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Sample records for anemia em menores

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolytic anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  2. Anemias.

    PubMed

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cell destruction. Conditions that may lead to anemia include Heavy periods Pregnancy Ulcers Colon polyps or colon cancer Inherited disorders A diet that does not have enough iron, folic acid or vitamin B12 Blood ... cell anemia and thalassemia, or cancer Aplastic anemia, a condition ...

  4. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depression Falls Prevention Nutrition Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Anemia Basic Facts & Information ... older adults, although it’s not caused by normal aging. It has many causes, including some you can ...

  5. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... malabsorption); Anemia - intrinsic factor; Anemia - IF; Anemia - atrophic gastritis ... of pernicious anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune ...

  6. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  7. Unusual Anemias.

    PubMed

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  9. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Anemia What's in this article? ... Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Print What Is Anemia? Anemia is when the level of healthy red ...

  10. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  11. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from Fanconi syndrome , a rare kidney disorder. Causes Fanconi anemia is due to an abnormal gene that damages ... lead to excess bleeding. Most people with Fanconi anemia have some of these ... or ribs, can cause a curved spine ( scoliosis ) Changes in the color ...

  12. [Hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Treatments of aplastic anemia are comprised of supportive therapy and aplastic anemia-specific therapy aimed at restoring hematopoiesis. Supportive therapies include transfusion, G-CSF, and the administration of iron chelation agents, as well as dealing specifically with individual symptoms. Aplastic anemia-specific treatments given with the aim of achieving hematopoietic recovery include immunosuppressive therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and anabolic hormone therapy. Although transplantation provides complete recovery of hematopoiesis (cure), there is a risk of death due to transplant-related complications. The most effective immunosuppressive therapy is a combination of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. This treatment is also effective against the secondary, drug-induced and hepatitis-associated forms of aplastic anemia. In the management of aplastic anemia, a treatment is selected from among these options depending on the disease severity and the age of the individual case. The thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag appears to be effective and to provide tri-lineage recovery of hematopoiesis in some cases. Indications for its use are expected to expand in Japan.

  14. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the number of these blood cell types. Aplastic anemia can be caused by: Use of certain drugs or exposure to toxic chemicals (such as benzene) Exposure to radiation or chemotherapy Autoimmune disorders Pregnancy Viruses Sometimes, the cause is unknown. In this ...

  15. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  16. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  17. Anemia and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  18. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org US National Library of Medicine -- ghr.nlm. ...

  19. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition ... they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic ...

  20. Primary hyperparathyroidism and anemia.

    PubMed

    Falko, J M; Guy, J T; Smith, R E; Mazzaferri, E L

    1976-08-01

    The frequency of anemia associated with primary hyperparathyroidism is uncertain. When anemia does occur, its mechanisms are obscure. Two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and moderate normochromic, normocytic, reticulocytopenic anemia were studied in detail. Both had results of ferrokinetic studies that were consistent with the anemia of chronic disease; one had low serum iron concentrations and reduced normoblastic iron incorporation. Anemia in both patients resolved after parathyroidectomy. Clinical records of 100 nonuremic patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed and three other anemic patients were found. The cause of anemia in two of these individuals was bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal system, and the third had folate deficiency attributable to chronic alchoholism.

  1. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... long-term (chronic) medical conditions that involve inflammation. Causes Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red ... cells in the blood. ACD is a common cause of anemia. Some conditions that can lead to ACD include: ...

  2. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  3. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  4. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  5. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anemia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  6. Side Effects: Anemia

    Cancer.gov

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  7. Myeloma and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Perillie, P E

    1978-01-01

    Four cases of pernicious anemia developing in association with multiple myeloma are described. The description now of 14 cases demonstrating the association of these two disorders suggest a causative relationship. These observations, in addition to the previously well-documented increased coincidence of pernicious anemia and benign monoclonal gammopathy and pernicious anemia and hypoglobulinemia, suggest that screening for vitamine B12 deficiency in patients with gammopathies and for protein abnormalities in patients with pernicious anemia is indicated.

  8. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  9. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anemia in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Khan, Leah

    2018-02-01

    Anemia is a pervasive problem in pediatrics and evaluating for it is considered part of standard care for all pediatric patients. If left untreated, it can cause significant problems for children and many of the detriments can be long lasting. Although iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of pediatric anemia, it is important to keep the broad differential in mind for those in whom the history suggests an alternate diagnosis or who do not respond to standard treatment with iron supplementation. This article gives a basic overview of anemia in children with a focus on iron deficiency. [Pediatr Ann. 2018;47(2):e42-e47.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Infection and anemia.

    PubMed

    Kwaan, Hau C

    2011-02-01

    Anemia most frequently accompanies infection in varying degrees and in different forms. Anemia of inflammation is the most common and is due to over-expression of hepcidin. This is followed by hemolytic anemia, red cell aplasia and blood loss. The degree of anemia may not necessarily be proportional to the severity of the infection, nor is it specific for the type of infection. A clear understanding of these diverse causes and a recognition that they often occur in combination can be of enormous assistance in forming a proper diagnosis and an appropriate management plan.

  12. Infection and Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kwaan, Hau C

    2010-08-10

    Anemia most frequently accompanies infection in varying degrees and in different forms. Anemia of inflammation is the most common and is due to over-expression of hepcidin. This is followed by hemolytic anemia, red cell aplasia and blood loss. The degree of anemia may not necessarily be proportional to the severity of the infection, nor is it specific for the type of infection. A clear understanding of these diverse causes and a recognition that they often occur in combination can be of enormous assistance in forming a proper diagnosis and an appropriate management plan.

  13. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  14. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Anemia in Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Cindy N.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis While anemia is regarded as a relatively common occurrence in older adults, the vigor with which the medical community should intervene to correct this common problem is disputed. Epidemiologic data clearly correlate anemia with functional decline, disability and mortality. Anemia may contribute to functional decline by restricting oxygen delivery to muscle, or to cognitive decline by restricting oxygen delivery to the brain. On the other hand, the erythron may be a separate target of the same biological mediators that influence deterioration of physiologic systems that contribute to weakness, functional and cognitive decline and mortality. Clinical trials aimed to treat anemia in older adults could assess whether physical performance is improved or whether mortality risk declines with improved hemoglobin, but sufficient evidence from such trials is currently lacking. With few guidelines regarding treatment for older adults and significant risk for adverse events associated with transfusion and erythroid stimulating agents (ESA), anemia often goes untreated or ignored in geriatric clinics. This article reviews the problem of anemia in older adults, with a particular emphasis on the frail elderly. We will review the gaps in our evidence base for the treatment of anemia in older adults and assess options for advancing the field. PMID:21093723

  16. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  17. [Anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Anemia is one of the most common symptoms in children caused by numerous underlying diseases. In majority of patients, these diseases can be correctly diagnosed through physical examination, history taking, and routine laboratory tests. Bone marrow failure syndromes associated with several genetic diseases are rare causes of anemia in childhood. We reviewed the recent progress of molecular mechanisms in bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC), which are all predicted to involve defective ribosome synthesis. Delineation of the precise role of each gene product in ribosomal biogenesis and hematopoiesis may have both therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  18. Anemia in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Shailaja J.; Albert, Tyler J.; Watkins, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is common in the intensive care unit, and may be associated with adverse consequences. However, current options for correcting anemia are not without problems and presently lack convincing efficacy for improving survival in critically ill patients. In this article we review normal red blood cell physiology; etiologies of anemia in the intensive care unit; its association with adverse outcomes; and the risks, benefits, and efficacy of various management strategies, including blood transfusion, erythropoietin, blood substitutes, iron therapy, and minimization of diagnostic phlebotomy. PMID:22281832

  19. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... of vitamin K at birth. Red blood cell production Before birth, the fetus's bone marrow may fail ... in severe anemia. Examples of this lack of production include rare genetic disorders such as Fanconi syndrome ...

  20. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person with severe anemia may need a blood transfusion. Getting a blood transfusion is the fastest way to get blood to ... Count Becoming a Vegetarian Vitamins and Minerals Blood Blood Transfusions All About Menstruation My Friend Has Sickle Cell ...

  1. About Anemia (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person with severe anemia may need a blood transfusion . A transfusion means that donated blood, which is ... scary, but millions of kids and adults have blood transfusions every year. Except for inserting the tube, they ...

  2. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  4. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  5. Anemia: Evaluation and Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Michael J; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Anemia is among the most common medical problems and clinical and laboratory evaluation need to be approached logically. The complete blood count with red cell indices offers clues to diagnosis. Many anemias have characteristic red cell morphology. The reticulocyte count serves as a useful screen for hemolysis or blood loss. Testing for specific causes of the anemia is performed. Occasionally, examination of the bone marrow is required for diagnosis. Molecular testing is increasingly being use to aid the diagnostic process. This article reviews diagnostic tests for anemia and suggests a rational approach to determining the etiology of a patient's anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  8. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  9. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  10. [Anemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  11. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  12. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  13. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  14. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  15. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  16. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, Toyomi

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia is defined as anemia due to a reduction of the RBC lifespan to less than the normal range of approximately 120 days. Patients with anemia and jaundice are often suspected to have hemolysis. Herein, different causes of hemolysis and the diagnostic algorithm are reviewed. Currently, there is no generic treatment for hemolytic anemia. Appropriate management of a patient with hemolytic anemia requires determination of the underlying cause. Treatments for the different causes of hemolytic anemia are also reviewed.

  18. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the ...

  20. Equine infectious anemia virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention. PMID:29416700

  1. Equine infectious anemia virus in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-02

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention.

  2. Anemia for the Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    Powell, Darryl J; Achebe, Maureen Okam

    2016-12-01

    Anemia denotes a reduced red blood cell (RBC) mass from any cause. The causes of anemia are numerous and due to decreased (or abnormal) erythropoesis, shortened RBC life span, or blood loss. The most common etiology of anemia is iron deficiency. A judicious work up of anemia includes evaluating the reticulocyte count and peripheral smear. The severity of illness of a patient with anemia is determined by the degree of anemia and the seriousness of the underlying disorder. Management of patients with hereditary and hemolytic anemias should involve a hematologist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased risk of developing a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow called acute myeloid ... PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Kitao H, Takata M. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in ...

  5. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplants, which require chemotherapy and radiation therapy medications blood transfusions Treatment options depend on the age and general ... and people with aplastic anemia who depend on blood transfusions. 5 Taking these medications alone usually does not ...

  6. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  7. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  9. Neonatal nonimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yaish, Hassan M; Christensen, Robert D; Lemons, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    As in adults and older children, anemia in newborn infants can be the result of erythropoietic failure, hemorrhage, or hemolysis. When hemolysis is the prime consideration, it can be challenging for physicians caring for neonates to choose from the wide variety of available diagnostic tests. This review describes the authors' opinions regarding rational, consistent, and cost-effective means of making an exact diagnosis of a neonatal hemolytic condition. Two recent advances in the diagnosis of neonatal nonimmune hemolytic disorders are highlighted in this review: introduction of flow cytometry-based Eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) uptake as a screening test to identify RBC membrane defects and next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based panels to uncover exact mutations causing hemolysis. The availability of newer tools such as EMA and NGS to diagnose specific hemolytic conditions, which might otherwise remain unknown, enables neonatal practitioners not only to identify the exact cause of hemolysis but also to discover novel mutations that can be implicated in the cause of neonatal hemolytic processes.

  10. Anemia in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Aljomah, Ghanim; Baker, Susan S; Schmidt, Kenneth; Alkhouri, Razan; Kozielski, Rafal; Zhu, Lixin; Baker, Robert D

    2018-04-17

    Anemia is the most frequent extra-intestinal finding in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and types of anemia in pediatric patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease at diagnosis and at approximately one year follow up. This is a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with Inflammatory Bowel Disease from 2005 to 2012, ages 1-18 years. Patients who had hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and iron indices obtained at the time of diagnosis and at approximately one year follow up were included in the study. The prevalence of anemia at the beginning and the end of the study was recorded. Using the soluble transferrin receptor index the type of anemia was determined. At diagnosis, 67.31% of patients were anemic. Overall, 28.85% of patients had either Iron deficiency anemia or a combination of Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, while 38.46% had anemia of chronic disease alone. At follow up 20.51% were anemic. 15.38% had either iron deficiency anemia or a combination of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease; 5.13% had anemia of chronic disease alone. The pattern of anemia and response to therapy differed among the inflammatory Bowel disease phenotypes CONCLUSION:: Anemia is frequent in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The prevalence was higher in Crohn's Disease. At one year, the prevalence of anemia decreased significantly, but persisted. Anemia of Chronic Disease predominated in CD. Iron Deficiency Anemia continued to be present in CD and UC.

  11. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is anemia of inflammation and chronic disease (AI/ACD)? Anemia of inflammation and chronic disease is ... of the immune system occurs, can also cause AI/ACD. AI/ACD is easily confused with iron- ...

  12. Fanconi anemia with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Jurca, A; Kinga, Kozma; Bembea, M; Gug, Cristina; Jurca, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare plurimalformative syndrome (1/350,000 newborns) presenting a large phenotypic heterogeneity, chromosomal instability and autosomal recessive inheritance (OMIM 227650). Male patient followed in the genetics service since infancy, till death. The child was referred for multiple congenital anomalies: bilateral aplasia of the radius and thumb, left kidney agenesis, cardiac malformation cleft palate, bilateral cryptorchidism, ear anomalies, which were associated, in time, with facial hyperpigmentation, anomalies of dental eruption, nasal septum deviation, and lumbar scoliosis. By the age of 10 years, he develop progressive pancytopenia, aplastic anemia. The diagnosis was completed by medulogram, immunogram, and karyotype. Treatment was primarily hematologic with substitution products, immunosuppressive, marrow stimulants, antibiotic therapy. Death occurred at age of 16 by infection and pulmonary hemorrhage occurred in severe pancytopenia. It is presented a rare case of Fanconi anemia customized by the clinical association with cleft palate and instructive clinical and evolutionary complexity.

  13. [Immune pathophysiology of refractory anemias].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    Among different immune pathophysiologies of anemia, those of bone marrow failure syndromes such as aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome are most difficult to understand. An increase in the proportion of glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol anchored protein-deficient cells has been identified as the best marker for the presence of immune pathophysiology in this elusive syndrome. The significance of detecting small populations of such paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)-type cells was substantiated by a recent observation that PNH-type cells arose from a donor-derived hematopoietic stem cell with a PIG-A mutation in an aplastic anemia patient with late graft failure which responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. Identification of auto-antigens capable of inducing cytotoxic T cells against hematopoietic stem cells is necessary to prove the escape of PIG-A mutant clone from the immune system attack using animal models.

  14. Fanconi Anemia and its Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous recessive disorder characterized by diverse congenital malformations, progressive pancytopenia, and predisposition to both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Congenital anomalies vary from patient to patient and may affect skeletal morphogenesis as well as any of the major organ systems. Although this highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, laboratory study of chromosomal breakage induced by diepoxybutane (DEB) or other crosslinking agents provides a unique cellular marker for the diagnosis of the disorder either prenatally or postnatally. Diagnosis based on abnormal response to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. This overview will present our present knowledge regarding the varied phenotypic manifestations of FA and procedures for diagnosis based upon abnormal DNA damage responses. PMID:19622403

  15. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  16. Clinico-aetiologic profile of macrocytic anemias with special reference to megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Vineetha; Dutta, Tarun Kumar; Badhe, Bhawana A; Bobby, Zachariah; Panigrahi, Ashish K

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to study the clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with macrocytic anemia and to determine the etiology of macrocytic anemia with special reference to megaloblastic anemia. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried over a period of 18 months on 60 adult patients (age ≥13 years) of macrocytic anemia. Macrocytic anemia was identified when peripheral blood examination showed anemia with a mean red blood corpuscular volume of >95 fl. The most common cause of macrocytic anemia was megaloblastic anemia (38.4%). The major causes of nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia were primary bone marrow disorders (35%), liver diseases (15%) and hemolytic anemia (8.3%). There was a significant male preponderance in the study (65%). The megaloblastic anemias observed were due to either vitamin B(12) deficiency (78.3%) or combined B(12) and folate deficiency (21.7%). A significant proportion of non-vegetarians (73.9%) had megaloblastic anemia. Patients with an MCV of >110fl were more likely to have megaloblastic anemia (p value 0.0007). Three patients (mean age 55 years) with a megaloblastic marrow did not respond to vitamin replacement and were found to have myelodysplastic syndrome. Megaloblastic anemia due to Vitamin B(12) or folate deficiency remains the most important cause of macrocytic anemia. In settings with limited laboratory facilities, a therapeutic trial of vitamins B(12) or folic acid is useful in determining the specific vitamin deficiency.

  17. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  18. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  19. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  1. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors.

  2. [Anemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grau-Amorós, J; Formiga, F; Urrutia, A

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward. However, although there is evidence supporting its treatment to improve the functional capacity of the patients and to reduce the new admissions rate, the clinical practice guidelines do not provide any directives regarding its approach. This is an ideal clinical problem for the internist due to its multifactorial origin and the comprehensive point of view needed to approach the group of syndromes that occur in these patients (anemia, heart failure, geriatric syndromes, diabetes, etc.) The choice of treatment strategy, if such treatment is decided, should always begin after correcting the congestive signs in the outpatient with optimal treatment of heart failure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Megaloblastic anemia: back in focus.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jagdish

    2010-07-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA), in most instances in developing countries, results from deficiency of vitamin B(12) or folic acid. Over the last two to three decades, incidence of MA seems to be increasing. Of the two micronutrients, folic acid deficiency contributed to MA in a large majority of cases. Now deficiency of B(12) is far more common. In addition to anemia, occurrence of neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia is increasingly being reported. Among cases presenting with pancytopenia, MA stands out as an important (commonest cause in some series) cause. This article focuses on these and certain other aspects of MA. Possible causes of increasing incidence of MA are discussed. Observations on other clinical features like neurocognitive dysfunction, associated hyperhomocysteinemeia and occurrence of tremors and thrombocytosis during treatment are highlighted.

  4. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  5. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  7. [ANEMIA IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Bukmir, L; Fišić, M; Diminić-Lisica, I; Ljubotina, A

    2016-12-01

    Renal anemia develops secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its incidence increases with the progression of CKD. The aim is to inform family physicians about the latest developments and ways of approaching the issue, in accordance with national guidelines. The PubMed and Cochrane systematic reviews databases were searched for the 1996-2015 period using the following key words: anemia, chronic renal failure, erythropoietin, and primary health care. In addition, all relevant articles and textbooks available were manually searched to suggest the following conclusions. The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) slows down the progression of CKD, reduces the need for blood transfusions and improves the patient quality of life. Target hemoglobin (Hb) concentration to be permanently maintained is 110-120 g/L. Higher Hb levels are associated with higher mortality and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. Target hemoglobin level should be strictly individualized depending on CKD stage (both non-dialyzed and dialyzed population), age, other risks, initial and maintenance treatment. Early recognition and appropriate correction of anemia using ESA is of utmost importance in CKD patients. Systematic primary and secondary prevention measures along with education and professional implementation of national guidelines in daily work of family practitioners can improve medical care of patients with CKD.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Hereditary sideroblastic anemia Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 ... my area? Other Names for This Condition Anemia, hereditary sideroblastic Anemia, sex-linked hypochromic sideroblastic ANH1 Congenital ...

  9. Anemia in Pregnancy: A Pragmatic Approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongmei; McLeod, Anne; Gandhi, Shital; Malinowski, Ann Kinga; Shehata, Nadine

    2017-12-01

    Anemia is common in pregnancy, ranging from 5.4% in developed countries to more than 80% in developing countries. Anemia in pregnancy has been associated with prematurity, low birth weight, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. This review uses clinical vignettes to illustrate the clinical presentations, approach to diagnosis, maternal and fetal implications, and treatment for the common etiologies of anemia in pregnancy. Literature review. Normal physiological changes in pregnancy result in alterations of hematological parameters particularly in a reduction of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration. Consequently, the Hb used to define anemia in pregnancy is lower than in nonpregnant patients. As there is an increased requirement of iron in pregnancy, it is not unexpected that iron deficiency remains the most common cause of anemia and warrants a preemptive approach to prevent a further reduction in Hb. The syndromes associated with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia may pose a diagnostic challenge, as there are several potential etiologies that may be difficult to differentiate, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia can be associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity andmortality. Anemia secondary to sickle cell disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemiamerit special attention because there are risks secondary to red blood cell transfusion and risks to withholding transfusion. Anemia in pregnancy is potentially associated with maternal and fetal adverse outcomes. Providing evidence-based care is essential to achieving the best pregnancy outcomes.

  10. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  11. Megaloblastic Anemias: Nutritional and Other Causes.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Datta Mitra, Ananya

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B 12 and folate deficiencies are major causes of megaloblastic anemia. Causes of B 12 deficiency include pernicious anemia, gastric surgery, intestinal disorders, dietary deficiency, and inherited disorders of B 12 transport or absorption. The prevalence of folate deficiency has decreased because of folate fortification, but deficiency still occurs from malabsorption and increased demand. Other causes include drugs and inborn metabolic errors. Clinical features of megaloblastic anemia include anemia, cytopenias, jaundice, and megaloblastic marrow morphology. Neurologic symptoms occur in B 12 deficiency, but not in folate deficiency. Management includes identifying any deficiency, establishing its cause, and replenishing B 12 or folate parenterally or orally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Child with aplastic anemia: Anesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Gupta, Babita; Sharma, Aanchal; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare heterogeneous disorder of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia with the depletion of all types of blood cells. This results in anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which pose a challenge to both surgical and anesthetic management of such cases. We report a child with aplastic anemia who sustained traumatic ulcer on the arm and underwent split-thickness skin grafting under general anesthesia. There are only two case reports on anesthetic considerations in aplastic anemia patients in the literature. The anesthetic management is challenging because of the rarity of the disease, associated pancytopenia and immunosuppression. PMID:23162410

  13. Supraventricular Tachycardia Associated With Severe Anemia.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Daniel J; Scarfone, Richard J

    2018-04-01

    We present the unusual case of a 7-year-old girl with severe iron-deficiency anemia who concurrently was determined to be in a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) rhythm. To our knowledge, the association of anemia with SVT has not been reported previously. We review the presentation of SVT, management strategies for treating both severe anemia and SVT, risks and benefits of using the classic treatments for SVT in a severely anemic patient and discuss iron-deficiency anemia-related cardiac disease.

  14. Preoperative Anemia in Hindfoot and Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Dix, Brian; Grant-McDonald, Lisa; Catanzariti, Alan; Saltrick, Karl

    2017-04-01

    This is a retrospective study (n = 39) evaluating the postoperative outcomes of patients with mild to moderate preoperative anemia who underwent a hindfoot and/or ankle arthrodesis. In the study, 32 patients did not have preoperative anemia, and 7 had preoperative anemia. Mortality, length of hospital stay, blood transfusions, deep-vein thrombosis, infection, time to union, malunion, delayed union, nonunion, and ulceration were of particular interest. Comparative analyses between patients with preoperative anemia and those without were performed utilizing the independent samples t-test or by the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test. The Fisher exact test was used to analyze categorical data. The Shapiro-Wilk test was utilized to check normality. Statistical significance was defined at a 2-sided level of P <.05. Delayed union, nonunion, and malunion were all significantly increased in patients with preoperative anemia (P = .032, P = .004, and P = .028, respectively). Accordingly, the median total number of noninfectious complications (delayed union + nonunion + malunion) in patients with preoperative anemia (0.86 ± 0.38) was significantly higher than in patients without preoperative anemia (0.063 ± 0.25; P < .001). Patients with preoperative anemia had a significantly longer length of hospital stay in days (4.14 ± 2.61). Total infection was also significantly associated with preoperative anemia (P = .001). This study clearly demonstrated that infectious complications, noninfectious complications, and length of hospital stay in hindfoot and/or ankle arthrodesis was significantly affected by preoperative anemia. Thus, consideration should be given to addressing preoperative anemia prior to hindfoot and/or ankle arthrodesis. Level II Study.

