, given reading materials on the subject, and given social encouragement to solve the problem. At follow-up no improvement was found in any of the outcome variables.

  6. The influence of IS1301 in the capsule biosynthesis locus on meningococcal carriage and disease.

    PubMed

    Kugelberg, Elisabeth; Gollan, Bridget; Farrance, Christopher; Bratcher, Holly; Lucidarme, Jay; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén; Maiden, Martin C J; Borrow, Ray; Tang, Christoph M

    2010-02-25

    Previously we have shown that insertion of IS1301 in the sia/ctr intergenic region (IGR) of serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis (MenC) isolates from Spain confers increased resistance against complement-mediated killing. Here we investigate the significance of IS1301 in the same location in N. meningitidis isolates from the UK. PCR and sequencing was used to screen a collection of more than 1500 meningococcal carriage and disease isolates from the UK for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR. IS1301 was not identified in the IGR among vaccine failure strains but was frequently found in serogroup B isolates (MenB) from clonal complex 269 (cc269). Almost all IS1301 insertions in cc269 were associated with novel polymorphisms, and did not change capsule expression or resistance to human complement. After excluding sequence types (STs) distant from the central genotype within cc269, there was no significant difference for the presence of IS1301 in the IGR of carriage isolates compared to disease isolates. Isolates with insertion of IS1301 in the IGR are not responsible for MenC disease in UK vaccine failures. Novel polymorphisms associated with IS1301 in the IGR of UK MenB isolates do not lead to the resistance phenotype seen for IS1301 in the IGR of MenC isolates.

  7. Analysis of 17 autoimmune disease-associated variants in type 1 diabetes identifies 6q23/TNFAIP3 as a susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Fung, E Y M G; Smyth, D J; Howson, J M M; Cooper, J D; Walker, N M; Stevens, H; Wicker, L S; Todd, J A

    2009-03-01

    As a result of genome-wide association studies in larger sample sets, there has been an increase in identifying genes that influence susceptibility to individual immune-mediated diseases, as well as evidence that some genes are associated with more than one disease. In this study, we tested 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from 16 gene regions that have been reported in several autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and Crohn's disease (CD) to determine whether the variants are also associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). In up to 8010 cases and 9733 controls we found some evidence for an association with T1D in the regions containing genes: 2q32/STAT4, 17q21/STAT3, 5p15/ERAP1 (ARTS1), 6q23/TNFAIP3 and 12q13/KIF5A/PIP4K2C with allelic P-values ranging from 3.70 x 10(-3) to 3.20 x 10(-5). These findings extend our knowledge of susceptibility locus sharing across different autoimmune diseases, and provide convincing evidence that the RA/SLE locus 6q23/TNFAIP3 is a newly identified T1D locus. PMID:19110536

  8. Safety and Efficacy of PDpoetin for Management of Anemia in Patients with end Stage Renal Disease on Maintenance Hemodialysis: Results from a Phase IV Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Javidan, Abbas Norouzi; Shahbazian, Heshmatollah; Emami, Amirhossein; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Emami-Razavi, Hassan; Farhadkhani, Masoumeh; Ahmadzadeh, Ahmad; Gorjipour, Fazel

    2014-08-26

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is available for correcting anemia. PDpoetin, a new brand of rHuEPO, has been certified by Food and Drug Department of Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran for clinical use in patients with chronic kidney disease. We conducted this post-marketing survey to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Patients from 4 centers in Iran were enrolled for this multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase IV clinical trial. Changes in blood chemistry, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, renal function, and other characteristics of the patients were recorded for 4 months; 501 of the patients recruited, completed this study. Mean age of the patients was 50.9 (±16.2) years. 48.7% of patients were female. Mean of the hemoglobin value in all of the 4 centers was 9.29 (±1.43) g/dL at beginning of the study and reached 10.96 (±2.23) g/dL after 4 months and showed significant increase overall (P<0.001). PDpoetin dose was stable at 50-100 U/kg thrice weekly. Hemorheologic disturbancesand changes in blood electrolytes was not observed. No case of immunological reactions to PDpoetin was observed. Our study, therefore, showed that PDpoetin has significantly raised the level of hemoglobin in the hemodialysis patients (about 1.7±0.6 g/dL). Anemia were successfully corrected in 49% of patients under study. Use of this biosimilar was shown to be safe and effective for the maintenance of hemoglobin in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of PDpoetin for Management of Anemia in Patients with end Stage Renal Disease on Maintenance Hemodialysis: Results from a Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Javidan, Abbas Norouzi; Shahbazian, Heshmatollah; Emami, Amirhossein; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Emami-Razavi, Hassan; Farhadkhani, Masoumeh; Gorjipour, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is available for correcting anemia. PDpoetin, a new brand of rHuEPO, has been certified by Food and Drug Department of Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran for clinical use in patients with chronic kidney disease. We conducted this post-marketing survey to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Patients from 4 centers in Iran were enrolled for this multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase IV clinical trial. Changes in blood chemistry, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, renal function, and other characteristics of the patients were recorded for 4 months; 501 of the patients recruited, completed this study. Mean age of the patients was 50.9 (±16.2) years. 48.7% of patients were female. Mean of the hemoglobin value in all of the 4 centers was 9.29 (±1.43) g/dL at beginning of the study and reached 10.96 (±2.23) g/dL after 4 months and showed significant increase overall (P<0.001). PDpoetin dose was stable at 50-100 U/kg thrice weekly. Hemorheologic disturbancesand changes in blood electrolytes was not observed. No case of immunological reactions to PDpoetin was observed. Our study, therefore, showed that PDpoetin has significantly raised the level of hemoglobin in the hemodialysis patients (about 1.7±0.6 g/dL). Anemia were successfully corrected in 49% of patients under study. Use of this biosimilar was shown to be safe and effective for the maintenance of hemoglobin in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:25317316

  10. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  11. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A.; Alghamdi, Sharifa A.; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y.; Alhussaini, Bakr H.; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  12. Alterations of the IKBKG locus and diseases: an update and a report of 13 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Francesca; Pescatore, Alessandra; Bal, Elodie; Ghoul, Aida; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Lioi, Maria Brigida; D'Urso, Michele; Rabia, Smail Hadj; Bodemer, Christine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Smahi, Asma; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase gamma (IKBKG), also called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) essential modulator (NEMO), gene are the most common single cause of incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in females and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) in males. The IKBKG gene, located in the Xq28 chromosomal region, encodes for the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkB) kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of the NF-kB pathway. Therefore, the remarkably heterogeneous and often severe clinical presentation reported in IP is due to the pleiotropic role of this signaling transcription pathway. A recurrent exon 4_10 genomic rearrangement in the IKBKG gene accounts for 60 to 80% of IP-causing mutations. Besides the IKBKG rearrangement found in IP females (which is lethal in males), a total of 69 different small mutations (missense, frameshift, nonsense, and splice-site mutations) have been reported, including 13 novel ones in this work. The updated distribution of all the IP- and EDA-ID-causing mutations along the IKBKG gene highlights a secondary hotspot mutation in exon 10, which contains only 11% of the protein. Furthermore, familial inheritance analysis revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of sporadic cases (>65%). The sum of the observations can aid both in determining the molecular basis of IP and EDA-ID allelic diseases, and in genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:18350553

  13. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  14. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD.

  15. RPS2, an Arabidopsis disease resistance locus specifying recognition of Pseudomonas syringae strains expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2.

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, B N; Bent, A F; Dahlbeck, D; Innes, R W; Staskawicz, B J

    1993-01-01

    A molecular genetic approach was used to identify and characterize plant genes that control bacterial disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A screen for mutants with altered resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2 resulted in the isolation of four susceptible rps (resistance to P. syringae) mutants. The rps mutants lost resistance specifically to bacterial strains expressing avrRpt2 as they retained resistance to Pst strains expressing the avirulence genes avrB or avrRpm1. Genetic analysis indicated that in each of the four rps mutants, susceptibility was due to a single mutation mapping to the same locus on chromosome 4. Identification of a resistance locus with specificity for a single bacterial avirulence gene suggests that this locus, designated RPS2, controls specific recognition of bacteria expressing the avirulence gene avrRpt2. Ecotype Wü-0, a naturally occurring line that is susceptible to Pst strains expressing avrRpt2, appears to lack a functional allele at RPS2, demonstrating that there is natural variation at the RPS2 locus among wild populations of Arabidopsis. PMID:8400869

  16. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid in your diet Hemolytic anemia Long-term alcoholism Use of certain medicines (such as phenytoin [Dilantin], ... raise your risk for this type of anemia: Alcoholism Eating overcooked food Poor diet (often seen in ...

  17. How Is Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This ... iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning. Procedures If your anemia is severe, your doctor ...

  18. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  19. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video) Meconium Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  20. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  1. Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the FRMD4A gene as a risk locus for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J-C; Grenier-Boley, B; Harold, D; Zelenika, D; Chouraki, V; Kamatani, Y; Sleegers, K; Ikram, M A; Hiltunen, M; Reitz, C; Mateo, I; Feulner, T; Bullido, M; Galimberti, D; Concari, L; Alvarez, V; Sims, R; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Deniz-Naranjo, C; Solfrizzi, V; Sorbi, S; Arosio, B; Spalletta, G; Siciliano, G; Epelbaum, J; Hannequin, D; Dartigues, J-F; Tzourio, C; Berr, C; Schrijvers, E M C; Rogers, R; Tosto, G; Pasquier, F; Bettens, K; Van Cauwenberghe, C; Fratiglioni, L; Graff, C; Delepine, M; Ferri, R; Reynolds, C A; Lannfelt, L; Ingelsson, M; Prince, J A; Chillotti, C; Pilotto, A; Seripa, D; Boland, A; Mancuso, M; Bossù, P; Annoni, G; Nacmias, B; Bosco, P; Panza, F; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Del Zompo, M; Coto, E; Owen, M; O'Donovan, M; Valdivieso, F; Caffara, P; Scarpini, E; Combarros, O; Buée, L; Campion, D; Soininen, H; Breteler, M; Riemenschneider, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Alpérovitch, A; Lathrop, M; Trégouët, D-A; Williams, J; Amouyel, P

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to the discovery of nine new loci of genetic susceptibility in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the landscape of the AD genetic susceptibility is far away to be complete and in addition to single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses as performed in conventional GWAS, complementary strategies need to be applied to overcome limitations inherent to this type of approaches. We performed a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study in the EADI1 study (n=2025 AD cases and 5328 controls) by applying a sliding-windows approach. After exclusion of loci already known to be involved in AD (APOE, BIN1 and CR1), 91 regions with suggestive haplotype effects were identified. In a second step, we attempted to replicate the best suggestive haplotype associations in the GERAD1 consortium (2820 AD cases and 6356 controls) and observed that 9 of them showed nominal association. In a third step, we tested relevant haplotype associations in a combined analysis of five additional case–control studies (5093 AD cases and 4061 controls). We consistently replicated the association of a haplotype within FRMD4A on Chr.10p13 in all the data set analyzed (OR: 1.68; 95% CI: (1.43–1.96); P=1.1 × 10−10). We finally searched for association between SNPs within the FRMD4A locus and Aβ plasma concentrations in three independent non-demented populations (n=2579). We reported that polymorphisms were associated with plasma Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio (best signal, P=5.4 × 10−7). In conclusion, combining both GWHA study and a conservative three-stage replication approach, we characterised FRMD4A as a new genetic risk factor of AD. PMID:22430674

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  3. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  4. Iron-deficiency anemia caused by a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Rintaro; Matsuda, Tomoki; Chonan, Akimichi

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was orally administered rabeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), for gastroesophageal reflux disease, after which he gradually developed iron-deficiency anemia. The anemia did not improve following the administration of ferrous fumarate, and endoscopic screening of the entire gastrointestinal tract, including the small intestine, did not reveal any findings indicating the cause of the anemia. The patient was then switched from rabeprazole to famotidine and the anemia was cured within three months. There is much debate as to whether the long-term use of PPIs causes iron-deficiency. However, this case strongly suggests that PPIs can induce iron-deficiency anemia.

  5. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27542426

  6. Comparison of two recombinant erythropoietin formulations in patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: A parallel, randomized, double blind study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Oliva, Jorge F; Casanova-González, Martha; García-García, Idrian; Porrero-Martín, Pedro J; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen M; Hernández-Montero, Tairí; Lagarde-Ampudia, Marcia; Casanova-Kutsareva, Yuri; Ávila-Albuerne, Yisel; Vargas-Batista, Alicia; Bobillo-López, Hailen; Herrera-Valdés, Raúl; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Background Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) is used for the treatment of last stage renal anemia. A new EPO preparation was obtained in Cuba in order to make this treatment fully nationally available. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety properties of two recombinant EPO formulations in patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Methods A parallel, randomized, double blind study was performed. A single 100 IU/Kg EPO dose was administered subcutaneously. Heberitro (Heber Biotec, Havana, formulation A), a newly developed product and Eprex (CILAG AG, Switzerland, formulation B), as reference treatment were compared. Thirty-four patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis were included. Patients had not received EPO previously. Serum EPO level was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) during 120 hours after administration. Clinical and laboratory variables were determined as pharmacodynamic and safety criteria until 216 hours. Results Both groups of patients were similar regarding all demographic and baseline characteristics. EPO kinetics profiles were similar for both formulations; the pharmacokinetic parameters were very close (i.e., AUC: 4667 vs. 4918 mIU.h/mL; Cmax: 119.1 vs. 119.7 mIU/mL; Tmax: 13.9 vs. 18.1 h; half-life, 20.0 vs. 22.5 h for formulations A and B, respectively). The 90% confidence intervals for the ratio between both products regarding these metrics were close to the 0.8 – 1.25 range, considered necessary for bioequivalence. Differences did not reach 20% in any case and were not determined by a formulation effect, but probably by a patients' variability effect. Concerning pharmacodynamic features, a high similitude in reticulocyte counts increments until 216 hours and the percentage decrease in serum iron until 120 hours was observed. There were no differences between formulations regarding the adverse events and their intensity. The more

  7. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  8. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Venkateswara K; Brine, Patrick L; Gemmel, David; Ingnam, Sisham

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case. PMID:27609735

  9. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kollipara, Venkateswara K.; Brine, Patrick L.; Gemmel, David; Ingnam, Sisham

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case. PMID:27609735

  10. Aggressive therapy of congestive heart failure and associated chronic renal failure with medications and correction of anemia stops or slows the progression of both diseases.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, D S; Wexler, D; Blum, M; Sheps, D; Schwartz, D; Yachnin, T; Baruch, R; Tchebiner, J; Zubkov, A; Shaked, M; Steinbruch, S; Keren, G; Iaina, A

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of congestive heart failure (CHF) is increasing rapidly in the community. We and others have shown that the prevalence and severity of both anemia and chronic renal failure (CRF) increase steadily with increasing severity of CHF. We have also shown that CHF patients may be resistant to standard drug therapy for CHF as long as the associated anemia is not corrected, and that correction of the anemia with subcutaneous erythropoietin and intravenous iron sucrose (Venofer: Vifor International, St. Gallen, Switzerland) may improve both the CHF and CRF and markedly reduce hospitalizations without causing side effects. We report here our experience with correcting anemia in this manner in 126 cases of anemic-resistant CHF patients. As in our previous studies, correction of the anemia improved both CHF and CRF, and reduced hospitalizations. Our studies suggest that correction of even mild anemia in CHF may be an important addition to the treatment of patients with the combination of CHF and CRF.

  11. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Martin, Alison; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of “anemia of unknown etiology” and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders. Methods This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient’s anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities. Conclusions We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology. PMID:27310832

  12. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  13. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  14. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  15. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  16. Monoubiquitination of Histone 2B at the Disease Resistance Gene Locus Regulates Its Expression and Impacts Immune Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Baohong; Yang, Dong-Lei; Shi, Zhenying; Dong, Hansong; Hua, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Disease resistance (R) genes are key components in plant immunity. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) E3 ubiquitin ligase genes HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 (HUB1) and HUB2 regulate the expression of R genes SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1) and RESISTANCE TO PERONOSPORA PARASITICA4. An increase of SNC1 expression induces constitutive immune responses in the bonzai1 (bon1) mutant, and the loss of HUB1 or HUB2 function reduces SNC1 up-regulation and suppresses the bon1 autoimmune phenotypes. HUB1 and HUB2 mediate histone 2B (H2B) monoubiquitination directly at the SNC1 R gene locus to regulate its expression. In addition, SNC1 and HUB1 transcripts are moderately up-regulated by pathogen infection, and H2B monoubiquitination at SNC1 is enhanced by pathogen infection. Together, this study indicates that H2B monoubiquitination at the R gene locus regulates its expression and that this histone modification at the R gene locus has an impact on immune responses in plants. PMID:24664204

  17. Identification and characterization of a locus which regulates multiple functions in Pseudomonas tolaasii, the cause of brown blotch disease of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, S I; Han, B; Johnstone, K

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas tolaasii, the causal agent of brown blotch disease of Agaricus bisporus, spontaneously gives rise to morphologically distinct stable sectors, referred to as the phenotypic variant form, at the margins of the wild-type colonies. The phenotypic variant form is nonpathogenic and differs from the wild type in a range of biochemical and physiological characteristics. A genomic cosmid clone (pSISG29) from a wild-type P. tolaasii library was shown to be capable of restoring a range of characteristics of the phenotypic variant to those of the wild-type form, when present in trans. Subcloning and saturation mutagenesis analysis with Tn5lacZ localized a 3.0-kb region from pSISG29, designated the pheN locus, required for complementation of the phenotypic variant to the wild-type form. Marker exchange of the Tn5lacZ-mutagenized copy of the pheN locus into the wild-type strain demonstrated that a functional copy of the pheN gene is required to maintain the wild-type pathogenic phenotype and that loss of the pheN gene or its function results in conversion of the wild-type form to the phenotypic variant form. The pheN locus contained a 2,727-bp open reading frame encoding an 83-kDa protein. The predicted amino acid sequence of the PheN protein showed homology to the sensor and regulator domains of the conserved family of two component bacterial sensor regulator proteins. Southern hybridization analysis of pheN genes from the wild type and the phenotypic variant form revealed that DNA rearrangement occurs within the pheN locus during phenotypic variation. Analysis of pheN expression with a pheN::lacZ fusion demonstrated that expression is regulated by environmental factors. These results are related to a model for control for phenotypic variation in P. tolaasii. PMID:7642492

  18. George Minot and Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dhungat, J V Pai

    2015-08-01

    George Minot (1885-1950) was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was great grandson of James Jackson, co-founder of Massachusetts General Hospital in 1821. Graduating from Harvard College he enrolled at Harvard Medical School and obtained his MD in 1912. As a house pupil (intern) at the hospital he became interested in diseases of the blood and began taking meticulous histories of dietary habits of patients with anemia. PMID:27604448

  19. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  20. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  1. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    SciTech Connect

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G.

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Marked Phenotypic Heterogeneity Associated with Expansion of a CAG Repeat Sequence at the Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph Disease Locus

    PubMed Central

    Cancel, Géraldine; Abbas, Nacer; Stevanin, Giovanni; Dürr, Alexandra; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Néri, Christian; Duyckaerts, Charles; Penet, Christiane; Cann, Howard M.; Agid, Yves; Brice, Alexis

    1995-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropatho-logical findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5 PMID:7573040

  3. Refining the localization of the PKD2 locus on chromosome 4q by linkage analysis in Spanish families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease type 2

    SciTech Connect

    San Millan, J.L.; Viribay, M.; Peral, B.; Moreno, F.; Martinez, I.; Weissenbach, J.

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. At least two distinct forms of ADPKD are now well defined. In {approximately}86% of affected European families, a gene defect localized to 16p13.3 was responsible for ADPKD, while a second locus has been recently localized to 4q13-q23 as candidate for the disease in the remaining families. We present confirmation of linkage to microsatellite markers on chromosome 4q in eight Spanish families with ADPKD, in which the disease was not linked to 16p13.3. By linkage analysis with marker D4S423, a maximum lod score of 9.03 at a recombination fraction of .00 was obtained. Multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed the PKD2 locus between D4S1542 and D4S1563, thereby defining a genetic interval of {approximately}1 cM. The refined map will serve as a genetic framework for additional genetic and physical mapping of the region and will improve the accuracy of presymptomatic diagnosis of PKD2. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Relationships between systemic vascular resistance, blood rheology and nitric oxide in children with sickle cell anemia or sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease

    PubMed Central

    Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Waltz, Xavier; Petras, Marie; Doumdo, Lydia; Blanchet-Deverly, Anne; Martino, Jean; Tressières, Benoît; Maillard, Frederic; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Vascular function has been found to be impaired in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The present study investigated the determinants of systemic vascular resistance in two main SCD syndromes in children: sickle cell anemia (SCA) and sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease (SCC). Nitric oxide metabolites (NOx), hematological, hemorheological, and hemodynamical parameters were investigated in 61 children with SCA and 49 children with SCC. While mean arterial pressure was not different between SCA and SCC children, systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was greater in SCC children. Although SVR and blood viscosity (ηb) were not correlated in SCC children, the increase of ηb (+18%) in SCC children compared to SCA children results in a greater mean SVR in this former group. SVR was positively correlated with ηb, hemoglobin (Hb) level and RBC deformability, and negatively with NOx level in SCA children. Multivariate linear regression model showed that both NOx and Hb levels were independently associated with SVR in SCA children. In SCC children, only NOx level was associated with SVR. In conclusion, vascular function of SCC children seems to better cope with higher ηb compared to SCA children. Since the occurrence of vaso-occlusive like complications are less frequent in SCC than in SCA children, this finding suggests a pathophysiological link between the vascular function alteration and these clinical manifestations. In addition, our results suggested that nitric oxide metabolism plays a key role in the regulation of SVR, both in SCA and SCC. PMID:23302597

  5. Persistence of chicken anemia virus antigen and inclusions in spontaneous cases of Marek's disease visceral lymphomas in broiler chickens at slaughterhouses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed Sabry; Ono, Hiroki; Sasaki, Jun; Ochiai, Kenji; Goryo, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    The chicken anemia virus (CAV) and Marek's disease virus (MDV) infect chickens worldwide; a single or dual infection by these viruses has a great impact on poultry production. In the present study, we examined the existence of CAV antigen and its inclusions in Marek's disease (MD) lymphomas in chickens in the slaughterhouses of Iwate prefecture, Japan. Forty-nine spleens and 13 livers with different degrees of nodular lesions were histopathologically examined at our laboratory. Grossly, the tested organs showed various sizes and anatomical architectures. Based on the cellular morphology and the infiltrative nature of the neoplastic lymphocytes, MD was confirmed in 76% (37/49) of the spleens and 92% (12/13) of the livers. The lesions of MD, according to the pattern of lymphocytic accumulation in the affected organs, were divided into multifocal, coalesced and diffuse. CAV intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected within the small and the large bizarre lymphocytes of the MD lymphomas in 2 livers and 9 spleens, and the immunostaining test for CAV confirmed the persistence of CAV antigens and inclusions in the neoplastic cells. This study demonstrated the persistence of CAV infection within the neoplastic cells of naturally occurring MD lymphomas in chickens.

