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  1. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  2. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone marrow such as lymphoma, leukemia, myelodysplasia, multiple myeloma, or aplastic anemia Slow blood loss (for example, from heavy menstrual periods or stomach ulcers ) Sudden heavy blood loss

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reasons. Anemia is a common condition in older adults, although it’s not caused by normal aging. It has many causes, including some you can control. For example, in older people, a poor diet ...

  4. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or help your body absorb nutrients. In some cases, your doctor can prescribe medicine to help your body produce more red blood cells. Examples include: Erythropoietin shots to treat normocytic anemia. These can help your ...

  5. Análise dos fatores de risco relacionados às amputações maiores e menores de membros inferiores em hospital terciário

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus-Silva, Seleno Glauber; de Oliveira, João Pedro; Brianezi, Matheus Henrique Colepicolo; Silva, Melissa Andreia de Moraes; Krupa, Arturo Eduardo; Cardoso, Rodolfo Souza

    2017-01-01

    Resumo Contexto As amputações dos membros inferiores, sejam definidas como maiores ou menores, são um grave problema de saúde, com altos índices de morbimortalidade e de relevante impacto social. Diferentes características clínicas dos pacientes parecem estar relacionadas aos diferentes tipos de amputação realizados. Objetivos Analisar os fatores de risco presentes em pacientes submetidos a amputações de membros inferiores em hospital terciário. Métodos Estudo retrospectivo, transversal, envolvendo 109 pacientes submetidos a amputação de membro inferior em um período de 31 meses, através da análise de gênero e idade, 15 dados clínicos e cinco parâmetros laboratoriais presentes no momento da admissão. Os dados foram submetidos a estatística descritiva e comparativa através do teste t de Student não pareado (para variáveis numéricas), e dos testes de Mann-Whitney e exato de Fisher (para variáveis categóricas). Resultados Das 109 amputações realizadas, 59 foram maiores e 50 menores. A maioria dos pacientes era do gênero masculino (65%), e a média de idade foi de 65 anos (mín. 39, máx. 93). Dentre os fatores de risco observados, idade avançada, acidente vascular encefálico, isquemia, sepse e níveis baixos de hemoglobina e hematócrito estavam estatisticamente mais relacionados às amputações maiores (p < 0,05). Diabetes melito, neuropatia e pulsos distais palpáveis foram fatores mais associados às amputações menores. Conclusões Os níveis das amputações de membros inferiores estão relacionados a diferentes fatores de risco. Os quadros isquêmicos mais graves e de maior morbidade estiveram associados a amputações maiores, enquanto a neuropatia e perfusão preservada, mais relacionados às amputações menores. PMID:29930618

  6. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  7. George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia

    Science.gov Websites

    Nobel Prize for his discovery that liver fed to anemic dogs reverses the <em>effects> of the anemia. This <em>Effects> of Ionizing Radiation Cycle, DOE Technical Report, 1952 Top Additional Web Pages: George H

  8. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  9. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  10. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Fanconi anemia is due to an abnormal gene that damages cells, which keeps them from repairing damaged DNA. To inherit Fanconi anemia, a person must get 1 copy of the abnormal gene from each parent. The condition is most often diagnosed in children between 2 ...

  11. About Anemia (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  12. Aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Treatments of aplastic anemia are comprised of supportive therapy and aplastic anemia-specific therapy aimed at restoring hematopoiesis. Supportive therapies include transfusion, G-CSF, and the administration of iron chelation agents, as well as dealing specifically with individual symptoms. Aplastic anemia-specific treatments given with the aim of achieving hematopoietic recovery include immunosuppressive therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and anabolic hormone therapy. Although transplantation provides complete recovery of hematopoiesis (cure), there is a risk of death due to transplant-related complications. The most effective immunosuppressive therapy is a combination of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. This treatment is also effective against the secondary, drug-induced and hepatitis-associated forms of aplastic anemia. In the management of aplastic anemia, a treatment is selected from among these options depending on the disease severity and the age of the individual case. The thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag appears to be effective and to provide tri-lineage recovery of hematopoiesis in some cases. Indications for its use are expected to expand in Japan.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... D1 Genetic Testing Registry: Fanconi anemia, complementation group D2 Genetic Testing Registry: Fanconi anemia, complementation group E ... ANEMIA, COMPLEMENTATION GROUP D1 FANCONI ANEMIA, COMPLEMENTATION GROUP D2 FANCONI ANEMIA, COMPLEMENTATION GROUP E FANCONI ANEMIA, COMPLEMENTATION ...

  14. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... t known. AIHA accounts for half of all cases of hemolytic anemia. AIHA may come on very quickly and become serious. Having certain diseases or infections can raise your risk for AIHA. Examples include: Autoimmune diseases, such as lupus Chronic lymphocytic ...

  15. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the number of these blood cell types. Aplastic anemia can be caused by: Use of certain drugs or exposure to toxic chemicals (such as benzene) Exposure to radiation or chemotherapy Autoimmune disorders Pregnancy Viruses Sometimes, the cause is unknown. In this ...

  16. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can ... Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments and ...

  17. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Section Anemia - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (bosanski) Expand Section Anemia - bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section Anemia - ...

  18. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org US National Library of Medicine -- ghr.nlm. ...

  19. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  20. Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Soulier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is the most frequent inherited cause of BM failure (BMF). Fifteen FANC genes have been identified to date, the most prevalent being FANCA, FANCC, FANCG, and FANCD2. In addition to classical presentations with progressive BMF during childhood and a positive chromosome breakage test in the blood, atypical clinical and/or biological situations can be seen in which a FA diagnosis has to be confirmed or eliminated. For this, a range of biological tools have been developed, including analysis of skin fibroblasts. FA patients experience a strong selective pressure in the BM that predisposes to clonal evolution and to the emergence in their teens or young adulthood of myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a specific pattern of somatic chromosomal lesions. The cellular mechanisms underlying (1) the hematopoietic defect which leads to progressive BMF and (2) somatic clonal evolutions in this background, are still largely elusive. Elucidation of these mechanisms at the molecular and cellular levels should be useful to understand the physiopathology of the disease and to adapt the follow-up and treatment of FA patients. This may also ultimately benefit older, non-FA patients with aplastic anemia, MDS/AML for whom FA represents a model genetic condition.

  1. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Teens / Anemia What's in this article? ... Enough Iron Print en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  2. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  3. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  4. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  5. Side Effects: Anemia

    Cancer.gov

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  7. Pernicious anemia associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Zafad, Saadia; Madani, Abdellah; Harif, Mhamed; Quessar, Asmaa; Benchekroun, Said

    2007-12-01

    We report a 16-year-old male with a combination of pernicious anemia, auto-immune hemolytic anemia and alopecia areata. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia coexisted with pernicious anemia but was diagnosed only when the anemia failed to respond to cobalamin therapy. Alopecia areata occurred 9 years later. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  8. Anemia and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in your plasma and the amount of hemoglobin in your blood. These are indicators of whether you are at risk for becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to prevent anemia if ...

  9. Anemia in Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Cindy N.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis While anemia is regarded as a relatively common occurrence in older adults, the vigor with which the medical community should intervene to correct this common problem is disputed. Epidemiologic data clearly correlate anemia with functional decline, disability and mortality. Anemia may contribute to functional decline by restricting oxygen delivery to muscle, or to cognitive decline by restricting oxygen delivery to the brain. On the other hand, the erythron may be a separate target of the same biological mediators that influence deterioration of physiologic systems that contribute to weakness, functional and cognitive decline and mortality. Clinical trials aimed to treat anemia in older adults could assess whether physical performance is improved or whether mortality risk declines with improved hemoglobin, but sufficient evidence from such trials is currently lacking. With few guidelines regarding treatment for older adults and significant risk for adverse events associated with transfusion and erythroid stimulating agents (ESA), anemia often goes untreated or ignored in geriatric clinics. This article reviews the problem of anemia in older adults, with a particular emphasis on the frail elderly. We will review the gaps in our evidence base for the treatment of anemia in older adults and assess options for advancing the field. PMID:21093723

  10. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  11. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACD include: Autoimmune disorders , such as Crohn disease , systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , ... AOCD; ACD Images Blood cells References Bunn HF. Approach to the anemias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  12. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... was fatal in the past, before vitamin B12 shots were avail able. Today, pernicious anemia is easily ... me. “The doctor said that taking vitamin B12 shots would give me more pep. He started me ...

  13. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease National Hematologic Diseases Information Service What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person has ... also cause low blood iron levels. People with anemia may feel tired because their blood does not ...

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Anemia “I told my doctor that I was ... exercise a little every day. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia Eat and drink well. ● ● Talk with your ...

  15. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  16. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  17. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  18. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... raise your risk for this type of anemia: Alcoholism Eating overcooked food Poor diet (often seen in the poor, the older people, and people who do not eat fresh fruits or vegetables) Pregnancy Folic acid is needed to help a baby ...

  19. [Anemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  20. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  1. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  2. Anemia of Inflammation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fraenkel, Paula G.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired iron homeostasis and the suppressive effects of proinflammatory cytokines on erythropoiesis, together with alterations of the erythrocyte membrane that impair its survival, cause the anemia of inflammation. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected inflammatory anemia with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, and the iron exporter, ferroportin, interact to cause iron sequestration in the setting of inflammation. While severe anemia is associated with adverse outcomes in critical illness, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is part of a natural defense against pathogens. In animal models and human patients, experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of inflammation. PMID:28189171

  3. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the ... Tribute Of Individual Gifts Corporate Sponsorship Invest in Research Diseases Aplastic Anemia Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Types Treatments ...

  4. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  5. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  6. Severe anemia in Malawian children.

    PubMed

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S; Faragher, E Brian; Brabin, Bernard J; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E; de Haan, Rob J; Phiri, Ajib I; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; Teo, Yik Y; Rockett, Kirk A; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Molyneux, Malcolm E; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool children without severe anemia in urban and rural settings in Malawi. Causal factors previously associated with severe anemia were studied. The data were examined by multivariate analysis and structural equation modeling. Bacteremia (adjusted odds ratio, 5.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6 to 10.9), malaria (adjusted odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 3.3), hookworm (adjusted odds ratio, 4.8; 95% CI, 2.0 to 11.8), human immunodeficiency virus infection (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), the G6PD -202/-376 genetic disorder (adjusted odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.4), vitamin A deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.8), and vitamin B 12 deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4 to 3.6) were associated with severe anemia. Folate deficiency, sickle cell disease, and laboratory signs of an abnormal inflammatory response were uncommon. Iron deficiency was not prevalent in case patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.60) and was negatively associated with bacteremia. Malaria was associated with severe anemia in the urban site (with seasonal transmission) but not in the rural site (where malaria was holoendemic). Seventy-six percent of hookworm infections were found in children under 2 years of age. There are multiple causes of severe anemia in Malawian preschool children, but folate and iron deficiencies are not prominent among them. Even in the presence of malaria parasites, additional or alternative causes of severe anemia should be considered.

  7. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mahmoud; Jaberian, Sara; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Riazi, Sajedeh; Rangraz, Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber, Somayyeh

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 1252 patients with morbid obesity that randomly selected from all patients referred to Clinic of obesity at Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in 2014. The morbid obesity was defined according to the guideline as body mass index (BMI) equal to or higher than 40 kg/m2. Various laboratory parameters including serum levels of hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, folic acid, and vitamin B12 were assessed using the standard laboratory techniques. BMI was adversely associated with serum vitamin B12, but not associated with other hematologic parameters. The overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.8%. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was independent to patients' age and also to body mass index. The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was totally 20.9%. According to the multivariable logistic regression model, no association was revealed between BMI and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia adjusting gender and age. A similar regression model showed that higher BMI could predict occurrence of vitamin B12 deficiency in morbid obese patients. Although iron deficiency is a common finding among obese patients, vitamin B12 deficiency is more frequent so about one-fifth of these patients suffer vitamin B12 deficiency. In fact, the exacerbation of obesity can result in exacerbation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  8. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  9. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  10. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 188,000 ...

  11. Optimal management of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Andres, Emmanuel; Serraj, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer's disease) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis, predominantly of the fundus, and is responsible for a deficiency in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) due to its malabsorption. Its prevalence is 0.1% in the general population and 1.9% in subjects over the age of 60 years. Pernicious anemia represents 20%-50% of the causes of vitamin B12 deficiency in adults. Given its polymorphism and broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, pernicious anemia is a great pretender. Its diagnosis must therefore be evoked and considered in the presence of neurological and hematological manifestations of undetermined origin. Biologically, it is characterized by the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Treatment is based on the administration of parenteral vitamin B12, although other routes of administration (eg, oral) are currently under study. In the present update, these various aspects are discussed with special emphasis on data of interest to the clinician.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia What's in ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  13. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  14. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  15. [Therapeutic approach to postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Moltó, L

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative anemia is a common finding in patients who undergo major surgery, and it can affect early rehabilitation and the return to daily activities. Allogeneic blood transfusion is still the most widely used method for restoring hemoglobin levels rapidly and effectively. However, the potential risks of transfusions have led to the review of this practice and to a search for alternative measures for treating postoperative anemia. The early administration of intravenous iron appears to improve the evolution of postoperative hemoglobin levels and reduce allogeneic transfusions, especially in patients with significant iron deficiency or anemia. What is not clear is whether this treatment heavily influences rehabilitation and quality of life. There is a lack of well-designed, sufficiently large, randomized prospective studies to determine whether postoperative or perioperative intravenous iron treatment, with or without recombinant erythropoietin, has a role in the recovery from postoperative anemia, in reducing transfusions and morbidity rates and in improving exercise capacity and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  17. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  18. Anemia and mortality in older persons: does the type of anemia affect survival?

    PubMed

    Shavelle, Robert M; MacKenzie, Ross; Paculdo, David R

    2012-03-01

    Anemia is a common condition among community-dwelling older adults. The present study investigates the effect of type of anemia on subsequent mortality. We analyzed data from participants of the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey who were aged ≥50 and had valid hemoglobin levels determined by laboratory measurement. Anemia was defined by World Health Organization criteria. 7,171 subjects met our inclusion criterion. Of those with anemia (n = 862, deaths = 491), 24% had nutritional anemia, 11% had anemia of chronic renal disease, 26% had anemia of chronic inflammation, and 39% had unexplained anemia. We found an overall relative risk (RR) for mortality of 1.8 (p < 0.001) comparing those with anemia to those without, after adjusting for age, sex, and race. After we controlled for a number of chronic medical conditions, the overall RR was 1.6. Compared to persons without anemia, we found the following RRs for the type of anemia: nutritional (2.34, p < 0.0001), chronic renal disease (1.70, p < 0.0001), chronic inflammation (1.48, p < 0.0001), and unexplained (1.26, p < 0.01). Anemia is common although not severe in older non-institutionalized adults. When compared with non-anemic older adults, those with nutritional anemia or anemia due to chronic renal disease have the highest mortality risk.

  19. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  20. Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    Specifically, the commonly used diabetes drug metformin will be tested by itself and in combination with the current standard of care, anabolic steroids...pertains to the treatment of the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome Fanconi’s Anemia. Specifically, the commonly used diabetes drug metformin will be... drug , small molecule, DNA damage, metformin 3. Accomplishments We started work on this project less than a year ago and already have made good progress

  1. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that ...

  4. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  5. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  6. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  7. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  8. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  9. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  10. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  11. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause the body to absorb too much lead. Prevention Eating a variety of healthy foods is the most important way to prevent and treat iron deficiency. Alternative Names Anemia - ... MD. Disorders of iron and copper metabolism, the sideroblastic anemias, and lead toxicity. In: Orkin SH, Fisher DE, Ginsburg D, ...

  12. Diagnosis and management of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Annibale, Bruno; Lahner, Edith; Fave, Gianfranco Delle

    2011-12-01

    Pernicious anemia is a macrocytic anemia due to cobalamin deficiency, which is the result of intrinsic factor deficiency. Pernicious anemia is associated with atrophic body gastritis, whose diagnostic criteria are based on the histologic evidence of gastric body atrophy associated with hypochlorhydria. Serological markers suggesting the presence of oxyntic mucosa damage are increased levels of fasting gastrin and decreased levels of Pepsinogen I. Without the now obsolete Schilling's test, intrinsic factor deficiency may not be proven, and gastric intrinsic factor output after pentagastric stimulation has been proposed. Intrinsic factor autoantibodies are useful surrogate markers of pernicious anemia. The management of patients with pernicious anemia should focus on the life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin and the monitoring to early diagnose an eventual onset of iron deficiency. Moreover, these patients should be advised about possible gastrointestinal long-term consequences, such as gastric cancer and carcinoids.

  13. Challenging clinical presentations of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Oo, Thein Hlaing; Rojas-Hernandez, Cristhiam Mauricio

    2017-09-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is an autoimmune disease of multifactorial etiologies characterized by autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis, cobalamin deficiency (CD) due to defective absorption of dietary cobalamin from the terminal ileum, and by the presence of intrinsic factor and parietal cell antibodies. PA is a very common cause of CD-related anemia worldwide. Despite advances in the understanding molecular biology and pathophysiology of PA, the diagnosis of PA remains challenging in many circumstances for many clinicians because of its diverse clinical manifestations and the limitations of currently available diagnostic tools. Diagnostic dilemmas could occur when patients with PA present with spuriously normal or high cobalamin levels, normocytic or microcytic anemia, non-anemic macrocytosis, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, pseudo-thrombotic microangiopathy, hyperhomocysteinemia-associated thromboembolism, pseudoleu-kemia, bone marrow failure, bone marrow ring sideroblasts, and neurologic manifestations without anemia or macrocytosis. Herein, we provide an overview of the challenging clinical presentations of PA, diagnostic approach, and management.

  14. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likelymore » that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.« less

  15. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  16. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... include those with high levels of iron (beef, dark green leafy vegetables, dried fruits, and nuts), vitamin ... meat and dairy), and folic acid (citrus juices, dark green leafy vegetables, legumes, and fortified cereals). A ...

  17. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... sources of iron include lean meat and chicken, dark, leafy vegetables, and beans. Eat and drink foods ... serving) Canned white beans (8 milligrams per cup) Dark chocolate (7 milligrams per 3-ounce serving) Beef ...

  18. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L) and severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration <70 g/L) and individual-level (age, anthropometric measures, micronutrient deficiencies, malaria, and inflammation) and household-level predictors; we also examined the proportion of anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration <12 μg/L). Countries were grouped into 4 categories on the basis of risk and burden of infectious disease, and a pooled multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted for each group. Results: Iron deficiency, malaria, breastfeeding, stunting, underweight, inflammation, low socioeconomic status, and poor sanitation were each associated with anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by

  19. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  20. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  1. Clinical management of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E; Brodsky, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is a potentially fatal bone marrow failure disorder that is characterized by pancytopenia and a hypocellular bone marrow. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for young patients who have a matched sibling donor. Immunosuppression with either anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine or high-dose cyclophosphamide is an effective therapy for patients who are not suitable BMT candidates owing to age or lack of a suitable donor. Results of BMT from unrelated and mismatched donors are improving, but presently this treatment option is best reserved for those patients who do not respond, relapse or develop secondary clonal disorders following immunosuppressive therapy. Efforts are currently underway to both improve immunosuppressive regimens and to expand the application of BMT. PMID:21495931

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... developing certain cancers, including a cancer of blood-forming tissue known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ... proteins may increase the self-destruction of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, resulting in anemia. ...

  3. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  4. Severe iron deficiency anemia and lice infestation.

    PubMed

    Guss, David A; Koenig, Mark; Castillo, Edward M

    2011-10-01

    Lice infestation is a commonly encountered disorder in emergency medicine. The louse survives from a blood meal from its host; hence, iron deficiency anemia is a theoretic possibility. A limited number of reports of severe iron deficiency anemia have appeared in the veterinary literature, but a thorough review of the medical literature did not reveal a single instance in human beings. We report a small case series of patients with heavy louse infestation and profound iron deficiency anemia. The index case along with two other cases discovered from an exhaustive search of 4 years of the institution's Emergency Department records all had heavy infestation with head and body lice. Laboratory evaluation revealed serum hemoglobin levels under 6 gm/dL, low serum ferritin levels, and microcytic red blood cell indices. All patients were admitted to the hospital, received transfusions, and had evaluation of their anemia. No patient had evidence of gastrointestinal blood loss or alternative explanation for their anemia. Although cause and effect cannot be established from this case series, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first published evidence of a provocative association of louse infestation and severe iron deficiency anemia in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. From Bad to Worse: Anemia on Admission and Hospital-Acquired Anemia.

    PubMed

    Koch, Colleen G; Li, Liang; Sun, Zhiyuan; Hixson, Eric D; Tang, Anne S; Phillips, Shannon C; Blackstone, Eugene H; Henderson, J Michael

    2017-12-01

    Anemia at hospitalization is often treated as an accompaniment to an underlying illness, without active investigation, despite its association with morbidity. Development of hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) has also been associated with increased risk for poor outcomes. Together, they may further heighten morbidity risk from bad to worse. The aims of this study were to (1) examine mortality, length of stay, and total charges in patients with present-on-admission (POA) anemia and (2) determine whether these are exacerbated by development of HAA. In this cohort investigation, from January 1, 2009, to August 31, 2011, a total of 44,483 patients with POA anemia were admitted to a single health system compared with a reference group of 48,640 without POA anemia or HAA. Data sources included the University HealthSystem Consortium database and electronic medical records. Risk-adjustment methods included logistic and linear regression models for mortality, length of stay, and total charges. Present-on-admission anemia was defined by administrative coding. Hospital-acquired anemia was determined by changes in hemoglobin values from the electronic medical record. Approximately one-half of the patients experienced worsening of anemia with development of HAA. Risk for death and resource use increased with increasing severity of HAA. Those who developed severe HAA had 2-fold greater odds for death; that is, mild POA anemia with development of severe HAA resulted in greater mortality (odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-3.18; P < 0.001), increased length of stay (2.23; 2.16-2.31; P < 0.001), and higher charges (2.09; 2.03-2.15; P < 0.001). Present-on-admission anemia is associated with increased mortality and resource use. This risk is further increased from bad to worse when patients develop HAA. Efforts to address POA anemia and HAA deserve attention.

  6. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  7. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation? : Differential diagnosis and mechanisms of anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body's iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear phagocytes system in liver and spleen. This results in iron-limited erythropoiesis and anemia. This review summarizes current diagnostic and pathophysiological concepts of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of inflammation, as well as combined conditions, and provides a brief outlook on novel therapeutic options.

  8. [Infection and sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Bégué, P

    1999-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with frequent and often severe infections as a result of immune function impairment and functional asplenia. Also, infection can trigger a vasoocclusive crisis. Pneumococcal bacteremia and meningitis are so severe as to warrant prophylactic penicillin therapy, which has provided a dramatic decrease in early mortality. Bacterial pneumonia is common in patients younger than four years, with most cases being due to S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Acute chest syndrome is both a difficult differential diagnosis and a common concomitant of bacterial pneumonia. Osteomyelitis is generally due to a salmonella, most often S. enteritidis; multiple foci are common and treatment is difficult, with some patients developing chronic osteomyelitis with sequestration. Parvovirus B 19 infection causes acute bone marrow failure. Malaria does not result in cerebral malaria but can lead to severe anemia or vasoocclusive crisis, and should therefore be effectively prevented. Antimicrobials are generally selected for efficacy against pneumococci (septicemia, meningitis), Salmonella (septicemia, meningitis, osteomyelitis), and mycoplasmas (pneumonia). Prophylactic therapy is of paramount importance and relies on long-term or lifelong penicillin therapy started at four months of age and on closely-spaced immunizations, most notably against pneumococci, the hepatitis B virus, S. typhi, and H. influenzae. Resistant pneumococcal strains have not been reported to cause prophylactic treatment failures. Conjugated pneumococcal vaccines are effective in protecting infants and should therefore be used in sickle cell patients.

  9. Fanconi Anemia and Laron Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; de Ita, Julieta Rodriguez; Aguirre, Gabriel Amador; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Ortiz-Urbina, Jesús; García-Magariño, Mariano; de la Garza, Rocío García; Diaz Olachea, Carlos; Elizondo Leal, Martha Irma

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a condition characterized by genetic instability and short stature, which is due to growth hormone (GH) deficiency in most cases. However, no apparent relationships have been identified between FA complementation group genes and GH. In this study, we thereby considered an association between FA and Laron syndrome (LS) (insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1] deficiency). A 21-year-old female Mexican patient with a genetic diagnosis of FA was referred to our research department for an evaluation of her short stature. Upon admission to our facility, her phenotype led to a suspicion of LS; accordingly, serum levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 were analyzed and a GH stimulation test was performed. In addition, we used a next-generation sequencing approach for a molecular evaluation of FA disease-causing mutations and genes involved in the GH-IGF signaling pathway. Tests revealed low levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 that remained within normal ranges, as well as a lack of response to GH stimulation. Sequencing confirmed a defect in the GH receptor signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to suggest an association between FA and LS. We propose that IGF-1 administration might improve some FA complications and functions based upon IGF-1 beneficial actions observed in animal, cell and indirect clinical models: erythropoiesis modulation, immune function improvement and metabolic regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  11. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel/Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemiamore » and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation

  12. Postpartum anemia II: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils

    2012-02-01

    This review focuses on the prevention and treatment of anemia in women who have just given childbirth (postpartum anemia). The problem of anemia both prepartum and postpartum is far more prevalent in developing countries than in the Western societies. The conditions for mother and child in the postpartum, nursing, and lactation period should be as favorable as possible. Many young mothers have a troublesome life due to iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) causing a plethora of symptoms including fatigue, physical disability, cognitive problems, and psychiatric disorders. Routine screening for postpartum anemia should be considered as part of the national maternal health programs. Major causes of postpartum anemia are prepartum iron deficiency and IDA in combination with excessive blood losses at delivery. Postpartum anemia should be defined as a hemoglobin level of <110 g/l at 1 week postpartum and <120 g/l at 8 weeks postpartum. Bleeding exceeding normal blood losses of approximately 300 ml may lead to rapid depletion of body iron reserves and may, unless treated, elicit long-standing iron deficiency and IDA in the postpartum period. The prophylaxis of postpartum anemia should begin already in early pregnancy in order to ensure a good iron status prior to delivery. The most reliable way to obtain this goal is to give prophylactic oral ferrous iron supplements 30-50 mg daily from early pregnancy and take obstetric precautions in pregnancies at risk for complications. In the treatment of slight-to-moderate postpartum IDA, the first choice should be oral ferrous iron 100 to 200 mg daily; it is essential to analyze hemoglobin after approximately 2 weeks in order to check whether treatment works. In severe IDA, intravenous ferric iron in doses ranging from 800 to 1,500 mg should be considered as first choice. In a few women with severe anemia and blunted erythropoiesis due to infection and/or inflammation, additional recombinant human

  13. Pathophysiology and laboratory diagnosis of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Toh, Ban-Hock

    2017-02-01

    Pernicious anemia is the hematologic manifestation of chronic atrophic gastritis affecting the corpus of the stomach that denudes the gastric mucosa of gastric parietal cells. Asymptomatic autoimmune gastritis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastric mucosa, precedes the onset of corpus atrophy by 10-20 years. The gastritis arises from activation of pathologic Th1 CD4 T cells to gastric H/K ATPase that is normally resident on gastric mucosal secretory membranes. The onset of autoimmune gastritis is marked by circulating parietal cell antibody to gastric H/K ATPase. Gastric parietal cells produce two essential biologics: intrinsic factor and HCl acid. Pernicious anemia is a consequence of intrinsic factor loss and neutralizing intrinsic factor antibody that impairs cobalamin absorption. Acid loss leads to iron deficiency anemia that precedes cobalamin-deficient pernicious anemia by 20 years. Laboratory diagnosis rests on parietal cell antibody with or without intrinsic factor antibody, cobalamin-deficient megaloblastic anemia and elevated serum gastrin from loss of acid secretion. Autoimmune gastritis is associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Anemia caused by low iron - infants and toddlers

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron. Infants younger than 12 months who drink cow's milk rather than breast milk or iron-fortified formula are more likely to have anemia. Cow's milk leads to anemia because it: Has less iron ...

  15. Association pernicious anemia and autoimmune polyendocrinopathy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zulfiqar, AA; Andres, E

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases. Methods: This retrospective and bicentric study was conducted at Reims and Strasbourg University Hospitals and involved 188 patients with pernicious anemia examined between 2000 and 2010 in order to search for other autoimmune diseases and to evaluate the role of pernicious anemia in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Results: A total of 74 patients with a combination of pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases were included in the study. Our study revealed the privileged association of pernicious anemia with autoimmune thyroiditis. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis are a part of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3b. Conclusion: We suggest undertaking a systematic clinical examination and laboratory investigations in search of autoimmune thyroiditis in patient(s) with the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis is frequent and a part of autoimmune polyglandular 3b. PMID:29362601

  16. [Pernicious anemia in an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M; Dumont, C

    2009-04-01

    The most frequent organ-specific autoimmune diseases associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus in children are hypothyroidism and celiac disease. Among adults, other associations exist, notably with pernicious anemia, which is extremely rare in children. We relate the observation of an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism, admitted for severe anemia in addition to chronic anemia caused by autoimmune gastritis. Blood cell count showed severe aregenerative anemia with pancytopenia, with signs of non-autoimmune hemolysis. Vitamin B12 levels were low, bone marrow aspiration revealed erythroid hyperplasia, and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were positive, providing the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Treatment with intramuscular vitamin B12 produced brisk reticulosis after 6 days, with a subsequent rapid resolution of the anemia. Follow-up of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children requires screening for organ-specific autoimmune diseases; in case of unexplained anemia, autoimmune gastritis must be suggested. It can evolve into pernicious anemia.

  17. Association pernicious anemia and autoimmune polyendocrinopathy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zulfiqar, A A; Andres, E

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association between pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases. This retrospective and bicentric study was conducted at Reims and Strasbourg University Hospitals and involved 188 patients with pernicious anemia examined between 2000 and 2010 in order to search for other autoimmune diseases and to evaluate the role of pernicious anemia in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. A total of 74 patients with a combination of pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases were included in the study. Our study revealed the privileged association of pernicious anemia with autoimmune thyroiditis. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis are a part of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3b. We suggest undertaking a systematic clinical examination and laboratory investigations in search of autoimmune thyroiditis in patient(s) with the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis is frequent and a part of autoimmune polyglandular 3b.

  18. Patterns and Predictors of Severe Postpartum Anemia after Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Butwick, Alexander. J.; Walsh, Eileen. M.; Kuzniewicz, Michael; Li, Sherian.X.; Escobar, Gabriel.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postpartum anemia is associated with maternal and perinatal morbidity. Population-level data may inform guideline development for postpartum anemia screening. Our objectives were to evaluate the associations between potential predictors (predelivery anemia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)) with severe postpartum anemia after cesarean section. Study Design and Methods Data were collected from 70,939 hospitalizations for cesarean section performed at Kaiser Permanente Northern California facilities between 2005 and 2013. Severe postpartum anemia was defined as a hemoglobin < 8 g/dl before hospital discharge. Using multivariable logistic regression, we assessed the associations between predelivery anemia and PPH with severe postpartum anemia. Distributions of these characteristics among women with severe postpartum anemia were evaluated. Results The overall rate of severe postpartum anemia was 7.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 7.1 – 7.4. Severe postpartum anemia was strongly associated with a predelivery hemoglobin between 10 and 10.9 g/dl (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.4; 95% CI = 4.89– 5.91), predelivery hemoglobin <10 g/dl (aOR 30.6; 95% CI = 27.21– 34.6, and PPH (aOR 8.45; 95% CI = 7.8–9.16). The proportions of women with severe postpartum anemia were highest for those experiencing PPH but no predelivery anemia (12.2%; 95% CI = 11.0 – 13.6), and those who did not incur PPH nor predelivery anemia (10.7%; 95% CI = 9.6 – 12.0). Conclusions Our findings suggest that PPH and predelivery anemia are strong independent risk factors for severe postpartum anemia. Optimization of patients’ hemoglobin prior to delivery may reduce the incidence of severe anemia after cesarean section. PMID:27618767

  19. Early severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sismanlar, Tugba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Köse, Mehmet; Pekcan, Sevgi; Ezgü, Fatih Süheyl; Budakoğlu, Işıl İrem; Yenicesu, İdil

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study aimed to determine the factors associated with early severe anemia in infants with CF. This study included 231 infants with CF from 3 pediatric CF centers ten year period that were retrospectively reviewed in terms of severe anemia as the first sign of CF. Factors that could affect anemia, such as age, pancreatic insufficiency, mutations, vitamin A and E, and albumin level were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory findings in CF patients that presented with severe anemia and no respiratory symptoms were compared to those in CF patients that did not present with severe anemia. Severe anemia as the first sign of CF was noted in 17 of 231 patients. Patient age, prolonged PT/INR and the albumin level differed significantly between the 2 groups of patients (P < 0.001). Feeding pattern, pancreatic insufficiency, vitamin E and A levels, and the types of genetic mutations did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean hemoglobin level was 5.59 ± 0.21 g/dL and respiratory symptoms began a mean 6.3 months after diagnosis of CF in the anemia group. In early infancy severe anemia in the absence of respiratory symptoms can be the first sign of CF. CF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe anemia in infants. Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF and may be caused due to several reasons. • Severe anemia as a first sign is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis. • Although anemia is well known in cystic fibrosis, factors that cause severe anemia are not known clearly. What is New: • This study shows the importance of severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis. • Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF.

  20. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  1. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients.

  2. Ambulatory dysfunction due to unrecognized pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Malizia, Robert W; Baumann, Brigitte M; Chansky, Michael E; Kirchhoff, Michael A

    2010-04-01

    Pernicious anemia can result in significant hematologic and neurologic impairments due to a reduction in cobalamin absorption. Typically thought to be a disease of elderly whites, a growing body of literature has documented the disease in blacks and in younger age groups. We describe a case of a young black woman with gradually progressive lower extremity paresthesias, weakness, and ataxia as the primary presenting symptoms of pernicious anemia. This case is presented to make emergency physicians aware of pernicious anemia as a cause of ambulatory dysfunction in younger patients. We review the current body of literature on the diagnosis and management as well as evidence that the demographic profile of the disease is changing. Furthermore, in women of reproductive age, there is the potential for significant fetal and infant morbidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  4. A case of pernicious anemia requiring differential diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia complication.

    PubMed

    Todo, Saki; Okamoto, Kohei; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Takahashi, Toshimasa; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Arai, Takashi; Nishiyama, Katsuhito; Hara, Kenta; Yasutomo, Yoshiro; Yokono, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    An 80-year-old female was admitted to our hospital due to malaise. The initial diagnosis on admission was pernicious anemia (PA), Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune atrophic gastritis. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia was suspected because direct antiglobulin test (DAT) was positive. Treatment with vitamin B12 improved anemia, with the disappearance of hemolysis. In some cases, PA patients with positive DAT may have hemolysis without the involvement of the autoimmune mechanism. Therefore, it is important to carefully assess PA patients with hemolysis and positive DAT for the prevention of unnecessary administration of steroid therapy.

  5. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin <5mg/dL, reticulocytosis, and positive direct antiglobulin test (IgG, C3d, warm). Additional workup revealed serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) <0.01μIU/mL and serum free-T4 (FT4) level 7.8ng/dL. Our patient was diagnosed with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hidden Anemias in the Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    With increasing knowledge of the risks associated with receiving blood transfusions, a new paradigm of bloodless medicine is needed. Principles of bloodless medicine include careful monitoring for obvious and hidden anemias, rapid intervention, minimizing blood losses from laboratory testing and procedures, and careful management of bleeding diatheses. As evidence is revealed and refined, standard treatment of anemia in the intensive care unit will include erythropoietin-stimulating agents, iron, folate, and vitamin B12, which will reduce risks associated with blood transfusions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Idiopathic aplastic anemia: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Dolberg, Osnat Jarchowsky; Levy, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a disease characterized by pancytopenia and hypoplastic bone marrow caused by the decrease of hematopoietic stem cells. The pathogenesis of AA is complex and involves an abnormal hematopoietic microenvironment, hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell deficiencies and immunity disorders. Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive and biologic drugs, and supportive care. Herein, we will update the main issues concern AA according to our literature review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Immune hemolytic anemia associated with probenecid.

    PubMed

    Sosler, S D; Behzad, O; Garratty, G; Lee, C L; Postoway, N; Khomo, O

    1985-09-01

    Upon hospital admission a patient was found to have severe anemia and a strongly positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The patient was taking probenecid periodically for gout. An antibody was detected in the patient's serum that only reacted with red blood cells (RBCs) when probenecid was added. Eluates from the patient's RBCs, with and without the presence of drug, were nonreactive. Upon the discontinuation of probenecid, the patient's hemoglobin level improved steadily. We believe this to be the first reported case of immune hemolytic anemia associated with probenecid.

  10. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012).

    PubMed

    Le, Chi Huu Hong

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40-49 years and 80-85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80-85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003-2004 to 2011-2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention.

  13. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fanconi anemia proteins in telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jaya; Liu, Yie

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres. Telomeres ensure genome stability by preventing chromosome termini from being recognized as DNA damage. Telomere length homeostasis is inevitable for telomere maintenance because critical shortening or over-lengthening of telomeres may lead to DNA damage response or delay in DNA replication, and hence genome instability. Due to their repetitive DNA sequence, unique architecture, bound shelterin proteins, and high propensity to form alternate/secondary DNA structures, telomeres are like common fragile sites and pose an inherent challenge to the progression of DNA replication, repair, and recombination apparatus. It is conceivable that longer the telomeres are, greater is the severity of such challenges. Recent studies have linked excessively long telomeres with increased tumorigenesis. Here we discuss telomere abnormalities in a rare recessive chromosomal instability disorder called Fanconi Anemia and the role of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in telomere biology. Reports suggest that Fanconi Anemia proteins play a role in maintaining long telomeres, including processing telomeric joint molecule intermediates. We speculate that ablation of the Fanconi Anemia pathway would lead to inadequate aberrant structural barrier resolution at excessively long telomeres, thereby causing replicative burden on the cell. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... E. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I (CDA I): molecular genetics, clinical appearance, and prognosis based on long-term ... Konen O, Yaniv I, Delaunay J. Clinical and molecular variability in congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia type I. ... Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its ...

  16. A short review of malabsorption and anemia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Monzón, Helena; Forné, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent finding in most diseases which cause malabsorption. The most frequent etiology is the combination of iron and vitamin B12 deficiency. Celiac disease is frequently diagnosed in patients referred for evaluation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), being reported in 1.8%-14.6% of patients. Therefore, duodenal biopsies should be taken during endoscopy if no obvious cause of iron deficiency (ID) can be found. Cobalamin deficiency occurs frequently among elderly patients, but it is often unrecognized because the clinical manifestations are subtle; it is caused primarily by food-cobalamin malabsorption and pernicious anemia. The classic treatment of cobalamin deficiency has been parenteral administration of the vitamin. Recent data suggest that alternative routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) may be useful in some cases. Anemia is a frequent complication of gastrectomy, and has been often described after bariatric surgery. It has been shown that banding procedures which maintain digestive continuity with the antrum and duodenum are associated with low rates of ID. Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection may be considered as a risk factor for IDA, mainly in groups with high demands for iron, such as some children and adolescents. Further controlled trials are needed before making solid recommendations about H pylori eradication in these cases. PMID:19787827

  17. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  18. Prevalence of pernicious anemia in patients with macrocytic anemia and low serum B12

    PubMed Central

    AA, Abdulmanea; AH, Alsaeed; AP, Shaik; FH, AlGahtani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The current research evaluated the prevalence of pernicious anemia (PA) in patients with macrocytic anemia (high MCV) and low serum B12 in Riyadh. Methods: Blood testing was done in 77 patients (males: 45.5%, females: 54.5%) with macrocytic anemia; 84 patients; (males: 23.8%, females: 76.2%) with low serum B12 and 30 healthy subjects. Complete blood count, differential count, folic acid, vitamin B12, intrinsic factor, gastric parietal cell antibodies and holotranscobalamin II were assessed. Results: A total of five subjects from 161 patients had PA; three of these patients had macrocyticanemia (3.90%) and two patients had low serum B12 (2.38%). Significant differences (p<0.05) in some hematological, immunological, biochemical parameters were found in subjects with macrocytic anemia and low serum B12 compared to controls. Conclusions: Pernicious anemia in patients with macrocytic anemia and low serum B12 was for the selected sample size can be assumed to be uncommon in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. PMID:25674111

  19. [Effect of anemia on child development: long-term consequences].

    PubMed

    Zavaleta, Nelly; Astete-Robilliard, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Anemia in children younger than 3 years is a public health problem in Peru and worldwide. It is believed that one of the primary causes of anemia is iron deficiency. Numerous studies and reviews have reported that iron deficiency limited psychomotor development in children and that, despite the correction of anemia, children with iron deficiency experienced poorer long-term performance in cognitive, social, and emotional functioning. These outcomes were reported in observational studies, follow-up studies, and experimental studies with a control group. Anemia can decrease school performance, productivity in adult life, quality of life, and the general income of affected individuals. Here we describe possible mechanisms underlying the effect of iron deficiency, with or without anemia, on childhood development. The high rate of anemia in this age group is a cause for concern. Moreover, anemia should be prevented in the first year of life to avoid long-term negative effects on individual development.

  20. Magnitude of Anemia at Discharge Increases 30-Day Hospital Readmissions.

    PubMed

    Koch, Colleen G; Li, Liang; Sun, Zhiyuan; Hixson, Eric D; Tang, Anne; Chagin, Kevin; Kattan, Michael; Phillips, Shannon C; Blackstone, Eugene H; Henderson, J Michael

    2017-12-01

    Anemia during hospitalization is associated with poor health outcomes. Does anemia at discharge place patients at risk for hospital readmission within 30 days of discharge? Our objectives were to examine the prevalence and magnitude of anemia at hospital discharge and determine whether anemia at discharge was associated with 30-day readmissions among a cohort of hospitalizations in a single health care system. From January 1, 2009, to August 31, 2011, there were 152,757 eligible hospitalizations within a single health care system. The endpoint was any hospitalization within 30 days of discharge. The University HealthSystem Consortium's clinical database was used for demographics and comorbidities; hemoglobin values are from the hospitals' electronic medical records, and readmission status was obtained from the University HealthSystem Consortium administrative data systems. Mild anemia was defined as hemoglobin of greater than 11 to less than 12 g/dl in women and greater than 11 to less than 13 g/dl in men; moderate, greater than 9 to less than or equal to 11 g/dl; and severe, less than or equal to 9 g/dl. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of anemia and 30-day readmissions adjusted for demographics, comorbidity, and hospitalization type. Among 152,757 hospitalizations, 72% of patients were discharged with anemia: 31,903 (21%), mild; 52,971 (35%), moderate; and 25,522 (17%), severe. Discharge anemia was associated with severity-dependent increased odds for 30-day hospital readmission compared with those without anemia: for mild anemia, 1.74 (1.65-1.82); moderate anemia, 2.76 (2.64-2.89); and severe anemia, 3.47 (3.30-3.65), P < 0.001. Anemia at discharge is associated with a severity-dependent increased risk for 30-day readmission. A strategy focusing on anemia treatment care paths during index hospitalization offers an opportunity to influence subsequent readmissions.

  1. Characteristics of anemia in subclinical and overt hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Mehmet, Erdogan; Kösenli, Aybike; Aybike, Kosenli; Ganidagli, Sencer; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Mustafa, Kulaksizoglu

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones stimulate directly or indirectly growth of erythroid colonies through erythropoietin. Anemia is often the first sign of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can cause a wide variety of anemic disorders. Numerous mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of these anemias that can be microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic. We designed this study to investigate the anemia frequency and if present, etiology of anemia in hypothyroid patients. 100 patients with overt hypothyroid, 100 patients with subclinical hypothyroid, and 200 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Overt hypothyroidism diagnosis is done when elevated TSH and low levels of free T4 and/or free T3 have been observed. Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined as elevated serum TSH with normal free T(4) and free T(3) levels. Peripheral smears of the anemic patients were examined. Anemia prevalence was 43% in the overt hypothyroid group, 39% in the subclinical hypothyroid group, and 26% in the control group (p=0.0003 and p=0.021 respectively related to controls). Thus, the frequency of anemia in subclinical hypothyroidism is as high as that in overt hypothyroidism. There was no difference between the hypothyroid groups in terms of anemia. Vitamin B12, Fe, and folic acid were similar between these groups. According to our findings, anemia of chronic disease is the most common type of anemia in hypothyroid patients. Suspicion of hypothyroidism should be considered in anemias with uncertain etiology.

  2. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Martin, Alison; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of “anemia of unknown etiology” and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders. Methods This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient’s anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities. Conclusions We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology. PMID:27310832

  3. Fanconi anemia and the development of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, due to mutations in 16 genes, whose protein products collaborate in a DNA repair pathway. The major complications are aplastic anemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and specific solid tumors. A severe subset, due to mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2, has a cumulative incidence of cancer of 97% by age 7 years; the cancers are AML, brain tumors, and Wilms tumor; several patients have multiple events. Patients with the other genotypes (FANCA through FANCQ) have cumulative risks of more than 50% of marrow failure, 20% of AML, and 30% of solid tumors (usually head and neck or gynecologic squamous cell carcinoma), by age 40, and they too are at risk of multiple adverse events. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant may cure AML and MDS, and preemptive transplant may be appropriate, but its use is a complicated decision. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia After Partial Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, M. C.; McKenna, R. D.

    1967-01-01

    Although the mechanism for its development is not well understood, iron-deficiency anemia is a well-recognized consequence of partial gastrectomy. The reported incidence varies considerably, depending upon the criteria used to define anemia, and other factors. Rapid emptying of the gastric remnant, intestinal “hurry”, and borderline dietary-iron intake, with or without concomitant blood loss, produce malabsorption of some forms of iron that appears to be responsible for development of the deficiency. The diagnosis rests on hematological findings in the peripheral blood, the evaluation of iron stores, epithelial changes, and the response to adequate treatment. Oral iron therapy can be both effective and inexpensive and should form the mainstay of treatment. PMID:6019057

  5. Predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project.

    PubMed

    Wirth, James P; Woodruff, Bradley A; Engle-Stone, Reina; Namaste, Sorrel Ml; Temple, Victor J; Petry, Nicolai; Macdonald, Barbara; Suchdev, Parminder S; Rohner, Fabian; Aaron, Grant J

    2017-07-01

    Background: Anemia in women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15-49 y) remains a public health problem globally, and reducing anemia in women by 50% by 2025 is a goal of the World Health Assembly. Objective: We assessed the associations between anemia and multiple proximal risk factors (e.g., iron and vitamin A deficiencies, inflammation, malaria, and body mass index) and distal risk factors (e.g., education status, household sanitation and hygiene, and urban or rural residence) in nonpregnant WRA. Design: Cross-sectional, nationally representative data from 10 surveys ( n = 27,018) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and pooled by the infection burden and risk in the country. We examined the severity of anemia and measured the bivariate associations between anemia and factors at the country level and by infection burden, which we classified with the use of the national prevalences of malaria, HIV, schistosomiasis, sanitation, and water-quality indicators. Pooled multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for each infection-burden category to identify independent determinants of anemia (hemoglobin concertation <120 g/L). Results: Anemia prevalence was ∼40% in countries with a high infection burden and 12% and 7% in countries with moderate and low infection burdens, respectively. Iron deficiency was consistently associated with anemia in multivariate models, but the proportion of anemic women who were iron deficient was considerably lower in the high-infection group (35%) than in the moderate- and low-infection groups (65% and 71%, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, inflammation, vitamin A insufficiency, socioeconomic status, and age were also significantly associated with anemia, but malaria and vitamin B-12 and folate deficiencies were not. Conclusions: The contribution of iron deficiency to anemia varies according to a country's infection

  6. [Cardiac manifestations of sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Gacon, P H; Donatien, Y

    HEMOGLOBINS S AND C: Drepanocytosis, the occurrence of sickle cells (drepanocytes) in the blood, is an inherited condition. Electrophoresis demonstrates hemoglobin SS in homozygous subjects who present the typical clinical features of severe hemolytic sickle-cell anemia. Heterozygous subjects have sickle-cell anemia trait, an asymptomatic condition associated with a 50% hemoglobin S and 50% hemoglobin C at electrophoresis. Hemoglobin S and C are transmitted by Mendelian inheritance. CARDIAC DISORDERS: Well-known, cardiac disorders occur in more than 82% of homozygous subjects while only 2% of heterozygous subjects are affected. Heart murmur, radiological cardiomegaly, or eletrocardiographic anomalies are often the only signs. There is a risk of fatal heart failure in children and neonates. Acute rheumatic fever or infectious endocarditis, particularly due to pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae infection, may trigger heart failure. CARDIAC ANOMALIES: Patients with sickle-cell anemia can develop an "anemic heart" expressed by an elevated cardiac output and systemic ejection volume at rest and a fall in arteriolar peripheral resistance. Patients who develop cor pulmonae have an elevated pulmonary pressure at exercise and experience venous occlusive events with a progressive reduction in the pulmonary vascular bed and development of a left-right shunt. Myocardiopathy leads to left ventricular dysfunction contrasting with the dilated right heart seen at echocardiography and rare cases of transmural infarction.