  15. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  16. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  17. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  18. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  19. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  20. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  1. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  2. Anemias excluding cobalamin and folate deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Dublis, Stephanie; Shah, Shefali; Nand, Sucha; Anderes, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Anemias are one of the commonest maladies affecting humans. They result from either a failure of production by the bone marrow (hypoproliferative), or from premature destruction or loss (hyperproliferative) of red cells. Hypoproliferative anemias typically result from deficiencies of essential nutrients, stem cell abnormalities or deficiency, and infiltrative processes of the bone marrow. In the hyperproliferative forms, the bone marrow function is normal and anemia results from bleeding or shortened erythrocyte lifespan due to hemoglobinopathies, red cell enzyme disorders, membrane defects, or external factors such as antibodies, trauma, or heat injury. The etiology of anemia is frequently obvious, but when obscure, a systematic diagnostic approach frequently yields the answer. It is important to realize that anemias are usually a consequence of another disease process, which must be identified. Without correction of the underlying disease process, the treatment is likely to fail. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  4. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likelymore » that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.« less

  5. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  6. Relationship of maternal knowledge of anemia with maternal and child anemia and health-related behaviors targeted at anemia among families in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Souganidis, Ellie S; Sun, Kai; de Pee, Saskia; Kraemer, Klaus; Rah, Jee-Hyun; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Sari, Mayang; Bloem, Martin W; Semba, Richard D

    2012-12-01

    Our specific aim was to characterize maternal knowledge of anemia and its relationship to maternal and child anemia and to behaviors related to anemia reduction. We examined the relationship between maternal knowledge of anemia and anemia in the mother and the youngest child, aged 6-59 months, in 7,913 families from urban slums and 37,874 families from rural areas of Indonesia. Knowledge of anemia was defined based upon the mother's ability to correctly name at least one symptom of anemia and at least one treatment or strategy for reducing anemia. Hemoglobin was measured in both the mother and the child. In urban and rural areas, respectively, 35.8 and 36.9% of mothers had knowledge of anemia, 28.7 and 25.1% of mothers were anemic (hemoglobin <12 g/dL), and 62.3 and 54.0% of children were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dL). Maternal knowledge of anemia was associated with child anemia in urban and rural areas, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79, 1.02, P = 0.10; OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.87, 0.98, P = 0.01) in multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders. There was no significant association between maternal knowledge of anemia and maternal anemia. Maternal knowledge of anemia was significantly associated with iron supplementation during pregnancy and child consumption of fortified milk. There was no association of maternal knowledge of anemia with child deworming. Maternal knowledge of anemia is associated with lower odds of anemia in children and with some health behaviors related to reducing anemia.

  7. Role of nutrition on anemia in elderly.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Vittorio Emanuele

    2016-02-01

    Anemia in elderly population have a great incidence and is related to increased mortality risk. The incidence of nutrition in anemia is about one third of the total. Caloric and protein restriction, iron, vitamin B 12 , folic deficiency are the causes of nutritional anemia. Protein and energy malnutrition stimulate an increased cytokines production with induction of inflammation, immunodeficiency and anemia. Anorexia and obesity can be associated with anemia due to increased cytokines and hepdicin serum level. Macrophages activity is inhibited and a decrease in red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb) concentration due to ineffective erythropoiesis is observed. An adequate energy and protein diet is necessary to reduce inflammation and increase iron absorption. A minimum of 1700 kcal/day and 1.7 gr/kg/day of protein intake are necessary to maintain anabolism in chronic patients to prevent and treat anemia. Iron supplementation by intravenous injection is safe and effective to correct severe iron deficiency. The supplementation of vitamins and oligomineral are useful to reduce oxidative stress and improve RBC longevity. Anemia in elderly could be prevented by an adequate nutrition, a simple and not expensive intervention, and associated to physical exercise reduce the incidence of mortality rate. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  9. Hepcidin regulation in the anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Yu; Babitt, Jodie L

    2016-05-01

    Anemia is prevalent in patients with infections and other inflammatory conditions. Induction of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin has been implicated in the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation. This review outlines recent discoveries in understanding how hepcidin and its receptor ferroportin are regulated, how they contribute to anemia of inflammation, and how this knowledge may help guide new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this disease. IL-6 is a primary driver for hepcidin induction in many models of anemia of inflammation, but the SMAD1/5/8 pathway also contributes, likely via Activin B and SMAD-STAT3 interactions at the hepcidin promoter. Hepcidin has an important functional role in many, but not all forms of anemia of inflammation, although hepcidin-independent mechanisms also contribute. In certain populations, hepcidin assays may help target therapy with iron or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to patients who may benefit most. New therapies targeting the hepcidin-ferroportin axis have shown efficacy in preclinical and early clinical studies. Recent studies confirm an important role for the hepcidin-ferroportin axis in the development of anemia of inflammation, but also highlight the diverse and complex pathogenesis of this disorder depending on the underlying disease. Hepcidin-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies offer promise to improve anemia treatment, but more work is needed in this area.

  10. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L) and severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration <70 g/L) and individual-level (age, anthropometric measures, micronutrient deficiencies, malaria, and inflammation) and household-level predictors; we also examined the proportion of anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration <12 μg/L). Countries were grouped into 4 categories on the basis of risk and burden of infectious disease, and a pooled multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted for each group. Results: Iron deficiency, malaria, breastfeeding, stunting, underweight, inflammation, low socioeconomic status, and poor sanitation were each associated with anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by

  11. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins,more » histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.« less

  12. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... dark green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and broccoli iron-fortified foods, such as breads and cereals ( ... dark green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and broccoli asparagus beans peas lentils bananas, oranges, and orange ...

  13. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... copy by e-mailing a request to the Blood Publishing Office . Patient Groups A list of Web links to patient groups and other organizations that provide information. back to top ASH ... Blood Blood Advances The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH ...

  14. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted ... Nutrition Heart Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted ...

  15. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  16. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  17. Clinical management of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E; Brodsky, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is a potentially fatal bone marrow failure disorder that is characterized by pancytopenia and a hypocellular bone marrow. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for young patients who have a matched sibling donor. Immunosuppression with either anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine or high-dose cyclophosphamide is an effective therapy for patients who are not suitable BMT candidates owing to age or lack of a suitable donor. Results of BMT from unrelated and mismatched donors are improving, but presently this treatment option is best reserved for those patients who do not respond, relapse or develop secondary clonal disorders following immunosuppressive therapy. Efforts are currently underway to both improve immunosuppressive regimens and to expand the application of BMT. PMID:21495931

  18. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  19. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  20. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    PubMed

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  1. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  2. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  3. Anemia: progress in molecular mechanisms and therapies.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to both the understanding of frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that are likely to benefit from new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease); rare genetic disorders of RBC production; and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new approaches to treatment include drugs that target recently defined pathways in RBC production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin-family gene expression, as well as gene therapies that use improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies.

  4. Social reproduction and anemia in infancy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Elizabeth; Duarte, Luciane Simões; Minagawa, Aurea Tamami; Laurenti, Daniela; Montero, Rosali Maria Juliano Marcondes

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between anemia in infancy and the social reproduction profile of the families. It was conducted with a representative sample of 254 children of the city of Itupeva, SP. Hemoglobin < 11 g/dL, determined by portable hemoglobin analyzer, was used to define anemia. Profiles of social reproduction had been built by 2 groups of indicators: working and living conditions. Three social homogeneous groups had been defined: upper, intermediate, lower. Anemia was prevalent in 41.7%, and more frequent in lower social groups (13.2%; 40.6%; 46.2%), but with no significant difference (p>0.05). However, profile of social reproduction of anemic families showed significant difference (p<0.05). Occurrence of anemia was related to poor working conditions in lower social groups and consequently inappropriate living conditions.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... developing certain cancers, including a cancer of blood-forming tissue known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ... proteins may increase the self-destruction of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, resulting in anemia. ...

  6. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Advancements in anemias related to chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lechi Santonastaso, Clara

    2010-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD), the most frequent anemia among hospitalized patients, occurs in chronic inflammatory disorders, such as chronic infections, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Different causes contribute to ACD including diversion of iron traffic, diminished erythropoiesis, blunted response to erythropoietin, erythrophagocytosis, hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. A particular case of ACD is represented by anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACD is characterized by hyposideremia and altered iron transport. Cytokines are implicated in the ACD by reducing erythropoiesis and increasing iron sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The regulation of iron absorption across the epithelium of the proximal small intestine is essential for maintaining body iron concentrations within a physiologically defined range. Hepcidin controls cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export protein ferroportin, causing ferroportin to be phosphorylated and degraded in lysosomes. Finally, hepcidin inhibits iron release from the reticulo-endothelial system. Increased expression of hepcidin leads to decreased iron absorption and iron deficient anemia. Hepcidin, therefore, is a negative regulator of iron transport in plasma. Causes of anemia in patients with CKD are multifactorial, but the most well-known cause is inadequate erythropoietin production. In these patients, anemia increases the risk of either cardiovascular disease or renal failure.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of macrocytic anemias in adults.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Takayo; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2017-10-01

    Anemia is one of the most common health problems in the primary care setting. Macrocytosis in adults is defined as a red blood cell (RBC) mean corpuscular volume (MCV) >100 femtoliter (fL). Macrocytic anemias are generally classified into megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia is caused by deficiency or impaired utilization of vitamin B12 and/or folate, whereas nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia is caused by various diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), liver dysfunction, alcoholism, hypothyroidism, certain drugs, and by less commonly inherited disorders of DNA synthesis. Macrocytic anemias are treated with cause-specific therapies, and it is crucial to differentiate nonmegaloblastic from megaloblastic anemia. Because MDS and myeloid neoplasms commonly affect the elderly, primary care physicians may encounter more cases of macrocytic anemias in the near future, as the older population increases. When MDS is suspected along with leukocytopenia and/or thrombocytopenia with anemia, a hematology consultation may be appropriate.

  9. Older people's perception of anemia in rural southwest Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mugisha, Joseph O; Kuper, Hannah; Seeley, Janet

    2014-03-01

    To describe older people's perceptions of anemia in a rural Ugandan population. Quantitative and qualitative data on anemia were collected from participants aged ≥50 years from January 2012 to January 2013 using questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Quantitative data were collected from 1,455 participants. Qualitative data were collected from 10 people who were purposively selected. Data were analyzed using STATA software and thematic content analysis. 33.8% men and 17.4% women had anemia. Older people perceived themselves to be anemic because of symptoms and beliefs about causes. Those with anemia were more likely to perceive that they had anemia (18.4% vs. 10.2%, p < .001). Poor diet, diseases, poor living conditions, and over work were mentioned as causes of anemia. Use of traditional methods for treating anemia was common. Anemia prevention and control programs in Uganda should target older people and correct misconceptions about the causes and treatment of anemia.

  10. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  11. Zopiclone induced methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2014-05-01

    To characterize the risk of methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following large overdoses of zopiclone, a cyclopyrrolone hypnotic-sedative and a racemic mixture of R-zopiclone and S-zopiclone (eszopiclone). This review included all reports of zopiclone induced methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia, and oxidative stress that had been published in medical journals or discussed in continuous medical education (CME) programs. These reports were identified by searching the Medline (1980 - December 9, 2013), China Journal Net (1994 - December 2013), and Google Scholar, using zopiclone, eszopiclone, methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia, and oxidative stress as the search terms. Six cases of methemoglobinemia, one case of methemoglobinemia, with concomitant hemolytic anemia, and one case of hemolytic anemia were identified. These complications occurred after large zopiclone overdoses (450 - 3,750, 1,125 - 1,500, and 375 - 750 mg, respectively, i.e., 60 - 500, 150 - 200, and 50 - 100 times the daily dose of 7.5 mg). The resulting methemoglobinemia could be severe (19.4 - 24.5%), while the hemolytic anemia was mild (Hb 9.0 - 9.6 g/dL). Molecular modelling analyses indicate that eszopiclone and its two metabolites will be kinetically labile. Their molecular surfaces have significant amounts of electron-deficient regions. All three compounds are expected to react with cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, causing its depletion and oxidative stress. After large overdoses, zopiclone, alone or together with its metabolites, most probably causes oxidative stress in erythrocytes to account for the methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia. Further studies are required to determine their incidence and the dose-related capacity of zopiclone and its metabolites in producing erythrocyte oxidative stress.

  12. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  13. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  14. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel/Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemiamore » and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation

  15. Drug-induced hemolytic anemia: Pharmacological aspects.

    PubMed

    Renard, D; Rosselet, A

    2017-09-01

    Drug-induced hemolytic anemia is a very rare but potentially lethal adverse drug reaction, which can take the form of oxidative damage to vulnerable erythrocytes (as in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency), drug-induced thrombotic microangiopathy, or immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. For each form, distinctive drugs are documented as potential triggers. When a formal diagnosis of hemolytic anemia is made following drug administration, a structured approach is recommended to assess the plausibility of an adverse drug reaction based on chronological sequence, epidemiological data, objective evidence (when available), and ruling out of non-drug causes. For suspicions of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, investigations by a laboratory with specific expertise are crucial given the complexity of the field. If there is good reason to believe hemolytic anemia is drug-induced, immediate drug discontinuation is necessary and corticosteroid administration can be considered. The clinical pharmacology specialist can support evaluation of drug imputability and report the case to the pharmacovigilance system, an important last step in managing such events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2009-10-01

    Inherited sideroblastic anemia comprises several rare anemias due to heterogeneous genetic lesions, all characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow. This morphological aspect reflects abnormal mitochondrial iron utilization by the erythroid precursors. The most common X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA), due to mutations of the first enzyme of the heme synthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), has linked heme deficiency to mitochondrial iron accumulation. The identification of other genes, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette B7 (ABCB7) and glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), has strengthened the role of iron sulfur cluster biogenesis in sideroblast formation and revealed a complex interplay between pathways of mitochondrial iron utilization and cytosolic iron sensing by the iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs). As recently occurred with the discovery of the SLC25A38-related sideroblastic anemia, the identification of the genes responsible for as yet uncharacterized forms will provide further insights into mitochondrial iron metabolism of erythroid cells and the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia syndrome usually require insulin to treat their diabetes . In some cases, treatment with thiamine can reduce the amount of insulin ... Genetic Testing Registry: Megaloblastic anemia, thiamine-responsive, with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness ... Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related ...

  18. Association pernicious anemia and autoimmune polyendocrinopathy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zulfiqar, AA; Andres, E

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases. Methods: This retrospective and bicentric study was conducted at Reims and Strasbourg University Hospitals and involved 188 patients with pernicious anemia examined between 2000 and 2010 in order to search for other autoimmune diseases and to evaluate the role of pernicious anemia in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Results: A total of 74 patients with a combination of pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases were included in the study. Our study revealed the privileged association of pernicious anemia with autoimmune thyroiditis. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis are a part of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3b. Conclusion: We suggest undertaking a systematic clinical examination and laboratory investigations in search of autoimmune thyroiditis in patient(s) with the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis is frequent and a part of autoimmune polyglandular 3b. PMID:29362601

  19. Association pernicious anemia and autoimmune polyendocrinopathy: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zulfiqar, A A; Andres, E

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association between pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases. This retrospective and bicentric study was conducted at Reims and Strasbourg University Hospitals and involved 188 patients with pernicious anemia examined between 2000 and 2010 in order to search for other autoimmune diseases and to evaluate the role of pernicious anemia in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. A total of 74 patients with a combination of pernicious anemia and other autoimmune diseases were included in the study. Our study revealed the privileged association of pernicious anemia with autoimmune thyroiditis. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis are a part of the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3b. We suggest undertaking a systematic clinical examination and laboratory investigations in search of autoimmune thyroiditis in patient(s) with the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. The association of pernicious anemia and autoimmune thyroiditis is frequent and a part of autoimmune polyglandular 3b.

  20. Sickle Cell Anemia: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Disease Also called: Hemoglobin SS disease, Sickle cell anemia On this page Basics Summary Start Here Diagnosis ... red blood cells. This is a condition called anemia , and it can make you feel tired. The ...

  1. Anemia caused by low iron -- infants and toddlers

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron. Infants younger than 12 months who drink cow's milk rather than breast milk or iron-fortified formula are more likely to have anemia. Cow's milk leads to anemia because it: Has less iron ...

  2. ANEMIA PLUS HYPOPROTEINEMIA IN DOGS

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, G. H.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.

    1951-01-01

    Dogs with sustained anemia plus hypoproteinemia due to bleeding and a continuing low protein or protein-free diet containing abundant iron have been used in the present work to test food proteins and supplements as to their See PDF for Structure capacity to produce new hemoglobin and plasma proteins. The reserve stores of blood protein-producing materials are thus largely depleted in such animals and sustained levels of 6 to 8 gm. per cent hemoglobin and 4 to 5 gm. per cent plasma protein can be maintained for considerable periods of time. The stimulus of double depletion drives the body to use all protein building materials with the utmost conservation. This represents a severe biological test for food and body proteins and its assay value must have significance. Measured by this biological test in these experiments, casein stands well up among the best food proteins. The ratio of plasma protein to hemoglobin is about 40 to 50 per cent, which emphasizes the fact that these dogs produce on most diets about 2 gm. hemoglobin to 1 gm. plasma protein. The reason for this preference for hemoglobin production is obscure. The mass of circulating hemoglobin is greater even in this degree of anemia and the life cycle of hemoglobin is much longer than that of the plasma protein. Egg protein, egg albumin, and lactalbumin all favor the production of more plasma protein and less hemoglobin as compared with casein. The plasma protein to hemoglobin ratio is increased, sometimes above 100 per cent. Supplements to the above proteins of casein digests or several amino acids may return the response toward that which is standard for casein. Histidine as a supplement to egg protein increases the total blood protein output and brings the ratio of plasma protein to hemoglobin toward that of casein. Beef muscle goes to the other extreme and favors new hemoglobin production up to 4 gm. hemoglobin to 1 gm. plasma protein—a ratio of 25 per cent. The total amounts of new blood proteins are

  3. [Transfusion in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Germain, S; Brahimi, L; Rohrlich, P; Benkerrou, M; Gerota, I; Ballerini, P

    1999-01-01

    Although blood transfusion (BT) therapy remains a key component of the weaponry used to treat acute and chronic sickle cell disease complications, its indications and modalities are currently the focus of a critical reappraisal prompted by the introduction of hydroxyurea, recent improvements in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and increasing attention to safety concerns. Expected benefits of each BT should be carefully weighed against the risks of infections, immunologic complications, and iron overload. Simple or exchange BT can be used. In emergency situations, the only effective means of improving tissue oxygenation and limiting blood vessel occlusion is dilution or removal of HbS by simple or exchange BT, respectively; simple BT is indicated in severe anemia or acute hypovolemia and exchange BT in acute vasoocclusive crisis or acute infection. In nonemergency situations, long-term exchange BT programs geared to maintain the HbS level around 30% are used to stabilize existing lesions and to prevent recurrences; they have been proved effective in preventing recurrent stroke in patients who are not candidates for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Situations in which BT therapy is widely used despite controversy regarding its value and modalities include the prevention of complications of pregnancy, the prevention of perioperative complications, and the prevention of recurrences of severe vaso occlusive crisis in patients eligible for hydroxyurea therapy. Advances have been made in the minimization of BT-related complications (alloimmunization, viral infections, iron overload) through critical appraisal of the need for each BT, careful selection of the most appropriate blood product, and a change in BT technique resulting in a reduction in the number of blood donors.

  4. Patterns and Predictors of Severe Postpartum Anemia after Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Butwick, Alexander. J.; Walsh, Eileen. M.; Kuzniewicz, Michael; Li, Sherian.X.; Escobar, Gabriel.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postpartum anemia is associated with maternal and perinatal morbidity. Population-level data may inform guideline development for postpartum anemia screening. Our objectives were to evaluate the associations between potential predictors (predelivery anemia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)) with severe postpartum anemia after cesarean section. Study Design and Methods Data were collected from 70,939 hospitalizations for cesarean section performed at Kaiser Permanente Northern California facilities between 2005 and 2013. Severe postpartum anemia was defined as a hemoglobin < 8 g/dl before hospital discharge. Using multivariable logistic regression, we assessed the associations between predelivery anemia and PPH with severe postpartum anemia. Distributions of these characteristics among women with severe postpartum anemia were evaluated. Results The overall rate of severe postpartum anemia was 7.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 7.1 – 7.4. Severe postpartum anemia was strongly associated with a predelivery hemoglobin between 10 and 10.9 g/dl (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.4; 95% CI = 4.89– 5.91), predelivery hemoglobin <10 g/dl (aOR 30.6; 95% CI = 27.21– 34.6, and PPH (aOR 8.45; 95% CI = 7.8–9.16). The proportions of women with severe postpartum anemia were highest for those experiencing PPH but no predelivery anemia (12.2%; 95% CI = 11.0 – 13.6), and those who did not incur PPH nor predelivery anemia (10.7%; 95% CI = 9.6 – 12.0). Conclusions Our findings suggest that PPH and predelivery anemia are strong independent risk factors for severe postpartum anemia. Optimization of patients’ hemoglobin prior to delivery may reduce the incidence of severe anemia after cesarean section. PMID:27618767

  5. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients.

  6. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Association of anemia with cognition among senior female in China].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi; Shi, Xiao-Ming; Qian, Han-Zhu; Fitzgerald, Simon Michael; Zeng, Yi; Yin, Zhao-Xue; Xu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Yu-Zhi

    2011-09-01

    To explore the relationship between anemia and cognitive function among senior female aged 90 years old and above in longevity regions in China. 383 senior female in 5 longevity areas from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) 2008 - 2009 were included in the study. The cognitive function was assessed by mini mental state examination (MMSE) scale. All subjects were administered the physical examinations and biochemical testing of blood, including the hemoglobin. The difference of cognitive function between those with and without anemia was analyzed. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between anemia and cognitive function. The 383 subjects were divided into two groups, 141 in anemia group and 242 in group without anemia. The total score of cognitive function was 9.65 ± 9.32 in anemia group, and 13.06 ± 10.25 in group without anemia (χ(2) = 5.59, P < 0.05). The percentage of cognition impairment was 84.4% (119/141) in anemia group, and 72.3% (175/242) in group without anemia (χ(2) = 8.08, P < 0.05). In the multivariable logistic regressions, after adjustment for age, education, marital status, smoking and alcohol drinking, the risk for cognition impairment in anemia group was about twice of that in group without anemia (OR = 2.016, 95%CI: 1.185 - 3.431, P = 0.010). Anemia increases the risk of cognition impairment among senior female in Chinese longevity areas.

  8. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin <5mg/dL, reticulocytosis, and positive direct antiglobulin test (IgG, C3d, warm). Additional workup revealed serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) <0.01μIU/mL and serum free-T4 (FT4) level 7.8ng/dL. Our patient was diagnosed with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  10. Idiopathic aplastic anemia: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Dolberg, Osnat Jarchowsky; Levy, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a disease characterized by pancytopenia and hypoplastic bone marrow caused by the decrease of hematopoietic stem cells. The pathogenesis of AA is complex and involves an abnormal hematopoietic microenvironment, hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell deficiencies and immunity disorders. Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive and biologic drugs, and supportive care. Herein, we will update the main issues concern AA according to our literature review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Hidden Anemias in the Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    With increasing knowledge of the risks associated with receiving blood transfusions, a new paradigm of bloodless medicine is needed. Principles of bloodless medicine include careful monitoring for obvious and hidden anemias, rapid intervention, minimizing blood losses from laboratory testing and procedures, and careful management of bleeding diatheses. As evidence is revealed and refined, standard treatment of anemia in the intensive care unit will include erythropoietin-stimulating agents, iron, folate, and vitamin B12, which will reduce risks associated with blood transfusions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012).

    PubMed

    Le, Chi Huu Hong

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40-49 years and 80-85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80-85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003-2004 to 2011-2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention.

  14. Pathophysiology of anemia in chronic kidney diseases: A review.

    PubMed

    Zadrazil, Josef; Horak, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    Backgroud. Anemia is one of the laboratory and clinical findings of chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The presence of anemia in patients with CKD has a wide range of clinically important consequences. Some of the symptoms that were previously attributed to reduced renal function are, in fact, a consequence of anemia. Anemia contributes to increased cardiac output, the development of left ventricular hypertrophy, angina, and congestive heart failure. According to current knowledge, anemia also contributes to the progression of CKD and is one of the factors that contribute to the high morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic renal failure and their reduced survival. MEDLINE search was performed to collect both original and review articles addressing anemia in CKD, pathophysiology of renal anemia, erythropoiesis, erythropoietin, iron metabolism, inflammation, malnutrition, drugs, renal replacement therapy and anemia management The present review summarized current knowledge in the field of the pathophysiology of renel anemia. Understanding the pathophysiology of anemia in CKD is crucial for the optimal treatment of anemia according to recent clinical practice guidelines and recommendation, and correct recognition of causes of resistence to treatment of erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA).

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  16. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  17. Treatment of cancer-related anemia.

    PubMed

    Badzek, Sasa; Curić, Zvonimir; Krajina, Zdenko; Plestina, Stjepko; Golubić-Cepulić, Branka; Radman, Ivo

    2008-06-01

    Anemia with consequent tissue hypoxia is common problem in cancer patients. Developed via various patophysiological mechanisms, it has deleterious effect on quality of life and survival of patients with cancer. Recognition of symptoms and timely initiation of treatment improve patients' quality of life, as well as efficacy of oncological treatment. Red blood cells transfusions are well known and efficient way of anemia correction. They are "golden standard" in treatment of cancer-related anemia today, and are unavoidable in almost all patients with hemoglobin concentration below 80 g/L. Newest therapy guidelines in developed countries, supported by recent literature, encourage use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHu-EPO), although detailed meta-analyses and prospective randomized clinical trials have shown that rHu-EPO decreases the need for transfusions in only 9-45% patients with cancer, only if they have mild anemia, rHu-EPO increases incidence of thromboembolic events, and suspicion arises that it supports tumor cells growth and multiplication. Therefore, it is necessary to define subgroups of patients which are best candidates for rHu-EPO therapy, to accomplish lower intensity of transfusion therapy.

  18. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia caused by a low iron level can affect a child's ability to learn in school. A low iron level can cause decreased attention span, reduced alertness, and learning problems in children. A low iron level can cause the body to absorb too much lead.