  6. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  7. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  8. Renal anemia: from incurable to curable.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Yanagita, Motoko

    2013-11-01

    Renal anemia has been recognized as a characteristic complication of chronic kidney disease. Although many factors are involved in renal anemia, the predominant cause of renal anemia is a relative deficiency in erythropoietin (EPO) production. To date, exogenous recombinant human (rh)EPO has been widely used as a powerful drug for the treatment of patients with renal anemia. Despite its clinical effectiveness, a potential risk for increased mortality has been suggested in patients who receive rhEPO, in addition to the economic burden of rhEPO administration. The induction of endogenous EPO is another therapeutic approach that might have advantages over rhEPO administration. However, the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of EPO are not fully understood, and this lack of understanding has hindered the development of an endogenous EPO inducer. In this review, we will discuss the current treatment for renal anemia and its drawbacks, provide an overview of EPO regulation in healthy and diseased conditions, and propose future directions for therapeutic trials that more directly target the underlying pathophysiology of renal anemia. PMID:23884144

  9. Sixteen years post radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma elicited multi-dysfunction along PTX and chronic kidney disease with microcytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic–pituitary (h-p) unit is a particularly radiosensitive region in the central nervous system. As a consequence, radiation-induced irreversible, progressively chronic onset hypopituitarism (RIH) commonly develops after radiation treatments and can result in variably impaired pituitary function, which is frequently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Case presentation A 38-year-old male subject, previously having received radiotherapy for treatment of nasopharygeal carcinoma (NPCA) 16 years ago, appeared at OPD complaining about his failure in penile erection, loss of pubic hair, atrophy of external genitalia: testicles reduced to 2×1.5 cm; penile size shrunk to only 4 cm long. Characteristically, he showed extremely lowered human growth hormone, (HGH, 0.115 ng/mL), testosterone (<0.1 ng/mL), total thyroxine (tT4: 4.740 g/mL), free T4 (fT4, 0.410 ng/mL), cortisol (2.34 g/dL); lowered LH (1.37 mIU/mL) and estradiol (22 pg/mL); highly elevated TSH (7.12 IU/mL). As contrast, he had low end normal ACTH, FSH, total T3, free T3, and estriol; high end normal prolactin (11.71 ng/mL), distinctly implicating hypopituitarism-induced hypothyroidism and hypogonadism. serologically, he showed severely lowered Hb (10.6 g/dL), HCT (32.7%), MCV (77.6 fL), MCH (25.3 pg), MCHC (32.6 g/dL), and platelet count (139×103/L) with extraordinarily elevated RDW (18.2%), together with severely lowered ferritin (23.6 ng/mL) and serum iron levels; highly elevated total iron binding capacity (TIBC, 509 g/dL) and transferrin (363.4 mg/dL), suggesting microcytic anemia. Severely reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) (89 mL/mim/1.73 m2) pointed to CKD2. Hypocortisolemia with hyponatremia indicated secondary adrenal insufficiency. Replacement therapy using androgen, cortisol, and Ringer’s solution has shown beneficial in improving life quality. Conclusions To our believe, we are the first group who report such complicate

  10. The rs10757278 Polymorphism of the 9p21.3 Locus Is Associated with Premature Coronary Artery Disease in Polish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynska-Kosiorz, Sylwia; Iwanicki, Tomasz; Krauze, Jolanta; Trautsolt, Wanda; Grzeszczak, Wladyslaw; Bochenek, Andrzej; Zak, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have revealed a locus associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction, namely, 9p21.3. Its participation in the conditioning of the disease has been proven in many populations of European descent, but not yet in Slavs. Allelic variants of the rs10757278 polymorphism functionally affect the activity of the 9p21.3 locus; therefore, we conducted a study to determine whether the rs10757278 is associated with premature CAD in Polish patients. We studied 320 subjects aged 25–55 years, divided into two groups matched by sex and age: (1) patients with angiographically proven premature CAD (n=160), and (2) blood donors as a control group (n=160). The rs10757278 was genotyped using the method of fluorescently labeled allele-specific oligonucleotides. The frequency of the G allele was significantly higher in patients than in controls (58.2% vs. 42.8%, respectively, p=0.011) and was similar to the frequency of the GG homozygotes (30.6% vs. 17.5%, respectively, p=0.006). Both the GG homozygosity (odds ratio [OR]=2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–3.66) as well as the G allele (OR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.08–2.07) have been associated with CAD in the analyzed population. These variants may be considered as risk factors, also in the Polish population. PMID:22946666

  11. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  13. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R.; Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F.; Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A.; Attwood, J.

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  15. Association Study between Coronary Artery Disease and rs1333049 and rs10757274 Polymorphisms at 9p21 Locus in South-West Iran

    PubMed Central

    Foroughmand, Ali Mohammad; Nikkhah, Emad; Galehdari, Hamid; Jadbabaee, Mohammad Hossin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multi-factorial and heterogenic disease with atherosclerosis plaques formation in internal wall of coronary artery. Plaque formation results to limitation of the blood reaching to myocardium leading to appearance of some problems, such as ischemia, sudden thrombosis veins and myocardial infarction (MI). Several environmental and genetic factors are involved in prevalence and incident of CAD as follows: hypertension, high low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), age, diabetes mellitus, family history of early-onset heart disease and smoking. According to genome wide association studies (GWAS), five polymorphisms in the 9p21 locus seem to be associated with the CAD. We aimed to evaluate the remarkable association of two polymorphisms at 9p21 locus, rs1333049 and rs10757274, with CAD. Materials and Methods This experimental study was conducted in Golestan, Aria Hospitals and Genetics Lab of Shahid Chamran University in the city of Ahvaz, Iran, in 2010- 2011. The collected blood samples belonging to 170 CAD patients (case group) and 100 healthy individuals (control group) were analyzed by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The results were analyzed using software package used for statistical analysis (SPSS; SPSS Inc., USA) version 16. A value of p<0.05 and an odd ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were considered significant. Results The frequencies of CC, CG and GG genotypes for rs1333049 polymorphism in patients were 18.2, 65.3 and 16.5%, while in controls, the related values were 25, 67 and 8%, respectively. GG genotypes of rs1333049 polymorphism in CAD patients were more than control cases (OR: 0.354, 95%CI: 0.138-0.912, p=0.032). The frequencies of AA, AG and GG genotypes for rs10757274 in CAD patients were 8.2, 58.3 and 33.5%, while in controls, the related values were 35, 63 and 2%, respectively. GG Genotype in rs10757274 polymorphism

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cells offer new approach to therapy in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia and option in prenatal diagnosis in genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lin; Chang, Judy C.; Lin, Chin; Sun, Xiaofang; Yu, Jingwei; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells provides a possible new approach to treat β-thalassemia and other genetic diseases such as sickle cell anemia. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be made from these patients' somatic cells and the mutation in the β-globin gene corrected by gene targeting, and the cells differentiated into hematopoietic cells to be returned to the patient. In this study, we reprogrammed the skin fibroblasts of a patient with homozygous β0 thalassemia into iPS cells, and showed that the iPS cells could be differentiated into hematopoietic cells that synthesized hemoglobin. Prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion have been effective in decreasing the number of β-thalassemia births in some countries that have instituted carrier screening and genetic counseling. To make use of the cells from the amniotic fluid or chorionic villus sampling that are used for prenatal diagnosis, we also showed that these cells could be reprogrammed into iPS cells. This raises the possibility of providing a new option following prenatal diagnosis of a fetus affected by a severe illness. Currently, the parents would choose either to terminate the pregnancy or continue it and take care of the sick child after birth. The cells for prenatal diagnosis can be converted into iPS cells for treatment in the perinatal periods. Early treatment has the advantage of requiring much fewer cells than adult treatment, and can also prevent organ damage in those diseases in which damage can begin in utero or at an early age. PMID:19482945

  17. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD. PMID:27392076

  18. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. PMID:25757096

  19. EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND): An Open-Label Phase II Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Little, Courtney R; Reid, Marvin E; Soares, Deanne P; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Knight-Madden, Jennifer M; Stuber, Susan E; Badaloo, Asha V; Aldred, Karen; Wisdom-Phipps, Margaret E; Latham, Teresa; Ware, Russell E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral vasculopathy in sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins in childhood and features intracranial arterial stenosis with high risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke risk can be reduced by transcranial doppler (TCD) screening and chronic transfusion therapy; however, this approach is impractical in many developing countries. Accumulating evidence supports the use of hydroxyurea for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular disease in children with SCA. Recently we reported that hydroxyurea significantly reduced the conversion from conditional TCD velocities to abnormal velocities; whether hydroxyurea can be used for children with newly diagnosed severe cerebrovascular disease in place of starting transfusion therapy remains unknown. Objective The primary objective of the EXpanding Treatment for Existing Neurological Disease (EXTEND) trial is to investigate the effect of open label hydroxyurea on the maximum time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV) after 18 months of treatment compared to the pre-treatment value. Secondary objectives include the effects of hydroxyurea on serial TCD velocities, the incidence of neurological and non-neurological events, quality of life (QOL), body composition and metabolism, toxicity and treatment response, changes to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), genetic and serologic markers of disease severity, and cognitive and pulmonary function. Methods This prospective Phase II trial will enroll children with SCA in Jamaica, between the ages of 2 and 17 years, with either conditional (170-199 cm/sec) or abnormal (≥ 200 cm/sec) TCD velocities. Oral hydroxyurea will be administered daily and escalated to the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Participants will be seen in the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU) in Kingston, Jamaica monthly until achieving MTD, and then every 3 months. TCD will be performed every 6 months. Results Currently, 43 participants have been enrolled out of a projected 50. There was one

  20. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. PMID:26404440

  1. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  2. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  3. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  4. Evaluation of the relationship between Chlamydia pecorum sequence types and disease using a species-specific multi-locus sequence typing scheme (MLST).

    PubMed

    Jelocnik, Martina; Walker, Evelyn; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Ellem, Judy; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydia pecorum is globally associated with several ovine diseases including keratoconjunctivitis and polyarthritis. The exact relationship between the variety of C. pecorum strains reported and the diseases described in sheep remains unclear, challenging efforts to accurately diagnose and manage infected flocks. In the present study, we applied C. pecorum multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to C. pecorum positive samples collected from sympatric flocks of Australian sheep presenting with conjunctivitis, conjunctivitis with polyarthritis, or polyarthritis only and with no clinical disease (NCD) in order to elucidate the exact relationships between the infecting strains and the range of diseases. Using Bayesian phylogenetic and cluster analyses on 62 C. pecorum positive ocular, vaginal and rectal swab samples from sheep presenting with a range of diseases and in a comparison to C. pecorum sequence types (STs) from other hosts, one ST (ST 23) was recognised as a globally distributed strain associated with ovine and bovine diseases such as polyarthritis and encephalomyelitis. A second ST (ST 69) presently only described in Australian animals, was detected in association with ovine as well as koala chlamydial infections. The majority of vaginal and rectal C. pecorum STs from animals with NCD and/or anatomical sites with no clinical signs of disease in diseased animals, clustered together in a separate group, by both analyses. Furthermore, 8/13 detected STs were novel. This study provides a platform for strain selection for further research into the pathogenic potential of C. pecorum in animals and highlights targets for potential strain-specific diagnostic test development. PMID:25223647

  5. Anemia and transfusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter D

    2011-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be affected by a number of factors, including cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Anemia affects about half of patients with SAH and is associated with worse outcome. Anemia also may contribute to the development of or exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia. This review was designed to examine the prevalence and impact of anemia in patients with SAH and to evaluate the effects of transfusion. A literature search was made to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in SAH patients. A total of 27 articles were identified that addressed the effects of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) on brain physiology, anemia in SAH, and clinical management with RBCT or erythropoietin. Most studies provided retrospectively analyzed data of very low-quality according to the GRADE criteria. While RBCT can have beneficial effects on brain physiology, RBCT may be associated with medical complications, infection, vasospasm, and poor outcome after SAH. The effects may vary with disease severity or the presence of vasospasm, but it remains unclear whether RBCTs are a marker of disease severity or a cause of worse outcome. Erythropoietin data are limited. The literature review further suggests that the results of the Transfusion Requirements in Critical Care Trial and subsequent observational studies on RBCT in general critical care do not apply to SAH patients and that randomized trials to address the role of RBCT in SAH are required. PMID:21769459

  6. [Acquired aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cells. An increase in the percentage of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein-deficient cells and the presence of HLA allele-lacking leukocytes due to 6pUPD provide indirect evidence that T cells contribute to the pathophysiology of AA. Recent studies have revealed the presence of somatic mutations in MDS and/or AML candidate genes in one third of AA patients. Current treatment topics include the efficacy of eltrombopag for AA found to be refractory to immunosuppressive therapy as well as for newly diagnosed AA when administered in combination with ATG and cyclosporine. Furthermore, improved outcomes of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors using reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been obtained with eltrombopag. Fludarabine-based regimens are now the mainstream approach for preconditioning and have lowered the transplant-related mortality rate. However, new problems such as mixed chimerism and secondary graft failure have arisen. Attempts to prevent GVHD more efficiently by including ATG and alemtuzumab in the preconditioning regimen are being investigated. PMID:26935624

  7. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) l Toxins (e.g., pesticides) l Diamond-Blackfan anemia l Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia l ... are stopped. n Environmental toxins. Substances such as pesticides, arsenic, and benzene can damage your bone marrow, ...

  8. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. About 1 out of every 500 African-American children is born with this form of anemia. Thalassemia , which usually affects people of Mediterranean, African, and Southeast Asian descent, is ...

  9. The location of a disease-associated polymorphism and genomic structure of the human 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus (SSA1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsugu, H.; Horowitz, R.; Gibson, N.

    1994-12-01

    Sera from approximately 30% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contain high titers of autoantibodies that bind to the 52-kDa Ro/SSA protein. We previously detected polymorphisms in the 52-kDa Ro/SSA gene (SSA1) with restriction enzymes, one of which is strongly associated with the presence of SLE (P < 0.0005) in African Americans. A higher disease frequency and more severe forms of the disease are commonly noted among these female patients. To determine the location and nature of this polymorphism, we obtained two clones that span 8.5 kb of the 52-kDa Ro/SSA locus including its upstream regulatory region. Six exons were identified, and their nucleotide sequences plus adjacent noncoding regions were determined. No differences were found between these exons and the coding region of one of the reported cDNAs. The disease-associated polymorphic site suggested by a restriction enzyme map and confirmed by DNA amplification and nucleotide sequencing was present upstream of exon 1. This polymorphism may be a genetic marker for a disease-related variation in the coding region for the protein or in the upstream regulatory region of this gene. Although this RFLP is present in Japanese, it is not associated with lupus in this race. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-01-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated. PMID:27417086

  11. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-06-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated. PMID:27417086

  12. [Case report: hookworm infection in a patient with severe anemia].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Hasan; Taş Cengiz, Zeynep; Ciçek, Mutalip; Dülger, Ahmet Cumhur

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a patient who was hospitalized with a severe anemia in the Internal Medicine Clinic of the Health Research and Application Hospital of Yüzüncü Yil University for one week is presented. The patient had fatigue, paleness and dizziness for one month and approximately 12 kg weight lost for four mounts previous to admission.. Severe iron deficiency anemia was diagnosed in the patient by laboratory analyses. Because there were no hematologic factors associated with severe anemia, the stool examination was also performed. In the Parasitology Laboratory, stool microscopy of the patient revealed numerous ova of hookworm. General condition of the patient well improved with anti-parasitic and anti-anemia treatment. It was concluded that patients with iron deficiency anemia diagnosed in health centers should be also examined for the intestinal parasitic diseases encountered rarely, and physicians should consider non-endemic parasitic diseases in their provinces.

  13. Health-Related Behavior, Profile of Health Locus of Control and Acceptance of Illness in Patients Suffering from Chronic Somatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Konrad; Kurpas, Donata; Kusz, Joanna; Mroczek, Bozena; Jedynak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to determine health-related behaviors, profile of health locus of control (HLC), and to assess the relationships between these constructs among patients suffering from chronic somatic diseases. Material and Methods Three-hundred adult patients suffering from various chronic diseases participated in the study. The patients' mean age was 54.6 years (SD = 17.57). Results No statistically significant differences were found between the different clinical groups in health-related behavior, acceptance of illness, internal HLC or chance HLC. Patients with neurologic conditions showed slightly lower powerful others HLC than did some other clinical groups. Health-related behavior was significantly positively related to all three categories of HLC, with most prominent associations observed with powerful others HLC. Only one type of health-related behavior – preventive behavior – correlated significantly and negatively with acceptance of illness. Differences in the frequency of health-related behavior were also found due to gender (women showing more healthy nutritional habits than men), age (older subjects showing more frequent health-promoting behavior), education (higher education was associated with less frequent health-promoting behavior) and marital status (widowed subjects reporting more frequent health-promoting behavior). Conclusions Health-related behavior in patients with chronic diseases seems to be unrelated to a specific diagnosis; however it shows associations with both internal and external HLC. Sociodemographic factors are also crucial factors determining frequency of health-related behavior in such patients. PMID:23675516

  14. Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.

    PubMed

    Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

    2015-06-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA. PMID:25825577

  15. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The Invisible Malady: Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd L.

    1981-01-01

    Though several articles have appeared on the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States, none has dealt with the dissemination of information from the scientific community to the public. It is an interesting commentary on our society that 60 years have passed before this important but racially oriented disease has reached the public forum. In this article, the author tries to describe the major events in the history of sickle cell anemia and to explain why it has not been publicized. PMID:7021863

  17. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    PubMed

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies.

  18. Genetic and Informatic Analyses Implicate Kif12 as a Candidate Gene within the Mpkd2 Locus That Modulates Renal Cystic Disease Severity in the Cys1cpk Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mrug, Michal; Zhou, Juling; Yang, Chaozhe; Aronow, Bruce J.; Cui, Xiangqin; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Siegal, Gene P.; Yoder, Bradley K; Guay-Woodford, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously mapped the interval on Chromosome 4 for a major polycystic kidney disease modifier (Mpkd) of the B6(Cg)-Cys1cpk/J mouse model of recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Informatic analyses predicted that this interval contains at least three individual renal cystic disease severity-modulating loci (Mpkd1-3). In the current study, we provide further validation of these predicted effects using a congenic mouse line carrying the entire CAST/EiJ (CAST)-derived Mpkd1-3 interval on the C57BL/6J background. We have also generated a derivative congenic line with a refined CAST-derived Mpkd1-2 interval and demonstrated its dominantly-acting disease-modulating effects (e.g., 4.2-fold increase in total cyst area; p<0.001). The relative strength of these effects allowed the use of recombinants from these crosses to fine map the Mpkd2 effects to a <14 Mbp interval that contains 92 RefSeq sequences. One of them corresponds to the previously described positional Mpkd2 candidate gene, Kif12. Among the positional Mpkd2 candidates, only expression of Kif12 correlates strongly with the expression pattern of Cys1 across multiple anatomical nephron structures and developmental time points. Also, we demonstrate that Kif12 encodes a primary cilium-associated protein. Together, these data provide genetic and informatic validation of the predicted renal cystic disease-modulating effects of Mpkd1-3 loci and implicate Kif12 as the candidate locus for Mpkd2. PMID:26295839

  19. Dysfunctional Sensory Modalities, Locus Coeruleus, and Basal Forebrain: Early Determinants that Promote Neuropathogenesis of Cognitive and Memory Decline and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2016-10-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. It is essential to unravel its etiology and pathogenesis. This should enable us to study the presymptomatic stages of the disease and to analyze and reverse the antemortem behavioral, memory, and cognitive dysfunction. Prima facie, an ongoing chronic vulnerability involving neural insult may lead normal elderly to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and then to AD. Development of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to thwart the disease pathology obviously requires a thorough delineation of underlying disruptive neuropathological processes. Our sensory capacity for touch, smell, taste, hearing, and vision declines with advancing age. Declines in different sensory attributes are considered here to be the primary "first-tier pathologies." Olfactory loss is among the first clinical signs of neurodegenerative diseases including AD and Parkinson's disease (PD). Sensory dysfunction in the aged promotes pathological disturbances in the locus coeruleus, basal forebrain, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and several key areas of neocortex and brainstem. Hence, sensory dysfunction is the pivotal factor that may upregulate cognitive and memory dysfunction. The age-related constellation of comorbid pathological factors may include apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, alcohol abuse, head trauma, and obstructive sleep apnea. The concepts and trajectories delineated here are the dynamic pillars of the current hypothesis presented-it postulates that the sensory decline, in conjunction with the above pathologies, is crucial in triggering neurodegeneration and promoting cognitive/memory dysfunction in aging and AD. The application of this thesis can be important in formulating new multifactorial preventive and treatment strategies (suggested here) in order to attenuate cognitive and memory decline and ameliorate pathological dysfunction in aging, MCI, and AD.