  7. The cutting edge of aplastic anemia treatment.

    PubMed

    Obara, Naoshi

    2017-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a syndrome in which hematopoietic stem cells are decreased and bone marrow hypoplasia and pancytopenia are observed; it is considered as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Recently, it has been reported that gene mutations suggestive of clonal hematopoiesis are detected in approximately one third of the patients with aplastic anemia. Among treatment approaches other than hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) plus cyclosporin is a basic approach, although it has been shown that eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, is effective and that the recovery of hematopoiesis in three blood lineage is observed in some patients. Studies on the optimum dose of ATG are in progress. Regarding hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aplastic anemia, regimens are being designed in which cyclophosphamide as a pretreatment is reduced and fludarabine is instead used in combination for the reduction of cardiotoxicity. Because HLA haploidentical transplantation has been developed and its reports are increasing for patients who cannot find appropriate donors, transplantation may be possible in patients who had previously given up on it.

  8. Diagnosis and classification of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is a complex disorder consisting of hematological, gastric and immunological alterations. Diagnosis of PA relies on histologically proven atrophic body gastritis, peripheral blood examination showing megaloblastic anemia with hypersegmented neutrophils, cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor and to gastric parietal cells. Anti-parietal cell antibodies are found in 90% of patients with PA, but have low specificity and are seen in atrophic gastritis without megaloblastic anemia as well as in various autoimmune disorders. Anti-intrinsic factor antibodies are less sensitive, being found in only 60% of patients with PA, but are considered highly specific for PA. The incidence of PA increases with age and is rare in persons younger than 30 years of age. The highest prevalence is seen in Northern Europeans, especially those in the United Kingdom and Scandinavia, although PA has been reported in virtually every ethnic group. Because of the complexity of the diagnosis, PA prevalence is probably underestimated and no reliable data are available on the risk of gastric cancer as the end-stage evolution of atrophic gastritis in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Communicating about chemotherapy-induced anemia.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Brad; Blum, Diane; Cella, David; Hamilton, Heidi; Nail, Lillian; Waltzman, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Many validated instruments exist for determining the impact of chemotherapy-induced anemia and related fatigue on patient quality of life, but few studies analyze how healthcare providers actually discuss these subjects with patients. The authors share their study results on patterns of communication between participating patients and their physicians and allied health professionals. Letters of invitation were mailed to over 1,000 community-based oncologists, 15 of whom met the criteria and agreed to participate in this study on a first-enrolled basis until sufficient participation was ensured. In total, 36 of their patients were audio- and/or video-recorded during their regularly scheduled visits. Post-visit interviews were conducted separately with patients and participating healthcare professionals. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using sociolinguistic techniques. Although 52% of visit time was spent discussing side effects and symptoms, most discussions of anemia and fatigue lacked specificity necessary to determine their true impact on patients' lives. Physician inquiries regarding fatigue also tended to be too brief to elicit patients' chief concerns. Vocabulary used to discuss anemia and related fatigue was variable and imprecise, and no fatigue assessment instrument was used or referenced in any visit. Community-based oncologists are encouraged to modify their vocabulary and consider incorporating a validated fatigue instrument, either within or before the consultation, to improve the quality of such communication.

  10. [Anemia and limping in a vegetarian adolescent].

    PubMed

    Chiron, R; Dabadie, A; Gandemer-Delignieres, V; Balençon, M; Legall, E; Roussey, M

    2001-01-01

    A vegan diet in the child and adolescent can induce severe bone sequelae by rickets and osteomalacia and megaloblastic anemia by cobalamin deficiency. A 15-year-old adolescent was hospitalized because of lameness and pallor. The lameness was explained by femoral epiphysiolysis caused by rickets with severe hypocalcemia. The pallor, jaundice and splenomegalia were due to cobalamin-deficiency megaloblastic anemia. A prolonged supplemental diet with calcium, vitamins D and B12 as well as orthopedic treatment stabilized the bone lesions. The megaloblastic anemia was cured by parenteral cobalamin. The adolescent and his brother were victims of a diet imposed by a cult and a lack of care due to their parents refusing that a vegan diet was the cause of the deficient pathology. Penal proceedings led to the incarceration of the parents and to the placement of the children. Deficiencies in calcium and vitamins D and B12 may be severe in a child's development with a vegan diet. This case report reveals the social and legal problems of an inappropriate diet in infancy imposed by parents who are followers of a fundamentalist church. Beyond the management of children in cults, health professionals have to prevent, screen and supplement the deficient diet.

  11. Selenium deficiency in cattle associated with Heinz bodies and anemia.

    PubMed

    Morris, J G; Cripe, W S; Chapman, H L; Walker, D F; Armstrong, J B; Alexander, J D; Miranda, R; Sanchez, A; Sanchez, B; Blair-West, J R

    1984-02-03

    Cattle grazing St. Augustine grass growing on peaty muck soils in the Florida Everglades developed anemia associated with the presence of Heinz bodies and suboptimal concentrations of selenium in blood. Selenium supplementation corrected the anemia, prevented Heinz body formation, increased the body weight of cows and calves, and elevated blood selenium. This may be the first recorded example of widespread anemia in a population due to selenium deficiency.

  12. Oral human papillomavirus is common in individuals with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Sharon L; Wells, Susanne I; Zhang, Xue; Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Davies, Stella M; Myers, Kasiani C; Mueller, Robin; Panicker, Gitika; Unger, Elizabeth R; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Brown, Darron R; Mehta, Parinda A; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda

    2015-05-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disorder resulting in a loss of function of the Fanconi anemia-related DNA repair pathway. Individuals with Fanconi anemia are predisposed to some cancers, including oropharyngeal and gynecologic cancers, with known associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population. As individuals with Fanconi anemia respond poorly to chemotherapy and radiation, prevention of cancer is critical. To determine whether individuals with Fanconi anemia are particularly susceptible to oral HPV infection, we analyzed survey-based risk factor data and tested DNA isolated from oral rinses from 126 individuals with Fanconi anemia and 162 unaffected first-degree family members for 37 HPV types. Fourteen individuals (11.1%) with Fanconi anemia tested positive, significantly more (P = 0.003) than family members (2.5%). While HPV prevalence was even higher for sexually active individuals with Fanconi anemia (17.7% vs. 2.4% in family; P = 0.003), HPV positivity also tended to be higher in the sexually inactive (8.7% in Fanconi anemia vs. 2.9% in siblings). Indeed, having Fanconi anemia increased HPV positivity 4.9-fold (95% CI, 1.6-15.4) considering age and sexual experience, but did not differ by other potential risk factors. Our studies suggest that oral HPV is more common in individuals with Fanconi anemia. It will be essential to continue to explore associations between risk factors and immune dysfunction on HPV incidence and persistence over time. HPV vaccination should be emphasized in those with Fanconi anemia as a first step to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, although additional studies are needed to determine whether the level of protection it offers in this population is adequate. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Prevalence of Anemia in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Coopman, María F; Brito, Alex; López de Romaña, Daniel; Ríos-Castillo, Israel; Coris, Héctor; Olivares, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    In Latin America and the Caribbean, anemia has been a public health problem that affects mainly women of childbearing age and children under 6 years of age. However, the current prevalence of anemia in this region is unknown. To examine the latest available prevalence data on anemia in Latin America and the Caribbean. A systematic review was conducted in 2011 and updated in 2014. Studies determining the prevalence of anemia conducted in apparently healthy populations with national or regional representativeness were included in the review. The lowest prevalence rates of anemia among children under 6 years of age were found in Chile (4.0%), Costa Rica (4.0%), Argentina (7.6%), and Mexico (19.9%). In Nicaragua, Brazil, Ecuador, El Panama, and Honduras, anemia was a moderate public health problem, with prevalence ranging Salvador, Cuba, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Peru, from 20.1% to 37.3%. Anemia was a severe public health problem in Guatemala, Haiti, and Bolivia. The prevalence of anemia among women of childbearing age was lowest in Chile (5.1%). In Colombia, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Honduras, and Argentina, anemia was a mild public health problem, with prevalence ranging from 7.6% to 18.7%. In Guatemala, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and Bolivia, anemia was a moderate public health problem, with prevalence ranging from 21.4% to 38.3%. Panama and Haiti had the highest reported prevalence rates (40.0% and 45.5%, respectively), and anemia was considered a severe public health problem in those countries. Anemia remains a public health problem in children under 6 years of age and women of childbearing age in most Latin America and Caribbean countries for which data are available.

  14. Diagnosis of Fanconi anemia in patients with bone marrow failure

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Fernando O.; Leblanc, Thierry; Chamousset, Delphine; Le Roux, Gwenaelle; Brethon, Benoit; Cassinat, Bruno; Larghero, Jérôme; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Baruchel, André; Socié, Gérard; Gluckman, Eliane; Soulier, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with bone marrow failure and undiagnosed underlying Fanconi anemia may experience major toxicity if given standard-dose conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Due to clinical variability and/or potential emergence of genetic reversion with hematopoietic somatic mosaicism, a straightforward Fanconi anemia diagnosis can be difficult to make, and diagnostic strategies combining different assays in addition to classical breakage tests in blood may be needed. Design and Methods We evaluated Fanconi anemia diagnosis on blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts from a cohort of 87 bone marrow failure patients (55 children and 32 adults) with no obvious full clinical picture of Fanconi anemia, by performing a combination of chromosomal breakage tests, FANCD2-monoubiquitination assays, a new flow cytometry-based mitomycin C sensitivity test in fibroblasts, and, when Fanconi anemia was diagnosed, complementation group and mutation analyses. The mitomycin C sensitivity test in fibroblasts was validated on control Fanconi anemia and non-Fanconi anemia samples, including other chromosomal instability disorders. Results When this diagnosis strategy was applied to the cohort of bone marrow failure patients, 7 Fanconi anemia patients were found (3 children and 4 adults). Classical chromosomal breakage tests in blood detected 4, but analyses on fibroblasts were necessary to diagnose 3 more patients with hematopoietic somatic mosaicism. Importantly, Fanconi anemia was excluded in all the other patients who were fully evaluated. Conclusions In this large cohort of patients with bone marrow failure our results confirmed that when any clinical/biological suspicion of Fanconi anemia remains after chromosome breakage tests in blood, based on physical examination, history or inconclusive results, then further evaluation including fibroblast analysis should be made. For that purpose, the flow-based mitomycin C sensitivity test here described proved

  15. Anemia as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iseki, K; Kohagura, K

    2007-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and moreover, plays a role in the morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, infection, and cancer. Anemia develops during the early stages of CKD and is common in patients with ESRD. Anemia is an important cause of left ventricular hypertrophy and congestive heart failure. Correction of anemia by erthyropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) has been shown to improve survival in patients with congestive heart failure. Anemia is counted as one of the non-conventional risk factors associated with CKD. Hypoxia is one of the common mechanisms of CKD progression. Treatment by ESA is expected to improve quality of life, survival, and prevent the CKD progression. Several clinical studies have shown the beneficial effects of anemia correction on renal outcomes. However, recent prospective trials both in ESRD and in CKD stages 3 and 4 failed to confirm the beneficial effects of correcting anemia on survival. Similarly, treatment of other risk factors such as hyperlipidemia by statin showed no improvement in the survival of dialysis patients. Given the high prevalence of anemia in ESRD and untoward effects of anemia in CKD stages 3 and 4, appropriate and timely intervention on renal anemia using ESA is required for practicing nephrologists and others involved in the care of high-risk population. Lessons from the recent studies are to correct renal anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dl not hemoglobin > or =13 g/dl). Early intervention for renal anemia is a part of the treatment option in the prevention clinic. In this study, clinical significance of anemia management in patients with CKD is discussed.

  16. Fanconi anemia (cross)linked to DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J; Lalai, Astrid S; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2005-12-29

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and susceptibility to tumor formation. Despite the identification of numerous Fanconi anemia (FANC) genes, the mechanism by which proteins encoded by these genes protect a cell from DNA interstrand crosslinks remains unclear. The recent discovery of two DNA helicases that, when defective, cause Fanconi anemia tips the balance in favor of the direct involvement of the FANC proteins in DNA repair and the bypass of DNA lesions.

  17. Predictors of anemia among pregnant women in Westmoreland, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Alyson M.; Campbell-Stennett, Dianne; Yatich, Nelly; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2010-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is a worldwide problem, but it is most prevalent in the developing world. This research project was conducted to determine the predictors of anemia in pregnant women in Westmoreland, Jamaica. A cross-sectional study design was conducted and descriptive, bivariate, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Body mass index, Mid-upper arm circumference, and the number of antenatal care visits showed a statistically significant association with anemia. Based on the results, we believe that maintaining a healthy body weight, and frequently visiting an antenatal clinic, will help to lower the prevalence of anemia among pregnant women in Westmoreland. PMID:20526925

  18. Anemia among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cojulun, Alicia Chang; Bustinduy, Amaya L.; Sutherland, Laura J.; Mungai, Peter L.; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9–11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  19. Nutrient Intake and Anemia Risk in the WHI Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanaway, Jeffrey; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Snetselaar, Linda G.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Arendell, Leslie; Chen, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Background Nutritional anemia among post-menopausal women is preventable; recent data on prevalence are limited. Objective To investigate the association between nutrient intakes and anemia prevalence, in relation to both incidence and persistence, in a longitudinal sample of post-menopausal women. We hypothesized that anemia prevalence, incidence and persistence would be greater among women reporting lower intake of B12, folate and iron. Design Prospective cohort analysis. Participants/setting Observational Cohort of the Women’s Health Initiative(WHI-OS) including 93,676 postmenopausal women, age 50 to 79 years, were recruited across the United States at 40 clinical study sites. Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1998; data collection for these analyses continued through 2000. Main outcome measures Anemia was defined as a blood hemoglobin concentration of <12.0 mg/dL. Persistent anemia was defined as anemia present at each measurement time point. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire for iron, folate, B12, red meat and cold breakfast cereal; inadequacies were based on dietary reference intakes for women over age 50 years. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) were used to characterize the population demographics, anemia rates and diet. Unconditional logistic regression was used to investigate associations between diet and incident and persistent anemia. Associations are presented as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Anemia was identified in 3,979 women or 5.5% of the cohort. Inadequate intakes of multiple anemia-associated nutrients were less frequent in non-Hispanic whites (7.4%) than other race/ethnic groups (inadequacies demonstrated in 14.6 to 16.3% of sample). Age, body mass index and smoking were associated with anemia. Women with anemia reported lower intakes of energy, protein, folate, B12, iron, vitamin C and red meat. Multiple (more than a single nutrient) dietary deficiencies

  20. Risk factors of infant anemia in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Michio; Kusakawa, Isao; Ohde, Sachiko; Yamanaka, Michiko; Yoda, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Infants are at particular risk of iron-deficiency anemia. We investigated changes in the blood count of the mother and infant as well as the relationship between them and the relationship between infant nutrition method and infant anemia. This retrospective cohort study included healthy neonates born between August 2011 and July 2014 at St Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Data from maternal blood samples obtained during late pregnancy and those of infants obtained at birth and at the age of 3, 6, and 9 months were analyzed. Using multivariate logistic regression, we investigated nutrition methods, maternal anemia, and other clinically relevant parameters that were potential risk factors for infant anemia. In total, data for 3472 infants and their mothers were analyzed. Nutrition method was the most significant risk factor for infant anemia, with risk of future anemia decreasing in the following order: exclusive breast-feeding, partial breast-feeding, and formula feeding. Furthermore, low umbilical cord blood hemoglobin led to a tendency toward anemia in the child. Infant nutrition method was the most significant factor related to anemia in late infancy. Infants with low umbilical cord blood hemoglobin are more likely to develop anemia in late infancy. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40–49 years and 80–85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80–85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003–2004 to 2011–2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention. PMID:27846276

  2. Pharmacoepidemiology of anemia in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Kewalramani, Reshma; Rutstein, Mark; Gabardi, Steven; Vonvisger, Tania; Chandraker, Anil

    2004-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Anemia has long been known to be a complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and it has been linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although kidney transplant recipients (KTR) are prone to experiencing cardiovascular outcomes, little is known about the epidemiology of anemia in this population. With few exceptions, studies to date have not fully evaluated the associations between posttransplant anemia (PTA) and medications commonly used in KTR, particularly immunosuppressant drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB). The authors aimed to specifically investigate possible associations between these drugs and PTA. Detailed medical information was retrospectively collected on 374 consecutive KTR from our transplant clinic. Univariate/multivariate linear regression models were used to test for associations between hematocrit (HCT) and other covariates, and logistic regression models were used to detect independent predictors of PTA, defined as HCT <33%. The mean time since transplantation was 7.7 yr, and mean creatinine was 2.2 mg/dl. The prevalence of PTA was 28.6%. Ten percent of all patients were on erythropoietin therapy, but only 41.6% of patients whose HCT was <30 received this treatment. From multivariate analyses, the authors found that female gender and lower renal function were associated with lower HCT (both P < 0.001). Patients on ACEI had significantly lower HCT (P = 0.005) compared with patients without such treatment. In addition, a significant curvilinear dose-response relationship was found between ACEI dose and HCT. Among the immunosuppressant drugs, mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.05) and tacrolimus (P = 0.02) were associated with a lower HCT. The authors conclude that PTA is prevalent and undertreated in KTR. Several medications that are possibly modifiable correlates of PTR deserve further study.

  3. Hepatitis Associated Aplastic Anemia: A review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is an uncommon but distinct variant of aplastic anemia in which pancytopenia appears two to three months after an acute attack of hepatitis. HAAA occurs most frequently in young male children and is lethal if leave untreated. The etiology of this syndrome is proposed to be attributed to various hepatitis and non hepatitis viruses. Several hepatitis viruses such as HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV, HEV and HGV have been associated with this set of symptoms. Viruses other than the hepatitis viruses such as parvovirus B19, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein bar virus, Transfusion Transmitted virus (TTV) and non-A-E hepatitis virus (unknown viruses) has also been documented to develop the syndrome. Considerable evidences including the clinical features, severe imbalance of the T cell immune system and effective response to immunosuppressive therapy strongly present HAAA as an immune mediated mechanism. However, no association of HAAA has been found with blood transfusions, drugs and toxins. Besides hepatitis and non hepatitis viruses and immunopathogenesis phenomenon as causative agents of the disorder, telomerase mutation, a genetic factor has also been predisposed for the development of aplastic anemia. Diagnosis includes clinical manifestations, blood profiling, viral serological markers testing, immune functioning and bone marrow hypocellularity examination. Patients presenting the features of HAAA have been mostly treated with bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation from HLA matched donor, and if not available then by immunosuppressive therapy. New therapeutic approaches involve the administration of steroids especially the glucocorticoids to augment the immunosuppressive therapy response. Pancytopenia following an episode of acute hepatitis response better to hematopoietic cell transplantation than immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:21352606

  4. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  5. Craving and Chewing Ice: A Sign of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... constantly craving and chewing ice a sign of anemia? Answers from Rajiv K. Pruthi, M.B.B.S. Possibly. Doctors use the term " ... often associated with iron deficiency, with or without anemia, although the reason is unclear. At least one ...

  6. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  7. Iron deficiency anemia due to excessive green tea drinking.

    PubMed

    Fan, Frank S

    2016-11-01

    Tea interferes with iron absorption and can lead to iron deficiency anemia when consumed in large quantities. The rechallenge effect of green tea on anemia in a middle-aged man emphasizes the potential causal role of this beverage. Lifestyle and dietary habits are important diagnostic considerations in diseases of this type.

  8. Students with Sickle Cell Anemia Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Devlin, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The participation of a student with Sickle Cell Anemia in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with Sickle Cell Anemia and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially the definition,…

  9. Ineffective Erythropoiesis: Anemia and Iron Overload.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritama; Musallam, Khaled M; Taher, Ali T; Rivella, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    Stress erythropoiesis (SE) is characterized by an imbalance in erythroid proliferation and differentiation under increased demands of erythrocyte generation and tissue oxygenation. β-thalassemia represents a chronic state of SE, called ineffective erythropoiesis (IE), exhibiting an expansion of erythroid-progenitor pool and deposition of alpha chains on erythrocyte membranes, causing cell death and anemia. Concurrently, there is a decrease in hepcidin expression and a subsequent state of iron overload. There are substantial investigative efforts to target increased iron absorption under IE. There are also avenues for targeting cell contact and signaling within erythroblastic islands under SE, for therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Fanconi anemia: cellular and molecular features].

    PubMed

    Macé, G; Briot, D; Guervilly, J-H; Rosselli, F

    2007-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive human cancer prone syndrome featuring bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities and hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents exposure. 11 among 12 FA gene have been isolated. The biochemical functions of the FANC proteins remain poorly understood. Anyhow, to cope with DNA crosslinks a cell needs a functional FANC pathway. Moreover, the FANC proteins appear to be involved in cell protection against oxidative damage and in the control of TNF-alpha activity. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the FANC pathway and we present how it may be integrated in the complex networks of proteins involved in maintaining the cellular homeostasis.

  11. Anemia and iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Wilson; Modotti, Caue; Nonino, Carla Barbosa; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are changes often associated with obesity. Bariatric surgery is responsible for increasing the iron loss and reducing its absorption. The objective of this study was to evaluate anemia and iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery and to relate them to possible predisposing factors. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients submitted to open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in which clinical and laboratory data were obtained up to 48 months postoperatively. Patients were divided into groups according to the presence or absence of anemia and to the presence or absence of iron deficiency (even without anemia), and all data were compared between these groups. Preoperatively, 21.5% of patients had anemia and 20% had iron deficiency. The number of patients with anemia did not vary through the 4 years of the study, but ferritin levels significantly decreased with time (P<.01). Younger patients and patients with greater weight loss had a higher incidence of anemia. Female gender was a variable associated with a greater incidence of iron deficiency. Anemia and iron deficiency are frequent in obese patients and must be treated before surgery. Medical and nutritional surveillance is important in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery. Management of each condition must be directed at correcting the 2 major sources of iron deficiency and anemia: food intolerance (mostly meat intolerance) and losses (frequently due to menstruation). These are the factors more related to iron deficient anemia. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anemia and hemoglobin levels among Indigenous Xavante children, Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aline Alves; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Souza, July Anne Mendonça de; Welch, James R; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of anemia, mean hemoglobin levels, and the main nutritional, demographic, and socioeconomic factors among Xavante children in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. A survey was conducted with children under 10 years of age in two indigenous Xavante communities within the Pimentel Barbosa Indigenous Reserve. Hemoglobin concentration levels, anthropometric measurements, and socioeconomic/demographic data were collected by means of clinical measurements and structured interviews. The cut-off points recommended by the World Health Organization were used for anemia classification. Linear regression analyses with hemoglobin as the outcome and Poisson regression with robust variance and with the presence or absence of anemia as outcomes were performed (95%CI). Lower mean hemoglobin values were observed in children under 2 years of age, without a significant difference between sexes. Anemia was observed among 50.8% of children overall, with the highest prevalence among children under 2 years of age (77.8%). Age of the child was inversely associated with the occurrence of anemia (adjusted PR = 0.60; 95%CI 0.38-0.95) and mean hemoglobin values increased significantly with age. Greater height-for-age z-score values reduced the probability of having anemia by 1.8 times (adjusted PR = 0.59; 95%CI 0.34-1.00). Presence of another child with anemia within the household increased the probability of the occurrence of anemia by 52.9% (adjusted PR = 1.89; 95%CI 1.16-3.09). Elevated levels of anemia among Xavante children reveal a disparity between this Indigenous population and the national Brazilian population. Results suggest that anemia is determined by complex and variable relationships between socioeconomic, sociodemographic, and biological factors.

  13. Socio-economic and demographic determinants of childhood anemia.

    PubMed

    Goswmai, Sankar; Das, Kishore K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate socio-economic and demographic determinants of anemia among Indian children aged 6-59 months. Statistical analysis was performed on the cross-sectional weighted sample of 40,885 children from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey by using multinomial logistic regression to assess the significance of some risk factors in different degrees of child anemia. Anemia was diagnosed by World Health Organization (WHO) cut-off points on hemoglobin level. Pearson's chi-squared test was applied to justify the associations of anemia with different categories of the study population. The prevalence of anemia was 69.5%; 26.2% mild, 40.4% moderate, and 2.9% severe anemia. Overall prevalence rate, along with mild and moderate cases, showed an increasing trend up to 2 years of age and then decreased. Rural children had a higher prevalence rate. Of 28 Indian states in the study, 10 states showed very high prevalence, the highest being Bihar (77.9%). Higher birth order, high index of poverty, low level of maternal education, mother's anemia, non-intake of iron supplements during pregnancy, and vegetarian mother increased the risks of all types of anemia among children (p<0.05). Christian population was at lower risk; and Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, and Other Backward Class categories were at higher risk of anemia. The results suggest a need for proper planning and implementation of preventive measures to combat child anemia. Economically under-privileged groups, maternal nutrition and education, and birth control measures should be priorities in the programs. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors associated with anemia in refugee children.

    PubMed

    Hassan, K; Sullivan, K M; Yip, R; Woodruff, B A

    1997-11-01

    A nutrition survey was performed in 1990 among children 6 through 35 mo of age living in Palestinian refugee camps in Syria, Jordan, the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Lebanon. Overall, 67% [95% confidence interval (CI): 66, 68] were anemic (hemoglobin <110 g/L), ranging from 54% in the West Bank to 75% in Syria. The following factors were significantly associated with anemia in one or more of three age groups (6-11.9, 12-23.9 and 24-35.9 mo) by logistic regression: living in Syria, Lebanon, or Gaza [with prevalence odds ratios (POR) in the range of 1.4-2.6 depending on the age group and area, relative to children living in Jordan]; never having been breast-fed (POR = 1.7); male sex (POR = 1.2); maternal illiteracy (POR = 1.4 relative to those with >/=6 y of education); having a recent (within 2 wk) or current episode of fever or diarrhea; and stunting. Recent or current illness and stunting interacted in two age groups with the general trend of stunted children with recent or current illness having high POR. Early childhood anemia is associated with factors reflecting poor socioeconomic status and recent diarrheal and febrile illnesses in Palestinian refugee camps.

  15. Fanconi anemia founder mutation in Macedonian patients.

    PubMed

    Madjunkova, Svetlana; Kocheva, Svetlana A; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) and profound cancer predisposition. Approximately 65% of all affected individuals have mutation in the FANCA (Fanconi anemia complementation group A) gene. The mutation spectrum of the FANCA gene is highly heterogeneous. FA-A is usually associated with private FANCA mutations in individual families. We describe 3 unrelated patients with FA with a similar clinical presentation: BMF, renal anomalies and café-au-lait pigmentation without major skeletal abnormality. The molecular analysis of the FANCA gene using the FA MLPA kit P031-A2/P032 FANCA, showed homozygous deletion of exon 3 in all 3 patients. Molecular analysis of the flanking regions of exon 3 precisely defined unique deletion of 2,040 bp and duplication of C (1788_3828dupC). These are the first 3 patients homozygous for deletion of FANCA exon 3 described to date. Although not related, the patients originated from the same Gypsy-like ethnic population. We conclude that c.190-256_283 + 1680del2040 dupC mutation in the FANCA gene is a founder mutation in Macedonian FA patients of Gypsy-like ethnic origin. Our finding has very strong implications for these patients in formulating diagnostic and carrier-screening strategy for BMF and FA and to enable comprehensive genetic counseling. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Clark, Susan F

    2009-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) still remains universally problematic worldwide. The primary focus of this review is to critique articles published over the past 18 months that describe strategies for the diagnosis and management of this prevalent condition. The medical community continues to lack consensus when identifying the optimal approach for the diagnosis and management of IDA. Current diagnostic recommendations revolve around the validity and practicality of current biomarkers such as soluble transferrin-receptor concentrations and others, and cause-based diagnostics that potentially include endoscopy. Management of IDA is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment. Advances in oral and parenteral low-molecular-weight iron preparations has expanded and improved treatment modalities for IDA. Since the introduction of low versus high-molecular-weight intravenous iron administration, there have been fewer serious adverse events associated with parenteral iron preparations. Best practice guidelines for diagnosing and managing IDA should include the design of an algorithm that is inclusive of multiple biomarkers and cause-based diagnostics, which will provide direction in managing IDA, and distinguish between IDA from the anemia of chronic disease.

  17. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  18. Anemia of prematurity: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Shannon, K M

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) is of interest to pediatric hematologists and neonatologists because it may prove to be an effective alternative to blood transfusions in preventing and treating anemia in premature infants. The anemia of prematurity is the most promising setting for initial clinical trials. However, it is conceivable that recombinant erythropoietin will be given at birth to low-birth-weight infants in an effort to stimulate endogenous erythropoiesis and thereby prevent some of the erythrocyte transfusions required to replace blood sampled for laboratory tests. Beyond its appeal as a therapeutic alternative to red blood cell transfusions, recombinant human erythropoietin is likely to be the first member of an entirely new class of drugs to be used widely in neonatal medicine. These are drugs produced by cloning normal human genes and expressing them in the laboratory. Because many of the problems of premature birth are caused by developmental immaturity, transiently replacing crucial proteins with exact copies produced by the techniques of recombinant DNA technology is an approach that may have a major impact on morbidity and mortality of neonates. Carefully designed, controlled clinical trials will be essential to determine the role of new agents like r-HuEPO in the treatment of medical problems of premature infants.

  19. ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY: IMPACT ON WEIGHT AND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANEMIA IN NEWBORN.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Solange Augusta; Willner, Erica; Duraes Pereira, Tatiane Aguiar; de Souza, Vanessa Rosse; Teles Boaventura, Gilson; Blondet de Azeredo, Vilma

    2015-11-01

    nutritional deficiencies are still a common problem during pregnancy causing anemia. Gestational anemia is still considered a public health problem in Brazil, because it is hazardous to both mother and fetus, and is associated with increased risk of maternal-fetal morbidity, as well as the nutritional status of child. to evaluate the frequency of maternal gestational anemia in newborns and its relation to the nutritional status of the child at birth. anthropometric data of pregnant women and their newborns were obtained. Blood was collected from pregnant women and the umbilical cord of newborns for analysis of hemoglobin, hematocrit, RDW, iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation index in automatic devices. The results are presented such as the arithmetic mean and the standard deviation. GraphPadinStat Software version 3.0 was used, with a maximum significance level of 5%. the frequency of maternal anemia was 53.7%, and 32.6% in newborns. Half the newborns were anemic children of anemic mothers. 79.3% of the anemic pregnant women had mild anemia and in 20.7% moderate. The average concentration of hemoglobin and hematocrit was lower in anemic pregnant women (9.7 ± 0.9 g/dL and 29.8 ± 3.2%) compared with non-anemic (11.9 ± 0.7 g/ dL and 36.5 ± 2.7%). The maternal iron was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.3889, p = 0.01) from umbilical cord blood. The newborns' weight, length and head circumference of anemic mothers were 3 375.9 ± 506,9 g, 51.2 ± 1.7 cm and 34.5 ± 1.5 cm, respectively, while of nonanemic mothers were 3 300.2 ± 458,4 g, 50.3 ± 2.0 cm and 34.2 ± 2.0 cm, respectively. There were no significant correlations between maternal hemoglobin, iron and ferritin with weight, length and head circumference of newborns. the results of this study show that maternal iron deficiency anemia (mild to moderate) can affect the blood profile and iron concentrations in umbilical cord blood of newborns, but without interfering with the child

  20. Management of Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhruvan; Trivedi, Chinmay; Khan, Nabeel

    2018-03-01

    Anemia is the most common complication as well as an extra intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is associated with a significant impact on patient's quality of life (QoL); as well it represents a common cause of frequent hospitalization, delay of hospital inpatient discharge and overall increased healthcare burden. In spite of all these, anemia is still often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Our aim in this review is to provide a pathway for physicians to help them achieve early diagnosis as well as timely and appropriate treatment of anemia which in turn would hopefully reduce the prevalence and subsequent complications of this condition among IBD patients. The etiology of anemia among IBD patients is most commonly due to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) followed by anemia of chronic disease. Despite this, more than a third of anemic ulcerative colitis (UC) patients are not tested for IDA and among those tested and diagnosed with IDA, a quarter are not treated with iron replacement therapy. A new algorithm has been validated to predict who will develop moderate to severe anemia at the time of UC diagnosis. While oral iron is effective for the treatment of mild iron deficiency-related anemia, the absorption of iron is influenced by chronic inflammatory states as a consequence of the presence of elevated levels of hepcidin. Also, it is important to recognize that ferritin is elevated in chronic inflammatory states and among patients with active IBD, ferritin levels less than 100 are considered to be diagnostic of iron deficiency. Newer formulations of intra-venous (IV) iron have a good safety profile and can be used for replenishment of iron stores and prevention of iron deficiency in the future. Routine screening for anemia is important among patients with IBD. The cornerstone for the accurate management of anemia in IBD patients lies in accurately diagnosing the type of anemia. All IBD patients with IDA should be considered appropriate for

  1. Metal bioaccumulation pattern by Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) in the Mar Menor coastal lagoon (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Vera, Ana; García, Gregorio; García-Sánchez, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems highly vulnerable to human impacts because of their situation between terrestrial and marine environment. Mar Menor coastal lagoon is one of the largest lagoons of the Mediterranean Sea, placed in SE Spain and subjected to major human impacts, in particular the mining of metal sulphides. As a consequence, metal concentration in water column and sediments of this ecosystem is usually higher than in other areas. For monitoring ecosystem health, the present study has assessed the ability of Cotylorhiza tuberculata for bioaccumulating metals from sea water. Up to 65 individuals were sampled at 8 different sampling stations during the summer of 2012. Although the concentration values for different elements considered were moderate (Pb: 0.04-29.50 ppm, Zn: 2.27-93.44 ppm, Cd: 0-0.67 ppm, As: 0.56-130.31 ppm) by dry weight of the jellyfish tissues (bell and oral arms combined), bioconcentration levels in relation to seawater metal concentration were extremely high. In any case, the use or disposal of these organisms should consider their metal content because of their potential environmental and health implications.

  2. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  3. Prevalence of anemia in First Nations children of northwestern Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, E. A.; Caulfield, L. E.; Harris, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among First Nations children of northwestern Ontario. DESIGN: Retrospective review of all hemoglobin determinations between 1990 and 1992 in the Sioux Lookout Zone. SETTING: The Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital, a secondary care referral hospital for 28 remote First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario, affiliated with the University of Toronto's Sioux Lookout Program. PARTICIPANTS: All First Nations children age 3 to 60 months who had produced venipuncture or fingerprick blood samples between 1990 and 1992 (614 children had a total of 1223 hemoglobin determinations). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of anemia by age, sex, geographical location, and diagnosis. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin value less than 110g/L. RESULTS: Prevalence of anemia peaked in the age range of 6 to 24 months with prevalence rates of 51.7% to 79.3%. Conditions most commonly associated with anemia were respiratory tract infections. Children living in communities in the western part of the Sioux Lookout Zone were 1.64 times more likely to have anemia (95% confidence interval 1.15, 2.35) than children in the other communities. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia appears to be a serious public health problem among preschool children in the Sioux Lookout Zone. PMID:9111982

  4. Iron status, iron supplementation and anemia in pregnancy: ethnic differences.

    PubMed

    Baraka, M A; Steurbaut, S; Laubach, M; Coomans, D; Dupont, A G

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the anemia prevalence during pregnancy and the use of and response to iron supplementation in a multi-ethnic population as well as the possible association between anemia and birth outcomes (pregnancy duration, birth weight). Cross-sectional study conducted in a university hospital (Brussels, Belgium) in 341 women. Hemoglobin, ferritin and iron prescription data were extracted from the patients' electronic dossiers; a questionnaire was used to assess iron intake during pregnancy. Anemia prevalence was higher during the 3rd trimester (24.3%) than in the 1st trimester (6.2%). Arab/Turkish women had a higher prevalence of anemia (9.1%) in the 1st trimester compared to Western women (2.4%; p = 0.044). The frequency of iron prescription was significantly higher among Arab/Turkish (43.7%) compared to Western women (27.9%; p = 0.006). A significantly lower mean birth weight was found among women presenting with anemia in the 1st trimester (3166 g) compared to non anemic women (3442 g; p = 0.036) but no significant difference was detected in mean pregnancy duration between both groups (p = 0.804). Anemia was more prevalent among Arab/Turkish women in spite of receiving more iron prescriptions than Western women. Efficient iron therapy and intensive follow-up are warranted to decrease the anemia prevalence during pregnancy, especially among non-Western women.

  5. [Iron deficiency and pernicious anemia: a rare association?].

    PubMed

    Zulfiqar, Abrar-Ahmad; Dramé, Moustapha; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Novella, Jean-Luc; Vogel, Thomas; Andres, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency among patients with pernicious anemia. We realized a retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 including 55 patients suffering from pernicious anemia who were followed in Reims and Strasbourg university hospitals. Inclusion criteria were histological diagnosis of immune atrophic fundic gastritis and criteria of gastric autoimmuninty, and for which ferritin was measured. Iron deficiency is defined as serum ferritin level <20 μg/L in women and <30 μg/L in men. 45 (81.8%) patients were female. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years (range: 25/98).There was anemia in 32 patients (58.2%). Macrocytosis was noted, with or without anemia, in 30 patients (54.5%); microcytosis, with or without anemia, was noted in 8 (14.5%) patients. 17 patients (30.9%) had normal mean corpuscular volume. Vitamin B12 deficiency was objectived in 42 patients (76.4%) in our series. 16 patients (29%) had iron deficiency. 14 patients were female. They were significantly younger than female subjects without iron deficiency (p =0.004). In conclusion, iron deficiency is not rare in patients with pernicious anemia. It could be a complication of achlorhydria. We suggest a dosage of serum ferritin for all patients with pernicious anemia.

  6. [Pernicious anemia: diagnosis and course in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Koulidiati, J; Sawadogo, S; Sagna, Y; Somda, K S; Tieno, H; Kafando, E; Drabo, Y J

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer disease or anemia, Addison or Addisonian anemia, and Addison-Biermer anemia) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis responsible for vitamin B12 malabsorption due to a deficiency of intrinsic factor. We report eight cases of pernicious anemia in Burkina Faso, collected over a 44-month period. The three criteria for diagnosis of pernicious anemia were: vitamin B12 deficiency, gastric disease (gastric histology) with presence of anti-intrinsic factor, and/or anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies in serum. All patients had anemia, with a mean hemoglobin level of 8.75 g/100 mL. The average mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was 122.1 fL the average mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) 39.3 pg, the mean reticulocyte count 12.069 10(9)/L reticulocytes, and the mean rate of megaloblast marrow cells 17.2%. The serum vitamin B12 level ranged from 35 to 71 pmol/L. Antibodies against intrinsic factor were found in all eight patients. All ABO blood groups were present with a predominance (4 cases) of group O. Endoscopy found a normal fundic mucosa in three patients. Histology showed gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia for six patients (85.7%). Under B12 vitamin therapy, the course was favorable in all patients; seven patients also had 10 days of iron therapy. We recommend a gastric biopsy even in the absence of macroscopic gastric lesions on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  7. Predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Bradley A; Petry, Nicolai; Macdonald, Barbara; Aaron, Grant J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anemia in women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15–49 y) remains a public health problem globally, and reducing anemia in women by 50% by 2025 is a goal of the World Health Assembly. Objective: We assessed the associations between anemia and multiple proximal risk factors (e.g., iron and vitamin A deficiencies, inflammation, malaria, and body mass index) and distal risk factors (e.g., education status, household sanitation and hygiene, and urban or rural residence) in nonpregnant WRA. Design: Cross-sectional, nationally representative data from 10 surveys (n = 27,018) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and pooled by the infection burden and risk in the country. We examined the severity of anemia and measured the bivariate associations between anemia and factors at the country level and by infection burden, which we classified with the use of the national prevalences of malaria, HIV, schistosomiasis, sanitation, and water-quality indicators. Pooled multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for each infection-burden category to identify independent determinants of anemia (hemoglobin concertation <120 g/L). Results: Anemia prevalence was ∼40% in countries with a high infection burden and 12% and 7% in countries with moderate and low infection burdens, respectively. Iron deficiency was consistently associated with anemia in multivariate models, but the proportion of anemic women who were iron deficient was considerably lower in the high-infection group (35%) than in the moderate- and low-infection groups (65% and 71%, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, inflammation, vitamin A insufficiency, socioeconomic status, and age were also significantly associated with anemia, but malaria and vitamin B-12 and folate deficiencies were not. Conclusions: The contribution of iron deficiency to anemia varies according to a country’s infection

  8. Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Bryder, David; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2012-09-13

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by a functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding for ribosomal proteins. Recently, a case study reported a patient who became transfusion-independent in response to treatment with the amino acid L-leucine. Therefore, we have validated the therapeutic effect of L-leucine using our recently generated mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA. Administration of L-leucine significantly improved the anemia in Rps19-deficient mice (19% improvement in hemoglobin concentration; 18% increase in the number of erythrocytes), increased the bone marrow cellularity, and alleviated stress hematopoiesis. Furthermore, the therapeutic response to L-leucine appeared specific for Rps19-deficient hematopoiesis and was associated with down-regulation of p53 activity. Our study supports the rationale for clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA.

  9. [Prevalence and risk factors for anemia in Southern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Neuman, N A; Tanaka, O Y; Szarfarc, S C; Guimarães, P R; Victora, C G

    2000-02-01

    To measure the prevalence and evaluate the risk factors of anemia. Cross sectional populational based study of the urban area of Criciuma town, in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil. The study population was a probabilistic sample of 476 children aged under three years. The prevalence of anemia found in the sample was 60.4% for children aged 0 to 35.9 months according to the Brault-Dubuc criteria and 54% for children aged 6 to 35.9 months according to the OMS criteria. The prevalence of anemia increases with age up to 18 months-old and then decreases. It is less prevalent in families where the father has a higher education level and where there is a higher total family income. Nevertheless, even within the 25% higher income group 40% of the children are anemic. The prevalence of anemia is higher among children living in unfinished and overcrowded houses, where the toilet is not equipped with flush, and among children who have two or more older brothers. It is also higher among teenager mothers (<20 years), and 35 years old or older mothers. The prevalence of anemia is lower among women who had 5 to 9 prenatal visits during pregnancy. Low weight at birth was associated with iron deficiency. The nutritional condition was associated with anemia only according to weight/age criteria. Hospitalizations in the last 12 months were not associated with the disease. In the hierarchical multivariate analysis children age, family income, and crowded house were the only significant variables. Reproductive health history, health service visits, birth weight, breast-feeding, anthropometry, and morbidity did not characterize a risk factor of anemia in the multivariate analysis. The study makes it evident that social inequality is a strong determinant of anemia. The risk imposed by anemia to children in regard to their health and intellectual development requires immediate action.

  10. The effect of automated alerts on preoperative anemia management.

    PubMed

    Dilla, Andrew; Wisniewski, Mary Kay; Waters, Jonathan H; Triulzi, Darrell J; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the role of an automated anemia notification system that alerted providers about anemic pre-operative patients. After scheduling surgery, the alert program continuously searched the patient's laboratory data for hemoglobin value(s) in the medical record. When an anemic patient according to the World Health Oganization's criteria was identified, an email was sent to the patient's surgeon, and/or assistant, and/or patient's primary care physician suggesting that the anemia be managed before surgery. Thirteen surgeons participated in this pilot study. In 11 months, there were 70 pre-surgery anemia alerts generated on 69 patients. The surgeries were 60 orthopedic, 7 thoracic, 2 general surgery, and 1 urological. The alerts were sent 15 ± 10 days before surgery. No pre-operative anemia treatment could be found in 37 of 69 (54%) patients. Some form of anemia management was found in 32 of 69 (46%) patients. Of the 23 patients who received iron, only 3 of 23 (13%) of these patients started iron shortly after the alert was generated. The alert likely resulted in the postponement of one surgery for anemia correction. Although anemia diagnosis and management can be complex, it was hoped that receipt of the alert would lead to the management of all anemic patients. Alerts are only effective if they are received and read by a healthcare provider empowered to treat the patient or to make an appropriate referral. Automated preoperative alerts alone are not likely to alter surgeons' anemia management practices. These alerts need to be part of a comprehensive anemia management strategy.

  11. Iron deficiency, anemia, and mortality in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Eisenga, Michele F; Minović, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2016-11-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality in RTR. Cox regression analyses were used to investigate prospective associations. In 700 RTR, prevalences of anemia, IDA, and ID were 34%, 13%, and 30%, respectively. During follow-up for 3.1 (2.7-3.9) years, 81 (12%) RTR died. In univariable analysis, anemia [HR, 1.72 (95%CI: 1.11-2.66), P = 0.02], IDA [2.44 (1.48-4.01), P < 0.001], and ID [2.04 (1.31-3.16), P = 0.001] were all associated with all-cause mortality. In multivariable analysis, the association of anemia with mortality became weaker after adjustment for ID [1.52 (0.97-2.39), P = 0.07] and disappeared after adjustment for proteinuria and eGFR [1.09 (0.67-1.78), P = 0.73]. The association of IDA with mortality attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders. In contrast, the association of ID with mortality remained independent of potential confounders, including anemia [1.77 (1.13-2.78), P = 0.01]. In conclusion, ID is highly prevalent among RTR and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of anemia. As ID is a modifiable factor, correction of ID could be a target to improve survival. © 2016 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  12. The relationship of aplastic anemia and PNH.

    PubMed

    Young, Neal S; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Sloand, Elaine; Chen, Guiben; Zeng, Weihua; Risitano, Antonio; Miyazato, Akira

    2002-08-01

    Bone marrow failure has been regarded as one of the triad of clinical manifestations of paroxysmal noctumal hemoglobinuria (PNH), and PNH in turn has been described as a late clonal disease evolving in patients recovering from aplastic anemia. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of both diseases and improved tests for cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins has radically altered this view. Flow cytometry of granulocytes shows evidence of an expanded PNH clone in a large proportion of marrow failure patients at the time of presentation: in our large NIH series, about 1/3 of over 200 aplastic anemia cases and almost 20% of more than 100 myelodysplasia cases. Clonal PNH expansion (rather than bone marrow failure) is strongly linked to the histocompatability antigen HLA.-DR2 in all clinical varieties of the disease, suggesting an immune component to its pathophysiology. An extrinsic mechanism of clonal expansion is also more consistent with knock-out mouse models and culture experiments with primary cells and cell lines, which have failed to demonstrate an intrinsic proliferative advantage for PNH cells. DNA chip analysis of multiple paired normal and PIG-A mutant cell lines and lymphoblastoid cells do not show any consistent differences in levels of gene expression. In aplastic anemia/PNH there is surprisingly limited utilization of the V-beta chain of the T cell receptor, and patients' dominant T cell clones, which are functionally inhibitory of autologous hematopoiesis, use identical CDR3 regions for antigen binding. Phenotypically normal cells from PNH patients proliferate more poorly in culture than do the same patient's PNH cells, and the normal cells are damaged as a result of apoptosis and overexpress Fas. Differences in protein degradation might play a dual role in pathophysiology, as GPI-linked proteins lacking an anchor would be predicted to be processed by the proteasome machinery and displayed in a class I H.A. context, in

  13. The ecology of anemia: Anemia prevalence and correlated factors in adult indigenous women in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Laura G; Valeggia, Claudia

    2017-05-06

    The Toba/Qom of Namqom are an indigenous community native to the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina. Historically seminomadic foragers, the diet of peri-urban community members has rapidly changed from high-protein, high-fiber to hypercaloric, processed. This study aims to understand the impact of this nutritional transition on aspects of women's health by exploring the relationship between prevalence of anemia and current diet composition, place of birth, and reproductive history. We measured the capillary hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 153 adult women. Each participant was also given two interviews characterizing reproductive history and a 24-hour food recall. The average Hb level was 12.6 g/dL (range 5.8-15.7 g/dL). In our sample, 28% of participants were anemic and 31% were borderline anemic. Iron and vitamin C consumption were negatively associated with Hb levels. Body mass index was marginally associated with Hb levels. Being born in a peri-urban setting, a proxy for early Westernized diet was associated with higher risk of anemia, suggesting developmental experience may play a role. Pregnant and lactating women had lower Hb levels than menstruating and menopausal women. Age, height, parity, and age at first pregnancy were not found to be statistically significant predictors of anemia. Iron deficiency represents a serious health concern for women, particularly pregnant ones. Our results suggest that both past and current nutritional ecology variables may be associated with the risk of anemia. These findings inform public health interventions, since reproductive history may be more difficult to modify than current diet. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 in Aplastic Anemia, Fanconi Anemia and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Wassenhove, Lauren D.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Weinberg, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment depends on the ability to metabolize exogenously and endogenously generated toxins, and to repair cellular damage caused by such toxins. Reactive aldehydes have been demonstrated to cause specific genotoxic injury, namely DNA interstrand cross-links. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of a 19 isoenzyme ALDH family with different substrate specificities, subcellular localization, and patterns of expression. ALDH2 is localized in mitochondria and is essential for the metabolism of acetaldehyde, thereby placing it directly downstream of ethanol metabolism. Deficiency in ALDH2 expression and function are caused by a single nucleotide substitution and resulting amino acid change, called ALDH2*2. This genetic polymorphism affects 35–45% of East Asians (about ~560 million people), and causes the well-known Asian flushing syndrome, which results in disulfiram-like reactions after ethanol consumption. Recently, the ALDH2*2 genotype has been found to be associated with marrow failure, with both an increased risk of sporadic aplastic anemia and more rapid progression of Fanconi Anemia. This review discusses the unexpected interrelationship between aldehydes, ALDH2 and hematopoietic stem cell biology, and in particular its relationship to Fanconi anemia. PMID:27650066

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenhove, Lauren D; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment depends on the ability to metabolize exogenously and endogenously generated toxins, and to repair cellular damage caused by such toxins. Reactive aldehydes have been demonstrated to cause specific genotoxic injury, namely DNA interstrand cross-links. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of a 19 isoenzyme ALDH family with different substrate specificities, subcellular localization, and patterns of expression. ALDH2 is localized in mitochondria and is essential for the metabolism of acetaldehyde, thereby placing it directly downstream of ethanol metabolism. Deficiency in ALDH2 expression and function are caused by a single nucleotide substitution and resulting amino acid change, called ALDH2*2. This genetic polymorphism affects 35-45% of East Asians (about ~560 million people), and causes the well-known Asian flushing syndrome, which results in disulfiram-like reactions after ethanol consumption. Recently, the ALDH2*2 genotype has been found to be associated with marrow failure, with both an increased risk of sporadic aplastic anemia and more rapid progression of Fanconi anemia. This review discusses the unexpected interrelationship between aldehydes, ALDH2 and hematopoietic stem cell biology, and in particular its relationship to Fanconi anemia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Busca de estruturas em grandes escalas em altos redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, N. V.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Cypriano, E.