  19. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  20. Aplastic anemia associated with lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, A. G.; Chaudhry, Z. A.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of fatal aplastic anemia developing in a 50-year-old woman who received lithium carbonate in the generally accepted dosage for a manic-depressive disorder. The serum lithium had been determined at regular intervals and never exceeded what is considered a safe level. Patients for whom lithium is prescribed should have periodic hematologic examinations. PMID:4691107

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in an urban slum.

    PubMed

    Hanumante, N M; Kanvinde, S; Sanwalka, N J; Vaidya, M V; Khadilkar, A V

    2008-04-01

    Of this pilot study was to assess the iron status and dietary intake of 1-3 year-old apparently healthy toddlers of the lower socio-economic class, and the effect of eight weeks intervention with liquid oral iron in an urban slum in Pune, India. 50 toddlers (M= 25, F= 25) with mean age of 2.4 years (SD 0.82) were evaluated. Anthropometry, Food Frequency Questionnaire, a hemogram and ferritin were measured. Twenty mg of elemental iron was given to all toddlers. After 8 weeks clinical examination, anthropometry, hemoglobin (HGB) and Ferritin were measured. Prevalence of anemia was 66% (HGB <11 gm %) and ferritin (iron stores) were low (< 12 microgm/L) in 45 (90%). After therapy prevalence of anemia was 30%. There was a significant difference in the HGB and ferritin levels of children after eight weeks of therapy (p<0.001). The prevalence of anemia decreased from 66 to 30% after treatment with liquid iron. We propose that all concerned in the care of toddlers should join the fight against anemia and prescribe iron to all toddlers when they are seen for minor ailments.

  2. [Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Homberg, J C

    1999-04-03

    AUTOANTIBODY PRODUCTION: The production of autoantibodies can only occur if immune tolerance is circumvented. Thus drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia requires that the drug have an effect on both autoantigens and on the immune system. AN EXAMPLE, METHYLDOPA: Methyldopa is a hypotensive agent which induces major production of anti-Rh IgG anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies, anti-nuclear antibodies and anti-actin antibodies. These autoantibodies generally appear 6 months after treatment onset and are observed in 20% of treated patients. Hemolysis is however exceptional and is only clinically or biologically perceptible in 1 to 2% of the patients who become immunized. Induced lupus has been reported as have been several dozen cases of drug-induced hepatitis with anti-actin autoantibodies. DRUGS INDUCING HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA: Besides methyldopa, other drugs known to induce hemolytic anemia include levodopa used for Parkinson's disease, mefenamic acid, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, interferon-alpha, used in chronic viral hepatitis, cyclosporin used for the prevention of graft rejection and the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases, and fludarabin, used in chronic lymphoid leukemia. If there is no clinical or biological expression, the drug can be continued, excepting fludarabin where regular controls are needed. If hemolytic anemia is patent, the drug must be discontinued, transfusion and corticosteroid therapy should be envisaged.

  3. Ecthyma gangrenosum associated with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Chun, W. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, L. S.; Ko, Y. W.; Bang, D.

    1996-01-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum is a characteristic skin lesion of systemic infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It has a high incidence in patients with chronic disease and impaired defense mechanisms. Early diagnosis and appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy is crucial since its mortality rate is very high. We report a case of ecthyma gangrenosum in aplastic anemia. PMID:8703372

  4. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location. PMID:21960747

  5. Cancer in Fanconi anemia, 1927-2001.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2003-01-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease associated with an abnormal response to DNA damage. Although FA is well known for the association of aplastic anemia and characteristic birth defects, leukemia and solid tumors also occur at a high rate in this group of patients. A review of all reported cases is informative with regard to the specific types of cancer, the ages at which they occur, and the cumulative probability of their development. Medline and bibliographies of publications were searched for articles containing "Fanconi's anemia" or "aplastic anemia" and all cases of FA from 1927 through 2001 were included in the database. Cancer cases were identified within these reports. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed using Stata7 software. One thousand three hundred cases of FA were identified. Nine percent had leukemia (primarily acute myeloid leukemia), 7% had myelodysplastic syndrome, 5% had solid tumors, and 3% had liver tumors. Patients with cancer were older than the cancer-free patients at the time of diagnosis of FA. The median age for cancer (including leukemia) was 16, compared with 68 in the general population. The most frequent solid tumors were aerodigestive and gynecological carcinomas. In approximately 25% of patients with cancer, the malignancy preceded the diagnosis of FA. If the competing risks of aplastic anemia and leukemia could be removed, the estimated cumulative probability of development of a solid tumor in FA patients is 76% by the age of 45 years. Carcinogenic pathways and cancer prevention, surveillance, and treatment can be studied to advantage in this genetic model of human cancer.

  6. Anemia for risk assessment of patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meneveau, Nicolas; Schiele, François; Seronde, Marie-France; Descotes-Genon, Vincent; Oettinger, Joanna; Chopard, Romain; Ecarnot, Fiona; Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2009-02-15

    In patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes, those with anemia are at higher risk. However, current risk score systems do not take into account the presence of anemia. The impact of anemia on mortality was studied, and its incremental predictive value was evaluated. Demographic, clinical, and biologic characteristics at admission, as well as treatments and mortality, were recorded for 1,410 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndromes. The incremental value of adding anemia information to risk score evaluation was determined using changes in the appropriateness of Cox models when anemia was added. Anemia was detected in 381 patients (27%). They were older, had more co-morbidities, had higher Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores, received fewer guideline-recommended treatments, and, as a result, had 4-fold higher mortality. When included in a prediction model based on the GRACE risk score, anemia remained an independent predictor of mortality. The addition of anemia improved both the discriminatory capacity and calibration of the models. According to the GRACE risk score, the population was divided into 4 groups of different risk levels of <1%, 1% to <5%, 5% to <10%, and > or =10%. The addition of anemia to the model made it possible to reclassify 9%, 43%, 47%, and 23% of patients into the different risk categories, respectively. In conclusion, our data confirmed that anemia was an independent predictive factor of mortality and had incremental predictive value to the GRACE score system for early clinical outcomes.

  7. [Comparison of the prevalence of anemia among elderly groups].

    PubMed

    Uno, Hisamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Although anemia is common among the elderly, available data for anemia among them are limited in Japan. The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of anemia among elderly groups, and evaluate factors attributable to anemia. We enrolled 284 elderly residents in 2 long-term health care facilities, and 1,019 people aged 65 and over who visited outpatient clinics for medical checkups in 1 hospital all located in urban areas in Hiroshima. Hematological data from the 2004 National Nutrition Survey in Japan were cited for comparison. Based on the WHO criteria for anemia, more than half of the residents in both health care facilities were anemic, regardless of gender. However, the prevalence of anemia among elderly people visiting outpatient clinics at hospital was only about 6% for both genders. Analysis of underlying diseases among residents of the health care facility did not reveal any association between a particular disease and anemia. Total serum protein values were significantly lower in the elderly in health care facilities than in those of the elderly of the outpatient clinics, and they showed weak statistical correlations with anemic state in the former group. Finally, the elderly in outpatient clinics showed significantly lower prevalence of anemia compared to the elderly in the National Nutrition Survey in Japan, partly due to selection bias. The prevalence of anemia in the elderly covered a broad spectrum depending on the group examined. Anemia in the elderly was an indicator of comorbidity.

  8. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Martin, Alison; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of “anemia of unknown etiology” and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders. Methods This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient’s anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities. Conclusions We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology. PMID:27310832

  9. Anemia after bariatric surgery: more than just iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    von Drygalski, Annette; Andris, Deborah A

    2009-01-01

    Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is rapidly gaining popularity. Restrictive and/or malabsorptive surgical interventions result in dramatic weight loss with significantly decreased obesity-related morbidity and mortality. Anemia, which may affect as many as two-thirds of these patients, is of concern and generally thought to be caused by iron deficiency. Although iron deficiency in this population may be frequent given pouch hypoacidity, defunctionalized small bowel, and red meat intolerance, it may not account for all anemias seen. First, there is increasing evidence that obesity creates a state of chronic inflammation. Both iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic inflammation present with low serum iron levels. Most studies reporting anemia after bariatric surgery lack serum ferritin determinations so that the relative contribution of inflammation to anemia cannot be assessed. Second, a significant number of anemias after bariatric surgery remain unexplained and may be attributable to less frequently seen micronutrient deficiencies such as copper, fatsoluble vitamins A and E, or an imbalance in zinc intake. Third, although deficiencies of folate and vitamin B(12) are infrequent, study observation periods may be too short to detect anemia attributable to vitamin B(12) deficiency because vitamin B(12) storage depletion takes many years. This review is intended to increase awareness of the mechanisms of anemia above and beyond iron deficiency in the bariatric patient and provide healthcare providers with tools for a more thoughtful approach to anemia in this patient population.

  10. Characteristics of anemia in subclinical and overt hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Mehmet, Erdogan; Kösenli, Aybike; Aybike, Kosenli; Ganidagli, Sencer; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Mustafa, Kulaksizoglu

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones stimulate directly or indirectly growth of erythroid colonies through erythropoietin. Anemia is often the first sign of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can cause a wide variety of anemic disorders. Numerous mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of these anemias that can be microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic. We designed this study to investigate the anemia frequency and if present, etiology of anemia in hypothyroid patients. 100 patients with overt hypothyroid, 100 patients with subclinical hypothyroid, and 200 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Overt hypothyroidism diagnosis is done when elevated TSH and low levels of free T4 and/or free T3 have been observed. Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined as elevated serum TSH with normal free T(4) and free T(3) levels. Peripheral smears of the anemic patients were examined. Anemia prevalence was 43% in the overt hypothyroid group, 39% in the subclinical hypothyroid group, and 26% in the control group (p=0.0003 and p=0.021 respectively related to controls). Thus, the frequency of anemia in subclinical hypothyroidism is as high as that in overt hypothyroidism. There was no difference between the hypothyroid groups in terms of anemia. Vitamin B12, Fe, and folic acid were similar between these groups. According to our findings, anemia of chronic disease is the most common type of anemia in hypothyroid patients. Suspicion of hypothyroidism should be considered in anemias with uncertain etiology.

  11. Distal limb anomalies in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia.

    PubMed

    Amir, Achiya Zvi; Horev, Gadi; Yacobovich, Joanne; Bennett, Michael; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-02-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are a group of rare genetic disorders characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and the development of secondary hemochromatosis. Distal limb anomalies are a well-documented though rare feature of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, that have not been reported so far in other types. We describe a patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II and four members of a family with clinical features of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III with distal limb anomalies. The patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II presented with bilateral complete osseous syndactyly of the hands, and bilateral complete cutaneous syndactyly of feet. Three of the four affected family members with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III had partial absence of fingers, small or absent nails, overlapping toes, and short metatarsals. We suggest that similar to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, distal anomalies may appear in some patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia types II and III. Patients presenting with anemia and distal limb anomalies should be further investigated for the presence of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anemia and Its Effect on Cardiovascular Findings in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Öner; Demircan, Tülay; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Kızılca, Özgür; Kuyum, Pınar; Kır, Mustafa; Abacı, Ayhan; Ünal, Nurettin; Arslan, Nur; Böber, Ece; Yılmaz, Şebnem; Ören, Hale

    2018-04-18

    We assessed the effect of anemia on cardiovascular findings in obese adolescents. We studied 29 anemic, 33 nonanemic obese adolescents, and 33 nonobese healthy adolescents. These three groups were investigated for clinical and laboratory features of anemia and obesity. Echocardiography was used to examine cardiac functions. The anemia was mild (mean hemoglobin 11.67±0.79g/dL), ferritin level was significantly low, and CRP and fibrinogen levels were significantly high in anemic obese patients. Increased cardiac pulse and echocardiographic findings which may be indicative of early left ventricular diastolic dysfunction were present in these patients. Anemia may develop due to iron deficiency and chronic inflammation in obese adolescents. Even mild anemia may cause increased heart rate and affect left ventricular diastolic functions. So diet programmes of obese children should be carefully planned to avoid iron deficiency anemia, which may worsen the cardiac events in long term follow-up.

  13. Gas ionizado alrededor de la estrella WR AB7 en la Nube Menor de Magallanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez Benitez, S.; Niemela, V. S.

    En base a observaciones espectroscópicas en el rango óptico, obtenidas en el CASLEO, se estudian las condiciones físicas de la región HII N76 alrededor de la estrella AB7, en la Nube Menor de Magallanes. En esta región se observa la línea nebular de HeII 4686 Å. Utilizando líneas nebulares de diagnóstico, se derivan los valores de la densidad y la temperatura electrónica, así como también las abundancias de los elementos químicos nebulares.

  14. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Gal; Boodhan, Sabrina; Wurman, Ilana; Koren, Gideon; Bitnun, Ari; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Ito, Shinya

    2014-12-01

    To describe a case of ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia (CIIHA) in a 6 year-old boy with sickle cell disease (SCD) and perform a systematic literature review to delineate the clinical and laboratory features of this condition. EMBASE (1947-January 2014), MEDLINE (1946-January 2014), and databases from the US Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada were searched, using anemia, hemolytic anemia, hemolysis, and ceftriaxone as search terms. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. All case reports and observational studies describing clinical and laboratory features of CIIHA were included. A total of 37 eligible reports of CIIHA were identified, including our index case, and 70% were children. Mortality was 30% in all age groups and 64% in children. The majority of patients had underlying conditions (70%), of which SCD was most commonly reported. Previous ceftriaxone exposure was reported in 65%. Common features included elevated lactate dehydrogenase (70%); early, new-onset hemoglobinuria (59%); acute renal failure (46%); positive direct antibody testing (70%); and anticeftriaxone antibodies (68%). Also, 32% had a preceding, unrecognized, hemolytic episode associated with ceftriaxone. Given the common use of ceftriaxone worldwide, knowledge of CIIHA, which often goes undiagnosed until late in the course, is essential for clinicians. Based on the findings of this review, we suggest obtaining past history of ceftriaxone exposures and screening for new-onset hemoglobinuria during ceftriaxone therapy in selected patients as potential methods for early diagnosis of this rare but potentially fatal condition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    PubMed

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The cutting edge of aplastic anemia treatment.

    PubMed

    Obara, Naoshi

    2017-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a syndrome in which hematopoietic stem cells are decreased and bone marrow hypoplasia and pancytopenia are observed; it is considered as a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Recently, it has been reported that gene mutations suggestive of clonal hematopoiesis are detected in approximately one third of the patients with aplastic anemia. Among treatment approaches other than hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) plus cyclosporin is a basic approach, although it has been shown that eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, is effective and that the recovery of hematopoiesis in three blood lineage is observed in some patients. Studies on the optimum dose of ATG are in progress. Regarding hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aplastic anemia, regimens are being designed in which cyclophosphamide as a pretreatment is reduced and fludarabine is instead used in combination for the reduction of cardiotoxicity. Because HLA haploidentical transplantation has been developed and its reports are increasing for patients who cannot find appropriate donors, transplantation may be possible in patients who had previously given up on it.

  17. Prevalence of Anemia in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Mujica-Coopman, María F; Brito, Alex; López de Romaña, Daniel; Ríos-Castillo, Israel; Coris, Héctor; Olivares, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    In Latin America and the Caribbean, anemia has been a public health problem that affects mainly women of childbearing age and children under 6 years of age. However, the current prevalence of anemia in this region is unknown. To examine the latest available prevalence data on anemia in Latin America and the Caribbean. A systematic review was conducted in 2011 and updated in 2014. Studies determining the prevalence of anemia conducted in apparently healthy populations with national or regional representativeness were included in the review. The lowest prevalence rates of anemia among children under 6 years of age were found in Chile (4.0%), Costa Rica (4.0%), Argentina (7.6%), and Mexico (19.9%). In Nicaragua, Brazil, Ecuador, El Panama, and Honduras, anemia was a moderate public health problem, with prevalence ranging Salvador, Cuba, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Peru, from 20.1% to 37.3%. Anemia was a severe public health problem in Guatemala, Haiti, and Bolivia. The prevalence of anemia among women of childbearing age was lowest in Chile (5.1%). In Colombia, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Honduras, and Argentina, anemia was a mild public health problem, with prevalence ranging from 7.6% to 18.7%. In Guatemala, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and Bolivia, anemia was a moderate public health problem, with prevalence ranging from 21.4% to 38.3%. Panama and Haiti had the highest reported prevalence rates (40.0% and 45.5%, respectively), and anemia was considered a severe public health problem in those countries. Anemia remains a public health problem in children under 6 years of age and women of childbearing age in most Latin America and Caribbean countries for which data are available.

  18. Incidence and patterns of hemolytic anemia in acute dapsone overdose.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yong Sung; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Juwon; Kim, Oh Hyun; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic anemia is one of the complications related to the chronic consumption of dapsone. However, in acute dapsone overdose, there have been few case reports regarding hemolytic anemia. Herein, we reported the prevalence and patterns of hemolytic anemia in acute dapsone overdose, and compared clinical features including mortality in the non-hemolytic anemia and the hemolytic anemia groups. We conducted a retrospective review of 43 consecutive acute dapsone overdose cases that were diagnosed and treated at the emergency department of the Wonju Severance Christian Hospital between January 2006 and January 2014. There were 13 male patients (30.2%) and the ages of all patients ranged from 18 to 93 years with a median of 67 years. The ingested dose varied from a minimum of two 100-mg tablet to a maximum of twenty five 100-mg tablets. All patients had methemoglobinemia irrespective of the presence of hemolytic anemia. Among 43 patients, 30 patients (69.8%) were shown to have hemolytic anemia and hemolytic anemia developed the day after admission and persisted for more than 6 days after admission. Even though mortality rate was not significantly higher in the hemolytic anemia group, the hemolytic anemia group had significantly longer total admission and intensive care unit admission stays than the non-hemolytic group. A significant proportion of the patients with acute dapsone overdose is associated with occurrence of hemolytic anemia. Hemolytic anemia may be developed the day after admission and persisted for more than 6 days after admission. Therefore, monitoring of serum hemoglobin level is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anemia and digestive diseases: An update for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Gomollón, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2009-01-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are so common in digestive diseases that often are underestimated and undertreated. Our goal is to review from classification to treatment of the diverse types of anemias in different digestive diseases to update our knowledge on diagnosis and treatment. With the goal of improving the prognosis and quality of life of digestive diseases patients, we will review current transfusion, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin roles in the treatment of anemia. PMID:19787823

  20. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0590 TITLE: SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: KATHLEEN M...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0590 SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT: Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a disorder that results in pure red cell aplasia, congenital

  1. An unusual case of anemia in a cardiac transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Elizabeth; Raj, Ashok; Sparks, Joshua

    2018-04-11

    Anemia is a well-described comorbidity in patients with heart failure and has been associated with decreased survival rates after heart transplant. The causes of anemia are broad, and identification of the underlying etiology is critical for management. Herein, we report an unusual case of severe anemia complicating cardiac transplantation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Iron deficiency anemia--bridging the knowledge and practice gap.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Auerbach, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey; Ershler, William B; Ghiglione, Mary; Glaspy, John; Lew, Indu

    2014-07-01

    Despite its high prevalence, anemia often does not receive proper clinical attention, and detection, evaluation, and management of iron deficiency anemia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis can possibly be an unmet medical need. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians with expertise in anemia management convened and reviewed recent published data on prevalence, etiology, and health implications of anemia as well as current therapeutic options and available guidelines on management of anemia across various patient populations and made recommendations on the detection, diagnostic approach, and management of anemia. The available evidence confirms that the prevalence of anemia is high across all populations, especially in hospitalized patients. Anemia is associated with worse clinical outcomes including longer length of hospital stay, diminished quality of life, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it is a modifiable risk factor of allogeneic blood transfusion with its own inherent risks. Iron deficiency is usually present in anemic patients. An algorithm for detection and management of anemia was discussed, which incorporated iron study (with primary emphasis on transferrin saturation), serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, and vitamin B12 and folic acid measurements. Management strategies included iron therapy (oral or intravenous), erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and referral as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anemia among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cojulun, Alicia Chang; Bustinduy, Amaya L.; Sutherland, Laura J.; Mungai, Peter L.; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9–11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  4. Prenatal anemia control and anemia in children aged 6-23 months in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilunda, Calistus; Tanaka, Shiro; Esamai, Fabian; Kawakami, Koji

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear whether routine prenatal anemia control interventions can reduce anemia risk in young children. This study examines the associations between prenatal iron supplementation and/or deworming and anemia in children aged 6-23 months in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We analyzed data from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 2003 and 2014 in 25 SSA countries. The surveys collected data on prenatal iron supplementation and deworming and determined children's hemoglobin levels through blood testing. We assessed the associations between prenatal iron supplementation and/or deworming and anemia using multinomial logistic regression. The study included 31,815 mother-child pairs: 25.0%, 41.4%, and 4.8% of children had mild, moderate, and severe anemia, respectively. Compared with children whose mothers did not take iron and deworming drugs prenatally, the risk of moderate/severe anemia was reduced among children whose mothers took only iron supplements for ≥6 months (odds ratio [OR]: 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.45-0.76); only deworming drugs (OR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56-0.93); deworming drugs plus iron for <6 months (OR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.67-0.93); and deworming drugs plus iron for ≥6 months (OR: 0.77; 95% CI: 0.59-0.99). Prenatal use of only iron for <6 months was not associated with moderate/severe anemia. Prenatal iron and/or deworming drugs had no effect on mild anemia. Prenatal anemia control interventions are associated with reduced risk of moderate/severe anemia but not with mild anemia in young children in SSA. Iron supplements should be taken for ≥6 months or with deworming drugs prenatally to reduce moderate/severe anemia risk in children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40–49 years and 80–85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80–85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003–2004 to 2011–2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention. PMID:27846276

  6. Equine infectious anemia and equine infectious anemia virus in 2013: a review.

    PubMed

    Cook, R F; Leroux, C; Issel, C J

    2013-11-29

    A detailed description of equine infectious anemia virus and host responses to it are presented. Current control and eradication of the infection are discussed with suggestions for improvements to increase their effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Accuracy of anemia diagnosis by physical examination.

    PubMed

    Benseñor, Isabela Martins; Calich, Ana Luísa Garcia; Brunoni, André Russowsky; Espírito-Santo, Fábio Ferreira do; Mancini, Renato Lendimuth; Drager, Luciano Ferreira; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade

    2007-05-03

    Quantification of clinical signs such as the presence or absence of pallor at clinical examination is a key step for making diagnoses. The aim was, firstly, to evaluate two methods for anemia diagnosis by physical examination: four-level evaluation (crosses method: +/++/+++/++++) and estimated hemoglobin values, both performed by medical students and staff physicians; and secondly, to investigate whether there was any improvement in assessment accuracy according to the number of years in clinical practice. Forty-four randomly selected physicians and medical students in a tertiary care teaching hospital completed a physical examination on five patients with mild to severe anemia. The observers used four-level evaluation and also predicted the hemoglobin level. Both methods were compared with the real hemoglobin value as the gold standard. The mean estimated hemoglobin value correlated better with the real hemoglobin values than did the four-level evaluation method, for attending physicians, residents and students (Spearman's correlation coefficients, respectively: 1.0, 1.0 and 0.9 for guessed hemoglobin and -0.8, -0.8 and -0.7 for the four-level evaluation method). There were no differences in the mean "guessed" hemoglobin values from attending physicians, residents and students. However, the correlation between guessed hemoglobin value and the four-level method was positive for attending physicians, thus suggesting some kind of improvement with time (p = 0.04). This study showed that estimated hemoglobin was more accurate than evaluation by the four-level method. The number of years in clinical practice did not improve the accuracy of clinical examination for anemia.