  20. Dysfunctional Sensory Modalities, Locus Coeruleus, and Basal Forebrain: Early Determinants that Promote Neuropathogenesis of Cognitive and Memory Decline and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2016-10-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. It is essential to unravel its etiology and pathogenesis. This should enable us to study the presymptomatic stages of the disease and to analyze and reverse the antemortem behavioral, memory, and cognitive dysfunction. Prima facie, an ongoing chronic vulnerability involving neural insult may lead normal elderly to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and then to AD. Development of effective preventive and therapeutic strategies to thwart the disease pathology obviously requires a thorough delineation of underlying disruptive neuropathological processes. Our sensory capacity for touch, smell, taste, hearing, and vision declines with advancing age. Declines in different sensory attributes are considered here to be the primary "first-tier pathologies." Olfactory loss is among the first clinical signs of neurodegenerative diseases including AD and Parkinson's disease (PD). Sensory dysfunction in the aged promotes pathological disturbances in the locus coeruleus, basal forebrain, entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and several key areas of neocortex and brainstem. Hence, sensory dysfunction is the pivotal factor that may upregulate cognitive and memory dysfunction. The age-related constellation of comorbid pathological factors may include apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, alcohol abuse, head trauma, and obstructive sleep apnea. The concepts and trajectories delineated here are the dynamic pillars of the current hypothesis presented-it postulates that the sensory decline, in conjunction with the above pathologies, is crucial in triggering neurodegeneration and promoting cognitive/memory dysfunction in aging and AD. The application of this thesis can be important in formulating new multifactorial preventive and treatment strategies (suggested here) in order to attenuate cognitive and memory decline and ameliorate pathological dysfunction in aging, MCI, and AD. PMID

  1. Investigation of the Genetics of Hematologic Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes; Erythrocyte Disorder; Leukocyte Disorder; Hemostasis; Blood Coagulation Disorder; Sickle Cell Disease; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Congenital Thrombocytopenia; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Fanconi Anemia

  2. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  3. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  4. Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease Is Associated with Reduced 6-[(18)F]Fluoro-l-m-tyrosine Uptake in the Locus Coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Ono, Sayaka Asari; Sato, Toshihiko; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a common disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD) and could be attributed to a reduction in brain noradrenaline. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity in the locus coeruleus (LC) and FOG in PD using high-resolution positron emission tomography with an AADC tracer, 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT). We assessed 40 patients with PD and 11 age-matched healthy individuals. PD was diagnosed based on the UK Brain Bank criteria by two movement disorder experts. FOG was directly observed by the clinician and assessed using a patient questionnaire. FMT uptake in the LC, caudate, and putamen was analyzed using PMOD software on coregistered magnetic resonance images. FOG was present in 30 patients. The severity of FOG correlated with the decrease of FMT uptake in the LC regardless of disease duration and the severity of other motor impairments, indicating dysfunction of the noradrenergic network in FOG.

  5. Complex Network-Driven View of Genomic Mechanisms Underlying Parkinson's Disease: Analyses in Dorsal Motor Vagal Nucleus, Locus Coeruleus, and Substantia Nigra

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Beatriz Raposo; Tampellini, Edilaine; Farfel, José Marcelo; Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD)—classically characterized by severe loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta—has a caudal-rostral progression, beginning in the dorsal motor vagal nucleus and, in a less extent, in the olfactory system, progressing to the midbrain and eventually to the basal forebrain and the neocortex. About 90% of the cases are idiopathic. To study the molecular mechanisms involved in idiopathic PD we conducted a comparative study of transcriptional interaction networks in the dorsal motor vagal nucleus (VA), locus coeruleus (LC), and substantia nigra (SN) of idiopathic PD in Braak stages 4-5 (PD) and disease-free controls (CT) using postmortem samples. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) for each brain region (patients and controls) were obtained to identify highly connected relevant genes (hubs) and densely interconnected gene sets (modules). GCN analyses showed differences in topology and module composition between CT and PD networks for each anatomic region. In CT networks, VA, LC, and SN hub modules are predominantly associated with neuroprotection and homeostasis in the ageing brain, whereas in the patient's group, for the three brain regions, hub modules are mostly related to stress response and neuron survival/degeneration mechanisms. PMID:25525598

  6. Targeted Gene Addition to a Safe Harbor locus in human CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells for Correction of X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Reik, Andreas; Liu, Pei-Qi; Li, Linhong; Wu, Xiaolin; Su, Ling; Raley, Castle; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Song, Alexander H.; Chan, Andy; Pearl, Jocelynn R.; Paschon, David E.; Lee, Janet; Newcombe, Hannah; Koontz, Sherry; Sweeney, Colin; Shivak, David A.; Zarember, Kol A.; Peshwa, Madhusudan V.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Malech, Harry L.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy with genetically modified human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) may be safer using targeted integration (TI) of transgenes into a genomic ‘safe harbor’ site than random viral integration. We demonstrate that temporally optimized delivery of zinc finger nuclease mRNA via electroporation and adeno associated virus (AAV) 6 delivery of donor constructs in human HSCs approaches clinically relevant levels of TI into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus. Up to 58% Venus-positive HSCs with 6–16% human cell marking were observed following engraftment into mice. In HSCs from patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), caused by mutations in the gp91phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase, TI of a gp91phox transgene into AAVS1 in resulted in ~15% gp91phox expression and increased NADPH oxidase activity in ex vivo–derived neutrophils. In mice transplanted with corrected HSCs, 4–11% of human cells in the bone marrow expressed gp91phox. This method for TI into AAVS1 may be broadly applicable to correction of other monogenic diseases. PMID:26950749

  7. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  8. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  9. Use Massive Parallel Sequencing and Exome Capture Technology to Sequence the Exome of Fanconi Anemia Children and Their Patents

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-21

    Fanconi Anemia; Autosomal or Sex Linked Recessive Genetic Disease; Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis Failure, Multiple Congenital Abnormalities, and Susceptibility to Neoplastic Diseases.; Hematopoiesis Maintainance.

  10. Factors Associated with Anemia in the Institutionalized Elderly.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emanuelle Cruz da; Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; Eickemberg, Michaela; Mello, Adriana Lima; Côrtes, Elvira Barbosa Quadros; Feitosa, Caroline Alves; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Ramos, Lílian Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    As a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), anemia affects 25-63% of the elderly. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and its associated factors in the institutionalized elderly. The cross-sectional study was carried out with three hundred thirteen individuals aged ≥ 60 years, of both genders, living in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Poisson regression (PR) with robust variance estimates was used to assess the factors related to anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 38%. Mild anemia was predominant in both genders (male: 26.8%; female: 21.1%), as normocytic and normochromic anemia, with no anisocytosis (69.75%). Anemia was associated with thinness (PR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04-2.72) and with moderate (PR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.07-3.63) and total (PR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.34-5.07) dependence in the final model. Severe dependence exhibited borderline significance (PR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.00-3.77). The prevalence of anemia was high in the institutionalized elderly in both genders, with characteristics suggesting chronic diseases as the causal factor, and the frequency of occurrence was higher in thinness elderly with moderate to total dependence. PMID:27607057

  11. Factors Associated with Anemia in the Institutionalized Elderly

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Emanuelle Cruz; Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; Eickemberg, Michaela; Mello, Adriana Lima; Côrtes, Elvira Barbosa Quadros; Feitosa, Caroline Alves; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Ramos, Lílian Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    As a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), anemia affects 25–63% of the elderly. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and its associated factors in the institutionalized elderly. The cross-sectional study was carried out with three hundred thirteen individuals aged ≥ 60 years, of both genders, living in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Poisson regression (PR) with robust variance estimates was used to assess the factors related to anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 38%. Mild anemia was predominant in both genders (male: 26.8%; female: 21.1%), as normocytic and normochromic anemia, with no anisocytosis (69.75%). Anemia was associated with thinness (PR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04–2.72) and with moderate (PR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.07–3.63) and total (PR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.34–5.07) dependence in the final model. Severe dependence exhibited borderline significance (PR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.00–3.77). The prevalence of anemia was high in the institutionalized elderly in both genders, with characteristics suggesting chronic diseases as the causal factor, and the frequency of occurrence was higher in thinness elderly with moderate to total dependence. PMID:27607057

  12. Deletion of Huntington's disease-linked G8 (D4S10) locus in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gusella, J F; Tanzi, R E; Bader, P I; Phelan, M C; Stevenson, R; Hayden, M R; Hofman, K J; Faryniarz, A G; Gibbons, K

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive involuntary movements and dementia. The symptoms of the disease, although devastating in severity, do not usually appear until the third to fourth decade of life. The gene defect is highly penetrant, and results in the loss of neurones in the basal ganglia, globus pallidus, and more diffusely in the cortex. A DNA marker, G8 (or D4S10), is tightly linked to Huntington's disease and this gene has been localized to chromosome 4 (ref. 3). The discovery of this linkage marker raises the possibility of developing a presymptomatic test for the disorder, and of eventually isolating the disease gene based on its map position. We have now regionally localized the DNA marker G8 to the terminal band of the short arm of the chromosome, a region representing approximately 0.5% of the total human genome. The assignment was made by examining DNA from patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, a birth defect resulting from partial heterozygous deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4.

  13. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  14. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  15. Anemia in People with Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Anemia in People With Cancer What is anemia? When you don’t have enough healthy red ... the symptoms that bother people most. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons a person with ...

  16. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  17. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presented with abdominal and back pain. The patient was operated on for acute abdomen and diagnosed with duodenal perforation. Helicobacter pylorus was negative. There was no risk factor to account for duodenal perforation other than sickle cell anemia. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. Duodenal perforation is a rare entity described in patients with sickle cell anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of duodenal perforation in a patient sickle cell anemia. PMID:25422692

  18. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  19. Clinical analysis of primary Sjögren's syndrome complicating anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Guo; Qing, Yu-Feng; Jiang, Li; Yang, Qi-Bin; Luo, Wen-Feng

    2010-05-01

    This is a cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence and causes of anemia in the primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). One hundred and thirty-two consecutive patients with pSS were enrolled into the study. Standard hematological and immunological tests and examination of bone marrow were performed. Anemia occurred in 45 (34.1%) patients. The causes of anemia included anemia of chronic disease (69%), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, 18%), iron deficiency anemia (9%) and other causes (4%), of which AIHA caused the most severe anemia. The prevalence of ANA, anti-Ro/SSA, and anti-La/SSB was much higher in patients with anemia than those without anemia. Anticardiolipin antibodies were most commonly detected in AIHA; the prevalence of IgG and hypocomplementemia in AIHA was much higher in patients without anemia. Abnormal bone marrow changes were observed in two cases with anemia, one with morphological changes in the myeloid, megakaryocytic, and erythroid lineages and one with hypocellularity in the erythroid lineage. Therefore, pSS patients with anemia may be associated with destruction of peripheral mature blood cells, impaired red cells production, and hematopoietic abnormalities due to an immune mechanism, although the concrete pathogenesis is still unclear.

  20. Mathematical analysis of a multiple strain, multi-locus-allele system for antigenically variable infectious diseases revisited.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Alhaji

    2015-09-01

    Many important pathogens such as HIV/AIDS, influenza, malaria, dengue and meningitis generally exist in phenotypically distinct serotypes that compete for hosts. Models used to study these diseases appear as meta-population systems. Herein, we revisit one of the multiple strain models that have been used to investigate the dynamics of infectious diseases with co-circulating serotypes or strains, and provide analytical results underlying the numerical investigations. In particular, we establish the necessary conditions for the local asymptotic stability of the steady states and for the existence of oscillatory behaviors via Hopf bifurcation. In addition, we show that the existence of discrete antigenic forms among pathogens can either fully or partially self-organize, where (i) strains exhibit no strain structures and coexist or (ii) antigenic variants sort into non-overlapping or minimally overlapping clusters that either undergo the principle of competitive exclusion exhibiting discrete strain structures, or co-exist cyclically.

  1. Exclusion mapping of the benign hereditary chorea gene from the Huntington's disease locus: report of a family.

    PubMed

    Yapijakis, C; Kapaki, E; Zournas, C; Rentzos, M; Loukopoulos, D; Papageorgiou, C

    1995-03-01

    A Greek family is presented in which seven members suffered from benign hereditary chorea (a rare autosomal dominant non-progressive chorea without dementia). All patients and three informative healthy relatives were submitted to DNA analysis using probes from loci linked to Huntington's disease. The results confirm one previous suggestion that these two disorders are not allelic and that they should be considered as two distinct genetic entities.

  2. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  3. A short review of malabsorption and anemia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Monzón, Helena; Forné, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent finding in most diseases which cause malabsorption. The most frequent etiology is the combination of iron and vitamin B12 deficiency. Celiac disease is frequently diagnosed in patients referred for evaluation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), being reported in 1.8%-14.6% of patients. Therefore, duodenal biopsies should be taken during endoscopy if no obvious cause of iron deficiency (ID) can be found. Cobalamin deficiency occurs frequently among elderly patients, but it is often unrecognized because the clinical manifestations are subtle; it is caused primarily by food-cobalamin malabsorption and pernicious anemia. The classic treatment of cobalamin deficiency has been parenteral administration of the vitamin. Recent data suggest that alternative routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) may be useful in some cases. Anemia is a frequent complication of gastrectomy, and has been often described after bariatric surgery. It has been shown that banding procedures which maintain digestive continuity with the antrum and duodenum are associated with low rates of ID. Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection may be considered as a risk factor for IDA, mainly in groups with high demands for iron, such as some children and adolescents. Further controlled trials are needed before making solid recommendations about H pylori eradication in these cases. PMID:19787827

  4. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  5. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  6. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  7. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    PubMed

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  8. [Pernicious anemia: diagnosis and course in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Koulidiati, J; Sawadogo, S; Sagna, Y; Somda, K S; Tieno, H; Kafando, E; Drabo, Y J

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer disease or anemia, Addison or Addisonian anemia, and Addison-Biermer anemia) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis responsible for vitamin B12 malabsorption due to a deficiency of intrinsic factor. We report eight cases of pernicious anemia in Burkina Faso, collected over a 44-month period. The three criteria for diagnosis of pernicious anemia were: vitamin B12 deficiency, gastric disease (gastric histology) with presence of anti-intrinsic factor, and/or anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies in serum. All patients had anemia, with a mean hemoglobin level of 8.75 g/100 mL. The average mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was 122.1 fL the average mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) 39.3 pg, the mean reticulocyte count 12.069 10(9)/L reticulocytes, and the mean rate of megaloblast marrow cells 17.2%. The serum vitamin B12 level ranged from 35 to 71 pmol/L. Antibodies against intrinsic factor were found in all eight patients. All ABO blood groups were present with a predominance (4 cases) of group O. Endoscopy found a normal fundic mucosa in three patients. Histology showed gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia for six patients (85.7%). Under B12 vitamin therapy, the course was favorable in all patients; seven patients also had 10 days of iron therapy. We recommend a gastric biopsy even in the absence of macroscopic gastric lesions on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:25787024

  9. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: Prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Ke-Jian Lei; Hungwen Chen; Ji-Lan Liu

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient`s biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type la disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease. 22 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Clustering and age of onset in familial late onset Alzheimer`s disease are determined at the apoliopoprotein E locus

    SciTech Connect

    Houlden, H.; Rossor, M.

    1994-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is of great importance in the etiology of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). Thus, inheritance of the ApoE4 allele predisposes to the occurrences of late onset disease and decreases the onset age in families with pathogenic mutations in the amyloid precursor protein gene. We analysed ApoE genotypes in 35 families multiply affected by AD and confirm that familial clustering in late onset AD is associated with the ApoE4 allele. This allele occurs in the great majority (82%) of late onset familial Alzheimer cases. Elderly unaffected sibs (80-90 years) have an allele frequency that is not significantly different to that of normal controls. Data presented from our family sets together previously published data is suggestive that the effect of a single ApoE4 allele is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 5 years and that the effect of ApoE4 homozygosity is to increase the risk of developing AD by an amount equivalent to 10 years of age. Data shows significant difference between the frequency of the ApoE4 allele in the familial AD probands and controls and in both sets of unaffected sibs, p<0.01.

  11. Genetic basis of glycogen storage disease type 1a: prevalent mutations at the glucose-6-phosphatase locus.

    PubMed

    Lei, K J; Chen, Y T; Chen, H; Wong, L J; Liu, J L; McConkie-Rosell, A; Van Hove, J L; Ou, H C; Yeh, N J; Pan, L Y

    1995-10-01

    Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a currently is established by demonstrating the lack of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) activity in the patient's biopsied liver specimen. Recent cloning of the G6Pase gene and identification of mutations within the gene that causes GSD type 1a allow for the development of a DNA-based diagnostic method. Using SSCP analysis and DNA sequencing, we characterized the G6Pase gene of 70 unrelated patients with enzymatically confirmed diagnosis of GSD type 1a and detected mutations in all except 17 alleles (88%). Sixteen mutations were uncovered that were shown by expression to abolish or greatly reduce G6Pase activity and that therefore are responsible for the GSD type 1a disorder. R83C and Q347X are the most prevalent mutations found in Caucasians, 130X and R83C are most prevalent in Hispanics, and R83H is most prevalent in Chinese. The Q347X mutation has thus far been identified only in Caucasian patients, and the 130X mutation has been identified only in Hispanic patients. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-based analysis can accurately, rapidly, and noninvasively detect the majority of mutations in GSD type 1a. This DNA-based diagnosis now permits prenatal diagnosis among at-risk patients and serves as a database in screening and counseling patients clinically suspected of having this disease.

  12. Association of rs10757274 and rs2383206 Polymorphisms on 9p21 locus with Coronary Artery Disease in Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Okyay, Kaan; Yılmaz, Akın; Şahinarslan, Asife; Yar Sağlam, Atiye Seda; Eyiol, Azmi; Bolayır, Hasan Ata; Sezenöz, Burak; Menevşe, Sevda; Çengel, Atiye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genetic predisposition is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of rs10757274 and rs2383206 polymorphisms in chromosome 9p21 on presence and severity of CAD in a Turkish population. Subjects and Methods A total of 646 patients who underwent coronary angiography were included in this study. Coronary vessel score and Gensini score were calculated to assess the angiographic severity of CAD. Alleles of AA, AG, and GG were determined for rs10757274 (polymorphism-1) and rs2383206 (polymorphism-2) polymorphisms located in chromosome 9p21 from the blood samples. Results There was a significant difference between the alleles in polymorphism-1 in the presence of coronary artery disease (38.9% in AA, 48.0% in GG and 56.4% in AG, p=0.017). However, there was no difference between the alleles in polymorphism-2. According to vessel scores, there was a significant difference between the alleles in polymorphism-1 (AA 0.71±1.04, GG 0.88±1.07, AG 1.06±1.12, p=0.018). In polymorphism-2, vessel scores did not show a difference between the alleles. In polymorphism-1, there was a significant difference in Gensini score (p=0.041). Gensini scores did not differ between the alleles in polymorphism-2 (p>0.05 for all). In multivariate analyses, none of the alleles was an independent factor for presence of CAD. Conclusion The presence of rs10757274 polymorphism including AG allele in chromosome 9p21 was related to CAD. However, this relationship was not independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27721851

  13. Potential contribution of the Alzheimer's disease risk locus BIN1 to episodic memory performance in cognitively normal Type 2 diabetes elderly.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Lior; Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Lubitz, Irit; Schmeidler, James; Cooper, Itzik; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M; Heymann, Anthony; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, several promising susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) were discovered, by implementing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach. Recent GWAS meta-analysis has demonstrated the association of 19 loci (in addition to the APOE locus) with AD in the European ancestry population at genome-wide significance level. Since Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a substantial risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent the 19 AD loci were studied for association with performance in episodic memory, a primary cognitive domain affected by AD, in a sample of 848 cognitively normal elderly Israeli Jewish T2D patients. We found a suggestive association of SNP rs6733839, located near the bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) gene, with this phenotype. Controlling for demographic (age, sex, education, disease duration and ancestry) covariates, carriers of two copies of the AD risk allele T (TT genotype) performed significantly worse (p=0.00576; p=0.00127 among Ashkenazi origin sub-sample) in episodic memory compared to carriers of the C allele (CT+CC genotypes). When including additional potential covariates (clinical and APOE genotype), results remained significant (p=0.00769; p=0.00148 among Ashkenazi). Interestingly, as validated in multiple large studies, BIN1 is one of the most established AD risk loci, with a high odds ratio. Although preliminary and require further replications, our findings support a contribution of BIN1 to individual differences in episodic memory performance among T2D patients. PMID:26947052

  14. The Role of Health Locus of Control in Predicting Depression Symptoms in a Sample of Iranian Older Adults with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Abadi, Mohammad-Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the prediction of depression on a group of Iranian older adults based on components of health locus of control. Method: Sixty-six men and 42 women over the age of 55 were recruited from the retirement clubs in Shiraz, using convenience sampling. The participants completed the research questionnaires including the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLC). Results: The findings on health locus of control revealed that the highest score was on internal locus of control followed by God, powerful others and chance. The mean score on depression was on a normal range. Multiple regression analysis showed that two independent variables including internal control (ß = −.32, p < 0.01) and God control (ß = −.20, = p < 0.03) significantly predicted depression. The other components of health locus of control such as chance and powerful others as well as age did not predict depression. Findings also revealed that the independents variables explained 26% of the total variance of depression (R2 = .26, p <0.001). Conclusion: his study provides more support for the application of theory of health locus of control on depression. PMID:27437004

  15. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig encompassing the critical region of the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) locus.

    PubMed

    Lanyi, A; Li, B; Li, S; Talmadge, C B; Brichacek, B; Davis, J R; Kozel, B A; Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Uzvolgyi, E; Stanbridge, E J; Nelson, D L; Chinault, C; Heslop, H; Gross, T G; Seemayer, T A; Klein, G; Purtilo, D T; Sumegi, J

    1997-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia, or malignant lymphoma. Initially the XLP gene was assigned to a 10-cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS37. Subsequently, an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 was identified in one XLP family, 43. In this study we estimated the deletion in XLP patient 43-004 by dual-laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mb of DNA sequence. From a human chromosome Xq25-specific yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) sublibrary, five YACs containing DNA sequences deleted in patient 43-004 have been isolated. Sequence-tagged sites (STSs) from these YACs have been used to identify interstitial deletions in unrelated XLP patients. Three more families with interstitial deletions were found. Two of the patients (63-003 and 73-032) carried an interstitial deletion of 3.0 Mb overlapping the 43-004 deletion. In one XLP patient (30-011) who exhibited the characteristic postinfectious mononucleosis phenotype of XLP with hypogammaglobulinemia and malignant lymphoma, a deletion of approximately 250 kb was detected overlapping the deletion detected in patients 43-004, 63-003, and 73-032. A YAC contig of 2.2 Mb spanning the XLP critical region, whose orientation on chromosome X was determined by double-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and which consists of 15 overlapping YAC clones, has been constructed. A detailed restriction enzyme map of the region has been constructed. YAC insert sizes were determined by counter-clamped homogenous electric field gel electrophoresis. Chimerism of YACs was determined by FISH and restriction mapping. On the basis of lambda subclones, YAC end-derived plasmids, and STSs with an average spacing of 100 kb, a long-range physical map was constructed using 5 rare-cutter restriction

  16. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia--the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Therapy (TREAT).