    2003-08-01

    A busca por estruturas em grandes escalas (aglomerados de galáxias, por exemplo) é um ativo tópico de pesquisas hoje em dia, pois a detecção de um único aglomerado em altos redshifts pode por vínculos fortes sobre os modelos cosmológicos. Neste projeto estamos fazendo uma busca de estruturas distantes em campos contendo pares de quasares próximos entre si em z Â3 0.9. Os pares de quasares foram extraídos do catálogo de Véron-Cetty & Véron (2001) e estão sendo observados com os telescópios: 2,2m da University of Hawaii (UH), 2,5m do Observatório de Las Campanas e com o GEMINI. Apresentamos aqui a análise preliminar de um par de quasares observado nos filtros i'(7800 Å) e z'(9500 Å) com o GEMINI. A cor (i'-z') mostrou-se útil para detectar objetos "early-type" em redshifts menores que 1.1. No estudo do par 131046+0006/J131055+0008, com redshift ~ 0.9, o uso deste método possibilitou a detecção de sete objetos candidatos a galáxias "early-type". Num mapa da distribuição projetada dos objetos para 22 < i' < 25 observou-se que estas galáxias estão localizadas próximas a um dos quasares e há indícios de que estejam aglomeradas dentro de um área de ~ 6 arcmin2. Se esse for o caso, estes objetos seriam membros de uma estrutura em grande escala. Um outro argumento em favor dessa hipótese é que eles obedecem uma relação do tipo Kormendy (raio equivalente X brilho superficial dentro desse raio), como a apresentada pelas galáxias elípticas em z = 0.

  17. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  18. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  19. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. TNF-α signaling in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Pang, Qishen

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and the acute phase reaction. Dysregulation of TNF production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA). FA is a genomic instability syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The patients with FA are often found overproducing TNF-α, which may directly affect hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function by impairing HSC survival, homing and proliferation, or indirectly change the bone marrow microenvironment critical for HSC homeostasis and function, therefore contribute to disease progression in FA. In this brief review, we discuss the link between TNF-α signaling and FA pathway with emphasis on the implication of inflammation in the pathophysiology and abnormal hematopoiesis in FA. PMID:23890415

  1. TNF-α signaling in Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Pang, Qishen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and the acute phase reaction. Dysregulation of TNF production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA). FA is a genomic instability syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The patients with FA are often found overproducing TNF-α, which may directly affect hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function by impairing HSC survival, homing and proliferation, or indirectly change the bone marrow microenvironment critical for HSC homeostasis and function, therefore contributing to disease progression in FA. In this brief review, we discuss the link between TNF-α signaling and FA pathway with emphasis on the implication of inflammation in the pathophysiology and abnormal hematopoiesis in FA. © 2013.

  2. Ubiquitylation and the Fanconi Anemia Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Elizabeth; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway maintains genome stability through co-ordination of DNA repair of interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Disruption of the FA pathway yields hypersensitivity to interstrand crosslinking agents, bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition. Early steps in DNA damage dependent activation of the pathway are governed by monoubiquitylation of FANCD2 and FANCI by the intrinsic FA E3 ubiquitin ligase, FANCL. Downstream FA pathway components and associated factors such as FAN1 and SLX4 exhibit ubiquitin-binding motifs that are important for their DNA repair function, underscoring the importance of ubiquitylation in FA pathway mediated repair. Importantly, ubiquitylation provides the foundations for cross-talk between repair pathways, which in concert with the FA pathway, resolve interstrand crosslink damage and maintain genomic stability. PMID:21605559

  3. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia: Chromosomal Breakage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oostra, Anneke B.; Nieuwint, Aggie W. M.; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited syndrome with diverse clinical symptoms including developmental defects, short stature, bone marrow failure, and a high risk of malignancies. Fifteen genetic subtypes have been distinguished so far. The mode of inheritance for all subtypes is autosomal recessive, except for FA-B, which is X-linked. Cells derived from FA patients are—by definition—hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C, diepoxybutane, or cisplatinum, which becomes manifest as excessive growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and chromosomal breakage upon cellular exposure to these drugs. Here we provide a detailed laboratory protocol for the accurate assessment of the FA diagnosis as based on mitomycin C-induced chromosomal breakage analysis in whole-blood cultures. The method also enables a quantitative estimate of the degree of mosaicism in the lymphocyte compartment of the patient. PMID:22693659

  4. How I treat acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive biologics and drugs, and supportive care. However, management of SAA patients remains challenging, both acutely in addressing the immediate consequences of pancytopenia and in the long term because of the disease's natural history and the consequences of therapy. Recent insights into pathophysiology have practical implications. We review key aspects of differential diagnosis, considerations in the choice of first- and second-line therapies, and the management of patients after immunosuppression, based on both a critical review of the recent literature and our large personal and research protocol experience of bone marrow failure in the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. PMID:22517900

  5. Severe anemia following uvulectomy in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Karla R

    2004-09-01

    Uvulectomy is a common practice in eastern Africa for treatment of a variety of throat conditions. Traditional healers perform the procedure. I present a case report to illustrate a complication of uvulectomy. This is a report of a child who presented with severe anemia secondary to uvulectomy performed for treatment of chronic cough. This case report is intended to illustrate a procedure not commonly performed by western otolaryngologists and to describe the management of a severe complication. Western physicians are increasingly being tasked in medical situations in which they encounter traditional medical practices outside of their scope of training. The intent of this report is to familiarize western physicians with one such procedure and its potential complications.

  6. [Splenic nodules and sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Jouini, S; Sehili, S; Mokrani, A; Ayadi, K; Fakunle, Y; Daghfous, M H; Ladeb, M F

    2001-11-01

    We report 4 patients with sickle cell anemia presenting with intra-splenic benign nodules corresponding to islands of preserved tissue within splenic ferro-calcinosis. Ultrasound, CT and MRI findings were evaluated and compared to a follow-up study by ultrasound and CT done after 6 to 12 months. Ultrasound showed multiple well-defined rounded nodules appearing hypoechoic compared to the rest of the spleen that was hyperechoic. On CT, the nodules were homogenous, hypodense relative to the spleen, isodense to the liver in 3 cases and hypodense to the liver in 1 case. On MRI, the nodules appeared relatively hyperintense within low-signal-intensity spleens. The ultrasound and CT follow-up study demonstrated no remarkable change. In sickle cell patients, intra-splenic benign nodules corresponding to normal splenic tissue may be identified on imaging studies. The differential diagnosis is discussed.

  7. [Sickle cell anemia: experience in a center].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Chiari, M; Tusell Puigbert, J; Ortega Aramburu, J

    2003-02-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a structural hemoglobinopathy in which morphological and physical changes in erythrocytes cause vaso-occlusive episodes in various organs and tissues. The disease is common among blacks and the African population. As a result of the growing migratory flow, this is an emerging disease in Spain. To present the casuistics of a pediatric hospital: clinical onset, the most frequent features and complications, and treatment. We performed a retrospective study of 22 patients aged less than 18 years old diagnosed with sickle cell anemia between January 1985 and December 2001. Epidemiologic data, symptoms, complications, blood test results, treatment, and response were recorded. The mean age of the patients was 39 months. In 54 %, diagnosis was established before the age of 2 years. No differences were found in sex. The countries of origin were Gambia in 32 %, Morocco in 23 %, and Senegal in 18 % as well as other African and Central America countries; 53 % of the children were born in Spain. The most common complaint was vaso-occlusive pain localized in the abdomen (45 %). The most frequent complications were infections and 13.7 % suffered stroke. Twenty-eight percent of the patients diagnosed before the age of 2 years presented complications. Eleven patients received hydroxyurea for recurrent vaso-occlusive crises with favorable results; one patient underwent splenectomy and another received an allogenic bone marrow transplant from an HLA-identical brother with excellent results. This study reproduces the data described in the literature from countries with a high prevalence of the disease. Morbidity could be minimized by early diagnosis and preventive treatment and good healthcare. Given the increasing incidence of the disease, screening of black and African neonates and genetic counseling are recommended together with guidelines for prompt and appropriate treatment in primary health centers and emergency departments.

  8. Severe Refractory Anemia in Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Vasile Daniel; Popp, Alina; Grasu, Mugur; Vasilescu, Florina; Jinga, Mariana

    2015-09-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is a rare disease characterized by dilated lymphatics in the small bowel leading to an exudative enteropathy with lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. We report the case of a 23 year-old male who presented with chronic anemia and in whom primary intestinal lymphangiectasia was diagnosed. A low-fat diet along with nutritional therapy with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation improved the protein-losing enteropathy, but did not solve the anemia. Octreotide was also unsuccessful, and after attempting angiographic embolization therapy, limited small bowel resection together with antiplasmin therapy managed to correct the anemia and control the exudative enteropathy. Although primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is usually adequately managed by nutritional therapy, complications such as anemia can occur and can prove to be a therapeutic challenge.

  9. Diagnosis of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Bahrainwala, Jehan; Berns, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-01

    Anemia is a common and clinically important consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is most commonly a result of decreased erythropoietin production by the kidneys and/or iron deficiency. Deciding on the appropriate treatment for anemia associated with CKD with iron replacement and erythropoietic-stimulating agents requires an ability to accurately diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. However, the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia in CKD patients is complicated by the relatively poor predictive ability of easily obtained routine serum iron indices (eg, ferritin and transferrin saturation) and more invasive gold standard measures of iron deficiency (eg, bone marrow iron stores) or erythropoietic response to supplemental iron. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic utility of currently used serum iron indices and emerging alternative markers of iron stores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Diphyllobothrium pacificum infection is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Juan A; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H

    2012-11-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit.

  11. Diphyllobothrium pacificum Infection is Seldom Associated with Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit. PMID:22987655

  12. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  14. Idiopathic hyperzincemia with associated copper deficiency anemia: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Merza, Hussein; Sood, Neha; Sood, Raman

    2015-10-01

    Prompt serum copper and zinc in addition to vitamin B12 levels should be measured in patients suffering from refractory anemia with neurological symptoms. A timely copper supplementation can help revert the hematological and possibly the neurological manifestations.

  15. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  16. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presented with abdominal and back pain. The patient was operated on for acute abdomen and diagnosed with duodenal perforation. Helicobacter pylorus was negative. There was no risk factor to account for duodenal perforation other than sickle cell anemia. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. Duodenal perforation is a rare entity described in patients with sickle cell anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of duodenal perforation in a patient sickle cell anemia.

  17. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presented with abdominal and back pain. The patient was operated on for acute abdomen and diagnosed with duodenal perforation. Helicobacter pylorus was negative. There was no risk factor to account for duodenal perforation other than sickle cell anemia. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. Duodenal perforation is a rare entity described in patients with sickle cell anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of duodenal perforation in a patient sickle cell anemia. PMID:25422692

  18. Alternative Etiologies for Stroke In Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Michael Morgan; Quinn, Charles T.; Rogers, Zora R.; Journeycake, Janna M.

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is common in children with sickle cell anemia but is rarely attributed to the traditional causes of stroke identified in other children. We report an 11 year-old girl with sickle cell anemia who presented with severe headache and was found to have recurrent bilateral multifocal strokes in a cardioembolic pattern. Evaluation revealed the presence of a patent foramen ovale, antiphospholipid antibodies, and elevations in factor VIII and lipoprotein a. Sickle cell anemia is itself a hypercoaguable state with potential for increased right heart pressures, both of which predispose to paradoxical embolization via right-to-left intracardiac shunting of emboli causing stroke. This case suggests that the more traditional etiologies for pediatric stroke may also cause stroke in children with sickle cell anemia. PMID:19589461

  19. Characterization of anemia induced by avian osteopetrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Smith, R E

    1978-01-01

    Chickens infected intravenously at 8 days after hatching with an avian osteopetrosis virus developed a severe, progressive anemia in the absence of osteopetrosis. The anemia was characterized as a pancytopenia, in which erythrocytes, granulocytes, and thrombocytes decreased concomitantly. Serum bilirubin levels were normal, whereas erythrocytes from infected chickens demonstrated a slightly elevated osmotic fragility. A negative Coombs test indicated that there was no evidence for erythrocyte-bound antibody. Erythrocytes from infected animals had slightly decreased 51Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival time when compared with normal. Examination of marrow histological preparations, together with ferrokinetic studies with 59Fe, indicated that marrow failure occurred during the acute phase of the anemia. Circulating virus was present during the development and acute phases of the anemia, but disappeared during the recovery phase of the disease. Neutralizing antibody appeared after the disappearance of circulating virus. It is concluded that virus infection induced both marrow failure (aplastic crisis) and decreased erythrocyte survival. Images PMID:215554

  20. Establishing the Cause of Anemia in a Premature Newborn Infant.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Gijs; van der Weide, Karen; Schuerman, Frank A B A; Michael Cotten, C; Rondeel, Jan M M

    2018-06-02

    The three major causes of anemia in neonates are blood loss, decreased red blood cell production, and increased degradation of erythrocytes. Establishing the cause of anemia in a neonate born prematurely can be challenging. Clinically, fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) can be difficult to diagnose-the condition often presents only after the manifestation of severe fetal anemia. FMH can be confirmed by determining the fetal hemoglobin F fraction in the mother, which is traditionally performed using the Kleihauer-Betke test (KBT). Herein, we present a case study of a newborn baby boy of Dutch ethnicity with massive FMH and negative KBT result. The KBT result appeared to be false-negative due to AO antagonism. However, the results of an additional marker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) test confirmed the diagnosis of massive FMH. Therefore, measuring AFP in maternal blood can be helpful in confirming FMH in unexplained anemia of the neonate.

  1. The significance of gallstones in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander-Reindorf, C.; Nwaneri, R. U.; Worrell, R. G.; Ogbonna, A.; Uzoma, C.

    1990-01-01

    Infection is the most common cause of high morbidity, hospitalization, and mortality in children with sickle cell anemia. In this study of pediatric sickle cell anemia patients, aged 1 to 19, we explore the hypothesis that gallstones (usually pigment stones) create a nidus of infection, predisposing the affected patients to high morbidity. Our study involved 86 children with sickle cell anemia at the Howard University Center for Sickle Cell Disease, who had been followed at the clinic for a total of 602 patient years. Review of their records revealed that patients with gallstones had a mean number of 10.24 hospitalizations and 25.35 ambulatory visits; those without gallstones had a mean number of only 4.26 hospitalizations and 13.41 ambulatory visits. In children with sickle cell anemia and gallstones, elective cholecystectomy (or, in the future, cholelithotripsy) could reduce the high morbidity caused by infection. PMID:2213913

  2. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia: understanding the nemesis.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Sheila

    2003-11-01

    IMHA is one of the most common causes of anemia in small animals. Although treatment may be rewarding, many patients do not respond adequately to glucocorticoids alone and require additional immunosuppressive therapy. Some patients may succumb to acute severe anemia and die within the first few weeks of treatment; even if they survive, relapses may occur. IMHA is the nemesis; as our understanding of this disease increases and treatment options expand, it is hoped that survival rates will finally improve.

  3. Anemia--prevalence and risk factors in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bencaiova, Gabriela; Burkhardt, Tilo; Breymann, Christian

    2012-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of decreased iron stores and anemia in pregnant women. To determine whether the risk factors: socio-demographic background, age, BMI, and parity are associated with abnormal hemoglobin concentrations and/or abnormal iron status. A longitudinal study was carried out at the Department of Obstetrics, University Hospital of Zurich to establish the risk factors and prevalence of the decreased iron stores and anemia in early pregnancy. In order to determine the hematological parameters and ferritin levels, venous blood samples of 470 singleton pregnancies between 16 and 20 pregnancy weeks were collected. According to hemoglobin and iron status, the patients were divided into four groups: patients with iron deficiency anemia, patients with decreased iron stores, patients with anemia for other reasons and normal patients. The determinants socio-demographic background, age, BMI and parity were explored using multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of decreased iron stores (ferritin<20 μg/l) was observed in 31.8% of subjects (149/470) and anemia (Hb<110 g/l) in 18.5% (87/470). The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was higher among women coming from former Yugoslavia and developing countries (p=0.004 and p=0.012). In patients coming from developing countries, a significant increase of anemia for other reasons was observed (p=0.027) and in patients older than 30 years, a significant increase of decreased iron stores (p=0.018). In our study population with low parity, the prevalence of abnormal hemoglobin and abnormal iron status was 50.2% (236/470), and socio-demographic background was the most important risk factor of anemia. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Severe anemia in 3 toddlers with gastric lactobezoar.

    PubMed

    Klein-Franke, A; Kropshofer, G; Gassner, I; Meister, B; Salvador, C; Scholl-Bürgi, S; Mueller, T; Heinz-Erian, P

    2013-05-01

    Anemia in toddlers may result from many disorders including excessive feeding with cow's milk. Another sequel of age-inadequate cow's milk nutrition may be gastric lactobezoar (GLB), a dense lump of coagulated milk and mucus in the stomach. 3 toddlers presented with a history of excessive intake of full cream cow's milk, abdominal distension, vomiting, dehydration, fatigue, marked pallor and tachycardia. Diagnostic imaging revea-led large GLBs as the likely origin of the abdominal symptoms. Laboratory evaluation showed severe anemia with depleted iron stores and signs of protein catabolism. Non-cow's milk-induced causes of anemia including defects of erythropoiesis, hemoglobin structure, RBC-enzymes and blood coagulation, hemolysis, immune disorders, infection, inflammation, extraintestinal hemorrhage, nephropathy were - according to the available data - unlikely to cause the anemia in our patients. Thus their anemia is thought to be due to age-inadequate cow's milk nutrition leading to 1) low intake, decreased absorption/bioavailability and increased intestinal loss of iron, and 2) GLB which induced blood loss following mechanical irritation of the gastric mucosa and vomiting causing high gastric pH and decrease in duodenal iron absorption. The anemia in our patients is due to both exaggerated feeding with cow's milk and adverse effects of GLBs. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that, after erythrocyte transfusion, iron substitution, age-adapted nutrition and GLB-dissolution, the anemia did not recur. We propose to include GLB in the differential diagnosis of anemia in cow's milk fed small children. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. [Spatial analysis of gestational anemia in Peru, 2015].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Antiporta, Daniel A; Cortés, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    To establish regional prevalences of anemia in pregnant women receiving care at public clinics in Peru in 2015 and identify high-prevalence district conglomerates. An ecological study was carried out on data from pregnant women with anemia registered on the Nutritional Status Information System (SIEN) who received care in 7703 public clinics in 2015. Regional and district prevalences of gestational anemia were calculated. District conglomerates with a high prevalence of gestational anemia were identified using the Moran Index. Information was gathered from 311,521 pregnant women distributed in 1638 districts in Peru. The national prevalence of anemia was 24.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 24.0-24.3%), the rural prevalence was 30.5%, and the urban prevalence was 22.0%. The regions of Huancavelica (45.5%; 95% CI: 44.2-46.7%), Puno (42.8%; 95% CI: 41.9-43.7%), Pasco (38.5%; 95% CI: 36.9-40.0%), Cusco (36.0%; 95% CI: 35.3-36.8%), and Apurímac (32.0%; 95% CI: 30.8-33.1%) had the highest prevalences of anemia. The local Moran Index identified 202 high-priority districts (hot spots) (12.3% of total; 44 urban and 158 rural) located in Ancash, Apurímac, Arequipa, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huancavelica, Huánuco, Junín, La Libertad, Lima, Pasco, and Puno containing high-prevalence district conglomerates. Gestational anemia in Peru has its highest prevalence rates in rural and southern mountainous areas. The district conglomerates with high prevalence rates of gestational anemia coincide with the areas of high regional prevalence.

  6. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  7. SnapShot: Fanconi anemia and associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anderson T; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-01-15

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic disorder resulting from biallelic mutations in one of the 17 FANC genes. It is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. The underlying cause is genomic instability resulting from the deficiency in replication-dependent DNA interstrand crosslink repair pathway commonly referred to as the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway. This SnapShot presents the key factors involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Solid fuel use is associated with anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Accinelli, Roberto A; Leon-Abarca, Juan A

    2017-10-01

    Over 3 billion people use solid fuels as a means of energy and heating source, and ~ 50% of households burn them in inefficient, poorly ventilated stoves. In 2010, ~ 43% of the 640 million preschool children in 220 countries suffered from a certain degree of anemia, with iron deficiency as the main cause in developed countries whereas its causes remained multifactorial in the undeveloped group. In this study, we explore the relations of country-wide variables that might affect the people's health status (from socioeconomic status to more specific variables such as water access). We found independent relationship between solid fuel use and anemia in children under five years old (p < 0.0001), taking into account the prevalence of anemia in pregnant woman and the access to improved water sources. Countries in which the population uses solid fuel the most have over three times higher anemia rates in children than countries with the lowest prevalence of solid fuels use. There is still a complex relationship between solid fuels use and anemia, as reflected in its worldwide significance (p < 0.05) controlled for measles immunization, tobacco consumption, anemia in pregnant mothers, girl's primary education, life expectancy and improved water access but not (p > 0.05) when weighing for sanitation access or income per capita. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hemoperitoneum from corpus luteum rupture in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaquan; Guo, Lifang; Shao, Zonghong

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare hematopoietic stem-cell disorder that results in pancytopenia and hypocellular bone marrow. Women with aplastic anemia usually are at increased risk of corpus luteum rupture due to thrombocytopenia and infection. Here we report two cases had hemoperitoneum from corpus luteum rupture in patients with aplastic anemia in our center. Case 1 involved two episodes of hemoperitoneum resulting from rupture of the corpus luteum in a 23-year-old unmarried female with severe aplastic anemia. This patient was managed conservatively with platelet and packed red cell transfusion. Case 2 involved two episodes of hemoperitoneum resulting from rupture of the corpus luteum in a 33-year-old married patient with aplastic anemia. Emergency laparoscopy revealed massive hemoperitoneum. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed successively with platelet and packed red cell transfusion. Hemoperitoneum resulting from a ruptured corpus luteum is a life-threatening condition in patients with aplastic anemia. Prompt and appropriate evaluation of corpus luteum rupture and emergent therapy are needed.

  10. Concepts of anemia among low income Nicaraguan women.

    PubMed

    Ailinger, Rita L; Moore, Jean B; Pawloski, Lisa; Cortés, Lidya Ruth Zamora

    2009-01-01

    Anemia is a common health problem among women throughout the world, however, there has been minimal research on women's concepts of anemia. The purpose of this study was to examine concepts of anemia in low income Nicaraguan women. A qualitative design was used. Audio-taped open-ended interviews in Spanish with 14 women were used to obtain data. Tapes were transcribed and content analyzed. The findings indicate that few of the women had biomedically accurate concepts of anemia, such as that it was due to lack of iron from poor eating. Others held folk medical beliefs including home remedies, for example drinking the milk of a mare or beet juice and eating certain foods such as bean soup. Most of the women did not know any symptoms of anemia and a few reported that it can develop into leukemia. These concepts of anemia are instructive for nurses working with patients from Nicaragua and will be useful in developing nursing interventions to alleviate this public health problem.

  11. Anemia in new congenital adult type polycystic kidney mice.

    PubMed

    Koumegawa, J; Nagano, N; Arai, H; Wada, M; Kusaka, M; Takahashi, H

    1991-12-01

    Mechanisms for the development of anemia and the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) on hematological parameters were studied in new congenital adult type polycystic kidney (DBA/2FG-pcy) mice. The majority of DBA/2FG-pcy mice showed progressive anemia and an elevation of blood urea nitrogen, while a minority showed progressive anemia following polycythemia. Kidneys with numerous cysts in the cortex and medulla occupied virtually the entire abdominal cavity, and the combined kidney weight taken as a percentage of body weight reached 13.5% in the DBA/2FG-pcy mouse. The osmotic fragility of DBA/2FG-pcy mice erythrocytes was significantly increased compared with that of normal control mice. In addition, two-fold increases in serum EPO levels, determined by radioimmunoassay, and a decreased number of colony forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) were observed in the DBA/2FG-pcy mice. The administration of r-HuEPO during anemia significantly increased the red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit and reticulocyte percentage in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicate that anemia in the DBA/2FG-pcy mouse is due to increased fragility of erythrocytes, a deficiency in EPO for the degree of anemia and a decreased number or a decreased response of erythroid progenitor cells. We suggest that the DBA/2FG-pcy mouse is a useful spontaneous model of chronic progressive renal failure.

  12. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:26936610

  13. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S.; Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H.

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure hasmore » been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.« less

  14. Maternal anemia during pregnancy and subsequent risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Azulay, Carmit Erez; Pariente, Gali; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Kessous, Roy; Sergienko, Ruslan; Sheiner, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between anemia during pregnancy and subsequent future maternal cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, comparing women with and without anemia during pregnancy. Deliveries occurred during 1988-1998 and had followed for more than a decade. Incidence of long-term cardiovascular morbidity was compared between the two groups. During the study period, 47 657 deliveries met the inclusion criteria; of these 12 362 (25.9%) occurred in women with anemia at least once during their pregnancies. Anemia of pregnancy was noted as a risk factor for long-term complex cardiovascular events (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1-2.8, p = 0.04). Using a Cox multivariable regression model, controlling for ethnicity and maternal age, anemia was found to be an independent risk factor for long-term maternal cardiovascular hospitalization (OR for total hospitalizations = 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.4, p < 0.001). Anemia of pregnancy is an independent risk factor for long-term cardiovascular morbidity in a follow-up period of more than a decade.

  15. The incidence of gastrointestinal pathology and subsequent anemia in young men presenting with iron deficiency without anemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Bardan, Eytan; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Avidan, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of iron deficiency (ID) without anemia in young men is unclear, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for the required gastrointestinal (GI) evaluation. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of significant GI pathology and the development of anemia during the follow-up of young men presenting with ID, but without anemia. All young men (18-30 years) who served in the Israel Defense Forces during the years 2005-2013 and had at least a single laboratory test indicative of ID without anemia were followed until the diagnosis of significant GI pathology or discharge from military service. The study population included 2061 young men (mean age 20.7±1.8). During follow-up of 3150 person years, significant GI pathologies were diagnosed in 39 patients: inflammatory bowel disease in 25 (1.2%), celiac disease in 8 (0.4%), and peptic disease in 4 (0.1%). No cases of GI-related cancer were diagnosed. ID anemia developed during follow-up in 203 (9.8%). Lower baseline hemoglobin levels, lower ferritin levels, and younger age at diagnosis were more common among those who developed anemia. The development of anemia was a predisposing factor for the diagnosis of GI pathology (risk ratio=3.60, 95% confidence interval 1.34-8.32, P=0.012). Significant GI pathology is very uncommon in young men presenting with ID. Overt anemia developed in close to 10% of the study cohort. Therefore, we advise simple GI evaluation (celiac serology, C-reactive protein or fecal calprotectin, and urease breath test) as well as follow-up in this population.

  16. Does antenatal care attendance prevent anemia in pregnancy at term?

    PubMed

    Ikeanyi, E M; Ibrahim, A I

    2015-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is one of the public health problems in the developed and developing world. If uncontrolled it is a major indirect cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. This is worst in settings with poor prenatal practices. Quality prenatal interventions therefore are expected to prevent or ameliorate this disorder in pregnancy. Nigerian scientific literatures are full of data on anemia in pregnancy, but few of them are on the influence of prenatal care on maternal anemia. This study, therefore, sought to appraise the role of antenatal care (ANC) services in the prevention of anemia in pregnancy at term in Nigerian women. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of anemia at first antenatal visit and determine if antenatal attendance prevents anemia at term among prenatal Nigerian women. To measure the hematocrit levels at booking and at term respectively and compare the proportion anemic at booking with the proportion anemic at term. A retrospective cross-sectional comparative study of 3442 prenatal women in a mission hospital in South-South Nigeria from 2009 to 2013. Venous blood hematocrit was estimated from each woman at booking and at term, and the prevalence of anemia for the two periods were compared. There were 1205 subjects with hematocrit of below 33% at booking, an anemia prevalence of 32.2% at booking in this population. At term or delivery at term 736 (21.4% odds ratio [OR] =2.3, P < 0.0001) of the 1052 subjects that fulfilled the study criteria had their anemia corrected, a 69.9% prevention, while 316 (9.2%, OR = 0.43, P < 0.0001) persisted despite their antenatal attendance. The subjects were similar in most of the confounding factors like parity, social class, mean age, body mass index and gestational age at delivery (P value: all > 0.05). The prevalence of anemia in pregnancy is still high in our setting. Quality ANC appeared a valuable preventive intervention that should be made widely available, accessible and affordable to

  17. Recent advances in treatment of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA) made most of patients to expect to achieve a long-term survival. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) from HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD-SCT) is a preferred first-line treatment option for younger patients with severe or very severe AA, whereas immunosuppressive treatment (IST) is an alternative option for others. Horse anti-thymocyte globuline (ATG) with cyclosporin A (CsA) had been a standard IST regimen with acceptable response rate. Recently, horse ATG had been not available and replaced with rabbit ATG in most countries. Subsequently, recent comparative studies showed that the outcomes of patients who received rabbit ATG/CsA were similar or inferior compared to those who received horse ATG/CsA. Therefore, further studies to improve the outcomes of IST, including additional eltrombopag, are necessary. On the other hand, the upper age limit of patients who are able to receive MSD-SCT as first-line treatment is a current issue because of favorable outcomes of MSD-SCT of older patients using fludarabine-based conditioning. In addition, further studies to improve the outcomes of patients who receive allogeneic SCT from alternative donors are needed. In this review, current issues and the newly emerging trends that may improve their outcomes in near futures will be discussed focusing the management of patients with AA. PMID:25378968

  18. Overcoming reprogramming resistance of Fanconi anemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Lars U. W.; Milsom, Michael D.; Harris, Chad E.; Vyas, Rutesh; Brumme, Kristina M.; Parmar, Kalindi; Moreau, Lisa A.; Schambach, Axel; Park, In-Hyun; London, Wendy B.; Strait, Kelly; Schlaeger, Thorsten; DeVine, Alexander L.; Grassman, Elke; D'Andrea, Alan; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive syndrome characterized by progressive fatal BM failure and chromosomal instability. FA cells have inactivating mutations in a signaling pathway that is critical for maintaining genomic integrity and protecting cells from the DNA damage caused by cross-linking agents. Transgenic expression of the implicated genes corrects the phenotype of hematopoietic cells, but previous attempts at gene therapy have failed largely because of inadequate numbers of hematopoietic stem cells available for gene correction. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) constitute an alternate source of autologous cells that are amenable to ex vivo expansion, genetic correction, and molecular characterization. In the present study, we demonstrate that reprogramming leads to activation of the FA pathway, increased DNA double-strand breaks, and senescence. We also demonstrate that defects in the FA DNA-repair pathway decrease the reprogramming efficiency of murine and human primary cells. FA pathway complementation reduces senescence and restores the reprogramming efficiency of somatic FA cells to normal levels. Disease-specific iPSCs derived in this fashion maintain a normal karyotype and are capable of hematopoietic differentiation. These data define the role of the FA pathway in reprogramming and provide a strategy for future translational applications of patient-specific FA iPSCs. PMID:22371882

  19. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T; Ware, Russell E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a severe, inherited hemoglobin disorder affecting 100,000 persons in the US and millions worldwide. Hydroxyurea, a once daily oral medication, has emerged as the primary disease-modifying therapy for SCA. The accumulated body of evidence over 30 years demonstrates that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective therapy for SCA, but hydroxyurea remains underutilized for a variety of reasons. Areas covered In this review, we summarize the available evidence regarding the pharmacology, clinical, and laboratory benefits, and safety of hydroxy-urea therapy for the treatment of SCA. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader a comprehensive understanding of hydroxyurea and to reinforce the fact that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective medication for the treatment of SCA. Expert opinion In our opinion, hydroxyurea therapy should be considered standard-of-care for SCA, representing an essential component of patient management. Early initiation and broader use of hydroxyurea will alter the natural history of SCA, so affected children can live longer and healthier lives. In addition, hydroxyurea use should be extended to low-resource settings such as sub-Saharan Africa, where the burden of SCA and the need for hydroxyurea is arguably the greatest. PMID:26366626

  1. Hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a severe, inherited hemoglobin disorder affecting 100,000 persons in the US and millions worldwide. Hydroxyurea, a once daily oral medication, has emerged as the primary disease-modifying therapy for SCA. The accumulated body of evidence over 30 years demonstrates that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective therapy for SCA, but hydroxyurea remains underutilized for a variety of reasons. In this review, we summarize the available evidence regarding the pharmacology, clinical, and laboratory benefits, and safety of hydroxyurea therapy for the treatment of SCA. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader a comprehensive understanding of hydroxyurea and to reinforce the fact that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective medication for the treatment of SCA. In our opinion, hydroxyurea therapy should be considered standard-of-care for SCA, representing an essential component of patient management. Early initiation and broader use of hydroxyurea will alter the natural history of SCA, so affected children can live longer and healthier lives. In addition, hydroxyurea use should be extended to low-resource settings such as sub-Saharan Africa, where the burden of SCA and the need for hydroxyurea is arguably the greatest.

  2. Sickle Cell Anemia and Its Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas N; Thein, Swee Lay

    2018-04-11

    In the 100 years since sickle cell anemia (SCA) was first described in the medical literature, studies of its molecular and pathophysiological basis have been at the vanguard of scientific discovery. By contrast, the translation of such knowledge into treatments that improve the lives of those affected has been much too slow. Recent years, however, have seen major advances on several fronts. A more detailed understanding of the switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin and the identification of regulators such as BCL11A provide hope that these findings will be translated into genomic-based approaches to the therapeutic reactivation of hemoglobin F production in patients with SCA. Meanwhile, an unprecedented number of new drugs aimed at both the treatment and prevention of end-organ damage are now in the pipeline, outcomes from potentially curative treatments such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are improving, and great strides are being made in gene therapy, where methods employing both antisickling β-globin lentiviral vectors and gene editing are now entering clinical trials. Encouragingly, after a century of neglect, the profile of the vast majority of those with SCA in Africa and India is also finally improving. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics Volume 19 is August 31, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  3. Epidemiology of aplastic anemia: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Montané, Eva; Ibáñez, Luisa; Vidal, Xavier; Ballarín, Elena; Puig, Ramon; García, Nuria; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    2008-04-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare and severe disease. Its incidence varies considerably worldwide. We aimed at describing the epidemiology of this disease, including the incidence, mortality and survival trends, in a well-defined population. Since 1980, a case-control surveillance study of aplastic anemia has been carried out by a cooperative group, in the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Inclusion is dependent on the patient having at least two of the following features: white blood cell count < or = 3.5 x 10(9)/L, platelet count < or = 50 x 10(9)/L, hemoglobin <10 g/L or hematocrit of <30%; when only one of these last two criteria is fulfilled, a reticulocyte count of < or = 30 x 10(9)/L is also required. The bone marrow biopsy has to be compatible with the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. Between 1980 and 2003, a total of 235 cases of aplastic anemia were identified. The overall incidence was 2.34 per million inhabitants per year and the incidence increased with age. Most of the cases were classified as severe or very severe aplastic anemia. Survival rates at 3 months, and at 2 and 15 years after the diagnosis were 73%, 57%, and 51%, respectively. Advanced age and more severe disease at the time of diagnosis were associated with a lower survival rate. There was a trend to a better 2-year survival rate among patients treated with bone marrow transplantation. Forty-nine cases (20.8%) were exposed to drugs reported to be associated with aplastic anemia, and 21 (8.9%) to toxic agents. The incidence of aplastic anemia in Barcelona is low but the case fatality rate is high. Advanced age and severe disease at the time of diagnosis were associated with decreased survival.

  4. Blood center practice and education for blood donors with anemia

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Meghan; Schellhase, Kenneth G.; Young, Staci; Geiger, Susan; Fink, Arlene; Mast, Alan E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anemia is an early indicator of many diseases, yet blood donors with low hematocrit (Hct) often receive inadequate information about its medical importance. We sought to understand the types of information that are and should be provided to these donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two companion studies were performed. The first investigated blood center practices for care of donors with low Hct including deferral length, information provided, and cutoff values used when referring donors for medical attention. The second was a randomized prospective pilot study comparing behavior of deferred donors receiving an “older” pamphlet providing a list of iron-rich foods or a “newer” pamphlet providing descriptions of common causes of anemia and advice for seeking medical attention. RESULTS More than 70% of centers defer donors for 1 day. Only 6% defer donors for more than 2 weeks. Most centers provide written and/or verbal information about low Hct. Only 35% have a cutoff value defining significant anemia that requires additional medical attention. In the study of donors with low Hct, significant disease was identified within 3 months after deferral in 2 of 104 subjects: metastatic lung cancer and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Only donors receiving the newer pamphlet reported that it “definitely improved” their ability to speak with their doctor about anemia. CONCLUSIONS The diagnosis of anemia in blood donors may be an indicator of significant undiagnosed disease. There are wide variations in how centers care for and educate donors with anemia. Donors with anemia should be provided improved and consistent educational information. PMID:20977487

  5. Determinants of anemia among young children in rural India.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Black, James; Muthayya, Sumithra; Shet, Anita; Bhat, Vijay; Nagaraj, Savitha; Prashanth, N S; Sudarshan, H; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Shet, Arun S

    2010-07-01

    More than 75% of Indian toddlers are anemic. Data on factors associated with anemia in India are limited. The objective of this study was to determine biological, nutritional, and socioeconomic risk factors for anemia in this vulnerable age group. We conducted a cross-sectional study of children aged 12 to 23 months in 2 rural districts of Karnataka, India. Children were excluded if they were unwell or had received a blood transfusion. Hemoglobin, ferritin, folate, vitamin B(12), retinol-binding protein, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined. Children were also tested for hemoglobinopathy, malaria infection, and hookworm infestation. Anthropometric measurements, nutritional intake, family wealth, and food security were recorded. In addition, maternal hemoglobin level was measured. Anemia (hemoglobin level < 11.0 g/dL) was detected in 75.3% of the 401 children sampled. Anemia was associated with iron deficiency (low ferritin level), maternal anemia, and food insecurity. Children's ferritin levels were directly associated with their iron intake and CRP levels and with maternal hemoglobin level and inversely associated with continued breastfeeding and the child's energy intake. A multivariate model for the child's hemoglobin level revealed associations with log(ferritin level) (coefficient: 1.20; P < .001), folate level (0.05; P < .01), maternal hemoglobin level (0.16; P < .001), family wealth index (0.02; P < .05), child's age (0.05 per month; P < .005), hemoglobinopathy (-1.51; P < .001), CRP level (-0.18; P < .001), and male gender (-0.38; P < .05). Wealth index and food insecurity could be interchanged in this model. Hemoglobin level was primarily associated with iron status in these Indian toddlers; however, maternal hemoglobin level, family wealth, and food insecurity were also important factors. Strategies for minimizing childhood anemia must include optimized iron intake but should simultaneously address maternal anemia, poverty, and food

  6. Anemia, nutritional status, and inflammation in hospitalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Alfons; Jonsson, Palmi V; Bjornsson, Sigurbjorn; Thorsdottir, Inga

    2008-01-01

    Anemia (hemoglobin <120 g/L) in elderly patients is a health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of anemia and associations of anemia with nutritional status and inflammation in hospitalized elderly. Sixty patients from the Department of Geriatrics were randomly assigned to participate. Blood samples were drawn and analyzed at the laboratory of the University Hospital in Reykjavik. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometric and hematologic parameters. The prevalence of anemia was 36.7%. Female participants were more frequently anemic than male participants (47.4% versus 18.2%, P = 0.024). Anemic patients had a lower albumin level (31.3 versus 33.4 g/L, P = 0.019) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (29.6 versus 16.0 mm/h, P = 0.005) and were more often malnourished (81.8% versus 44.7%, P = 0.005) than non-anemic patients. Hemoglobin correlated with prealbumin (rho = 0.338, P = 0.008) and albumin (rho = 0.250, P = 0.054) levels, but negatively with age (rho = -0.310, P = 0.016) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (rho = -0.412, P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and nutritional status were significant predictors of hemoglobin (R(2) = 34.0%). This cross-sectional analysis provides evidence of anemia in 36.7% of patients hospitalized at the Landspitali-University Hospital in Reykjavik and shows an association among anemia, deteriorated nutritional status, and inflammation. Future prospective studies are needed to assess the efficacy of adjuvant nutritional support to stabilize or improve nutritional status including anemia in hospitalized elderly.

  7. Whole-exome analysis to detect congenital hemolytic anemia mimicking congenital dyserythropoietic anemia.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Motoharu; Doisaki, Sayoko; Okuno, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Hideki; Hama, Asahito; Kawashima, Nozomu; Narita, Atsushi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Kenichi; Kanno, Hitoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Taga, Takashi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji

    2018-06-23

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) is a heterogeneous group of rare congenital disorders characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and dysplastic changes in erythroblasts. Diagnosis of CDA is based primarily on the morphology of bone marrow erythroblasts; however, genetic tests have recently become more important. Here, we performed genetic analysis of 10 Japanese patients who had been diagnosed with CDA based on laboratory findings and morphological characteristics. We examined 10 CDA patients via central review of bone marrow morphology and genetic analysis for congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Sanger sequencing for CDAN1, SEC23B, and KLF1 was performed for all patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing in patients without mutation in these genes. Three patients carried pathogenic CDAN1 mutations, whereas no SEC23B mutations were identified in our cohort. WES unexpectedly identified gene mutations known to cause congenital hemolytic anemia in two patients: canonical G6PD p.Val394Leu mutation and SPTA1 p.Arg28His mutation. Comprehensive genetic analysis is warranted for more effective diagnosis of patients with suspected CDA.

  8. Increased cardiovascular risk in adult survivors of fetal anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Alexandra H; Dalziel, Stuart R; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A; Thornburg, Kent L; Harding, Jane E

    2017-01-01

    Importance Brief exposure to intrauterine anemia doubles coronary conductance but increases susceptibility to cardiac ischemic injury in adult sheep. The effects of fetal anemia in humans on cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood has not previously been investigated. Objective To compare cardiovascular disease risk factors in adult survivors of fetal anemia with that of non-anemic siblings. Design A retrospective observational cohort study (The Fetal Anemia Study), undertaken between January 1, 2010 and July 31, 2012. Setting Tertiary hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Participants Exposed participants (n=95) were adults who received intrauterine transfusion at National Women’s Hospital, Auckland between 1963–92 for treatment of severe anemia due to rhesus disease, resident in New Zealand and with a suitable non-anemic sibling. Unexposed participants (n=92) were siblings of exposed participants. Of potentially eligible exposed participants, 86% agreed to participate. Exposure Severe fetal anemia secondary to rhesus disease vs no intrauterine anemia. Main Outcomes Height, weight, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipid concentrations, heart rate variability, and cardiac MRI-determined left ventricular function and myocardial blood flow at rest, with cold pressor stress, and adenosine-induced vasodilation. Participant characteristics included gestation and weight at birth, age, and comorbid disease. Results Exposed participants were younger than unexposed (mean±SD: 33.7±9.3 vs 40.1±10.9 years, p<0.001), born earlier (34.3±1.7 vs 39.5±2.1 weeks, p<0.001), had decreased high-density lipoprotein concentration (−0.12 mmol/l, −0.24 to 0.00, p=0.04), and increased low to high frequency heart rate variability ratio (ratio of geometric means 1.53, 1.04 to 2.25, p=0.03). Exposed participants also had smaller left ventricular volumes (end diastolic volume/body surface area, difference between adjusted means −6.09 ml, 95% CI −9.75 to −2.42, p=0

  9. Association of Preoperative Anemia With Postoperative Mortality in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Goobie, Susan M; Faraoni, David; Zurakowski, David; DiNardo, James A

    2016-09-01

    Neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery are at risk for adverse outcomes. Preoperative anemia is a strong independent risk factor for postoperative mortality in adults. To our knowledge, this association has not been investigated in the neonatal population. To assess the association between preoperative anemia and postoperative mortality in neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery in a large sample of US hospitals. Using data from the 2012 and 2013 pediatric databases of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, we conducted a retrospective study of neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery. Analysis of the data took place between June 2015 and December 2015. All neonates (0-30 days old) with a recorded preoperative hematocrit value were included. Anemia defined as hematocrit level of less than 40%. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to assess the association between preoperative hematocrit and mortality, and the Youden J Index was used to determine the specific hematocrit cutoff point to define anemia in the neonatal population. Demographic and postoperative outcomes variables were compared between anemic and nonanemic neonates. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with postoperative neonatal mortality. An external validation was performed using the 2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Neonates accounted for 2764 children (6%) in the 2012-2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases. Neonates inlcuded in the study were predominately male (64.5%), white (66.3%), and term (69.9% greater than 36 weeks' gestation) and weighed more than 2 kg (85.0%). Postoperative in-hospital mortality was 3.4% in neonates and 0.6% in all age groups (0-18 years). A preoperative hematocrit level of less than 40% was the optimal cutoff (Youden) to predict in-hospital mortality

  10. Anemia of chronic disease is the more frequent type of anemia seen in patients with chronic idiopathic neutropenia of adults.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, H A; Eliopoulos, D G; Valatas, V; Eliopoulos, G D

    2001-04-01

    This study describes the frequency and the type of anemia seen in patients with nonimmune chronic idiopathic neutropenia of adults (NI-CINA). We found that NI-CINA patients had low hemoglobin levels and increased serum concentrations of erythropoietin (EPO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The hemoglobin levels correlated positively with the number of circulating neutrophils and inversely with the levels of EPO and TNF-alpha but not of IL-1beta. Anemia, defined as the reduction of the hemoglobin below 12.0 g/dl for women and 13.3 g/dl for men, was found in 23 out of 148 patients studied, a proportion of 15.5%. Two of the anemic patients had iron deficiency anemia (8.7%), 11 had anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 47.8%) presenting with normal or slightly reduced erythrocytic indices, low serum iron, and increased serum ferritin, and the remaining ten had anemia of undefined pathogenesis (AUP; 43.5%) with normal or slightly decreased erythrocytic indices, serum iron ranging from 43 to 88 microg/dl, and ferritin values ranging from 12 to 50 ng/ml. We conclude that ACD is the more frequent type of anemia seen in patients with NI-CINA, and that pro-inflammatory cytokines, notably TNF-alpha, may be involved in the pathogenesis of both ACD and AUP, given that serum levels of the cytokine were significantly increased and that the EPO response to anemia was blunted in these patients. These findings further support our previously reported suggestion for the possible existence, in NI-CINA patients, of an unrecognized low-grade chronic inflammatory process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

  11. Anemia and Helicobacter pylori Seroreactivity in a Rural Haitian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Sodikoff, Jamie B.; Speckman, Rebecca A.; Rollin, Francois G.; Chery, Marie P.; Cole, Conrad R.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is a significant health concern worldwide and can be the result of nutritional, environmental, social, and infectious etiologies. We estimated the prevalence of anemia in 336 pre-school children and 132 adults in the rural Central Plateau of Haiti and assessed associations with age, sex, household size, water source, sanitation, and Helicobacter pylori seroreactivity using logistic regression analysis; 80.1% (269/336) of children and 63.6% (84/132) of adults were anemic. Among children, younger age was associated with increased prevalence of anemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5–11.1 for children 6–11 months compared with children 48–59 months). Among adults, 50.8% were H. pylori-seropositive, and seropositivity was inversely associated with anemia (aOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2–0.9). Anemia prevalence in this region of Haiti is very high and not attributable to sanitary conditions or a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. PMID:22049049

  12. Anemia and Helicobacter pylori seroreactivity in a rural Haitian population.

    PubMed

    Shak, Joshua R; Sodikoff, Jamie B; Speckman, Rebecca A; Rollin, Francois G; Chery, Marie P; Cole, Conrad R; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2011-11-01

    Anemia is a significant health concern worldwide and can be the result of nutritional, environmental, social, and infectious etiologies. We estimated the prevalence of anemia in 336 pre-school children and 132 adults in the rural Central Plateau of Haiti and assessed associations with age, sex, household size, water source, sanitation, and Helicobacter pylori seroreactivity using logistic regression analysis; 80.1% (269/336) of children and 63.6% (84/132) of adults were anemic. Among children, younger age was associated with increased prevalence of anemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5-11.1 for children 6-11 months compared with children 48-59 months). Among adults, 50.8% were H. pylori-seropositive, and seropositivity was inversely associated with anemia (aOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.9). Anemia prevalence in this region of Haiti is very high and not attributable to sanitary conditions or a high prevalence of H. pylori infection.