  8. Hepatitis Associated Aplastic Anemia: A review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is an uncommon but distinct variant of aplastic anemia in which pancytopenia appears two to three months after an acute attack of hepatitis. HAAA occurs most frequently in young male children and is lethal if leave untreated. The etiology of this syndrome is proposed to be attributed to various hepatitis and non hepatitis viruses. Several hepatitis viruses such as HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV, HEV and HGV have been associated with this set of symptoms. Viruses other than the hepatitis viruses such as parvovirus B19, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein bar virus, Transfusion Transmitted virus (TTV) and non-A-E hepatitis virus (unknown viruses) has also been documented to develop the syndrome. Considerable evidences including the clinical features, severe imbalance of the T cell immune system and effective response to immunosuppressive therapy strongly present HAAA as an immune mediated mechanism. However, no association of HAAA has been found with blood transfusions, drugs and toxins. Besides hepatitis and non hepatitis viruses and immunopathogenesis phenomenon as causative agents of the disorder, telomerase mutation, a genetic factor has also been predisposed for the development of aplastic anemia. Diagnosis includes clinical manifestations, blood profiling, viral serological markers testing, immune functioning and bone marrow hypocellularity examination. Patients presenting the features of HAAA have been mostly treated with bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation from HLA matched donor, and if not available then by immunosuppressive therapy. New therapeutic approaches involve the administration of steroids especially the glucocorticoids to augment the immunosuppressive therapy response. Pancytopenia following an episode of acute hepatitis response better to hematopoietic cell transplantation than immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:21352606

  9. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Natasha; Duffy, Patrick E.; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to co-infections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world. PMID:24910614

  10. Post-Babesiosis Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Ann E; Montgomery, Mary W; Savage, William J; Achebe, Maureen O; Dunford, Kathleen; Villeda, Sarah; Maguire, James H; Marty, Francisco M

    2017-03-09

    Background Babesiosis, a tickborne zoonotic disease caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus babesia, is characterized by nonimmune hemolytic anemia that resolves with antimicrobial treatment and clearance of parasitemia. The development of warm-antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (also known as warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia [WAHA]) in patients with babesiosis has not previously been well described. Methods After the observation of sporadic cases of WAHA that occurred after treatment of patients for babesiosis, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all the patients with babesiosis who were cared for at our center from January 2009 through June 2016. Data on covariates of interest were extracted from the medical records, including any hematologic complications that occurred within 3 months after the diagnosis and treatment of babesiosis. Results A total of 86 patients received a diagnosis of babesiosis during the 7.5-year study period; 18 of these patients were asplenic. WAHA developed in 6 patients 2 to 4 weeks after the diagnosis of babesiosis, by which time all the patients had had clinical and laboratory responses to antimicrobial treatment of babesiosis, including clearance of Babesia microti parasitemia. All 6 patients were asplenic (P<0.001) and had positive direct antiglobulin tests for IgG and complement component 3; warm autoantibodies were identified in all these patients. No alternative explanation for clinical hemolysis was found. WAHA required immunosuppressive treatment in 4 of the 6 patients. Conclusions We documented post-babesiosis WAHA in patients who did not have a history of autoimmunity; asplenic patients appeared to be particularly at risk.

  11. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  12. Expectation of aplastic anemia following radiotherapy for malignancy. [Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kitabatake, T.; Sakai, K.; Saito, A.

    1978-10-01

    In Japan after 1969, 11 cases of aplastic anemia following radiotherapy for malignant disease were detected. The population at risk in irradiated patients was estimated at 674,664 man-years. The expected cases of aplastic anemia in this population were calculated as 10.1. There is no statistically significant difference between the expected and the observed values.

  13. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  14. Craving and Chewing Ice: A Sign of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... constantly craving and chewing ice a sign of anemia? Answers from Rajiv K. Pruthi, M.B.B.S. Possibly. Doctors use the term " ... often associated with iron deficiency, with or without anemia, although the reason is unclear. At least one ...

  15. Facts and artifacts about anemia and preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, M A; Shiono, P H; Berendes, H W; Rhoads, G G

    1989-07-28

    The effect of anemia (hematocrit less than or equal to 0.34) on subsequent preterm birth was prospectively studied in 35,423 pregnancies. The incidence of preterm birth among women with and without anemia at each week during the third trimester was compared. Early in the third trimester, there was a weak association between anemia and preterm delivery. However, anemia early in the third trimester did not account for the substantial increase in preterm birth seen among black women. Anemia after 30 weeks' gestation was not associated with preterm birth. Among women delivering term infants weighing 2500 g or more, the mean hematocrit rose 0.029 among black women and 0.021 among white women from 25 weeks to term. Compared with hematocrits at 40 weeks' gestation, the odds ratios for anemia reached a maximum at 28 weeks and fell sharply as term approached. When the hematocrits of women in term labor were compared with those of women in preterm labor, a spurious dose-response effect for anemia was created. We conclude that anemia is not a strong factor in the pathogenesis of preterm birth and that comparison of hematocrits from women who are in preterm and term labor produces biased results.

  16. An Etiologic Profile of Anemia in 405 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  17. [Evaluation of treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    O'Farrill-Santoscoy, Fernando; O'Farrill-Cadena, Marcela; Fragoso-Morales, Lilia Esperanza

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy is a condition that predisposes women to anemia, a problem which is easily solved with the identification of susceptible patients and with proper treatment. To determine the prevalence of anemia in the study group, the characteristics of the patients, and assess the impact of iron therapy in anemic pregnant women. A retrospective study was done in 98 pregnant patients who attended a medical office in San Luis Potosi, S.L.P, between 2010 and 2011. The studied variables were: hemoglobin and hematocrit concentration for anemia diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info-7 for the association between variables. The prevalence of anemia found in the study was 4.08% in the first weeks of gestation. 75% of those patients were overweight or obese, and as the pregnancy progressed prevalence increased to 16.32%. The patients whose anemia was detected between weeks 28-33 of gestation had 4.58 times the risk of having it than those who were detected in the first trimester (p < .05). While anemia was more frequent among women with overweight or obesity 5% (n = 3), no statistically significant difference with normal weight women was observed in early pregnancy. The prevalence of anemia increased as pregnancy progressed, therefore It is necessary that the physician requests the patient 3 or 4 blood studies to keep adequate prenatal care and have the opportunity for early detection of anemia.

  18. Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Janz, Timothy G; Johnson, Roy L; Rubenstein, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is a common worldwide problem that is associated with nonspecific complaints. The initial focus for the emergency evaluation of anemia is to determine whether the problem is acute or chronic. Acute anemia is most commonly associated with blood loss, and the patient is usually symptomatic. Chronic anemia is usually well tolerated and is often discovered coincidentally. Once diagnosed, the etiology of anemia can often be determined by applying a systematic approach to its evaluation. The severity of the anemia impacts clinical outcomes, particularly in critically ill patients; however, the specific threshold to transfuse is uncertain. Evaluation of the current literature and clinical guidelines does not settle this controversy, but it does help clarify that a restrictive transfusion strategy (ie, for patients with a hemoglobin < 6-8 g/dL) is associated with better outcomes than a more liberal transfusion strategy. Certain anemias may have well-defined treatment options (eg, sickle cell disease), but empiric use of nutritional supplements to treat anemia of uncertain etiology is discouraged.

  19. A case of splenic torsion with progressive anemia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Schnier, Lisa M

    2010-05-01

    A 4-year-old male, castrated Saint Bernard was evaluated for acute onset of lethargy and collapse. Moderately severe anemia and splenomegaly were noted. Immune mediated hemolytic anemia was initially suspected. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated an absence of splenic blood flow. Splenic torsion was confirmed on exploratory laparotomy and a splenectomy was performed.

  20. Students with Sickle Cell Anemia Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Devlin, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The participation of a student with Sickle Cell Anemia in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with Sickle Cell Anemia and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially the definition,…

  1. Iron deficiency anemia due to excessive green tea drinking.

    PubMed

    Fan, Frank S

    2016-11-01

    Tea interferes with iron absorption and can lead to iron deficiency anemia when consumed in large quantities. The rechallenge effect of green tea on anemia in a middle-aged man emphasizes the potential causal role of this beverage. Lifestyle and dietary habits are important diagnostic considerations in diseases of this type.

  2. Redefining normal hemoglobin and anemia in singleton and twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Shinar, Shiri; Shapira, Udi; Maslovitz, Sharon

    2018-04-10

    To assess the benefit of a hemoglobin cutoff of 105 g/L as a trigger for anemia evaluation during the second trimester of pregnancy. The present cross-sectional study, conducted at a health center in Israel between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015, included pregnant women with hemoglobin values below 105 g/L who were assessed for anemia. Anemia workup included complete blood count, serum ferritin and vitamin B12 measurements, and hemoglobin electrophoresis. The primary outcome was the incidence of nondilutional anemia, defined by a positive workup, across predefined hemoglobin thresholds. Receiver operating characteristic curves were created to identify the best hemoglobin threshold for predicting anemia, mandating further evaluation. In total, 651 women with singleton and 300 women with twin pregnancies were evaluated for nondilutional anemia. Of these, 340 (52.2%) and 127 (42.3%) women, respectively, had positive workup results. The most common cause was iron deficiency. The hemoglobin values that best predicted positive workup results were 100 g/L in singleton pregnancies and 97 g/L in twin pregnancies. Anemia evaluation could be unnecessary in pregnant women with a hemoglobin value of 100-105 g/L. Consideration should be given to redefining anemia in singleton and twin pregnancies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Ineffective Erythropoiesis: Anemia and Iron Overload.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritama; Musallam, Khaled M; Taher, Ali T; Rivella, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    Stress erythropoiesis (SE) is characterized by an imbalance in erythroid proliferation and differentiation under increased demands of erythrocyte generation and tissue oxygenation. β-thalassemia represents a chronic state of SE, called ineffective erythropoiesis (IE), exhibiting an expansion of erythroid-progenitor pool and deposition of alpha chains on erythrocyte membranes, causing cell death and anemia. Concurrently, there is a decrease in hepcidin expression and a subsequent state of iron overload. There are substantial investigative efforts to target increased iron absorption under IE. There are also avenues for targeting cell contact and signaling within erythroblastic islands under SE, for therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in sickle-cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E

    2009-04-01

    A 10-year-old African American girl with sickle-cell anemia developed headaches and seizures associated with hypertension during hospitalization for a pulmonary abscess. Hypertension developed after multiple transfusions, associated with abnormally high hematocrit and headache. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with posterior leukoencephalopathy. Neurologic signs, hypertension, and high hematocrit resolved after erythrocytapheresis. Magnetic resonance imaging, 1 month after the episode, produced normal results. Because reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome was only described in sickle-cell anemia during severe acute chest syndrome, this report documents that milder illness can be associated with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in sickle-cell anemia, and also highlights subtle signs that may herald serious neurologic events in high-risk patients. Examination of the pathophysiology of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in the context of sickle-cell anemia suggests that patients with sickle-cell anemia and subtle neurologic signs should be treated with high vigilance.

  6. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  7. Mild Anemia and Pregnancy Outcome in a Swiss Collective

    PubMed Central

    Bencaiova, Gabriela; Breymann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over half of all women in the world experience anemia during their pregnancy. Our aim was to investigate the relation between hemoglobin and iron status examined in second trimester and pregnancy outcome. Methods. In a prospective longitudinal study, 382 pregnant women were included. Blood samples were examined for hematological status and serum ferritin between 16 and 20 weeks and for hemoglobin before delivery. The adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were determined. Regression analysis was performed to establish if anemia and low serum ferritin are risk factors for pregnancy complications. Results. There was no increase of complications in women with mild anemia and in women with depleted iron stores. The finding showed that mild iron deficiency anemia and depleted iron stores are not risk factors for adverse outcomes in iron supplemented women. Conclusions. Mild anemia and depleted iron stores detected early in pregnancy were not associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in iron supplemented women. PMID:25478229

  8. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-06-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated.

  10. Hypocholesterolemia in chronic anemias with increased erythropoietic activity.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Knobler, Hilla; Tamary, Hannah

    2007-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemia of unknown etiology has been previously described in various chronic anemias. Few small studies also suggested that those patients have a lower incidence of atherosclerotic events. The aim of our study was to determine the extent of hypocholesterolemia in various types of anemias. We studied 59 patients with chronic anemias associated with high-erythropoietic activity (thalassemia intermedia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, congenital spherocytosis), 8 patients with low-erythropoietic activity anemias (acquired aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia), and 20 healthy controls. Mean serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (STR), and serum erythropoietin levels were determined in each patient. All patients with chronic anemia and increased erythropoietic activity had hypocholesterolemia, whereas none of those with low erythropoietic activity was hypocholesterolemic. Mean serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels were found to be significantly lower in the high-erythropoietic activity group (80+/-19 mg/dl; 31+/-10 mg/dl; 35+/-14 mg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.001, respectively) and the low-erythropoietic activity group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.01, respectively). Significant inverse correlation (R2=0.507) was observed between serum cholesterol and STR levels, which in the absence of iron deficiency reflect bone marrow activity. Taken together, our results imply that hypocholesterolemia accompanies anemias with high-erythropoietic activity. We suggest that the high-erythropoitic activity-associated hypocholesterolemia is due to increased cholesterol requirements by the proliferating erythoid cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and the possible clinical consequences of this phenomenon. Copyright (c

  11. Anemia and iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Wilson; Modotti, Caue; Nonino, Carla Barbosa; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are changes often associated with obesity. Bariatric surgery is responsible for increasing the iron loss and reducing its absorption. The objective of this study was to evaluate anemia and iron deficiency before and after bariatric surgery and to relate them to possible predisposing factors. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients submitted to open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, in which clinical and laboratory data were obtained up to 48 months postoperatively. Patients were divided into groups according to the presence or absence of anemia and to the presence or absence of iron deficiency (even without anemia), and all data were compared between these groups. Preoperatively, 21.5% of patients had anemia and 20% had iron deficiency. The number of patients with anemia did not vary through the 4 years of the study, but ferritin levels significantly decreased with time (P<.01). Younger patients and patients with greater weight loss had a higher incidence of anemia. Female gender was a variable associated with a greater incidence of iron deficiency. Anemia and iron deficiency are frequent in obese patients and must be treated before surgery. Medical and nutritional surveillance is important in the postoperative period of bariatric surgery. Management of each condition must be directed at correcting the 2 major sources of iron deficiency and anemia: food intolerance (mostly meat intolerance) and losses (frequently due to menstruation). These are the factors more related to iron deficient anemia. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Initial diagnosis of anemia from sore mouth and improved classification of anemias by MCV and RDW in 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shin-Yu; Wu, Hong-Cheng

    2004-12-01

    Thirty patients with a wide range of sore mouth that led to the diagnosis of iron deficiency in 12 patients, pernicious anemia in 8 patients, combined deficiency of iron and vitamin B12 in 2 patients, and anemia of chronic disease in 8 patients were investigated. The oral signs and symptoms included glossitis, glossodynia, angular cheilitis, recurrent oral ulcer, oral candidosis, diffuse erythematous mucositis, and pale oral mucosa. The values of hemoglobin in 30 patients varied from normal to severe life-threatening levels, but none had developed generalized symptoms sufficiently advanced to arouse suspicions of anemia before they visited the Oral Medicine Clinic. The aim of this paper is to describe a retrospective study of 30 patients with oral changes as the initial manifestation of nutritional deficiency or anemia of chronic diseases. Improved diagnosis and classification of anemia based on the mean and heterogeneity of red cell size will be discussed.

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Morishita, Eriko

    2015-07-01

    "Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA)" is now used to designate any hemolytic anemia related to RBC fragmentation, occurring in association with small vessel disease. In DIC, RBC fragmentation is thought to result from the deposition of fibrin or platelets within the microvasculature. The term "thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA)" is also used to describe syndromes characterized by MAHA, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic lesions in small blood vessels. The most prominent diagnoses associated with TMA are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Many different disorders, including preeclampsia, infections, adverse drug reactions, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, autoimmune diseases, and malignancies, can cause TMA (i.e., secondary TMA). Recently, because the pathogeneses of TTP and HUS have been elucidated, great progress has been made in diagnosis and treatments. However, the pathogenesis of secondary TMA remains unclear. Clinical problems awaiting solution in TMA management include determination of the positioning of rituximab in the treatment sequence of primary TTP, management of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli-HUS complicated by encephalopathy, confirmation of the efficacy and long-term safety of eculizumab in the treatment of atypical HUS, and elucidating the pathogenesis of secondary TMA as well as improving the efficacy of treatment.

  14. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wangang

    2013-01-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA) is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary) or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies. PMID:24106518

  15. Supplementary iron dose in pregnancy anemia prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Reddaiah, V P; Raj, P P; Ramachandran, K; Nath, L M; Sood, S K; Madan, N; Rusia, U

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the optimum dose of supplemental iron for prophylaxis against pregnancy anemia. One hundred and ten pregnant women were randomly allocated to three groups: Group A receiving equivalent of 60 mg, group B 120 mg and Group C 240 mg, elemental iron as ferrous sulphate daily; the content of folic acid was constant in all the three groups (0.5 mg). These women had at least consumed 90 tablets in 100 +/- 10 days. Blood was drawn at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Fifty percent were anemic (less than 11 g/100 ml). The hemoglobin levels rose similarly in all groups and the differences were statistically not significant. Fifty-six percent had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin value less than 12 micrograms/l) at the beginning of the study. Following therapy a statistically significant increase in iron stores was observed in group B and C as compared to group A. The difference between group B and C was not significant. The side effects increased with increasing doses of iron; 32.4%, 40.3% and 72% in group A, B and C respectively. Based on these findings, the authors advocate that optimum dose of iron should be 120 mg instead of 60 mg as is currently being used in the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme.

  16. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  17. Extracellular histones induce erythrocyte fragility and anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; O’Meara, Connor H.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Lelliott, Patrick M.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones have been shown to play an important pathogenic role in many diseases, primarily through their cytotoxicity toward nucleated cells and their ability to promote platelet activation with resultant thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. In contrast, little is known about the effect of extracellular histones on erythrocyte function. We demonstrate in this study that histones promote erythrocyte aggregation, sedimentation, and using a novel in vitro shear stress model, we show that histones induce erythrocyte fragility and lysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, histones impair erythrocyte deformability based on reduced passage of erythrocytes through an artificial spleen. These in vitro results were mirrored in vivo with the injection of histones inducing anemia within minutes of administration, with a concomitant increase in splenic hemoglobin content. Thrombocytopenia and leukopenia were also observed. These findings suggest that histones binding to erythrocytes may contribute to the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates observed in inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, histone-induced increases in red blood cell lysis and splenic clearance may be a significant factor in the unexplained anemias seen in critically ill patients. PMID:29133350

  18. Extracellular histones induce erythrocyte fragility and anemia.

    PubMed

    Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; O'Meara, Connor H; Coupland, Lucy A; Lelliott, Patrick M; Parish, Christopher R

    2017-12-28

    Extracellular histones have been shown to play an important pathogenic role in many diseases, primarily through their cytotoxicity toward nucleated cells and their ability to promote platelet activation with resultant thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. In contrast, little is known about the effect of extracellular histones on erythrocyte function. We demonstrate in this study that histones promote erythrocyte aggregation, sedimentation, and using a novel in vitro shear stress model, we show that histones induce erythrocyte fragility and lysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, histones impair erythrocyte deformability based on reduced passage of erythrocytes through an artificial spleen. These in vitro results were mirrored in vivo with the injection of histones inducing anemia within minutes of administration, with a concomitant increase in splenic hemoglobin content. Thrombocytopenia and leukopenia were also observed. These findings suggest that histones binding to erythrocytes may contribute to the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates observed in inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, histone-induced increases in red blood cell lysis and splenic clearance may be a significant factor in the unexplained anemias seen in critically ill patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Electronic monitoring feedback to promote adherence in an adolescent with Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Ramey, Christina; Rohan, Jennifer M; Drotar, Dennis; Cortina, Sandra

    2011-09-01

    This report describes an intervention to promote medication adherence and treat comorbid psychological symptoms in a 17 year-old female with Fanconi Anemia. The patient presented with a typical adherence rate estimated at 25% and self-reported symptoms of depressed mood and anxiety. Our comprehensive treatment approach integrated electronic monitoring (EM), an emerging strategy for adherence promotion, and motivational interviewing (MI) within an evidence-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) framework. We used EM data to assess and track medication adherence. The therapist reviewed these data with the patient and family in session and used MI techniques to promote health behavior change. We analyzed changes in adherence rates over time using a time series analysis (Auto-Regressive Moving Average [ARIMA]). In addition, the patient and her mother reported on depression, anxiety, and quality of life at intake and after 12 months, and the therapist treated psychological symptoms with CBT. The average adherence rate during the baseline EM phase was ~53%. The mean adherence rate across treatment was ~77%, and after 17 months, the final weekly adherence rate was 82%. Adherence rates significantly improved over the treatment period, ARIMA t = 36.16, p < .01. EM feedback and MI are viable additions to CBT to promote medication adherence in adolescence. This approach has the potential to effectively treat adolescents with adherence problems and psychological symptoms across multiple chronic illness diagnoses, and ultimately to improve health and quality of life outcomes.

  20. Risk of infant anemia is associated with exclusive breast-feeding and maternal anemia in a Mexican cohort.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Altaye, Mekibib; Ortega-Gallegos, Hilda; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2006-02-01

    The WHO recommends exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) for the first 6 mo of life to decrease the burden of infectious disease. However, some are concerned about the effect of EBF >6 mo on iron status of children in developing countries in which anemia is prevalent. This study examines the risk of anemia in relation to the duration of EBF and maternal anemia in a birth cohort studied between March 1998 and April 2003. All infant birth weights were >or=2.2 kg. All mothers received home-based peer counseling to promote EBF. Infant feeding data were collected weekly. Nurses measured hemoglobin (Hb) values every 3 mo. Hb was measured in 183 infants at 9 mo of age. Anemia at 9 mo was defined as a Hb value <100 g/L. EBF was defined by WHO criteria and ranged in duration from 0 to 31 wk. At 9 mo, Hb (mean +/- SEM) was 114 +/- 0.9 g/L; 23 children (12.5%) had Hb levels <100 g/L. EBF >6 mo, but not EBF 4-6 mo, was associated with increased risk of infant anemia compared with EBF <4 mo (odds ratio=18.4, 95% CI=1.9, 174.0). Maternal anemia was independently (P=0.03) associated with a 3-fold increased risk of infant anemia. These associations were not explained by confounding with other maternal or infant factors. By linear regression, a lower infant Hb at 9 mo was associated with increased EBF duration among mothers who had a history of anemia (beta=-0.07, P=0.003), but not among mothers with no history of anemia. Infants who are exclusively breast-fed for >6 mo in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia, especially among mothers with a poor iron status; greater attention to this issue is warranted.

  1. ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY: IMPACT ON WEIGHT AND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANEMIA IN NEWBORN.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Solange Augusta; Willner, Erica; Duraes Pereira, Tatiane Aguiar; de Souza, Vanessa Rosse; Teles Boaventura, Gilson; Blondet de Azeredo, Vilma

    2015-11-01

    nutritional deficiencies are still a common problem during pregnancy causing anemia. Gestational anemia is still considered a public health problem in Brazil, because it is hazardous to both mother and fetus, and is associated with increased risk of maternal-fetal morbidity, as well as the nutritional status of child. to evaluate the frequency of maternal gestational anemia in newborns and its relation to the nutritional status of the child at birth. anthropometric data of pregnant women and their newborns were obtained. Blood was collected from pregnant women and the umbilical cord of newborns for analysis of hemoglobin, hematocrit, RDW, iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation index in automatic devices. The results are presented such as the arithmetic mean and the standard deviation. GraphPadinStat Software version 3.0 was used, with a maximum significance level of 5%. the frequency of maternal anemia was 53.7%, and 32.6% in newborns. Half the newborns were anemic children of anemic mothers. 79.3% of the anemic pregnant women had mild anemia and in 20.7% moderate. The average concentration of hemoglobin and hematocrit was lower in anemic pregnant women (9.7 ± 0.9 g/dL and 29.8 ± 3.2%) compared with non-anemic (11.9 ± 0.7 g/ dL and 36.5 ± 2.7%). The maternal iron was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.3889, p = 0.01) from umbilical cord blood. The newborns' weight, length and head circumference of anemic mothers were 3 375.9 ± 506,9 g, 51.2 ± 1.7 cm and 34.5 ± 1.5 cm, respectively, while of nonanemic mothers were 3 300.2 ± 458,4 g, 50.3 ± 2.0 cm and 34.2 ± 2.0 cm, respectively. There were no significant correlations between maternal hemoglobin, iron and ferritin with weight, length and head circumference of newborns. the results of this study show that maternal iron deficiency anemia (mild to moderate) can affect the blood profile and iron concentrations in umbilical cord blood of newborns, but without interfering with the child

  2. Hypocholesterolemia and nonregenerative, suspected immune-mediated, anemia: Report of 3 canine cases.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rachel; Viviano, Katrina R

    2017-10-01

    This report describes hypocholesterolemia in 3 dogs with nonregenerative, suspected immune-mediated anemias. Common causes of hypocholesterolemia were ruled out, raising suspicion for a mechanistic link between anemia and hypocholesterolemia in dogs. As observed in humans with concurrent anemia and hypocholesterolemia, cholesterol concentrations increased to within the reference interval once the dogs' anemia resolved.