    PubMed

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W; Skali, H; Lewis, E F; Solomon, S D; Parving, H-H; Pfeffer, M; McMurray, J J; Rossing, P

    2016-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038 type 2 diabetes patients, darbepoetin alfa treatment did not affect the primary outcome. Risk related to PP at randomization was evaluated in a multivariable model including age, gender, kidney function, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other conventional risk factors. End points were myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, end stage renal disease (ESRD) and the composite of cardiovascular death, MI or hospitalization for myocardial ischemia, heart failure or stroke (CVD composite). Median (interquartile range) age, gender, eGFR and PP was 68 (60-75) years, 57.3% women, 33 (27-42) ml min(-1) per 1.73 m2 and 60 (50-74) mm Hg. During 29.1 months (median) follow-up, the number of events for composite CVD, MI, stroke and ESRD was 1010, 253, 154 and 668. In unadjusted analyses, higher quartiles of PP were associated with higher rates per 100 years of follow-up of all end points (P⩽0.04), except stroke (P=0.52). Adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) per one quartile increase in PP were 1.06 (0.99-1.26) for MI, 0.96 (0.83-1.11) for stroke, 1.01 (0.94-1.09) for ESRD and 1.01 (0.96-1.07) for CVD composite. Results were similar in continuous analyses of PP (per 10 mm Hg). In patients with type 2 diabetes, CKD and anemia, PP did not independently predict cardiovascular events or ESRD. This may reflect confounding by aggressive antihypertensive treatment, or PP may be too rough a risk marker in these high-risk patients.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  19. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  20. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  1. Prevalence and outcomes of anemia in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Belperio, Pamela S; Rhew, David C

    2004-04-01

    In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), anemia is a commonly encountered hematologic abnormality that has a significant impact on clinical outcomes and quality of life (QOL). This review describes the prevalence of anemia in several populations of patients with HIV and the effects of anemia on survival, morbidity, disease progression, transfusion requirements, and QOL. The prevalence of anemia in HIV disease varies considerably, ranging from 1.3% to 95%: it depends on several factors, including the stage of HIV disease, sex, age, pregnancy status, and injection-drug use as well as the definition of anemia used. In general, as HIV disease progresses, the prevalence and severity of anemia increase. Anemia is also more prevalent in HIV-positive women, children, and injection-drug users than in HIV-negative women, children, and injection-drug users. Anemia has been shown to be a statistically significant predictor of progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and is independently associated with an increased risk of death in patients with HIV. Treatment of anemia with epoetin-alpha has resulted in significantly fewer patients requiring transfusion as well as decreases in the mean number of units of blood transfused. Resolution of HIV-related anemia has been shown to improve QOL, physical functioning, energy, and fatigue in individuals with HIV. More recently, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy has also been associated with a significant increase in hemoglobin concentrations and a decrease in the prevalence of anemia.

  2. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz Agladioglu, S; Aycan, Z; Bas, V N; Peltek Kendirci, H N; Onder, A

    2012-01-01

    The thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, megaloblastic anemia and sensorineural hearing loss due to mutations in SLC 19A2 that encodes a thiamine transporter protein. The disease can manifest at any time between infancy and adolescence, and not all cardinal findings are present initially. The anemia typically improves significantly with pharmacological doses of thiamine. Variable improvement in diabetes is also noted. However, the hearing loss is apparently irreversible, although a delay in the onset of deafness may be possible. We present a 2-year old girl with non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus and anemia in whom we found a novelc.95T>A (leu32X) mutation in the SLC19A2 gene in this study.Our patient with this new mutation did not suffer from hearing loss. PMID:22876572

  3. Correlation of blood pressure in end-stage renal disease with platelet cytosolic free calcium concentration during treatment of renal anemia with recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Schiffl, H

    1992-06-01

    The hemodynamic hallmark of hypertension complicating the treatment of renal anemia with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHu-EPO) is increased total peripheral vascular resistance, but the mechanisms underlying the arteriolar vasoconstriction are still an enigma. We studied body fluid volumes, plasma renin activity, plasma norepinephrine, and calcium metabolism in platelets in 40 previously normotensive hemodialysis patients before and after 12 weeks of rHu-EPO treatment. Partial correction of anemia caused a rise in arterial pressure (94 +/- 6 mmHg vs 124 +/- 7 mmHg, p less than 0.05) and in platelet cytosolic calcium concentration (113 +/- 5 nM vs 171 +/- 18 nM, p less than 0.05) in eight patients. Hypertensive patients had significantly higher plasma noradrenaline concentrations, but they did not differ significantly in body fluid volumes and plasma renin activities. There was a close correlation between free calcium concentration in platelets and mean arterial pressure in patients developing rHu-EPO-induced-hypertension (r = 0.95). Short-term antihypertensive treatment resulted in a reduction of free calcium concentrations in platelets and a concomitant fall in blood pressure. The main results of the present studies suggest that rHu-EPO-induced hypertension might be associated with altered cellular calcium homeostasis and hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. If rHu-EPO therapy induces alterations of pressor factors or the hormone itself raises the cytosolic calcium not only in platelets but also in vascular smooth muscle cells, altered cellular calcium influx may contribute to the arteriolar vasoconstriction. PMID:1639525

  4. [Molecular study of Fanconi anemia in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Chiraz; Abdelhak, Sonia; Dellagi, Koussay

    2004-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive rare disease characterized by progressive pancytopenia, congenital malformations and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. Fanconi anemia is genetically heterogeneous, with at least eight complementation groups of FA (FAA to FAD2). In order to characterize the molecular defects underlying FA in Tunisia, fourty-one families were genotyped with microsatellite markers linked to known FA gene. Haplotype analysis and homozygosity mapping showed that 92% of these families belong to FAA group. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the molecular analysis for a better selection of bone marrow graft donor and for the evaluation of chimerism after bone marrow transplantation. This study also allows genetic counselling for FA family members.

  5. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  6. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  7. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  8. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  9. Imaging diagnosis of neonatal anemia: report of two unusual etiologies.

    PubMed

    Grover, Shabnam Bhandari; Preethi, G Rajalakshmi; Saluja, Sumita; Bhargava, Ankit

    2013-01-01

    Anemia in neonatal period is rare, with the common causes being Rh and ABO blood group incompatibility, hemorrhagic disease of newborn, congenital hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinopathies, and TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus) infections. Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis (OP) are among the rare causes of neonatal anemia. A review of the literature shows approximately 200 reported cases of congenital leukemia. Articles describing the imaging features of congenital leukemia are still rarer. Infantile OP, another rare disorder with a reported incidence of 1 in 250,000 has characteristic imaging features, which are diagnostic of the disease. We report a case each, of two rare diseases: Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis. Additionally, our report highlights the radiological and imaging features of congenital leukemia and infantile OP and their crucial role in arriving at an early diagnosis. PMID:24605254

  10. Megaloblastic anemia with hypotension and transient delirium as the primary symptoms: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Lv, Xue-Ying; Yang, Yun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes a case of an elderly patient that was hospitalized secondary to hypotension and delirium. Physical examination at admission revealed bilateral positive Babinski's sign. Laboratory examination revealed severe anemia. Bone marrow examination showed megaloblastic changes of the granulocyte and erythroid series, as well as other dyshaematopoiesis. The conditions of the patient rapidly improved after vitamin B12 treatments. Because the clinical manifestations of megaloblastic anemia are complex, this disease is often misdiagnosed in the geriatric population. Bone marrow examinations can aid in the diagnosis of anemia, but the results from these tests cannot always differentiate the type of anemia. Clinical management of the disorder is reliant upon proper classification of the type of anemia. The prognosis of megaloblastic anemia is typically good and a simple regimen of folic acid and/or vitamin B12 is effective. PMID:26770511

  11. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Supplementation on Lipid Profile, Anemia, and Quality of Life in Chronic Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Emami Naini, Afsoon; Moradi, Mahnaz; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Amini Harandi, Asghar; Hadizadeh, Mehdi; Shirani, Farhad; Basir Ghafoori, Hamed; Emami Naini, Pardis

    2012-01-01

    In patients on maintenance hemodialysis several factors reduce the body stored carnitine which could lead to dyslipidemia, anemia, and general health in these patients. We evaluated the effect of oral L-carnitine supplementation on lipid profiles, anemia, and quality of life (QOL) in hemodialysis patients. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis received either L-carnitine 1 g/d (n = 24) or placebo (27 patients) for 16 weeks. At the end of the study, there was a significant decrease in triglyceride (−31.1 ± 38.7 mg/dL, P = 0.001) and a significant increase in HDL (3.7 ± 2.8 mg/dL, P < 0.001) levels in the carnitine group. Decrease in total cholesterol (−6.6 ± 16.0 mg/dL, P = 0.075) and increase in hemoglobin (0.7 ± 1.7 g/dL, P = 0.081) concentrations in the carnitine group were not significant. There was no statistically significant changes in LDL in any group (P > 0.05). Erythropoietin dose was significantly decreased in both the carnitine (−4750 ± 5772 mg, P = 0.001) and the placebo group (−2000 ± 4296 mg, P < 0.05). No improvement was observed in QOL scores of two groups. In ESRD patients under maintenance hemodialysis, oral L-carnitine supplementation may reduce triglyceride and cholesterol and increase HDL and hemoglobin and subsequently reduce needed erythropoietin dose without effect on QOL. PMID:22720143

  12. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  13. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  14. High frequency of exon 15 deletion in the FANCA gene in Tunisian patients affected with Fanconi anemia disease: implication for diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Amouri, Ahlem; Talmoudi, Faten; Messaoud, Olfa; d'Enghien, Catherine D; Rekaya, Mariem B; Allegui, Ines; Azaiez, Héla; Kefi, Rym; Abdelhak, Ahlem; Meseddi, Sondes H; Torjemane, Lamia; Ouederni, Monia; Mellouli, Fethi; Abid, Héla B; Aissaoui, Lamia; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Othmen, Tarek B; Lyonnet, Dominique S; Soulier, Jean; Hachicha, Mongia; Dellagi, Koussay; Abdelhak, Sonia; Fanconi, Tunisian

    2014-01-01

    Tunisian population is characterized by its heterogeneous ethnic background and high rate of consanguinity. In consequence, there is an increase in the frequency of recessive genetic disorders including Fanconi anemia (FA). The aim of this study was to confirm the existence of a founder haplotype among FA Tunisian patients and to identify the associated mutation in order to develop a simple tool for FA diagnosis. Seventy-four unrelated families with a total of 95 FA patients were investigated. All available family members were genotyped with four microsatellite markers flanking FANCA gene. Haplotype analysis and homozygosity mapping assigned 83 patients belonging to 62 families to the FA-A group. A common haplotype was shared by 42 patients from 26 families at a homozygous state while five patients from five families were heterozygous. Among them, 85% were from southern Tunisia suggesting a founder effect. Using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique, we have also demonstrated that this haplotype is associated with a total deletion of exon 15 in FANCA gene. Identification of a founder mutation allowed genetic counseling in relatives of these families, better bone marrow graft donor selection and prenatal diagnosis. This mutation should be investigated in priority for patients originating from North Africa and Middle East. PMID:24689079

  15. A Cladistic Analysis of Phenotypic Associations with Haplotypes Inferred from Restriction Endonuclease Mapping or DNA Sequencing. V. Analysis of Case/Control Sampling Designs: Alzheimer's Disease and the Apoprotein E Locus

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Present-day associations between haplotypes at a candidate locus and phenotypes exist when phenotypically important mutations occurred at some point during the evolution of the current array of genetic variation. A cladistic statistical design can be defined that focuses power by using the evolutionary history of the candidate DNA region. This paper shows how cladistic methodology is used for the analysis of case/control data, a common sampling design in genetic/disease association studies. A worked example is presented of the associations for sporadic early and late-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease with the 19q13.2 chromosomal region that includes the loci for apoproteins E, CI, and CII. This analysis confirms earlier reports of a strong association of the ApoE &4 allele with Alzheimer's disease but indicates that it is premature to condsider this association causal, particularly for early onset cases. Associations were also found with the &2 allele, as previously reported, and with the 1 allele at the ApoCI locus. However, this analysis indicates that it is inappropriate both statistically and medically to use single markers as risk predictors when haplotype data are available, even when the mutation leading to the marker is identified as having a strong phenotypic association. PMID:7635303

  16. Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000 1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8 000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

  17. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  18. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  19. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  20. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  1. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. [Therapeutic approach to postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Moltó, L

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative anemia is a common finding in patients who undergo major surgery, and it can affect early rehabilitation and the return to daily activities. Allogeneic blood transfusion is still the most widely used method for restoring hemoglobin levels rapidly and effectively. However, the potential risks of transfusions have led to the review of this practice and to a search for alternative measures for treating postoperative anemia. The early administration of intravenous iron appears to improve the evolution of postoperative hemoglobin levels and reduce allogeneic transfusions, especially in patients with significant iron deficiency or anemia. What is not clear is whether this treatment heavily influences rehabilitation and quality of life. There is a lack of well-designed, sufficiently large, randomized prospective studies to determine whether postoperative or perioperative intravenous iron treatment, with or without recombinant erythropoietin, has a role in the recovery from postoperative anemia, in reducing transfusions and morbidity rates and in improving exercise capacity and quality of life.

  3. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  4. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... I told my doctor that I was very tired. My doctor did blood tests to check for ... or faint ● ● Short of breath ● ● Very weak and tired ● ● Your heart beating very fast What is anemia? ...

  5. Association between polymorphisms in PDCD1 gene and aplastic anemia in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zixia; Miao, Miao; Qiu, Yuhua; Qin, Zhenghong; Wang, Jin; Jiang, Yiguo; Ming, Zhijun; Zhang, Xueguang

    2013-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1, encoded by PDCD1) has been reported to be associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Graves' disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). In order to study the correlation between PD-1 gene polymorphism and aplastic anemia in a Chinese Han population, two SNPs, PD-1.1 G/A (rs36084323) and PD-1.6 G/A (rs10204525), were genotyped in 166 patients with aplastic anemia and 144 healthy controls by direct sequencing. All genotype distributions in both patients and controls were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Associations of genotypes and alleles with aplastic anemia were analyzed. The results suggested that the G allele of PD-1.1 was associated with an increased risk for aplastic anemia, while SNP of PD-1.6 was not associated with aplastic anemia in a Chinese Han population. PMID:23373967

  6. Aplastic Anemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Guinan, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent and young adult patient presentations of aplastic anemia require a particular perspective on both diagnosis and treatment. This unique age group necessitates a thorough diagnostic evaluation to ensure the etiology, acquired or inherited, is sufficiently determined. The treatment options include human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation or immunosuppressive therapy, and both require attention to the specific medical and social needs of these adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal surveillance throughout life for the development of late complications of the disease and treatment is mandatory. PMID:25228559

  7. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy.

  8. Anemia in Clinical Practice-Definition and Classification: Does Hemoglobin Change With Aging?

    PubMed

    Cappellini, M Domenica; Motta, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem affecting both developing and developed countries at all ages. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is defined as hemoglobin (Hb) levels <12.0 g/dL in women and <13.0 g/dL in men. However, normal Hb distribution varies not only with sex but also with ethnicity and physiological status. New lower limits of normal Hb values have been proposed, according to ethnicity, gender, and age. Anemia is often multifactorial and is not an independent phenomenon. For the classification and diagnosis the hematologic parameters, the underlying pathological mechanism and patient history should be taken into account. The aging of population, especially in Western countries, causes an increase of anemia in elderly people. In this population, anemia, recently defined by levels of Hb <12 g/dL in both sexes, is mostly of mild degree (10-12 g/dL). Understanding the pathophysiology of anemia in this population is important because it contributes to morbidity and mortality. In one third of the patients, anemia is due to nutritional deficiency, including iron, folate, or vitamin B12 deficiency; moreover, anemia of chronic disease accounts for about another third of the cases. However, in one third of patients anemia cannot be explained by an underlying disease or by a specific pathological process, and for this reason it is defined "unexplained anemia". Unexplained anemia might be due to the progressive resistance of bone marrow erythroid progenitors to erythropoietin, and a chronic subclinical pro-inflammatory state.

  9. Anemia in Clinical Practice-Definition and Classification: Does Hemoglobin Change With Aging?

    PubMed

    Cappellini, M Domenica; Motta, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem affecting both developing and developed countries at all ages. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is defined as hemoglobin (Hb) levels <12.0 g/dL in women and <13.0 g/dL in men. However, normal Hb distribution varies not only with sex but also with ethnicity and physiological status. New lower limits of normal Hb values have been proposed, according to ethnicity, gender, and age. Anemia is often multifactorial and is not an independent phenomenon. For the classification and diagnosis the hematologic parameters, the underlying pathological mechanism and patient history should be taken into account. The aging of population, especially in Western countries, causes an increase of anemia in elderly people. In this population, anemia, recently defined by levels of Hb <12 g/dL in both sexes, is mostly of mild degree (10-12 g/dL). Understanding the pathophysiology of anemia in this population is important because it contributes to morbidity and mortality. In one third of the patients, anemia is due to nutritional deficiency, including iron, folate, or vitamin B12 deficiency; moreover, anemia of chronic disease accounts for about another third of the cases. However, in one third of patients anemia cannot be explained by an underlying disease or by a specific pathological process, and for this reason it is defined "unexplained anemia". Unexplained anemia might be due to the progressive resistance of bone marrow erythroid progenitors to erythropoietin, and a chronic subclinical pro-inflammatory state. PMID:26404438

  10. Physical mapping of the major early-onset familial Alzheimer`s disease locus on chromosome 14 and analysis of candidate gene sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzi, R.E.; Romano, D.M.; Crowley, A.C.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic studies of kindreds displaying evidence for familial AD (FAD) have led to the localization of gene defects responsible for this disorder on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21. A minor early-onset FAD gene on chromosome 21 has been identified to enode the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and the late-onset FAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 19 has been shown to be in linkage disequilibrium with the E4 allele of the APOE gene. Meanwhile, the locus responsible for the major form of early-onset FAD on chromosome 14q24 has not yet been identified. By recombinational analysis, we have refined the minimal candidate region containing the gene defect to approximately 3 megabases in 14q24. We will describe our laboratory`s progress on attempts to finely localize this locus, as well as test known candidate genes from this region for either inclusion in the minimal candidate region or the presence of pathogenic mutations. Candidate genes that have been tested so far include cFOS, heat shock protein 70 member (HSF2A), transforming growth factor beta (TGFB3), the trifunctional protein C1-THF synthase (MTHFD), bradykinin receptor (BR), and the E2k component of a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. HSP2A, E2k, MTHFD, and BR do not map to the current defined minimal candidate region; however, sequence analysis must be performed to confirm exclusion of these genes as true candidates. Meanwhile, no pathogenic mutations have yet been found in cFOS or TGFB3. We have also isolated a large number of novel transcribed sequences from the minimal candidate region in the form of {open_quotes}trapped exons{close_quotes} from cosmids identified by hybridization to select YAC clones; we are currently in the process of searching for pathogenic mutations in these exons in affected individuals from FAD families.

  11. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder affecting at least one third of world's population. Though anemia is common manifestation of iron deficiency, other effects of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems are usually under recognized. Impaired brain development and cognitive, behavioural and psychomotor impairment are most worrisome manifestations of iron deficiency. Studies have demonstrated that some of these changes occurring during period of brain growth spurt (<2 years age) may be irreversible. Association of iron deficiency with febrile seizures, pica, breath holding spells, restless leg syndrome and thrombosis is increasingly being recognized. Impaired cell-mediated immunity and bactericidal function are generally noted in iron-deficient persons; however, the findings are inconsistent. Despite proven reversible functional immunological defects in vitro studies, a clinically important relationship between states of iron deficiency and susceptibility to infections remains controversial. Studies from malaria endemic regions have reported increased incidence of malaria in association with iron supplementation. These and some other aspects of iron deficiency are reviewed in this article.

  12. [Hemolytic anemia and dysenteric syndrome: a case of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Colard, M; Benghiat, F S; Maerevoet, M; Bailly, B; De Wilde, V

    2015-01-01

    A 53-years-old man has a dysentery since two weeks. The blood test shows Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and inflammation. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is treated with corticosteroid. A colonoscopy reveals an ulcerative colitis. The evolution of the patient is complicated by a spontaneous digestive perforation treated by total proctocolectomy. After this intervention, there is a resolution of the AIHA and the patient is gradually weaned from corticosteroids. AIHA is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease essentially ulcerative colitis. Identification of this cause of secondary AIHA is important for the therapeutic strategy. However treatment is nonspecific and based on low levels of evidence.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  14. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  15. Association of alpha-thalassemia, TNF-alpha (-308G>A) and VCAM-1 (c.1238G>C) gene polymorphisms with cerebrovascular disease in a newborn cohort of 411 children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Belisário, André Rolim; Nogueira, Frederico Lisboa; Rodrigues, Rahyssa Sales; Toledo, Nayara Evelin; Cattabriga, Ana Luiza Moreira; Velloso-Rodrigues, Cibele; Duarte, Filipe Otávio Chaves; Silva, Célia Maria; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is a severe complication associated with sickle cell anemia. Abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies some children at high risk, but other markers would be helpful. This cohort study was aimed at evaluating the effects of genetic biomarkers on the risk of developing CVD in children from Minas Gerais, Brazil. Clinical and hematological data were retrieved from children's records. Outcomes studied were overt ischemic stroke and CVD (overt ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, abnormal TCD, or abnormal cerebral angiography). Out of 411 children, 386 (93.9%) had SS genotype, 23 (5.6%) had Sβ(0)-thal and two had severe Sβ(+)-thal (0.5%). Frequency of CVD was lower in Sβ-thal group (p=0.05). No effect of VCAM-1 polymorphism on stroke or CVD risks was detected. Cumulative incidence of stroke was significantly higher for children with TNF-α A allele (p=0.02) and lower for children with HBA deletion (p=0.02). However, no association between CVD and TNF-α -308G>A was found. CVD cumulative incidence was significantly lower for children with HBA deletion (p=0.004). This study found no association between VCAM1 c.1238G>C and stroke. An association between stroke and TNF-α -308A allele has been suggested. Our results have confirmed the protective role of HBA deletion against stroke and CVD.

  16. Effects of Iron Supplementation With and Without Docosahexaenoic Acid on the Cardiovascular Disease Risk Based on Paraoxonase-1, hs-CRP, and ApoB/ApoA-I Ratio in Women with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Shidfar, Farzad; Amani, Samira; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shekarriz, Ramin; Hosseini, Sharieh; Shidfar, Shahrzad; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Neda

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tissue deposition of iron following prolonged high dose of oral supplementation for treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) leads to body iron overload and oxidative stress, which starts the process of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to determine the effect of iron supplementation in combination with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the cardiovascular disease risk based on paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in women with IDA. In this randomized controlled trial, 76 women with IDA, aged 15-45 years, were included. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg of DHA supplement or placebo with an iron tablet, once daily for 12 weeks. The participants were assessed by measurement of the serum iron, ferritin, PON-1, hs-CRP levels, and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio at the beginning and end of study. Serum hs-CRP decreased in the DHA-supplemented group (p = 0.036), and ApoA-I decreased in the placebo group (p = 0.013). No significant difference was detected for the serum PON-1 concentration and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in two groups. Iron supplementation combined with DHA may have favorable effects on serum hs-CRP in women with IDA.