  13. Triumph and tragedy: anemia management in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Novak, James E; Szczech, Lynda A

    2008-11-01

    Recent trial data have resulted in a reevaluation of the management of anemia in chronic kidney disease, including the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, intravenous iron, and novel pharmaceuticals. In this review, we evaluate the latest research on anemia management in chronic kidney disease. Clinical trials of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents indicate that targeting the complete correction of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease results in a greater risk of morbidity and mortality despite improved hemoglobin and quality of life. Conversely, intravenous iron has been found effective and relatively well tolerated in treating anemia in chronic kidney disease, even in patients with elevated ferritin. New agents to manage anemia, including long-acting erythropoietin derivatives, are also in active development. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents should be used to target hemoglobin 11-12 g/dl in patients with chronic kidney disease. Intravenous iron may be beneficial for patients with hemoglobin less than 11 g/dl and transferrin saturation less than 25% despite elevated ferritin (500-1200 ng/ml). An upcoming placebo-controlled trial of darbepoetin should help to define the role of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in chronic kidney disease.

  14. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  15. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of <333 m. There is currently a lack of concrete data to support the use of targeted oral pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy in chronic hemolytic anemia. As a result, management is generally targeted towards medical optimization of the underlying anemia. This literature review aims to discuss the pathophysiology, diagnostic and prognostic tools, recent studies and current protocols that are essential in guiding management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Issues in prevention of iron deficiency anemia in India.

    PubMed

    Anand, Tanu; Rahi, Manju; Sharma, Pragya; Ingle, Gopal K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be major public health problem in India. It is estimated that about 20% of maternal deaths are directly related to anemia and another 50% of maternal deaths are associated with it. The question, therefore, is why, despite being the first country to launch the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme in 1970, the problem of IDA remains so widespread. As is to be expected, the economic implications of IDA are also massive. The issues of control of IDA in India are multiple. Inadequate dietary intake of iron, defective iron absorption, increased iron requirements due to repeated pregnancies and lactation, poor iron reserves at birth, timing of umbilical cord clamping, timing and type of complementary food introduction, frequency of infections in children, and excessive physiological blood loss during adolescence and pregnancy are some of the causes responsible for the high prevalence of anemia in India. In addition, there are other multiple programmatic and organizational issues. This review, therefore, is an attempt to examine the current burden of anemia in India, its epidemiology, and the various issues regarding its prevention and control, as well as to offer some innovative approaches to deal with this major health problem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Blunted erythropoietic response in the anemia of anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Juncà, Jordi; Sorigué, Marc; Rodríguez-Hernández, Inés; Aldea, Marta; Granada, María Luisa; Sánchez-Planell, Lluis

    2015-11-20

    The cause of the anemia in anorexia nervosa (AN) has not been fully ascertained. Ferritin, folate and cobalamin values are usually within normal ranges. Anemia does not have a relationship with bone marrow changes and erythropoietin (EPO) levels have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the EPO response in a small group of AN patients. EPO levels were measured in serum samples of 41 female AN patients (11 with anemia, and 30 with normal blood cell count). The adequacy of EPO response was assessed by comparing the increase observed in a group of normal weight patients with anemia. EPO concentrations in anemic AN patients were higher than in non-anemic: 20.63mU/mL (4.04-28.46) vs 8.7mU/mL (3.9-20.93), P=.0088, but the increase in EPO was lower than expected (27.85mU/mL [17.7-118.9]), P=.014. BMI and the difference between actual and expected EPO were inversely correlated. Inadequate EPO response may partly explain anemia in AN, but further studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Neil D

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. PMID:23766655

  20. Mild anemia during pregnancy upregulates placental vascularity development.

    PubMed

    Stangret, A; Skoda, M; Wnuk, A; Pyzlak, M; Szukiewicz, D

    2017-05-01

    The connection between maternal hematological status and pregnancy outcome has been shown by many independent researchers. Attention was initially focused on the adverse effects of moderate and severe anemia. Interestingly, some studies revealed that mild anemia was associated with optimal fetal development and was not affecting pregnancy outcome. The explanation for this phenomenon became a target for scientists. Hemodilution, physiologic anemia and relative decrease in hemoglobin concentration are the changes observed during pregnancy but they do not explain the reasons for the positive influence of mild anemia on a fetomaternal unit. It is hypothesized that hemodilution facilitates placental perfusion because blood viscosity is reduced. Subsequently, it may lead to a decline in hemoglobin concentration. Anemia from its definition implies decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and can result in hypoxemia and even hypoxia, which is a common factor inducing new blood vessels formation. Therefore, we raised the hypothesis that the lowered hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy may upregulate vascular growth factor receptors expression such as VEGFR-1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR-2 (FLK-1/KDR). Consecutively, increased fetoplacental vasculogenesis and angiogenesis provide further expansion of vascular network development, better placental perfusion and hence neither fetus nor the mother are affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-07-21

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1 Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1. Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. PMID:27121470

  3. Macrocytic anemia and thrombocytopenia induced by orlistat.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Martinez, David; Garcia-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Montero-Santamaria, Nieves; Villar-Ruiz, Olga Patricia; Ruiz-Garcia, Antonio; Diaz-Alonso, Raquel Asuncion

    2013-10-01

    The overall incidence of obesity and its prevalence is increasing continuously. The obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor whose importance is increasing too. It is associated with many chronic conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular diseases. The obesity is also implicated as a risk factor for several kinds of cancer such as esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, breast cancer in menopausal women. The treatment of the obesity may reduce the incidence of these diseases. The mainstray of the treatment of obesity is changing the lifestyles, but obesity´s treatment may need drug therapy or even though surgical treatment. Orlistat is a specific inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, which stops fat absortion. It is used along with a hypocaloric diet, for obesity´s treatment. The beneficial effects of orlistat include weight loss, the improvement of blood pressure´s control, it may delay the development of diabetes mellitus, and it may reduce HbA1c. Besides the interaction with other drugs (mainly warfarin and amiodarone). Orlistat´s mainly side effects are gastrointestinal disorders such as the existence of oily spotting from the rectum, abdominal pain or discomfort, fecal urgency. There are also side effects at other levels, like flu symptoms, hypoglycemia, heathache or upper respiratory infections. There are other side effects with very low incidence but clinically relevant like pancreatitis, subacute liver failure, severe liver disease, myopathy, or tubular necrosis secondary to oxalate nephropathy induced by Orlistat. IN THIS CASE REPORT APPEARS A NEW ADVERSE EFFECT OF ORLISTAT THAT HAS NOT BEEN DESCRIBED ABOVE: thrombopenia and macrocytic anemia.

  4. Anemia and pregnancy: a link to maternal chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Raja; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Keith, Louis

    2011-11-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. It has serious short- and long-term consequences during pregnancy and beyond. The anemic condition is often worsened by the presence of other chronic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and diabetes. Untreated anemia also leads to increased morbidity and mortality from these chronic conditions as well. It is surprising that despite these chronic conditions (such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV) often being preventable, they still pose a real threat to public health. This article aims to review the current understanding of the pathophysiology, risks, prevention, and treatment of anemia in the light of these chronic conditions. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus.

  6. Reproductive endocrine issues in men with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, A W; Muneyyirci-Delale, O

    2017-07-01

    In patients with sickle cell anemia, the sickling of red blood cells is known to cause end-organ damage by infarction. In some men who are affected by sickle cell anemia, the obstruction of venous outflow of the penis causes priapism, which could lead to erectile dysfunction. There is also evidence that the disease is linked to other reproductive issues in men-specifically delayed puberty, low testosterone, and sperm abnormalities-although the causes of these problems are less clear. Treatment of sickle cell anemia can have effects on the reproductive system as well. This review summarizes the findings from various publications pertaining to reproductive endocrinology, along with their conclusions and discrepancies. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  7. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  8. Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.

    1991-03-11

    The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severemore » signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.« less

  9. Pharmacogenetics of ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, Javier; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenetics assesses inherited genetic differences in drug metabolic pathways and its role in medicine is growing. Ribavirin (RBV) and peginterferon were the standard of care therapy in hepatitis C virus infection during 15 years, with the addition of first-generation protease inhibitors at the beginning of 2010s. New direct-acting agents are the new standard of care, but RBV remains important in some scenarios. The main adverse effect of RBV is anemia, which requires dose reduction and even stopping treatment in some patients. Pharmacogenetics has identified ITPA and SLC28/29 genes to be closely related to RBV-induced anemia. The routine evaluation of these genes could help to identify those patients at risk of developing anemia during the hepatitis C virus treatment.

  10. Current controversies in the management of the anemia of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Nader; Ohls, Robin K

    2009-02-01

    Preterm infants, especially those with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) are exposed to frequent blood draws as part of their care in the neonatal intensive care unit. ELBW infants develop the anemia of prematurity (AOP), a hypo-proliferative anemia marked by inadequate production of erythropoietin (Epo). Treatment of AOP includes red blood cell transfusions, which are given to preterm infants based on indications and guidelines (hematocrit/hemoglobin levels, ventilation and oxygen need, apneas and bradycardias, poor weight gain) that are relatively non-specific. In this article we review recent studies evaluating transfusion guidelines, discuss ways to decrease phlebotomy losses and examine the use of red cell growth factors such as Epo in preventing and treating anemia in preterm infants.

  11. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  12. Anemia, red blood cell transfusions, and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Akhil; Patel, Ravi M; Christensen, Robert D

    2018-02-01

    In the past 15 years, multiple clinical studies have identified a temporal association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). With some variability, most of these studies indicate that up to one-third of all cases of NEC involving very low-birth weight infants may occur within 24-48h after receiving a RBC transfusion. There is also evidence that the risk of such transfusion-associated NEC may be higher in infants transfused with the greatest severity of anemia. In this article, we summarize the clinical evidence pertaining to these issues; specifically, the contribution of RBC transfusions, and the contribution of severity of underlying anemia, to the pathogenesis of a type of NEC potentially termed, "transfusion/anemia-associated NEC." Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pernicious anemia: What are the actual diagnosis criteria?

    PubMed Central

    Cattan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A gastric intrinsic factor output under 200 U/h after pentagastrin stimulation (N > 2000 U/h) is specific for pernicious anemia. The other findings are either variable or non specific. Serum intrinsic factor antibodies, considered as specific in general practice, are present only in half of the patients with pernicious anemia. In their absence, since the disappearance of the Schilling tests, the gastric tubage currently used for the study of gastric acid secretion, is obligatory for the simultaneous study of intrinsic factor output. This study is important to eliminate another disease much more frequent than pernicious anemia, the protein bound to cobalamin malabsorption was observed in achlorhydric simple atrophic gastritis in the presence of intrinsic factor secretion. PMID:21274387

  14. Pernicious anemia: what are the actual diagnosis criteria?

    PubMed

    Cattan, Daniel

    2011-01-28

    A gastric intrinsic factor output under 200 U/h after pentagastrin stimulation (N > 2000 U/h) is specific for pernicious anemia. The other findings are either variable or non specific. Serum intrinsic factor antibodies, considered as specific in general practice, are present only in half of the patients with pernicious anemia. In their absence, since the disappearance of the Schilling tests, the gastric tubage currently used for the study of gastric acid secretion, is obligatory for the simultaneous study of intrinsic factor output. This study is important to eliminate another disease much more frequent than pernicious anemia, the protein bound to cobalamin malabsorption was observed in achlorhydric simple atrophic gastritis in the presence of intrinsic factor secretion.

  15. Noninvasive molecular screening for oral precancer in Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Wu, Thijs; Brink, Arjen; Buijze, Marijke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Soulier, Jean; Leemans, C René; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-11-01

    LOH at chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 11q, and 17p are well-established oncogenetic aberrations in oral precancerous lesions and promising biomarkers to monitor the development of oral cancer. Noninvasive LOH screening of brushed oral cells is a preferable method for precancer detection in patients at increased risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), such as patients with Fanconi anemia. We determined the prevalence of LOH in brushed samples of the oral epithelium of 141 patients with Fanconi anemia and 144 aged subjects, and studied the association between LOH and HNSCC. LOH was present in 14 (9.9%) nontransplanted patients with Fanconi anemia, whereas LOH was not detected in a low-risk group (n = 50, >58 years, nonsmoking/nonalcohol history) and a group with somewhat increased HNSCC risk (n = 94, >58 years, heavy smoking/excessive alcohol use); Fisher exact test, P = 0.023 and P = 0.001, respectively. Most frequent genetic alteration was LOH at 9p. Age was a significant predictor of LOH (OR, 1.13, P = 0.001). Five patients with Fanconi anemia developed HNSCC during the study at a median age of 39.6 years (range, 24.8-53.7). LOH was significantly associated with HNSCC (Fisher exact test, P = 0.000). Unexpectedly, the LOH assay could not be used for transplanted patients with Fanconi anemia because donor DNA in brushed oral epithelium, most likely from donor leukocytes present in the oral cavity, disturbed the analysis. Noninvasive screening using a LOH assay on brushed samples of the oral epithelium has a promising outlook in patients with Fanconi anemia. However, assays need to be adapted in case of stem cell transplantation, because of contaminating donor DNA. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  17. Economic burden of anemia in an insured population.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R; Wade, Sally; Goodnough, Tim; Knight, Kevin; Dubois, Robert W

    2005-09-01

    Anemia is a common hematological disorder characterized by reduced hemoglobin concentrations. Despite information on prevalence and associated outcomes, little is known about the impact of anemia on health care utilization and costs. This study examines anemia prevalence and associated medical costs and utilization, using administrative claims for adults newly diagnosed with anemia, including up to 12 months of follow-up. Patients predisposed to anemia, based on selected comorbid conditions (chronic kidney disease, human immunodeficiency virus, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, congestive heart failure, and solid-tumor cancers), were identified. Costs for anemic patients and a random sample of nonanemic patients with these conditions were compared. Associations were evaluated after adjustment for potential confounders using a regression model. Clinical care patterns were examined overall and by condition. Anemia was observed in 3.5% (81,423) of approximately 2.3 million health plan members in 2000; 15% of anemic patients received an identified treatment, with transfusion being the most frequent intervention. Utilization and costs were significantly higher for anemic patients (P < 0.001). Average annualized per-patient costs were 14,535 US dollars for anemic patients (55% outpatient, 33% inpatient, 13% pharmacy), 54% higher than the 9,451 US dollars average cost for nonanemic patients (45% outpatient, 36% inpatient, 19% pharmacy). After adjustment for age, other comorbidities (e.g., chronic kidney disease and cancer), sex, and insurance type (indemnity, preferred provider organization/point of service, or health maintenance organization, in the Medstat MarketScan database), anemic patients had average costs that were more than twice the adjusted costs of nonanemic patients. Medical costs for anemic patients are as much as twice those for nonanemic patients with the same comorbid conditions.

  18. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  19. Fanconi Anemia: A Rarely Considered Cause of Macrocytosis During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Deniz

    2017-10-01

    We describe a Turkish boy newly diagnosed with Fanconi anemia with mutation in the FANCA gene. The patient, with normal clinical phenotype and negative chromosomal breakage test result, presented with macrocytosis. No clinical or laboratory changes were observed in a follow-up period of 4 years. The diagnosis was confirmed molecularly after a prolonged and exhaustive investigation. He was found to be a compound heterozygote for 2 mutations in the FANCA gene (1 of which is novel, c.4261-2A>C). We present this experience to alert physicians that Fanconi anemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of otherwise unexplained macrocytosis during childhood.

  20. EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ANEMIA IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Schrier, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of adverse outcomes in the elderly, including hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. What constitutes appropriate evaluation and management for an elderly patient with anemia, and when to initiate a referral to a hematologist, are significant issues. Attempts to identify suggested hemoglobin levels for blood transfusion therapy have been confounded for elderly patients with their co-morbidities. Since no specific recommended hemoglobin threshold has stood the test of time, prudent transfusion practices to maintain hemoglobin thresholds of 9–10 g/dl in the elderly are indicated, unless or until evidence emerges to indicate otherwise. PMID:24122955

  1. [Anesthetic considerations in sickle cell anemia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Meré, L A; Sopena-Zubiría, L A; Alvarez-Blanco, M

    2009-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common hemoglobinopathy. Advances in therapeutic techniques and anesthetic procedures have led to a considerable increase in the success of surgical procedures in these patients. We report the case of a 16-year-old black boy diagnosed with sickle cell anemia and beta-thalassemia who presented with chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia. He was scheduled for debridement of the lesion and musculocutaneous flap repair. We emphasize the importance of communication between anesthesiologists, surgeons, and hematologists in the perioperative period in order to determine the risk of complications and anticipate them.

  2. Pernicious Anemia: Fundamental and Practical Aspects in Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tun, Aung Myint; Thein, Kyaw Zin; Myint, Zin War; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2017-11-08

    Pernicious Anemia (PA), the most common cause of cobalamin deficiency anemia worldwide, is an autoimmune disease of multifactorial etiologies involving complex environmental and immunological factors. Although it was first reported by Addison in 1849 with subsequent advances in understanding of pathogenesis and molecular biology, diagnosis of PA is still challenging for clinicians because of its complexity and diverse clinical presentations. Herein, we provide an overview of PA, mainly focusing on its scientific and practical aspects in diagnosis. We also discuss the limitations of currently available diagnostic tools for the evaluation of cobalamin deficiency and PA. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. The Lived Experience of Anemia Without a Cause.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    This article explores anemia without an obvious cause from two perspectives: a patient and the evidence. Although evidence is required to drive favorable patient outcomes, the focus on evidence often hides the patient experience during diagnosis and treatment. Knowledge of experience with evidence can provide a deeper perspective for clinical decision making and meet nursing's ethical mandate to relieve suffering. Although one patient experience does not reflect every patient experience, this patient's experience demonstrates how difficult and dark anemia can be. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer Risk After Pernicious Anemia in the US Elderly Population.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gwen; Dawsey, Sanford M; Engels, Eric A; Ricker, Winnie; Parsons, Ruth; Etemadi, Arash; Lin, Shih-Wen; Abnet, Christian C; Freedman, Neal D

    2015-12-01

    Pernicious anemia, a result of autoimmune gastritis, is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency, affecting 2% to 5% of the elderly population. Treatment with vitamin B12 cures the anemia, but not the gastritis. Findings from small studies have indicated that patients with pernicious anemia could have an increased risk of cancer. We performed a population-based, case-control study of individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database, comparing 1,138,390 cancer cases (age, 66-99 y) with 100,000 matched individuals without cancer (controls). Individuals with pernicious anemia were identified based on their medical claims within the year before selection for the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, and models were adjusted for sex, age, and calendar year of diagnosis and selection. Compared with controls, we found individuals with pernicious anemia to be at increased risk for noncardia gastric adenocarcinoma (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.94-2.45) and gastric carcinoid tumors (OR, 11.43; 95% CI, 8.90-14.69). In addition, people with pernicious anemia have an increased risk of developing tonsilar cancer (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.40-2.85), hypopharyngeal cancer (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.35-2.73), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.76-2.55), small intestinal cancer (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.32-2.02), liver cancer (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.28- 1.73), myeloma (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.37-1.75), acute myeloid leukemia (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.46-1.93), and myelodysplastic syndrome (OR, 2.87; 95% CI, 2.53-3.26). People with pernicious anemia have a lower risk of rectal cancer than the general population (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.74- 0.92). In a population-based, case-control study of individuals in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database, we found individuals with pernicious anemia to have significantly increased risks of gastric carcinoid tumors

  5. Cancer Risk Following Pernicious Anemia in the US Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Gwen; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Engels, Eric A.; Ricker, Winnie; Parsons, Ruth; Etemadi, Arash; Lin, Shih-Wen; Abnet, Christian C.; Freedman, Neal D.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Pernicious anemia, a result of autoimmune gastritis, is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency, affecting 2%–5% of the elderly population. Treatment with vitamin B12 cures the anemia, but not the gastritis. Findings from small studies indicated that patients with pernicious anemia could have an increased risk of cancer. Methods We performed a population-based, case–control study of individuals the SEER-Medicare database, comparing 1,138,390 cancer cases (66–99 y old) to 100,000 matched individuals without cancer (controls). Individuals with pernicious anemia were identified based on their medical claims within the year before selection for the study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, and models were adjusted for sex, age, and calendar year of diagnosis and selection. Results Compared with controls, we found individuals with pernicious anemia to be at increased risk for non-cardia gastric adenocarcinoma (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.94–2.45) and gastric carcinoid tumors (OR, 11.43; 95% CI, 8.90–14.69). In addition, people with pernicious anemia have an increased risk of developing tonsilar cancer (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.40–2.85), hypopharyngeal cancer (OR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.35–2.73), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.76–2.55), small intestinal cancer (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.32–2.02), liver cancer (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.28– 1.73), myeloma (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.37–1.75), acute myeloid leukemia (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.46–1.93), and myelodysplastic syndrome (OR, 2.87; 95% CI, 2.53–3.26). People with pernicious anemia have a lower risk of rectal cancer than the general population (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.74– 0.92). Conclusion In a population-based, case–control study of individuals the SEER-Medicare database, we found individuals with pernicious anemia to have significantly increased risks of gastric carcinoid tumors, adenocarcinomas, and other

  6. [Hemolytic anemia due to hemoglobin Evans in an Argentinean family].

    PubMed

    Zanotto, María I; Calvo, Karina; Schvartzman, Gabriel; Deana, Alejandra; Noguera, Nélida; Bragós, Irma; Milani, Angela

    2010-12-01

    Unstable hemoglobins are structural variants of the hemoglobin molecule, mostly originated by single amino-acid replacement in some globin chains. These changes affect molecule stability, leading to loss of solubility, precipitation, and cellular lysis. Patients carrying these unstable hemoglobins may present mild to severe chronic hemolytic anemia. Hemoglobin Evans is an unstable variant originated by replacement of valine with methionine at position 62 of the α-globin chain. We have identified this variant in a girl with an acute hemolytic crisis associated to pharyngitis, as well as in two of her family members. This is the third case of hemolytic anemia due to hemoglobin Evans reported in the literature.

  7. Association Between Atopic Disease and Anemia in US Children.

    PubMed

    Drury, Kerry E; Schaeffer, Matt; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-01-01

    Atopic disease is associated with chronic inflammation, food allergen avoidance, and use of systemic immunosuppressant medications. All these factors have been shown to be associated with anemia. To investigate whether atopic disease is associated with increased risk of childhood anemia. A cross-sectional survey and laboratory assessment were conducted using data from the 1997-2013 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) that included 207,007 children and adolescents and the 1999-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) that included 30,673 children and adolescents. Analysis of the data was conducted between August 1, 2014, and August 28, 2015. Caregiver-reported history of eczema, asthma, hay fever, and/or food allergy. Anemia was defined by caregiver report in the NHIS and by hemoglobin levels for age and sex in the NHANES. Data were collected on 207,007 children and adolescents from NHIS, representing all pediatric age, sex, racial/ethnic, household educational level, and income groups. The US prevalence was 9.5% (95% CI, 9.4%-9.7%) from all years of the NHIS for health care-diagnosed eczema, 12.8% (95% CI, 12.6%-13.0%) for asthma, 17.1% (95% CI, 16.9%-17.3%) for hay fever, 4.2% (95% CI, 4.1%-4.3%) for food allergy, and 1.1% (95% CI, 1.1%-1.2%) for anemia. In multivariable logistic regression models controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, highest educational level in the family, insurance coverage, number of persons in the household, birthplace in the United States, and history of asthma, hay fever, and food allergy, anemia was associated with eczema in 14 of 17 studies, asthma in 11, hay fever in 12, and food allergy in 12. In multivariable analysis across the NHIS (with results reported as adjusted odds ratios [95% CIs]), children with any eczema (1.83; 1.58-2.13), asthma (1.31; 1.14-1.51), hay fever (1.57; 1.36-1.81), and food allergy (2.08; 1.71-2.52) had higher odds of anemia (P < .001 for all). In the

  8. Peginesatide in patients with anemia undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, Steven; Schiller, Brigitte; Locatelli, Francesco; Covic, Adrian C; Provenzano, Robert; Wiecek, Andrzej; Levin, Nathan W; Kaplan, Mark; Macdougall, Iain C; Francisco, Carol; Mayo, Martha R; Polu, Krishna R; Duliege, Anne-Marie; Besarab, Anatole

    2013-01-24

    Peginesatide, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), is a potential therapy for anemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. We conducted two randomized, controlled, open-label studies (EMERALD 1 and EMERALD 2) involving patients undergoing hemodialysis. Cardiovascular safety was evaluated by analysis of an adjudicated composite safety end point--death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or serious adverse events of congestive heart failure, unstable angina, or arrhythmia--with the use of pooled data from the two EMERALD studies and two studies involving patients not undergoing dialysis. In the EMERALD studies, 1608 patients received peginesatide once monthly or continued to receive epoetin one to three times a week, with the doses adjusted as necessary to maintain a hemoglobin level between 10.0 and 12.0 g per deciliter for 52 weeks or more. The primary efficacy end point was the mean change from the baseline hemoglobin level to the mean level during the evaluation period; noninferiority was established if the lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval was -1.0 g per deciliter or higher in the comparison of peginesatide with epoetin. The aim of evaluating the composite safety end point in the pooled cohort was to exclude a hazard ratio with peginesatide relative to the comparator ESA of more than 1.3. In an analysis involving 693 patients from EMERALD 1 and 725 from EMERALD 2, peginesatide was noninferior to epoetin in maintaining hemoglobin levels (mean between-group difference, -0.15 g per deciliter; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.30 to -0.01 in EMERALD 1; and 0.10 g per deciliter; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.26 in EMERALD 2). The hazard ratio for the composite safety end point was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.89 to 1.26) with peginesatide relative to the comparator ESA in the four pooled studies (2591 patients) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.17) in the EMERALD studies. The proportions of patients with adverse and serious

  9. 6-Month Mortality and Cardiac Catheterization in Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients with Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Chih; Waring, Molly E.; Lessard, Darleen; Yarzebski, Jorge; Gore, Joel; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unknown how anemia influences the invasive management of patients with non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and associated mortality. We investigated whether receipt of cardiac catheterization relates to 6-month death rates among patients with different severity of anemia. Methods We used data from the population-based Worcester Heart Attack Study, which included 2,634 patients hospitalized with confirmed NSTEMI, from 3 PCI-capable medical centers in the Worcester (MA) metropolitan area, during 5 biennial periods between 1997 and 2005. Severity of anemia was categorized using admission hematocrit levels: ≤30.0% (moderate-to-severe anemia), 30.1–39.0% (mild anemia), and >39.0% (no anemia). Propensity matching and conditional logistic regression adjusting for hospital use of aspirin, heparin, and plavix compared 6-month post-admission all-cause mortality rates in relation to cardiac catheterization during NSTEMI hospitalization. Results Compared to patients without anemia, patients with anemia were less likely to undergo cardiac catheterization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.79 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67–0.95] for mild anemia and 0.45 [95%CI: 0.42–0.49] for moderate-to-severe anemia). After propensity matching, cardiac catheterization was associated with lower 6-month death rates only in patients without anemia (AOR 0.26 [95%CI: 0.09–0.79]) but not in patients with mild anemia (AOR 0.55 [95%CI: 0.25–1.23]). The small number of patients rendered data inconclusive for patients with moderate-to-severe anemia. Conclusions Anemia at the time of hospitalization for NSTEMI was associated with lower utilization of cardiac catheterization. However, cardiac catheterization use was associated with a decreased risk of dying at 6 months post hospital admission only in patients without anemia. PMID:21738102

  10. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. [Characterization of anemia in children under five years of age from urban areas of Huancavelica and Ucayali, Peru].

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Elena; Huamán-Espino, Lucio; Gutiérrez, César; Aparco, Juan Pablo; Pillaca, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Characterize anemia in children aged between 12 and 59 months from urban areas in the provinces of Coronel Portillo and Huancavelica in Peru. Cross-sectional study carried out in two stages: a) population-based study to identify children with anemia using multistage probability sampling, and b) characterization of the serum levels of ferritin, vitamin B12, intraerythrocytic folic acid and presence of parasitosis in children with anemia. For the statistical analysis, expansion factors calculated from the sampling plan were applied. The prevalence of anemia was 55.9% in Huancavelica and 36.2% in Coronel Portillo. In Huancavelica, the coexistence of anemia with iron deficiency was 22.8% and anemia with vitamin B12 deficiency was 11%. In Coronel Portillo, the coexistence of anemia with iron deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency was 15.2% and 29.7%, respectively. The most common types of anemia in Huancavelica were anemia with concurrent parasitosis (50.9%), iron deficiency anemia and parasitosis (12.3%), and iron deficiency alone (6.4%). In Coronel Portillo, it was anemia and parasitosis (54.4%), vitamin B12 deficiency and parasitosis (18.4%), and iron deficiency anemia and parasitosis (6.3%). The prevalence of anemia is higher than the national average, with anemia concurrent with parasitosis and anemia concurrent with two or more causes as the most common type. Consideration should be given to different causes other than iron deficiency in the programs of anemia contol for Peruvian children.

  12. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

  13. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-09-21

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice.

  14. An unusual presentation of listeriosis: anemia and cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Yap, Jonathan; Fong, Yuke Tien

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing food-borne disease. It usually affects the young as well as immunocompromised individuals and is associated with high mortality rates. Cutaneous manifestations have rarely been described. We describe an interesting case of a traveller from the tropics presenting with cutaneous listeriosis and anemia.

  15. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  16. Effect of 131I on the anemia of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perlman, J.A.; Sternthal, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the National Thyrotoxicosis Therapy Follow-Up Study (NTTFS) are presented here to document the existence of anemia in hyperthyroidism, a mild and reversible anemia that is simultaneously ameliorated with reversal of the hyperthyroid state. Among 20,600 women entered into the NTTF study with no previous history of hematological disorders, the prevalence of anemia was found to range from 10-15%, appearing to be higher in those selected for treatment with 131I when compared to those selected for surgery. An attempt is made to verify the recent hypothesis that thyroid hormone levels in the supraphysiologic range may suppress erythrogenesis. Two statisticallymore » significant regression models are consistent with a hypothesis of thyrotoxic bone marrow suppression. However, both associations are weak enough to suggest that some other physiologic improvement underlies the amelioration of anemia when hyperthyroidism is reversed. The degree of improvement in hematological status is similar for women in both treatment groups. Among 4464 women for whom serial hematological tests are obtained, over 3/4 of anemic patients are no longer anemic after an average 6.2 yr of follow-up. Clinicians are reassured that radioactive iodine exposure causes no further insult to the bone marrow, no matter what the cumulative dosage. The highly fractionated low dose bone marrow exposures to radiation account for the minimal hematological risks of 131I treatment.« less

  17. Anemia management in cancer patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Deak, Andras T; Troppan, Katharina; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common complication of cancer and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with decreased physical performance as well as poor prognosis for life expectancy. Renal and cancer-induced anemia share common features regarding pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies. It is typically treated with iron substitution, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and in refractory cases with red blood cell transfusions. However, studies of the past few years unveiled numerous setbacks in the use of ESAs. These included a higher risk of cerebrovascular events and increased mortality without the improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD. Moreover, particularly negative results were observed in patients with previous cancer history under ESA therapy. These unfavorable findings have forced the clinicians to reevaluate the management of renal anemia. This led to decrease of ESA usage, while iron substitution and alternative therapeutic options gained more significance. Iron supplementation is also accompanied with certain risks ranging from gastrointestinal complications to severe allergic reactions and increased rate of infections. Furthermore, the evaluation of the long-term safety of excessive iron therapy is still lacking, especially in CKD patients with cancer. In the absence of these clinical studies, this review aims to summarize the currently available therapeutic strategies in anemia management of CKD patients with concomitant cancer. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  19. Idiopathic hyperzincemia with associated copper deficiency anemia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Merza, Hussein; Sood, Neha; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Prompt serum copper and zinc in addition to vitamin B12 levels should be measured in patients suffering from refractory anemia with neurological symptoms. A timely copper supplementation can help revert the hematological and possibly the neurological manifestations. PMID:26509015

  20. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  1. Renal abscess in a child with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Taksande, Amar M; Vilhekar, K Y

    2009-03-01

    Renal abscess is rare in children and the usual presenting features include fever, lumbar pain, abdominal pain and occasional flank mass. Renal ultrasonography facilitates an early diagnosis and helps in percutaneous drainage. We herewith report on a child with sickle cell anemia who developed a renal abscess.

  2. Pancytopenia in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, K Y; Karayalcin, G; Rosner, F; Aballi, A

    1975-10-01

    An 11-year-old black boy with sickle cell anemia developed profound pancytopenia during the course of his disease, but fully recovered therefrom. The patient was receiving anticonvulsant drugs for a seizure disorder secondary to a "stroke," and, therefore, a drug-related marrow aplasia cannot be ruled out.

  3. [Iron deficiency anemia and pregnancy. Prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Beucher, G; Grossetti, E; Simonet, T; Leporrier, M; Dreyfus, M

    2011-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness and the safety of prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy. French and English publications were searched using PubMed and Cochrane library. Early screening of iron deficiency by systematic examination and blood analysis seemed essential. Maternal and perinatal complications were correlated to the severity and to the mode of appearance of anemia. Systematic intakes of iron supplements seemed not to be recommended. In case of anemia during pregnancy, iron supplementation was not associated with a significant reduction in substantive maternal and neonatal outcomes. Oral iron supplementation increased blood parameters but exposed to digestive side effects. Women who received parenteral supplementation were more likely to have better hematological response but also severe potential side effects during pregnancy and in post-partum. The maternal tolerance of anemia motivated the choice between parenteral supplementation and blood transfusion. Large and methodologically strong trials are necessary to evaluate the effects of iron supplementation on maternal health and pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. How I treat anemia in pregnancy: iron, cobalamin, and folate.

    PubMed

    Achebe, Maureen M; Gafter-Gvili, Anat

    2017-02-23

    Anemia of pregnancy, an important risk factor for fetal and maternal morbidity, is considered a global health problem, affecting almost 50% of pregnant women. In this article, diagnosis and management of iron, cobalamin, and folate deficiencies, the most frequent causes of anemia in pregnancy, are discussed. Three clinical cases are considered. Iron deficiency is the most common cause. Laboratory tests defining iron deficiency, the recognition of developmental delays and cognitive abnormalities in iron-deficient neonates, and literature addressing the efficacy and safety of IV iron in pregnancy are reviewed. An algorithm is proposed to help clinicians diagnose and treat iron deficiency, recommending oral iron in the first trimester and IV iron later. Association of folate deficiency with neural tube defects and impact of fortification programs are discussed. With increased obesity and bariatric surgery rates, prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in pregnancy is rising. Low maternal cobalamin may be associated with fetal growth retardation, fetal insulin resistance, and excess adiposity. The importance of treating cobalamin deficiency in pregnancy is considered. A case of malarial anemia emphasizes the complex relationship between iron deficiency, iron treatment, and malaria infection in endemic areas; the heightened impact of combined etiologies on anemia severity is highlighted. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Management of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wish, Jay B

    2004-11-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing at an alarming rate in the United States and other Western countries, due in part to an increased incidence of diabetes, which itself appears to be a direct consequence of the obesity epidemic in modern society. Hypertension, a condition that also results from or is exacerbated by excess body weight, remains an important cause of CKD as well. In patients with CKD, anemia is both a common occurrence and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, especially from cardiac complications such as coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and congestive heart failure. Correction of anemia in patients with CKD is associated with demonstrated benefits, including a reduction in hospitalization and per-patient healthcare expenditures. In this article, Dr Wish describes the magnitude of the population with, or at risk for, CKD in the United States and examines data on the risks associated with anemia, particularly in patients with comorbid conditions such as diabetes and heart disease. Practical issues related to the treatment of anemia in patients with CKD are also presented.

  6. White centered retinal hemorrhages in vitamin b(12) deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Zehetner, Claus; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E

    2011-05-01

    To report a case of severe vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia presenting with white centered retinal hemorrhages. Interventional case report. A 40-year-old man, general practitioner himself, presented with a 1-day history of diminished left visual acuity and a drop-shaped central scotoma. The corrected visual acuities were 20/20, OD and 20/100, OS. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilaterally pale tarsal conjunctiva, discretely icteric bulbar conjunctiva and disseminated white centered intraretinal hemorrhages with foveal involvement. OCT imaging through these lesions revealed a retinal thickening caused by a sub-ILM accumulation of hyperreflective and inhomogeneous deposits within the nerve fiber layer. Immediate laboratory work-up showed severe megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B(12) deficiency requiring erythrocyte transfusions. Most reports of white centered retinal hemorrhages have been described in patients with leukemic retinopathy and bacterial endocarditis. It is interesting that this case of vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia retinopathy has a clinically indistinguishable fundus appearance. This is probably due to the common pathology of capillary disruption and subsequent hemostatic fibrin plug formation. In megaloblastic anemia, direct anoxia results in endothelial dysfunction. The loss of impermeability allows extrusion of whole blood and subsequent diffusion from the disrupted site throughout and above the nerve fiber layer. Therefore the biomicroscopic pattern of white centered hemorrhages observed in anemic retinopathy is most likely due to the clot formation as the reparative sequence after capillary rupture.

  7. Anemia in conventional hemodialysis: Finding the optimal treatment balance.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Koiwa, Fumihiko; Akizawa, Tadao

    2018-06-17

    Renal anemia is a serious and common complication in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The introduction of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) has dramatically improved hemoglobin levels and outcomes. Several interventional studies reported that excessive correction of anemia and the massive use of ESA can trigger cardiovascular disease (CVD), and consequently may worsen the prognosis of patients undergoing HD. Therefore, it has been widely recognized that large doses of ESA should be used with caution. An effective use of iron preparations is required to yield the optimal effect of ESA. It is well-known that iron utilization is inhibited under pathological conditions, such as chronic inflammation, resulting in ESA resistance. It is postulated that a new class of therapeutic agents for renal anemia, hypoxia inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (HIF-PH) inhibitors, will have beneficial treatment effects in patients on HD. HIF is induced by hypoxia and promotes erythropoietin production. In the absence of a hypoxic state, HIF is decomposed by the HIF catabolic enzyme. HIF-PH inhibitors inhibit this degrading enzyme and stimulate endogenous erythropoietin production via HIF induction. Additionally, HIF-PH inhibitors promote effective utilization of iron and raise erythropoietin to physiological concentrations. Accordingly, HIF-PH inhibitors improve anemia and iron metabolism. It appears that this effect persists irrespective of chronic inflammatory conditions. HIF-PH inhibitors do not overshoot erythropoietin above physiological concentrations like ESAs. Therefore, it is hypothesized that HIF-PH inhibitors would not increase the risk of CVD in patients undergoing HD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient with Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Kumar; Dahal, Sumit; Fadlalla, Kamal Fadlalla El Jack; Bhagat, Shambhu; Bhattarai, Bikash

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been associated with different autoimmune disorders. However, its association with pernicious anemia is rarely reported. Case Report . A 46-year-old male presented with blood in sputum and urine for one day. The vitals were stable. The physical examination was significant for icterus. Lab tests' results revealed leukocytosis, macrocytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. He had an elevated LDH, low haptoglobin levels with many schistocytes, nucleated RBCs, and reticulocytes on peripheral smear. Low ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) with elevated ADAMTS13 antibody clinched the diagnosis of severe acquired TTP, and plasmapheresis was started. There was an initial improvement in his hematological markers, which were however not sustained on discontinuation of plasmapheresis. For his refractory TTP, he was resumed on daily plasmapheresis and Rituximab was started. Furthermore, the initial serum Vitamin B12 and reticulocyte index were low in the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibody. So with the concomitant diagnosis of pernicious anemia, Vitamin B12 was supplemented. The rest of the immunological workups were negative. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and his hematological parameters improved. Discussion . While pernicious anemia can masquerade as TTP, an actual association between the two can also occur and needs further evaluation and characterization.

  9. Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient with Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Shambhu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been associated with different autoimmune disorders. However, its association with pernicious anemia is rarely reported. Case Report. A 46-year-old male presented with blood in sputum and urine for one day. The vitals were stable. The physical examination was significant for icterus. Lab tests' results revealed leukocytosis, macrocytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. He had an elevated LDH, low haptoglobin levels with many schistocytes, nucleated RBCs, and reticulocytes on peripheral smear. Low ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) with elevated ADAMTS13 antibody clinched the diagnosis of severe acquired TTP, and plasmapheresis was started. There was an initial improvement in his hematological markers, which were however not sustained on discontinuation of plasmapheresis. For his refractory TTP, he was resumed on daily plasmapheresis and Rituximab was started. Furthermore, the initial serum Vitamin B12 and reticulocyte index were low in the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibody. So with the concomitant diagnosis of pernicious anemia, Vitamin B12 was supplemented. The rest of the immunological workups were negative. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and his hematological parameters improved. Discussion. While pernicious anemia can masquerade as TTP, an actual association between the two can also occur and needs further evaluation and characterization. PMID:28473932

  10. "What an Affliction": Mary Todd Lincoln's Fatal Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2015-01-01

    To date, no single diagnosis has unified the psychiatric illness and the numerous poorly defined physical complaints that Mary Lincoln (née Todd, 1818-1882) suffered in adulthood. Here, I show that her physical ailments spanned 30 years and included sore mouth, pallor, paresthesias, the Lhermitte symptom, fever, headaches, fatigue, resting tachycardia, edema, episodic weight loss, progressive weakness, ataxia, and visual impairment. Long thought hypochondriacal, these findings, plus their time course and her psychopathology (irritability, delusions, hallucinations, with preserved clarity), are all consistent with vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia most probably caused this deficiency: she lacked risk factors for other causes, and her consanguineous parents both derived from a region of Scotland having a high incidence of pernicious anemia. A diagnosis of chronic multisystem pernicious anemia would clarify the conduct of Mary Lincoln as First Lady and widow, and illuminate challenges faced by her husband, President Abraham Lincoln. Her case highlights many forgotten features of the natural history of untreated pernicious anemia and is unique in the medical literature in demonstrating such a course extending over a lifetime.

  11. [Anemia status and correlation factors in rural regions of Hebei province].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-jin; Li, Jian-guo; Xu, Wei-ling; Wang, Xiao-bo; Liu, Yan-li; Jiang, Hong

    2008-05-01

    To investigate anemia status and correlation infection factors in rural regions of Hebei province and to find out evidence for preventing and controlling anemia. A random-sampling survey was conducted among 3367 houses in Hebei rural areas. The investigation involved economic levels, ages, education levels and occupations of 11,627 questionnaire. The hemoprotein and serum iron were measured. Unconditional logistic regression was performed. The anemia prevalence rate was shown up to 8.4% in rural regions of Hebei province, and in men and women was 5.5% and 11.0%, respectively;mainly in infant (< 2 years old, 27.2%) child bearing age women, the anemia prevalence rate was 11.0%-16.0%. The analysis showed that the main risk factors of anemia were sex and serum iron. The anemia prevalence is highest in infant and child bearing age women;supplying of iron should be an important measure for preventing and controlling anemia.

  12. Risk and Prevalence of Anemia among Women Attending Public and Private Universities.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marcelo Rodrigues; De Oliveira E Silva, Lília Maria Monteiro; Dos Santos Beserra Pessoa, Marcia Luiza; Da Mota Araújo, Marcos Antônio; Dos Reis Moreira-Araújo, Regilda Saraiva

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. Women are known to be more susceptible to anemia; however, no controlled study has yet assessed differences in the prevalence of anemia exclusively among women with higher education. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of anemia among women attending universities. The hemoglobin concentration of 140 women aged 18 to 45 years old from a private and a public university was measured. Anthropometric and socioeconomic data were also collected. The risk of developing anemia was almost threefold higher among the students attending the public university (OR: 2.71; p=.0248). The prevalence of anemia was much higher than in the overall female population (79%). The higher education was not a protective factor for anemia in women when analysed separately from the total population of women.

  13. Combatting anemia in adolescent girls: a report from India.

    PubMed

    Kanani, S

    1994-01-01

    In a study on anemia in adolescent girls living in slum areas, 105 girls, aged 10 to 18, participated in qualitative (focus group discussions; open ended, in depth interviews) and quantitative (structured survey and hemoglobin estimation) research activities before and after intervention. Perceptions of mothers were also surveyed. The qualitative methods were used on selected subsamples in order to represent all age and ethnic groups and geographic areas of the slum. Quantitative methods were used on all 105 girls. The prevalence of anemia was 98%. The patterns of responses were similar for the focus groups, interviews, and surveys. Mothers and their daughters believed the girls were healthy (" one who ate well, worked without tiring easily and did not fall sick often"). There was no major connection made between menstruation and health, or between present and future health. Most of the girls were unaware of the Gujarati term for anemia, pandurog, which is used in awareness campaigns. The girls described symptoms (weakness = kamshakti) associated with anemia and knew these could be remedied with green leafy vegetables, fruit, milk, meat, tonics from the doctor, and iron tablets (shakti ni goli). Based on these results, a puppet show, using local terms and events, was developed that covered the causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention of anemia. The term, pandurog, was introduced and reinforced. The girls were encouraged to have their blood tested and to take iron tablets. The hemoglobin levels of the girls were taken after the show and after an iron supplement program lasting three months. Compliance with the supplementation program was monitored biweekly. Group discussions with flash cards reinforced the information in the puppet show. Results from the last hemoglobin level showed a significant increase; however, the prevalence of anemia was 87%. About half of the girls consumed at least 60% of the tablets; one-fifth consumed 80%. Forgetfulness and fasting

  14. Inflammation associated anemia and ferritin as disease markers in SLE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In a recent screening to detect biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, was increased. Given that proteins that regulate the storage, transfer and release of iron play an important role in inflammation, this study aims to determine the serum and urine levels of ferritin and of the iron transfer protein, transferrin, in lupus patients and to correlate these levels with disease activity, inflammatory cytokine levels and markers of anemia. Methods A protein array was utilized to measure ferritin expression in the urine and serum of SLE patients and healthy controls. To confirm these results as well as the role of the iron transfer pathway in SLE, ELISAs were performed to measure ferritin and transferrin levels in inactive or active SLE patients and healthy controls. The relationship between ferritin/transferrin levels and inflammatory markers and anemia was next analyzed. Results Protein array results showed elevated ferritin levels in the serum and urine of lupus patients as compared to controls, which were further validated by ELISA. Increased ferritin levels correlated with measures of disease activity and anemia as well as inflammatory cytokine titers. Though active SLE patients had elevated urine transferrin, serum transferrin was reduced. Conclusion Urine ferritin and transferrin levels are elevated significantly in SLE patients and correlate with disease activity, bolstering previous reports. Most importantly, these changes correlated with the inflammatory state of the patients and anemia of chronic disease. Taken together, altered iron handling, inflammation and anemia of chronic disease constitute an ominous triad in SLE. PMID:22871034

  15. Hemodialysis patients' preferences for the management of anemia.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Brett; Caloyeras, John; Posner, Joshua; Brommage, Deborah; Tzivelekis, Spiros; Pollock, Allan

    2017-07-28

    Patient engagement in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is expected to result in a more patient-centered approach to care that aligns with patients' values, preferences, and goals for treatment. Nevertheless, no previous studies of which we are aware have evaluated patients' benefit-risk preferences for the management of anemia associated with ESRD. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the tradeoffs patients are willing to make between cardiovascular risks associated with some anemia medicines and red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. A secondary objective was to quantify the importance of avoiding transfusion-related risks. A survey instrument was developed from the clinical literature, clinician input, patient-education resources, and a patient focus group. The survey instrument was qualitatively pretested before its administration to a broader sample of patients. The National Kidney Foundation invited individuals in the United States to participate in the survey. In a discrete-choice experiment (DCE), respondents chose between two hypothetical anemia medications in a series of questions. Each medication was defined by symptom relief, frequency of transfusions, cardiovascular risk, mode of administration, and out-of-pocket cost. The survey also included a best-worst scaling (BWS) exercise to quantify the importance of avoiding attributes of blood transfusions. Results from the DCE were used to estimate relative importance and marginal willingness to pay. Results from the BWS were converted to relative importance weights. A total of 200 individuals completed the survey. Patients were willing to accept a 6% medication-related risk of heart attack to avoid having two RBC transfusions per month. Symptom relief and mode of administration were of moderate importance. The most important transfusion-related risk to avoid was transfusion-related lung injury. Patients with ESRD and anemia have measurable treatment preferences and are willing to accept risks

  16. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S; Cheng, Sunfa; Desai, Akshay S; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P; McMurray, John J V; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A; Solomon, Scott D; Sun, Yan; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2013-03-28

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia. In this randomized, double-blind trial, we assigned 2278 patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia (hemoglobin level, 9.0 to 12.0 g per deciliter) to receive either darbepoetin alfa (to achieve a hemoglobin target of 13 g per deciliter) or placebo. The primary outcome was a composite of death from any cause or hospitalization for worsening heart failure. The primary outcome occurred in 576 of 1136 patients (50.7%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 565 of 1142 patients (49.5%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the darbepoetin alfa group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 1.13; P=0.87). There was no significant between-group difference in any of the secondary outcomes. The neutral effect of darbepoetin alfa was consistent across all prespecified subgroups. Fatal or nonfatal stroke occurred in 42 patients (3.7%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 31 patients (2.7%) in the placebo group (P=0.23). Thromboembolic adverse events were reported in 153 patients (13.5%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 114 patients (10.0%) in the placebo group (P=0.01). Cancer-related adverse events were similar in the two study groups. Treatment with darbepoetin alfa did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia. Our findings do not support the use of darbepoetin alfa in these patients. (Funded by Amgen; RED-HF ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00358215.).

  17. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4(th) and 7(th) months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study.