  3. [Pernicious anemia: diagnosis and course in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Koulidiati, J; Sawadogo, S; Sagna, Y; Somda, K S; Tieno, H; Kafando, E; Drabo, Y J

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer disease or anemia, Addison or Addisonian anemia, and Addison-Biermer anemia) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis responsible for vitamin B12 malabsorption due to a deficiency of intrinsic factor. We report eight cases of pernicious anemia in Burkina Faso, collected over a 44-month period. The three criteria for diagnosis of pernicious anemia were: vitamin B12 deficiency, gastric disease (gastric histology) with presence of anti-intrinsic factor, and/or anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies in serum. All patients had anemia, with a mean hemoglobin level of 8.75 g/100 mL. The average mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was 122.1 fL the average mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) 39.3 pg, the mean reticulocyte count 12.069 10(9)/L reticulocytes, and the mean rate of megaloblast marrow cells 17.2%. The serum vitamin B12 level ranged from 35 to 71 pmol/L. Antibodies against intrinsic factor were found in all eight patients. All ABO blood groups were present with a predominance (4 cases) of group O. Endoscopy found a normal fundic mucosa in three patients. Histology showed gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia for six patients (85.7%). Under B12 vitamin therapy, the course was favorable in all patients; seven patients also had 10 days of iron therapy. We recommend a gastric biopsy even in the absence of macroscopic gastric lesions on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  4. Coombs negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Bong Soo; Park, Sihyung; Jin, Kyubok; Kim, Yeon Mee; Park, Kang Min; Lee, Jeong-Nyeo; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kim, Yang Wook

    2014-12-09

    Anemia is a common, important extraintestinal complication of Crohn's disease. The main types of anemia in patients with Crohn's disease are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. Although patients with Crohn's disease may experience various type of anemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in patients with Crohn's disease, especially Coombs-negative AIHA, is very rare. A 41-year-old woman with Crohn's disease presented to our emergency room (ER) with dark urine, dizziness, and shortness of breath. The activity of Crohn's disease had been controlled, with Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI) score below 100 point. On physical examination, the patient had pale conjunctivae and mildly icteric sclerae. Serum bilirubin was raised at 3.1 mg/dL, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was 1418 U/L and the haptoglobin level was <3 mg/dL. Results of direct and the indirect Coombs tests were all negative. We then measured the RBC-IgG to evaluate the possibility of Coombs-negative AIHA. The result revealed that RBC-IgG level was 352 IgG molecules/cell, with the cut-off value at 78.5 IgG molecules/cell. We report a case of Coombs-negative AIHA in a patient with Crohn's disease with chronic anemia, diagnosed by red blood cell-bound immunoglobulin G (RBC-IgG) and treated with steroids therapy.

  5. [Prevalence of anemia in reproductive-age Mexican women].

    PubMed

    Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Villalpando, Salvador; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Mejía-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Méndez Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    To update the prevalence of anemia and its trend in Mexican women of childbearing age over the past 13 years using information from the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 and 2006 (ENSANUT 2012 and ENSANUT 2006, respectively) and from the National Nutrition Survey 1999 (ENN 99). Data came from three national probabilistic surveys, representative at regional and rural / urban level. Hemoglobin (Hb) in women was measured using a HemoCue photometer and classified as anemia according to the WHO criteria. Frequencies and CI95% were estimated for each survey (ENSANUT 2012, ENSANUT 2006 and ENN 99) as well as percentage changes in anemia prevalence among pregnant and non-pregnant women in this survey sequence. The national prevalence of anemia in 2012 in non-pregnant women was 11.6% and in pregnant women was 17.9%. Between 1999 and 2012, a 10 percentage point (pp) decreasing in anemia prevalence was observed in the first ones and a 13.5 pp in the second ones. Although it has declined in the past 13 years, anemia in women of childbearing age remains as a serious public health problem. It is considered necessary to design strategies to prevent iron deficiency and for the early detection of anemia in women.

  6. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  7. Predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Bradley A; Petry, Nicolai; Macdonald, Barbara; Aaron, Grant J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anemia in women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15–49 y) remains a public health problem globally, and reducing anemia in women by 50% by 2025 is a goal of the World Health Assembly. Objective: We assessed the associations between anemia and multiple proximal risk factors (e.g., iron and vitamin A deficiencies, inflammation, malaria, and body mass index) and distal risk factors (e.g., education status, household sanitation and hygiene, and urban or rural residence) in nonpregnant WRA. Design: Cross-sectional, nationally representative data from 10 surveys (n = 27,018) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and pooled by the infection burden and risk in the country. We examined the severity of anemia and measured the bivariate associations between anemia and factors at the country level and by infection burden, which we classified with the use of the national prevalences of malaria, HIV, schistosomiasis, sanitation, and water-quality indicators. Pooled multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for each infection-burden category to identify independent determinants of anemia (hemoglobin concertation <120 g/L). Results: Anemia prevalence was ∼40% in countries with a high infection burden and 12% and 7% in countries with moderate and low infection burdens, respectively. Iron deficiency was consistently associated with anemia in multivariate models, but the proportion of anemic women who were iron deficient was considerably lower in the high-infection group (35%) than in the moderate- and low-infection groups (65% and 71%, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, inflammation, vitamin A insufficiency, socioeconomic status, and age were also significantly associated with anemia, but malaria and vitamin B-12 and folate deficiencies were not. Conclusions: The contribution of iron deficiency to anemia varies according to a country’s infection

  8. The effect of hyperbaric oxygen on severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Keith W

    2012-01-01

    As a respiratory pigment, hemoglobin allows blood to carry unnaturally high levels of nascent, molecular oxygen at one atmosphere of pressure in chemical solution to capillary beds and post-capillary venules supplying parenchymal cells of all organ systems in the body. When hemoglobin drops to critical levels to disallow proper oxygen delivery, hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be used as bridge therapy to emergently supply oxygen. Hyperbaric-administered oxygen allows oxygen to be dissolved in increased concentration in red blood cell-poor plasma or crystalloid/ colloid-diluted intravascular fluids in a volume-resuscitated patient. Additionally in both subacutely and chronically anemic patients, pulsed, intermittently provided normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen induces an increase in red blood cell/hemoglobic mass. Transfusions of separate donor red blood cells are transplantations of tissue not uncomplicated by immunomodulatory reactions. In the long term, autologous blood products may be less problematic than transfused, homologous packed red blood cells to reduce patient oxygen debt in illness or injury. Hyperbaric oxygen can reduce oxygen debt decisively in the polar clinical extremes of exsanguination with cardiopulmonary arrest all the way to resuscitation of the severely anemic patient who cannot be transfused with red blood cells for religious reasons, immunologic reasons, or blood availability problems. A hyperbaric oxygen treatment is equivalent in wholesale cost to a unit of packed red blood cells in the western world. By controversy, but true, hyperbaric oxygen provides a low-technology, cost-competitive means of pharmacologically reducing accumulated oxygen debt in the anemic, injured or critically ill patient with little side effect. To address severe anemia in trauma or illness, the future may well afford the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the military far-forward, in pre-hospital EMS settings, in trauma center emergency departments, in operative and

  9. The Ostracoda (Crustacea) of the Tina Menor estuary (Cantabria, southern Bay of Biscay): Distribution and ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Blanca; Pascual, Ana; Rodríguez-Lázaro, Julio; Martín-Rubio, Maite; Rofes, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Recent ostracods from the Tina Menor estuary (northern Spain, southern Bay of Biscay) have been analysed. Twenty-five species have been identified for the first time, 20 with living individuals during the sampling period. The most abundant species are Leptocythere castanea, Leptocythere porcellanea, Loxoconcha elliptica, Cytherois fischeri, and Hemicytherura hoskini, Leptocythere psammophila and Semicytherura aff. angulata. These species are grouped into four assemblages defining different environments: muddy inner estuary with euryhaline species (L. elliptica); middle estuary with silty sand flats and low marsh environments (L. castanea, L. porcellanea and C. fischeri); sandy outer estuary with marine characteristics (H. hoskini, S. aff. angulata, Leptocythere baltica and L. psammophila); and littoral to inner shelf environment (Caudites calceolatus, H. hoskini and Callistocythere murrayi). In the middle estuary, L. castanea also delimits sandy-silty low marshes, and L. porcellanea and C. fischeri the vegetated ecosystems. Multivariate analyses with the samples and species (cluster Q-type and detrended and canonical correspondence analysis) confirm that ostracod distribution in the Tina Menor estuary is controlled by sediment grain size and by the distance to the mouth of the estuary (associated to salinity). The geographical height in relation with mean tide levels (and therefore with emersion periods) also plays an important role in distribution. The results of this study confirm ostracod validity as tide-level markers due to the presence of C. fischeri below the MHWNT (mean high water neap tide), whereas L. castanea and L. porcellanea are present between the MHWNT and MHW (mean high water) levels. Ostracods can also indicate environmental changes due to human-influenced processes. Abundant individuals of L. elliptica in some areas of the middle estuary evidence discharges of lower-salinity water from a nearby fish farm. Ostracods from the marine shelf reach the

  10. Anemia and risk for cognitive decline in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Vittinghoff, Eric; Yang, Jingrong; Go, Alan S; Seliger, Stephen L; Kusek, John W; Lash, James; Cohen, Debbie L; Simon, James; Batuman, Vecihi; Ordonez, Juan; Makos, Gail; Yaffe, Kristine

    2016-01-28

    Anemia is common among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but its health consequences are poorly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between anemia and cognitive decline in older adults with CKD. We studied a subgroup of 762 adults age ≥55 years with CKD participating in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Anemia was defined according to the World Health Organization criteria (hemoglobin <13 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women). Cognitive function was assessed annually with a battery of six tests. We used logistic regression to determine the association between anemia and baseline cognitive impairment on each test, defined as a cognitive score more than one standard deviation from the mean, and mixed effects models to determine the relation between anemia and change in cognitive function during follow-up after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Of 762 participants with mean estimated glomerular filtration rate of 42.7 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 349 (46 %) had anemia. Anemia was not independently associated with baseline cognitive impairment on any test after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Over a median 2.9 (IQR 2.6-3.0) years of follow-up, there was no independent association between anemia and change in cognitive function on any of the six cognitive tests. Among older adults with CKD, anemia was not independently associated with baseline cognitive function or decline.

  11. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The ecology of anemia: Anemia prevalence and correlated factors in adult indigenous women in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Laura G; Valeggia, Claudia

    2017-05-06

    The Toba/Qom of Namqom are an indigenous community native to the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina. Historically seminomadic foragers, the diet of peri-urban community members has rapidly changed from high-protein, high-fiber to hypercaloric, processed. This study aims to understand the impact of this nutritional transition on aspects of women's health by exploring the relationship between prevalence of anemia and current diet composition, place of birth, and reproductive history. We measured the capillary hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 153 adult women. Each participant was also given two interviews characterizing reproductive history and a 24-hour food recall. The average Hb level was 12.6 g/dL (range 5.8-15.7 g/dL). In our sample, 28% of participants were anemic and 31% were borderline anemic. Iron and vitamin C consumption were negatively associated with Hb levels. Body mass index was marginally associated with Hb levels. Being born in a peri-urban setting, a proxy for early Westernized diet was associated with higher risk of anemia, suggesting developmental experience may play a role. Pregnant and lactating women had lower Hb levels than menstruating and menopausal women. Age, height, parity, and age at first pregnancy were not found to be statistically significant predictors of anemia. Iron deficiency represents a serious health concern for women, particularly pregnant ones. Our results suggest that both past and current nutritional ecology variables may be associated with the risk of anemia. These findings inform public health interventions, since reproductive history may be more difficult to modify than current diet. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Durable responses in refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia with alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    McAlister, Renee K; Talbott, Mahsa S; Reddy, Nishitha M

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia occurs due to an interaction of IgG antibodies with protein antigens expressed on red blood corpuscles. Glucocorticoids are the mainstay of treatment for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. For patients not responding to initial therapy, other agents such as rituximab, immunosuppressive therapy, or splenectomy are considered. When refractory to these treatment options, alemtuzumab is an alternative agent. However, long-term outcomes of patients supporting its use are lacking. We present three patients with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with alemtuzumab.

  14. Post-dengue fever severe aplastic anemia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Mohammed; PrakashYadav, Satya; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever has rarely been reported as an etiology for aplastic anemia. An 8-year-old girl was admitted with fever, myalgia and petechiae. Dengue virus IgM antibodies were positive. She recovered completely, but her thrombocytopenia persisted. Six weeks later she became pancytopenic. A bone marrow aspirate and biopsy showed severe aplastic anemia. She was treated with antithymocytic immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and cyclosporine. She became transfusion independent 6 months later. Dengue-virus induced aplastic anemia is a rare entity, but it must be identified early for better outcome. Immunosuppressive therapy can induce remission.

  15. Mild anemia as a protective factor against pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Buzyan, L O

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is traditionally considered to be a pathological condition during pregnancy. According to the standards, prescription of iron supplements to pregnant women is required at hemoglobin levels of 110 g/l and lower. Numerous studies at different periods showed the relationship of anemia and premature birth [5], preeclampsia [1], low birth-weight [2]. Meanwhile, physiological hemodilution carries in pregnancy an important adaptive function. It is well known, that in the second half of pregnancy physiological hypercoagulability develops (increased activity of the plasma clotting factors, platelet aggregation, decreased activity and blood concentrations of physiological anticoagulants) aimed at implementing adequate hemostasis in labor. Under these conditions, moderate hemodilution is an effective mechanism for preventing the development of severe disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in labor, during surgery, in various forms of obstetric pathology. To study the effect of anemia of varying severity on the pregnancy course and outcomes. We conducted a "case-control" study based on cohort. The study included 421 pregnant women who received outpatient care under the monitoring of pregnancy in the antenatal clinic of the South Ural State Medical University and the antenatal clinic of Chelyabinsk Clinical Hospital №6. The inclusion period was from January to March 2014. Inclusion criteria were: confirmed pregnancy, informed consent to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria were multiple pregnancy, induced pregnancy, late first appearance in the antenatal clinic (after 25 weeks' gestation), change of residence and medical supervision during pregnancy, the presence of severe mental disorders, severe somatic diseases in decompensation stage, HIV infection, cancer, active tuberculosis. Study design complies with the legislation of the Russian Federation, international ethical standards and was approved by the Ethics Committee of the South Ural

  16. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenhove, Lauren D; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment depends on the ability to metabolize exogenously and endogenously generated toxins, and to repair cellular damage caused by such toxins. Reactive aldehydes have been demonstrated to cause specific genotoxic injury, namely DNA interstrand cross-links. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of a 19 isoenzyme ALDH family with different substrate specificities, subcellular localization, and patterns of expression. ALDH2 is localized in mitochondria and is essential for the metabolism of acetaldehyde, thereby placing it directly downstream of ethanol metabolism. Deficiency in ALDH2 expression and function are caused by a single nucleotide substitution and resulting amino acid change, called ALDH2*2. This genetic polymorphism affects 35-45% of East Asians (about ~560 million people), and causes the well-known Asian flushing syndrome, which results in disulfiram-like reactions after ethanol consumption. Recently, the ALDH2*2 genotype has been found to be associated with marrow failure, with both an increased risk of sporadic aplastic anemia and more rapid progression of Fanconi anemia. This review discusses the unexpected interrelationship between aldehydes, ALDH2 and hematopoietic stem cell biology, and in particular its relationship to Fanconi anemia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 in Aplastic Anemia, Fanconi Anemia and Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Wassenhove, Lauren D.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Weinberg, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment depends on the ability to metabolize exogenously and endogenously generated toxins, and to repair cellular damage caused by such toxins. Reactive aldehydes have been demonstrated to cause specific genotoxic injury, namely DNA interstrand cross-links. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of a 19 isoenzyme ALDH family with different substrate specificities, subcellular localization, and patterns of expression. ALDH2 is localized in mitochondria and is essential for the metabolism of acetaldehyde, thereby placing it directly downstream of ethanol metabolism. Deficiency in ALDH2 expression and function are caused by a single nucleotide substitution and resulting amino acid change, called ALDH2*2. This genetic polymorphism affects 35–45% of East Asians (about ~560 million people), and causes the well-known Asian flushing syndrome, which results in disulfiram-like reactions after ethanol consumption. Recently, the ALDH2*2 genotype has been found to be associated with marrow failure, with both an increased risk of sporadic aplastic anemia and more rapid progression of Fanconi Anemia. This review discusses the unexpected interrelationship between aldehydes, ALDH2 and hematopoietic stem cell biology, and in particular its relationship to Fanconi anemia. PMID:27650066

  18. The Mar Menor lagoon (SE Spain): A singular natural ecosystem threatened by human activities.

    PubMed

    Conesa, Héctor M; Jiménez-Cárceles, Francisco J

    2007-07-01

    The Mar Menor lagoon is one of the most important ecological singularities in the Mediterranean area. At the same time, it is an area where many economic and industrial activities meet. The sum of the impacts of mining, agriculture and urban development in the surroundings to the lagoon during the last decades has affected its ecosystem. In this paper, we have reviewed the studies done by researchers over two decades regarding the impacts of human activities in the lagoon, reporting data of contamination levels and the effects generated in the ecosystem of the lagoon. The discharge of enriched nutrient waters seems to be the most important input in the lagoon. Changes to more friendly agricultural techniques in the surrounding areas are therefore necessary. After our review, we can conclude that it is necessary to have higher efforts from the public administrations and stricter environmental regulations in order to preserve, on one hand, the important ecological values of the lagoon, and on other hand, public health.

  19. Metal bioaccumulation pattern by Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) in the Mar Menor coastal lagoon (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Vera, Ana; García, Gregorio; García-Sánchez, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems highly vulnerable to human impacts because of their situation between terrestrial and marine environment. Mar Menor coastal lagoon is one of the largest lagoons of the Mediterranean Sea, placed in SE Spain and subjected to major human impacts, in particular the mining of metal sulphides. As a consequence, metal concentration in water column and sediments of this ecosystem is usually higher than in other areas. For monitoring ecosystem health, the present study has assessed the ability of Cotylorhiza tuberculata for bioaccumulating metals from sea water. Up to 65 individuals were sampled at 8 different sampling stations during the summer of 2012. Although the concentration values for different elements considered were moderate (Pb: 0.04-29.50 ppm, Zn: 2.27-93.44 ppm, Cd: 0-0.67 ppm, As: 0.56-130.31 ppm) by dry weight of the jellyfish tissues (bell and oral arms combined), bioconcentration levels in relation to seawater metal concentration were extremely high. In any case, the use or disposal of these organisms should consider their metal content because of their potential environmental and health implications.

  20. How I treat acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive biologics and drugs, and supportive care. However, management of SAA patients remains challenging, both acutely in addressing the immediate consequences of pancytopenia and in the long term because of the disease's natural history and the consequences of therapy. Recent insights into pathophysiology have practical implications. We review key aspects of differential diagnosis, considerations in the choice of first- and second-line therapies, and the management of patients after immunosuppression, based on both a critical review of the recent literature and our large personal and research protocol experience of bone marrow failure in the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. PMID:22517900

  1. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  2. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  3. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic hemolytic anemia due to cold agglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert S.; Turner, Elizabeth; Bingham, Margaret; Woods, Richard

    1968-01-01

    The sera of four patients with chronic hemolytic anemia due to cold agglutinins deposited C′ globulins on normal red cells at 37°C. The circulating cells of the patients were heavily coated with C′ complex and were relatively resistant to C′ hemolysis by cold agglutinin. Such red cells were removed from the patients' circulation at an exponential rate with 51Cr t½ that varied from 7 to 19 days. Normal red cells were removed rapidly by hepatic sequestration during the first hours in the patients' circulation. Thereafter, a slower rate of abnormal destruction occurred which was associated with the accumulation of C′ complexes on the red cell and the development of resistance to C′ hemolysis by cold agglutinin. Normal red cells coated with sufficient C′ complex by action of cold agglutinins in vitro to produce resistance to C′ hemolysis by cold agglutinins demonstrated varying degrees of improved survival during the first hours in the circulation of three of the patients. The levels of serum C′ were reduced in all four patients with chronic hemolytic anemia due to cold agglutinins. Transfusion of large volumes of normal red cells into two patients further reduced serum C′. 51Cr-labeled normal red cells survived longer after red cell transfusions than before, because of less rapid destruction during the first hours in the circulation. The reduction in serum C′ levels appeared responsible for the improved survival. In subjects without cold agglutinins, the presence of the spleen decreased the survival of red cells from a patient who had previously undergone splenectomy. Splenic removal also predominated in the reduced survival of autologous red cells in one patient. Neither hepatic nor splenic mechanisms predominated in removing autologous C′-coated cells in the other two patients. PMID:5641611

  5. Hemolytic Anemia after Aortic Valve Replacement: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is exceedingly rare and an underestimated complication after aortic valve replacement (AVR).The mechanism responsible for hemolysis most commonly involves a regurgitated flow or jet that related to paravalvar leak or turbulence of subvalvar stenosis. It appears to be independent of its severity as assessed by echocardiography. We present a case of a 24-year-old man with a history of AVR in 10 year ago that developed severe hemolytic anemia due to a mild subvalvar stenosis caused by pannus formation and mild hypertrophic septum. After exclusion of other causes of hemolytic anemia and the lack of clinical and laboratory improvement, the patient underwent redo valve surgery with pannus and subvalvar hypertrophic septum resection. Anemia and heart failure symptoms gradually resolved after surgery.

  6. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  7. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines anemia as the point at which the amount of hemoglobin in the circulation falls below World Health Organization cutoffs for specific age and sex groups. Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the community. The important biomarkers are the automated red cell counts, tests for nutritional deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies, and inflammation. Diseases are important potential initiators of anemia, but biomarkers of specific diseases are not included in this review, only the underlying feature common to all disease – namely, inflammation. PMID:23687454

  9. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... helps maintain an appropriate balance of iron (iron homeostasis) in developing red blood cells. ABCB7 mutations slightly ... its usual role in heme production and iron homeostasis. Anemia results when heme cannot be produced normally, ...

  11. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy in India.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Rimpy; Jain, Arihant; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2018-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the commonest etiology of anemia in pregnancy. The prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) in pregnant Indian women is amongst the highest in the world. Untreated iron deficiency (ID) has significant adverse feto-maternal consequences. Plethora of investigations are available for diagnosis of IDA, each having specific advantages and disadvantages when used in the pregnancy setting. Therapy for ID includes dietary modification, oral iron supplementation, intravenous iron and blood transfusion. Newer parenteral iron preparations are safe and there is mounting evidence to suggest their use in frontline settings for pregnancy associated IDA in the second and third trimester. Through this review, we suggest an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of IDA in pregnancy depending on the severity of anemia and period of gestation suited for widespread use in resource limited settings. Also, we recommend ways for increasing public awareness and tackling this health issue including the observance of "National Anemia Awareness and Treatment Day."

  12. Pernicious anemia in a young man with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Benjilali, L; Tazi-Mezalek, Z; Harmouche, H; Lebbar, K; Aouni, M; Adnaoui, M; Maaouni, A

    2007-01-01

    Association of pernicious anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus is rare, although both diseases are autoimmune origin. We describe the case of a 40-year old man with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed pernicious anemia. The cobalamin deficiency was revealed by macrocytic pancytopenia. After 1 month of vitamin B12 treatment, hemoglobin and white blood cell count remain normal but thrombocytopenia persists and was considered as immunologic from SLE origin requiring corticosteroids.

  13. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia: understanding the nemesis.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Sheila

    2003-11-01

    IMHA is one of the most common causes of anemia in small animals. Although treatment may be rewarding, many patients do not respond adequately to glucocorticoids alone and require additional immunosuppressive therapy. Some patients may succumb to acute severe anemia and die within the first few weeks of treatment; even if they survive, relapses may occur. IMHA is the nemesis; as our understanding of this disease increases and treatment options expand, it is hoped that survival rates will finally improve.

  14. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  15. [Spatial analysis of gestational anemia in Peru, 2015].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Antiporta, Daniel A; Cortés, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    To establish regional prevalences of anemia in pregnant women receiving care at public clinics in Peru in 2015 and identify high-prevalence district conglomerates. An ecological study was carried out on data from pregnant women with anemia registered on the Nutritional Status Information System (SIEN) who received care in 7703 public clinics in 2015. Regional and district prevalences of gestational anemia were calculated. District conglomerates with a high prevalence of gestational anemia were identified using the Moran Index. Information was gathered from 311,521 pregnant women distributed in 1638 districts in Peru. The national prevalence of anemia was 24.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 24.0-24.3%), the rural prevalence was 30.5%, and the urban prevalence was 22.0%. The regions of Huancavelica (45.5%; 95% CI: 44.2-46.7%), Puno (42.8%; 95% CI: 41.9-43.7%), Pasco (38.5%; 95% CI: 36.9-40.0%), Cusco (36.0%; 95% CI: 35.3-36.8%), and Apurímac (32.0%; 95% CI: 30.8-33.1%) had the highest prevalences of anemia. The local Moran Index identified 202 high-priority districts (hot spots) (12.3% of total; 44 urban and 158 rural) located in Ancash, Apurímac, Arequipa, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huancavelica, Huánuco, Junín, La Libertad, Lima, Pasco, and Puno containing high-prevalence district conglomerates. Gestational anemia in Peru has its highest prevalence rates in rural and southern mountainous areas. The district conglomerates with high prevalence rates of gestational anemia coincide with the areas of high regional prevalence.