  17. Effects of Iron Supplementation With and Without Docosahexaenoic Acid on the Cardiovascular Disease Risk Based on Paraoxonase-1, hs-CRP, and ApoB/ApoA-I Ratio in Women with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Shidfar, Farzad; Amani, Samira; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shekarriz, Ramin; Hosseini, Sharieh; Shidfar, Shahrzad; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Neda

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tissue deposition of iron following prolonged high dose of oral supplementation for treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) leads to body iron overload and oxidative stress, which starts the process of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to determine the effect of iron supplementation in combination with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the cardiovascular disease risk based on paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in women with IDA. In this randomized controlled trial, 76 women with IDA, aged 15-45 years, were included. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg of DHA supplement or placebo with an iron tablet, once daily for 12 weeks. The participants were assessed by measurement of the serum iron, ferritin, PON-1, hs-CRP levels, and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio at the beginning and end of study. Serum hs-CRP decreased in the DHA-supplemented group (p = 0.036), and ApoA-I decreased in the placebo group (p = 0.013). No significant difference was detected for the serum PON-1 concentration and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in two groups. Iron supplementation combined with DHA may have favorable effects on serum hs-CRP in women with IDA. PMID:26077874

  18. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality.

  19. Selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 displays recessive Mendelian inheritance: Assignment of a locus to chromosome 10 by linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Aminoff, M.; Tahvanainen, E.; Chapelle, A. de la

    1995-10-01

    Juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12 has been considered a distinct condition displaying autosomal recessive inheritance. It appears to have a worldwide distribution, and comparatively high incidences were reported 30 years ago in Finland and Norway. More recently, the Mendelian inheritance of the condition has been questioned because almost no new cases have occurred in these populations. Here we report linkage studies assigning a recessive-gene locus for the disease to chromosome 10 in previously diagnosed multiplex families from Finland and Norway, proving the Mendelian mode of inheritance. The locus is tentatively assigned to the 6-cM interval between markers D10S548 and D10S466, with a multipoint maximum lod score (Z{sub max}) of 5.36 near marker D10S1477. By haplotype analysis, the healthy sibs in these families did not appear to constitute any examples of nonpenetrance. We hypothesize that the paucity of new cases in these populations is due either to a dietary effect on the gene penetrance that has changed with time, or to a drop in the birth rate in subpopulations showing enrichment of the mutation, or to both of these causes. 38 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Castleman-Kojima disease (TAFRO syndrome) : a novel systemic inflammatory disease characterized by a constellation of symptoms, namely, thrombocytopenia, ascites (anasarca), microcytic anemia, myelofibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly : a status report and summary of Fukushima (6 June, 2012) and Nagoya meetings (22 September, 2012).

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Takai, Kazue; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Naoya; Aoki, Sadao; Nakamura, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Masaki, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a unique clinicopathologic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) has been identified in Japan. This disease is characterized by a constellation of symptoms, as listed in the title, and multiple lymphadenopathy of mild degree with a pathologic diagnosis of atypical CD, often posing diagnostic and therapeutic problems for pathologists and hematologists, respectively. These findings suggest that this disease represents a novel clinical entity belonging to systemic inflammatory disorders with a background of immunological abnormality beyond the ordinal spectrum of MCD. To define this disorder more clearly, Japanese participants presented clinicopathologic data at the Fukushima and Nagoya meetings. Many of the patients presented by the participants were significantly accompanied by a combination of thrombocytopenia, ascites (anasarca), pleural effusions, microcytic anemia, fever, myelofibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly (TAFRO). Multiple lymphadenopathies were generally of mild degree, less than 1.5 cm in diameter, and consistently featured the histopathology of mixed- or less hyaline vascular-type CD. Autoantibodies were often detected. However, this disease did not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for well-known autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus. Castleman-Kojima disease and TAFRO syndrome (the favored clinical term) were proposed for this disease. The patients were sensitive to steroid and anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody (tocilizumab), but some exhibited a deteriorated clinical course despite the treatment. The participants proposed a future nationwide survey and a Japanese consortium to facilitate further clinical and therapeutic studies of this novel disease. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 57-61, 2013].

  1. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning . Symptoms Mild anemia may have no symptoms. As ... Saunders; 2011:chap 449. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: Sameer ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  3. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  4. Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160476.html Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds Blood condition ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older stroke victims suffering from anemia -- a lack of red blood cells -- may have ...

  5. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics.

  6. Fanconi Anemia and its Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous recessive disorder characterized by diverse congenital malformations, progressive pancytopenia, and predisposition to both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Congenital anomalies vary from patient to patient and may affect skeletal morphogenesis as well as any of the major organ systems. Although this highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, laboratory study of chromosomal breakage induced by diepoxybutane (DEB) or other crosslinking agents provides a unique cellular marker for the diagnosis of the disorder either prenatally or postnatally. Diagnosis based on abnormal response to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. This overview will present our present knowledge regarding the varied phenotypic manifestations of FA and procedures for diagnosis based upon abnormal DNA damage responses. PMID:19622403

  7. Prevalence and Predictors of Anemia in a Population-Based Study of Octogenarians and Centenarians in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Alyson; Johnson, Mary Ann; Davey, Adam; Poon, Leonard W.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anemia has been associated with increased physical and financial costs and occurs more frequently in older individuals. Therefore, the primary objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence and possible predictors of anemia in the very old. Methods. Hemoglobin was used to identify those with anemia in a group of centenarians and near centenarians (98+, n = 185) and octogenarians (n = 69), who were recruited as part of the population-based multidisciplinary Georgia Centenarian Study. Blood markers, including ferritin, vitamin B12, red blood cell folate, methylmalonic acid, creatinine, and C-reactive protein, demographic variables, and medication and/or supplement usage were used to determine possible predictors of anemia. Results. The prevalence of anemia was 26.2% in octogenarians and 52.1% in centenarians. Low serum albumin (<3.6 g/dL) and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (<45 mL/min/m2) were predictors of anemia in centenarians. Conclusions. Anemia is a major health issue, particularly as people age. Because of the high prevalence of anemia in older individuals, awareness of the predictors associated with anemia becomes increasingly important so as to reduce the negative consequences associated with it and allow for the identification of steps that can be taken to correct anemia, including managing chronic disease. PMID:21896502

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxian; Li, Chenglong; Li, Qiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the result of altered genetic make up due to hereditary encounter and its form as homozygous sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe. The disease is characterized by chronic anemia, recurrent pain crises and vascular occlusion. Neurologically, there is a high incidence of stroke in childhood, as well as cognitive dysfunction. Newborn screening programmes and preventative treatments have allowed a much longer lifespan. However, recently, neurological research has shifted to characterizing more subtle aspects of brain development and functioning that may be critically important to the individual's quality of life. The present review article examines the neurological and neurocognitive complications of sickle cell disease, and discusses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging scans in the management of the disease. PMID:27446243

  9. [Anemia treatment in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Janković, Nikola; Janković, Mateja

    2009-09-01

    Anemia is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and patients receiving renal replacement therapy. In this paper we will outline the prevention and treatment of anemia in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). PD patients are less anemic and more sensitive to erythropoesis-stimulating agent (ESA) than their hemodialysis (HD) counterparts and, in general, dosages required for achieving similar hemoglobin levels to those achieved in HD patients are remarkably less. Before starting with ESA treatment we have to evaluate the degree of anemia and excluded other causes which are not connected with CKD and method of treatment. Patient's compliance is crucial for a successful therapy and it can be improved by decreasing frequency of administration of ESA. Since ESAare expensive, "cost-effectivnes" studies represent an important factor in choosing a distinct drug. Subcutaneous administration provides better long-term utilization of ESA in comparison to intravenous administration and is therefore preferred in PD patients. Intraperitoneal administration is not recommended due to poor bioavailability. In some patients we can observe the reduced response to ESA therapy. The definition of reduced response is generally regarded as a failure to achieve target hemoglobin concentration of >11 g/dL. Identification of underlying cause is not always easy but every attempt should be made to investigate every patient with resistance to therapy because some causes are easily corrected. Since 2005 particular ESA drugs have been approved by Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and registered for use in Croatia. For PD patients the ESAcan be prescribed by general practitioner. The list of available drugs is available in the official government newspaper Nardone novine No.27, March 2nd, 2009. PMID:20232548

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  11. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Anemia (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Anemia Anemija - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Anemia 贫血 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) ...

  13. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  14. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  15. TNF-α signaling in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Pang, Qishen

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and the acute phase reaction. Dysregulation of TNF production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA). FA is a genomic instability syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The patients with FA are often found overproducing TNF-α, which may directly affect hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function by impairing HSC survival, homing and proliferation, or indirectly change the bone marrow microenvironment critical for HSC homeostasis and function, therefore contribute to disease progression in FA. In this brief review, we discuss the link between TNF-α signaling and FA pathway with emphasis on the implication of inflammation in the pathophysiology and abnormal hematopoiesis in FA. PMID:23890415

  16. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Solenostemon monostachyus, Ipomoea involucrata and Carica papaya seed oil versus Glutathione, or Vernonia amygdalina: Methanolic extracts of novel plants for the management of sickle cell anemia disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disease caused by an individual inheriting an allele for sickle cell hemoglobin from both parents and is associated with unusually large numbers of immature blood cells, containing many long, thin, crescent-shaped erythrocytes. It is a disease prevalent throughout many populations. The use of medicinal plants and nutrition in managing SCD is gaining increasing attention. Methods The antisickling effects of Solenostemon monostachyus (SolMon), Carica papaya seed oil (Cari-oil) and Ipomoea involucrata (Ipocrata) in male (HbSSM) and female (HbSSF) human sickle cell blood was examined in vitro and compared with controls, or cells treated with glutathione or an antisickling plant (Vernonia amygdalina; VerMyg). Results Levels of sickle blood cells were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all the plant-extract treated SCD patients’ blood compared with that of untreated SCD patients. RBCs in SolMon, Ipocrata, and Cari-oil treated samples were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg-treated samples. The Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in all plant extract-treated HbSSM samples compared with controls. Hemoglobin concentration was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by SolMon treatment in HbSSF compared with VerMyg. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition exhibited by SolMon was significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with that of VerMyg in HbSSF blood. Sickle cell polymerization inhibition in SolMon and Ipocrata were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with VerMyg in HbSSM blood. All plant extracts significantly reduced (P < 0.05) lactate dehydrogenase activity in both HbSSM and HbSSF-treated blood. Catalase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in HbSSF blood treated with Ipocrata compared with glutathione. Cari-oil treated HbSSM and HbSSF blood had significantly increased (P < 0.05) peroxidase activity compared with controls. Conclusions Methanolic extracts from S

  18. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  19. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www.hematology.org Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation ... Fax: 301–279–7205 Email: help@aamds.org Internet: www.aamds.org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ...

  20. The central role of macrophages in trypanosomiasis-associated anemia: rationale for therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Stijlemans, Benoît; Vankrunkelsven, Ann; Caljon, Guy; Bockstal, Viki; Guilliams, Martin; Bosschaerts, Tom; Beschin, Alain; Raes, Geert; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    Bovine African trypanosomiasis causes severe economical problems on the African continent and one of the most prominent immunopathological parameters associated with this parasitic infection is anemia. In this report we review the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying trypanosomiasis-associated anemia. In first instance, the central role of macrophages and particularly their activation state in determining the outcome of the disease (i.e. trypanosusceptibility versus trypanotolerance) will be discussed. In essence, while persistence of classically activated macrophages (M1) contributes to anemia development, switching towards alternatively activated macrophages (M2) alleviates pathology including anemia. Secondly, while parasite-derived glycolipids such as the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) induce M1, host-derived IL-10 blocks M1-mediated inflammation, promotes M2 development and prevents anemia development. In this context, strategies aimed at inducing the M1 to M2 switch, such as GPI-based treatment, adenoviral delivery of IL-10 and induction of IL-10 producing regulatory T cells will be discussed. Finally, the crucial role of iron-homeostasis in trypanosomiasis-associated anemia development will be documented to stress the analogy with anemia of chronic disease (ACD), hereby providing new insight that might contribute to the treatment of ACD.

  1. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate.

  2. BMT Abatacept for Non-Malignant Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Hurler Syndrome; Fanconi Anemia; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia; Thalassemia Major; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Sickle Cell Disease

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  4. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  5. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy: a precipitating factor of cerebrovascular accident in a child with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Wali, Y A; al-Lamki, Z; Soliman, H; al-Okbi, H

    2000-08-01

    Cerebrovascular accident is one of the most serious complications of sickle cell anemia. The specific factors that predispose patients with sickle cell anemia to stroke are increased disease severity, higher baseline white blood cell count and lower baseline hematocrits. Likewise the presence of a co-existent alpha thalassemia trait and/or high fetal hemoglobin (HbF%) may reduce the risk. We report a child with sickle cell anemia and marked adenotonsillar hypertrophy resulting in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. There was no other known risk factor for developing cerebrovascular accident in this child during her hospitalization for adenotonsillectomy.

  6. A 17-month-old patient with severe anemia and respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Ahmad A; Parekh, Hetu; Bahna, Sami L

    2015-01-01

    Anemia can be caused by, or be associated with, many clinical conditions, including pulmonary diseases, some of which are rare and can be misdiagnosed. Nontraumatic pulmonary bleeding may be caused by a variety of conditions and results in anemia and pulmonary hemosiderosis, even when it is subtle. The differential diagnosis in such cases is extensive. We present the case of a diagnostic dilemma in a 17-month-old child hospitalized for severe anemia and respiratory distress in which the diagnosis was settled through an allergy/immunology consultation. PMID:26534758

  7. Anemia of Chronic Disorders: New Diagnostic Tools and New Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Guenter

    2015-10-01

    Anemia in the setting of chronic inflammatory disorders is a very frequent clinical condition, which is, however, often neglected or not properly treated given the problems often caused by the diseases underlying the development of anemia. Mechanistically, anemia is mainly caused by inflammation-driven retention of iron in macrophages making the metal unavailable for heme synthesis in the course of erythropoiesis, and further by impaired biological activity of the red blood cell hormone erythropoietin and the reduced proliferative capacity of erythroid progenitor cells. Anemia can be aggravated by chronic blood loss, as found in subjects with gastrointestinal cancers, inflammatory or infectious bowel disease, or iatrogenic blood loss in the setting of dialysis, all resulting in true iron deficiency. The identification of such patients is a clinical necessity because these individuals need contrasting therapies in comparison to subjects suffering from only classical anemia of chronic disorders. The diagnosis is challenging because no state of the art laboratory test is currently available that can clearly separate patients with inflammatory anemia from those with additional true iron deficiency. However, based on our expanding knowledge on the pathophysiology of inflammatory anemia, new diagnostic markers, including the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin, and hematologic parameters emerge. Apart from traditional anemia treatments such as blood transfusions, recombinant erythropoietin, and iron, including new high-molecular-weight formulations, new therapeutics are currently under preclinical and clinical evaluation. These novel compounds aim at correcting anemia by multiple pathways, including antagonizing the inflammation- and hepcidin-driven retention of iron in the monocyte-macrophage system and thereby promoting the supply of iron for erythropoiesis or by stimulating the endogenous formation of erythopoietin via stabilization of hypoxia-regulated factors.

  8. Mapping of the DNA locus D4S10 and the linked Huntington's disease gene to 4p16----p15.

    PubMed

    Zabel, B U; Naylor, S L; Sakaguchi, A Y; Gusella, J F

    1986-01-01

    An anonymous DNA fragment (G8) detects two restriction fragment length polymorphic alleles (RFLPs) called D4S10 in HindIII-digested human genomic DNA. This segment had been assigned to chromosome 4 and shows close linkage to the Huntington's disease gene. With in situ hybridization, we mapped D4S10 to the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 4, localizing the Huntington's disease gene to bands 4p16----p15. This information may prove useful for the development of strategies to clone the Huntington's disease gene.

  9. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse Healthy School Lunch Planner How Can I ...

  10. Randomized placebo-controlled dose-ranging and pharmacodynamics study of roxadustat (FG-4592) to treat anemia in nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) patients

    PubMed Central

    Besarab, Anatole; Provenzano, Robert; Hertel, Joachim; Zabaneh, Raja; Klaus, Stephen J.; Lee, Tyson; Leong, Robert; Hemmerich, Stefan; Yu, Kin-Hung Peony; Neff, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Roxadustat (FG-4592) is an oral hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor that stimulates erythropoiesis. This Phase 2a study tested efficacy (Hb response) and safety of roxadustat in anemic nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) subjects. Methods NDD-CKD subjects with hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11.0 g/dL were sequentially enrolled into four dose cohorts and randomized to roxadustat or placebo two times weekly (BIW) or three times weekly (TIW) for 4 weeks, in an approximate roxadustat:placebo ratio of 3:1. Efficacy was assessed by (i) mean Hb change (ΔHb) from baseline (BL) and (ii) proportion of Hb responders (ΔHb ≥ 1.0 g/dL). Pharmacodynamic evaluation was performed in a subset of subjects. Safety was evaluated by adverse event frequency/severity. Results Of 116 subjects receiving treatment, 104 completed 4 weeks of dosing and 96 were evaluable for efficacy. BL characteristics for roxadustat and placebo groups were comparable. In roxadustat-treated subjects, Hb levels increased from BL in a dose-related manner in the 0.7, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups. Maximum ΔHb within the first 6 weeks was significantly higher in the 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg groups than in the placebo subjects. Hb responder rates were dose dependent and ranged from 30% in the 0.7 mg/kg BIW group to 100% in the 2.0 mg/kg BIW and TIW groups versus 13% in placebo. Conclusions Roxadustat transiently and moderately increased endogenous erythropoietin and reduced hepcidin. Adverse events were similar in the roxadustat and placebo groups. Roxadustat produced dose-dependent increases in blood Hb among anemic NDD-CKD patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Clinical Trials Registration Clintrials.gov #NCT00761657. PMID:26238121

  11. Gaucher disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... harmful substances to build up in the liver, spleen, bones, and bone marrow. These substances prevent cells ... common. It involves bone disease, anemia, an enlarged spleen and low platelets (thrombocytopenia). Type I affects both ...

  12. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice.

  13. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-09-21

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  15. Individualized treatment for iron deficiency anemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting mankind, and iron deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age due to pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition or gut malabsorption. Iron deficiency anemia remains quite prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed upon consideration of patient specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based upon the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least one month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  16. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  17. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  18. [Hookworm discovered in a patient presenting with severe iron-deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Basset, D; Rullier, P; Segalas, F; Sasso, M

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a case involving severe anemia in a patient from New Caledonia. Endoscopic discovery of adult hematophagic hookworms in mainland France is novel because it is exceptional. However, this case also reminds us that hookworm disease is extremely widespread in the world. It often goes unrecognized causing progressive, insidious anemia that can be severe though long-term tolerance is good.

  19. THE PREVALENCE OF ANEMIA IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN CHINA: EVIDENCE FROM THE CHINA HEALTH AND NUTRITION SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Li, Liying; Luo, Renfu; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Although China has experienced rapid economic growth over the past few decades, significant health and nutritional problems remain. Little work has been done to track basic diseases, such as iron-deficiency anemia, so the exact prevalence of these health problems is unknown. The goals of this study were to assess the prevalence of anemia in China and identify individual, household and community-based factors associated with anemia. We used data from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), including the measurement of hemoglobin levels among 7,261 individuals from 170 communities and 7 provinces in central and eastern China. The overall prevalence of anemia was 13.4% using the WHO's blood hemoglobin thresholds (1968). This means in China's more developed central and eastern regions up to 180 million people may be anemic. Some vulnerable subgroups were disproportionately affected by anemia. Seniors (aged 60 years and above) were more likely to be anemic than younger age cohorts, and females had higher anemia prevalence among all age groups except among children aged 7 to 14 years. We found a negative correlation between household wealth and the presence of anemia, suggesting anemia prevalence may decline as China's economy grows. However, the prevalence of anemia was greater in migrant households, which should be experiencing an improved economic status. PMID:26513934

  20. THE PREVALENCE OF ANEMIA IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN CHINA: EVIDENCE FROM THE CHINA HEALTH AND NUTRITION SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Li, Liying; Luo, Renfu; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Although China has experienced rapid economic growth over the past few decades, significant health and nutritional problems remain. Little work has been done to track basic diseases, such as iron-deficiency anemia, so the exact prevalence of these health problems is unknown. The goals of this study were to assess the prevalence of anemia in China and identify individual, household and community-based factors associated with anemia. We used data from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), including the measurement of hemoglobin levels among 7,261 individuals from 170 communities and 7 provinces in central and eastern China. The overall prevalence of anemia was 13.4% using the WHO's blood hemoglobin thresholds (1968). This means in China's more developed central and eastern regions up to 180 million people may be anemic. Some vulnerable subgroups were disproportionately affected by anemia. Seniors (aged 60 years and above) were more likely to be anemic than younger age cohorts, and females had higher anemia prevalence among all age groups except among children aged 7 to 14 years. We found a negative correlation between household wealth and the presence of anemia, suggesting anemia prevalence may decline as China's economy grows. However, the prevalence of anemia was greater in migrant households, which should be experiencing an improved economic status.

  1. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  2. The frequency and etiology of anemia among children 6-16 years of age in the southeast region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koç, A; Kösecik, M; Vural, H; Erel, O; Ataş, A; Tatli, M M

    2000-01-01

    The frequency and etiology of anemia were investigated in 2,913 children between six and 16 years of age in Sanliurfa, in the southeast region of Turkey. Anemia was found in 142 (7.8%) children in the 6-11 years of age group, and in 16 (1.5%) in the 12-16 years of age group; in total, in 158 (5.4%) children. Causes were iron deficiency in 93 (58.9%) children, beta-thalassemia heterozygosity in 10 (6.3%) children, chronic disease that causes anemia of inflammation in 30 (19.0%) children, and intestinal parasitic infections in 17 (10.8%) children. In eight (5.1%) children, the cause of anemia could not be determined. The study's results showed that iron deficiency anemia and chronic and parasitic disease are important problems in schoolchildren of Sanliurfa, while beta-thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies have less importance.