  18. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4th and 7th months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Results: Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Conclusion: Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study. PMID:25972720

  19. Cytokine overproduction and crosslinker hypersensitivity are unlinked in Fanconi anemia macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garbati, Michael R; Hays, Laura E; Rathbun, R Keaney; Jillette, Nathaniel; Chin, Kathy; Al-Dhalimy, Muhsen; Agarwal, Anupriya; Newell, Amy E Hanlon; Olson, Susan B; Bagby, Grover C

    2016-03-01

    The Fanconi anemia proteins participate in a canonical pathway that repairs cross-linking agent-induced DNA damage. Cells with inactivated Fanconi anemia genes are universally hypersensitive to such agents. Fanconi anemia-deficient hematopoietic stem cells are also hypersensitive to inflammatory cytokines, and, as importantly, Fanconi anemia macrophages overproduce such cytokines in response to TLR4 and TLR7/8 agonists. We questioned whether TLR-induced DNA damage is the primary cause of aberrantly regulated cytokine production in Fanconi anemia macrophages by quantifying TLR agonist-induced TNF-α production, DNA strand breaks, crosslinker-induced chromosomal breakage, and Fanconi anemia core complex function in Fanconi anemia complementation group C-deficient human and murine macrophages. Although both M1 and M2 polarized Fanconi anemia cells were predictably hypersensitive to mitomycin C, only M1 macrophages overproduced TNF-α in response to TLR-activating signals. DNA damaging agents alone did not induce TNF-α production in the absence of TLR agonists in wild-type or Fanconi anemia macrophages, and mitomycin C did not enhance TLR responses in either normal or Fanconi anemia cells. TLR4 and TLR7/8 activation induced cytokine overproduction in Fanconi anemia macrophages. Also, although TLR4 activation was associated with induced double strand breaks, TLR7/8 activation was not. That DNA strand breaks and chromosome breaks are neither necessary nor sufficient to account for the overproduction of inflammatory cytokines by Fanconi anemia cells suggests that noncanonical anti-inflammatory functions of Fanconi anemia complementation group C contribute to the aberrant macrophage phenotype and suggests that suppression of macrophage/TLR hyperreactivity might prevent cytokine-induced stem cell attrition in Fanconi anemia. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. Caregiver perceptions of iron deficiency anemia and iron replacement therapies in young children with nutritional iron deficiency anemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the U.S., approximately 3% of young children develop iron deficiency anemia (IDA), with Hispanic/Latino children disproportionately affected. IDA is associated with inferior neurodevelopmental outcomes. Treatment with oral iron mitigates its consequences yet non-adherence often results in treatme...

  1. Association of Testosterone Levels With Anemia in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Cindy N.; Snyder, Peter J.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Artz, Andrew S.; Bhasin, Shalender; Cohen, Harvey J.; Farrar, John T.; Gill, Thomas M.; Zeldow, Bret; Cella, David; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cauley, Jane A.; Crandall, Jill P.; Cunningham, Glenn R.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Lewis, Cora E.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Molitch, Mark E.; Pahor, Marco; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Cifelli, Denise; Hou, Xiaoling; Resnick, Susan M.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan J.; Wang, Christina; Schrier, Stanley L.; Ellenberg, Susan S.

    2017-01-01

    Importance In one-third of older men with anemia, no recognized cause can be found. Objective To determine if testosterone treatment of men 65 years or older with unequivocally low testosterone levels and unexplained anemia would increase their hemoglobin concentration. Design, Setting, and Participants A double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with treatment allocation by minimization using 788 men 65 years or older who have average testosterone levels of less than 275 ng/dL. Of 788 participants, 126 were anemic (hemoglobin Š12.7 g/dL), 62 of whom had no known cause. The trial was conducted in 12 academic medical centers in the United States from June 2010 to June 2014. Interventions Testosterone gel, the dose adjusted to maintain the testosterone levels normal for young men, or placebo gel for 12 months. Main Outcomes and Measures The percent of men with unexplained anemia whose hemoglobin levels increased by 1.0 g/dL or more in response to testosterone compared with placebo. The statistical analysis was intent-to-treat by a logistic mixed effects model adjusted for balancing factors. Results The men had a mean age of 74.8 years and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 30.7; 84.9% were white. Testosterone treatment resulted in a greater percentage of men with unexplained anemia whose month 12 hemoglobin levels had increased by 1.0 g/dL or more over baseline (54%) than did placebo (15%) (adjusted OR, 31.5; 95% CI, 3.7-277.8; P = .002) and a greater percentage of men who at month 12 were no longer anemic (58.3%) compared with placebo (22.2%) (adjusted OR, 17.0; 95% CI, 2.8-104.0; P = .002). Testosterone treatment also resulted in a greater percentage of men with anemia of known cause whose month 12 hemoglobin levels had increased by 1.0 g/dL or more (52%) than did placebo (19%) (adjusted OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 2.1-31.9; P = .003). Testosterone treatment resulted in a hemoglobin concentration of more than 17

  2. Input of pharmaceuticals through coastal surface watercourses into a Mediterranean lagoon (Mar Menor, SE Spain): sources and seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, R; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Gros, M; Pérez-Cánovas, E; Barceló, D; León, V M

    2014-08-15

    The seasonal occurrence and distribution of 69 pharmaceuticals along coastal watercourses during 6 sampling campaigns and their input through El Albujón watercourse to the Mar Menor lagoon were determined by UPLC-MS-MS, considering a total of 115 water samples. The major source of pharmaceuticals running into this watercourse was an effluent from the Los Alcazares WWTP, although other sources were also present (runoffs, excess water from irrigation, etc.). In this urban and agriculturally influenced watercourse different pharmaceutical distribution profiles were detected according to their attenuation, which depended on physicochemical water conditions, pollutant input variation, biodegradation and photodegradation rates of pollutants, etc. The less recalcitrant compounds in this study (macrolides, β-blockers, etc.) showed a relevant seasonal variability as a consequence of dissipation processes (degradation, sorption, etc.). Attenuation was lower, however, for diclofenac, carbamazepine, lorazepam, valsartan, sulfamethoxazole among others, due to their known lower degradability and sorption onto particulate matter, according to previous studies. The maximum concentrations detected were higher than 1000 ng L(-1) for azithromycin, clarithromycin, valsartan, acetaminophen and ibuprofen. These high concentration levels were favored by the limited dilution in this low flow system, and consequently some of them could pose an acute risk to the biota of this watercourse. Considering data from 2009 to 2010, it has been estimated that a total of 11.3 kg of pharmaceuticals access the Mar Menor lagoon annually through the El Albujón watercourse. The highest proportion of this input corresponded to antibiotics (46%), followed by antihypertensives (20%) and diuretics (18%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnitude and Correlates of Anemia in Elderly Women of a Resettlement Colony of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tulika; Nagesh, S; Ray, T K

    2018-01-01

    Anemia of any degree contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and has a significant effect on the quality of life of elderly women. Despite its clinical importance, anemia in the elderly women is underrecognized. The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude and correlates of anemia in elderly women of a resettlement colony of Delhi. A community-based, cross-sectional study for the duration of 1 year was conducted among 512 geriatric women (≥60 years). Demographic characteristics, dietary assessment, and behavioral risk factors were determined by interview, and the participants underwent physical examination followed by hemoglobin estimation by HemoCue. Anemia was defined using the WHO criteria of hemoglobin <12 g/dl. Chi-square test was employed to study the association between sociodemographic factors and anemia followed by multivariate regression analysis. The prevalence of anemia was 79.9% according to the WHO criteria of hemoglobin <12 g/dl in females. Age, education, marital status, financial dependence, diagnosed chronic disease, diet, calorie intake, history of worm infestation, and body mass index (BMI) were significantly associated with anemia on univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, age, marital status, financial dependence, diagnosed chronic disease, diet, calorie intake, and BMI were significant explanatory variables for anemia. Our study points out high prevalence of and some of the major factors associated with anemia in elderly women. The need of the hour is to include our elderly women under the gamut of National Anemia Prophylaxis Program.

  4. Anemia among pregnant women in Southeast Ethiopia: prevalence, severity and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kefiyalew, Filagot; Zemene, Endalew; Asres, Yaregal; Gedefaw, Lealem

    2014-11-03

    Anemia is a significant public health problem in developing countries, particularly in pregnant women. It may complicate pregnancy, sometimes resulting in tragic outcomes. There is a lack of information on the magnitude of anemia among pregnant women in Southeast Ethiopia. The aim of this study is, therefore, to determine the prevalence of anemia and assess associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) at Bisidimo Hospital in Southeast Ethiopia. A facility-based cross-sectional study, involving 258 pregnant women, was conducted from March to June 2013. Socio-demographic, medical and obstetric data of the study participants were collected using structured questionnaire. Hemoglobin was measured using a hematology analyzer and faecal specimens were examined to detect intestinal parasites. Anemia in pregnancy was defined as hemoglobin <11 g/dl. Overall, prevalence of anemia was 27.9%, of which 55% had mild anemia. Rural residence (AOR =3.3, 95% CI: 1.5-7.4), intestinal parasitic infection (IPI) (AOR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3-4.8) and history of heavy cycle (AOR =2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-1.7) were predictors of anemia. This study showed moderate prevalence of anemia among the pregnant women, with a sizable proportion having severe anemia. Routine testing of pregnant women for IPIs and creating awareness on factors predisposing to anemia is recommended.

  5. [Single center survey of the relationship between pregnancy anemia and prepregnancy lifestyle].

    PubMed

    Akase, Tomoko; Hihara, Emiko; Uematsu, Kazuko; Kodaka, Masanobu; Akase, Tomohide; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi

    2008-07-01

    Physiologically, anemia often occurs during pregnancy because of an increase in circulating plasma volume. Pregnancy anemia is found prenatally in 50-75% of women. Based on the present survey performed in our obstetrics and gynecology ward, 52% of women experienced anemia during their pregnancy. This suggests that normal physiological changes due to pregnancy alone are not the only factors contributing to pregnancy anemia. Therefore to study the influence of lifestyle on pregnancy anemia, we investigated prepregnancy lifestyles on the assumption that the accumulation of several factors over a long period is usually the cause of anemia. The present results suggest that (i) the probability of anemia is slight in late pregnancy, if a normal Hb concentration is maintained in early pregnancy; (ii) the menstrual cycle is involved in the onset of anemia during early pregnancy; (iii) the number of meals taken and the level of alcohol consumption influence Hb concentration in late pregnancy. We believe that these findings provide a useful information source for advising patients on avoiding pregnancy anemia, which we can also use as guidance for outpatients at puberty. In conclusion, to prevent pregnancy anemia it is important to keep a regular menstrual cycle before pregnancy, and to take 3 meals/day and abstain from alcohol before and during pregnancy.

  6. Plasma hepcidin levels and anemia in old age. The Leiden 85-Plus Study

    PubMed Central

    den Elzen, Wendy P.J.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Wiegerinck, Erwin T.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin, an important regulator of iron homeostasis, is suggested to be causally related to anemia of inflammation. The aim of this study was to explore the role of plasma hepcidin in anemia among older persons from the general population. The Leiden 85-Plus Study is a population-based study of 85-year olds in Leiden, the Netherlands. Eighty-five-year old inhabitants of Leiden were enrolled between September 1997 and September 1999. At the age of 86, plasma hepcidin was determined with time of flight mass spectrometry in 490 participants [160 (32.7%) male, 114 (23.3%) with anemia]. Anemia was defined according to criteria of the World Health Organization (hemoglobin level <13 g/dL for men and hemoglobin <12 g/dL for women). The median plasma hepcidin level was 3.0 nM [interquartile range (IQR) 1.8–4.9]. We found strong correlations between plasma hepcidin and body iron status, C-reactive protein and erythropoietin levels. Significantly higher hepcidin levels were found in participants with anemia of inflammation (P<0.01), in participants with anemia of kidney disease (P=0.01), and in participants with unexplained anemia (P=0.01) than in participants without anemia. Participants with iron-deficiency anemia had significantly lower plasma hepcidin levels than participants without anemia (P<0.01). In conclusion, older persons with anemia of inflammation have higher hepcidin levels than their counterparts without anemia. The potential clinical value of hepcidin in future diagnostic algorithms for anemia has to be explored. PMID:23065507

  7. Fatal winter dysentery with severe anemia in an adult cow.

    PubMed

    Natsuaki, Sumiko; Goto, Keiichi; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Yamada, Manabu; Ueo, Hiroshi; Komori, Toshihiro; Shirakawa, Hitomi; Uchinuno, Yukinori

    2007-09-01

    An adult dairy cow fatally affected with winter dysentery was investigated pathologically and virologically. The cow had severe anemia and diarrhea with massive blood. Pathologically, the loss of surface epithelial cells and necrosis of crypt epithelial cells in the large intestine were observed. Bovine coronavirus (BCV) antigen was observed in necrotic crypt epithelial cells of the large intestine. Virus particles were found in the necrotic epithelial cells of the large intestine. Virologically, BCV was isolated from the feces of the dead cow. The dead cow had no serum antibody against BCV although the co-habitants did. These suggest that severe infection of BCV in the cow without the BCV antibody accompanied by severe hemorrhagic anemia resulted in the cow's death.

  8. Fanconi anemia and the cell cycle: new perspectives on aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a complex heterogenic disorder of genomic instability, bone marrow failure, cancer predisposition, and congenital malformations. The FA signaling network orchestrates the DNA damage recognition and repair in interphase as well as proper execution of mitosis. Loss of FA signaling causes chromosome instability by weakening the spindle assembly checkpoint, disrupting centrosome maintenance, disturbing resolution of ultrafine anaphase bridges, and dysregulating cytokinesis. Thus, the FA genes function as guardians of genome stability throughout the cell cycle. This review discusses recent advances in diagnosis and clinical management of Fanconi anemia and presents the new insights into the origins of genomic instability in FA. These new discoveries may facilitate the development of rational therapeutic strategies for FA and for FA-deficient malignancies in the general population. PMID:24765528

  9. Fetal anemia as a signal of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Macé, Guillaume; Castaigne, Vanina; Trabbia, Aurore; Guigue, Virginie; Cynober, Evelyne; Cortey, Anne; Lalande, Valérie; Carbonne, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    An upsurge in syphilis has been observed almost everywhere over the past decade. The mother's clinical presentation is often uninformative. The diagnosis of maternal syphilis infection is most often based on serologic tests that allow early Extencilline treatment. Syphilis ultrasound findings are non-specific, and delay before treatment can be decisive for prognosis. Fetal anemia is a physiological consequence of severe infection. We confirmed that syphilis can be suggested non-invasively by MCA-PSV measurements in a context of ascitis or atypical hydrops in the absence of usual causes. It is therefore important to perform maternal TPHA/VDRL serology if fetal anemia is suspected. In association with Extencilline treatment, intra uterine transfusion can limit consequences of infection. Reduced fetal movements and non-reactive fetal heart rate may prefigure acute perinatal complications or stillbirth.

  10. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  11. [Stuttering priapism in children with sickle cell anemia in Togo].

    PubMed

    Gbadoé, A D; Géraldo, A; Guédénon, K; Koffi, S; Agbétiafa, K; Akpako, P

    2007-07-01

    To describe clinical aspects and outcome of stuttering priapism (SP) in children with sickle cell anemia. We included the 8 children with sickle cell anemia suffering from SP between 1996 and 2004. Age at onset of SP ranged from 5 to 14 years (mean 9.75+/-3.69 years). SP attacks occurred once a day for 6 patients, and 2 and 3 times by week for the others. It happened during deep sleep, especially in the night (all patients) and sometimes in the day (4 patients). The duration of attacks ranged from 10 min to 2 h in 6 patients and 4 to 5 h in 2 patients. Oral étilefrine was administered to all patients until the cessation of attacks, and continued during 1 month. A long remission was obtained in all patients after 7 days to 7 months treatment (follow-up 2 to 7 years) in spite of 1 or many relapses.

  12. A Hemoglobin Variant Associated with Neonatal Cyanosis and Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Moira A.; Mollan, Todd L.; Abdulmalik, Osheisa Y.; Butler, Andrew D.; Goodwin, Emily F.; Sarkar, Arindam; Stolle, Catherine A.; Gow, Andrew J.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Globin-gene mutations are a rare but important cause of cyanosis. We identified a missense mutation in the fetal G γ-globin gene (HBG2) in a father and daughter with transient neonatal cyanosis and anemia. This new mutation modifies the ligand-binding pocket of fetal hemoglobin by means of two mechanisms. First, the relatively large side chain of methionine decreases both the affinity of oxygen for binding to the mutant hemoglobin subunit and the rate at which it does so. Second, the mutant methionine is converted to aspartic acid post-translationally, probably through oxidative mechanisms. The presence of this polar amino acid in the heme pocket is predicted to enhance hemoglobin denaturation, causing anemia. PMID:21561349

  13. Molecular pathogenesis and clinical management of Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Younghoon; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder associated with a high frequency of hematological abnormalities and congenital anomalies. Based on multilateral efforts from basic scientists and clinicians, significant advances in our knowledge of FA have been made in recent years. Here we review the clinical features, the diagnostic criteria, and the current and future therapies of FA and describe the current understanding of the molecular basis of the disease. PMID:23114602

  14. The Fanconi anemia protein interaction network: casting a wide net.

    PubMed

    Rego, Meghan A; Kolling, Frederick W; Howlett, Niall G

    2009-07-31

    It has long been hypothesized that a defect in the repair of damaged DNA is central to the etiology of Fanconi anemia (FA). Indeed, an increased sensitivity of FA patient-derived cells to the lethal effects of various forms of DNA damaging agents was described over three decades ago [A.J. Fornace, Jr., J.B. Little, R.R. Weichselbaum, DNA repair in a Fanconi's anemia fibroblast cell strain, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 561 (1979) 99-109; Y. Fujiwara, M. Tatsumi, Repair of mitomycin C damage to DNA in mammalian cells and its impairment in Fanconi's anemia cells, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 66 (1975) 592-598; A.J. Rainbow, M. Howes, Defective repair of ultraviolet- and gamma-ray-damaged DNA in Fanconi's anaemia, Int. J. Radiat. Biol. Relat. Stud. Phys. Chem. Med. 31 (1977) 191-195]. Furthermore, the cytological hallmark of FA, the DNA crosslink-induced radial chromosome formation, exemplifies an innate impairment in the repair of these particularly cytotoxic DNA lesions [A.D. Auerbach, Fanconi anemia diagnosis and the diepoxybutane (DEB) test, Exp. Hematol. 21 (1993) 731-733]. Precisely defining the collective role of the FA proteins in DNA repair, however, continues to be one of the most enigmatic and challenging questions in the FA field. The first six identified FA proteins (A, C, E, F, G, and D2) harbored no recognizable enzymatic features, precluding association with a specific metabolic process. Consequently, our knowledge of the role of the FA proteins in the DNA damage response has been gleaned primarily through biochemical association studies with non-FA proteins. Here, we provide a chronological discourse of the major FA protein interaction network discoveries, with particular emphasis on the DNA damage response, that have defined our current understanding of the molecular basis of FA.

  15. Prevalence of intestinal helminths, anemia, and malnutrition in Paucartambo, Peru.

    PubMed

    Cabada, Miguel M; Goodrich, Mary R; Graham, Brittany; Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Deichsel, Emily L; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; Clinton White, A

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections, anemia, and malnutrition among children in the Paucartambo province of Cusco region, Peru, in light of demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiologic contextual factors. Children from three to twelve years old from six communities in Huancarani district in the highlands of Peru were evaluated for helminth infections, anemia, and nutritional status. Data collected included demographic variables, socioeconomic status, exposures, complete blood counts, and direct and sedimentation stool tests. Of 240 children analyzed, 113 (47%) were infected with one or more parasites. Giardia (27.5%) and Fasciola (9.6%) were the most commonly identified organisms. Eosinophilia was encountered in 21% of the children. Anemia (48.8%) was associated with age (3-4 vs 5-12 years old; odds ratio (OR): 5.86; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.81-12.21). Underweight (10%) was associated with male sex (OR: 5.97; CI: 1.12-31.72), higher eosinophil count (OR: 4.67; CI: 1.31-16.68) and education of the mother (OR: 0.6; CI: 0.4-0.9). Stunting (31.3%) was associated with education of the mother (OR: 0.83; CI: 0.72-0.95); wasting (2.7%) was associated with higher eosinophil count (OR: 2.75; CI: 1.04-7.25). Anemia and malnutrition remain significant problems in the Peruvian highlands. These findings suggest that demographic factors, socio-economic status, and possibly parasitic infections intertwine to cause these health problems.

  16. Somatic Mutations and Clonal Hematopoiesis in Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Hosokawa, Kohei; Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Townsley, Danielle; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sato, Yusuke; Liu, Delong; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Wu, Colin O; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Clemente, Michael J; Kataoka, Keisuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Okuno, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Nagata, Yasunobu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Scheinberg, Phillip; Miyano, Satoru; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Nakao, Shinji; Young, Neal S; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-07-02

    In patients with acquired aplastic anemia, destruction of hematopoietic cells by the immune system leads to pancytopenia. Patients have a response to immunosuppressive therapy, but myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia develop in about 15% of the patients, usually many months to years after the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. We performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples obtained from 439 patients with aplastic anemia. We analyzed serial samples obtained from 82 patients. Somatic mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes were present in one third of the patients, in a limited number of genes and at low initial variant allele frequency. Clonal hematopoiesis was detected in 47% of the patients, most frequently as acquired mutations. The prevalence of the mutations increased with age, and mutations had an age-related signature. DNMT3A-mutated and ASXL1-mutated clones tended to increase in size over time; the size of BCOR- and BCORL1-mutated and PIGA-mutated clones decreased or remained stable. Mutations in PIGA and BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and longer and a higher rate of overall and progression-free survival; mutations in a subgroup of genes that included DNMT3A and ASXL1 were associated with worse outcomes. However, clonal dynamics were highly variable and might not necessarily have predicted the response to therapy and long-term survival among individual patients. Clonal hematopoiesis was prevalent in aplastic anemia. Some mutations were related to clinical outcomes. A highly biased set of mutations is evidence of Darwinian selection in the failed bone marrow environment. The pattern of somatic clones in individual patients over time was variable and frequently unpredictable. (Funded by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and others.).

  17. Iron deficiency anemia: adverse effects on infant psychomotor development.

    PubMed

    Walter, T; De Andraca, I; Chadud, P; Perales, C G

    1989-07-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-control prospective cohort study of 196 infants from birth to 15 months of age, assessment was made at 12 months of age of the relationship between iron status and psychomotor development, the effect of a short-term (10-day) trial of oral iron vs placebo, and the effect of long-term (3 months) oral iron therapy. Development was assessed with the mental and psychomotor indices and the infant behavior record of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development in 39 anemic, 30 control, and 127 nonanemic iron-deficient children. Anemic infants had significantly lower Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Index scores than control infants or nonanemic iron-deficient infants (one-way analysis of variance, P less than .0001). Control infants and nonanemic iron-deficient infants performed comparably. No difference was noted between the effect of oral administration of iron or placebo after 10 days or after 3 months of iron therapy. Among anemic infants a hemoglobin concentration less than 10.5 g/dL and duration of anemia of greater than 3 months were correlated with significantly lower motor and mental scores (P less than .05). Anemic infants failed specifically in language capabilities and body balance-coordination skills when compared with controls. These results, in a design in which intervening variables were closely controlled, suggest that when iron deficiency progresses to anemia, but not before, adverse influences in the performance of developmental tests appear and persist for at least 3 months despite correction of anemia with iron therapy. If these impairments prove to be long standing, prevention of iron deficiency anemia in early infancy becomes the only way to avoid them.

  18. Sickle cell anemia and mitral valve replacement. Case report.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, V; Ribeiro, A; Gouvea, F; Pereira, J; Björk, V

    1989-01-01

    An 8-year-old black boy with sickle cell disease and severe hemolytic anemia crisis (95% hemoglobin S) also had mitral incompetence due to rheumatic valve disease. A 27 mm monostrut Björk-Shiley valve prosthesis was implanted after partial exchange transfusions had reduced the hemoglobin S to less than 40%. High-flow normothermic perfusion was used during extracorporeal circulation, with care taken to avoid hypoxia and acidosis. Postoperative recovery was uneventful.

  19. Preventing childhood anemia in India: iron supplementation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P S; Gera, T

    2013-05-01

    Childhood anemia has major adverse consequences for health and development. It's prevalence in India continues to range from 70 to 90%. Although anemia is multifactorial in etiology, preventative efforts have predominantly focused on increasing iron intake, primarily through supplementation in pregnant and lactating women. Policy thrust for childhood anemia is only recent. However, program implementation is dismal; only 3.8-4.7% of preschoolers receive iron-folate supplements. There is an urgent need for effective governance and implementation. Policy makers must distinguish anemia from iron deficiency, and introduce additional area-specific interventions as an integrated package.Increased iron intake may yield maximum benefit but will only address up to half the burden. In 6-59 months old children, instead of 100 days' continuous dosing with iron-folate syrup in a year, a directly supervised intermittent supplementation (biweekly; ~100 days per year) merits consideration. Multiple micronutrient powders for home fortification of foods in 6-23 months old infants do not appear viable. Additional interventions include delayed cord clamping, earlier supplementation in low birth weight infants, appropriate infant and young child feeding guidelines, and intermittent supervised supplementation in children and adolescents through school health programs. Use of double (iron-folate)-fortified salt in mid-day meal programs deserves piloting.Important area-specific, non-iron interventions include targeted deworming, and prevention and treatment of hemoglobinopathies, malaria and other common infections. Routine addition of multi-micronutrients to iron-folate supplementation appears unjustified currently. There is a pressing need to conduct relevant research, especially to inform etiology, additional interventions and implementation issues.

  20. Determination of tissue hypoxia by physicochemical approach in premature anemia.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Zeliha; Törer, Birgin; Hanta, Deniz; Cetinkaya, Bilin; Gulcan, Hande; Tarcan, Aylin

    2017-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in premature infants and its most rapid and effective therapy is erythrocyte transfusion. However, owing to inherent risks of transfusion in this population, transfusions should be administered only when adequate oxygen delivery to tissues is impaired. The aim of this study was to determine tissue acid levels using Stewart method in an attempt to evaluate the tissue oxygenation level and thereby the accuracy of transfusion timing. This study included 47 infants delivered at gestational age below 34 weeks who required erythrocyte transfusion for premature anemia. Strong ion gap (SIG), unmeasurable anions (UMA), tissue acid levels (TA), and Cl/Na ratios were calculated before and after transfusion. The mean birth weight and gestational age of the study population were 1210 ± 365 g and 29.2 ± 2.7 weeks, respectively. Tissue acid levels were increased (TA ≥ 4) and tissue hypoxia developed in 10 (16.6%) of 60 erythrocyte transfusions administered according to the restrictive transfusion approach. The patients were divided into two groups according to tissue acid levels as low (<4) and high (≥4) tissue acid groups. The group with tissue hypoxia (TA ≥ 4) had significantly higher UMA levels but a significantly lower Cl/Na ratio; and UMA levels decreased and Cl/Na ratio increased after transfusion in this group. Tissue hypoxia secondary to anemia was shown to be improved by erythrocyte transfusion. The results of the present study suggest that the determination of the level of tissue hypoxia by the Stewart approach may be an alternative to restrictive transfusion guidelines for timing of transfusion in premature anemia. It also showed that a low Cl/Na ratio can be used as a simple marker of tissue hypoxia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. [Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rivera, E Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    Severe aplastic anemia is a rare syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure with cytopenias and hypocellular bone marrow biopsy (usually 10-15%), without blasts or myelodysplasia. The first choice treatment for these patients is allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from a sibling matched for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Unfortunately only 30% of patients have an HLA-matched sibling (a 25% chance per sibling). The alternative treatment for severe aplastic anemia for the rest of the patients (70%) is immunosuppression with antithymocyte globuline and cyclosporine. The evolution of bone marrow transplantation since 1970's has been positive in terms of survival and transplant success (initial overall survival 43% vs. 90% lately, and graft rejection of 29% vs. 4%). The favorable outcome of bone marrow transplantation for severe or very severe aplastic anemia is due to: the use of conditioning with antithymocyte globuline and cyclophosphamide, the use of graft-vs.-host disease prophylaxis with short curse methotrexate and cyclosporine and the use of filtrated and irradiated blood products. For those patients without an HLA-matched related donor the first treatment to use is the immunosuppression with antithymocyte globuline and cyclosporine. Another option emerged in the late 80's is the unrelated bone marrow transplantation, with survival hardly half of the HLA-identical related bone marrow transplants. In our country, the first allogeneic bone marrow transplant was done in the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición, Salvador Zubirán, in a patient with aplastic anemia, making possible to perform this procedure safely in our country.

  2. Recent advances in understanding hematopoiesis in Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bagby, Grover

    2018-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease characterized by genomic instability, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, bone marrow failure, short stature, skeletal abnormalities, and a high relative risk of myeloid leukemia and epithelial malignancies. The 21 Fanconi anemia genes encode proteins involved in multiple nuclear biochemical pathways that effect DNA interstrand crosslink repair. In the past, bone marrow failure was attributed solely to the failure of stem cells to repair DNA. Recently, non-canonical functions of many of the Fanconi anemia proteins have been described, including modulating responses to oxidative stress, viral infection, and inflammation as well as facilitating mitophagic responses and enhancing signals that promote stem cell function and survival. Some of these functions take place in non-nuclear sites and do not depend on the DNA damage response functions of the proteins. Dysfunctions of the canonical and non-canonical pathways that drive stem cell exhaustion and neoplastic clonal selection are reviewed, and the potential therapeutic importance of fully investigating the scope and interdependences of the canonical and non-canonical pathways is emphasized. PMID:29399332

  3. Osteonecrosis of the hip in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongmi; Jun, Jeongsu; Kim, Yongsik; Lee, Jongwook; Kim, Chunchu; Hahn, Seongtae

    2002-01-01

    The incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of osteonecrosis of the hip were evaluated in patients with aplastic anemia. Two hundred and forty-one patients with aplastic anemia were examined using MR imaging of bone marrow during the five years from 1994 to 1998. Osteonecrosis of the hip was observed on MR imaging in nineteen (15 males and 4 females, mean age 35 yr) of the 241 patients. It was present in both hips in 14 patients, and there were five cases with unilateral occurrence, with a total of 33 involved hips. All except for five hips with associated bone marrow edema revealed increased fatty marrow conversion in the proximal femoral metaphysis. In nine patients, osteonecrosis was detected without any pain. Five patients already had osteonecrosis before any medication was administered. Twelve patients received antilymphocyte globulin, and seven patients received a low dose of steroids before the MR diagnosis of osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis of the hip frequently develops in patients with aplastic anemia (7.9%), associated with fatty marrow conversion of the proximal femoral metaphysis. PMID:12483006

  4. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials.

  5. Autoimmune gastritis: relationships with anemia and Helicobacter pylori status.

    PubMed

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Casella, Giovanni; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Di Bella, Camillo; Sidoni, Angelo; Cadei, Moris; Salviato, Tiziana; Dore, Maria Pina; Bassotti, Gabrio

    Autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is a gastric pathologic condition affecting the mucosa of the fundus and the body and eventually leading to hypo-achlorhydria. We report our clinical and pathological experience with AIG. Data from patients with a diagnosis of AIG seen in the period January 2002-December 2012 were retrieved. Only patients with complete sets of biopsies were analyzed. Data from 138 patients were available for analysis. Pernicious anemia was present in 25% of patients, iron deficiency anemia was found in 29.7% of patients, hypothyroidism in 23% of patients, type 1 diabetes in 7.9% of patients, and vitiligo in 2.8% of patients. Parietal cell antibodies were positive in 65% of patients, and no patient had serology positive for celiac disease. All gastric biopsies showed glandular atrophy associated with enterochromaffin-like (ECL)-cells hyperplasia, features limited to the mucosa of the fundus and body, and focal glandular intestinal metaplasia. Helicobacter pylori was negative in all cases. AIG was strongly associated with anemia; atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and ECL hyperplasia in the gastric fundus and body are hallmarks of this condition.

  6. Anemia in Mexican women: a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Villalpando, Salvador; Rivera, Juan A; Mejía-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Camacho-Cisneros, Martha; Monterrubio, Eric A

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence and distribution of anemia among women of childbearing age (12 to 49 years) participating in the 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-1999). The survey had a probabilistic design and was representative at the national level, of urban and rural areas and four regions: North, South, Center, and Mexico City. Hemoglobin concentration was determined in capillary blood samples using a portable photometer (HemoCue), in 17,194 women, 697 of whom were pregnant. The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.8% in pregnant women and 20.8% in non-pregnant women. Higher prevalences were observed in rural as compared to urban areas, both in pregnant (28.0% vs 27.7%) and non-pregnant (22.6% vs 20.0%) women, but the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Women in the South had the greatest prevalence (23.2%), followed by those in the North (20.9%), Center (20.6%), and Mexico City (16.4%). Non-pregnant indigenous women had a prevalence of 24.8%, while in-non-indigenous women the prevalence was 20.4%. Anemia in women of childbearing age is a growing public health problem that justifies the implementation of interventions for its prevention and control. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

  7. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  8. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  9. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  10. Developing a novel risk prediction model for severe malarial anemia.

    PubMed

    Brickley, E B; Kabyemela, E; Kurtis, J D; Fried, M; Wood, A M; Duffy, P E

    2017-01-01

    As a pilot study to investigate whether personalized medicine approaches could have value for the reduction of malaria-related mortality in young children, we evaluated questionnaire and biomarker data collected from the Mother Offspring Malaria Study Project birth cohort (Muheza, Tanzania, 2002-2006) at the time of delivery as potential prognostic markers for pediatric severe malarial anemia. Severe malarial anemia, defined here as a Plasmodium falciparum infection accompanied by hemoglobin levels below 50 g/L, is a key manifestation of life-threatening malaria in high transmission regions. For this study sample, a prediction model incorporating cord blood levels of interleukin-1β provided the strongest discrimination of severe malarial anemia risk with a C-index of 0.77 (95% CI 0.70-0.84), whereas a pragmatic model based on sex, gravidity, transmission season at delivery, and bed net possession yielded a more modest C-index of 0.63 (95% CI 0.54-0.71). Although additional studies, ideally incorporating larger sample sizes and higher event per predictor ratios, are needed to externally validate these prediction models, the findings provide proof of concept that risk score-based screening programs could be developed to avert severe malaria cases in early childhood.

  11. Phlebotomy-induced anemia alters hippocampal neurochemistry in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Diana J.; Tkac, Ivan; Stucker, Sara; Ennis, Kathleen M.; Sola-Visner, Martha; Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Phlebotomy-induced anemia (PIA) is common in preterm infants. The hippocampus undergoes rapid differentiation during late fetal/early neonatal life and relies on adequate oxygen and iron to support oxidative metabolism necessary for development. Anemia shortchanges these two critical substrates, potentially altering hippocampal development and function. Methods PIA (hematocrit <25%) was induced in neonatal mice pups from postnatal day (P)3 to P14. Neurochemical concentrations in the hippocampus were determined using in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 9.4T and compared with control animals at P14. Gene expression was assessed using qRT-PCR. Results PIA decreased brain iron concentration, increased hippocampal lactate and creatine concentrations, and decreased phosphoethanolamine (PE) concentration and the phosphocreatine/creatine ratio. Hippocampal transferrin receptor (Tfrc) gene expression was increased, while the expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II alpha (CamKIIα) was decreased in PIA mice. Conclusion This clinically relevant model of neonatal anemia alters hippocampal energy and phospholipid metabolism and gene expression during a critical developmental period. Low target hematocrits for preterm neonates in the NICU may have potential adverse neural implications. PMID:25734245

  12. The relation of maternal blood arsenic to anemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Atsuko; Ohtani, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the relationship of prenatal arsenic exposure to hemoglobin concentrations and anemia during pregnancy, a longitudinal study was conducted of 364 participants during early pregnancy from October 2006 to March 2011 in Tehran, Iran. Maternal whole blood (taken between 8-12 and 20-24 weeks of gestation, and at delivery) and umbilical cord blood samples were collected for arsenic measurement. The mean concentration of maternal blood arsenic in the first trimester of pregnancy was significantly lower in anemic women compared with non-anemic participants (mean ± SD: 12.4 ± 3.4 versus 14.8 ± 4.0 μg/L, respectively, p < 0.001). Maternal whole blood arsenic levels in the first and third trimesters were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with hemoglobin concentrations measured throughout gestation (r = 0.312, 0.424, and 0.183). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that increased maternal blood arsenic levels in the first trimester were significantly negatively associated to anemia during pregnancy (OR = 0.85, CI: 0.77-0.94, p < 0.01). The present study showed that prenatal blood arsenic exposure was not a risk factor for the occurrence of anemia.

  13. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  14. Update of the human and mouse Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongbin; Nebert, Daniel W; Bruford, Elspeth A; Thompson, David C; Joenje, Hans; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-11-24

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessively inherited disease manifesting developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancies. Whereas FA has been studied for nearly 90 years, only in the last 20 years have increasing numbers of genes been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with this genetic disease. To date, 19 genes have been identified that encode Fanconi anemia complementation group proteins, all of which are named or aliased, using the root symbol "FANC." Fanconi anemia subtype (FANC) proteins function in a common DNA repair pathway called "the FA pathway," which is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. The various FANC mutant proteins contribute to distinct steps associated with FA pathogenesis. Herein, we provide a review update of the 19 human FANC and their mouse orthologs, an evolutionary perspective on the FANC genes, and the functional significance of the FA DNA repair pathway in association with clinical disorders. This is an example of a set of genes--known to exist in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and yeast--that are grouped together on the basis of shared biochemical and physiological functions, rather than evolutionary phylogeny, and have been named on this basis by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC).

  15. Prevalence of anemia and malnutrition and their association in elderly nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sevnaz; Tasar, Pinar Tosun; Simsek, Hatice; Çicek, Zeynep; Eskiizmirli, Hulya; Aykar, Fisun Senuzun; Sahin, Fahri; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2016-10-01

    Malnutrition is one of the most important geriatric syndromes in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anemia and malnutrition in elderly nursing home residents. Local nursing home residents over 60 years old in the Izmir were included in the study. Blood samples were taken from study participants for hemogram, iron, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, vitamin B12 and folic acid analysis. WHO criteria were used to define anemia. Causes of anemia were classified as iron deficiency, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency, anemia of chronic disease or other hematologic causes. Anemia was defined as the dependent variable and malnutrition was defined as the independent variable. Correlation between MNA scores and Hb levels was determined using Pearson correlation analysis. The slope of causality between malnutrition and anemia was determined using the χ (2) test and logistic regression analysis. The study included 257 elderly nursing home residents with a mean age of 78.5 ± 7.8 years. The overall prevalence of anemia was 54.9 %; 35.8 % of the study participants were at risk of malnutrition and 8.2 % were malnourished. Anemia risk was 2.12-fold higher in participants at risk of malnutrition and 5.05-fold higher in those with malnutrition. In the participants with malnutrition or malnutrition risk, the most common cause of anemia was anemia of chronic disease (57.1 and 46.5 %, respectively). The prevalence of anemia among elderly nursing home residents is high in Turkey. Malnutrition and malnutrition risk increase the incidence of anemia.

  16. High prevalence of anemia in 10-month-old Japanese infants with breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masahiko; Kurozawa, Youichi; Saito, Yumi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ayame; Taketani, Takeshi

    2018-05-05

    Anemia in infancy is still prevalent in developing countries. Commercial iron-fortified complementary foods or iron drops are not available in Japan and breastfed infants have a higher risk of anemia. We studied anemia screening in infants in 10-month old infants and evaluated whether breastfeeding is a risk factor for anemia. Anemia screening was performed during a regular health check of 10-month children at four local pediatric clinics in Shimane prefecture, Japan. Venous blood was obtained for complete blood count. The clinical characteristics of each child were obtained through a questionnaire. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin level < 11.0 g/dL. Children were categorized into anemia and no-anemia and univariate analyses were conducted to compare with clinical variables. Multivariate logistic regression analyses for anemia were performed to adjust for several clinical variables. We analyzed data in 325 children. In the univariate analyses, anemia was associated with breastfeeding, monthly body weight gain and gestational week. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that anemia was associated with feeding type and gestational week, where the odds ratio (OR) of partial breastfeeding and formula feeding was 0.446 (95% confidential interval [CI], 0.208-0.957) and 0.223 ([CI], 0.075-0.660) respectively, compared to exclusive breastfeeding, in which the OR was taken as 1.0 and the OR of gestational week was 0.753 ([CI], 0583-0.972). Breastfeeding was an important factor for anemia in 10-month-old Japanese infants. Breastfed infants after 6 months of age may need sufficient iron sources such as iron supplements or iron fortified complimentary foods. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy and the postpartum period: Iron deficiency anemia working group consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Api, Olus; Breyman, Christian; Çetiner, Mustafa; Demir, Cansun; Ecder, Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is the most common disease, affecting >1.5 billion people worldwide. Furthermore, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) accounts for 50% of cases of anemia. IDA is common during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and can lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. The aim of this report was to present the experiences of a multidisciplinary expert group, and to establish reference guidelines for the optimal diagnosis and treatment of IDA during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Studies and guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of IDA published in Turkish and international journals were reviewed. Conclusive recommendations were made by an expert panel aiming for a scientific consensus. Measurement of serum ferritin has the highest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of IDA unless there is a concurrent inflammatory condition. The lower threshold value for hemoglobin (Hb) in pregnant women is <11 g/dL during the 1st and 3rd trimesters, and <10.5 g/dL during the 2nd trimester. In postpartum period a Hb concentration <10 g/dL indicates clinically significant anemia. Oral iron therapy is given as the first-line treatment for IDA. Although current data are limited, intravenous (IV) iron therapy is an alternative therapeutic option in patients who do not respond to oral iron therapy, have adverse reactions, do not comply with oral iron treatment, have a very low Hb concentration, and require rapid iron repletion. IV iron preparations can be safely used for the treatment of IDA during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and are more beneficial than oral iron preparations in specific indications. PMID:28913064

  18. Cobalamin deficiency associated with erythroblastic anemia and methylmalonic aciduria in a border collie.

    PubMed

    Morgan, L W; McConnell, J

    1999-01-01

    Anemia due to cobalamin deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that has been recognized in dogs only recently. This report concerns a 14-month-old border collie that presented for chronic, nonregenerative anemia. Cytological examination of a peripheral blood smear showed the presence of erythroblasts. Serum cobalamin levels were below reference ranges reported for clinically normal dogs. A methylmalonic aciduria was found on urinalysis. These signs are consistent with the anemia in Imerslund-Graesbeck syndrome reported in humans. Anemia due to cobalamin deficiency responds to parenteral vitamin B12 therapy, and affected animals have a good prognosis for recovery.

  19. Iron isotopic composition of blood serum in anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Anoshkina, Yulia; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Speeckaert, Marijn; Van Biesen, Wim; Delanghe, Joris; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2017-05-24

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a general term for disorders that affect the structure and function of the kidneys. Iron deficiency (ID) and anemia occur in the vast majority of CKD patients, most of whom are elderly. However, establishing the cause of anemia in CKD, and therefore making an informed decision concerning the corresponding therapeutic treatment, is still a challenge. High-precision Fe isotopic analysis of blood serum samples of CKD patients with and without ID/anemia was performed via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) for such a purpose. Patients with CKD and/or iron disorders showed a heavier serum Fe isotopic composition than controls. Many clinical parameters used for the diagnosis and follow-up of anemia correlated significantly with the serum Fe isotopic composition. In contrast, no relation was observed between the serum Fe isotopic composition and the estimated glomerular filtration rate as a measure of kidney function. Among the CKD patients, the serum Fe isotopic composition was substantially heavier in the occurrence of ID anemia, while erythropoietin-related anemia did not exert this effect. The Fe isotopic composition can thus be useful for distinguishing these different types of anemias in CKD patients, i.e. ID anemia vs. erythropoietin-related anemia.

  20. Household food insecurity is associated with anemia in adult Mexican women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nils C; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; Méndez-Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is a major cause of maternal mortality. Household food insecurity (HFI) may increase the risk of anemia among women of reproductive age although this hypothesis remains largely untested in representative samples from low- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to investigate the association of HFI with anemia in a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample of Mexican women of reproductive age (12-49 y old). We tested the association between HFI and anemia among 16,944 women of reproductive age using the multiple logistic regression among adolescent (12-20 y) and adult women (21-49 y). HFI was measured with the use of the Latin American and Caribbean Food Security Scale. Hemoglobin was measured with capillary hemoglobin with the use of HemoCue photometer (HemoCue, Inc.) and anemia was defined with the use of WHO standards. The association of HFI and anemia was not significant (P > 0.05) for adolescent women (12-20 y), whereas in adult women (21-49 y), the adjusted odds of having anemia were 31-43% higher among those living in mild to severely food insecure households than adult women residing in food secure households (P < 0.05). HFI is associated with anemia among adult Mexican women. Programs that reduce HFI may also be effective at reducing the risk of anemia among Mexican women. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Coexistence of pernicious anemia and myasthenia gravis--a rare combination of autoimmune diseases in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Lyu, Rong-Kuo; Ro, Long-Sun; Wu, Yih-Ru; Chen, Chiung-Mei

    2006-11-01

    About 5-10% of patients with myasthenia gravis concomitantly have other autoimmune diseases. However, the coexistence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia is rare. Here, we report a 73-year-old Taiwanese woman who developed myasthenia gravis 5 months after the onset of pernicious anemia. Her myasthenic and pernicious anemia symptoms markedly improved after pyridostigmine, prednisolone and hydroxocobalamine treatment. It is important to recognize concurrence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia in the same patient because the therapeutic results for both diseases are rewarding.

  2. Anemia: An Independent Predictor Of Adverse Outcomes In Older Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ali N; Athavale, Nandkishor V; Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Both anemia and atrial fibrillation are common in older people and their prevalence is age dependent which increases as population ages. Anemia, especially acute onset, predisposes to new onset atrial fibrillation which is likely to be mediated through inducing heart failure first and this predisposition seems to be potentiated by the presence of renal impairment. Anemia adds to the comorbidity burden of patients with atrial fibrillation and independently increases the risks of adverse outcomes such as increased hospitalization, mortality, bleeding and thromboembolic events. Early detection and correction of anemia in patients with atrial fibrillation may have a positive impact on reducing these adverse events.

  3. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  4. Prospective assessment of the occurrence of anemia in patients with heart failure: results from the Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) Registry.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kirkwood F; Patterson, James H; Patterson, John H; Oren, Ron M; Mehra, Mandeep R; O'Connor, Christopher M; Piña, Ileana L; Miller, Alan B; Chiong, Jun R; Dunlap, Stephanie H; Cotts, William G; Felker, Gary M; Schocken, Douglas D; Schwartz, Todd A; Ghali, Jalal K

    2009-05-01

    Although a potentially important pathophysiologic factor in heart failure, the prevalence and predictors of anemia have not been well studied in unselected patients with heart failure. The Study of Anemia in a Heart Failure Population (STAMINA-HFP) Registry prospectively studied the prevalence of anemia and the relationship of hemoglobin to health-related quality of life and outcomes among patients with heart failure. A random selection algorithm was used to reduce bias during enrollment of patients seen in specialty clinics or clinics of community cardiologists with experience in heart failure. In this initial report, data on prevalence and correlates of anemia were analyzed in 1,076 of the 1,082 registry patients who had clinical characteristics and hemoglobin determined by finger-stick at baseline. Overall (n = 1,082), the registry patients were 41% female and 73% white with a mean age (+/-SD) of 64 +/- 14 years (68 +/- 13 years in community and 57 +/- 14 years in specialty sites, P < .001). Among the 1,076 patients in the prevalence analysis, mean hemoglobin was 13.3 +/- 2.1 g/dL (median 13.2 g/dL); and anemia (defined by World Health Organization criteria) was present in 34%. Age identified patients at risk for anemia, with 40% of patients >70 years affected. Initial results from the STAMINA-HFP Registry suggest that anemia is a common comorbidity in unselected outpatients with heart failure. Given the strong association of anemia with adverse outcomes in heart failure, this study supports further investigation concerning the importance of anemia as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  5. Association of anemia with the risk of cardiovascular adverse events in overweight/obese patients.