  16. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus from Infected Horse Serum

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Yoshino, Tomoo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1974-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus was purified from infected horse serum samples. Electron microscope observation on negatively stained preparations of purified virus showed roughly spherical particles sized between 100 and 200 nm in diameter. In disrupted particles, an envelope was visible but no internal structure could be resolved. Since the purified virus fraction had a strong antigenic activity to antiserum in immunodiffusion reaction, these particles are thought to be the causative virus of equine infectious anemia. Images PMID:4372175

  17. Hepatitis-associated Aplastic Anemia Treated Successfully With Antithymocyte Globulin.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongyan; Chen, Li; Sun, Xiaojun; Li, Xiuli; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Yulin

    2018-04-03

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is a variant of acquired aplastic anemia in which bone marrow failure follows the development of an acute episode of seronegative hepatitis. HAAA occurs most frequently in male children and is lethal if left untreated. Antilymphocyte globulin, antithymocyte globulin, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation have been used in the treatment of this disease. In this work, we report the case of a 3-year-old boy with HAAA treated successfully with immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. Maternal anemia during pregnancy and subsequent risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Azulay, Carmit Erez; Pariente, Gali; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Kessous, Roy; Sergienko, Ruslan; Sheiner, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between anemia during pregnancy and subsequent future maternal cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, comparing women with and without anemia during pregnancy. Deliveries occurred during 1988-1998 and had followed for more than a decade. Incidence of long-term cardiovascular morbidity was compared between the two groups. During the study period, 47 657 deliveries met the inclusion criteria; of these 12 362 (25.9%) occurred in women with anemia at least once during their pregnancies. Anemia of pregnancy was noted as a risk factor for long-term complex cardiovascular events (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1-2.8, p = 0.04). Using a Cox multivariable regression model, controlling for ethnicity and maternal age, anemia was found to be an independent risk factor for long-term maternal cardiovascular hospitalization (OR for total hospitalizations = 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.4, p < 0.001). Anemia of pregnancy is an independent risk factor for long-term cardiovascular morbidity in a follow-up period of more than a decade.

  19. Anemia in Cambodia: prevalence, etiology and research needs.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher V; Summerlee, Alastair J S; Dewey, Cate E

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is a severe global public health problem with serious consequences for both the human and socio-economic health. This paper presents a situation analysis of the burden of anemia in Cambodia, including a discussion of the country-specific etiologies and future research needs. All available literature on the prevalence and etiology of anemia in Cambodia was collected using standard search protocols. Prevalence data was readily identified for pre-school aged children and women of reproductive age, but there is a dearth of information for school-aged children, men and the elderly. Despite progress in nation-wide programming over the past decade, anemia remains a significant public health problem in Cambodia, especially for women and children. Anemia is a multifaceted disease and both nutritional and non-nutritional etiologies were identified, with iron deficiency accounting for the majority of the burden of disease. The current study highlights the need for a national nutrition survey, including collection of data on the iron status and prevalence of anemia in all population groups. It is impossible to develop effective intervention programs without a clear picture of the burden and cause of disease in the country.

  20. [Cow's milk consumption and iron deficiency anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria A A; Osório, Mônica M

    2005-01-01

    To thoroughly investigate the association between the consumption of cow's milk and anemia in childhood. The information was gathered from papers catalogued in Lilacs and MEDLINE and published during the last two decades, and also from textbooks and publications by international organizations. Iron deficiency anemia is a severe public health problem in developing countries. Breast milk contains adequate iron for full term babies in the first 6 months. Thereafter, an additional iron-rich diet becomes essential. In recognition of the importance of the diet in triggering anemia, this paper discusses the relationship in children between a high intake of cow's milk and iron deficiency anemia. Gastrointestinal and allergic problems may be caused by early introduction of cow's milk or by its substitution for breast milk. Furthermore, cow's milk has decreased iron density and bioavailability, excess protein and minerals, notably calcium, and thus interferes in the absorption of iron from other foods, and is also linked to small intestinal hemorrhage in young children. The use of cow's milk in lieu of other foods rich in bioavailable iron was shown to be a risk factor for anemia. Exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life, discretionary weaning only after the 24th month, and a complementary diet rich in iron are highly important to avoid anemia and its consequences.

  1. [Immunologic hemolytic anemia. From autoimmunity to anti-medication immunization].

    PubMed

    Le Pennec, P Y; Rouger, P

    1995-01-01

    The serological investigation of auto-immune hemolytic anemias based on the direct antiglobulin test, the study of the serum and the eluate allows a classification of the auto-immune hemolytic anemia which is still valid and correlates well with the clinical features. The use of new techniques should increase the sensitivity of the tests but also stress the problem of the frontier between physiological and pathological states. The use of monoclonal antibodies of defined specificity would be an useful tool for the immunohematological classification of the auto-immune hemolytic anemias. The addition of new therapeutical means should improve the prognosis of these anemias. The increasing consumption of drugs and the development of the investigations of the adverse reactions including the hemolytic anemias have allowed the emergence of new pathogenic concepts. The gravity of the clinical evolution of some of these immune hemolytic anemias stress the necessity of an adequate therapeutic survey and the development of new means of diagnostic. The clinicians should be aware of the possibility of cross reactivity for drug dependent antibodies with other components of related chemical structure.

  2. Hemoperitoneum from corpus luteum rupture in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaquan; Guo, Lifang; Shao, Zonghong

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare hematopoietic stem-cell disorder that results in pancytopenia and hypocellular bone marrow. Women with aplastic anemia usually are at increased risk of corpus luteum rupture due to thrombocytopenia and infection. Here we report two cases had hemoperitoneum from corpus luteum rupture in patients with aplastic anemia in our center. Case 1 involved two episodes of hemoperitoneum resulting from rupture of the corpus luteum in a 23-year-old unmarried female with severe aplastic anemia. This patient was managed conservatively with platelet and packed red cell transfusion. Case 2 involved two episodes of hemoperitoneum resulting from rupture of the corpus luteum in a 33-year-old married patient with aplastic anemia. Emergency laparoscopy revealed massive hemoperitoneum. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed successively with platelet and packed red cell transfusion. Hemoperitoneum resulting from a ruptured corpus luteum is a life-threatening condition in patients with aplastic anemia. Prompt and appropriate evaluation of corpus luteum rupture and emergent therapy are needed.

  3. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S.; Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H.

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure hasmore » been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.« less

  4. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, themore » combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.« less

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Zuffo, Cristie Regine Klotz; Osório, Mônica Maria; Taconeli, Cesar Augusto; Schmidt, Suely Teresinha; da Silva, Bruno Henrique Corrêa; Almeida, Cláudia Choma Bettega

    2016-01-01

    To identify the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in children attending Municipal Early Childhood Education Day Care Center (Centros Municipais de Educação Infantil [CMEI]) nurseries in Colombo-PR. Analytical, cross-sectional study with a representative sample of 334 children obtained by stratified cluster sampling, with random selection of 26 nurseries. Data collection was conducted through interviews with parents, assessment of iron intake by direct food weighing, and hemoglobin measurement using the finger-stick test. Bivariate association tests were performed followed by multiple logistic regression adjustment. The prevalence of anemia was 34.7%. Factors associated with anemia were: maternal age younger than 28 years old (p=0.03), male children (p=0.02), children younger than 24 months (p=0.01), and children who did not consume iron food sources (meat+beans+dark green leafy vegetables) (p=0.02). There was no association between anemia and iron food intake in CMEI. However, iron intake was well below the recommended levels according to the National Education Development Fund resolution, higher prevalence of anemia was observed in children whose intake of iron, heme iron, and nonheme iron was below the median. In terms of public health, the prevalence of anemia is characterized as a moderate problem in the studied population and demonstrates the need for coordination of interdisciplinary actions for its reduction in CMEI nurseries. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of complement activation in thrombosis and hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Chapin, John; Terry, Hunter S; Kleinert, Dorothy; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe complement activation in hemostatic and pathologic states of coagulation and in the acquired and congenital hemolytic anemias. We review published and emerging data on the involvement of the classic, alternative and lectin-based complement pathways in coagulation and the hemolytic anemias. The alternative pathway in particular is always "on," at low levels, and is particularly sensitive to hyper-activation in a variety of physiologic and pathologic states including infection, autoimmune disorders, thrombosis and pregnancy, requiring tight control predicated on a variety of soluble and membrane bound regulatory proteins. In acquired hemolytic anemias such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and cold agglutinin disease (CAD), the complement system directly induces red blood cell injury, resulting in intravascular and extravascular hemolysis. In congenital hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, the complement system may also contribute to thrombosis and vascular disease. Complement activation may also lead to a storage lesion in red blood cells prior to transfusion. Complement pathways are activated in hemolytic anemias and are closely linked with thrombosis. In acquired disorders such as PNH and possibly CAD, inhibition of the alternative complement pathway improves clinical outcomes and reduces thrombosis risk. Whether complement inhibition has a similar role in congenital hemolytic anemias apart from the atypical hemolytic-uremic (aHUS)-type thrombotic microangiopathies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anemia in nephrotic syndrome: approach to evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Iorember, Franca; Aviles, Diego

    2017-08-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect in children. Complications may occur in nephrotic syndrome as a result of the disease itself as well as its treatment. Most of these complications result from excessive urinary protein losses, and control of proteinuria is the most effective treatment strategy. Anemia is one of the many complications seen in patients with persistent nephrotic syndrome and may occur as a result of excessive urinary losses of iron, transferrin, erythropoietin, transcobalamin and/or metals. This leads to a deficiency of substrates necessary for effective erythropoiesis, requiring supplementation in order to correct the anemia. Supplementation of iron and erythropoietin alone often does not lead to correction of the anemia, suggesting other possible mechanisms which need further investigation. A clear understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of anemia in nephrotic syndrome is necessary to guide appropriate therapy, but only limited evidence is currently available on the precise etiologic mechanisms of anemia in nephrotic syndrome. In this review we focus on the current state of knowledge on the pathogenesis of anemia in nephrotic syndrome.

  8. [Management of chemotherapy-induced anemia in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tiotiu, A; Clément-Duchêne, C; Martinet, Y

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of chemotherapy-induced anemia in lung cancer is estimated at about 80%. There are currently no specific recommendations for the management of chemotherapy-induced anemia in lung cancer. In this paper, we propose a synthesis of currently existing data in the literature on the management of chemotherapy-induced anemia in general, supplemented with specific data about the efficacy and safety of erythropoietic therapy in lung cancer. Better management of chemotherapy-induced anemia improves patient's quality of life and reduces red blood cell transfusion requirement. In the meantime, in respect to currently missing data, thoracic oncologists should develop specific recommendations for the management of chemotherapy-induced anemia in lung cancer, with specific studies in this domain. Since the prevalence of chemotherapy-induced anemia in patients with lung cancer is high and has a significant impact on these patients quality of life, a specific prospective management should be implemented as early as possible. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Good riddance to the term "refractory anemia" in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2016-12-01

    The term "refractory anemia" was used in 1937 by Cornelius Parker Rhoads to describe patients whose anemia did not improve after treatment with liver extract or iron salts, and this term has been used to denote patients with certain subtypes of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) since the 1976 and 1982 French-American-British (FAB) classifications of acute leukemias and MDS. In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed elimination of "refractory anemia" in a more general proposal for reclassification of myeloid neoplasia. A scandal relating to Dr. Rhoads' possibly unethical medical experiments on anemic patients in Puerto Rico in 1931 and a racially offensive letter he wrote during that period prompted an international incident and Congressional-level inquiry. This dark history, as well as continued terminological problems with refractory anemia, suggest that this hoary term has indeed worn out its usefulness. This article reviews the history of "refractory anemia" and evolution in its use over the past 80 years. Rhoads' personal history, the potentially confusing nature of "refractory anemia", and the fact that it is possible none of the 100 patients Rhoads described in 1937 actually had MDS all support the new WHO reclassification proposal to eliminate this term. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Anemia as a risk factor for CKD and CVD].

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Hirakata, Hideki

    2008-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is now recognized as a risk factor of both end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and independently cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, a specific renoprotective intervention is strongly recommended, including blood pressure control as well as anemia improvement with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs). Treatment of renal anemia with ESAs has been proved to improve quality of life (QOL) and finally reduce patient mortality. Recently, Silverberg, et al. created a novel clinical entity of Cardio-Renal Anemia (CRA) syndrome, in which anemia plays a key role for worsening both CKD and cardiac performance in a vicious circle. An appropriate and vigorous treatment of anemia has now been accepted to terminate or weaken the circle. Recently, two large-scaled randomized controlled trials were reported, being the CREATE (cardiovascular risk reduction by early anemia treatment with epoetin beta) study and the CHOIR (correction of hemoglobin and outcomes in renal insufficiency) study. They demonstrated that early initiation of ESA treatment and targeting at higher hemoglobin level (near normal level) failed to show the lowering effects for cardiovascular events as compared to a group in which Hb targeting was lower (sub-normal level) in pre-dialysis CKD patients. While there has been many argues in these reports especially about baseline patients characteristics, being a quite high incidence of severe cardiovascular co-morbidity. Thus, further evidences should be accumulated to resolve a proper target level of Hb in ESA treatment.

  11. The incidence of gastrointestinal pathology and subsequent anemia in young men presenting with iron deficiency without anemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Bardan, Eytan; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Avidan, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of iron deficiency (ID) without anemia in young men is unclear, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for the required gastrointestinal (GI) evaluation. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of significant GI pathology and the development of anemia during the follow-up of young men presenting with ID, but without anemia. All young men (18-30 years) who served in the Israel Defense Forces during the years 2005-2013 and had at least a single laboratory test indicative of ID without anemia were followed until the diagnosis of significant GI pathology or discharge from military service. The study population included 2061 young men (mean age 20.7±1.8). During follow-up of 3150 person years, significant GI pathologies were diagnosed in 39 patients: inflammatory bowel disease in 25 (1.2%), celiac disease in 8 (0.4%), and peptic disease in 4 (0.1%). No cases of GI-related cancer were diagnosed. ID anemia developed during follow-up in 203 (9.8%). Lower baseline hemoglobin levels, lower ferritin levels, and younger age at diagnosis were more common among those who developed anemia. The development of anemia was a predisposing factor for the diagnosis of GI pathology (risk ratio=3.60, 95% confidence interval 1.34-8.32, P=0.012). Significant GI pathology is very uncommon in young men presenting with ID. Overt anemia developed in close to 10% of the study cohort. Therefore, we advise simple GI evaluation (celiac serology, C-reactive protein or fecal calprotectin, and urease breath test) as well as follow-up in this population.

  12. Does antenatal care attendance prevent anemia in pregnancy at term?

    PubMed

    Ikeanyi, E M; Ibrahim, A I

    2015-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is one of the public health problems in the developed and developing world. If uncontrolled it is a major indirect cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. This is worst in settings with poor prenatal practices. Quality prenatal interventions therefore are expected to prevent or ameliorate this disorder in pregnancy. Nigerian scientific literatures are full of data on anemia in pregnancy, but few of them are on the influence of prenatal care on maternal anemia. This study, therefore, sought to appraise the role of antenatal care (ANC) services in the prevention of anemia in pregnancy at term in Nigerian women. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of anemia at first antenatal visit and determine if antenatal attendance prevents anemia at term among prenatal Nigerian women. To measure the hematocrit levels at booking and at term respectively and compare the proportion anemic at booking with the proportion anemic at term. A retrospective cross-sectional comparative study of 3442 prenatal women in a mission hospital in South-South Nigeria from 2009 to 2013. Venous blood hematocrit was estimated from each woman at booking and at term, and the prevalence of anemia for the two periods were compared. There were 1205 subjects with hematocrit of below 33% at booking, an anemia prevalence of 32.2% at booking in this population. At term or delivery at term 736 (21.4% odds ratio [OR] =2.3, P < 0.0001) of the 1052 subjects that fulfilled the study criteria had their anemia corrected, a 69.9% prevention, while 316 (9.2%, OR = 0.43, P < 0.0001) persisted despite their antenatal attendance. The subjects were similar in most of the confounding factors like parity, social class, mean age, body mass index and gestational age at delivery (P value: all > 0.05). The prevalence of anemia in pregnancy is still high in our setting. Quality ANC appeared a valuable preventive intervention that should be made widely available, accessible and affordable to

  13. Erythropoietin May Improve Anemia in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Reticulocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Arbach, Olga; Funck, Robert; Seibt, Frank; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and reticulocytopenia remains challenging. Case Reports Two patients with decompensated AIHA who were receiving immunosuppressive drugs were treated with erythropoietin (EPO). Administration of EPO increased reticulocyte counts and hemoglobin concentrations in both cases. One patient completely recovered following a short course of treatment. Hemolysis could be compensated in the second patient using only mild doses of immunosuppressive drugs in combination with EPO. Conclusion The administration of EPO should be considered in patients with therapy-refractory AIHA, particularly in the presence of reticulocytopenia. PMID:22851939

  14. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  15. Impairment of bone health in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Schündeln, Michael M; Goretzki, Sarah C; Hauffa, Pia K; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment.

  16. Anemia, nutritional status, and inflammation in hospitalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Alfons; Jonsson, Palmi V; Bjornsson, Sigurbjorn; Thorsdottir, Inga

    2008-01-01

    Anemia (hemoglobin <120 g/L) in elderly patients is a health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of anemia and associations of anemia with nutritional status and inflammation in hospitalized elderly. Sixty patients from the Department of Geriatrics were randomly assigned to participate. Blood samples were drawn and analyzed at the laboratory of the University Hospital in Reykjavik. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometric and hematologic parameters. The prevalence of anemia was 36.7%. Female participants were more frequently anemic than male participants (47.4% versus 18.2%, P = 0.024). Anemic patients had a lower albumin level (31.3 versus 33.4 g/L, P = 0.019) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (29.6 versus 16.0 mm/h, P = 0.005) and were more often malnourished (81.8% versus 44.7%, P = 0.005) than non-anemic patients. Hemoglobin correlated with prealbumin (rho = 0.338, P = 0.008) and albumin (rho = 0.250, P = 0.054) levels, but negatively with age (rho = -0.310, P = 0.016) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (rho = -0.412, P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and nutritional status were significant predictors of hemoglobin (R(2) = 34.0%). This cross-sectional analysis provides evidence of anemia in 36.7% of patients hospitalized at the Landspitali-University Hospital in Reykjavik and shows an association among anemia, deteriorated nutritional status, and inflammation. Future prospective studies are needed to assess the efficacy of adjuvant nutritional support to stabilize or improve nutritional status including anemia in hospitalized elderly.

  17. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Virulence determinants of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that rapidly Induces disease in experimentally infected horses. Because EIAV infection and replication is centered on the monocyte/macrophage and has a pronounced acute disease stage, it is a useful model system for understanding the contribution of monocyte/macrophages to other lentivirus-induced diseases. Genetic mapping studies utilizing chimeric proviruses in which parental viruses are acutely virulent or avirulent have allowed the identification of important regions that influence acute virulence. U3 regions in the viral LTR, surface envelope (SU) protein and the accessory S2 gene strongly influence acute disease expression. While the chimeric proviruses provide insight into genes or genome regions that affect viral pathogenesis, it is then necessary to further dissect those regions to focus on specific virus-host mechanisms that lead to disease expression. The V6 region of the viral env protein is an example of one identified region that may interact with the ELR-1 receptor in an important way and we are currently identifying S2 protein motifs required for disease expression.

  19. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Go, Ronald S; Winters, Jeffrey L; Kay, Neil E

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon entity that presents diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic dilemmas despite being a well-recognized entity for over 150 years. This is because of significant differences in the rates of hemolysis and associated diseases and because there is considerable clinical heterogeneity. In addition, there is a lack of clinical trials required to refine and update standardized and evidence-based therapeutic approaches. To aid the clinician in AIHA management, we present four vignettes that represent and highlight distinct clinical presentations with separate diagnostic and therapeutic pathways that we use in our clinical practice setting. We also review the parameters present in diagnostic testing that allow for prognostic insight and present algorithms for both diagnosis and treatment of the AIHA patient in diverse situations. This is done in the hope that this review may offer guidance in regard to personalized therapy recommendations. A section is included for the diagnosis of suspected AIHA with negative test results, a relatively infrequent but challenging situation, in order to assist in the overall evaluation spectrum for these patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Infections in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jessica M; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S; Walsh, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of death in patients with aplastic anemia (AA). There are differences between the immunocompromised state of a patient with AA and the patient who is neutropenic due to chemotherapy and this leads to a difference in the infections that they incur. Prolonged neutropenia is one of the largest risk factors for the development of infections with the invasive mycoses and bacteria. Recovery from neutropenia is directly related to survival, and supportive care plays a large role in protection while the patient is in a neutropenic state. The most common invasive mycoses include the Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Candida spp., and Fusarium spp. Bacterial infections that are seen in patients with AA include gram-positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus, Staphylococus aureus, Clostridium spp., Micrococcus, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, and Bacillus cereus. Gram-negative infections including gram-negative bacilli, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Bacteroides fragilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumonia, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio vulnificus. Viral infections are much less common but include those that belong to the Herpesviridae family, community-acquired respiratory viral infection, and the viral hepatitides A, B, and C. Evidence of the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis has also been documented. This review discusses the major invasive fungal infections, bacterial pathogens, parasites, and viral infections that are found in patients with AA who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy. The specific immune impairment and current treatment parameters for each of these classes of infection will also be discussed.

  1. Recent advances in treatment of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sung Eun

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA) made most of patients to expect to achieve a long-term survival. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) from HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD-SCT) is a preferred first-line treatment option for younger patients with severe or very severe AA, whereas immunosuppressive treatment (IST) is an alternative option for others. Horse anti-thymocyte globuline (ATG) with cyclosporin A (CsA) had been a standard IST regimen with acceptable response rate. Recently, horse ATG had been not available and replaced with rabbit ATG in most countries. Subsequently, recent comparative studies showed that the outcomes of patients who received rabbit ATG/CsA were similar or inferior compared to those who received horse ATG/CsA. Therefore, further studies to improve the outcomes of IST, including additional eltrombopag, are necessary. On the other hand, the upper age limit of patients who are able to receive MSD-SCT as first-line treatment is a current issue because of favorable outcomes of MSD-SCT of older patients using fludarabine-based conditioning. In addition, further studies to improve the outcomes of patients who receive allogeneic SCT from alternative donors are needed. In this review, current issues and the newly emerging trends that may improve their outcomes in near futures will be discussed focusing the management of patients with AA. PMID:25378968

  2. Emerging drugs for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priya C; Ballas, Samir K

    2015-03-01

    The search for effective therapeutic interventions for sickle cell disease (SCD) has been an ongoing endeavor for over 50 years. During this period, only hydroxyurea (HU), which received US FDA approval in February 1998, was identified as an effective therapeutic agent in preventing or ameliorating the frequency of vaso-occlusive crises, acute chest syndrome and the need for blood transfusion. Approximately 25% of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), however, do not respond to HU and some patients experiencing serious side effects of this chemotherapeutic agent. Nevertheless, the success of HU opened the sluice gates to identify other effective drug therapies. The objective of this review is to describe the emerging drug therapies for SCA. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of SCD and provide an in-depth analysis of the current and new pharmacologic therapies in the field. Literature searches involved multiple databases including Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus. SCA is a heterogeneous disease that has caused tremendous global morbidity and early mortality. More effective, individualized and inexpensive therapies are needed. New therapies targeting multiple pathways in its complex pathophysiology are under investigation.

  3. Newer strategies for anemia prevention in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Handelman, G J

    2007-11-01

    Anemia prevention for hemodialysis relies primarily on supplemental erythropoietin (EPO) and intravenous iron (IV-iron). The doses of EPO utilized are somewhat higher than normal endogenous rates of EPO production in healthy subjects, and the amount of IV-iron used to boost red blood cell (RBC) production may be greater than the amounts used for erythropoiesis. EPO and IV-iron might be used more efficiently if two fundamental problems were solved in the management of dialysis patients: better vitamin C status, and avoidance of chronic inflammation. The low levels of plasma vitamin C commonly observed in dialysis patients restrict mobilization of stored iron from the reticuloendothelial system (RES), and inflammation has a very similar effect. The impact of low vitamin C levels and concurrent inflammation causes a large amount of iron to be stored, with relatively inefficient utilization for erythropoiesis. Vitamin C intake for dialysis patients is often restricted because of avoidance of vitamin C-rich foods, and because of concerns about oxalosis. Inflammation is a chronic feature of renal disease, which is compounded by infections from use of catheters. Research strategies to improve vitamin C status and to decrease inflammation would lead to better utilization of iron and EPO, and could have parallel benefits for the long-term health of patients on hemodialysis.

  4. [History of the therapy of pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Jeney, András

    2013-11-03

    Increased blood cell regeneration in exsanguinated experimental animals treated either with liver or with aqueous liver extracts was reported by Whipple and by Jeney and Jobling, respectively. These findings stimulated Minot and Murphy to provide evidence for the efficacy of liver against anaemia in clinical studies. After oral administration of liver (45-50 g per day) for 45 patients with anaemia perniciosa improvement of the hematological status was demonstrated. Consequently, for proving the therapeutic value of liver therapy Whipple, Minot and Murphy received Nobel price in 1934. The isolation of the antianemic factor from the liver has been succeeded in 1948 and designated as vitamin B12. At the same time Lucy Wills applied yeast for the treatment of pregnant women with anemia related to undernourishment. The conclusions of this study inspired the discovery of folate. The detailed investigation of the mode of action of vitamin B12 and folate enriched our knowledge in the area of pathophysiology and extended the clinical application of these two drugs.

  5. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway of Genomic Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Levitus, Marieke; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.