  3. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  4. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. PMID:25680481

  5. Animal models of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Kelly A.; Mason, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a genetic syndrome characterized by red blood cell aplasiain association with developmental abnormalities such as growth retardation, orofacial, hand or limb malformations, urogenital anomalies and heart defects. The only known cause is heterozygosity for mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins. Understanding how defective ribosome biogenesis and function, important for all cells, causes defects in erythropoiesis and tissue-specific phenotypes during development is paramount to the evolution of effective treatment protocols. Here, we discuss how animal models based on mammals, insects and fish replicate genetic or developmental aspects of DBA and have led to the identification of pathways and candidate molecules that are important in the pathogenesis of the disease. A recurring theme in many of these models suggests that defective ribosome biogenesis induces a p53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in cells that require high levels of ribosome production and leads to cell type-specific, whole animal phenotypes. PMID:21435507

  6. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  7. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review.

  8. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Delnatus, Jacques R; Odom, Audrey R; Eaton, Jacob C; Griggs, Jennifer J; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B

    2015-11-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3-13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30-4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes.

  9. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  10. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Delnatus, Jacques R; Odom, Audrey R; Eaton, Jacob C; Griggs, Jennifer J; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B

    2015-11-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3-13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30-4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes. PMID:26350448

  11. Aplastic anemia associated to systemic lupus erythematosus in an AIDS patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Leonardo Rodrigues; Ferreira, Thaís Camargos; Neves, Fernando de Freitas; Meneses, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by peripheral cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow. Although aplastic anemia is idiopathic in most cases, rheumatic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus are recognized as causes of aplastic anemia, with their possible etiological mechanisms being T and B lymphocyte dysfunction and pro-inflammatory cytokines and autoantibody production directed against bone marrow components. In the course of the human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, the identification of autoantibodies and the occurrence of rheumatic events, in addition to the natural course of systemic lupus erythematosus which is modified by immune changes that are characteristic of human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, make the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus challenging. This study reports the case of a woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome treated with a highly active antiretroviral therapy, who had prolonged cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow consistent with aplastic anemia. The clinical picture, high autoantibodies titers, and sustained remission of the patient's hematological status through immunosuppression supported the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus-associated aplastic anemia. This is the first report of aplastic anemia concurrent with systemic lupus erythematosus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, providing additional evidence that immune dysfunction is a key part of the pathophysiological mechanism of aplastic anemia. PMID:24255622

  12. In situ localization of the genetic locus encoding the lysosomal acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (LIPA) deficient in wolman disease to chromosome 10q23. 2-q23. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.A.; Rao, N.; Byrum, R.S.; Rothschild, C.B.; Bowden, D.W.; Hayworth, R.; Pettenati, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Human acid lipase/cholesteryl esterase (EC 3.1.1.13) is a 46-kDa glycoprotein required for the lysosomal hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides that cells acquire through the receptor-mediated endocytosis of low-density lipoproteins. This activity is essential in the provision of free cholesterol for cell metabolism as well as for the feedback signal that modulates endogenous cellular cholesterol production. The extremely low level of lysosomal acid lipase in patients afflicted with the hereditary, allelic lysosomal storage disorders Woman disease (WD) and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) (MIM Number 278000 (6)) is associated with the massive intralysosomal lipid storage and derangements in the regulation of cellular cholesterol production (10). Both WD and CESD cells lack a specific acid lipase isoenzyme and it is thought that the different mutations associated with WD and CESD are in the structural gene for this isoenzyme, LIPA. Analysis of the activity of the acid lipase isoenzyme in cell extracts from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids (4, 11) demonstrated the concordant segregation of the gene locus for lysosomal acid lipase with the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase-1 (GOT1) enzyme marker for human chromosome 10 which was subsequently localized to 10q24.1 q25.1 (8). 11 refs., 1 figs.

  13. Allele-specific expression at the RET locus in blood and gut tissue of individuals carrying risk alleles for Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Matera, Ivana; Musso, Marco; Griseri, Paola; Rusmini, Marta; Di Duca, Marco; So, Man-Ting; Mavilio, Domenico; Miao, Xiaoping; Tam, Paul Hk; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Ceccherini, Isabella; Garcia-Barcelo, Merce

    2013-05-01

    RET common variants are associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; colon aganglionosis), a congenital defect of the enteric nervous system. We analyzed a well-known HSCR-associated RET haplotype that encompasses linked alleles in coding and noncoding/regulatory sequences. This risk haplotype correlates with reduced level of RET expression when compared with the wild-type counterpart. As allele-specific expression (ASE) contributes to phenotypic variability in health and disease, we investigated whether RET ASE could contribute to the overall reduction of RET mRNA detected in carriers. We tested heterozygous neuroblastoma cell lines, ganglionic gut tissues (18 HSCR and 14 non-HSCR individuals) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs; 16 HSCR and 14 non-HSCR individuals). Analysis of the data generated by SNaPshot and Pyrosequencing revealed that the RET risk haplotype is significantly more expressed in gut than in PBMCs (P = 0.0045). No ASE difference was detected between patients and controls, irrespective of the sample type. Comparison of total RET expression levels between gut samples with and without ASE, correlated reduced RET expression with preferential transcription from the RET risk haplotype. Nonrandom RET ASE occurs in ganglionic gut regardless of the disease status. RET ASE should not be excluded as a disease mechanism acting during development.

  14. Concurrent Anemia and Elevated C-Reactive Protein Predicts HIV Clinical Treatment Failure, Including Tuberculosis, After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Yang, Wei-Teng; Gupte, Nikhil; Berendes, Sima; Rosa, Alberto La; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Riviere, Cynthia; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Santos, Brento; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Tripathy, Srikanth; Bollinger, Robert C.; Currier, Judith S.; Tang, Alice M.; Semba, Richard D.; Christian, Parul; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a known risk factor for clinical failure following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Notably, anemia and inflammation are interrelated, and recent studies have associated elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammation marker, with adverse human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment outcomes, yet their joint effect is not known. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and risk factors of anemia in HIV infection and to determine whether anemia and elevated CRP jointly predict clinical failure post-ART. Methods. A case-cohort study (N = 470 [236 cases, 234 controls]) was nested within a multinational randomized trial of ART efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings [PEARLS]). Cases were incident World Health Organization stage 3, 4, or death by 96 weeks of ART treatment (clinical failure). Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for pre-ART (baseline) anemia (females: hemoglobin <12.0 g/dL; males: hemoglobin <13.0 g/dL). Association of anemia as well as concurrent baseline anemia and inflammation (CRP ≥10 mg/L) with clinical failure were assessed using multivariable Cox models. Results. Baseline anemia prevalence was 51% with 15% prevalence of concurrent anemia and inflammation. In analysis of clinical failure, multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were 6.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.82–14.57) for concurrent anemia and inflammation, 0.77 (95% CI, .37–1.58) for anemia without inflammation, and 0.45 (95% CI, .11–1.80) for inflammation without anemia compared to those without anemia and inflammation. Conclusions. ART-naive, HIV-infected individuals with concurrent anemia and inflammation are at particularly high risk of failing treatment, and understanding the pathogenesis could lead to new interventions. Reducing inflammation and anemia will likely improve HIV disease outcomes. Alternatively, concurrent anemia and inflammation could represent

  15. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

  16. [Hematocrit values and prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren of Jujuy].

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Ignacio F; Dipierri, José E; Alfaro, Emma L; Tortora, Carlos; García, Teresa; Buys, María C

    2003-01-01

    The hematocrit (Ht), as an indicator of anemia in individuals and populations, shows variations in relation to mesologic and genetic factors. Anemia is an endemic disease with insufficiently known prevalence in Argentina, in different age and risk groups and particularly in schoolchildren. The aim of this work was to study the variation of schoolchildren Ht in San Salvador of Jujuy city located at 1,200 m.a.s.l. in order to evaluate the prevalence of anemia and to relate these variations to the socio-economic characteristics of the population. The Ht data proceed from 17,580 schoolchildren of private and public schools. They were grouped by age, sex and socio-economic level. Were considered as anemic the children whose Ht was found: a) under a minimal value accepted for the 1200 m level; b) below 2 standard deviations. For the statistical analysis, ANOVA, chi 2 and correlation coefficient were employed. Independently of age, sex and socio-economic level, the average Ht values agree with those adjusted for the altitude. We observed: a) statistically significant intersex differences, males showing higher values than females; b) a trend to the Ht augmentation in relationship to the increase of the socio-economic level. Independently of the criterion used the prevalence of anemia was low in both sexes, age groups and in all socio-economic levels. Ht values: a) are representative of a schoolchildren population located at a moderate altitude; b) in spite of a trend to decrease in the low socio-economic level, this did not surpass, in most cases, the critical anemia level; c) are not indicative of malnutrition in the schoolchildren examined.

  17. Positive predictive value of diagnosis coding for hemolytic anemias in the Danish National Patient Register

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis Lund; Overgaard, Ulrik Malthe; Pedersen, Lars; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nationwide public health registers in Denmark provide a unique opportunity for evaluation of disease-associated morbidity if the positive predictive values (PPVs) of the primary diagnosis are known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive values of hemolytic anemias registered in the Danish National Patient Register. Patients and methods All patients with a first-ever diagnosis of hemolytic anemia from either specialist outpatient clinic contact or inpatient admission at Odense University Hospital from January 1994 through December 2011 were considered for inclusion. Patients with mechanical reason for hemolysis such as an artificial heart valve, and patients with vitamin-B12 or folic acid deficiency were excluded. Results We identified 412 eligible patients: 249 with a congenital hemolytic anemia diagnosis and 163 with acquired hemolytic anemia diagnosis. In all, hemolysis was confirmed in 359 patients, yielding an overall PPV of 87.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 83.5%–90.2%). A diagnosis could be established in 392 patients of whom 355 patients had a hemolytic diagnosis. Diagnosis was confirmed in 197 of the 249 patients with congenital hemolytic anemia, yielding a PPV of 79.1% (95% CI: 73.5%–84.0%). Diagnosis of acquired hemolytic anemia could be confirmed in 136 of the 163 patients, resulting in a PPV of 83.4% (95% CI: 76.8%–88.8%). For hemoglobinopathy PPV was 84.1% (95% CI: 77.4%–89.4%), for hereditary spherocytosis PPV was 80.6% (95% CI: 69.5%–88.9%), and for autoimmune hemolytic anemia PPV was 78.4% (95% CI: 70.4%–85.0%). Conclusion The PPV of hemolytic anemias was moderately high. The PPVs were comparable in the three main categories of overall hemolysis, and congenital and acquired hemolytic anemia. PMID:27445504

  18. Clinical features and course of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts associated with marked thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Broseus, Julien; Florensa, Lourdes; Zipperer, Esther; Schnittger, Susanne; Malcovati, Luca; Richebourg, Steven; Lippert, Eric; Cermak, Jaroslav; Evans, Jyoti; Mounier, Morgane; Raya, José Maria; Bailly, François; Gattermann, Norbert; Haferlach, Torsten; Garand, Richard; Allou, Kaoutar; Besses, Carlos; Germing, Ulrich; Haferlach, Claudia; Travaglino, Erica; Luno, Elisa; Pinan, Maria Angeles; Arenillas, Leonor; Rozman, Maria; Perez Sirvent, Maria Luz; Favre, Bernardine; Guy, Julien; Alonso, Esther; Ahwij, Nuhri; Jerez, Andrés; Hermouet, Sylvie; Maynadié, Marc; Cazzola, Mario; Girodon, François

    2012-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts associated with marked thrombocytosis was proposed as a provisional entity in the 2001 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and also in the 2008 version, but its existence as a single entity is contested. We wish to define the clinical features of this rare myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm and to compare its clinical outcome with that of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and essential thrombocythemia. Design and Methods We conducted a collaborative retrospective study across Europe. Our database included 200 patients diagnosed with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis. For each of these patients, each patient diagnosed with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts was matched for age and sex. At the same time, a cohort of 454 patients with essential thrombocythemia was used to compare outcomes of the two diseases. Results In patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis, depending on the Janus Kinase 2 V617F mutational status (positive or negative) or platelet threshold (over or below 600×109/L), no difference in survival was noted. However, these patients had shorter overall survival and leukemia-free survival with a lower risk of thrombotic complications than did patients with essential thrombocythemia (P<0.001) but better survival (P<0.001) and a higher risk of thrombosis (P=0.039) than patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts. Conclusions The clinical course of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis is better than that of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and worse than that of essential thrombocythemia. The higher risk of thrombotic events in this disorder suggests that anti-platelet therapy might be considered in this subset of patients. From a clinical point of view, it appears to be important to consider refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and

  19. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  20. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  1. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lunch Recipes Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About Sickle ... stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: in- ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  3. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www. hematology. org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ... or 864–292–1175 Email: cgarrison@ irondisorders. org Internet: www. irondisorders. org or www. hemachromatosis. org National ...

  4. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and acute chest syndrome revealing sickle cell anemia in a 32 years female patient.

    PubMed

    Igala, Marielle; Nsame, Daniela; Ova, Jennie Dorothée Guelongo Okouango; Cherkaoui, Siham; Oukkach, Bouchra; Quessar, Asmae

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from a single amino acid substitution in the gene encoding the β-globin subunit. Polymerization of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin leads to decreased deformability of red blood cells. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common thyroid disease now recognized as an auto-immune thyroid disorder, it is usually thought to be haemolytic autoimmune anemia. We report the case of a 32 years old women admitted for chest pain and haemolysis anemia in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis and sickle cell anemia were found. In our observation the patient is a young woman whose examination did not show signs of goitre but the analysis of thyroid function tests performed before an auto-immune hemolytic anemia (confirmed by a high level of unconjugated bilirubin and a Coombs test positive for IgG) has found thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and positive thyroid antibody at rates in excess of 4.5 times their normal value. In the same period, as the hemolytic anemia, and before the atypical chest pain and anguish they generated in the patient, the search for hemoglobinopathies was made despite the absence of a family history of haematological disease or painful attacks in childhood. Patient electrophoresis's led to research similar cases in the family. The mother was the first to be analyzed with ultimately diagnosed with sickle cell trait have previously been ignored. This case would be a form with few symptoms because the patient does not describe painful crises in childhood or adolescence. PMID:26327979

  5. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-03

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  6. [Regional differences in prevalence of anemia found by periodic health checkups at workplaces in Japan].

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Tomoko; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Anemia-related blood examinations are included in examinations for periodic health checkups at workplaces designated by the Industrial Safety and Health Law in Japan. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were regional differences in the prevalence of anemia in workers and, if so, to investigate possible reasons for the differences. Relationships between prevalence of anemia found by periodic health checkups and some common factors related to anemia in each prefecture of Japan were investigated by ecological regression analysis using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. There were regional differences in the prevalence of anemia in the prefectures of Japan (5.2-11.7%), and high prevalence was observed in prefectures in the northeastern district, such as Iwate, Akita and Yamagata Prefectures, and in Fukui, Shimane and Nagasaki Prefectures. Prevalence of anemia in each prefecture was significantly correlated with the prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, liver dysfunction, abnormality in ECG, hyperglycemia or glucosuria at health checkups in each prefecture. Prevalence of anemia in each prefecture was significantly correlated with the percentage of patients receiving therapy for anemia in each prefecture but not with the prevalence of myoma uteri, endometriosis uteri or mortality of uterus cancer in each prefecture. There was also no significant correlation of the prevalence of anemia with the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia or dietary iron intake in each prefecture. The prevalence of anemia in each prefecture showed significant positive correlations with the ratio of female population to total population and the ratio of female workers to total workers in each prefecture; it also showed a significant negative correlation with the ratio of the number of large-sized workplaces (300 or more workers) to the number of workplaces with 50 or more workers in each prefecture. A considerable regional difference in the prevalence of anemia was found

  7. The 4p16.3 Parkinson Disease Risk Locus Is Associated with GAK Expression and Genes Involved with the Synaptic Vesicle Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Michael W.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Labadorf, Adam; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hadzi, Tiffany C.; Beach, Thomas G.; Myers, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified the GAK/DGKQ/IDUA region on 4p16.3 among the top three risk loci for Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the specific gene and risk mechanism are unclear. Here, we report transcripts containing the 3’ clathrin-binding domain of GAK identified by RNA deep-sequencing in post-mortem human brain tissue as having increased expression in PD. Furthermore, carriers of 4p16.3 PD GWAS risk SNPs show decreased expression of one of these transcripts, GAK25 (Gencode Transcript 009), which correlates with the expression of genes functioning in the synaptic vesicle membrane. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for GAK clathrin-binding- and J-domain transcripts’ influence on PD pathogenicity, and for a role for GAK in regulating synaptic function in PD. PMID:27508417

  8. Phytomedicines and nutraceuticals: alternative therapeutics for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the "SS" individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β -globin subunit results in replacement of β 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  9. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  10. MEDIATING EFFECTS OF SMOKING AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE AIRWAY DISEASE ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CHRNA5-A3 GENETIC LOCUS AND LUNG CANCER RISK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Spitz, Margaret R.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Wu, Xifeng; Shete, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of lung cancer have shown that the CHRNA5-A3 region on chromosome 15q24-25.1 is strongly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and nicotine dependence, and thought to be associated with chronic obstructive airways disease as well. However, it has not been established whether the association between genetic variants and lung cancer risk is a direct one or one mediated by nicotine dependence. Methods In this paper we applied a rigorous statistical approach, mediation analysis, to examine the mediating effect of smoking behavior and self-reported physician-diagnosed emphysema (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) on the relationship between the CHRNA5-A3 region genetic variant rs1051730 and the risk of lung cancer. Results Our results showed that rs1051730 is directly associated with lung cancer risk, but that it is also associated with lung cancer risk through its effect on both smoking behavior and COPD. Furthermore, we showed that COPD is a mediating phenotype that explains part of the effect of smoking behavior on lung cancer. Our results also suggested that smoking behavior is a mediator of the relationship between rs1051730 and COPD risk. Conclusions Smoking behavior and COPD are mediators of the association between the SNP rs1051730 and the risk of lung cancer. Also, COPD is a mediator of the association between smoking behavior and lung cancer. Finally, smoking behavior also has mediating effects on the association between the SNP and COPD. PMID:20564069

  11. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  12. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  13. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  14. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  15. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  16. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  17. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  18. [Anemia in candidates for heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Yanes Vidal, G J

    2015-06-01

    Heart surgery patients have a high prevalence of anemia. Its etiology is multifactorial, and iron deficiency is one of the most common correctable causes. Anemia is an independent risk factor for postsurgical morbidity and mortality. It also predisposes patients to a greater need for transfusions, which increases the associated complications and the use of resources. The etiological diagnosis of anemia is no different from that of other surgical procedures, but the time available for correcting it before surgery is shorter. Studies have been conducted on therapeutic regimens with iron deficiency replenishment with total dose and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which enable the rapid correction of anemia and reduce transfusion requirements. There is considerable variability in terms of dosage, adverse effects, administration time and routes, drug combinations and results. New studies are needed to investigate the most ideal regimens for correcting anemia in these patients.

  19. [Anemia in candidates for heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Yanes Vidal, G J

    2015-06-01

    Heart surgery patients have a high prevalence of anemia. Its etiology is multifactorial, and iron deficiency is one of the most common correctable causes. Anemia is an independent risk factor for postsurgical morbidity and mortality. It also predisposes patients to a greater need for transfusions, which increases the associated complications and the use of resources. The etiological diagnosis of anemia is no different from that of other surgical procedures, but the time available for correcting it before surgery is shorter. Studies have been conducted on therapeutic regimens with iron deficiency replenishment with total dose and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which enable the rapid correction of anemia and reduce transfusion requirements. There is considerable variability in terms of dosage, adverse effects, administration time and routes, drug combinations and results. New studies are needed to investigate the most ideal regimens for correcting anemia in these patients. PMID:26320348

  20. Evolution of new disease specificity at a simple resistance locus in a crop-weed complex: reconstitution of the Lr21 gene in wheat.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Brooks, Steven; Li, Wanlong; Fellers, John; Nelson, James C; Gill, Bikram

    2009-06-01

    The wheat leaf-rust resistance gene Lr21 was first identified in an Iranian accession of goatgrass, Aegilops tauschii Coss., the D-genome donor of hexaploid bread wheat, and was introgressed into modern wheat cultivars by breeding. To elucidate the origin of the gene, we analyzed sequences of Lr21 and lr21 alleles from 24 wheat cultivars and 25 accessions of Ae. tauschii collected along the Caspian Sea in Iran and Azerbaijan. Three basic nonfunctional lr21 haplotypes, H1, H2, and H3, were identified. Lr21 was found to be a chimera of H1 and H2, which were found only in wheat. We attempted to reconstitute a functional Lr21 allele by crossing the cultivars Fielder (H1) and Wichita (H2). Rust inoculation of 5876 F(2) progeny revealed a single resistant plant that proved to carry the H1H2 haplotype, a result attributed to intragenic recombination. These findings reflect how plants balance the penalty and the necessity of a resistance gene and suggest that plants can reuse "dead" alleles to generate new disease-resistance specificity, leading to a "death-recycle" model of plant-resistance gene evolution at simple loci. We suggest that selection pressure in crop-weed complexes contributes to this process.