    PubMed

    Winther, S A; Finer, N; Sharma, A M; Torp-Pedersen, C; Andersson, C

    2014-03-01

    Anemia is associated with increased cardiovascular risks. Obesity may cause anemia in several ways, for example, by low-grade inflammation and relative iron deficit. The outcomes associated with anemia in overweight/obese patients at high cardiovascular risk are however not known. Therefore, we investigated the cardiovascular prognosis in overweight/obese subjects with anemia. A total of 9,687 overweight/obese cardiovascular high-risk patients from the Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes trial were studied. Patients were stratified after baseline hemoglobin level and followed for the risks of primary event (comprising nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, resuscitated cardiac arrest or cardiovascular death) and all-cause mortality. Risk estimates (hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI)) were calculated using Cox regression models. Anemia was unadjusted associated with increased risk for the primary event, HR 1.73 (CI 1.37-2.18) and HR 2.02 (CI 1.34-3.06) for patients with mild or moderate-to-severe anemia, respectively, compared with patients without anemia. Adjusted for several confounders, anemia remained of prognostic importance. Increased risk of the primary events appeared to be driven by risk of cardiovascular death, adjusted HR 1.82 (CI 1.33-2.51) for mild anemia and adjusted HR 1.65 (CI 0.90-3.04) for moderate-to-severe anemia, and all-cause mortality, adjusted HR 1.50 (CI 1.17-1.93) for mild and adjusted HR 1.61 (CI 1.04-2.51) for moderate-to-severe anemia. While adding serum creatinine to the models, the increased risk of mild anemia was still a significant predictor for mortality (cardiovascular and all-cause), whereas moderate-to-severe anemia was not. For the primary events, anemia was no longer of independent prognostic importance when including serum creatinine. Anemia is associated with an increased risk of long-term adverse cardiovascular events and deaths among overweight/obese cardiovascular high-risk patients. The

  6. Genetic disposition and modifiable factors independently associated with anemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Lee, Jong-Jer; Wang, Ming-Chung; Chung, Min-Shien; Pan, Lin-Lin; Hsieh, Ching-Jung; Huang, Siang-Ting; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yang, Kuender D; Lee, Chien-Te; Liu, Rue-Tsuan

    2015-04-01

    Anemia is prevalent but under-recognized in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Genetic variants in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and erythropoietin (EPO) have been associated with diabetic nephropathy. In the present study, we investigated the associations between anemia and polymorphisms in EPO promoter (rs1617640), TNF-α G-308A and ACE Insertion/Deletion in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Polymorphisms in ACE, TNF-α and EPO were genotyped in 1142 patients. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin (Hb) levels below 12 g/dL for women and 13 g/dL for men. 286 (25%) patients had anemia. Patients with anemia were older, had longer duration of diabetes, worse renal function and more albuminuria. ACE Insertion/Deletion and TNF-a G-308A were not associated with anemia. The frequencies of EPO polymorphism (rs1617640) were significantly different between anemic and nonanemic patients. Patients with TT genotype had higher prevalence of anemia than those with TG and GG. Regression analysis identified EPO SNP, duration of DM, serum albumin, albuminuria and renal function independently associated with anemia. After adjusting for multiple variables, TT and TG genotypes were associated with 3-5-fold increased risk for anemia compared to GG. The EPO genotype in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with anemia and may help to identify those at risk. Further evaluation of its effect on clinical outcomes in prospective studies may be useful to predict the outcomes of erythropoiesis stimulating therapy, and to individualize anemia management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [The prevalence and risk factors of anemia in a general population from Kailuan in north China].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Li, Z F; Hou, J Y; Lu, Y K; Zhang, X L; Zhang, X M; Zou, H R; Zhang, H; Cui, Y; Xie, Y H; Lu, B J; Zhang, P; Wang, J W; Zhang, L X

    2018-05-01

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence and risk factors of anemia in a general population in Kailuan. Methods: Working and retired employees in Kailuan Company who had participated in biennial physical examination from 2006-2014 were investigated by questionnaire and blood test. Hemoglobin levels<120 g/L in male and<110 g/L in female are defined as anemia. The trend of prevalence of anemia was analyzed by chi square test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the factors associated with anemia. Results: (1) The biennial prevalence of anemia in Kailuan during 2006-2014 were 3.7%, 3.1%, 2.4%, 1.3%, 1.5%. The corresponding proportion were 3.3%, 2.3%, 1.9%, 0.8%, 1.0% in males and 5.3%, 5.9%, 4.2%, 3.1% and 3.3% in females, respectively. The differences between males and females were statistically significant (all P <0.05). The prevalence of anemia declined over time ( P for trend<0.05). (2) The results of multivariable logistic regression showed that aging and elevated hs-CRP were positively associated with anemia, with OR= 1.01 (95% CI 1.01-1.02) and 1.03 (95% CI 1.02-1.03) , respectively. While male, BMI, physical exercise, smoking, hyperlipidemia were negatively associated with anemia with OR= 0.60 (95% CI 0.55-0.65) , 0.99 (95% CI 0.98-0.99) , 0.91 (95% CI 0.82-0.98) , 0.87 (95% CI 0.81-0.95) and 0.87 (95% CI 0.81-0.94) , respectively. Conclusions: The prevalence of anemia in a large general population in Kailuan has been analyzed. Prevalence of anemia is higher in males than females and declines over time. Several demographic and clinical characteristics are associated with anemia.

  8. [Prevalence and factors associated with anemia in pregnant women attending the General Hospital in Douala].

    PubMed

    Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Tsakeu, Eveline Ngouadjeu Dongho; Nguea, Arlette Géraldine; Njamen, Théophile Nana; Ekane, Gregory Halle; Priso, Eugene Belley

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a public health problem, prevalent among children and women of childbearing age. Our study aims to determine the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in pregnant women at Douala General Hospital. We conducted a cross sectional study from July 2012 to July 2013. All consenting pregnant women attending antenatal consultation and having undergone complete blood count (CBC) were included in the study. Sociodemographic characteristics, individual's obstetrical history and the results of the CBC were recorded on a pre tested data collection sheet. Anemia was defined according to the WHO criteria. After some descriptive statistics, we performed a bivariate analysis using the Chi-square test and Fisher exact probability test in order to determine the factors associated with anemia. P value <0.05 was considered significant. A total of 415 pregnant women were enrolled in the study. Anemia prevalence was 39,8%. The average age was 29,89±4,835 years. The mean hemoglobin level was 10.93 ± 1.23. Normochromic normocytic anemia (53,3%) was prevalent. Anaemia was severe in 2,4% of cases. Anemia in pregnancy was significantly associated with a personal history of chronic diseases (P = 0.02) and of anemia in a previous pregnancy (P = 0.003). Anemia was more frequently observed during the 3rd trimester (P = 0.04) and breastfeeding played a protective role (P = 0.02). The prevalence of anemia during pregnancy remains high. A better management of chronic diseases in pregnant women and of postpartum follow-up is necessary to treat anemia before a subsequent pregnancy.

  9. The pain experience of patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, E

    2001-09-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disorder that affects 1 in 600 black infants in the United States. The painful crisis is one of its most characteristic manifestations and consists of pain in the extremities, back, abdomen, or chest. It may occur in 4 phases and may be precipitated by a variety of factors. The frequency, location, duration, severity, and character of pain differ both within and among patients. The pain may be localized, involve several areas, be diffuse, or be migratory. The intensity of pain varies from mild to excruciating and is perceived to be more intense by those who have experienced other forms of pain such as postoperative pain. Patients with sickle cell anemia who experience frequent painful crises exhibit problems with self-concept and low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, dissatisfaction with body image, poor school performance, social isolation, decreased participation in normal activities of daily living, and poor peer and family relationships. The periodic and unpredictable episodes can be incapacitating and may affect the way children see and feel about themselves, the way they relate to other people, the goals they set for themselves, and the way they approach a range of activities and situations. Research is very limited, and most of the available literature is based on personal observations, opinions, and anecdotal reports. The purpose of this report is to describe the phases of a painful episode as well as to examine the predisposing factors to, defining characteristics of, and patient outcomes associated with a painful crisis from sickle cell anemia.

  10. Pernicious anemia: New insights from a gastroenterological point of view

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is a macrocytic anemia that is caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, as a result of intrinsic factor deficiency. PA is associated with atrophic body gastritis (ABG), whose diagnosis is based on histological confirmation of gastric body atrophy. Serological markers that suggest oxyntic mucosa damage are increased fasting gastrin and decreased pepsinogen I. Without performing Schilling’s test, intrinsic factor deficiency may not be proven, and intrinsic factor and parietal cell antibodies are useful surrogate markers of PA, with 73% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PA is mainly considered a disease of the elderly, but younger patients represent about 15% of patients. PA patients may seek medical advice due to symptoms related to anemia, such as weakness and asthenia. Less commonly, the disease is suspected to be caused by dyspepsia. PA is frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (40%) and other autoimmune disorders, such as diabetes mellitus (10%), as part of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. PA is the end-stage of ABG. Long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection probably plays a role in many patients with PA, in whom the active infectious process has been gradually replaced by an autoimmune disease that terminates in a burned-out infection and the irreversible destruction of the gastric body mucosa. Human leucocyte antigen-DR genotypes suggest a role for genetic susceptibility in PA. PA patients should be managed by cobalamin replacement treatment and monitoring for onset of iron deficiency. Moreover, they should be advised about possible gastrointestinal long-term consequences, such as gastric cancer and carcinoids. PMID:19891010

  11. Pernicious anemia: new insights from a gastroenterological point of view.

    PubMed

    Lahner, Edith; Annibale, Bruno

    2009-11-07

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is a macrocytic anemia that is caused by vitamin B(12) deficiency, as a result of intrinsic factor deficiency. PA is associated with atrophic body gastritis (ABG), whose diagnosis is based on histological confirmation of gastric body atrophy. Serological markers that suggest oxyntic mucosa damage are increased fasting gastrin and decreased pepsinogen I. Without performing Schilling's test, intrinsic factor deficiency may not be proven, and intrinsic factor and parietal cell antibodies are useful surrogate markers of PA, with 73% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PA is mainly considered a disease of the elderly, but younger patients represent about 15% of patients. PA patients may seek medical advice due to symptoms related to anemia, such as weakness and asthenia. Less commonly, the disease is suspected to be caused by dyspepsia. PA is frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (40%) and other autoimmune disorders, such as diabetes mellitus (10%), as part of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. PA is the end-stage of ABG. Long-standing Helicobacter pylori infection probably plays a role in many patients with PA, in whom the active infectious process has been gradually replaced by an autoimmune disease that terminates in a burned-out infection and the irreversible destruction of the gastric body mucosa. Human leucocyte antigen-DR genotypes suggest a role for genetic susceptibility in PA. PA patients should be managed by cobalamin replacement treatment and monitoring for onset of iron deficiency. Moreover, they should be advised about possible gastrointestinal long-term consequences, such as gastric cancer and carcinoids. 2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng. All rights reserved.

  12. Anemia, Iron Deficiency and Iodine Deficiency among Nepalese School Children.

    PubMed

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Lamsal, Madhab; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Nepal, Ashwini Kumar; Brodie, David; Baral, Nirmal

    2016-07-01

    To assess iodine and iron nutritional status among Nepalese school children. A cross-sectional, community based study was conducted in the two districts, Ilam (hilly region) and Udayapur (plain region) of eastern Nepal. A total of 759 school children aged 6-13 y from different schools within the study areas were randomly enrolled. A total of 759 urine samples and 316 blood samples were collected. Blood hemoglobin level, serum iron, total iron binding capacity and urinary iodine concentration was measured. Percentage of transferrin saturation was calculated using serum iron and total iron binding capacity values. The mean level of hemoglobin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation and median urinary iodine excretion were 12.29 ± 1.85 g/dl, 70.45 ± 34.46 μg/dl, 386.48 ± 62.48 μg/dl, 19.94 ± 12.07 % and 274.67 μg/L respectively. Anemia, iron deficiency and iodine deficiency (urinary iodine excretion <100 μg/L) were present in 34.5 %, 43.4 % and 12.6 % children respectively. Insufficient urinary iodine excretion (urinary iodine excretion <100 μg/L) was common in anemic and iron deficient children. Iron deficiency and anemia are common in Nepalese children, whereas, iodine nutrition is more than adequate. Low urinary iodine excretion was common in iron deficiency and anemia.

  13. A case of fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation causing severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Kitada, Kohei; Kurihara, Yasushi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Sakae, Yukari; Morotomi, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shiho; Saito, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare, life-threatening disease. Left untreated, hemorrhage from necrotic bowel tissue will lead to severe fetal anemia and even intrauterine death. We encountered a case of fetal intestinal volvulus causing severe anemia, which was diagnosed postnatally and successfully treated with surgical intervention.

  14. A Case of Fetal Intestinal Volvulus Without Malrotation Causing Severe Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Kitada, Kohei; Kurihara, Yasushi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Sakae, Yukari; Morotomi, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shiho; Saito, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare, life-threatening disease. Left untreated, hemorrhage from necrotic bowel tissue will lead to severe fetal anemia and even intrauterine death. We encountered a case of fetal intestinal volvulus causing severe anemia, which was diagnosed postnatally and successfully treated with surgical intervention. PMID:25628516

  15. Perspective: What Makes It So Difficult to Mitigate Worldwide Anemia Prevalence?123

    PubMed Central

    Schümann, Klaus; Solomons, Noel W

    2017-01-01

    Anemia can be related to decreased production or increased loss of erythrocytes, or both, leading to many underlying and often overlapping causes. A largely cereal-based diet with plenty of phytates, polyphenols, and other ligands that inhibit intestinal iron absorption predominated in preindustrial Europe and predominates in present-day developing countries alike. In both situations, we find poor hygienic conditions, which frequently lead to anemia of inflammation. The large number of possible causes and their interaction shows why it is so difficult to mitigate anemia prevalence. Diagnostic biomarkers are required to differentiate the different types of anemia and to treat them appropriately. Some of them are well established in adults [e.g., concentrations of serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and serum iron or the ratio of sTfR to log ferritin]. Others, such as serum hepcidin, hold considerable promise, although they are not yet widely used. A particular issue is to establish reference values for biomarkers in infants and children at different ages. The fact that resource-rich postindustrial societies have a very low prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia offers hope that common types of anemia can be eliminated. In contrast, inborn forms of anemia, such as thalassemia, and anemias related to underlying diseases (e.g., bleeding tumors or peptic ulcers, gynecologic blood losses, or renal diseases) require an operational health system to be addressed appropriately. PMID:28507005

  16. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A neglected issue with relevant effects

    PubMed Central

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  17. Association of Living Arrangement Conditions and Socioeconomic Differentials with Anemia Status among Women in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shangfeng; Hossain, Akmal; Fan, Yang; Akter, Mahmuda

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and remains a significant public health concern. Being a high anemia prevalent country, numerous efforts have been made to confront the issue especially among women and children by both local and international actors. Though the situation has substantially improved in recent years, a staggering number of adult women are currently living with anemia. The etiology of anemia is a multifactorial problem and has been proposed to be associated with various household, societal, economic, cultural factors apart from dietary habits. However, evidence regarding the household arrangements and socioeconomic determinants of anemia is scarce, especially in the context of Bangladesh. To this end, we utilized the 2011 demographic and health survey data to explore the association between anemia status and selected demographic, socioeconomic, and household characteristics. Our result showed significant correlation of anemia with both sociodemographic and household characteristics. Among the sociodemographic variables the following were found to be significantly associated with anemia status: age (p = 0.014; OR = 1.195; 95% CI = 1.036–1.378) and microcredit membership (p = 0.014; OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.037–1.386). Regarding the household arrangements, women utilizing biomass fuel for cooking (p < 0.019; OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 0.981–2.460) were more likely to be anemic. PMID:27517045

  18. Association of Living Arrangement Conditions and Socioeconomic Differentials with Anemia Status among Women in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bishwajit, Ghose; Yaya, Sanni; Tang, Shangfeng; Hossain, Akmal; Fan, Yang; Akter, Mahmuda; Feng, Zhanchun

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and remains a significant public health concern. Being a high anemia prevalent country, numerous efforts have been made to confront the issue especially among women and children by both local and international actors. Though the situation has substantially improved in recent years, a staggering number of adult women are currently living with anemia. The etiology of anemia is a multifactorial problem and has been proposed to be associated with various household, societal, economic, cultural factors apart from dietary habits. However, evidence regarding the household arrangements and socioeconomic determinants of anemia is scarce, especially in the context of Bangladesh. To this end, we utilized the 2011 demographic and health survey data to explore the association between anemia status and selected demographic, socioeconomic, and household characteristics. Our result showed significant correlation of anemia with both sociodemographic and household characteristics. Among the sociodemographic variables the following were found to be significantly associated with anemia status: age (p = 0.014; OR = 1.195; 95% CI = 1.036-1.378) and microcredit membership (p = 0.014; OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.037-1.386). Regarding the household arrangements, women utilizing biomass fuel for cooking (p < 0.019; OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 0.981-2.460) were more likely to be anemic.

  19. Cancel all Hollidays for SLX4 mutations: identification of a new Fanconi anemia subtype, FANCP.

    PubMed

    Kang, M H

    2011-07-01

    SLX4, a coordinator of structure-specific endo-nucleases, is mutated in a new Fanconi anemia subtype Stoepker et al. (2011) Nature Genetics 43:138-141. Mutations of the SLX4 gene in Fanconi anemia Kim et al. (2011) Nature Genetics 43:142-146. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. The association of pagophagia with Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between pagophagia (compulsive ice eating) and H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. We identified H. pylori infection using the (13)C-urea breath test in 45 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (group 1) and 55 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia (group 2). Subgroups for testing oral intestinal iron absorption were randomly assigned from both groups. These subgroups consisted of (a) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, (b) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia, (c) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, pagophagia, and H. pylori infection before the eradication of H. pylori and (d) subgroup c after eradication therapy. There was no difference in the rate of H. pylori infection in the iron-deficiency anemia groups, with or without pagophagia. Furthermore, oral intestinal iron absorption was not influenced by pagophagia and/or H. pylori infection. Pagophagia did not increase the risk of H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Pagophagia and H. pylori infection do not synergistically affect the development of intestinal iron absorption abnormalities.

  1. Liver congestion in heart failure contributes to inappropriately increased serum hepcidin despite anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yukako; Hanawa, Haruo; Jiao, Shuang; Hayashi, Yuka; Yoshida, Kaori; Suzuki, Tomoyasu; Kashimura, Takeshi; Obata, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Komei; Watanabe, Tohru; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of mammalian iron metabolism and mainly produced by the liver. Hepcidin excess causes iron deficiency and anemia by inhibiting iron absorption from the intestine and iron release from macrophage stores. Anemia is frequently complicated with heart failure. In heart failure patients, the most frequent histologic appearance of liver is congestion. However, it remains unclear whether liver congestion associated with heart failure influences hepcidin production, thereby contributing to anemia and functional iron deficiency. In this study, we investigated this relationship in clinical and basic studies. In clinical studies of consecutive heart failure patients (n = 320), anemia was a common comorbidity (41%). In heart failure patients without active infection and ongoing cancer (n = 30), log-serum hepcidin concentration of patients with liver congestion was higher than those without liver congestion (p = 0.0316). Moreover, in heart failure patients with liver congestion (n = 19), the anemia was associated with the higher serum hepcidin concentrations, which is a type of anemia characterized by induction of hepcidin. Subsequently, we produced a rat model of heart failure with liver congestion by injecting monocrotaline that causes pulmonary hypertension. The monocrotaline-treated rats displayed liver congestion with increase of hepcidin expression at 4 weeks after monocrotaline injection, followed by anemia and functional iron deficiency observed at 5 weeks. We conclude that liver congestion induces hepcidin production, which may result in anemia and functional iron deficiency in some patients with heart failure.

  2. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  3. Anemia in postmenopausal women: dietary inadequacy or non-dietary factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postmenopausal women are disproportionately affected by anemia, and the prevalence in females > 65 years of age in the United States is approximately 10%. The manifestation of anemia in older populations is associated with dietary inadequacy, blood loss, genetics, alterations in bioavailability, ren...

  4. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

  5. In anemia of multiple myeloma hepcidin is induced by increased bone-morphogenetic protein-2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contrib...

  6. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  7. Causes and correlates of anemia in 200 patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rovellini, Angelo; Graziadei, Giovanna; Folli, Christian; Brambilla, Anna Maria; Cosentini, Roberto; Canetta, Ciro; Monzani, Valter

    2012-12-01

    Acute heart failure has a poor prognosis and the presence of anemia may increase the risk of adverse outcomes. However, the clinical and laboratory characteristics of anemia in acute heart failure are poorly known. We aimed to assess the causes and the clinical and laboratory correlates of anemia in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This observational study, performed in an Emergency Unit, enrolled 200 patients treated with medical therapy and continuous positive airway pressure. Anemia was found in 36% of patients (38.5% of females and 32.5% of males) and was severe (hemoglobin <9 g/dL) in 6.9% of cases. The most frequent causes of anemia were chronic renal failure (27.8%), chronic inflammatory states (27.8%) and the clustering of multiple factors (18.1%). A wider spectrum of etiological factors was found in females than in males. Microcytic anemia was observed only in females (20% of those anemic), mainly due to iron deficiency/chronic blood loss. Glomerular filtration rate, serum iron, serum albumin, total cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure were independently associated with hemoglobin levels. The etiology of anemia in ACPE is heterogeneous, with several causal factors besides impaired renal function. The pattern of anemia is different between genders, suggesting that sex-specific diagnostic and therapeutic targets should be implemented. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pernicious anemia and juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus in an adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yu, L C; Warrier, R P; Ducos, R S

    1989-02-01

    We report a case of a 15-year-old black boy who developed juvenile-onset pernicious anemia in association with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. He had both intrinsic factor and parietal cell antibodies in addition to anti-islet cell surface antibodies. The existence of pernicious anemia and diabetes mellitus in such a young child makes this an unusual case.

  9. Prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and its effect on neonatal outcomes in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bora, Reeta; Sable, Corey; Wolfson, Julian; Boro, Kanta; Rao, Raghavendra

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and characterize its effect on neonatal outcome in Northeast India. Four hundred and seventy mothers and their newborn infants during a one month period were included. The association between maternal hemoglobin (Hb) at delivery and neonatal outcomes were determined. Anemia (Hb < 110 g/L) was present in 421 (89.6%) mothers with 35 (8.3%) having severe anemia(Hb < 70 g/L). After adjusting for maternal and neonatal variables, each 10 g/L decrease in maternal Hb was associated with 0.18 week decrease in gestational length (p = 0.003) and 21 g decrease in birth weight (p = 0.093). Severe maternal anemia was associated with 0.63 week (95% CI, 0.03-1.23week) shorter gestation, 481 g (95% CI, 305-658 g) lower birth weight and 89% increased risk of small-for-gestation (OR 1.89, 95% CI, 1.25-2.86)in the offspring, compared with those born to mothers without anemia (p < 0.001). Maternal anemia was highly prevalentin this population. Lower gestational age and birth weight, and increased risk of small-for-gestation were associated with maternal anemia, especially when maternal Hb was <80 g/L. Maternal anemia needs urgent attention to improve neonatal outcome in this population.

  10. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn associated with severe congenital anemia of various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Danielle; Kapelushnik, Josef; Harush, Miri B; Marks, Kyla; Shalev, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many associated features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN), severe congenital anemia has been described only occasionally and is not included in the list of conditions that may cause PPHN in the neonate. We describe the clinical course of a group of 12 full-term neonates with PPHN and congenital anemia due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (7/12), α thalasemia (1/12), Diamond-Blackfan (1/12), and epsilon gamma delta beta thalassemia (3/12). The association of congenital anemia and PPHN is more common than previously thought; it can exist with various etiologies and severity of anemia. Congenital anemia has not been described until now as a cause or risk factor for PPHN; it should be considered as such alone or in combination with other known causes to be recognized early and treated appropriately to improve outcome. In families with known cases of congenital anemia due to the above-mentioned diagnosis, closer prenatal follow-up should be offered to anticipate possible fetal distress and/or fetal anemia and PPHN after birth.

  11. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  12. Aplastic anemia, mucormycosis and aspergillosis in infectious mononucleosis: success is possible.

    PubMed

    Ergene, Ulku; Ozbalci, Demircan; Baykal, Bahattin; Metin Ciris, I; Yariktas, Murat

    2007-10-01

    Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is a rare cause of aplastic anemia in adults. We report of a patient in whom aplastic anemia, mucormycosis and aspergillosis complicated during the course of IM and successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. According to our searches in literature, we could not find a similar patient complicated and successfully treated like ours.

  13. A participatory approach for selecting cost-effective measures in the WFD context: the Mar Menor (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Perni, Angel; Martínez-Paz, José M

    2013-08-01

    Achieving a good ecological status in water bodies by 2015 is one of the objectives established in the European Water Framework Directive. Cost-effective analysis (CEA) has been applied for selecting measures to achieve this goal, but this appraisal technique requires technical and economic information that is not always available. In addition, there are often local insights that can only be identified by engaging multiple stakeholders in a participatory process. This paper proposes to combine CEA with the active involvement of stakeholders for selecting cost-effective measures. This approach has been applied to the case study of one of the main coastal lagoons in the European Mediterranean Sea, the Mar Menor, which presents eutrophication problems. Firstly, face-to-face interviews were conducted to estimate relative effectiveness and relative impacts of a set of measures by means of the pairwise comparison technique. Secondly, relative effectiveness was used to estimate cost-effectiveness ratios. The most cost-effective measures were the restoration of watercourses that drain into the lagoon and the treatment of polluted groundwater. Although in general the stakeholders approved the former, most of them stated that the latter involved some uncertainties, which must be addressed before implementing it. Stakeholders pointed out that the PoM would have a positive impact not only on water quality, but also on fishing, agriculture and tourism in the area. This approach can be useful to evaluate other programmes, plans or projects related to other European environmental strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. THE FACTOR DETERMINING THE SPREAD OF RED MARROW DURING ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, Philip D.; Haessler, Herbert

    1921-01-01

    Rabbits in which a chronic anemia of moderate grade is induced by repeated bleedings repair the hemoglobin loss much more rapidly when given subcutaneous injections of hemoglobin than when this is not the case. But the effect of the injections is not manifest for several weeks, during which many pale corpuscles are put out by the marrow; whence it follows that the introduced pigment does not find its way in quantity direct to the new-formed cells but must follow a more or less roundabout metabolic route, perhaps the same one as that of ordinary iron compounds destined for the blood. The rapid replacement of the circulating hemoglobin in the injected animals occurs chiefly through an increased production of corpuscular substance having the same color index as that found in uninjected, anemic controls. By color index in this connection is meant the relation of hemoglobin to the volume of the massed corpuscles. Late in the period of bleedings and hemoglobin injections the demand for stroma for the new-formed blood is far greater than in control animals that have been merely bled, yet the circulating corpuscles show no lessening in resistance to salt solution, such as might perhaps be expected were there a stroma lack. The hematopoietic tissue of the injected animals undergoes an extensive increase—a fact which speaks strongly for the view that the elements out of which stroma is formed are still abundant. The factor which determines the spread of red marrow during anemia is shown by our experiments to be the presence in the body of hemoglobin, or perhaps of its precursors, in excess of the amount which can be utilized by the marrow already existing. Numerous illustrations in support of the point can be adduced from human pathology. Two will suffice. The widespread "currant jelly" marrow of pernicious anemia is found in an organism rendered anemic but supplied with hemoglobin in excess; while the pale, restricted marrow of cases suffering from chronic anemia due to

  15. Diamond Blackfan Anemia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Ellis, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by erythroid failure, congenital anomalies and a predisposition to cancer. Faulty ribosome biogenesis, resulting in pro-apoptotic erythropoiesis leading to erythroid failure, is hypothesized to be the underlying defect. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA all encode ribosomal proteins associated with either the small (RPS) or large (RPL) subunit and in these cases haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. Extraordinarily robust laboratory and clinical investigations have recently led to demonstrable improvements in clinical care for patients with DBA. PMID:19327583

  16. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation.

  17. Seizure disorders and anemia associated with chronic borax intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. S.; Prichard, J. S.; Freedman, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    During the course of investigation of two infants with seizure disorders it was discovered that both had been given large amounts of a preparation of borax and honey which resulted in chronic borate intoxication. In one child a profound anemia developed as well. The symptoms of chronic borate intoxication are different from those of the acute poisoning with which we are more familiar. The borax and honey preparations are highly dangerous and should no longer be manufactured or distributed for sale. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4691106

  18. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed

  19. Maxillary sinus marrow hyperplasia in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M; Slovis, T L; Whitten-Shurney, W

    1995-11-01

    Marrow hyperplasia is a sequela of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and may be seen in the skull in children after 5 years of age [1]. The facial bones, except for the mandible and orbits, are usually not involved [1-3]. We report an unusual case of a 28-month-old black boy with SCA who presented with extensive marrow hyperplasia of the maxillary sinuses in addition to severe calvarial and mandibular changes. The imaging characteristics on CT (similar to other sites of marrow hyperplasia) and MR (low signal on both T1 and T2 sequences) should aid in making the correct diagnosis.

  20. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru

    2011-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital developmental defects, chromosomal abnormalities, and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) agents. So far mutations in 14 FANC genes were identified in FA or FA-like patients. These gene products constitute a common ubiquitin-phosphorylation network called the "FA pathway" and cooperate with other proteins involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control to repair ICL lesions and to maintain genome stability. In this review, we summarize recent exciting discoveries that have expanded our view of the molecular mechanisms operating in DNA repair and DNA damage signaling.

  1. [Mechanisms of congenital erythrocyte enzyme deficiencies associated with hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Boivin, P; Kahn, A

    1976-01-01

    The search for a mechanism for red cell enzyme deficiency associated with congenital hemolytic anemia, requires one to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the enzyme reaction and study the physico-chemical and immunological characteristics of the protein which supports enzyme activity. The technique of iso-electric focalisation and the use of specific anti-enzyme antibodies, is the reason for recent progress in the understanding of the mechanism of these deficiencies. Examples of application of these techniques are given in relation to glucose-6-dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, glucose phosphate isomerase, phosphofructokinase and phosphoglycerate kinase of deficiencies showing the multiplicity of the molecular mechanisms.

  2. Molecular defects identified by whole exome sequencing in a child with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojing; Geng, Juan; Yao, Ru-En; Li, Caihua; Ying, Daming; Shen, Yongnian; Ying, Lei; Yu, Yongguo; Fu, Qihua

    2013-11-10

    Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure, multiple congenital malformations, and an increased susceptibility to malignancy. At least 15 genes have been identified that are involved in the pathogenesis of Fanconi anemia. However, it is still a challenge to assign the complementation group and to characterize the molecular defects in patients with Fanconi anemia. In the current study, whole exome sequencing was used to identify the affected gene(s) in a boy with Fanconi anemia. A recurring, non-synonymous mutation was found (c.3971C>T, p.P1324L) as well as a novel frameshift mutation (c.989_995del, p.H330LfsX2) in FANCA gene. Our results indicate that whole exome sequencing may be useful in clinical settings for rapid identification of disease-causing mutations in rare genetic disorders such as Fanconi anemia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetes and Anemia: International Diabetes Federation (IDF) - Southeast Asian Region (SEAR) position statement.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Manisha; Kalra, Sanjay; Badani, Rajesh; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Bhoraskar, Anil; Das, A K; Dhorepatil, Bharati; Ghosh, Sujoy; Jeloka, Tarun; Khandelwal, Deepak; Latif, Zafar Ahmed; Nadkar, Milind; Pathan, Md Faruque; Saboo, Banshi; Sahay, Rakesh; Shimjee, Suleiman; Shrestha, Dina; Siyan, Ali; Talukdar, Shamim Hayder; Tiwaskar, Mangesh; Unnikrishnan, A G

    2017-12-01

    Anemia is often associated with diabetes mellitus and is known to intensify the risk of developing diabetes-related microvascular and macrovascular complications. There is paucity in understanding of co-existence of these conditions, especially in Southeast Asian countries. Iron and/or erythropoietin deficiencies are the major causes of anemia in diabetes, and diabetic kidney disease plays a key role. Patients with diabetes need to be screened for anemia along with other risk factors and anemia should be corrected appropriately to improve overall clinical outcomes. This position statement aims to provide a comprehensive overview and an algorithm for appropriate management of anemia in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anemia in children: prevalence, causes, diagnostic work-up, and long-term consequences.

    PubMed

    Allali, Slimane; Brousse, Valentine; Sacri, Anne-Sylvia; Chalumeau, Martin; de Montalembert, Mariane

    2017-11-01

    Anemia in children is a major public health problem throughout the world. It is often multifactorial, iron deficiency being the most frequent etiology. Consequences are diverse and largely under evaluated. Areas covered: This paper briefly reviews the main causes and focus on the potential consequences of acute and chronic anemia in children. Expert commentary: Anemia in children should never be trivialized. Even if iron deficiency is frequently involved, other potentially life-threatening causes are possible and should be looked for. The exact contribution of anemia to child mortality and morbidity is difficult to assess because of overlapping comorbidities. Chronic anemia may impair growth, cardiac function and cognitive development in infants but other consequences are rather poorly described and should be explored more thoroughly.

  5. Structured Additive Quantile Regression for Assessing the Determinants of Childhood Anemia in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Habyarimana, Faustin; Zewotir, Temesgen; Ramroop, Shaun

    2017-06-17

    Childhood anemia is among the most significant health problems faced by public health departments in developing countries. This study aims at assessing the determinants and possible spatial effects associated with childhood anemia in Rwanda. The 2014/2015 Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey (RDHS) data was used. The analysis was done using the structured spatial additive quantile regression model. The findings of this study revealed that the child's age; the duration of breastfeeding; gender of the child; the nutritional status of the child (whether underweight and/or wasting); whether the child had a fever; had a cough in the two weeks prior to the survey or not; whether the child received vitamin A supplementation in the six weeks before the survey or not; the household wealth index; literacy of the mother; mother's anemia status; mother's age at the birth are all significant factors associated with childhood anemia in Rwanda. Furthermore, significant structured spatial location effects on childhood anemia was found.

  6. Iron deficiency and anemia: a common problem in female elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Landahl, Göran; Adolfsson, Peter; Börjesson, Mats; Mannheimer, Clas; Rödjer, Stig

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among elite women soccer players. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity, and ferritin were determined in 28 female soccer players called up for the national team. Of the investigated female soccer players, 57% had iron deficiency and 29% iron deficiency anemia 6 months before the FIFA Women's World Cup. It is concluded that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is common in female soccer players at the top international level. Some might suffer from relative anemia and measurement of hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to reveal relative anemia. Regular monitoring of hemoglobin concentration and iron status is necessary to institute iron supplementation when indicated.

  7. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia: early diagnosis may be effective in preventing deafness.

    PubMed

    Onal, Hasan; Bariş, Safa; Ozdil, Mine; Yeşil, Gözde; Altun, Gürkan; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Aydin, Ahmet; Celkan, Tiraje

    2009-01-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, megaloblastic anemia and sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the SLC19A2 gene, encoding a high-affinity thiamine transporter protein, THTR-1, are responsible for the clinical features associated with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome in which treatment with pharmacological doses of thiamine correct the megaloblastic anemia and diabetes mellitus. The anemia can recur when thiamine is withdrawn. Thiamine may be effective in preventing deafness if started before two months. Our patient was found homozygous for a mutation, 242insA, in the nucleic acid sequence of exon B, with insertion of an adenine introducing a stop codon at codon 52 in the high-affinity thiamine transporter gene, SLC19A2, on chromosome 1q23.3.

  8. [A case of curable encephalomyelitis in a tropical area: pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Razafimahefa, S H; Razafimahefa, J; Rabenjanahary, T H; Rakotoarivelo, R A; Andriantseheno, M; Ramanampamonjy, R M; Rajaona, H R

    2011-06-01

    Pernicious anemia is uncommon in Africa. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of pernicious anemia observed in Madagascar. The revealing manifestation was encephalomyelitis with combined medullar sclerosis that responded favorably to vitamin B12 replacement therapy. Clinical symptoms included paresthesia associated with allodynia of all four extremities and with tetrapyramidal syndrome, medullar ataxia and minor cognitive disturbances ongoing for 5 months. Hemogram testing revealed macrocytic anemia. Serum cobalamin level was low. Anti-intrinsic factor antibody was detected. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse high-signal intensity along the posterior spinal cord extending from C1 to C4. Vitamin B12 replacement therapy led to full regression of clinical signs after six weeks. Association of central nervous system involvement with macrocytic anemia suggests vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anemia should be suspected. This disease can be considered as a curable form of myelitis in Africa and Madagascar.

  9. [Pancytopenia and hemolysis--diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Meier, N; Lipp, E; Solenthaler, M

    2007-07-29

    Pernicious anemia and Vitamin B12 deficiency have a wide range of symptoms and are a common finding in the elderly. A 73 year old female is admitted to the hospital because of dyspnea, fatigue and loss of appetite and weight. While previous medical history and physical examination are inconspicuous, laboratory findings show severe pancytopenia with macrocytosis, low reticulocyte count and marked signs of hemolysis. A very low serum level of vitamin B12 and chronic atrophic type A gastritis upon endoscopy with presence of parietal cell antibodies in the serum lead to the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Complete restitution is achieved by parenteral vitamin B12 substitution. Nowadays, severe pernicious anemia is only rarely seen. The differential diagnosis of pancytopenia (with macrocytic anemia) combined with hemolysis and the essential hints to the diagnosis of pernicious anemia are discussed, and thereby practical aspects including therapy actualized.

  10. Response to parenteral iron therapy distinguish unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia from iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Akin, M; Sarbay, H; Guler, S; Balci, Y I; Polat, A

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated that response to parenteral iron therapy could be helpful in distinguishing the types of iron deficiency anemia. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy of 15 children with unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia (URIDA). We compared the results at diagnosis, 6 weeks and 6 months after the therapy. Results were compared with responses of 11 patients' results with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) from our previous study. Six weeks after the start of treatment, ferritin, MCV, MCH and Hb values were in normal range in 10 patients. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 2.6-3.5 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. In five patients, Hb, MCH, and MCV mean (range) values [11.2 g/dL (11-12.2), 24.5 pg (24-25.6), and 67 fL (65-70)] were nearly normal but ferritin mean (range) values [9.8 ng/mL (8-11)] were below normal. Six weeks after the start of treatment, Hb, MCH, MCV and ferritin values of patients with IRIDA were increased. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 0.8-2.7 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. IRIDA is only partially responsive to parenteral iron supplementation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the response to intravenous iron therapy for the URIDA cases improved blood parameters more effectively than hereditary IRIDA. Response to parenteral iron therapy would be helpful to distinguish unexplained refractory IDA from hereditary IRIDA for clinicians who do not have access to hepcidin or TMPRS6 mutation analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Association of complementation group and mutation type with clinical outcome in fanconi anemia. European Fanconi Anemia Research Group.

    PubMed

    Faivre, L; Guardiola, P; Lewis, C; Dokal, I; Ebell, W; Zatterale, A; Altay, C; Poole, J; Stones, D; Kwee, M L; van Weel-Sipman, M; Havenga, C; Morgan, N; de Winter, J; Digweed, M; Savoia, A; Pronk, J; de Ravel, T; Jansen, S; Joenje, H; Gluckman, E; Mathew, C G

    2000-12-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Clinical care is complicated by variable age at onset and severity of hematologic symptoms. Recent advances in the molecular biology of FA have allowed us to investigate the relationship between FA genotype and the nature and severity of the clinical phenotype. Two hundred forty-five patients from all 7 known complementation groups (FA-A to FA-G) were studied. Mutations were detected in one of the cloned FANC genes in 169 patients; in the remainder the complementation group was assigned by cell fusion or Western blotting. A range of qualitative and quantitative clinical parameters was compared for each complementation group and for different classes of mutation. Significant phenotypic differences were found. FA-G patients had more severe cytopenia and a higher incidence of leukemia. Somatic abnormalities were less prevalent in FA-C, but more common in the rare groups FA-D, FA-E, and FA-F. In FA-A, patients homozygous for null mutations had an earlier onset of anemia and a higher incidence of leukemia than those with mutations producing an altered protein. In FA-C, there was a later age of onset of aplastic anemia and fewer somatic abnormalities in patients with the 322delG mutation, but there were more somatic abnormalities in patients with IVS4 + 4A --> T. This study indicates that FA patients with mutations in the FANCG gene and patients homozygous for null mutations in FANCA are high-risk groups with a poor hematologic outcome and should be considered as candidates both for frequent monitoring and early therapeutic intervention. (Blood. 2000;96:4064-4070)

  12. [Prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases in Spain].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; González-Galilea, Ángel; Gisbert, Javier P; Cucala, Mercedes; Ponce, Julio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases. An epidemiological, multicenter, mixed design study (retrospective review of randomized clinical records and prospective visits) conducted between February 2010 and March 2011 in 22 Spanish gastroenterology departments. Severe anemia was defined as Hb < 10g/dL, mild/moderate as Hb ≥ 10g/dL, and iron deficiency as ferritin < 30ng/ml or transferrin saturation < 16%. We included 379 patients. The mean±SD age was 57±19 years and 47% were men. The prevalence of anemia at admission was 60% (95% CI 55 to 65), and anemia was severe (Hb <10g/dl) in half the patients. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 54% of evaluable patients (95% CI 47 to 61). Gastrointestinal bleeding at admission was found in 39% of the patients, of whom 83% (121/146) were anemic. At discharge, the proportion of anemic patients was unchanged (from 60% at admission to 58% at discharge) (95% CI 53 to 63) and iron deficiency was found in 41% (95% CI 32 to 50): anemia was severe in 17% and mild/moderate in 41%. During follow-up, at 3-6 months after admission, 44% (95% CI 39 to 50) of evaluable patients continued to have iron deficiency and 28% (95% CI 23 to 32) were still anemic: 5% severe and 23% mild/moderate. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 44% (95% CI: 39-50). During admission, 50% of patients with anemia did not receive treatment. At discharge, 55% were untreated. The prevalence of anemia in patients hospitalized for gastroenterological diseases was very high. Anemia persisted in over a quarter of patients at the follow-up visit. Only half of hospitalized patients received treatment for anemia, even when the anemia was severe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinants of Anemia among School-Aged Children in Mexico, the United States and Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Sana; Addo, O. Yaw; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Ashour, Fayrouz A. Sakr; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia affects approximately 25% of school-aged children (SAC—aged 5.00–14.99 years) globally. We determined in three countries the prevalence and determinants of anemia in SAC. Data on sociodemographics, inflammation and nutrition status were obtained from the 2006 Mexican National Nutrition Survey, the 2003-6 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and the 2010 Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición Situación Colombia. In the US, vitamin A and iron deficiency (ID) were available only for girls aged 12.00–14.99 years to which our analysis was limited. Associations were evaluated by country using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for confounders and complex survey design. The prevalence of anemia and ID were: Mexico 12% (ID 18%), n = 3660; US 4% (ID 10%), n = 733; and Colombia 4% (ID 9%), n = 8573. The percentage of anemia associated with ID was 22.4% in Mexico, 38.9% in the US and 16.7% in Colombia. In Mexico, anemia was associated with ID (adjusted OR: 1.5, p = 0.02) and overweight (aOR 0.4, p = 0.007). In the US, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 14.1, p < 0.0001) and ID (aOR: 8.0, p < 0.0001). In Colombia, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.005), lowest socio-economic status quintile (aOR: 1.8, p = 0.0005), ID (aOR: 2.7, p < 0.0001), and being stunted (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.02). While anemia was uniformly associated with iron deficiency in Mexico, Columbia, and the United States, other measured factors showed inconsistent associations with anemia. Additional data on anemia determinants in SAC are needed to guide interventions. PMID:27347992

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of anemia among pregnant women of Mekelle town: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abriha, Abrehet; Yesuf, Melkie Edris; Wassie, Molla Mesele

    2014-12-09

    Nutritional anemia is the most common type of anemia worldwide and mainly includes iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin C deficiencies. Anemia is a global public health problem affecting people in all age groups but the burden of the problem is higher in pregnant women. The study aimed to assess prevalence of anemia and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care in governmental health institutions in mekele town. Institution based cross-sectional study was employed. Systematic random sampling procedure was employed to select 619 study subjects. Pretested questionnaire were used to collect the data. The predictive value of the variable to Anemia was identified by bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. The overall prevalence of anemia among pregnant women was 19.7%. Meal frequency less than two per day [AOR 3.93 95% CI (2.0,7.9)], Low Dietary Diversity score [AOR 12.8 95% CI (6.4,25.6)], Medium Dietary Diversity score [AOR 2.4 95% CI (1.2,4.8)], Parity [AOR 2.3 95% CI (1.4,3.8)] and Meat consumption less than once per week [AOR 2.2 95% CI (1.0,4.9)] were found to be factors affecting Anemia in pregnant women. Anemia among pregnant women is found to be mild public health problem in the study area. Parity, meal frequency, dietary diversity and meat consumption were significantly and independently affect anemia of pregnant women. Using family planning methods and improved meat consumption contributes for decreasing prevalence of anemia. Moreover, Diversifying food intake and increasing meal frequency of pregnant women is highly recommended.

  15. Determinants of Anemia among School-Aged Children in Mexico, the United States and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Addo, O Yaw; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Ashour, Fayrouz A Sakr; Ziegler, Thomas R; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2016-06-23

    Anemia affects approximately 25% of school-aged children (SAC-aged 5.00-14.99 years) globally. We determined in three countries the prevalence and determinants of anemia in SAC. Data on sociodemographics, inflammation and nutrition status were obtained from the 2006 Mexican National Nutrition Survey, the 2003-6 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and the 2010 Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición Situación Colombia. In the US, vitamin A and iron deficiency (ID) were available only for girls aged 12.00-14.99 years to which our analysis was limited. Associations were evaluated by country using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for confounders and complex survey design. The prevalence of anemia and ID were: Mexico 12% (ID 18%), n = 3660; US 4% (ID 10%), n = 733; and Colombia 4% (ID 9%), n = 8573. The percentage of anemia associated with ID was 22.4% in Mexico, 38.9% in the US and 16.7% in Colombia. In Mexico, anemia was associated with ID (adjusted OR: 1.5, p = 0.02) and overweight (aOR 0.4, p = 0.007). In the US, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 14.1, p < 0.0001) and ID (aOR: 8.0, p < 0.0001). In Colombia, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.005), lowest socio-economic status quintile (aOR: 1.8, p = 0.0005), ID (aOR: 2.7, p < 0.0001), and being stunted (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.02). While anemia was uniformly associated with iron deficiency in Mexico, Columbia, and the United States, other measured factors showed inconsistent associations with anemia. Additional data on anemia determinants in SAC are needed to guide interventions.

  16. Increased Risk of Severe Infant Anemia Following Exposure to Maternal HAART, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Shapiro, Roger L.; Hughes, Michael D.; Powis, Kathleen; Ogwu, Anthony; Moffat, Claire; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Lockman, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT), but may increase the risk for infant anemia. Methods The incidence of first severe anemia (Grade 3 or 4, Division of AIDS 2004 Toxicity Table) was assessed among HIV-uninfected infants in the Mashi and Mma Bana MTCT prevention trials in Botswana. Severe anemia rates were compared between 3 groups: infants exposed to maternal HAART in utero and during breastfeeding and 1 month of postnatal zidovudine (HAART-BF); infants exposed to maternal zidovudine (ZDV) in utero, 6 months of postnatal ZDV, and breastfeeding (ZDV-BF); and infants exposed to maternal ZDV in utero, 1 month of postnatal ZDV, and formula-feeding (ZDV-FF). Results A total of 1719 infants were analyzed— 691 HAART-BF, 503 ZDV-BF, and 525 ZDV-FF. Severe anemia was detected in 118 infants (7.4%). By 6 months, 12.5% of HAART-BF infants experienced severe anemia, compared with 5.3% of ZDV-BF (P<0.001) and 2.5% of ZDV-FF infants (P<0.001). In adjusted analysis, HAART-BF infants were at greater risk of severe anemia than ZDV-BF or ZDV-FF infants (adjusted odds ratios 2.6 and 5.8, respectively; P < 0.001). Most anemias were asymptomatic and improved with iron/multivitamin supplementation and cessation of ZDV exposure. However, 11 infants (0.6% of all infants) required transfusion for symptomatic anemia. Microcytosis and hypochromia were common among infants with severe anemia. Conclusions Exposure to maternal HAART starting in utero was associated with severe infant anemia. Confirmation of this finding and possible strategies to mitigate hematologic toxicity warrant further study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00197587 and NCT00270296. PMID:21266910

  17. The effects of malaria and intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy on fetal anemia in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Elizabeth T; Chaluluka, Ebbie; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Feng, Gaoqian; Rogerson, Stephen J; Meshnick, Steven R

    2012-10-01

    Fetal anemia is common in malarious areas and is a risk factor for infant morbidity and mortality. Malaria during pregnancy may cause decreased cord hemoglobin (Hb) and fetal anemia among newborns. Intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is protective against malaria but may also affect hematopoiesis and contribute to fetal anemia. Peripheral, placental, and cord blood were examined for malaria parasitemia and Hb concentration in a cross-section of 3848 mothers and infants delivered at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi between 1997 and 2006. Unconditional linear and logistic regressions were performed with multiple imputation for missing covariates to assess the associations between malaria, IPTp with SP, and fetal anemia. The overall prevalence of fetal anemia was 7.9% (n = 304). Malaria parasitemia at delivery was associated with an adjusted decrease in cord Hb of -0.24 g/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -.42 to -.05). The adjusted prevalence odds ratio for the effect of malaria on fetal anemia was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.05-1.90). Primigravidae who did not take IPTp had infants at highest risk for fetal anemia, and density of parasitemia was correlated with the decrease in cord Hb. There was no significant association between SP use and cord Hb or fetal anemia. Malaria during pregnancy, but not IPTp, decreases cord Hb and is a risk factor for fetal anemia in Malawi. Intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy with SP may continue to be safe and effective in preventing malaria during pregnancy and fetal anemia despite development of SP resistance.