    2006-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessive syndrome with both autosomal and X-linked inheritance, features diverse clinical symptoms, such as progressive bone marrow failure, hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, chromosomal instability and susceptibility to cancer. At least 12 genetic subtypes have been described (FA-A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L, M) and all except FA-I have been linked to a distinct gene. Most FA proteins form a complex that activates the FANCD2 protein via monoubiquitination, while FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 function downstream of this step. The FA proteins typically lack functional domains, except for FANCJ/BRIP1 and FANCM, which are DNA helicases, and FANCL, which is probably an E3 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Based on the hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents, the FA proteins are thought to function in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links, which block the progression of DNA replication forks. Here we present a hypothetical model, which not only describes the assembly of the FA pathway, but also positions this pathway in the broader context of DNA cross-link repair. Finally, the possible role for the FA pathway, in particular FANCF and FANCB, in the origin of sporadic cancer is discussed. PMID:16675878

  6. Nutritional Anemia and Megaloblastosis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Louis; Brunton, Lauder; Hsieh, Yang-Shu

    1966-01-01

    Macrogranulocytic and/or erythroid megaloblastic bone marrow changes which could not be accurately predicted from the hematologic findings in the blood were present in 25% of 305 mildly to moderately anemic pregnant women attending a public antepartum clinic in Montreal. Iron deficiency was the primary cause of anemia in most instances. Serum folate activity of less than 4.1 ng./ml. and/or serum vitamin B12 levels of less than 100 pg./ml. were present in 90% of the 77 patients having these bone marrow changes, whereas approximately one-third of 228 patients with normoblastic marrow had these low values. Red cell folate did not correlate as well as serum folate activity with bone marrow changes. After treatment with oral folic acid in the range of 0.2 mg. to 0.8 mg., daily, for seven to 14 days, the megaloblastic and macrogranulocytic changes in patients with low serum folate activity and normal serum vitamin B12 values disappeared in 15 of 21 patients. Of five women having both low folate and vitamin B12 values, three failed to respond and two showed only partial improvement after 0.4 mg. of folic acid daily, per os, for 10 days. The average diet of these anemic women was suboptimal in folate and in iron. PMID:5907944

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia and Its Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas N; Thein, Swee Lay

    2018-04-11

    In the 100 years since sickle cell anemia (SCA) was first described in the medical literature, studies of its molecular and pathophysiological basis have been at the vanguard of scientific discovery. By contrast, the translation of such knowledge into treatments that improve the lives of those affected has been much too slow. Recent years, however, have seen major advances on several fronts. A more detailed understanding of the switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin and the identification of regulators such as BCL11A provide hope that these findings will be translated into genomic-based approaches to the therapeutic reactivation of hemoglobin F production in patients with SCA. Meanwhile, an unprecedented number of new drugs aimed at both the treatment and prevention of end-organ damage are now in the pipeline, outcomes from potentially curative treatments such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are improving, and great strides are being made in gene therapy, where methods employing both antisickling β-globin lentiviral vectors and gene editing are now entering clinical trials. Encouragingly, after a century of neglect, the profile of the vast majority of those with SCA in Africa and India is also finally improving. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics Volume 19 is August 31, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  8. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T; Ware, Russell E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a severe, inherited hemoglobin disorder affecting 100,000 persons in the US and millions worldwide. Hydroxyurea, a once daily oral medication, has emerged as the primary disease-modifying therapy for SCA. The accumulated body of evidence over 30 years demonstrates that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective therapy for SCA, but hydroxyurea remains underutilized for a variety of reasons. Areas covered In this review, we summarize the available evidence regarding the pharmacology, clinical, and laboratory benefits, and safety of hydroxy-urea therapy for the treatment of SCA. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader a comprehensive understanding of hydroxyurea and to reinforce the fact that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective medication for the treatment of SCA. Expert opinion In our opinion, hydroxyurea therapy should be considered standard-of-care for SCA, representing an essential component of patient management. Early initiation and broader use of hydroxyurea will alter the natural history of SCA, so affected children can live longer and healthier lives. In addition, hydroxyurea use should be extended to low-resource settings such as sub-Saharan Africa, where the burden of SCA and the need for hydroxyurea is arguably the greatest. PMID:26366626

  10. Hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a severe, inherited hemoglobin disorder affecting 100,000 persons in the US and millions worldwide. Hydroxyurea, a once daily oral medication, has emerged as the primary disease-modifying therapy for SCA. The accumulated body of evidence over 30 years demonstrates that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective therapy for SCA, but hydroxyurea remains underutilized for a variety of reasons. In this review, we summarize the available evidence regarding the pharmacology, clinical, and laboratory benefits, and safety of hydroxyurea therapy for the treatment of SCA. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader a comprehensive understanding of hydroxyurea and to reinforce the fact that hydroxyurea is a safe and effective medication for the treatment of SCA. In our opinion, hydroxyurea therapy should be considered standard-of-care for SCA, representing an essential component of patient management. Early initiation and broader use of hydroxyurea will alter the natural history of SCA, so affected children can live longer and healthier lives. In addition, hydroxyurea use should be extended to low-resource settings such as sub-Saharan Africa, where the burden of SCA and the need for hydroxyurea is arguably the greatest.

  11. Factors Influencing Spore Germination and Early Gametophyte Development in Anemia mexicana and Anemia phyllitidis1

    PubMed Central

    Nester, Joan E.; Coolbaugh, Ronald C.

    1986-01-01

    Spores of Anemia mexicana Klotzsch and Anemia phyllitidis (L.) Swartz were tested comparatively to investigate the effects of various treatments on spore germination and early gametophyte development in light and darkness. The optimum pH for induction of spore germination is approximately 6. Both species have a minimum 8 hour light insensitive preinduction phase for spore germination. An additional 8 to 12 hours of light are needed to induce 50% germination in A. phyllitidis while at least 24 hours of light are needed for A. mexicana spores. A. phyllitidis has greater sensitivity to the four gibberellic acids tested (GA3, GA4, GA7, and GA13) than A. mexicana for induction of spore germination in darkness. In both species the greatest response was observed with GA4 and GA7. GA13 was clearly the least effective. Gametophytes of each species are 100 times more sensitive to their own antheridiogen than to the antheridiogen of the other species. AMO-1618 (1 millimolar), fenarimol (1 mm), and ancymidol (0.1 mm) had essentially no effect on light-induced germination. The latter two did, however, inhibit gametophyte development. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:16664998

  12. Association of Preoperative Anemia With Postoperative Mortality in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Goobie, Susan M; Faraoni, David; Zurakowski, David; DiNardo, James A

    2016-09-01

    Neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery are at risk for adverse outcomes. Preoperative anemia is a strong independent risk factor for postoperative mortality in adults. To our knowledge, this association has not been investigated in the neonatal population. To assess the association between preoperative anemia and postoperative mortality in neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery in a large sample of US hospitals. Using data from the 2012 and 2013 pediatric databases of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, we conducted a retrospective study of neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery. Analysis of the data took place between June 2015 and December 2015. All neonates (0-30 days old) with a recorded preoperative hematocrit value were included. Anemia defined as hematocrit level of less than 40%. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to assess the association between preoperative hematocrit and mortality, and the Youden J Index was used to determine the specific hematocrit cutoff point to define anemia in the neonatal population. Demographic and postoperative outcomes variables were compared between anemic and nonanemic neonates. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with postoperative neonatal mortality. An external validation was performed using the 2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Neonates accounted for 2764 children (6%) in the 2012-2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases. Neonates inlcuded in the study were predominately male (64.5%), white (66.3%), and term (69.9% greater than 36 weeks' gestation) and weighed more than 2 kg (85.0%). Postoperative in-hospital mortality was 3.4% in neonates and 0.6% in all age groups (0-18 years). A preoperative hematocrit level of less than 40% was the optimal cutoff (Youden) to predict in-hospital mortality

  13. Mild anemia during pregnancy upregulates placental vascularity development.

    PubMed

    Stangret, A; Skoda, M; Wnuk, A; Pyzlak, M; Szukiewicz, D

    2017-05-01

    The connection between maternal hematological status and pregnancy outcome has been shown by many independent researchers. Attention was initially focused on the adverse effects of moderate and severe anemia. Interestingly, some studies revealed that mild anemia was associated with optimal fetal development and was not affecting pregnancy outcome. The explanation for this phenomenon became a target for scientists. Hemodilution, physiologic anemia and relative decrease in hemoglobin concentration are the changes observed during pregnancy but they do not explain the reasons for the positive influence of mild anemia on a fetomaternal unit. It is hypothesized that hemodilution facilitates placental perfusion because blood viscosity is reduced. Subsequently, it may lead to a decline in hemoglobin concentration. Anemia from its definition implies decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and can result in hypoxemia and even hypoxia, which is a common factor inducing new blood vessels formation. Therefore, we raised the hypothesis that the lowered hemoglobin concentration during pregnancy may upregulate vascular growth factor receptors expression such as VEGFR-1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR-2 (FLK-1/KDR). Consecutively, increased fetoplacental vasculogenesis and angiogenesis provide further expansion of vascular network development, better placental perfusion and hence neither fetus nor the mother are affected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ceftriaxone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia in a Jehovah's Witness.

    PubMed

    Tasch, James; Gonzalez-Zayaz, Pedro

    2017-04-21

    BACKGROUND Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is a rare condition that may result from the administration of an antibiotic, most notably the cephalosporin class, commonly used in both the adult and pediatric populations. A delay in recognition by a provider may lead to continuation of the offending agent and possibly result in fatal outcomes. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 65-year-old woman on ceftriaxone infusions after being diagnosed with acute mitral valve endocarditis 3 weeks prior, which presented with severe anemia and bilateral transient vision loss. Being a Jehovah's Witness, the patient refused blood product transfusions and was managed with alternative therapies. The etiology of the symptoms was suspected to be a hemolytic anemia directly related to her ceftriaxone infusions. CONCLUSIONS This report demonstrates the importance of close vigilance while prescribing drugs known to cause hemolytic anemia. Although rare, drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia caused by ceftriaxone may be a potentially fatal condition, but with early recognition and withdrawal of the offending agent, successful treatment may ensue. Serological tests should be utilized to obtain a definitive diagnosis.

  15. Evidencing the Role of Erythrocytic Apoptosis in Malarial Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Totino, Paulo R. R.; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio T.; Ferreira-da-Cruz, Maria de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade it has become clear that, similarly to nucleated cells, enucleated red blood cells (RBCs) are susceptible to programmed apoptotic cell death. Erythrocytic apoptosis seems to play a role in physiological clearance of aged RBCs, but it may also be implicated in anemia of different etiological sources including drug therapy and infectious diseases. In malaria, severe anemia is a common complication leading to death of children and pregnant women living in malaria-endemic regions of Africa. The pathogenesis of malarial anemia is multifactorial and involves both ineffective production of RBCs by the bone marrow and premature elimination of non-parasitized RBCs, phenomena potentially associated with apoptosis. In the present overview, we discuss evidences associating erythrocytic apoptosis with the pathogenesis of severe malarial anemia, as well as with regulation of parasite clearance in malaria. Efforts to understand the role of erythrocytic apoptosis in malarial anemia can help to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention based on apoptotic pathways and consequently, mitigate the harmful impact of malaria in global public health. PMID:28018860

  16. Possible Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole-Induced Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Montgomery F; Doss, Emily P; Montgomery, Maggie

    2017-12-01

    To report a case of hemolytic anemia in a patient who received trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for a urinary tract infection (UTI). A 47-year-old woman recently diagnosed with uncomplicated UTI received 3 doses of TMP-SMX. She developed yellowing of the skin and eyes, lethargy, mild abdominal pain, and dry mucous membranes. Laboratory testing demonstrated significant anemia with red blood cells (RBCs) of 1.99, hemoglobin (Hgb) of 6.3 g/dL, and hematocrit (Hct) of 18.1%. TMP-SMX was immediately discontinued. The patient was given methylprednisolone 60 mg intravenously (IV) followed by oral steroids and infused with 3 units of packed RBCs over the course of a 10-day inpatient admission. On discharge, the patient continued oral steroids. Outpatient follow-up indicated Hgb of 11.0 g/dL and Hct of 32.7%, 41 days after hospital discharge. Utilizing the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, there is a probable association between the patient's hemolytic anemia and TMP-SMX. We report a case of hemolytic anemia resulting from the use of TMP-SMX. Although this is a rare adverse effect, clinicians should be aware of the signs and symptoms of hemolytic anemia, and so appropriate treatment can be administered should it occur.

  17. Prevalence, characteristics and prognostic significance of anemia in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Terrier, B; Resche-Rigon, M; Andres, E; Bonnet, F; Hachulla, E; Marie, I; Rosenthal, E; Cacoub, P

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of anemia has been studied in well-defined populations, but no large study is available for less restricted populations with various disorders. Two-phase nationwide study: (i) a cross-sectional study including 1351 patients aimed to define the prevalence and characteristics of anemic patients seen in France, and (ii) a prospective longitudinal study of 398 anemic patients aimed to define factors associated with survival. Anemia was present in 874 (65%) patients according to WHO criteria, and 573 (42%) patients had hemoglobin levels <110 g/l. Characteristics independently associated with anemia were the presence of cancer, hematological disorder, renal failure and inflammatory syndrome. Baseline factors negatively associated with the 3-month survival were cancer, older age and a lower target hemoglobin level defined at baseline. Negative predictive factors at Month 3 of the 6-month survival were older age and the absence of correction of anemia according to the target hemoglobin level defined at baseline. Anemia is frequent and is associated with cancer, hematological disorders, renal failure and inflammatory syndrome. At baseline, prognostic factors of 3-month survival include cancer, older age and lower target hemoglobin level, whereas reaching the target hemoglobin level at Month 3 has a favorable prognostic impact on 6-month survival.

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Neil D

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. PMID:23766655

  19. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia.

    PubMed

    Crispino, John D; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2014-05-15

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Anemia of chronic disease: illness or adaptive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Županić-Krmek; Sučić, Mirna; Bekić, Dinko

    2014-09-01

    The anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most prevalent anemia after iron deficiency anemia. It is associated with infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disease. ACD is a medical condition caused by the release of cytokines which mediate inflammatory and immune response (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins 1 and 6, and interferon). Abnormal iron metabolism with iron trapping in reticuloendothelial cells is primarily the cause of this condition, making iron unavailable for erythropoiesis although iron tissue reserves are elevated. Disorder in erythropoietin secretion and shortening of red cell life span also play a role in the pathogenesis of ACD. The main therapy is treatment of the underlying disorder and red cell transfusions in severe anemia. In more severe (protracted) anemias that lead to impaired quality of life and have an impact on the mortality and survival rate, erythropoiesis stimulating agents are used. Recently, new possibilities are being evaluated in terms of therapy for ACD in defined conditions, such as chelating agents, as well as hepcidin antagonist and other erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

  1. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  2. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias in adults.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich

    2010-09-16

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a heterogeneous disease with respect to the type of the antibody involved and the absence or presence of an underlying condition. Treatment decisions should be based on careful diagnostic evaluation. Primary warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to steroids, but most patients remain steroid-dependent, and many require second-line treatment. Currently, splenectomy can be regarded as the most effective and best-evaluated second-line therapy, but there are still only limited data on long-term efficacy and adverse effects. The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab is another second-line therapy with documented short-term efficacy, but there is limited information on long-term efficacy and side effects. The efficacy of immunosuppressants is poorly evaluated. Primary cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to rituximab but are resistant to steroids and splenectomy. The most common causes of secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemias are malignancies, immune diseases, or drugs. They may be treated in a way similar to primary autoimmune hemolytic anemias, by immunosuppressants or by treatment of the underlying disease.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of <333 m. There is currently a lack of concrete data to support the use of targeted oral pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy in chronic hemolytic anemia. As a result, management is generally targeted towards medical optimization of the underlying anemia. This literature review aims to discuss the pathophysiology, diagnostic and prognostic tools, recent studies and current protocols that are essential in guiding management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Prevalence of pica in iron deficiency anemia in Marrakech (Morocco)].

    PubMed

    Nafil, H; Tazi, I; Mahmal, L

    2015-01-01

    Pica is an eating disorder, defined by long-term ingestion of non-nutritive substances. To determine the frequency of pica in patients with iron deficiency anemia and to describe the population with both iron deficiency anemia and pica. This retrospective study examined records from the department of hematology at the Mohammed VI University Hospital Center in Marrakech of all adult patients seen from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2010 who met both criteria. Results: During the 6-year study period, 320 patients with iron deficiency anemia were seen: 256 women and 64 men (sex-ratio F/M: 4). The prevalence of pica among the patients with iron deficiency anemia was 17.5% (56/320). All the patients with pica were women, for a prevalence of 21.8% (56/256); their average age was 23 years; 40 were white (71.4%) and 16 black (28.6%). The clinical signs were primarily pallor (100%) and asthenia (100%). The mean level of hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL and of ferritin, 6.4 mg/L. Geophagia was the most common form of pica (75%). Iron supplementation induced regression of pica in 64.3% of patients. Our study shows a high prevalence of pica in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  5. Association between depression and anemia in otherwise healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Vulser, H; Wiernik, E; Hoertel, N; Thomas, F; Pannier, B; Czernichow, S; Hanon, O; Simon, T; Simon, J-M; Danchin, N; Limosin, F; Lemogne, C

    2016-08-01

    It remains debated whether anemia is associated with depression, independently of physical health factors. We report a large-scale cross-sectional study examining this association in adults free of chronic disease and medication from the general population. Hemoglobin levels were measured among 44 173 healthy participants [63% men; mean [standard deviation] age = 38.4 (11.1) years] from the 'Investigations Préventives et Cliniques' (IPC) cohort study. Depression was measured with the Questionnaire of Depression 2nd version, Abridged. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between anemia and depression, while adjusting for a wide range of sociodemographic characteristics and health-related factors (i.e., sex, age, living status, education level, occupational status, alcohol intake, smoking status, physical activity, and body mass index). Depressed participants were significantly more likely to have anemia compared to non-depressed participants, even after adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related variables [odds ratio = 1.36; 95% confidence interval = (1.18; 1.57)]. Anemia prevalence increased with depression severity, suggesting a dose-response relationship (P for trend <0.001). In healthy adults from the general population, we found a significant and robust association between depression and anemia. Further studies are needed to assess the longitudinal relationship between both conditions and determine the mechanisms underlying this association. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  7. Busca de estruturas em grandes escalas em altos redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, N. V.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Cypriano, E.

    2003-08-01

    A busca por estruturas em grandes escalas (aglomerados de galáxias, por exemplo) é um ativo tópico de pesquisas hoje em dia, pois a detecção de um único aglomerado em altos redshifts pode por vínculos fortes sobre os modelos cosmológicos. Neste projeto estamos fazendo uma busca de estruturas distantes em campos contendo pares de quasares próximos entre si em z Â3 0.9. Os pares de quasares foram extraídos do catálogo de Véron-Cetty & Véron (2001) e estão sendo observados com os telescópios: 2,2m da University of Hawaii (UH), 2,5m do Observatório de Las Campanas e com o GEMINI. Apresentamos aqui a análise preliminar de um par de quasares observado nos filtros i'(7800 Å) e z'(9500 Å) com o GEMINI. A cor (i'-z') mostrou-se útil para detectar objetos "early-type" em redshifts menores que 1.1. No estudo do par 131046+0006/J131055+0008, com redshift ~ 0.9, o uso deste método possibilitou a detecção de sete objetos candidatos a galáxias "early-type". Num mapa da distribuição projetada dos objetos para 22 < i' < 25 observou-se que estas galáxias estão localizadas próximas a um dos quasares e há indícios de que estejam aglomeradas dentro de um área de ~ 6 arcmin2. Se esse for o caso, estes objetos seriam membros de uma estrutura em grande escala. Um outro argumento em favor dessa hipótese é que eles obedecem uma relação do tipo Kormendy (raio equivalente X brilho superficial dentro desse raio), como a apresentada pelas galáxias elípticas em z = 0.

  8. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, R. K.; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The “best match” or “least incompatible units” can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue “best match” packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea and sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Carol L; Debaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I; Gavlak, Johanna C D; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J

    2014-08-01

    To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for β(S) hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non-preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Macrocytic anemia and thrombocytopenia induced by orlistat.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Martinez, David; Garcia-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Montero-Santamaria, Nieves; Villar-Ruiz, Olga Patricia; Ruiz-Garcia, Antonio; Diaz-Alonso, Raquel Asuncion

    2013-10-01

    The overall incidence of obesity and its prevalence is increasing continuously. The obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor whose importance is increasing too. It is associated with many chronic conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular diseases. The obesity is also implicated as a risk factor for several kinds of cancer such as esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, breast cancer in menopausal women. The treatment of the obesity may reduce the incidence of these diseases. The mainstray of the treatment of obesity is changing the lifestyles, but obesity´s treatment may need drug therapy or even though surgical treatment. Orlistat is a specific inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, which stops fat absortion. It is used along with a hypocaloric diet, for obesity´s treatment. The beneficial effects of orlistat include weight loss, the improvement of blood pressure´s control, it may delay the development of diabetes mellitus, and it may reduce HbA1c. Besides the interaction with other drugs (mainly warfarin and amiodarone). Orlistat´s mainly side effects are gastrointestinal disorders such as the existence of oily spotting from the rectum, abdominal pain or discomfort, fecal urgency. There are also side effects at other levels, like flu symptoms, hypoglycemia, heathache or upper respiratory infections. There are other side effects with very low incidence but clinically relevant like pancreatitis, subacute liver failure, severe liver disease, myopathy, or tubular necrosis secondary to oxalate nephropathy induced by Orlistat. IN THIS CASE REPORT APPEARS A NEW ADVERSE EFFECT OF ORLISTAT THAT HAS NOT BEEN DESCRIBED ABOVE: thrombopenia and macrocytic anemia.

  12. Anemia in patients with ulcerative colitis in remission: A study from western India.

    PubMed

    Chaubal, Alisha; Pandey, Vikas; Choksi, Dhaval; Poddar, Prateik; Ingle, Meghraj; Phadke, Aniruddha; Sawant, Prabha

    2017-09-01

    Anemia is common in patients with active ulcerative colitis. We aimed to study the anemia profile in patients with ulcerative colitis in clinical remission. Sixty-four patients with ulcerative colitis and with a clinical Mayo score less than 3 for at least 3 months were evaluated for anemia. Initial screening was done by hemogram and only patients with anemia were evaluated further for the cause of anemia. We also screened a control population for anemia. Patients with mild anemia were given oral iron, moderate anemia were given intravenous iron and severe anemia were given blood transfusion. The mean hemoglobin in ulcerative colitis patients was 11.75 g/dL and in controls was 13.1 g/dL (p=0.011). The prevalence of anemia was 53.1% in the ulcerative colitis patients and 13.3% in the controls (p=<0.001). 58.8% had mild anemia, 29.4% had moderate anemia and 8.8% had severe anemia. Iron deficiency was the most common cause of anemia (70.5%) followed by anemia of chronic disease combined with iron deficiency in 23.5%. Ferritin levels did not correlate with hemoglobin levels. Oral iron increased the hemoglobin by 1.4 g/dL and intravenous iron by 2.2 g/dL at 1 month. Anemia was seen in more than half of patients with ulcerative colitis in clinical remission, iron deficiency being the most common cause.

  13. The hepcidin-ferroportin system as a therapeutic target in anemias and iron overload disorders.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2011-01-01

    The review summarizes the current understanding of the role of hepcidin and ferroportin in normal iron homeostasis and its disorders. The various approaches to therapeutic targeting of hepcidin and ferroportin in iron-overload disorders (mainly hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia) and iron-restrictive anemias (anemias associated with infections, inflammatory disorders, and certain malignancies, anemia of chronic kidney diseases, and iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia) are also discussed.

  14. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  15. Deferasirox Decreases Liver Iron Concentration in Iron-Overloaded Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Aplastic Anemia and Other Rare Anemias.

    PubMed

    Kohgo, Yutaka; Urabe, Akio; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Agaoglu, Leyla; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Miyamura, Koichi; Lim, Lay Cheng; Glaser, Sabine; Wang, Candace; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with rare anemias can be managed with chelation therapy. This study evaluated deferasirox efficacy and safety in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), aplastic anemia (AA) or other rare anemias. A 1-year, open-label, multicenter, single-arm, phase II trial was performed with deferasirox (10–40 mg/kg/day, based on transfusion frequency and therapeutic goals), including an optional 1-year extension. The primary end point was a change in liver iron concentration (LIC) after 1 year. Secondary end points included changes in efficacy and safety parameters (including ophthalmologic assessments) overall as well as in a Japanese subpopulation. Overall, 102 patients (42 with MDS, 29 with AA and 31 with other rare anemias) were enrolled; 57 continued into the extension. Mean absolute change in LIC was –10.9 mg Fe/g dry weight (d.w.) after 1 year (baseline: 24.5 mg Fe/g d.w.) and –13.5 mg Fe/g d.w. after 2 years. The most common drug-related adverse event was increased serum creatinine (23.5%), predominantly in MDS patients. Four patients had suspected drug-related ophthalmologic abnormalities. Outcomes in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall population. Results confirm deferasirox efficacy in patients with rare anemias, including a Japanese subpopulation. The safety profile was consistent with previous studies and ophthalmologic parameters generally agreed with baseline values (EUDRACT 2006-003337-32).