  1. Genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) to the interval D16S288-D16S383 by analysis of haplotypes and allelic association

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; O`Rawe, A.M.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1994-07-15

    CLN3, the gene for juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or Batten disease, has been localized by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 16p between loci D16S297 and D16S57. The authors have now further refined the localization of CLN3 by haplotype analysis using two new microsatellite markers from loci D16S383 and SPN in the D16S297-D16S57 interval on a larger collaborative family resource consisting of 142 JNCL pedigrees. Crossover events in 3 maternal meioses define new flanking markers for CLN3 and localize the gene to the interval at 16p12.1-11.2 between D16S288 and D16S383, which corresponds to a genetic distance of 2.1 cM. Within this interval 4 microsatellite loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3, and extended haplotype analysis of the associated alleles indicates that CLN3 is in closest proximity to loci D16S299 and D16S298. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. A genome-wide admixture scan identifies MYH9 as a candidate locus associated with non-diabetic end stage renal disease in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Linda Kao, WH; Klag, Michael J; Meoni, Lucy A; Reich, David; Berthier-Schaad, Yvette; Li, Man; Coresh, Josef; Patterson, Nick; Tandon, Arti; Powe, Neil R; Fink, Nancy E; Sadler, John H; Weir, Matthew R; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon; Divers, Jasmin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Freedman, Barry I; Kimmel, Paul L; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly F; Kramp, Kristopher; Leehey, David J; Nicholas, Susanne; Pahl, Madeleine; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Sedor, John R; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Winkler, Cheryl A; Smith, Michael W.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2008-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) has a four times higher incidence in African Americans compared to European Americans. This led to the hypothesis that susceptibility alleles for ESRD have a higher frequency in West African than European gene pool. We performed a genome-wide admixture scan in 1,372 ESRD cases and 806 controls and demonstrated a highly significant association between excess African ancestry and non-diabetic ESRD (LOD 5.70) but not diabetic ESRD (LOD 0.47) on chromosome 22q12. Each copy of the European ancestral allele conferred a relative risk of 0.50 (95% credible interval 0.39 – 0.63) compared to African ancestry. Multiple common SNPs (allele frequency ranging from 0.2 to 0.6) in the gene that encodes non-muscle myosin heavy chain type II isoform A (MYH9) were associated with 2-4 times greater risk of non-diabetic ESRD and accounted for a large proportion of the excess risk of ESRD observed in African compared to European Americans. PMID:18794854

  3. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: a novel SLC19A2 compound heterozygous mutation in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Mozzillo, Enza; Melis, Daniela; Falco, Mariateresa; Fattorusso, Valentina; Taurisano, Roberta; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Franzese, Adriana

    2013-08-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by loss of function mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. TRMA is characterized by anemia, deafness, and diabetes. In some cases, optic atrophy or more rarely retinitis pigmentosa is noted. We now report two sisters, the eldest of which presented to a different hospital during childhood with sensorineural deafness, which was treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, optic atrophy, and macrocytic anemia. These features initially suggested a clinical diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome (WS). Therapy with thiamine was initiated which resulted in the resolution of the anemia. The younger sister, who was affected with sensorineural deafness, was referred to our hospital for non-autoimmune diabetes. She was found to have macrocytosis and ocular abnormalities. Because a diagnosis of TRMA was suspected, therapy with insulin and thiamine was started. Sequencing analysis of the SLC19A2 gene identified a compound heterozygous mutation p.Y81X/p.L457X (c.242insA/c.1370delT) in both sisters. Non-autoimmune diabetes associated with deafness and macrocytosis, without anemia, suggests a diagnosis of TRMA. Patients clinically diagnosed with WS with anemia and/or macrocytosis should be reevaluated for TRMA. PMID:23289844

  4. Anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anemia.

    PubMed

    Luo, X-Y; Yang, M-H; Peng, Ping; Wu, L-J; Liu, Q-S; Chen, L; Tang, Z; Liu, N-T; Zeng, X-F; Liu, Y; Yuan, G-H

    2013-02-01

    Anemia is a common hematologic abnormality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An inadequate erythropoietin (EPO) response in SLE patients with anemia has been described that may be due to the presence of antibodies to EPO in SLE patients. However, whether anemia in patients with SLE is related to antibodies to EPO receptor (EPOR) has not yet been investigated. We enlisted 169 consecutive patients with SLE and 45 normal individuals to investigate the existence and importance of circulating autoantibodies to EPOR in sera from patients with SLE. In all patients with SLE, the disease activity was evaluated by using the SLE disease activity index SLEDAI. Anti-EPOR antibodies were detected by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A higher frequency of anti-EPOR antibodies was observed in SLE patients than in healthy controls (18.3% vs 2.2%, p = 0.007). Moreover, anti-EPOR antibodies were detected in 22 of 69 (31.9%) SLE patients with anemia and in only nine of 100 (9.0%, p < 0.001) in those without. Furthermore, the patients with anti-EPOR antibodies exhibited more severe anemia and often presented as microcytic anemia (p = 0.001). Finally, anti-EPOR antibodies seemed more likely to occur in patients with rash (p = 0.008), lower levels of C(3) component (p = 0.01), higher titer of anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.001) and higher disease activity scores (p = 0.024). The results of this study suggest that anti-EPOR antibodies might play a vital role in SLE patients developing anemia because of the higher incidence of antibodies to EPOR found in SLE patients with anemia. Thus, there might be clinical value in detecting anti-EPOR antibodies in SLE patients with anemia. Therefore, the pathologic role of the antibodies in inducing anemia needs to be established in future studies.

  5. Investigation of the Etiology of Anemia in Thromboangiitis Obliterans.

    PubMed

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Ravari, Hassan; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Valizadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Bahare

    2016-09-01

    During a review of patients admitted with thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), there was evidence of normochromic normocytic anemia and abrupt changes in hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in patients with several hospital admissions. Therefore, the evidence of hemolytic anemia was evaluated based on 37 banked plasma samples taken from Caucasian male TAO patients during disease exacerbation between 2012 and 2014. The patients' hospital records, including clinical manifestations and complete blood count, were evaluated. The following tests were performed on all samples: indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), haptoglobin, indirect bilirubin, d-aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and d-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The mean age of the patients was 40 ± 7 years. Two patients underwent below-knee amputation. The mean hospital-documented Hgb of the patients was 12.9 ± 2.6 g/dL. CRP and IAT were positive in 75.6 and 70.2% of the samples, respectively. The tests and corresponding results were as follows: hsCRP, 14.07 ± 2.37 µg/mL; LDH, 2,552 ± 315 u/L; haptoglobin, 2.27 ± 1.1 g/L; indirect bilirubin, 0.09 ± 0.04 mg/dL; AST, 67 ± 7 u/L; and ALT, 26 ± 3 u/L. There was a significant inverse correlation between hsCRP and hospital-documented Hgb level (p = 0.03). Anemia with the positive IAT in most of the samples, high LDH and AST, and normal ALT are suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Normal indirect bilirubin is consistent with intravascular hemolysis. The positive CRP and elevated haptoglobin levels could be due to systemic inflammation in TAO. However, it is not known if an autoantigen or an infectious antigen is responsible for TAO systemic inflammation and induction hemolytic anemia. As such, the underlying mechanism of anemia in TAO could be part of the footprint of its main etiology. PMID:27574381

  6. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin C pills or eating foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits or juice, at the same time you eat ... vitamins contain at least this amount.) Foods with vitamin C—such as strawberries and citrus fruits—help your body absorb iron. Eat these foods ...

  7. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body needs extra folate. Folate is a B vitamin found in foods such as leafy green vegetables, fruits, and dried beans and peas. Folic acid is ... iron, like orange juice, strawberries, broccoli, or other fruits and vegetables with vitamin C. Don't drink coffee or tea with ...

  8. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: Resources for Clinicians Resources for Trainees Resources for Educators Resources for Patients Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to ...

  9. Update on safety of ESAs in cancer-induced anemia.

    PubMed

    Glaspy, John

    2012-05-01

    Patients with cancer frequently develop a multifactorial anemia. The past decade has seen a dramatic improvement in understanding of the biology of the anemia of chronic disease, which has increased interest in studies of parenteral iron or antihepcidin strategies in these patients. Randomized trials have shown that therapy with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) is associated with a reduction in transfusion rates in patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. More recently, some studies have suggested that ESA therapy may increase the risk of tumor progression or reduce survival in patients with cancer. This topic was extensively reviewed previously. This update supplements prior reviews with data generated over the past 4 years. During this interval, interest in thrombosis and its role in cancer biology has increased, and concerns about the thrombotic risks of ESAs has moved to the fore-front. Until additional safety data are forthcoming, ESAs should be used only to treat chemotherapy-induced anemia, with the goal of preventing transfusions. Patients and physicians should be aware of the safety data for these products.

  10. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome.

  11. Urinary schistosomiasis and malaria associated anemia in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Deribew, Ketema; Tekeste, Zinaye; Petros, Beyene

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of anemia in children with urinary schistosomiasis, malaria and concurrent infections by the two diseases. Methods Urine and blood samples were collected from 387 children (216 males and 171 females) to examine urinary schistosomiasis and malaria and to determine hemoglobin concentration at Hassoba and Hassoba Buri village in Amibara woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia. Results The overall prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and Plasmodium falciparum malaria was 24.54% and 6.20% respectively. Only 2.84% of children carried concurrent infections of both parasites. There was high percentage of anemic patients (81.81%) in the coinfected cases than in either malaria (33.3%) or schistosomiasis (38.94%) cases. There was significantly low mean hemoglobin concentration in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected (P<0.05). The mean hemoglobin concentration between Plasmodium falciparum and S. haematobium infected children showed no significant difference (P>0.05). The level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs/10 mL urine (r=-0.6) and malaria parasitemia (r=-0.53). Conclusions The study showed that anemia is higher in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected. Furthermore, level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs and malaria parsitemia. Therefore, examination of hemoglobin status in patients co-infected with malaria and schistosomiasis is important to reduce the risk of anemia and to improve health of the community. PMID:23620856

  12. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin B12. They include: Chronic alcoholism Crohn disease, celiac disease, infection with the fish tapeworm, or other problems ... may no longer be needed after Crohn disease, celiac disease, or alcohol use is properly treated. Your provider ...

  13. A new EcoRI polymorphism at the D21S13 locus.

    PubMed

    Pulst, S M; Korenberg, J R; Greenwald, J; Carbone, M

    1990-05-01

    The D21S13 locus has shown linkage to a gene for familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) on chromosome 21 (St. George-Hyslop et al. 1987). The limited informativeness of probes for this locus have hindered precise mapping of the FAD locus and analysis of nonallelic heterogeneity in FAD (Schellenberg et al. 1988; St. George-Hyslop et al. 1987). We describe a new EcoRI polymorphism at the D21S13 locus that may be useful for the further study of FAD families.

  14. Retroviral transfer of a human beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene linked to beta locus control region hypersensitive site 2 aimed at the gene therapy of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Takekoshi, K J; Oh, Y H; Westerman, K W; London, I M; Leboulch, P

    1995-03-28

    Human gamma-globin and delta-globin chains have been previously identified as strong inhibitors of the polymerization of hemoglobin S, in contrast to the beta-globin chain, which exerts only a moderate antisickling effect. However, gamma-globin and delta-globin are normally expressed at very low levels in adult erythroid cells, in contrast to beta-globin. We report the design of a beta-globin/delta-globin hybrid gene, beta/delta-sickle cell inhibitor 1 (beta/delta-SCI1) and its transduction by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. The beta/delta-SCI1-encoding gene retains the overall structure of the human beta-globin gene, while incorporating specific amino acid residues from the delta chain previously found responsible for its enhanced antisickling properties. To achieve high expression levels of beta/delta-SCI1 in adult erythrocytes, the hybrid gene was placed under the transcriptional control of the human beta-globin promoter and the DNase I hypersensitive site 2 of the human beta locus control region. High-titer retroviruses were generated, and stable proviral transmission was achieved in infected cells. The mRNA expression levels of the beta/delta-SCI1 gene in infected, dimethyl sulfoxide-induced murine erythroleukemia cells approached 85% of the endogenous murine beta maj-globin mRNA, on a per gene basis, evidence that high gene expression levels were achieved in adult erythroid cells. Further evaluation of this strategy in transgenic animal models of sickle cell disease should assess its efficacy for the gene therapy of human patients.

  15. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  16. Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation(HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    Sickle Cell Disease; Thalassemia; Anemia; Granuloma; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chediak Higashi Syndrome; Osteopetrosis; Neutropenia; Thrombocytopenia; Hurler Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Fucosidosis

  17. [Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rivera, E Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia is a rare syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure with cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow biopsy (usually 10-15%), without blasts or myelodysplasia. The first choice treatment for these patients is allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from a sibling matched for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Unfortunately only 30% of patients have an HLA-matched sibling (a 25% chance per sibling). The alternative treatment for severe aplastic anemia for the rest of the patients (70%) is immunosuppression with antithymocyte globuline and cyclosporine. The evolution of bone marrow transplantation since 1970's has been positive in terms of survival and transplant success (initial overall survival 43% vs. 90% lately, and graft rejection of 29% vs. 4%). The favorable outcome of bone marrow transplantation for severe or very severe aplastic anemia is due to: the use of conditioning with antithymocyte globuline and cyclophosphamide, the use of graft-vs.-host disease prophylaxis with short curse methotrexate and cyclosporine and the use of filtrated and irradiated blood products. For those patients without an HLA-matched related donor the first treatment to use is the immunosuppression with antithymocyte globuline and cyclosporine. Another option emerged in the late 80's is the unrelated bone marrow transplantation, with survival hardly half of the HLA-identical related bone marrow transplants. In our country, the first allogeneic bone marrow transplant was done in the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición, Salvador Zubirán, in a patient with aplastic anemia, making possible to perform this procedure safely in our country.

  18. The Gulf Survey on Anemia Management (GSAM 2005).

    PubMed

    Alsuwaida, Abdulkareem; Abdulkareem, Ali; Alwakeel, Jamal

    2007-06-01

    We conducted this study to determine the achievements of the current practice guidelines in the management of anemia in the Arabian Gulf Countries. The survey was designed as a retrospective, one day screening of adult patients with end-stage renal disease in six Arabian Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman, United Arab Emirates and Qatar. Data were collected on patients undergoing chronic dialysis. For random patient sampling, each participating center drew up an alphabetical list of all hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients which were 18 years or older and selected every fourth patient on the list. A total of 563 patients from 18 centers were included in the survey. The most common cause of end-stage renal failure was diabetic nephropathy, closely followed by chronic glomerulonephritis. The majority of patients were treated by HD, with only 20% receiving PD. The mean (+/-SD) hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration was 115 +/- 15 g/L (median, 115 g/L; range, 61-159 g/L). The Hgb concentration was > or = 110 g/L in 28%, > or = 120 g/L in 38% and < 100 g/L in 16%. Information on their iron status was available for 97% of patients, ferritin levels were available for 97% and TSAT values for 67% were available. The mean serum ferritin concentration for the study patients was 503 +/- 406 ng/ml (median, 390 ng/ml; range, 20.0-2960 ng/ml); 90.5% had a serum ferritin concentration > 100 ng/ml. We conclude that the results of our study demonstrate anemia management in the Gulf countries which is comparable to the European Survey on Anemia Management 2003 (ESAM 2003). However, many patients still have not reached the current recommendation of anemia management.

  19. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P < 0.001), practiced birth control more (24.2 vs. 9.9 %, P < 0.001), and adhered to it more (81.1 vs. 61.9 %, P < 0.001). Bedouin women had more children (3.7 vs. 1.9, P < 0.001), and more Bedouin women were pregnant during the study period (49.3 vs. 35.0 %, P < 0.001). The most prevalent types of anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P < 0.001) and folic acid deficiency (3.3 vs. 2.2 %, P > 0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.295, P < 0.001), use of birth control (OR = 0.419, P < 0.001), and pregnancy (OR = 0.447, P < 0.001). Being a Bedouin woman is a risk factor for severe anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities.

  20. Independent Association of Circulating Vitamin D Metabolites with Anemia Risk in Patients Scheduled for Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Tobias; Kuhn, Joachim; Gummert, Jan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anemia is considered an independent risk factor of poor clinical outcome in cardiac surgical patients. Low vitamin D status may increase anemia risk. Methods We investigated 3,615 consecutive patients scheduled for cardiac surgery to determine the association between preoperative anemia (hemoglobin [Hb] <12.5 g/dL) and circulating levels of the vitamin D metabolites 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D). Results Of the study cohort, 27.8 % met the criteria for anemia. In patients with deficient 25OHD levels (<30 nmol/l) mean Hb concentrations were 0.5 g/dL lower than in patients with adequate 25OHD levels (50.0–125 nmol/l; P<0.001). Regarding 1,25(OH)2D, mean Hb concentrations were 1.2 g/dL lower in the lowest 1,25(OH)2D category (<40 pmol/l) than in the highest 1,25(OH)2D category (>70 pmol/l; P<0.001). In multivariable–adjusted logistic regression analyses, the odds ratios for anemia of the lowest categories of 25OHD and 1,25(OH)2D were 1.48 (95%CI:1.19-1.83) and 2.35 (95%CI:1.86-2.97), compared with patients who had adequate 25OHD levels and 1,25(OH)2D values in the highest category, respectively. Anemia risk was greatest in patients with dual deficiency of 25OHD and 1,25(OH)2D (multivariable-adjusted OR = 3.60 (95%CI:2.40-5.40). Prevalence of deficient 25OHD levels was highest in anemia of nutrient deficiency, whereas low 1,25(OH)2D levels were most frequent in anemia of chronic kidney disease. Conclusion This cross-sectional study demonstrates an independent inverse association between vitamin D status and anemia risk. If confirmed in clinical trials, preoperative administration of vitamin D or activated vitamin D (in case of chronic kidney disease) would be a promising strategy to prevent anemia in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:25885271

  1. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  2. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  3. Pernicious anemia: New insights from a gastroenterological point of view

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is a macrocytic anemia that is caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, as a result of intrinsic factor deficiency. PA is associated with atrophic body gastritis (ABG), whose diagnosis is based on histological confirmation of gastric body atrophy. Serological markers that suggest oxyntic mucosa damage are increased fasting gastrin and decreased pepsinogen I. Without performing Schilling’s test, intrinsic factor deficiency may not be proven, and intrinsic factor and parietal cell antibodies are useful surrogate markers of PA, with 73% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PA is mainly considered a disease of the elderly, but younger patients represent about 15% of patients. PA patients may seek medical advice due to symptoms related to anemia, such as weakness and asthenia. Less commonly, the disease is suspected to be caused by dyspepsia. PA is frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (40%) and other autoimmune disorders, such as diabetes mellitus (10%), as part of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. PA is the end-stage of ABG. Long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection probably plays a role in many patients with PA, in whom the active infectious process has been gradually replaced by an autoimmune disease that terminates in a burned-out infection and the irreversible destruction of the gastric body mucosa. Human leucocyte antigen-DR genotypes suggest a role for genetic susceptibility in PA. PA patients should be managed by cobalamin replacement treatment and monitoring for onset of iron deficiency. Moreover, they should be advised about possible gastrointestinal long-term consequences, such as gastric cancer and carcinoids. PMID:19891010

  4. Macrocytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia Induced by Orlistat

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Martinez, David; Garcia-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Montero-Santamaria, Nieves; Villar-Ruiz, Olga Patricia; Ruiz-Garcia, Antonio; Diaz-Alonso, Raquel Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The overall incidence of obesity and its prevalence is increasing continuously. The obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor whose importance is increasing too. It is associated with many chronic conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular diseases. The obesity is also implicated as a risk factor for several kinds of cancer such as esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, breast cancer in menopausal women. The treatment of the obesity may reduce the incidence of these diseases. The mainstray of the treatment of obesity is changing the lifestyles, but obesity´s treatment may need drug therapy or even though surgical treatment. Orlistat is a specific inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, which stops fat absortion. It is used along with a hypocaloric diet, for obesity´s treatment. The beneficial effects of orlistat include weight loss, the improvement of blood pressure´s control, it may delay the development of diabetes mellitus, and it may reduce HbA1c. Case Report: Besides the interaction with other drugs (mainly warfarin and amiodarone). Orlistat´s mainly side effects are gastrointestinal disorders such as the existence of oily spotting from the rectum, abdominal pain or discomfort, fecal urgency. There are also side effects at other levels, like flu symptoms, hypoglycemia, heathache or upper respiratory infections. There are other side effects with very low incidence but clinically relevant like pancreatitis, subacute liver failure, severe liver disease, myopathy, or tubular necrosis secondary to oxalate nephropathy induced by Orlistat. Discussion: In this case report appears a new adverse effect of Orlistat that has not been described above: thrombopenia and macrocytic anemia. PMID:24719628

  5. Change in serum ferritin concentration in experimentally induced anemia of chronic inflammation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chikazawa, Seishiro; Nakazawa, Takafumi; Hori, Yasutomo; Hoshi, Fumio; Kanai, Kazutaka; Ito, Naoyuki; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Higuchi, Seiichi

    2013-11-01

    In veterinary medicine, hyperferritinemia is often observed in dogs with various diseases (e.g., histiocytic sarcoma and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia) without evidence of iron overload. The mechanism underlying hyperferritinemia development is not well understood. Anemia caused by inflammation is termed as anemia of chronic disease (ACD), and experimentally induced ACD is known to cause slight hyperferritinemia. However, almost all these studies were based on short-term acute inflammation. Hepcidin, a protein mainly produced by hepatocytes, is thought to be a key regulator in iron release from reticuloendothelial cells (RECs), and its expression is related to ACD. We hypothesized that in the case of long-term ACD, iron deposition in RECs increases through hepcidin, causing a diachronic increase in serum ferritin levels. In the present study, we used a canine model with repeated subcutaneous administration of turpentine oil every 3 days over a period of 42 days (15 injections) and induced long-term inflammatory conditions; furthermore, we evaluated the change in serum ferritin concentration. Hypoproliferative anemia, bone marrow iron deposition and hypoferremia, which are characteristic of ACD, were observed on administering the turpentine injections. Hepatic iron content, hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression and serum ferritin concentration increased during the early period after turpentine injection, but returned to normal levels later. These results show that experimentally induced long-term ACD caused hypoproliferative anemia without sustained increase in hepcidin expression and did not cause systemic iron overload. Thus, chronic inflammation may not contribute greatly to increase in hyperferritinemia.

  6. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    PubMed

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  7. An analysis of anemia and child mortality.

    PubMed

    Brabin, B J; Premji, Z; Verhoeff, F

    2001-02-01

    The relationship of anemia as a risk factor for child mortality was analyzed by using cross-sectional, longitudinal and case-control studies, and randomized trials. Five methods of estimation were adopted: 1) the proportion of child deaths attributable to anemia; 2) the proportion of anemic children who die in hospital studies; 3) the population-attributable risk of child mortality due to anemia; 4) survival analyses of mortality in anemic children; and 5) cause-specific anemia-related child mortality. Most of the data available were hospital based. For children aged 0-5 y the percentage of deaths due to anemia was comparable for reports from highly malarious areas in Africa (Sierra Leone 11.2%, Zaire 12.2%, Kenya 14.3%). Ten values available for hemoglobin values <50 g/L showed a variation in case fatality from 2 to 29.3%. The data suggested little if any dose-response relating increasing hemoglobin level (whether by mean value or selected cut-off values) with decreasing mortality. Although mortality was increased in anemic children with hemoglobin <50 g/L, the evidence for increased risk with less severe anemia was inconclusive. The wide variation for mortality with hemoglobin <50 g/L is related to methodological variation and places severe limits on causal inference; in view of this, it is premature to generate projections on population-attributable risk. A preliminary survival analysis of an infant cohort from Malawi indicated that if the hemoglobin decreases by 10 g/L at age 6 mo, the risk of dying becomes 1.72 times higher. Evidence from a number of studies suggests that mortality due to malarial severe anemia is greater than that due to iron-deficiency anemia. Data are scarce on anemia and child mortality from non-malarious regions. Primary prevention of iron-deficiency anemia and malaria in young children could have substantive effects on reducing child mortality from severe anemia in children living in malarious areas.