  18. Salmonella pyomyositis complicating sickle cell anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pyomyositis is a bacterial infection of skeletal muscle and a rare complication of sickle cell anemia. It may present a difficult problem in diagnosis, leading to delay in appropriate treatment and development of complications including abscess formation and osteomyelitis. Case presentation We report the case of a 44-year-old Afro-Caribbean woman with homozygous sickle cell disease who presented with chest crisis and later developed pyomyositis of her hip and pelvic muscles. Salmonella agbeni was isolated from blood cultures and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis in this case. It is noteworthy of this case that there were no antecedent signs of gastroenteritis. Drainage was not appropriate and she was treated with intravenous antibiotics for six weeks. Conclusions Focal Salmonella infections are uncommon in soft tissue. Pyomyositis should be considered in patients with sickle cell anemia that continue to have muscle pain and high fevers, despite initial management of their sickle cell crisis. Radiological imaging, particularly magnetic resonance imaging, is a crucial tool in establishing the diagnosis. PMID:20591146

  19. Oral cancer in Fanconi anemia: Review of 121 cases.

    PubMed

    Furquim, Camila Pinheiro; Pivovar, Allana; Amenábar, José Miguel; Bonfim, Carmem; Torres-Pereira, Cassius Carvalho

    2018-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by aplastic anemia, progressive pancytopenia, congenital anomalies, and increased risk of cancer development. After hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), patients have an estimated 500-fold increase in the risk of developing head and neck cancer compared to a non-affected, and the oral cavity is affected in one-third of cases. Thus, this study aimed to better understand the natural history of oral cavity cancer in patients affected by FA. After conducting a keyword search on MEDLINE, we found 121 cases of oral cavity cancer in patients who had been affected by FA. In conclusion, HSCT may increase the risks of oral cancer development, especially after 5 years after the transplant. In the normal population, the tongue is the most affected area. FA patients should be informed of the risks of oral malignant transformation and encouraged to be undergo medical surveillance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanism of Ubiquitination and Deubiquitination in the Fanconi Anemia Pathway.

    PubMed

    van Twest, Sylvie; Murphy, Vincent J; Hodson, Charlotte; Tan, Winnie; Swuec, Paolo; O'Rourke, Julienne J; Heierhorst, Jörg; Crismani, Wayne; Deans, Andrew J

    2017-01-19

    Monoubiquitination and deubiquitination of FANCD2:FANCI heterodimer is central to DNA repair in a pathway that is defective in the cancer predisposition syndrome Fanconi anemia (FA). The "FA core complex" contains the RING-E3 ligase FANCL and seven other essential proteins that are mutated in various FA subtypes. Here, we purified recombinant FA core complex to reveal the function of these other proteins. The complex contains two spatially separate FANCL molecules that are dimerized by FANCB and FAAP100. FANCC and FANCE act as substrate receptors and restrict monoubiquitination to the FANCD2:FANCI heterodimer in only a DNA-bound form. FANCA and FANCG are dispensable for maximal in vitro ubiquitination. Finally, we show that the reversal of this reaction by the USP1:UAF1 deubiquitinase only occurs when DNA is disengaged. Our work reveals the mechanistic basis for temporal and spatial control of FANCD2:FANCI monoubiquitination that is critical for chemotherapy responses and prevention of Fanconi anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aflatoxin Exposure During Pregnancy, Maternal Anemia, and Adverse Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laura E.; Prendergast, Andrew J.; Turner, Paul C.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Pregnant women and their developing fetuses are vulnerable to multiple environmental insults, including exposure to aflatoxin, a mycotoxin that may contaminate as much as 25% of the world food supply. We reviewed and integrated findings from studies of aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy and evaluated potential links to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We identified 27 studies (10 human cross-sectional studies and 17 animal studies) assessing the relationship between aflatoxin exposure and adverse birth outcomes or anemia. Findings suggest that aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy may impair fetal growth. Only one human study investigated aflatoxin exposure and prematurity, and no studies investigated its relationship with pregnancy loss, but animal studies suggest aflatoxin exposure may increase risk for prematurity and pregnancy loss. The fetus could be affected by maternal aflatoxin exposure through direct toxicity as well as indirect toxicity, via maternal systemic inflammation, impaired placental growth, or elevation of placental cytokines. The cytotoxic and systemic effects of aflatoxin could plausibly mediate maternal anemia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal loss, and preterm birth. Given the widespread exposure to this toxin in developing countries, longitudinal studies in pregnant women are needed to provide stronger evidence for the role of aflatoxin in adverse pregnancy outcomes, and to explore biological mechanisms. Potential pathways for intervention to reduce aflatoxin exposure are urgently needed, and this might reduce the global burden of stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birthweight. PMID:28500823

  2. BRCA1 interacts directly with the Fanconi anemia protein FANCA.

    PubMed

    Folias, Alexandra; Matkovic, Mara; Bruun, Donald; Reid, Sonja; Hejna, James; Grompe, Markus; D'Andrea, Alan; Moses, Robb

    2002-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal defects, anemia, chromosomal instability and increased risk of leukemia. At the cellular level FA is characterized by increased sensitivity to agents forming interstrand crosslinks (ICL) in DNA. Six FA genes have been cloned and interactions among individual FANC proteins have been found. The FANCD2 protein co-localizes in nuclear foci with the BRCA1 protein following DNA damage and during S-phase, requiring the FANCA, C, E and G proteins to do so. This finding may reflect a direct role for the BRCA1 protein in double strand break (DSB) repair and interaction with the FANC proteins. Therefore interactions between BRCA1 and the FANC proteins were investigated. Among the known FANC proteins, we find evidence for direct interaction only between the FANCA protein and BRCA1. The evidence rests on three different tests: yeast two-hybrid analysis, coimmunoprecipitation from in vitro synthesis, and coimmunoprecipitation from cell extracts. The amino terminal portion of FANCA and the central part (aa 740-1083) of BRCA1 contain the sites of interaction. The interaction does not depend on DNA damage, thus FANCA and BRCA1 are constitutively interacting. The demonstrated interaction directly connects BRCA1 to the FA pathway of DNA repair.

  3. Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E.

    1991-03-15

    The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences inmore » tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.« less

  4. Evaluation and treatment of iron deficiency anemia: a gastroenterological perspective.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Amy; Kaneshiro, Marc; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2010-03-01

    A substantial volume of the consultations requested of gastroenterologists are directed towards the evaluation of anemia. Since iron deficiency anemia often arises from bleeding gastrointestinal lesions, many of which are malignant, establishment of a firm diagnosis usually obligates an endoscopic evaluation. Although the laboratory tests used to make the diagnosis have not changed in many decades, their interpretation has, and this is possibly due to the availability of extensive testing in key populations. We provide data supporting the use of the serum ferritin as the sole useful measure of iron stores, setting the lower limit at 100 microg/l for some populations in order to increase the sensitivity of the test. Trends of the commonly obtained red cell indices, mean corpuscular volume, and the red cell distribution width can provide valuable diagnostic information. Once the diagnosis is established, upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is usually indicated. Nevertheless, in many cases a gastrointestinal source is not found after routine evaluation. Additional studies, including repeat upper and lower endoscopy and often investigation of the small intestine may thus be required. Although oral iron is inexpensive and usually effective, there are many gastrointestinal conditions that warrant treatment of iron deficiency with intravenous iron.

  5. Macrocytic anemia in Lesch-Nyhan disease and its variants.

    PubMed

    Cakmakli, Hasan F; Torres, Rosa J; Menendez, Araceli; Yalcin-Cakmakli, Gul; Porter, Christopher C; Puig, Juan Garcia; Jinnah, H A

    2018-06-06

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by overproduction of uric acid and neurobehavioral abnormalities. The purpose of this study was  to describe macrocytic erythrocytes as another common aspect of the phenotype. The results of 257 complete blood counts from 65 patients over a 23-year period were collected from 2 reference centers where many patients are seen regularly. Macrocytic erythrocytes occurred in 81-92% of subjects with Lesch-Nyhan disease or its neurological variants. After excluding cases with iron deficiency because it might pseudonormalize erythrocyte volumes, macrocytosis occurred in 97% of subjects. Macrocytic erythrocytes were sometimes accompanied by mild anemia, and rarely by severe anemia. These results establish macrocytic erythrocytes as a very common aspect of the clinical phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan disease and its neurological variants. Macrocytosis is so characteristic that its absence should prompt suspicion of a secondary process, such as iron deficiency. Because macrocytosis is uncommon in unaffected children, it can also be used as a clue for early diagnosis in children with neurodevelopmental delay. Better recognition of this characteristic feature of the disorder will also help to prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing and unnecessary attempts to treat it with folate or B12 supplements.

  6. Sickle cell anemia in northern Israel: screening and prevention.

    PubMed

    Koren, Ariel; Zalman, Lucia; Palmor, Haya; Zamir, Ronit Bril; Levin, Carina; Openheim, Ariella; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty; Shalev, Stavit; Filon, Dvora

    2009-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a hemolytic anemia caused by a single mutation in position 6 of the beta globin molecule. About 80 patients with SCA in northern Israel are currently receiving treatment. To assess a screening program in northern Israel aimed at detecting couples at risk for having offspring with SCA. Since 1987, screening for beta thalassemia in pregnant women in northern Israel has been conducted, and from 1999 all the samples were also tested for hemoglobin S, Hgb C, Hgb D, Hgb O Arab and others. During the 20 year period 1987-2006 a total of 69,340 women were screened; 114 couples who carried Hgb S were detected and 187 prenatal diagnoses were performed in couples at risk for having an offspring with Hgb S. The mean gestational age was 13 +/- 4 weeks. Fifty-four of those diagnoses revealed affected fetuses and in 4 cases the couple declined to perform therapeutic abortion. The economic burden to the health services for treating SCA patients is about U.S.$ 7000 per year, and the institution of prevention programs has proven cost-effective in populations with a high frequency of carriers. Since our program is aimed to also detect beta thalassemia, a disease that is more frequent in this area (> 2.5%), the added cost for the prevention of SCA is less significant despite the low incidence of the S gene in our population, namely < 1%.

  7. Aflatoxin Exposure During Pregnancy, Maternal Anemia, and Adverse Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura E; Prendergast, Andrew J; Turner, Paul C; Humphrey, Jean H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2017-04-01

    AbstractPregnant women and their developing fetuses are vulnerable to multiple environmental insults, including exposure to aflatoxin, a mycotoxin that may contaminate as much as 25% of the world food supply. We reviewed and integrated findings from studies of aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy and evaluated potential links to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We identified 27 studies (10 human cross-sectional studies and 17 animal studies) assessing the relationship between aflatoxin exposure and adverse birth outcomes or anemia. Findings suggest that aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy may impair fetal growth. Only one human study investigated aflatoxin exposure and prematurity, and no studies investigated its relationship with pregnancy loss, but animal studies suggest aflatoxin exposure may increase risk for prematurity and pregnancy loss. The fetus could be affected by maternal aflatoxin exposure through direct toxicity as well as indirect toxicity, via maternal systemic inflammation, impaired placental growth, or elevation of placental cytokines. The cytotoxic and systemic effects of aflatoxin could plausibly mediate maternal anemia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal loss, and preterm birth. Given the widespread exposure to this toxin in developing countries, longitudinal studies in pregnant women are needed to provide stronger evidence for the role of aflatoxin in adverse pregnancy outcomes, and to explore biological mechanisms. Potential pathways for intervention to reduce aflatoxin exposure are urgently needed, and this might reduce the global burden of stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birthweight.

  8. Assessment of Gaps in Care and the Development of a Care Pathway for Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jason K; Gasche, Christoph; Drazin, Noam Z; Weaver, Sarah Alandra; Ehrlich, Orna G; Oberai, Ridhima; Zapala, Sophie; Siegel, Corey A; Melmed, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and is associated with high rates of IBD-related complications, resource utilization, and impaired quality of life. Despite practice guidelines for anemia in patients with IBD, gaps remain in the perceptions of anemia among health care providers. The aims of this study were to identify gaps in care and to develop a care pathway for anemia in patients with IBD. The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America anemia care pathway was developed by a committee using principles of cognitive task analysis. Focus groups of providers of patients with IBD were performed to identify domains of perceptions and management decisions for anemia and IBD. Knowledge elicitation from subject experts in anemia was conducted using case-based scenarios of patients with IBD and anemia to determine decision-making branch points. The care pathway was modified in an iterative fashion to encompass clinical presentations of anemia in IBD and potential barriers to the recognition, management, and follow-up of anemia. Variations were observed in how providers define iron deficiency, thresholds for treatment of anemia, and route of iron therapy. A care pathway for anemia incorporating the World Health Organization definition of anemia, universal hemoglobin and ferritin screening, evaluation of iron stores using ferritin and transferrin saturation, management of anemia based on adequacy of iron stores, and follow-up was developed. The authors identified domains of how providers perceive and manage patients with IBD and anemia, and developed a care pathway to align clinical practices with guideline recommendations.

  9. The use of multiplexed MRM for the discovery of biomarkers to differentiate iron-deficiency anemia from anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Dominik; Cohen Freue, Gabriela V; Sojo, Luis; Kuzyk, Michael A; Ratkay, Leslie; Parker, Carol E; Goldberg, Y Paul; Borchers, Christoph H

    2012-06-27

    In this study we demonstrate the use of a multiplexed MRM-based assay to distinguish among normal (NL) and iron-metabolism disorder mouse models, particularly, iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), inflammation (INFL), and inflammation and anemia (INFL+IDA). Our initial panel of potential biomarkers was based on the analysis of 14 proteins expressed by candidate genes involved in iron transport and metabolism. Based on this study, we were able to identify a panel of 8 biomarker proteins: apolipoprotein A4 (APO4), transferrin, transferrin receptor 1, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, lactoferrin, hemopexin, and matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP8) that clearly distinguish among the normal and disease models. Within this set of proteins, transferrin showed the best individual classification accuracy over all samples (72%) and within the NL group (94%). Compared to the best single-protein biomarker, transferrin, the use of the composite 8-protein biomarker panel improved the classification accuracy from 94% to 100% in the NL group, from 50% to 72% in the INFL group, from 66% to 96% in the IDA group, and from 79% to 83% in the INFL+IDA group. Based on these findings, validation of the utility of this potentially important biomarker panel in human samples in an effort to differentiate IDA, inflammation, and combinations thereof, is now warranted. This article is part of a Special Section entitled: Understanding genome regulation and genetic diversity by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Early Reticulocytosis and Anemia Are Associated with Abnormal and Conditional Transcranial Doppler Velocities in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Emily Riehm; Fasano, Ross M; Estrada, Monica; He, Jianping; Luban, Naomi L C; McCarter, Robert

    2016-02-01

    To improve prediction of sickle cell anemia severity at an early age, we evaluated whether absolute reticulocyte count (ARC) or hemoglobin (Hb) levels during early infancy (2-6 months of age) in patients with sickle cell anemia predict the risk of later developing an abnormal (abTCD) or conditional (cdTCD) Transcranial Doppler (TCD). We used chart review to identify 121 consecutive patients who underwent TCD screening and had steady state ARC and Hb levels recorded between 2 and 6 months of age. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between ARC, Hb levels, and risk of developing cdTCD/abTCD over time. Mean ARC in early infancy was highest and mean Hb lowest in those children with abTCDs and cdTCDs. Cox regression analysis revealed that those subjects with an ARC ≥200 K/μL in early infancy had nearly 3 times the risk of having an abTCD/cdTCD than the group with an ARC <200 K/μL, and patients with a Hb <8.5 g/dL had 2.7 times the risk of having an abTCD/cdTCD. These data suggest that both elevated ARC and low baseline Hb during early infancy are associated with an increased risk of developing a cdTCD or abTCD later in childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stem cell gene therapy for fanconi anemia: report from the 1st international Fanconi anemia gene therapy working group meeting.

    PubMed

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-07-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA.

  12. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  13. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F.; Rodrigues, Pedro N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia. PMID:27100629

  14. The prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and its associated risk factors in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, S.; Fujiati, I. I.; Keumalasari, D.; Daulay, M.; Martina, S. J.; Syarifah, S.

    2018-03-01

    The gestation period is the period that determines the quality of human resources in the future because the development of the child is determined from the time of the fetus in utero. The most common nutrition problems suffered by pregnant women in Indonesia is Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED) and anemia. The aim of this research to determine the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and the risk factors associated with anemia in urban and rural areas of North Sumatera Province. This research is as descriptive analyticwith cross-sectional approach. Total sample 140 pregnant women from the Medan City, Langkat District and South Labuhan Batu District, and was from June to October 2016. Data collected by using interviews, hemoglobinometer tool and analyzed with Chi-square test. Anemia was in 40.7% of pregnant women, and the incidence of anemia is more common in pregnant women in urban areas than in rural areas. The factors associated with anemia in pregnant women is parity, knowledge of nutrition, diet and the risk of chronic energy deficiency (p <0.05). This study concludes that the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women in North Sumatra was higher than the national prevalence.

  15. Induction by alkylating agents of sister chromatid exchanges and chromatid breaks in Fanconi's anemia.

    PubMed

    Latt, S A; Stetten, G; Juergens, L A; Buchanan, G R; Gerald, P S

    1975-10-01

    Sister chromatid exchanges, which may reflect chromosome repair in response to certain types of DNA damage, provide a means of investigating the increased chromosome fragility characteristic of Fanconi's anemia. By a recently developed technique using 33258 Hoechst and 5-bromodeoxyuridine, it was observed that the baseline frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes from four males with Fanconi's anemia differed little from that of normal lymphocytes. However, addition of the bifunctional alkylating agent mitomycin C (0.01 or 0.03 mug/ml) to the Fanconi's anemia cells during culture induces less than half of the increase in exchanges found in identically treated normal lymphocytes. This reduced increment in exchanges in accompanied by a partial suppression of mitosis and a marked increase in chromatid breaks and rearrangements. Many of these events occur at sites of incomplete chromatid interchange. The increase in sister chromatid exchanges induced in Fanconi's anemia lymphocytes by the monofunctional alkylating agent ethylmethane sulfonate (0.25 mg/ml) was slightly less than that in normal cells. Lymphocytes from two sets of parents of the patients with Fanconi's anemia exhibited a normal response to alkylating agents, while dermal fibroblasts from two different patients with Fanconi's anemia reacted to mitomycin C with an increase in chromatid breaks, but a nearly normal increment of sister chromatid exchanges. The results suggest that chromosomal breaks and rearrangements in Fanconi's anemia lymphocytes may result from a defect in a form of repair of DNA damage.

  16. Anemia and malaria in a Yanomami Amerindian population from the southern Venezuelan Amazon.

    PubMed

    Pérez Mato, S

    1998-12-01

    The prevalence and age distribution of anemia and malaria among Yanomami Amerindians undergoing sociocultural assimilation are described. Anemia and malaria proportions were determined in 103 individuals randomly selected from 515 villagers in Mavaca in the southern Venezuelan Amazon. The age and sex distribution reflected that of the entire village cluster. Anemia (hematocrit less than World Health Organization/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference values) was found in 91% of the study population. As a group, adults (> or = 15 years old) had the highest proportion of anemia (P=0.037). Adult females had lower mean hematocrit values than adult males (P=0.013). The anemia was predominantly hypochromic and microcytic (62%), a finding that could suggest a diagnosis of iron deficiency in the absence of known hereditary hemoglobinopathies in these Amerindians. Malaria was diagnosed in 14% overall. Children (< 10 years old) displayed the highest proportion of Plasmodium falciparum (17%) and P. vivax (14%) parasitemia, splenomegaly (94%), and fever (34%) (P=0.059, 0.039, 0.005, and 0.008, respectively). The high proportions of anemia and splenomegaly observed in the survey may be used as indicators of inadequately controlled malaria in this community. Further studies to assess the epidemiology of risk factors for the high prevalence of anemia, and predominance of P. falciparum infections in the area are urgently needed.

  17. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Lora L.; Delnatus, Jacques R.; Odom, Audrey R.; Eaton, Jacob C.; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3–13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30–4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes. PMID:26350448

  18. Low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia between 1981 and 2010 in Chilean women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Castillo, Israel; Brito, Alex; Olivares, Manuel; López-de Romaña, Daniel; Pizarro, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anemia and iron status among Chilean women of childbearing age between 1981 and 2010. Calculation of the prevalence of anemia and iron status was based on multiple cross-sectional iron absorption studies performed in 888 women during this period of time. All studies included measurements of hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, zinc protoporphyrin, percentage of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin. Data were grouped by decade (1981-1990, 1991-2000, and 2001-2010). Prevalence of anemia for these decades was 9, 6 and 10%, respectively (p=NS). Iron deficiency anemia was the main cause of anemia in all periods (55, 85 and 75%, respectively; p=NS). A high prevalence of women with normal iron status was observed for all periods (64, 69, and 67, respectively; p=NS). Prevalence of iron deficiency without anemia in 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 was 7, 20 and 12%, respectively (p<0.05). Finally, prevalence of iron depleted stores was 20, 6 and 10%, respectively (p<0.05). Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Chilean women of childbearing age was mild between 1981 and 2010. More than 60% of childbearing age women presented normal iron status in all periods. However, prevalence of iron depleted stores was moderate during 1981-1990, and was mild during 1991-2000 and 2001-2010.

  19. Diagnosis and management of iron-related anemias in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Pieracci, Fredric M; Barie, Philip S

    2006-07-01

    To review of the prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of iron (Fe)-related anemias in critical illness. A MEDLINE/PubMed search from 1966 to October 2005 was conducted. References from relevant articles were manually cross-referenced with additional original articles, review articles, correspondence, and chapters from selected textbooks. Both Fe metabolism and erythropoiesis are affected by the inflammatory response that accompanies critical illness. As a result, many critically ill patients develop the anemia of inflammation, which may be compounded by an underlying Fe deficiency. Most commonly available markers of total body Fe detect Fe deficiency unreliably in the setting of inflammation. Among these tests, the serum transferrin receptor assay is relatively accurate in reflecting total body Fe, regardless of inflammation. Treatment options for Fe-related anemias in critical illness include Fe replacement and recombinant human erythropoietin therapy. The decision to implement these therapies is complex and centers on a critical evaluation of ability to affect anemia, morbidity, and mortality in critical illness and on the potential risks of therapy. Fe deficiency anemia and the anemia of inflammation may co-exist in critical illness. Diagnosis of and differentiation between these two anemias involves careful interpretation of multiple markers of total body Fe stores. The utility of treatment with both Fe and recombinant human erythropoietin for these disorders during critical illness requires further investigation.

  20. Meta-analysis of Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Jiang, Ting; Hao, Cao; Gao, Zongshuai; Sun, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia therapy remains difficult, due to lack of effective treatment regimens. In recent years, Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia has been reported in many clinical trials. Considering that Huangqi injection may be a novel approach to aplastic anemia treatment, we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical controlled trials to assess the clinical value of Huangqi injection in the treatment of aplastic anemia. We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Full-text Database (VIP), Wanfang Database, PubMed and EMBASE database to collect the data about the trials of Huangqi injection combined with androgens for treating aplastic anemia. A total of ten studies involving 720 patients with aplastic anemia were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed significant increases in the pool effectiveness rate, white blood cells (WBC), haematoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), and reticulocytes (Ret) between the experimental group versus the control group. No severe side effects were found in this study. However, the lower Jadad scores and asymmetric funnel plot degrades the validity of the meta-analysis as the clinical evidence. Therefore, Huangqi injection may significantly enhance the efficacy of androgens for aplastic anemia, suggesting that the novel approach of Chinese traditional medicine combined with Western medicine is promising. The exact outcome required confirmation with rigorously well-designed multi-center trials. PMID:26379817

  1. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. The science and practice of micronutrient supplementations in nutritional anemia: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Mike, Leigh Ann

    2014-08-01

    Nutritional anemia is the most common type of anemia, affecting millions of people in all age groups worldwide. While inadequate access to food and nutrients can lead to anemia, patients with certain health status or medical conditions are also at increased risk of developing nutritional anemia. Iron, cobalamin, and folate are the most recognized micronutrients that are vital for the generation of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency is associated with insufficient production of hemoglobin. Deficiency of cobalamin or folate leads to impaired synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid, proteins, and cell division. Recent research has demonstrated that the status of copper and zinc in the body can significantly affect iron absorption and utilization. With an increasing number of patients undergoing bariatric surgical procedures, more cases of anemia associated with copper and zinc deficiencies have also emerged. The intestinal absorption of these 5 critical micronutrients are highly regulated and mediated by specific apical transport mechanisms in the enterocytes. Health conditions that persistently alter the histology of the upper intestinal architecture, expression, or function of these substrate-specific transporters, or the normal digestion and flow of these key micronutrients, can lead to nutritional anemia. The focus of this article is to review the science of intestinal micronutrient absorption, discuss the clinical assessment of micronutrient deficiencies in relation to anemia, and suggest an effective treatment plan and monitoring strategies using an evidence-based approach. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Contribution of fetal brain MRI in management of severe fetal anemia.

    PubMed

    Ghesquière, L; Houfflin-Debarge, V; Verpillat, P; Fourquet, T; Joriot, S; Coulon, C; Vaast, P; Garabedian, C

    2018-06-06

    Intrauterine transfusion (IUT) has changed fetal anemia prognosis. However, long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is altered in 5% of children. Our objective was to study the contribution of fetal MRI to diagnosis brain lesions in case of fetal anemia. Retrospective monocentric descriptive study from 2005 to 2016, including all patients followed for fetal anemia requiring IUT. The indications for MRI were: hydrops fetalis and / or hemoglobin <5 g / dL and / or more than 3 IUTs and / or acute severe anemia and / or ultrasound abnormality. Fetal and neonatal outcome and pediatric neurological monitoring were studied. 89 patients were followed for fetal anemia with IUT and 28 (29.1%) had fetal MRI, 12 of which were abnormal. Two out of twelve had abnormal ultrasound. Seven out of twelve had poor neurological prognosis: 2 medical terminations of pregnancy were performed; 2 children had severe developmental delay and 3 children had schooling difficulties. Five out of twelve children had favorable neurological prognosis. MRI of the fetal brain makes it possible to better detect brain lesions than ultrasound does in the management of severe fetal anemia and seems particularly appropriate in cases of acute anemia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. MCPIP1 Deficiency in Mice Results in Severe Anemia Related to Autoimmune Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Miao, Ruidong; Huang, Shengping; Elder, Brandon; Quinn, Tim; Papasian, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jifeng; Fan, Daping; Chen, Y. Eugene; Fu, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease of the stomach associated with pernicious anemia. The previous work from us and other groups identified MCPIP1 as an essential factor controlling inflammation and immune homeostasis. MCPIP1-/- developed severe anemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain unclear. In the present study, we found that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice resulted in severe anemia related to autoimmune mechanisms. Although MCPIP1 deficiency did not affect erythropoiesis per se, the erythropoiesis in MCPIP1-/- bone marrow erythroblasts was significantly attenuated due to iron and vitamin B12 (VB12) deficiency, which was mainly resulted from autoimmunity-associated gastritis and parietal cell loss. Consistently, exogenous supplement of iron and VB12 greatly improved the anemia phenotype of MCPIP1-/- mice. Finally, we have evidence suggesting that autoimmune hemolysis may also contribute to anemia phenotype of MCPIP1-/- mice. Taken together, our study suggests that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice leads to the development of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia. Thus, MCPIP1-/- mice may be a good mouse model for investigating the pathogenesis of pernicious anemia and testing the efficacy of some potential drugs for treatment of this disease. PMID:24324805

  5. Deficiencies in school readiness skills of children with sickle cell anemia: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Chua-Lim, C; Moore, R B; McCleary, G; Shah, A; Mankad, V N

    1993-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia often express myriad clinical signs and symptoms that affect their life-style and academic performance. Certain psychoeducational and psychosocial factors have been shown to influence the academic achievement of older patients with sickle cell anemia. However, studies evaluating the school readiness skills of younger children have not been published. To determine whether sickle cell anemia delays preschool development in children aged 4 to 6 years, we studied 10 affected children and 10 normal subjects matched for age, sex, and race. School readiness was evaluated by the Pediatric Examination of Educational Readiness (PEER), which assess a child's performance in areas of developmental attainment such as visual input, verbal output, and short-term memory. The presence of associated movements (minor neurologic signs) and other areas of behavior such as selective attention, activity level, adaptive behavior, and processing efficiency are also observed. The children with sickle cell anemia scored significantly lower than their normal counterparts in several parameters of the PEER. The McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities, a standardized psychometric test, showed that these children with sickle cell anemia were within the normal range of intelligence. Magnetic resonance imaging done on three children with sickle cell anemia who scored lowest on the PEER revealed no cerebrovascular infarcts. These preliminary studies demonstrate significant differences in school readiness skills between children with sickle cell anemia and normal subjects.

  6. Effect of dietary habits on prevalence of anemia in pregnant women of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Soni, Dimple; Murthy, Nandagudi Srinivasa; Malhotra, Monika

    2003-04-01

    To see the effect of various dietary habits, such as a vegetarian diet or various types of meat, on the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women. A study was carried out in Delhi to determine the effect of different dietary habits on prevalence of anemia during pregnancy by questioning the women during pregnancy regarding their dietary habits (vegetarian diet, jhatka or halal meat) and assessing their hemoglobin levels. The data was compiled and chi2 test was employed for understanding the associations between the effect of food habits on prevalence of anemia. Mean age was 26.5 years. Most women were in the second (26%) or third trimester (63.2%) of pregnancy. Prevalence of anemia was found to be very high. Of 1150 women, 96% were anemic (89.8% mildly anemic, 5.3% severely anemic). Anemia was seen in 96.18% cases in vegetarian women, 95.3% in halal meat eaters, and 96.2% in jhatka meat eaters (not significant). Although the percentage of women with < 11 g/dL Hb was less in the jhatka group eating meat more than 5 times per month, than in halal meat eaters and vegetarians, the difference was not statistically significant. There is very high prevalence of anemia during pregnancy in Delhi, probably due to very low frequency of meat eating in India. Different types of dietary habits had no effect on the prevalence of anemia in pregnant Indian women.

  7. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Pediatric anemia in rural Ghana: a cross-sectional study of prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    VanBuskirk, Kelley M; Ofosu, Anthony; Kennedy, Amy; Denno, Donna M

    2014-08-01

    To assess anemia prevalence and identify associated parameters in children <3 years of age in a rural area of Ghana. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression of cross-sectional survey results from 861 children aged <3 years attending routine immunization services in Berekum district. Anemia prevalence was 73.1%; most were either mildly (31.2%) or moderately (38.7%) affected. Risk factors for anemia (hemoglobin < 11.0 g/dl) in multivariate analysis were malaria parasitemia and male sex; these factors and younger age were associated with anemia severity. A partial defect in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was associated with decreased severity. Height-for-age, but not weight-for-age, was associated with anemia and its severity. Malaria parasitemia was strongly associated with anemia and its severity, suggesting that malaria control may be the most effective way to reduce the burden of anemia in rural Ghanaian children. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Malaria-Related Anemia in Patients from Unstable Transmission Areas in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Perez, Mary; Álvarez, Álvaro; Gutierrez, Juan B.; Moreno, Alberto; Herrera, Sócrates; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Information about the prevalence of malarial anemia in areas of low-malaria transmission intensity, like Latin America, is scarce. To characterize the malaria-related anemia, we evaluated 929 malaria patients from three sites in Colombia during 2011–2013. Plasmodium vivax was found to be the most prevalent species in Tierralta (92%), whereas P. falciparum was predominant in Tumaco (84%) and Quibdó (70%). Although severe anemia (hemoglobin < 7 g/dL) was almost absent (0.3%), variable degrees of non-severe anemia were observed in 36.9% of patients. In Tierralta, hemoglobin levels were negatively associated with days of illness. Moreover, in Tierralta and Quibdó, the number of previous malaria episodes and hemoglobin levels were positively associated. Both Plasmodium species seem to have similar potential to induce malarial anemia with distinct cofactors at each endemic setting. The target age in these low-transmission settings seems shifting toward adolescents and young adults. In addition, previous malaria experience seems to induce protection against anemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that early diagnosis and prompt treatment are likely preventing more frequent and serious malaria-related anemia in Colombia. PMID:25510719

  10. Anemia and Feeding Practices among Infants in Rural Shaanxi Province in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6–11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6–11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

  11. Parameters of oxidative metabolism in neonates suffering from sepsis and anemia.

    PubMed

    Sanodze, N; Uberi, N; Uberi, E; Kulumbegov, B

    2006-11-01

    Neonatal sepsis still remains as one of the actual problems in modern medicine due to its high morbidity and mortality rates determined by diagnostic difficulties and absence of sufficient evidence for effective therapy. Literature data have shown that essential role in pathogenesis of sepsis belongs to the cellular oxidation-reduction misballance and development of the oxidative stress. The aim of our work was to assess indices of pro- and antioxidant systems in term neonates with sepsis on the background of anemia and without it. A total of 41 neonates (17 male, 24 female) with the age range from 3 to 7 days, with early sepsis, and in 2003-2005 years treated at the department of neonates' therapy and intensive care unit of pediatric clinics of the Tbilisi State Medical University were under observation. The control group involved 17 practically healthy neonates of the same age range. In consequence of the analyses there was ascertained, that with anemia increases intensification free-radical oxidation process. At the same time, antioxidant system activity was not change significantly in the sepsis with anemia, than other one. Pathogenesis of anemia may was founded undergo hemolitic anemia results by oxidative stress. According to the results of investigations could be concluded that in case of anemia developed at neonatal sepsis supports intensify of oxidative stress and at the same time anemia is the result of the oxidative stress.

  12. Prevalence of Anemia and Its Risk Factors Among Lactating Mothers in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Li, Bo; Wang, Peiyu; Li, Jiayin; Xue, Yong; Gao, Hongchong

    2014-01-01

    In Myanmar, 60% of the population consists of mothers and children, and they are the groups most vulnerable to anemia. The objectives of this study are to determine (1) the anemia prevalence among lactating women and (2) the risk factors associated with anemia. Convenience sampling was used to select three villages in two different regions (Kachin and Shan) in Myanmar. Hemoglobin and anthropometric indicators were measured for 733 lactating women. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with anemia. The anemia prevalence rate was 60.3% in lactating women, with 20.3% of lactating women having severe anemia. Factors of malnutrition (P = 0.026), self-reported symptoms of night blindness or poor dark adaptation (P < 0.001), lack of primary education experience (P < 0.001), low family annual capita income (< 800 MMK; P < 0.001), drinking spring or river water (P < 0.001), and drinking unboiled water (P = 0.016) were associated with anemia. To promote health in lactating women, a comprehensive intervention is needed in these regions. PMID:24639302

  13. A multicenter retrospective analysis of the clinical features of pernicious anemia in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Song, Ik-Chan; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kim, Han-Jo; Bae, Sang-Byung; Lee, Kyu-Taek; Yang, Young-Jun; Park, Suk-Young; Cho, Do-Yeun; Kim, Nae Yu; Cho, In-Sung; Jo, Deog-Yeon

    2013-02-01

    To determine the approximate incidence and clinical features of pernicious anemia in a Korean population, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data for patients with pernicious anemia who were diagnosed between 1995 and 2010 at five hospitals in Chungnam province. Ninety-seven patients were enrolled, who accounted for 24% of patients with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. The approximate annual incidence of pernicious anemia was 0.3 per 100,000. The median age was 66 (range, 32-98) yr, and the male/female ratio was 1.25. Anemia-associated discomfort was the most common symptom (79.4%), followed by gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms (78.4% and 38.1%, respectively). Pancytopenia was found in 36 patients (37.1%), and autoimmune disorders were found in 15 patients (15.5%). Antibody to intrinsic factor was detected in 62 (77.5%) of 80 patients examined, and antibody to parietal cells was detected in 35 (43.2%) of 81 patients examined. Of the 34 patients who underwent tests for Helicobacter pylori, 7 (12.5%) were positive. The anemia-associated and gastrointestinal symptoms resolved completely in all patients after intramuscular injection of cobalamin, whereas neurological symptoms remained in some. In conclusion, pernicious anemia is less frequent in Koreans than in Western populations; however, the clinical features of this disorder in Koreans do not differ from those of Western cases.

  14. A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis of the Clinical Features of Pernicious Anemia in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ik-Chan; Lee, Hyo Jin; Kim, Han-Jo; Bae, Sang-Byung; Lee, Kyu-Taek; Yang, Young-Jun; Park, Suk-Young; Cho, Do-Yeun; Kim, Nae Yu; Cho, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    To determine the approximate incidence and clinical features of pernicious anemia in a Korean population, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data for patients with pernicious anemia who were diagnosed between 1995 and 2010 at five hospitals in Chungnam province. Ninety-seven patients were enrolled, who accounted for 24% of patients with vitamin B12 deficiency anemia. The approximate annual incidence of pernicious anemia was 0.3 per 100,000. The median age was 66 (range, 32-98) yr, and the male/female ratio was 1.25. Anemia-associated discomfort was the most common symptom (79.4%), followed by gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms (78.4% and 38.1%, respectively). Pancytopenia was found in 36 patients (37.1%), and autoimmune disorders were found in 15 patients (15.5%). Antibody to intrinsic factor was detected in 62 (77.5%) of 80 patients examined, and antibody to parietal cells was detected in 35 (43.2%) of 81 patients examined. Of the 34 patients who underwent tests for Helicobacter pylori, 7 (12.5%) were positive. The anemia-associated and gastrointestinal symptoms resolved completely in all patients after intramuscular injection of cobalamin, whereas neurological symptoms remained in some. In conclusion, pernicious anemia is less frequent in Koreans than in Western populations; however, the clinical features of this disorder in Koreans do not differ from those of Western cases. PMID:23400269

  15. [Obesity, overweight and anemia in children from a rural area of Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Milton J

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association between anemia, overweight and obesity in a children population of a rural area in Lima.Demographic, anthropometric and hemoglobin information (from the Information System of Nutritional Status of Children, ISNSC, 2014, of schoolchildren 1-15 attending public schools under the Micro Red Pachacamac jurisdiction) were employed in a cross sectional design. Descriptive statistical and association analysis between anemia and nutritional status were carried out. Logistic regression was used to find significant variables associated to anemia.The prevalence of anemia was 10.8% (CI95% 9.5-12.0), overweight was 17.3% (CI95% 15.8-18.9) and 16.2% of children were obese (CI95% 14.7 - 17.7). No significant association between the diagnosis of anemia, overweight or obesity (chi2 = 1.68, p = 0.432) was found. However, there was an inverse significant association between the diagnosis of anemia and Body Mass Index (BMI) (z =-3.77, p = 0.000); and a higher level of hemoglobin among those over 12 y/o (ANOVA, F = 108.19, p = 0.006). In univariate analysis, only age (OR 1.14, IC95% 1.08-1.20) and IMC (OR 1.08, IC95% 1.04-1.13) were associated to anemia. There is no relationship between nutritional diagnosis of obesity, overweight and anemia in this population. However, children with older age and greater BMI were less likely to present anemia. Public policies in the last five years have focused on reducing this double nutritional problem in children.

  16. Anemia after continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation: characteristics and implications.

    PubMed

    Amione-Guerra, Javier; Cruz-Solbes, Ana S; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Trachtenberg, Barry H; Pingali, Sai R; Estep, Jerry D; Park, Myung H; Guha, Ashrith

    2017-09-15

    Anemia is common in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. Management of anemia in CF-LVAD patients is not well studied. Our purpose is to characterize and identify the etiology of anemia in CF-LVAD patients. Secondary objectives are to describe the effect of CF-LVAD on pre-existing anemia and assess its impact after CF-LVAD support. Cross-sectional study from January to July 2015 of ambulatory patients supported with a CF-LVAD for at least 6-months that presented with hemoglobin <12 g/dL and no recent gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients were classified as iron-deficient and non-iron-deficient and compared. Additionally, a retrospective analysis of 116 consecutive patients who underwent CF-LVAD from 2008 to 2013 with reported hemoglobin at 6 months as outpatients were divided into anemic or non-anemic and compared. In our cross-sectional cohort, iron deficiency was the most common cause of anemia. Notably, 49% of the iron-deficient patients were already on iron supplementation. In our retrospective cohort, 59% of the patients were anemic after 6 months of support. Anemic patients were older, had lower albumin, higher brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), worse renal function and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. Anemia had a HR of 3.16 (95%CI 1.38-7.26) to predict a composite of 1-year death and HF readmissions, as well as HF-readmissions alone. The most common cause of anemia in our study was iron-deficiency; almost half of the patients were iron deficient despite treatment, suggesting that oral iron may not be sufficient to reverse anemia. Anemia regardless of etiology was associated with adverse outcomes.

  17. Incidence of anemia in pediatric cancer patients in Europe: results of a large, international survey.

    PubMed

    Michon, Jean

    2002-10-01

    Anemia occurs frequently in children with cancer, but there is little information quantifying the incidence of anemia or treatment. A survey was conducted in 1998 in Europe by The Research Partnership with the objective of determining the incidence of anemia, identifying the hemoglobin triggers that initiated anemia treatment, and the current anemia treatment options available to clinicians. The survey was conducted in the 10 largest pediatric oncology centers each in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK, and in the 8 largest centers in both Belgium and The Netherlands. Telephone interviews with the most senior physician available in the institution were used to collect data, which included the numbers of patients treated or under follow-up, cancer types, and treatment practices for anemia. Data were collected for 25,093 patients. Over 80% of patients were anemic (WHO: hemoglobin anemia treatment. Treatment was almost exclusively blood transfusion; less than 5% of patients received drug treatment (which consisted mostly of folic acid or iron). Very few patients received recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO, epoetin alfa) to treat anemia. In general, clinicians were not able to give advantages or disadvantages of epoetin alfa as a treatment option for treating anemia in children with cancer, which reflects the limited knowledge of and experience with this agent. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Multicausal etiology of anemia among women of reproductive age in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P H; Gonzalez-Casanova, I; Nguyen, H; Pham, H; Truong, T V; Nguyen, S; Martorell, R; Ramakrishnan, U

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a significant public health concern, especially among women and young children. An improved understanding of the complex etiology of anemia is crucial for developing appropriate prevention strategies. This paper examines the determinants of anemia in a large sample of Vietnamese women of reproductive age (WRA). We included baseline data from 4986 WRA participating in a randomized controlled trial (PRECONCEPT). Hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were measured with Hemocue. Plasma ferritin (Fe), retinol binding protein (RBP) and markers of inflammation were assessed using the ELISA technique. We used multivariate logistic regression to describe associations with anemia and structural equation modeling (SEM) to characterize direct and indirect pathways influencing Hb concentrations. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency (Fe <12 μg/l), insufficient iron stores (Fe<30 μg/l) and iron deficiency anemia was 19.7, 3.5, 14.4 and 1.9%, respectively. Ferritin concentration (0.29 per log-mg/dl), being an ethnic minority (-0.24 compared with Kinh), number of children (-0.17) and socioeconomic status (0.09) were directly associated with Hb concentration (P<0.05). Similarly, RBP was directly (0.27 per mg/dl) associated with Hb and also indirectly (0.09 mg/dl) with ferritin. Hookworm infection was indirectly associated with Hb (-0.11) through RBP and ferritin. These findings illustrate the complex etiology of anemia and provide a useful framework for designing, targeting and evaluating appropriate strategies for the prevention and control of anemia. Contrary to expectations, iron deficiency accounted for a very small proportion of anemia in Northern Vietnam.

  19. Prevalence of celiac disease in nutritional anemia at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Kavimandan, Amit; Sharma, Meenakshi; Verma, Anil K; Das, Prasenjit; Mishra, Prabhash; Sinha, Sanjeev; Mohan, Anant; Sreenivas, V; Datta Gupta, Siddhartha; Makharia, Govind K

    2014-03-01

    While anemia occurs in 80 % to 90 % of patients with celiac disease (CD), it may be the sole manifestation of CD. The prevalence of CD in Indian patients with nutritional anemia is not known. Adolescent and adult patients presenting with nutritional anemia were prospectively screened for CD using IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (anti-tTG Ab) followed, if positive, by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsy. Ninety-six patients [mean ± SD age 32.1 ± 13.1 years and median duration of anemia 11 months (range 1 to 144 months)] were screened. Of these patients, 80 had iron deficiency anemia, 11 had megaloblastic anemia, and 5 had dimorphic anemia. Seventy-three patients were on hematinics and 36.4 % had received blood transfusions. Nineteen had a history of chronic diarrhea and the mean ± SD duration of diarrhea in them was 9.7 ± 35.8 months. IgA anti-tTG Ab was positive in 13 patients, of whom 12 agreed to undergo duodenal biopsy. Ten patients had villous atrophy (Marsh grade 3a in three, 3b in one, and 3c in six) and two did not. Thus, 10 patients with nutritional anemia (iron deficiency 9, vitamin B12 deficiency 1) were diagnosed to have CD. On multivariate logistic regression, age, duration of symptoms, and presence of diarrhea were found to be the predictors of CD. All the patients with CD were put on gluten-free diet and with iron and vitamin supplementations and showed a significant improvement in hemoglobin concentration. CD screening should be included in the work up of otherwise unexplained nutritional anemia.

  20. Clinical features and course of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts associated with marked thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Broseus, Julien; Florensa, Lourdes; Zipperer, Esther; Schnittger, Susanne; Malcovati, Luca; Richebourg, Steven; Lippert, Eric; Cermak, Jaroslav; Evans, Jyoti; Mounier, Morgane; Raya, José Maria; Bailly, François; Gattermann, Norbert; Haferlach, Torsten; Garand, Richard; Allou, Kaoutar; Besses, Carlos; Germing, Ulrich; Haferlach, Claudia; Travaglino, Erica; Luno, Elisa; Pinan, Maria Angeles; Arenillas, Leonor; Rozman, Maria; Perez Sirvent, Maria Luz; Favre, Bernardine; Guy, Julien; Alonso, Esther; Ahwij, Nuhri; Jerez, Andrés; Hermouet, Sylvie; Maynadié, Marc; Cazzola, Mario; Girodon, François

    2012-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts associated with marked thrombocytosis was proposed as a provisional entity in the 2001 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and also in the 2008 version, but its existence as a single entity is contested. We wish to define the clinical features of this rare myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm and to compare its clinical outcome with that of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and essential thrombocythemia. Design and Methods We conducted a collaborative retrospective study across Europe. Our database included 200 patients diagnosed with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis. For each of these patients, each patient diagnosed with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts was matched for age and sex. At the same time, a cohort of 454 patients with essential thrombocythemia was used to compare outcomes of the two diseases. Results In patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis, depending on the Janus Kinase 2 V617F mutational status (positive or negative) or platelet threshold (over or below 600×109/L), no difference in survival was noted. However, these patients had shorter overall survival and leukemia-free survival with a lower risk of thrombotic complications than did patients with essential thrombocythemia (P<0.001) but better survival (P<0.001) and a higher risk of thrombosis (P=0.039) than patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts. Conclusions The clinical course of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis is better than that of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and worse than that of essential thrombocythemia. The higher risk of thrombotic events in this disorder suggests that anti-platelet therapy might be considered in this subset of patients. From a clinical point of view, it appears to be important to consider refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and

  1. Management of anemia and iron deficiency in a cancer center in France.

    PubMed

    Laï-Tiong, Florence; Brami, Cloé; Dubroeucq, Olivier; Scotté, Florian; Curé, Hervé; Jovenin, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Anemia affects most patients treated for cancer by chemotherapy. It is a known major contributor to fatigue and loss of quality of life and is likely to have a negative effect on prognosis and mortality from cancer. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the management of anemia and iron deficiency in a French oncology day-care center. A retrospective study was conducted between May and November 2012 in the oncology day unit of the Jean Godinot Cancer Center (France). The 133 patients included were all over the age of 18 and being treated by chemotherapy and had mild, moderate, or severe anemia. Over half (58%) the patients were shown to be receiving no specific treatment for anemia. Iron balance was assessed in 71 patients and iron deficiency diagnosed in 37. Stepwise logistic regression showed that patients with severe to moderate anemia were nearly four times more likely to have an iron balance assessment than those with mild anemia (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 1.84-7.76; P = 0.0003). Classical logistic regression shows that older patients (≥70) are three times less likely to have an iron balance assessment than patients <70 years (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.12-0.86; P = 0.06). An ideal medical setting for the management of anemia and iron deficiency, and the associated quality-of-life concerns, has yet to be defined for patients with cancer. Screening and treatment of mild to moderate anemia are inadequate, despite the advent of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Large scale, multicenter studies are required to define a clear medical framework for the management of anemia and iron deficiency.

  2. The Association of Parasitic Infections in Pregnancy and Maternal and Fetal Anemia: A Cohort Study in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Elizabeth M.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Mungai, Peter; Malhotra, Indu; King, Christopher L.; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Hudgens, Michael G.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Dent, Arlene E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Relative contribution of these infections on anemia in pregnancy is not certain. While measures to protect pregnant women against malaria have been scaling up, interventions against helminthes have received much less attention. In this study, we determine the relative impact of helminthes and malaria on maternal anemia. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in coastal Kenya among a cohort of pregnant women who were recruited at their first antenatal care (ANC) visit and tested for malaria, hookworm, and other parasitic infections and anemia at enrollment. All women enrolled in the study received presumptive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, iron and multi-vitamins and women diagnosed with helminthic infections were treated with albendazole. Women delivering a live, term birth, were also tested for maternal anemia, fetal anemia and presence of infection at delivery. Principal Findings Of the 706 women studied, at the first ANC visit, 27% had moderate/severe anemia and 71% of women were anemic overall. The infections with highest prevalence were hookworm (24%), urogenital schistosomiasis (17%), trichuria (10%), and malaria (9%). In adjusted and unadjusted analyses, moderate/severe anemia at first ANC visit was associated with the higher intensities of hookworm and P. falciparum microscopy-malaria infections. At delivery, 34% of women had moderate/severe anemia and 18% of infants' cord hemoglobin was consistent with fetal anemia. While none of the maternal infections were significantly associated with fetal anemia, moderate/severe maternal anemia was associated with fetal anemia. Conclusions More than one quarter of women receiving standard ANC with IPTp for malaria had moderate/severe anemia in pregnancy and high rates of parasitic infection. Thus, addressing the role of co-infections, such as hookworm, as well as under-nutrition, and their contribution to anemia is needed. PMID:24587473

  3. Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO.

  4. [Chronic and severe anemia caused by Ancylostoma duodenale in Ecuador. Diagnosis by duodenoscopy].

    PubMed

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Flores, Jessica; Guaman, Isabel; Lara, Gabriela; Abarca, Jeyson

    2017-10-01

    For 11 years, a 38-year-old male residing in a subtropical region of Ecuador, was repeatedly diagnosed with chronic anemia, and treated with blood transfusions in a hospital of province of Cotopaxi, Ecuador. He was transferred to Quito for severe anemia, having hemoglobin of 4 g/dL. Duodenoscopy was performed and adult nematodes, identified later as Ancylostoma duodenale, were observed. The patient was successfully treated with albendazole for five consecutive days and given blood transfusions. In the control visit at eight months, without anemia and no hookworm ova in the stool examined were found.

  5. Prevalence and Outcome of Anemia After Restorative Proctocolectomy: A Clinical Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    M'Koma, Amosy E.; Wise, Paul E.; Schwartz, David A.; Muldoon, Roberta L.; Herline, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Iron and/or vitamin B12 deficiency anemias, which have adverse effects on patients’ quality of life, are commonly observed and often overlooked complications after restorative proctocolectomy. We performed a systematic review of publications on the prevalence of anemia as well as on the impact of anemia on a range of clinical, functional, quality of life, and economic outcomes in restorative proctocolectomy patients. This information is important to help healthcare providers through a comprehensive overview to increase awareness about a condition that could require therapy to improve patient healthcare and quality of life. METHODS We reviewed the English language publications on the incidence of anemia and its adverse effect after restorative proctocolectomy The United States National Library of Medicine database (MEDLINE), the Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), the Cochran Library, and the Google® search engine were searched for published articles on the prevalence and impact of anemia in post-restorative proctocolectomy surgical patients. RESULTS The long-term complication most frequently described after RPC is pouchitis. Pouchitis is significantly associated with iron deficiency anemia caused by pouch mucosal bleeding. Other causes are insufficient and/or impaired iron absorption. It has also been observed, however, that restorative proctocolectomy patients with underlying familial adenomatous polyposis rarely develop pouchitis yet show higher rates of iron deficiency anemia compared to those patients with underlying ulcerative colitis. Other causes shown as independent risk factors for iron deficiency anemia in restorative proctocolectomy patients are malignancy, desmoid tumors, and J-pouch configuration. Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia is also common after restorative proctocolectomy. About one-third of restorative proctocolectomy patients show abnormal Schilling test and 5 percent have low referenced serum cobalamin. It has been observed that the

  6. Periodontal disease and anemias associated with Crohn's disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Swati; Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath L

    2012-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease with oral findings, including periodontal manifestations. Anemias, such as iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), are the most common hematologic complications of CD. Periodontitis has systemic effects, and may tend toward anemia, which can be explained by depressed erythropoiesis. In the report presented here, the authors review a case of Crohn's disease diagnosed 10 years previous to the patient presenting with a changing anemic profile and periodontal disease. A discussion of patient and disease management is included.

  7. Isolated early onset anemia after rh isoimmunization: a unique presentation in 3 neonates.

    PubMed

    Louis, Deepak; Oberoi, Sapna; Sundaram, Venkataseshan; Trehan, Amita

    2010-08-01

    Rh isoimmunization manifesting as isolated early onset neonatal anemia has not been reported. We describe the presentation of 3 infants who manifested with isolated early severe anemia. All the infants presented early (3 to 7 d of age) with severe pallor. None had clinically significant jaundice. Evidence for hemolysis was present in all and their direct antiglobulin test was positive. To reduce the hemolysis, immunoglobulin was administered after which their hemoglobin improved. This report highlights the possibility of early onset anemia without significant jaundice as the sole manifestation of Rh isoimmunization and the possible beneficial role of immunoglobulin in them.

  8. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis associated with iron deficiency anemia secondary to severe menorrhagia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Medina, Fernando F; Grant, Leon; Egas-Bejar, Daniela; Valdivia-Ascuna, Zoila; Rodriguez, Nidra; Mancias, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis is a rare condition presenting with a wide spectrum of nonspecific symptoms that can make early diagnosis difficult. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis has been associated with various etiologies. Iron deficiency anemia associated with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in teenagers is rare. We present a teenage patient with complete thrombosis of the vein of Galen, straight sinus, and left internal cerebral vein associated with iron deficiency anemia due to severe menorrhagia. Mechanisms that can explain the association between iron deficiency anemia and thrombosis are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Life-threatening autoimmune warm hemolytic anemia following treatment for multiple sclerosis with alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Benoit; Rico, Audrey; Seguier, Julie; Boutiere, Clemence; Ebbo, Mikael; Harle, Jean Robert; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Pelletier, Jean

    2018-05-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed at CD52 approved as a disease-modifying therapy for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). To describe a case of a life-threatening autoimmune anemia occurring after a first course of alemtuzumab for relapsing-remitting MS in a 28-year-old male. Case report. A 28-year-old male developed a life-threatening autoimmune anemia occurring 11 months after first alemtuzumab course. We report the third case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia following treatment with alemtuzumab in a young MS patient. Due to the severity of this adverse event, neurologists using this treatment should be alert.

  10. Alpha-thalassemia genetic testing: an important anemia diagnostic tool in patients of African heritage.

    PubMed

    Dasanu, Constantin A

    2010-01-01

    Inherited alpha-thalassemia genotypes have been shown to have a rather high prevalence in some patient populations of African heritage. These genotypes lead to mild anemia with microcytic indices and a normal hemoglobin electrophoresis. In our outpatient department, we analyzed 54 consecutive patients of African descent with longstanding microcytic anemia, but no evidence of iron deficiency. We detected alpha-thalassemia gene deletions in 94 percent of these patients. Alpha-thalassemia genetic testing appears cost-effective in an otherwise unexplained, longstanding microcytic anemia in patients of African origin.

  11. Rasburicase-induced Hemolytic Anemia in an Adolescent With Unknown Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Akande, Manzilat; Audino, Anthony N; Tobias, Joseph D

    2017-01-01

    Rasburicase, used in the prevention and treatment of tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), may cause hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. Although routine screening for G6PD deficiency has been recommended, given the turnaround time for test results and the urgency to treat TLS, such screening may not be feasible. We report a case of rasburicase-induced hemolytic anemia without methemoglobinemia in an adolescent with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, TLS, and previously unrecognized G6PD deficiency. Previous reports of hemolytic anemia with rasburicase are reviewed, mechanisms discussed, and preventative strategies presented.

  12. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  13. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  14. Stress and DNA repair biology of the Fanconi anemia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Longerich, Simonne; Li, Jian; Xiong, Yong; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) represents a paradigm of rare genetic diseases, where the quest for cause and cure has led to seminal discoveries in cancer biology. Although a total of 16 FA genes have been identified thus far, the biochemical function of many of the FA proteins remains to be elucidated. FA is rare, yet the fact that 5 FA genes are in fact familial breast cancer genes and FA gene mutations are found frequently in sporadic cancers suggest wider applicability in hematopoiesis and oncology. Establishing the interaction network involving the FA proteins and their associated partners has revealed an intersection of FA with several DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination, DNA mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, and translesion DNA synthesis. Importantly, recent studies have shown a major involvement of the FA pathway in the tolerance of reactive aldehydes. Moreover, despite improved outcomes in stem cell transplantation in the treatment of FA, many challenges remain in patient care. PMID:25237197

  15. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Charlotte; Walden, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by the inability of patient cells to repair DNA damage caused by interstrand crosslinking agents. There are currently 14 verified FA genes, where mutation of any single gene prevents repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). The accumulation of ICL damage results in genome instability and patients having a high predisposition to cancers. The key event of the FA pathway is dependent on an eight-protein core complex (CC), required for the monoubiquitination of each member of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Interestingly, the majority of patient mutations reside in the CC. The molecular mechanisms underlying the requirement for such a large complex to carry out a monoubiquitination event remain a mystery. This paper documents the extensive efforts of researchers so far to understand the molecular roles of the CC proteins with regard to its main function in the FA pathway, the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. PMID:22675617

  16. Novel FANCI mutations in Fanconi anemia with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Ballew, Bari J; Giri, Neelam; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Ameziane, Najim; de Winter, Johan; Alter, Blanche P

    2016-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutations in DNA repair genes; some of these patients may have features of the VACTERL association. Autosomal recessive mutations in FANCI are a rare cause of FA. We identified FANCI mutations by next generation sequencing in three patients in our FA cohort among several whose mutated gene was unknown. Four of the six mutations are novel and all mutations are likely deleterious to protein function. There are now 16 reported cases of FA due to FANCI of whom 7 have at least 3 features of the VACTERL association (44%). This suggests that the VACTERL association in patients with FA may be seen in patients with FANCI mutations more often than previously recognized. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Emerging functions of the Fanconi anemia pathway at a glance.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Rhea; Levine, Beth

    2017-08-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disease, in which homozygous or compound heterozygous inactivating mutations in any of 21 genes lead to genomic instability, early-onset bone marrow failure and increased cancer risk. The FA pathway is essential for DNA damage response (DDR) to DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, proteins of the FA pathway have additional cytoprotective functions that may be independent of DDR. We have shown that many FA proteins participate in the selective autophagy pathway that is required for the destruction of unwanted intracellular constituents. In this Cell Science at a Glance and the accompanying poster, we briefly review the role of the FA pathway in DDR and recent findings that link proteins of the FA pathway to selective autophagy of viruses and mitochondria. Finally, we discuss how perturbations in FA protein-mediated selective autophagy may contribute to inflammatory as well as genotoxic stress. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Sickle cell anemia: the impact of discovery, politics, and business.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; Doye, Angelia A; Conley, Eric; Gwathmey, Judith K

    2013-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia affects 100,000 African Americans. Frequent blood transfusions to prevent stroke lead to fatal iron-overload. Iron chelation with deferoxamine (DFO) requires expensive infusions. In the present study, we explore the feasibility of using a new delivery system for DFO, i.e., targeted liposome entrapped DFO (LDFO). Our results reveal that our novel formulation lowered the dosage requirements by 50%-75%, allowed for less frequent and shorter treatment durations, eliminating the need for a pump and the standard multi-night administration of DFO. In an iron-overloaded rat model, LDFO reduced iron in the liver, and also improved cardiac function. The lower dosage and improved safety profile makes our novel LDFO delivery system a highly desirable new therapy. Meanwhile, this system will also provide an ideal model for studying the mechanism of Fe overload-induced arrhythmias. The political and economic factors related to health care disparities are also discussed.

  19. [FANCA gene mutation analysis in Fanconi anemia patients].

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Peng, Guang-Jie; Zhang, Kejian; Hu, Qun; Zhang, Liu-Qing; Liu, Ai-Guo

    2005-10-01

    To screen the FANCA gene mutation and explore the FANCA protein function in Fanconi anemia (FA) patients. FANCA protein expression and its interaction with FANCF were analyzed using Western blot and immunoprecipitation in 3 cases of FA-A. Genomic DNA was used for MLPA analysis followed by sequencing. FANCA protein was undetectable and FANCA and FANCF protein interaction was impaired in these 3 cases of FA-A. Each case of FA-A contained biallelic pathogenic mutations in FANCA gene. No functional FANCA protein was found in these 3 cases of FA-A, and intragenic deletion, frame shift and splice site mutation were the major pathogenic mutations found in FANCA gene.

  20. Cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Meier, Emily R; Hulbert, Monica L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA)-associated cerebral vasculopathy and moyamoya is a unique entity reflecting the abnormal interactions between sickled red blood cells (RBCs) and the cerebral arterial endothelium. Endothelial injury, coagulation activation, and the inflammatory response generated by sickled RBCs are implicated in the development of cerebral vasculopathy, but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. SCA-specific screening and treatment guidelines have successfully reduced the incidence of overt strokes in this high-risk population. However, despite aggressive hematological management, many children with cerebral vasculopathy due to SCA have progressive vasculopathy and recurrent strokes; therefore, more effective therapies, such as revascularization surgery and curative hematopoietic stem cell transplant, are urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Renal amyloidosis in a child with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Simşek, Behçet; Bayazit, Aysun K; Ergin, Melek; Soran, Mustafa; Dursun, Hasan; Kilinc, Yurdanur

    2006-06-01

    The kidney is frequently affected in patients with sickle cell syndrome, i.e., homozygous and heterozygous patients, with a consequently large spectrum of renal abnormalities that may range from minimal functional changes to chronic renal failure. Here, we present a 13-year-old boy with sickle cell anemia (SCA) (HbSS) who was referred to our unit with nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed AA type amyloidosis on the basis of light microscopic findings, indicating Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry. He had neither a family history of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) nor any complaint of recurrent abdominal pain, arthritis, and fever, but frequent painful vaso-occlusive crises. The patient was found to have no MEFV gene (Mediterranean feVer) mutations either. Painful episodic attacks might provoke recurrent acute inflammation, leading to repeated stimulation of acute phase responses and cause secondary amyloidosis. To our knowledge, this boy is the first case of SCA complicated by renal amyloidosis observed in childhood.

  2. Unusual causes of abdominal pain: sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Shahid, Rabia K; Russo, Linda A

    2005-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia and vaso-occlusive painful crises. The vascular occlusion in sickle cell disease is a complex process and accounts for the majority of the clinical manifestation of the disease. Abdominal pain is an important component of vaso-occlusive painful crises. It often represents a substantial diagnostic challenge in this population of patients. These episodes are often attributed to micro-vessel occlusion and infarcts of mesentery and abdominal viscera. Abdominal pain due to sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis is often indistinguishable from an acute intra-abdominal disease process such as acute cholecystitis, acute pancreatitis, hepatic infarction, ischemic colitis and acute appendicitis. In the majority of cases, however, no specific cause is identified and spontaneous resolution occurs. This chapter will focus on etiologies, pathophysiology and management of abdominal pain in patients with sickle cell disease.

  3. Advances in mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernandez, Cristhiam M; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2015-03-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is an entity initially described in 1849 as a condition that consisted of pallor, weakness, and progressive health decline. Since then several advances led to the conclusion that PA is an autoimmune disease characterized by the deficient absorption of dietary cobalamin. It is currently recognized as the most common cause of cobalamin deficiency worldwide. We hereby review the current understanding of the disease and its neurological, hematological, and biochemical manifestations with emphasis on the diagnostic approach, treatment, and monitoring strategies. We propose an algorithm for the diagnostic approach considering the current performance and limitations of the available diagnostic tools for evaluation of cobalamin status and the presence of autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). Patients with PA require lifelong treatment with cobalamin replacement therapy. The current widely available treatment can be provided through enteral or parenteral cobalamin supplements, with comparable efficacy and tolerability.

  4. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heart failure and anemia: Effects on prognostic variables.

    PubMed

    Cattadori, Gaia; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Corrà, Ugo; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Veglia, Fabrizio; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Bonomi, Alice; La Gioia, Rocco; Scardovi, Angela B; Ferraironi, Alessandro; Emdin, Michele; Metra, Marco; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Raimondo, Rosa; Re, Federica; Guazzi, Marco; Belardinelli, Romualdo; Parati, Gianfranco; Caravita, Sergio; Magrì, Damiano; Lombardi, Carlo; Frigerio, Maria; Oliva, Fabrizio; Girola, Davide; Mezzani, Alessandro; Farina, Stefania; Mapelli, Massimo; Scrutinio, Domenico; Pacileo, Giuseppe; Apostolo, Anna; Iorio, AnnaMaria; Paolillo, Stefania; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Gargiulo, Paola; Bussotti, Maurizio; Marchese, Giovanni; Correale, Michele; Badagliacca, Roberto; Sciomer, Susanna; Palermo, Pietro; Contini, Mauro; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Battaia, Elisa; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Clemenza, Francesco; Minà, Chiara; Binno, Simone; Passino, Claudio; Piepoli, Massimo F

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is frequent in heart failure (HF), and it is associated with higher mortality. The predictive power of established HF prognostic parameters in anemic HF patients is unknown. Clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic and cardiopulmonary-exercise-test (CPET) data were analyzed in 3913 HF patients grouped according to hemoglobin (Hb) values. 248 (6%), 857 (22%), 2160 (55%) and 648 (17%) patients had very low (<11g/dL), low (11-12 for females, 11-13 for males), normal (12-15 for females, 13-15 for males) and high (>15) Hb, respectively. Median follow-up was 1363days (606-1883). CPETs were always performed safely. Hb was related to prognosis (Hazard ratio (HR)=0.864). No prognostic difference was observed between normal and high Hb groups. Peak oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO 2 slope), plasma sodium concentration, ejection fraction (LVEF), kidney function and Hb were independently related to prognosis in the entire population. Considering Hb groups separately, peakVO 2 (very low Hb HR=0.549, low Hb HR=0.613, normal Hb HR=0.618, high Hb HR=0.542) and LVEF (very low Hb HR=0.49, low Hb HR=0.692, normal Hb HR=0.697, high Hb HR=0.694) maintained their prognostic roles. High VE/VCO 2 slope was associated with poor prognosis only in patients with low and normal Hb. Anemic HF patients have a worse prognosis, but CPET can be safely performed. PeakVO 2 and LVEF, but not VE/VCO 2 slope, maintain their prognostic power also in HF patients with Hb<11g/dL, suggesting CPET use and a multiparametric approach in HF patients with low Hb. However, the prognostic effect of an anemia-oriented follow-up is unknown. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Darbepoetin alfa therapeutic interchange protocol for anemia in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Donald F; Ripley, Elizabeth Bd; Kockler, Denise R; Lee, Seina; Proeschel, Lori A

    2005-11-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins, such as erythropoietin alfa and darbepoetin alfa, have positively impacted anemia management. These medications improve patient outcomes and quality of life. Their costs, however, remain a major barrier for health systems. To evaluate the development, implementation, and cost-effectiveness of an inpatient therapeutic interchange protocol for erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins at a large, tertiary care, university-affiliated health system. Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (VCUHS) developed and implemented a therapeutic interchange program to convert therapy for all inpatients undergoing dialysis from erythropoietin alfa to darbepoetin alfa for treatment of chronic kidney disease-related anemia. An evaluation of the economic impact of this program on drug expenditures over a fiscal quarter (2003) was conducted using historical comparator data (2002). Preliminary evaluation of the program demonstrated cost-savings and reduced drug utilization of erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins in hospitalized dialysis patients. For the first quarter of 2003 compared with the first quarter of 2002, VCUHS realized a cost-savings of nearly 10,000 US dollars, which was related to the program's aggressive screening procedure. When these data were normalized for equal numbers of patients in each group receiving one of the drugs, the actual cost-savings was over 2000 US dollars. These cost-savings are largely due to reduced utilization of these expensive biotechnology products with implementation of a dosing protocol. VCUHS has successfully developed and implemented a darbepoetin alfa therapeutic interchange protocol for hospitalized dialysis patients. This has translated into reduced use of erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins, resulting in cost-savings for the health system.

  7. Cytogenetic study is not essential in patients with aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Atreyee; De, Rajib; Dolai, Tuphan K; Mitra, Pradip K; Halder, Ajanta

    2017-01-01

    Depending on contemporary treatment approach of aggressive immunosuppression, Aplastic Anemia (AA) is caused by immunological destruction of otherwise normal hematopoietic stem cells. The aim was to summarize the cytogenetic abnormalities in AA patients and the frequency of Fanconi Anemia (FA) in morphologically normal AA patients in eastern India. Ethical clearances were obtained from both institutions involved in this study. Out of 72800 patients attending the outpatient department, 520 pancytopenia patients were screened for AA after Bone marrow (BM) aspiration and biopsy. Samples were collected from 117 cases in 3 phases. 51 peripheral venous blood (PVB) samples in the first phase, 19 BM & PVB paired samples in the second phase and 47 BM samples in third phase were collected followed by leukocyte and/or BM stem cell culture. Next GTG banding and karyotyping were performed. PVB was collected from 63 (< 50 years) AA patients and stress cytogenetics was done to diagnose FA. In the first phase of the study, out of 51 PVB samples, 1 (1.96%) showed a unique chromosomal abnormality, i.e. 45,XY,rob(14:21)(p10:q10)[20]. In the second phase of study, among 19 BM & PVB paired samples, 1 (5.26%) showed abnormal karyotype i.e. 45,X,-Y[3]/46,XY[47]. In the third phase of the study, 47 BM samples showed normal karyotype. Only 6 (9.52%) cases were found positive for stress cytogenetics. A negligible percentage showing cytogenetic abnormality in such a considerable number of AA cases indicates that routine cytogenetic analysis of AA patient is not essential. A significant percentage was positive for stress cytogenetics; suggestive for FA, even the patients were morphologically normal. PMID:29181263

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in chronic kidney disease: Uncertainties and cautions.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2017-06-01

    Anemia in chronic kidney disease is common and iron deficiency is an important cause. To repair iron-deficiency anemia, replacement of iron is needed. Iron can be replaced either by the oral route or by the intravenous route. In a meta-analysis, 5 of the 6 trials were short-term, 1 to 3 months, and compared to oral iron, the mean increase in hemoglobin with intravenous iron was only 0.31 g/dL. However, one of the studies included in this meta-analysis was 6 months long and had a mean decline in hemoglobin of 0.52 g/dL associated with intravenous iron administration. Given the short duration of most of the clinical trials comparing oral with intravenous administration of iron the long-term safety of these modes of administration of supplemental iron could not be assessed. Replacement of iron by the oral route is associated with mostly minor complications such as black stools, constipation, and abdominal discomfort. In contrast, intravenous administration of iron may lead to severe adverse events such as anaphylaxis and, as a more recent randomized trial has suggested, delayed complications such as infections and cardiovascular disease. Delayed complications of repeated intravenous iron use are difficult to recognize at an individual level therefore inpatients who have had recent cardiovascular events or are infected, intravenous iron should probably be avoided. Balancing safety and efficacy would require clinical judgment because 1 size may not fit all till we have better data to support the liberal use of parenteral iron. © Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Severe iron-deficiency anemia still an issue in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Gabrielle; Bogen, Debra L; Ritchey, A Kim

    2014-12-01

    Chronic, severe iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in the first years of life increases the risk of irreversibly compromised cognitive, affective, and motor development. While IDA in infants has decreased because of dietary changes (iron-fortified formula and delaying cow's milk), toddlers (13-36 months) are equally vulnerable to the adverse effects of IDA. We aimed to show that despite public health efforts, severe IDA remains a problem in toddlers and is associated with excess milk consumption. Retrospective chart review of children 6 to 36 months admitted to or evaluated by hematology at a children's hospital from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010 with a severe microcytic anemia (hemoglobin [Hb] <9 g/dL and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <75 fL). We identified 68 infants and toddlers with severe IDA; most (84%) were 13 to 36 months old. The mean Hb and MCV were 6.0 g/dL (range = 2.2-8.9 g/dL) and 54.0 fL (range = 45.5-69.8 fL), respectively. Fatigue, poor appetite, and pica were the most common symptoms, found in 43%, 29%, and 22% of patients, respectively. Only 41% of parents reported pale skin while 77% of physicians recorded it on physical exam. Daily cow's milk consumption surpassed 24 ounces for 47 of 48 children with reported intake; 11 consumed more than 64 ounces per day. Despite current screening recommendations, severe IDA continues to be a problem in toddlers and strongly correlates with excess cow's milk consumption. This reiterates the importance of screening for IDA into routine toddler care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient’s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia: pregnancy outcomes with or without iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Bánhidy, Ferenc; Acs, Nándor; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the efficacy of iron supplementation in anemic pregnant women on the basis of occurrence of pregnancy complications and birth outcomes. Comparison of the occurrence of medically recorded pregnancy complications and birth outcomes in pregnant women affected with medically recorded iron deficiency anemia and iron supplementation who had malformed fetuses/newborns (cases) and who delivered healthy babies (controls) in the population-based Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance System of Congenital Abnormalities. Of 22,843 cases with congenital abnormalities, 3242 (14.2%), while of 38,151 controls, 6358 (16.7%) had mothers with anemia. There was no higher rate of preterm births and low birth weight in the newborns of anemic pregnant women supplemented by iron. However, anemic pregnant women without iron treatment had a significantly shorter gestational age at delivery with a somewhat higher rate of preterm births but these adverse birth outcomes were prevented with iron supplementation. The rate of total and some congenital abnormalities was lower than expected and explained mainly by the healthier lifestyle and folic acid supplements. The secondary findings of the study showed a higher risk of constipation-related hemorrhoids and hypotension in anemic pregnant women with iron supplementation. A higher rate of preterm birth was found in anemic pregnant women without iron treatment but this adverse birth outcome was prevented with iron supplementation. There was no higher rate of congenital abnormalities in the offspring of anemic pregnant women supplemented with iron and/or folic acid supplements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14.more » Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.« less

  14. L-leucine improves the anemia and developmental defects associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and del(5q) MDS by activating the mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Maria; Narla, Anupama; Sun, Hong; Levine, Michelle; Paw, Barry H.; Berliner, Nancy; Look, A. Thomas; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins (RPs) has been proposed to be the common basis for the anemia observed in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome with loss of chromosome 5q [del(5q) MDS]. We have modeled DBA and del(5q) MDS in zebrafish using antisense morpholinos to rps19 and rps14, respectively, and have demonstrated that, as in humans, haploinsufficient levels of these proteins lead to a profound anemia. To address the hypothesis that RP loss results in impaired mRNA translation, we treated Rps19 and Rps14-deficient embryos with the amino acid L-leucine, a known activator of mRNA translation. This resulted in a striking improvement of the anemia associated with RP loss. We confirmed our findings in primary human CD34+ cells, after shRNA knockdown of RPS19 and RPS14. Furthermore, we showed that loss of Rps19 or Rps14 activates the mTOR pathway, and this is accentuated by L-leucine in both Rps19 and Rps14 morphants. This effect could be abrogated by rapamycin suggesting that mTOR signaling may be responsible for the improvement in anemia associated with L-leucine. Our studies support the rationale for ongoing clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA, and potentially for patients with del(5q) MDS. PMID:22734070

  15. Overlooked Management and Risk Factors for Anemia in Patients with Intestinal Behçet's Disease in Actual Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bun; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho

    2015-11-23

    Anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease significantly affects the quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of and risk factors for anemia and to describe the management of anemia in patients with intestinal Behçet's disease (BD) in actual clinical practice. We included 64 patients with intestinal BD who visited the outpatient clinic of a tertiary referral center in June 2011 and had available laboratory data for the subsequent 6 months. Anemia was detected in 26 patients (40.6%). After 6 months, anemia was still present in 14 of these patients (53.8%). The cause of anemia was investigated in eight patients (30.8%), and oral iron supplementation was prescribed to four patients (15.4%). Of these four patients, two (50%) recovered completely within 6 months. Anemia was associated with a high Disease Activity Index for Intestinal Behçet's Disease (DAIBD, p=0.024), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.003), and C-reactive protein (p=0.049) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the factor predictive for anemia in patients with intestinal BD was a higher DAIBD (≥40; odds ratio, 4.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 13.71; p=0.023). Although anemia is common in intestinal BD patients, its clinical importance is overlooked in daily practice. Moderate to severe disease activity is predictive of anemia.

  16. Nutritional causes of anemia in Mexican children under 5 years. Results from the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Villalpando, Salvador; Rebollar, Rosario; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Méndez-Gómez Humarán, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To describe the frequency and severity of anemia and the nutritional variables associated to hemoglobin levels (Hb) in children <5 years of age. We studied 981 children measuring hemoglobin and serum concentrations of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), C-reactive protein (CRP), zinc, iron, copper, magnesium, folate and vitamin B12. Ordinal logit or multiple regression models were constructed to assess the risk for anemia and the associations among nutritional variables. The overall prevalence of anemia was 20.6%, of which 14% were mild cases and 6.38% moderate. Anemia was associated with iron deficiency (ID) in 42.17% of the cases, whereas ID coexisted with either folate or vitamin B12 deficiency in 9%. Only 2% of cases of anemia were associated with either folate or vitamin B12 deficiencies. CRP (coef: 0.17 g/dl) and third tertile of s-copper (coef: -0.85 g/dl) were associated to unexplained anemia (p<0.05). ID is the main cause of anemia in children <5 y. Folate and vitamin B12 concentrations were associated with anemia. CRP was associated to unexplained anemia. However, vitamin A deficiency, which is associated with anemia, was not studied.

  17. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... be markedly deleterious effects on the nervous system. It is well established that whereas the development of anemia is completely reversible with adequate treatment, the involvement of the nervous system...

  18. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... be markedly deleterious effects on the nervous system. It is well established that whereas the development of anemia is completely reversible with adequate treatment, the involvement of the nervous system...

  19. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... be markedly deleterious effects on the nervous system. It is well established that whereas the development of anemia is completely reversible with adequate treatment, the involvement of the nervous system...

  20. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... be markedly deleterious effects on the nervous system. It is well established that whereas the development of anemia is completely reversible with adequate treatment, the involvement of the nervous system...

  1. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... be markedly deleterious effects on the nervous system. It is well established that whereas the development of anemia is completely reversible with adequate treatment, the involvement of the nervous system...

  2. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Julia G.; Friedman, Jennifer F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed. PMID:21738863

  3. Auto immune hemolytic anemia in a child precipitated by chicken pox.

    PubMed

    Billoo, Samina Shamim; Jamalvi, Syed Waseem

    2008-05-01

    Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) is a rare entity in children. We report a case of an adolescent girl with AIHA, which was precipitated by chicken pox. Clinical course over 3 years, till remission is described.

  4. The effect of floods on anemia among reproductive age women in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Oskorouchi, Hamid Reza; Nie, Peng; Sousa-Poza, Alfonso

    2018-01-01

    This study uses biomarker information from the 2013 National Nutrition Survey Afghanistan and satellite precipitation driven modeling results from the Global Flood Monitoring System to analyze how floods affect the probability of anemia in Afghan women of reproductive age (15-49). In addition to establishing a causal relation between the two by exploiting the quasi-random variation of floods in different districts and periods, the analysis demonstrates that floods have a significant positive effect on the probability of anemia through two possible transmission mechanisms. The first is a significant effect on inflammation, probably related to water borne diseases carried by unsafe drinking water, and the second is a significant negative effect on retinol concentrations. Because the effect of floods on anemia remains significant even after we control for anemia's most common causes, we argue that the condition may also be affected by elevated levels of psychological stress.

  5. Depressive disorders co-existing with Addison-Biermer anemia - case report.

    PubMed

    Just, Mark Jean; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a disease that can co-exist with depression, other mental disorders, or somatic diseases. Anemia can imitate symptoms of depression, while depression symptoms can mask concurring symptoms of anemia. I am presenting a case of a 48-year-old woman with Addison-Biermer anemia, with co-existing mood disorders. The clinical analysis of the presented patient's history indicates diagnostic problems and a need for a detailed analysis of drug-related complications that occurred during previous treatment, eg, in the form of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The presented case report contains valuable guidelines that can be of assistance in diagnostics and treatment of patients treated for mental disorders, who are also diagnosed with somatic diseases.

  6. [A regenerative anemia in infants: 2 cases of Pearson´s syndrome].

    PubMed

    Martínez de Zabarte Fernández, José M; Rodríguez-Vigil Iturrate, Carmen; Martínez Faci, Cristina; García Jiménez, Inmaculada; Murillo Sanjuan, Laura; Muñoz Mellado, Ascensión

    2017-02-01

    Anemia is very common in infants. Although its causes are usually not severe and treatable, proper etiologic diagnosis should be established. When anemia is non-regenerative, it can be caused by aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, bone marrow infiltration or hematopoietic factors deficiencies. Another possible cause is Pearson's syndrome, a rare mitochondrial disease that causes non-regenerative anemia associated with other cytopenias, pancreatic insufficiency, lactic acidosis and great variability in clinical presentation conditioned by heteroplasmy. It is characteristic to find in bone marrow studies variable vacuolization in erythroblastic progenitors and ring sideroblasts. The diagnosis is established by genetic study of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid performed by Southern blot analysis (complete mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid amplification by polymerase chain reaction -long), obtaining 70-80% deletion of 4977 bp (NMD 8343-13459). There is no curative therapy and support treatment is the only available nowadays. Death is frequent in early years of life. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Non-invasive Self-Care Anemia Detection during Pregnancy Using a Smartphone Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraeni, M. D.; Fatoni, A.

    2017-02-01

    Indonesian maternal mortality rate is the highest in South East Asia. Postpartum hemorrhage is the major causes of maternal mortality in Indonesia. Anemia during pregnancy contributes significantly to postpartum hemorrhage. Early detection of anemia during pregnancy may save mothers from maternal death. This research aim to develop a non-invasive self-care anemia detection based on the palpebral color observation and using a smartphone camera. The color intensity (Red, Green, and Blue) was then measured using a Colorgrab software (Loomatix) and analyzed compared to the hemoglobin concentration of the samples, measured using standard Spectrophotometer method. The result showed that the red color intensity had a high correlation (R2=0.814) with a linear regression of y=14.486x + 50.228. This preliminary study may be used as anemia early detection which more objective compared to visual assessment usually performed.

  8. A Demonstration of the Molecular Basis of Sickle-Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Marty; Gaynor, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a demonstration that permits the separation of different hemoglobin molecules within two to three hours. Introduces students to the powerful technique of gel electrophoresis and illustrates the molecular basis of sickle-cell anemia. (JRH)

  9. Cytomorphologic signs of severe pernicious anemia obscured in a patient with heterozygous hemoglobin Stanleyville II.

    PubMed

    Draube, Andreas; Chemnitz, Jens M; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Staib, Peter; Hallek, Michael; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2007-10-01

    Here, we report a rare coincidence of heterozygous hemoglobinopathy (Hb) Stanleyville II and severe pernicious anemia due to autoimmune gastritis. Hb Stanleyville II is characterized by a single base exchange (AAC-->AAA) resulting in a substitution Asn --> Lys at position 78 of hemoglobin alpha2-chain. Under normal conditions this hemoglobinopathy does not cause any symptoms even if present as homozygous variant. However, in our case diagnosis of pernicious anemia was hampered by the absence of typical erythrocytic macrocytosis and hyperchromasia. In addition, interpretation of bone marrow smears was difficult as characteristic findings for pernicious anemia were little pronounced. All known reasons for the absence of typical cytomorphologic signs in pernicious anemia as underlying iron deficiency and thalassemia could be excluded.

  10. Anemia prevalence and risk factors in pregnant women in an urban area of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Baig-Ansari, Naila; Badruddin, Salma Halai; Karmaliani, Rozina; Harris, Hillary; Jehan, Imtiaz; Pasha, Omrana; Moss, Nancy; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2008-06-01

    Anemia affects almost two-thirds of pregnant women in developing countries and contributes to maternal morbidity and mortality and to low birthweight. To determine the prevalence of anemia and the dietary and socioeconomic factors associated with anemia in pregnant women living in an urban community setting in Hyderabad, Pakistan. This was a prospective, observational study of 1,369 pregnant women enrolled at 20 to 26 weeks of gestation and followed to 6 weeks postpartum. A blood sample was obtained at enrollment to determine hemoglobin levels. Information on nutritional knowledge, attitudes, and practice and dietary history regarding usual food intake before and during pregnancy were obtained by trained interviewers within 1 week of enrollment. The prevalence of anemia (defined by the World Health Organization as hemoglobin < 11.0 g/dL) in these subjects was 90.5%; of these, 75.0% had mild anemia (hemoglobin from 9.0 to 10.9 g/dL) and 14.8% had moderate anemia (hemoglobin from 7.0 to 8.9 g/dL). Only 0.7% were severely anemic (hemoglobin < 7.0 g/ dL). Nonanemic women were significantly taller, weighed more, and had a higher body mass index. Multivariate analysis after adjustment for education, pregnancy history, iron supplementation, and height showed that drinking more than three cups of tea per day before pregnancy (adjusted prevalence odds ratio [aPOR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 8.0), consumption of clay or dirt during pregnancy (aPOR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 12.3), and never consuming eggs or consuming eggs less than twice a week during pregnancy (aPOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5) were significantly associated with anemia. Consumption of red meat less than twice a week prior to pregnancy was marginally associated with anemia (aPOR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.8) but was significantly associated with lower mean hemoglobin concentrations (9.9 vs. 10.0 g/dL, p = .05) during the study period. A subanalysis excluding women with mild anemia found similar

  11. Association of Maternal Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentrations with Risk of Gestational Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yingdi; Cai, Zhiyong; Dai, YaoYao; Hong, Qin; Wang, Xingyun; Zhu, Lijun; Xu, Pengfei; You, Lianghui; Wang, Xing; Ji, Chenbo; Wen, Juan; Guo, Xirong

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to be associated with a greater prevalence of anemia in various healthy and diseased populations by a great deal of observational studies. However, less work has been done to explore this association in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and risk of gestational anemia in a large, nested case-control study. The serum 25(OH)D concentrations was measured by enzyme immunoassay in 775 pregnant women affected with anemia and 1550 controls. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association of 25(OH)D concentrations with risk of gestational anemia. We found the 25(OH)D concentrations was significantly lower in women affected with anemia than in controls. Logistic regression analyses showed that women with 25(OH)D concentrations < 25.0 nmol/L, from 25.0 to 37.4 nmol/L and from 37.5 to 49.9 nmol/L all had increased risk of anemia when compared with women with concentrations from 50.0 to 74.9 nmol/L. And the risk of anemia was significantly increased with the decreasing concentrations of the serum 25(OH)D in a dose-dependent manner (P for trend = 0.012). For women with concentrations < 50.0 nmol/L, they had an 80% increase in anemia risk (95% CI = 1.45-2.25) after adjustment for confounders. We also observed a nonlinear relationship between the serum 25(OH)D and anemia, with a threshold for 25(OH)D of 50.0 nmol/L existed for anemia. Maternal serum 25(OH)D < 50.0 nmol/L may be a risk factor for gestational anemia, and it should be monitored for the high-risk pregnant women. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Association between food insecurity and anemia among women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Bishwajit; Tang, Shangfeng; Yaya, Sanni; Feng, Zhanchun

    2016-01-01

    Food insecurity and hidden hunger (micronutrient deficiency) affect about two billion people globally. Household food insecurity (HFI) has been shown to be associated with one or multiple micronutrient (MMN) deficiencies among women and children. Chronic food insecurity leads to various deficiency disorders, among which anemia stands out as the most prevalent one. As a high malnutrition prevalent country, Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of anemia among all Asian countries. In this study, we wanted to investigate for any association exists between HFI and anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Information about demographics, socioeconomic and anemia status on 5,666 married women ageing between 13 and 40 years were collected from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS 2011). Food security was measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Capillary hemoglobin concentration (Hb) measured by HemoCue® was used as the biomarker of anemia. Data were analysed using cross-tabulation, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression methods. Anemia prevalence was 41.7%. Logistic regression showed statistically significant association with anemia and type of residency (p = 0.459; OR = 0.953, 95%CI = 0.840-1.082), wealth status (Poorest: p < 0.001; OR = 1.369, 95%CI = 1.176-1.594; and average: p = 0.030; 95%CI = 1.017-1.398), educational attainment (p < 0.001; OR = 1.276, 95%CI = 1.132-1.439) and household food insecurity (p < 0.001; 95%CI = 1.348-1.830). Women who reported food insecurity were about 1.6 times more likely to suffer from anemia compared to their food secure counterparts. HFI is a significant predictor of anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Programs targeting HFI could prove beneficial for anemia reduction strategies. Gender aspects of food and nutrition insecurity should be taken into consideration in designing national anemia prevention

  13. Preoperative Anemia in Cardiac Operation: Does Hemoglobin Tell the Whole Story?

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Mick, Stephanie L; McCrae, Keith R; Houghtaling, Penny L; Sabik, Joseph F; Blackstone, Eugene H; Koch, Colleen G

    2018-01-01

    Preoperative anemia, defined by hemoglobin level, is associated with elevated risk after cardiac operation. Better understanding of anemia requires characterization beyond this. This investigation focuses on red cell size and its association with patient characteristics and outcomes after cardiac operation. From January 2010 to January 2014, 10,589 patients underwent elective cardiac operations at Cleveland Clinic. Anemia was characterized as normocytic, microcytic, or macrocytic based on mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Models for hospital complications were developed using multivariable logistic regression. Other outcomes were postoperative transfusion and intensive care unit (ICU) and postoperative hospital lengths of stay. A total of 2,715 patients (26%) were anemic. Of these, 2,365 (87%) had normocytic, 219 (8.1%) microcytic, and 131 (4.8%) macrocytic anemia. Non-anemic patients (n = 2,041, 26%) received transfusions compared with 1,553 (66%) normocytic, 148 (68%) microcytic, and 97 (74%) macrocytic anemia patients. Patients with normocytic or macrocytic anemia had more renal failure (normocytic: odds ratio (OR) 1.9, macrocytic: OR 3.5), other complications (normocytic: OR 1.3, macrocytic: OR 2.2) and death (normocytic: OR 2.0, macrocytic: OR 6.2) than non-anemic patients; patients with microcytic anemia had fewer reoperations (OR 0.35) and less postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR 0.50). Anemic patients experienced longer ICU (27 versus 48 hours, p < 0.001) and postoperative hospital (6.1 versus 7.4 days, p < 0.001) length of stay than non-anemic patients. Cardiac surgical patients are often anemic. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and outcomes are dissimilar according to red cell size. Patients with microcytic anemia had the lowest hemoglobin levels, yet the best clinical outcomes among anemic patients. MCV from the standard complete blood count adds additional information beyond hemoglobin for targeted intervention. Copyright © 2018 The Society

  14. Hospital-acquired Anemia in Critically Ill Dogs and Cats: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Lynch, A M; Respess, M; Boll, A E; Bozych, M; McMichael, M; Fletcher, D J; De Laforcade, A M; Rozanski, E A

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-acquired anemia is commonly described in people but limited information currently is available regarding its prevalence in animals. Assess the prevalence of hospital-acquired anemia in hospitalized critically ill dogs and cats, and examine its relationship with phlebotomy practices, transfusion administration, and survival to discharge. Eight hundred and fifty-one client-owned animals (688 dogs and 163 cats). A multicenter, observational study was conducted in which packed cell volume (PCV) was recorded at the time of admission and on subsequent hospitalization days. Signalment, number of blood samples obtained, underlying disease, whether or not blood products were administered, duration of hospitalization, and survival to discharge were recorded. Admission anemia prevalence was 32%, with overall prevalence during the hospitalization period of 56%. The last recorded PCV was significantly lower than the admission PCV for both dogs (admission PCV, 42% [range, 6-67%]; last recorded PCV, 34% [range, 4-64%], P < .0001) and cats (admission PCV, 31% [range, 6-55%]; last recorded PCV, 26% [range, 10-46%], P < .0001). Patients that developed anemia had significantly more blood samples obtained (nonanemic, 5 blood samples [range, 2-54]; anemic, 7 blood samples [range, 2-49], P < .0001). Hospitalized cats were significantly more likely to develop anemia compared to dogs (P < .0001), but anemic dogs were significantly less likely to survive to discharge (P = .0001). Surgical patients were at higher risk of developing hospital-acquired anemia compared to medical patients (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9; P = .01). Hospital-acquired anemia occurred frequently, especially in surgical patients. Additional studies focused on the direct effect of phlebotomy practices on the likelihood of anemia development in hospitalized animals are warranted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the

  15. [Meta-analysis of association between organophosphorus pesticides and aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Yang, Tubao

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the association between organophosphorus pesticides and aplastic anemia, and provide scientific evidence for the primary prevention of aplastic anemia. The published papers of case control studies on the association between organophosphorus pesticides and aplastic anemia from January 1990 to August 2014 were collected from Chinese BioMedical Literature Base (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), PubMed and EMBASE. The papers which met the inclusion criteria were evaluated. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of organophosphorus pesticides were calculated with software Review Manager 5.0. Subgroup analysis were conducted for different population and different usage of organophosphorus pesticides. A total of 9 papers were selected, involving 5 833 subjects (1 404 cases and 4 429 controls). The results showed that organophosphorus pesticides could increase the risk of aplastic anemia (OR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.60-2.44) . Subgroup analysis showed that Asian (OR=2.01, 95% CI: 1.52-2.66) had higher risk of aplastic anemia than American or European (OR=1.93, 95% CI: 1.39-2.67) . Using pure organophosphorus pesticides (OR=2.15, 95% CI: 1.60-2.88) was more prone to cause aplastic anemia than using the mixture of organophosphorus pesticides (OR=1.82, 95% CI: 1.34-2.47). The analysis indicated that organophosphorus pesticides might be a risk factor for aplastic anemia. Reducing organophosphorus pesticides exposure in daily life and industrial or agricultural production could prevent the incidence of aplastic anemia.

  16. Nandrolone decanoate for the treatment of erythropoietin refractory anemia: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Bobby; Iqbal, Fahad M; Chawla, Manjeet S

    2009-01-01

    Erythropoietin refractory anemias represent a continuing and increasing burden on the healthcare system. The current practice of providing these patients with rHuEPO does not seem to be working. Fewer than 50% of patients respond in some studies. We demonstrate that androgens have multiple benefits in this population. They control anemia and stop transfusion dependence and improve nutritional parameters. In some patients, they also have a salutary effect on both white blood cell and platelet counts.

  17. Excessive zinc ingestion: A reversible cause of sideroblastic anemia and bone marrow depression

    SciTech Connect

    Broun, E.R.; Greist, A.; Tricot, G.

    1990-09-19

    Two patients with sideroblastic anemia secondary to zinc-induced copper deficiency absorbed excess zinc secondary to oral ingestion. The source of excess zinc was a zinc supplement in one case; in the other, ingested coins. In each case, the sideroblastic anemia was corrected promptly after removal of the source of excess zinc. These two cases emphasize the importance of recognizing this clinical entity, since the myelodysplastic features are completely reversible.

  18. Deficiency of gamma-ray excision repair in skin fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Remsen, J F; Cerutti, P A

    1976-01-01

    The capacity of preparations of skin fibroblasts from normal individuals and patients with Fanconi's anemia to excise gamma-ray products of the 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine type from exogenous DNA was investigated. The excision capacity of whole-cell homogenates of fibroblasts from two of four patients with Fanconi's anemia was substantially below normal. This repair deficiency was further pronounced in nuclear preparations from cells of the same two patients. PMID:1065896

  19. Inappropriate expression of hepcidin by liver congestion contributes to anemia and relative iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoyasu; Hanawa, Haruo; Jiao, Shuang; Ohno, Yukako; Hayashi, Yuka; Yoshida, Kaori; Kashimura, Takeshi; Obata, Hiroaki; Minamino, Tohru

    2014-04-01

    Anemia and relative iron deficiency (RID) are prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF). The etiology of anemia and RID in HF patients is unclear. Hepcidin expression may be closely related to anemia and RID in HF patients. Although hepcidin is produced mainly by the liver, and the most frequent histologic appearance of liver in HF patients is congestion, the influence of liver congestion (LC) on hepcidin production has not yet been investigated. We investigated whether hepcidin contributed to anemia and RID in rats with LC. LC was induced in rats by ligating the inferior vena cava and compared with bleeding anemia (BA) model induced by phlebotomy and hemolytic anemia (HA) model induced by injection of phenylhydrazine. BA and HA strongly suppressed expression of hepcidin in liver and so did not cause decrease in serum iron and transferrin saturation. However, hepcidin expression did not decrease in LC rats, which resulted in anemia and lower transferrin saturation. In addition, many cells with hemosiderin deposits were observed in the liver and spleen and not in the bone marrow, and this appeared to be related to suppression of hepcidin expression. Iron accumulated in hepatocytes, and bone morphogenetic protein 6, which induces hepcidin, increased. Inflammation was observed in the congestive liver, and there was an increase in interleukin-6, which also induced hepcidin and was induced by free heme and hemoglobin via Toll-like receptor 4. We conclude that LC contributes to RID and anemia, and it does so via inappropriate expression of hepcidin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Monitoring and prevention of anemia relying on nutrition and environmental conditions in sports.

    PubMed

    Sacirović, Selim; Asotic, Jasminka; Maksimovic, Radmila; Radevic, Borislav; Muric, Benin; Mekic, Hasim; Biocanin, Rade

    2013-01-01

    none declared. Anemia is a blood disorder characterized by abnormally low levels of healthy red blood cells or reduced hemoglobin, the iron-bearing protein in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to tissues throughout the body. The most common symptoms of this disorder are fatigue, weakness and, in extreme cases, shortness of breath or palpitations, or you may have no symptoms at all. Sports anemia is a term loosely applied to a least three different conditions: hemodilution, iron deficiency anemia and foot-strike anemia. Not exclusive to athletes, iron deficiency anemia occurs most often among women who may lose more iron each month when they menstruate than they take in. Therefore, we examined its effect on the physical condition of female athletes. Several years (since 2010th until 2012th), we studied how anemia among girls (pioneers, juniors and seniors categories) that are involved in sports (women's soccer, volleyball and handball) in Rasina's district (Serbia), affecting their physical fitness. When their trainers approach to us, complaining that they have players who are great, so extraordinary talents, but by no means able to withstand more than twenty minutes in the game, we suggest them to perform laboratory tests. It was tested 134th female athletes. Anemia was observed in 43. (9. pioneers, 19. juniors and 15. seniors). So, laboratory results showed that in these girls anemia causes poor sport condition. After that, the girls enhanced nutrition. Their diet consisted of iron supplements and vitamins. Altitude training was organized for them, also. After all these treatments, condition significantly improved. It was first time that trainers in Rasina's district realizing significance of laboratory tests.