  8. Megaloblastic, dyserythropoietic anemia following arsenic ingestion.

    PubMed

    Lerman, B B; Ali, N; Green, D

    1980-01-01

    Following acute arsenic ingestion, a 35 year old woman experienced multiple organ failure, including renal and respiratory insufficiency, toxic hepatitis, peripheral neuropathy, and encephalopathy. In addition, she developed an anemia; the bone marrow showed a striking dyserythropoiesis with megaloblastic features. Her recovery was heralded by normalization of the bone marrow morphology, followed by improvement in all other organ dysfunction except for the peripheral neuropathy. Arsenic poisoning is a cause of megaloblastic anemia; early hematologic recovery suggests favorable prognosis.

  9. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  10. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia.

  11. Characterization of the bvgR Locus of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Tod J.; Barros, Cassia; Stibitz, Scott

    1998-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, produces a wide array of factors that are associated with its ability to cause disease. The expression and regulation of these virulence factors is dependent upon the bvg locus (originally designated the vir locus), which encodes two proteins: BvgA, a 23-kDa cytoplasmic protein, and BvgS, a 135-kDa transmembrane protein. It is proposed that BvgS responds to environmental signals and interacts with BvgA, a transcriptional regulator which upon modification by BvgS binds to specific promoters and activates transcription. An additional class of genes is repressed by the bvg locus. Expression of this class, the bvg-repressed genes (vrgs [for vir-repressed genes]), is reduced under conditions in which expression of the aforementioned bvg-activated virulence factors is maximal; this repression is dependent upon the presence of an intact bvgAS locus. We have previously identified a locus required for regulation of all of the known bvg-repressed genes in B. pertussis. This locus, designated bvgR, maps to a location immediately downstream of bvgAS. We have undertaken deletion and complementation studies, as well as sequence analysis, in order to identify the bvgR open reading frame and identify the cis-acting sequences required for regulated expression of bvgR. Studies utilizing transcriptional fusions of bvgR to the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase have demonstrated that bvgR is activated at the level of transcription and that this activation is dependent upon an intact bvgAS locus. PMID:9537363

  12. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  13. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico.

  14. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. PMID:23294876

  15. Locus of control and obesity.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Florence; Nemzer, Louis R

    2014-01-01

    In the developed world, the hazards associated with obesity have largely outstripped the risk of starvation. Obesity remains a difficult public health issue to address, due in large part to the many disciplines involved. A full understanding requires knowledge in the fields of genetics, endocrinology, psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy - among others. In this short review, which serves as an introduction to the Frontiers in Endocrinology research topic, we address one cross-disciplinary relationship: the interaction between the hunger/satiation neural circuitry, an individual's perceived locus of control, and the risk for obesity. Mammals have evolved a complex system for modulating energy intake. Overlaid on this, in humans, there exists a wide variation in "perceived locus of control" - that is, the extent to which an individual believes to be in charge of the events that affect them. Whether one has primarily an internal or external locus of control itself affects, and is affected by, external and physiological factors and has been correlated with the risk for obesity. Thus, the path from hunger and satiation to an individual's actual behavior may often be moderated by psychological factors, included among which is locus of control. PMID:25339940

  16. DNA Modification Study of Major Depressive Disorder: Beyond Locus-by-Locus Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gabriel; Wang, Sun-Chong; Pal, Mrinal; Chen, Zheng Fei; Khare, Tarang; Tochigi, Mamoru; Ng, Catherine; Yang, Yeqing A.; Kwan, Andrew; Kaminsky, Zachary A.; Mill, Jonathan; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Tackett, Jennifer L.; Gottesman, Irving I.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Wray, Naomi R.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Turecki, Gustavo; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; McGuffin, Peter; Kustra, Rafal; Petronis, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibits numerous clinical and molecular features that are consistent with putative epigenetic misregulation. Despite growing interest in epigenetic studies of psychiatric diseases, the methodologies guiding such studies have not been well defined. Methods We performed DNA modification analysis in white blood cells from monozygotic twins discordant for MDD, in brain prefrontal cortex, and germline (sperm) samples from affected individuals and control subjects (total N = 304) using 8.1K CpG island microarrays and fine mapping. In addition to the traditional locus-by-locus comparisons, we explored the potential of new analytical approaches in epigenomic studies. Results In the microarray experiment, we detected a number of nominally significant DNA modification differences in MDD and validated selected targets using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Some MDD epigenetic changes, however, overlapped across brain, blood, and sperm more often than expected by chance. We also demonstrated that stratification for disease severity and age may increase the statistical power of epimutation detection. Finally, a series of new analytical approaches, such as DNA modification networks and machine-learning algorithms using binary and quantitative depression phenotypes, provided additional insights on the epigenetic contributions to MDD. Conclusions Mapping epigenetic differences in MDD (and other psychiatric diseases) is a complex task. However, combining traditional and innovative analytical strategies may lead to identification of disease-specific etiopathogenic epimutations. PMID:25108803

  17. Overview of the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) Project.

    PubMed

    Suchdev, Parminder S; Namaste, Sorrel M L; Aaron, Grant J; Raiten, Daniel J; Brown, Kenneth H; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Anemia remains a widespread public health problem. Although iron deficiency is considered the leading cause of anemia globally, the cause of anemia varies considerably by country. To achieve global targets to reduce anemia, reliable estimates of the contribution of nutritional and non-nutritional causes of anemia are needed to guide interventions. Inflammation is known to affect many biomarkers used to assess micronutrient status and can thus lead to incorrect diagnosis of individuals and to overestimation or underestimation of the prevalence of deficiency in a population. Reliable assessment of iron status is particularly needed in settings with high infectious disease burden, given the call to screen for iron deficiency to mitigate potential adverse effects of iron supplementation. To address these information gaps, in 2012 the CDC, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, and Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition formed a collaborative research group called Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutrition Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA). Data from nationally and regionally representative nutrition surveys conducted in the past 10 y that included preschool children and/or women of childbearing age were pooled. Of 25 data sets considered for inclusion, 17 were included, representing ∼30,000 preschool children, 26,000 women of reproductive age, and 21,000 school-aged children from all 6 WHO geographic regions. This article provides an overview of the BRINDA project and describes key research questions and programmatic and research implications. Findings from this project will inform global guidelines on the assessment of anemia and micronutrient status and will guide the development of a research agenda for future longitudinal studies. PMID:26980818

  18. Overview of the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) Project.

    PubMed

    Suchdev, Parminder S; Namaste, Sorrel M L; Aaron, Grant J; Raiten, Daniel J; Brown, Kenneth H; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Anemia remains a widespread public health problem. Although iron deficiency is considered the leading cause of anemia globally, the cause of anemia varies considerably by country. To achieve global targets to reduce anemia, reliable estimates of the contribution of nutritional and non-nutritional causes of anemia are needed to guide interventions. Inflammation is known to affect many biomarkers used to assess micronutrient status and can thus lead to incorrect diagnosis of individuals and to overestimation or underestimation of the prevalence of deficiency in a population. Reliable assessment of iron status is particularly needed in settings with high infectious disease burden, given the call to screen for iron deficiency to mitigate potential adverse effects of iron supplementation. To address these information gaps, in 2012 the CDC, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, and Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition formed a collaborative research group called Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutrition Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA). Data from nationally and regionally representative nutrition surveys conducted in the past 10 y that included preschool children and/or women of childbearing age were pooled. Of 25 data sets considered for inclusion, 17 were included, representing ∼30,000 preschool children, 26,000 women of reproductive age, and 21,000 school-aged children from all 6 WHO geographic regions. This article provides an overview of the BRINDA project and describes key research questions and programmatic and research implications. Findings from this project will inform global guidelines on the assessment of anemia and micronutrient status and will guide the development of a research agenda for future longitudinal studies.

  19. A Retrospective Study of Equine Infectious Anemia Based on the Canadian Control Program

    PubMed Central

    Paquette, Benoit

    1985-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia in Canada was reviewed for the period January 1976 to December 1981. The human and ecological factors prevailing in Canada are deemed instrumental with respect to the evolution of the disease. The natural spread of the disease on a large scale has not been influenced by the Federal program. Reactors with signs of the disease are important for it's propagation. The author underlines the necessity of cooperation with private practising veterinarians to control it. PMID:17422597

  20. Diamond Blackfan anemia: a disorder of red blood cell development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R; Lipton, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited hypoplastic anemia that typically presents in the first year of life. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA encode ribosomal proteins, and in these cases ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. The developmental timing of DBA presentation suggests that the changes in red blood cell production that occur around the time of birth trigger a pathophysiological mechanism, likely linked to defective ribosome synthesis, which precipitates the hematopoietic phenotype. Variable presentation of other clinical phenotypes in DBA patients indicates that other developmental pathways may also be affected by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and that the involvement of these pathways is influenced by modifier genes. Understanding the molecular basis for the developmental timing of DBA presentation promises to shed light on a number of baffling features of this disease. This chapter also attempts to demonstrate how the marriage of laboratory and clinical science may enhance each and permit insights into human disease that neither alone can accomplish.

  1. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  2. Update on the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) for the management of anemia of multiple myeloma and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Katodritou, Eirini; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Zervas, Konstantinos; Terpos, Evangelos

    2009-12-01

    Anemia is a common side-effect of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and lymphoma. The etiology is complex, but the main cause is the underlying mechanism of anemia of chronic disease, which is characterized among others, by impairment of iron metabolism and consequently iron restricted erythropoiesis (IRE), resulting from the up-regulation of the iron distributing regulator, hepcidin. Erythopoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have been the standard of care since early 90's offering high response rates and improving the quality of life of the patients. However, the role of ESAs in the treatment of cancer-related anemia has been questioned recently, due to the growing evidence which support that ESAs may be associated with increased risk for thrombosis and may have a detrimental impact on patients' survival. Under the light of the recent considerations, the place of ESAs in the management of cancer-related anemia has been reassigned. Regarding the management of anemia in MM or lymphoma, the updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Society of Hematology (ASCO/ASH) 2007 clinical practice guidelines on the use of ESAs in cancer-related anemia, recommended that ESAs should be preferably omitted in patients planned to receive chemotherapy and applied in case that anemia does not improve over treatment. The quest for reliable predictors for response to ESAs and for indicators of IRE which plays a major etiological role for the development of anemia of cancer still remains an open issue. In the current review we present an update on ESAs use in anemia of MM and lymphoma.

  3. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  4. Pathophysiology of Anemia During the Neonatal Period, Including Anemia of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Widness, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes the current thinking about the causes of anemia universally experienced by preterm infants in the early postnatal weeks. In addition to describing developmentally determined physiologic processes contributing to anemia of prematurity, this review discusses clinically important nonphysiologic contributors to anemia experienced by preterm infants during the neonatal period. Chief among these and an important contributor to the need for red blood cell transfusions is the heavy laboratory phlebotomy loss sustained shortly after birth, when neonatal cardiorespiratory illness is most severe. Understanding and recognizing the physiologic and nonphysiologic processes contributing to anemia encountered in early postnatal life is important in knowing which treatment and prevention modalities are likely to be most effective in different clinical situations. The evaluation of rare and uncommon acquired and genetic causes of anemia in newborns are not covered in this review. PMID:20463861

  5. Unusual manifestations of acute Q fever: autoimmune hemolytic anemia and tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Serdal; Elaldi, Nazif; Kayatas, Mansur; Sencan, Mehmet; Yildiz, Esin

    2012-05-18

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection that caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strict intracellular bacterium. It may be manifested by some of the autoimmune events and is classified into acute and chronic forms. The most frequent clinical manifestation of acute form is a self-limited febrile illness which is associated with severe headache, muscle ache, arthralgia and cough. Meningoencephalitis, thyroiditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and nephritis are rare manifestations. Here we present a case of acute Q fever together with Coombs' positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and tubulointerstitial nephritis treated with chlarithromycin, steroids and hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of such rare manifestations of the disease.

  6. Case of cytomegalovirus-associated direct anti-globulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Saeko; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Goro; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Oishi, Tsutomu; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    A 1-year-old boy developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia after a negative direct anti-globulin test. The concentration of erythrocyte membrane-associated immunoglobulin G, determined using an immunoradiometric assay, correlated with disease activity. He was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) both serologically and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, indicating that his autoimmune hemolytic anemia was directly caused by CMV infection. Since anti-CMV immunoglobulin G was not absorbed by the patient's erythrocytes, cross-reaction between erythrocyte antigens and CMV was not likely a causative factor for hemolysis.

  7. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Yıldız, Sevler; Korucu, Tuba; Gundogan, Burcu; Sunbul, Zehra Emine; Korkmaz, Hasan; Atmaca, Murad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency. Methods All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic. Findings Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%), followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%). Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients. Results The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population. Thus, the study concluded that it would be beneficial to consider the physical symptoms and to conduct the required examinations to determine anemia among this patient group. PMID:26543367

  8. Successful Treatment of Severe Anemia using Erythropoietin in a Jehovah Witness with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Agapidou, Alexandra; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Papadopoulou, Theodosia; Chadjiaggelidou, Christina; Garypidou, Vasileia

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion many times works in a life-saving way when a patient is facing a critical situation. However, some patients, such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, may refuse their administration because it opposes to their religion beliefs. Thus, clinicians are forced to respect patients’ preferences and seek other treatments in order to overcome the obstacle of the transfusion. In 1989, recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure. This is an amino acid glycol-protein that stimulates red blood cell production in the same manner as endogenous erythropoietin. Other treatment indications approved by the FDA include anemia due to chronic kidney disease, anemia secondary to zidovudine therapy in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and anemia secondary to cancer chemotherapy. The drug also has been used for many off-label indications. Many Jehovah’s Witnesses have accepted rHuEPO as a treatment option to maintain and enhance erythropoiesis. This paper reports the case of a 57-year-old Jehovah’s Witness man, who was diagnosed with severe anemia due to aggressive non Hodgkin lymphoma and refused transfusion of blood; thanks to the treatment with rHuEPO he has managed to complete chemotherapy and has survived a life threatening situation. PMID:25568760

  9. Successful Treatment of Severe Anemia using Erythropoietin in a Jehovah Witness with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Agapidou, Alexandra; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Papadopoulou, Theodosia; Chadjiaggelidou, Christina; Garypidou, Vasileia

    2014-11-19

    Blood transfusion many times works in a life-saving way when a patient is facing a critical situation. However, some patients, such as Jehovah's Witnesses, may refuse their administration because it opposes to their religion beliefs. Thus, clinicians are forced to respect patients' preferences and seek other treatments in order to overcome the obstacle of the transfusion. In 1989, recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure. This is an amino acid glycol-protein that stimulates red blood cell production in the same manner as endogenous erythropoietin. Other treatment indications approved by the FDA include anemia due to chronic kidney disease, anemia secondary to zidovudine therapy in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and anemia secondary to cancer chemotherapy. The drug also has been used for many off-label indications. Many Jehovah's Witnesses have accepted rHuEPO as a treatment option to maintain and enhance erythropoiesis. This paper reports the case of a 57-year-old Jehovah's Witness man, who was diagnosed with severe anemia due to aggressive non Hodgkin lymphoma and refused transfusion of blood; thanks to the treatment with rHuEPO he has managed to complete chemotherapy and has survived a life threatening situation. PMID:25568760

  10. Telomerase gene therapy rescues telomere length, bone marrow aplasia, and survival in mice with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bär, Christian; Povedano, Juan Manuel; Serrano, Rosa; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Popkes, Miriam; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2016-04-01

    Aplastic anemia is a fatal bone marrow disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The disease can be hereditary or acquired and develops at any stage of life. A subgroup of the inherited form is caused by replicative impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to very short telomeres as a result of mutations in telomerase and other telomere components. Abnormal telomere shortening is also described in cases of acquired aplastic anemia, most likely secondary to increased turnover of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells. Here, we test the therapeutic efficacy of telomerase activation by using adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase Tert gene in 2 independent mouse models of aplastic anemia due to short telomeres (Trf1- and Tert-deficient mice). We find that a high dose of AAV9-Tert targets the bone marrow compartment, including hematopoietic stem cells. AAV9-Tert treatment after telomere attrition in bone marrow cells rescues aplastic anemia and mouse survival compared with mice treated with the empty vector. Improved survival is associated with a significant increase in telomere length in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, as well as improved blood counts. These findings indicate that telomerase gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aplastic anemia provoked or associated with short telomeres.

  11. Managing anemia in patients with chronic heart failure: what do we know?

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Ankur; Soman, Sandeep; Hudson, Michael; Besarab, Anatole

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) with an incidence ranging from 4% to 55% depending on the studied population. Several studies have highlighted that the prevalence of anemia increases with worsening heart failure as reflected by New York Heart Association classification. Additionally, several epidemiological studies have highlighted its role as a prognostic marker, linking it to worse outcomes including; malnutrition, increased hospitalizations, refractory heart failure and death. The pathophysiology of anemia is multifactorial and related to various factors including; hemodilution, iron losses from anti-platelet drugs, activation of the inflammatory cascade, urinary losses of erythropoietin and associated renal insufficiency. There are a host of epidemiological studies examining HF outcomes and anemia, but only a few randomized trials addressing this issue. The purpose of this article is to review the literature that examines the interrelationship of anemia and congestive HF, analyzing its etiology, impact on outcomes and also the role of associated kidney disease as well as cardiorenal syndrome both as a marker of morbidity and mortality. PMID:20407631

  12. Epoetin beta for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luca; Ricci, Clara; Egan, Colin Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Epoetin beta belongs to the class of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) that are currently available to treat anemic patients receiving chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced anemia affects a high percentage of cancer patients and, due to its negative effects on disease outcome and the patient’s quality of life, should be treated when first diagnosed. Initial trials with ESAs have shown efficacy in improving quality of life and reducing the need for blood transfusions in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia. However, recent meta-analyses have provided conflicting data on the impact of ESAs on survival and tumor progression. Here we provide an overview of these recent data and review the role of epoetin beta in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia over the past 20 years. PMID:25784818

  13. New insights into childhood autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a French national observational study of 265 children

    PubMed Central

    Aladjidi, Nathalie; Leverger, Guy; Leblanc, Thierry; Picat, Marie Quitterie; Michel, Gérard; Bertrand, Yves; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Nelken, Brigitte; Gandemer, Virginie; Savel, Hélène; Stephan, Jean Louis; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jeanpetit, Julien; Thomas, Caroline; Rohrlich, Pierre; Baruchel, André; Fischer, Alain; Chêne, Geneviève; Perel, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children. Little is known about its initial presentation and the subsequent progression of the disease. Design and Methods Since 2004, a national observational study has been aiming to thoroughly describe cases and identify prognostic factors. Patients from all French hematologic pediatric units have been included if they had a hemoglobin concentration less than 11 g/dL, a positive direct antiglobulin test and hemolysis. Evans’ syndrome was defined by the association of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immunological thrombocytopenic purpura. Data from patients’ medical records were registered from birth to last follow-up. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia was classified as primary or secondary. Remission criteria, qualifying the status of anemia at last follow-up, were used with the aim of identifying a subgroup with a favorable prognosis in continuous complete remission. Results The first 265 patients had a median age of 3.8 years at diagnosis. In 74% of cases the direct antiglobulin test was IgG/IgG+C3d. Consanguinity was reported in 8% of cases and first degree familial immunological diseases in 15% of cases. Evans’ syndrome was diagnosed in 37% of cases. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia was post-infectious in 10%, immunological in 53% and primary in 37% of cases. After a median follow-up of 3 years, 4% of children had died, 28% were still treatment-dependent and 39% were in continuous complete remission. In multivariate analysis, IgG and IgG+C3d direct antiglobulin tests were associated with a lower rate of survival with continuous complete remission (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.21–0.86). Conclusions This nationwide French cohort is the largest reported study of childhood autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The rarity of this condition is confirmed. Subgroups with genetic predisposition and underlying immune disorders were identified. PMID:21228033

  14. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, hemoglobin SS disease (sickle cell anemia) affects mostly African Americans. However, forms of sickle cell disease may happen in people with different ethnic backgrounds, such as those whose ...

  15. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  16. An infant with acute brucellosis presenting with Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia: is breastfeeding guilty for transmission?

    PubMed

    Apa, Hurşit; Keskin, Sükran; Gülfidan, Gamze; Yaman, Yöntem; Devrim, Ilker

    2013-07-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that can be transmitted to humans through infected milk and dairy products. There are limited cases with Brucella infection acquired via breastfeeding in infants in the literature. Also, Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia as a result of the disease is comparatively rare when considering the other frequent hematologic complications. We report a mother who acquired the infection as a result of consuming infected milk and dairy products after delivery and of her 5-month-old baby, who had acquired the disease via breastfeeding and presented with Coombs-positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  17. Ultrastructure of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Willingale-Theune, J; Schweiger, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Meek, A E; Paulin-Levasseur, M; Traub, P

    1989-08-01

    Employing indirect immunofluorescence and conventional electron microscopy, gross nuclear aberrations were observed in cultured interphase fibroblasts derived from a patient suffering from Fanconi's anemia (FA). Such aberrations were predominantly expressed in cells at high passages between 28 and 34. The structure of the nuclei appeared compound in nature, often consisting of two to three nuclear fragments connected to each other by thin nuclear bridges containing chromatin and nuclear lamin material. In other cases, the nuclei appeared lobed or budded but the cells did not contain distinct nuclear fragments. Chromatin was conspicuously absent from some nuclear lobes, revealing empty, cage-like structures comprising nuclear lamin material. Micronuclei were often abundant in the perinuclear cytoplasm but in some instances they appeared to be composed of chromatin lacking a delineating nuclear lamin matrix. Residual cytoskeletons examined by whole-mount electron microscopy revealed a network of intermediate filaments (IFs) within FA fibroblasts forming a bridge between the plasma membrane and the nucleus or its major fragments. In addition, there were thinner, 3-4 nm filaments connecting individual IFs with the surface of the nucleus. Micronuclei that were not connected to the main nuclear body, but which were delineated by a distinct lamina and possessed nuclear pores, did not appear to be anchored to the IF network. Multinuclearity, nuclear fragmentation, irregular chromatin distribution and inter-nuclear chromatin/lamin bridges might result from a failure in the redistribution of chromatin to sister nuclei, incomplete cytokinesis and proliferation of nuclear envelope material. These phenomena point to precocious aging of FA fibroblasts and may occur as a consequence of spontaneous damage to the sister chromatids or through the action of DNA-toxic agents.

  18. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses.

  19. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B; Bishop, David F; Steensma, David P

    2015-04-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5'-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:25705881

  20. Disease and Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Calvin

    1978-01-01

    Discusses disease and genetic disorders as evolutionary mechanisms. Emphasizes the archeological evidence from past human populations and societies, mentioning albinism, scurvy, sleeping sickness, bone conditions, various host-parasite relationships, rickets, sickle-cell anemia, diabetes, and influenza. (CS)