  16. [Hospital-acquired anemia: Facts, consequences and prevention].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Aubron, C; Nguyen, B-V

    2016-11-01

    Hospital-acquired anemia is common, especially in the most critically ill patients. It may be associated with poor patient outcomes. It may result from increased blood loss, impaired red cell production or reduced red cell life span. Multiple associated factors may contribute simultaneously or sequentially to the decrease in hemoglobin level. Some of them are related to the underlying disease and others are iatrogenic. Clinicians should be aware of the importance and consequences of iatrogenic anemia caused by diagnostic blood sampling. Strategies and measures to minimize iatrogenic blood loss should be prioritized. They may reduce the risk of developing anemia and then red blood cells transfusion requirement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  18. Spatial and social factors drive anemia in Congolese women.

    PubMed

    Messina, Jane P; Mwandagalirwa, Kashamuka; Taylor, Steve M; Emch, Michael; Meshnick, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is common in women of child-bearing age in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). As part of the 2007 DRC Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), 4638 women of childbearing age (including 526 pregnant women) were tested for HIV and had the hemoglobin content of their blood recorded. We used the leftover dried blood spots to assess malaria prevalence using PCR assays. The DHS provided extensive information on individuals, as well as the geographic coordinates of household clusters which enabled us to derive several variables that characterize the spatial context of these clusters. Multilevel analyses were conducted to determine individual and contextual risk factors for anemia. Prevalence varied geographically; the odds of anemia were associated with both one's ethnic group and the amount and type of nearby agriculture. The odds were not affected by HIV or malaria status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.

    1991-03-11

    The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severemore » signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.« less

  20. Reproductive endocrine issues in men with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, A W; Muneyyirci-Delale, O

    2017-07-01

    In patients with sickle cell anemia, the sickling of red blood cells is known to cause end-organ damage by infarction. In some men who are affected by sickle cell anemia, the obstruction of venous outflow of the penis causes priapism, which could lead to erectile dysfunction. There is also evidence that the disease is linked to other reproductive issues in men-specifically delayed puberty, low testosterone, and sperm abnormalities-although the causes of these problems are less clear. Treatment of sickle cell anemia can have effects on the reproductive system as well. This review summarizes the findings from various publications pertaining to reproductive endocrinology, along with their conclusions and discrepancies. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  1. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  2. PATHOGENESIS OF THYMIC CHANGES IN NZB MICE WITH HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, Richard

    1965-01-01

    Lymphoid follicles evolve in the perivascular connective tissue of many organs, including the thymuses, in NZB/Bl mice with hemolytic anemia. In previously published studies, these thymic follicles have been held to be causal in the autoimmune genesis of the hemolytic anemia. The present study contradicts this interpretation by demonstrating: (a) lymphoid follicles develop in the perivascular connective tissue of many organs in NZB mice, and are not restricted to the thymuses; and (b) thymic lymphoid follicles develop in aged Swiss mice without hemolytic anemia. Contrary to previous reports, the thymuses of NZB mice contain normal numbers of Hassall's corpuscles, which develop from preexisting thymic epithelial cells, and not from blood vessels. PMID:19867296

  3. Severe late anemia of hemolytic disease of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Simon; James, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Late anemia is a well-recognized complication of Rhesus hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). The incidence of Rhesus HDN is declining, with a tendency for more severely affected pregnancies to be managed in specialist centres. Consequently, many paediatric departments may see relatively few affected infants with comparatively mild disease, and the risk of late anemia in such cases may not always be appreciated. Two cases of infants born with evidence of Rhesus isoimmunization noted at birth and encountering no immediate problems other than mild hyperbilirubinemia are described. After an uneventful early neonatal course, both infants were discharged without follow-up and presented in the second to third weeks of life with severe, life-threatening anemia, leading to neurological sequelae in one case. The importance of close surveillance, including hemoglobin measurements, in all infants with Rhesus hemolytic disease, irrespective of initial severity, is reiterated. PMID:20212966

  4. A Rare Cause of Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Soylu Ustkoyuncu, Pembe; Mutlu, Fatma Türkan; Kiraz, Aslihan; Tag Balkis, Zuhal; Yel, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Isolated hemolysis or hemolytic anemia and 5-oxoprolinuria are 2 distinct medical conditions in the clinical spectrum associated with glutathione synthetase deficiency. A 1-day-old female baby presented with anemia and respiratory distress. Her hemoglobin level was 9.5 g/dL and the total serum bilirubin level was 5.6 mg/dL. Metabolic acidosis was detected in her blood gas analysis. Metabolic acidosis recurred despite treatment and further investigation was required. Her 5-oxoproline level was 3815 mmol/mol creatinine in urine organic acid analysis, and a homozygous mutation [p.R125H (c.374G>A)] was found in the glutathione synthetase gene. GSD has been observed in very few patients and is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia in newborns.

  5. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus.

  6. [Surgical treatment of an auto-immune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Martellosio, J-P; Landron, C; Milin, S; Sarfati, R; Arrivé, F; Beuvon, C; Roblot, P

    2018-04-09

    Auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare cause of anemia, characterized by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be primary or secondary, in particular due to lymphoproliferative diseases. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with a severe macrocytic anemia associated with an ovarian teratoma. Ovarian teratoma is a rare cause of secondary AIHA, with only few cases reported. Its treatment differs from primary AIHA as steroids may be ineffective. Indeed, complete response can only be achieved with surgical excision of the tumor. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Megaloblastic Anemia Associated with Surgically Produced Gastrointestinal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, James A.

    1955-01-01

    Two of the mechanisms for vitamin B12 deficiency, leading to megaloblastic anemia, are the result of surgically produced abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract. The basic mechanism is different for each lesion. Total gastrectomy results in complete lack of intrinsic factor which is necessary for vitamin B12 absorption. It is believed that if patients survive long enough and are not given prophylactic vitamin B12 therapy, all would develop megaloblastic anemia. Intestinal anastomosis leading to stasis of intestinal contents, with overgrowth of bacteria may cause vitamin B12 deficiency through bacterial interference with the utilization of vitamin B12. Use of radioactive vitamin B12 (cobalt60-labeled B12) has led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of both types of megaloblastic anemia. The radioactive vitamin provides a useful tool for study of its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:13250423

  8. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned with...

  9. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned with...

  10. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned with...

  11. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned with...

  12. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned with...

  13. Characterization and pathogenesis of anemia in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Q; Carreras, Caroline T; Fiske, Laurie M; Austin, Stephanie; Boree, Danielle; Kishnani, Priya S; Weinstein, David A

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the frequency and causes of anemia in glycogen storage disease type I. Hematologic data and iron studies were available from 202 subjects (163 with glycogen storage disease Ia and 39 with glycogen storage disease Ib). Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentrations less than the 5th percentile for age and gender; severe anemia was defined as presence of a hemoglobin <10 g/dl. In glycogen storage disease Ia, 68/163 patients were anemic at their last follow-up. Preadolescent patients tended to have milder anemia secondary to iron deficiency, but anemia of chronic disease predominated in adults. Severe anemia was present in 8/163 patients, of whom 75% had hepatic adenomas. The anemia improved or resolved in all 10 subjects who underwent resection of liver lesions. Anemia was present in 72% of patients with glycogen storage disease Ib, and severe anemia occurred in 16/39 patients. Anemia in patients with glycogen storage disease Ib was associated with exacerbations of glycogen storage disease enterocolitis, and there was a significant correlation between C-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels (P = 0.036). Anemia is a common manifestation of both glycogen storage disease Ia and Ib, although the pathophysiology appears to be different between these conditions. Those with severe anemia and glycogen storage disease Ia likely have hepatic adenomas, whereas glycogen storage disease enterocolitis should be considered in those with glycogen storage disease Ib.

  14. Characterization and pathogenesis of anemia in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David Q.; Carreras, Caroline T.; Fiske, Laurie M.; Austin, Stephanie; Boree, Danielle; Kishnani, Priya S.; Weinstein, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to characterize the frequency and causes of anemia in glycogen storage disease type I. Methods Hematologic data and iron studies were available from 202 subjects (163 with glycogen storage disease Ia and 39 with glycogen storage disease Ib). Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentrations less than the 5th percentile for age and gender; severe anemia was defined as presence of a hemoglobin <10 g/dl. Results In glycogen storage disease Ia, 68/163 patients were anemic at their last follow-up. Preadolescent patients tended to have milder anemia secondary to iron deficiency, but anemia of chronic disease predominated in adults. Severe anemia was present in 8/163 patients, of whom 75% had hepatic adenomas. The anemia improved or resolved in all 10 subjects who underwent resection of liver lesions. Anemia was present in 72% of patients with glycogen storage disease Ib, and severe anemia occurred in 16/39 patients. Anemia in patients with glycogen storage disease Ib was associated with exacerbations of glycogen storage disease enterocolitis, and there was a significant correlation between C-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels (P = 0.036). Conclusion Anemia is a common manifestation of both glycogen storage disease Ia and Ib, although the pathophysiology appears to be different between these conditions. Those with severe anemia and glycogen storage disease Ia likely have hepatic adenomas, whereas glycogen storage disease enterocolitis should be considered in those with glycogen storage disease Ib. PMID:22678084

  15. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  16. Iron deficiency anemia in older adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Etienne

    2018-03-01

    Anemia in older adults is a risk factor for numerous negative outcomes. There is no standard definition, but in most studies, anemia is defined as a hemoglobin value <12 g/dL for women and <13 g/dL for men. Absolute iron deficiency anemia is defined as the combination of anemia and the absence of total body iron. Serum ferritin is the most frequently used diagnostic parameter, but its concentration increases with age and in the presence of inflammatory diseases. Other laboratory tests, such as transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor and the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index might provide useful information, but there is a wide variety in the cut-off values and interpretation of the results. Recent research regarding hepcidin as a central regulator of iron homeostasis is promising, but it has not been used yet for the routine diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. In older iron deficiency anemia patients, an esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy should be initiated in order to identify the underlying bleeding cause. CT colonography can replace a colonoscopy, and in specific cases, a video capsule is recommended. It remains crucial to keep in mind which potential benefits might be expected from these investigations in this vulnerable population, taking into account the comorbidity and life expectancy, and one should discuss in advance the possible therapeutic options and complications with the patient, a family member or a proxy. Oral iron administration is the standard treatment, but parenteral iron is a convenient and safe way to provide the total iron dose in one or a few sessions. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 373-379. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. National survey of anemia prevalence after kidney transplantation in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Petrone, H; Arriola, M; Re, L; Taylor, F; Bruzzone, M; Chiurchu, C; Schiavelli, R

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is prevalent in kidney transplant recipients and likely contributes to morbidity and mortality. The definition of anemia as established by the World Health Organization and subsequently adopted by the American Society of Transplantation is a hemoglobin concentration of 12 g/dL or less in women and 13 g/dL or less in men. Using this definition, the prevalence of anemia is nearly 30%. The National Survey of Post Transplant Anemia (PTA) in kidney transplant recipients in Argentina was conducted to evaluate the incidence of PTA at 1 year and its relationship to variables that influence transplantation outcome. At 1 year posttransplantation, mean (SD) hemoglobin concentration was 12.43 (1.77) g/dL (n = 379), hematocrit concentration was 38.26% (5.59%) (n = 379), serum creatinine concentration was 1.51 (0.72) mg/dL (n = 380), and creatinine clearance was 60.8 (22.47) mL/min (n = 334). The prevalence of PTA in Argentina at 1 year posttransplantation was 42.25%. At univariate analysis, female sex, immunosuppression regimen (mycophenolate mofetil plus mammalian target of rapamycin), and pediatric age group were associated with anemia. At multivariate analysis, only renal function and pediatric age group were associated with anemia. The mean hemoglobin level at year of transplant was 12.43 g/dL +/-1.77 and the prevalence of PTA in Argentina at year of transplant is 42.25%. Results of our survey show a correlation between Hb levels and graft function and pediatric recipient.

  18. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  19. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia.

  20. Is there any relation between Duration of breastfeeding and anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, H; Baghersalimi, A; Dalili, S; Pakdaman, F; Hassanzadeh Rad, A; Abbasi Kakroodi, M; Rezvany, SM; Koohmanaei, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background In the early months of life, Breastfeeding increases chance of survival, reduces recovery time after disease and mortality due to infections such as diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. However, infants who are exclusively breast-fed for more than 6 months in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia. Therefore, the aim of study was to assess the relation between duration of breastfeeding and anemia. Materials and Methods In this analytical cross-sectional study, 400 neonates registered in primary health care system since birth time. Complete blood count and serum ferritin were obtained. Data were analyzed by chi- square test and regression analysis. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant and 95% confidence interval was noted. Results Results of this study showed that 199 infants were anemic (Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration <11 mg/dl). Ten percent of anemic patients reported Ferritin< 12ng/dl and %25 of anemic children had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In Binominal logistic regression, merely kind of delivery and duration of breastfeeding were effective factors. Binominal logistic regression also showed that natural vaginal delivery and exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months had a significant influence on anemia. Exclusive breast feeding for 6 months or more increased the likelihood of anemia. In addition, 4 months exclusive breastfeeding decreased 0.686 fold the likelihood of anemia. Conclusion According to the results, it seems that revision of health program recommendations for iron supplementation can be constructive. National planning to promote the level of knowledge regarding natural vaginal delivery and appropriate period for clamping can be recommended. PMID:26985355

  1. Hemoglobin E: another cause of microcytic anemia in North America.

    PubMed

    Bertolone, S J; Kent, A; Patel, C C

    1986-12-01

    The influx of Southeast Asians has expanded the differential diagnosis of microcytic, hypochromic anemia in this country. We describe four patients with hemoglobin E, all of whom had microcytic, hypochromic anemia. Hemoglobin E is benign in both the heterozygous and homozygous states. On routine hemoglobin electrophoresis at pH 8.4, hemoglobin E will migrate near the hemoglobin C and hemoglobin A2 regions. If hemoglobin E is suspected, the laboratory should be advised to do electrophoresis on citrate agar at pH 6.3.

  2. [A 74-year-old woman with macrocytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Picardi, A; Navajas, F; Spoto, S; Palma Modoni, A; De Galasso, L; Costantino, S

    2002-01-01

    A seventy-four years old woman is assessed for asthenia, fatigue, non ulcerous dyspepsia with macrocytic anemia. The patient's medical history taking in Binswanger disease--diagnosed 5 aa before-, epilepsy-2 aa before- and a previous episode of TVP of the left leg, suggested the hypothesis that a B12 deficiency, by a chronic gastritis, would involve an increase of homocysteine cause of the clinical manifestations of megaloblastic anemia, Binswanger disease, tardive epilepsy and previous TVP. The fisic and blood and instrumental exams confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The patient is having vitamin B12.

  3. Myasthenia Gravis Associated With Thymoma And Aplastic Anemia: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dežmalj Grbelja, Lidija; Vrhovac, Radovan; Ulamec, Monika

    2017-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis is associated in 10 to 15 percent of patients with thymic tumors, rarely with aplastic anemia. We report a 45-year-old male diagnosed with myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma. We started treatment with pyridostigmine. After thymectomy, the patient received 30 irradiation sessions. In the postoperative course, he had mild worsening of myasthenia gravis, which improved with prednisone. Five months later, he developed severe aplastic anemia. He was dependent on blood supplement. After allogeneic transplantation of bone marrow, he improved but later he -developed graft versus host disease. Myasthenia gravis was under good control with 480 mg of pyridostigmine per day.

  4. Hepcidin in tumor-related iron deficiency anemia and tumor-related anemia of chronic disease: pathogenic mechanisms and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Tingting; Jing, Changwen; Lv, Zhigang; Xie, Yuchun; Xu, Jiaren; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common hematological abnormality in patients with cancer. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease (ACD) are the most prevalent, both characterized by hypochromic microcytic anemia and low serum iron (SI). Their differential diagnosis is difficult in clinical practice, hampering their treatment. Our objective was to evaluate the use of hepcidin to discriminate tumor-related IDA and ACD and to investigate the mechanism of action of hepcidin in these anemias. Blood samples were collected at Jiangsu Cancer Hospital. Patients were divided into IDA and ACD groups by Prussian blue staining of bone marrow smears. Serum hepcidin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. SI, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation (TSAT), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) also determined in this study. Areas under the curve on receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of hepcidin to be better than those of SI, TIBC, and TSAT. In ACD, hepcidin was correlated positively with IL-6 (r = 0.81, P < 0.01) and negatively with SI (r = -0.78, P < 0.01). In IDA, no significant relationship between IL-6 and hepcidin was found (r = -0.20, P = 0.17), but hepcidin decreased with decreasing quartiles of SI (r = 0.89, P < 0.01). SI was positively correlated with hemoglobin (r = 0.89, P < 0.01; r = 0.84, P < 0.01) in both groups. Hepcidin is a promising serological marker for the differential diagnosis of tumor-related ACD and IDA, clarifying the pathogenesis of these anemias and guiding corrective treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Iron Deficiency and Anemia Predict Mortality in Patients with Tuberculosis123

    PubMed Central

    Isanaka, Sheila; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Urassa, Willy; Willett, Walter C.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Villamor, Eduardo; Spiegelman, Donna; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have documented a high prevalence of anemia among tuberculosis (TB) patients and anemia at TB diagnosis has been associated with an increased risk of death. However, little is known about the factors contributing to the development of TB-associated anemia and their importance in TB disease progression. Data from a randomized clinical trial of micronutrient supplementation in patients with pulmonary TB in Tanzania were analyzed. Repeated measures of anemia with iron deficiency, anemia without iron deficiency, and iron deficiency without anemia were assessed as risk factors for treatment failure, TB recurrence, and mortality. The prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin < 110 g/L) at baseline was 64%, more than one-half of which was related to iron deficiency (mean corpuscular volume , 80 fL). We found no evidence of an association between anemia (with or without iron deficiency) or iron deficiency without anemia at baseline and the risk of treatment failure at 1 mo after initiation. Anemia without iron deficiency was associated with an independent, 4-fold increased risk of TB recurrence [adjusted RR = 4.10 (95% CI = 1.88, 8.91); P < 0.001]. Iron deficiency and anemia (with and without iron deficiency) were associated with a 2- to nearly 3-fold independent increase in the risk of death [adjusted RR for iron deficiency without anemia = 2.89 (95% CI = 1.53, 5.47); P = 0.001; anemia without iron deficiency = 2.72 (95% CI = 1.50, 4.93); P = 0.001; iron deficiency anemia = 2.13 (95% CI = 1.10, 4.11); P = 0.02]. Efforts to identify and address the conditions contributing to TB-associated anemia, including iron deficiency, could play an important role in reducing morbidity and mortality in areas heavily affected by TB. PMID:22190024

  6. Peginesatide in patients with anemia undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, Steven; Schiller, Brigitte; Locatelli, Francesco; Covic, Adrian C; Provenzano, Robert; Wiecek, Andrzej; Levin, Nathan W; Kaplan, Mark; Macdougall, Iain C; Francisco, Carol; Mayo, Martha R; Polu, Krishna R; Duliege, Anne-Marie; Besarab, Anatole

    2013-01-24

    Peginesatide, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), is a potential therapy for anemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. We conducted two randomized, controlled, open-label studies (EMERALD 1 and EMERALD 2) involving patients undergoing hemodialysis. Cardiovascular safety was evaluated by analysis of an adjudicated composite safety end point--death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or serious adverse events of congestive heart failure, unstable angina, or arrhythmia--with the use of pooled data from the two EMERALD studies and two studies involving patients not undergoing dialysis. In the EMERALD studies, 1608 patients received peginesatide once monthly or continued to receive epoetin one to three times a week, with the doses adjusted as necessary to maintain a hemoglobin level between 10.0 and 12.0 g per deciliter for 52 weeks or more. The primary efficacy end point was the mean change from the baseline hemoglobin level to the mean level during the evaluation period; noninferiority was established if the lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval was -1.0 g per deciliter or higher in the comparison of peginesatide with epoetin. The aim of evaluating the composite safety end point in the pooled cohort was to exclude a hazard ratio with peginesatide relative to the comparator ESA of more than 1.3. In an analysis involving 693 patients from EMERALD 1 and 725 from EMERALD 2, peginesatide was noninferior to epoetin in maintaining hemoglobin levels (mean between-group difference, -0.15 g per deciliter; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.30 to -0.01 in EMERALD 1; and 0.10 g per deciliter; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.26 in EMERALD 2). The hazard ratio for the composite safety end point was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.89 to 1.26) with peginesatide relative to the comparator ESA in the four pooled studies (2591 patients) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.17) in the EMERALD studies. The proportions of patients with adverse and serious

  7. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Intractable hemolytic anemia after mitral valve repair: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Hee; Park, Yong Hyun; Yun, Kyung Won; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jeong Su; Kim, Jun; Kim, June Hong; Je, Hyung-Gon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Chun, Kook Jin

    2013-10-01

    Although hemolytic anemia after mitral valve replacement (MVR) is well recognized, hemolytic anemia associated with mitral valve repair is an uncommon condition. Furthermore, persistent and severe hemolytic anemia despite of medical treatment subsequently requiring reoperation is extremely rare. We here report three cases of intractable hemolytic anemia after mitral valve repair leading to MVR. Collision of regurgitant jet into the annuloplasty ring was the speculated mechanism of hemolysis in all cases. After MVR, all of them experienced immediate resolution of the hemolytic anemia. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Carla Valéria de Alvarenga; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Nascimento, Cristiano Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; Moutinho, Ivana Lúcia Damásio; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Malaguti, Carla; Castro, Antonio Carlos Santana; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological studies of nonwestern IBD populations are limited and may be confounded by demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related influences. This study evaluated the prevalence, risk factors, and etiology of anemia in Brazilian outpatients with IBD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 100 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 100 ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects were assessed. Anemia workup included complete blood count, ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia in IBD was 21%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia between CD subjects (24%) and UC (18%). Moderate disease activity (OR: 3.48, 95% CI, 1.95–9.64, P = 0.002) and elevated CRP levels (OR: 1.8, 95% CI, 1.04–3.11, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anemia. The most common etiologies of anemia found in both groups were iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 10% on CD and 6% on UC) followed by the anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 6% for both groups). Conclusions. In Brazilian IBD outpatients, anemia is highly concurrent condition. Disease moderate activity as well as increased CRP was strongly associated with comorbid anemia. IDA and/or ACD were the most common etiologies. PMID:25705682

  10. How I treat anemia in pregnancy: iron, cobalamin, and folate.

    PubMed

    Achebe, Maureen M; Gafter-Gvili, Anat

    2017-02-23

    Anemia of pregnancy, an important risk factor for fetal and maternal morbidity, is considered a global health problem, affecting almost 50% of pregnant women. In this article, diagnosis and management of iron, cobalamin, and folate deficiencies, the most frequent causes of anemia in pregnancy, are discussed. Three clinical cases are considered. Iron deficiency is the most common cause. Laboratory tests defining iron deficiency, the recognition of developmental delays and cognitive abnormalities in iron-deficient neonates, and literature addressing the efficacy and safety of IV iron in pregnancy are reviewed. An algorithm is proposed to help clinicians diagnose and treat iron deficiency, recommending oral iron in the first trimester and IV iron later. Association of folate deficiency with neural tube defects and impact of fortification programs are discussed. With increased obesity and bariatric surgery rates, prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in pregnancy is rising. Low maternal cobalamin may be associated with fetal growth retardation, fetal insulin resistance, and excess adiposity. The importance of treating cobalamin deficiency in pregnancy is considered. A case of malarial anemia emphasizes the complex relationship between iron deficiency, iron treatment, and malaria infection in endemic areas; the heightened impact of combined etiologies on anemia severity is highlighted. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Severe Aplastic Anemia following Parvovirus B19-Associated Acute Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Masanori; Kaji, Kosuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Kuniaki; Asada, Shohei; Koizumi, Aritoshi; Kubo, Takuya; Nishimura, Norihisa; Sawada, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Kosuke; Mashitani, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Masayuki; Amano, Itsuto; Ootani, Tomoyuki; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Murata, Koji; Ann, Tatsuichi; Mitoro, Akira; Yoshiji, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Human parvovirus (HPV) B19 is linked to a variety of clinical manifestations, such as erythema infectiosum, nonimmune hydrops fetalis, and transient aplastic anemia. Although a few cases have shown HPVB19 infection as a possible causative agent for hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) in immunocompetent patients, most reported cases of HAAA following transient hepatitis did not have delayed remission. Here we report a rare case of severe aplastic anemia following acute hepatitis with prolonged jaundice due to HPVB19 infection in a previously healthy young male. Clinical laboratory examination assessed marked liver injury and jaundice as well as peripheral pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy revealed severe hypoplasia and fatty replacement. HPVB19 infection was diagnosed by enzyme immunoassay with high titer of anti-HPVB19 immunoglobulin M antibodies. Immunosuppressive therapy was initiated 2 months after the onset of acute hepatitis when liver injury and jaundice were improved. Cyclosporine provided partial remission after 2 months of medication without bone marrow transplantation. Our case suggests that HPVB19 should be considered as a hepatotropic virus and a cause of acquired aplastic anemia, including HAAA.

  12. Anemia, Heart Failure and Evidence-Based Clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Camila Alves; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Zanati, Silméia Garcia; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a prevalent comorbidity and marker of a poorer prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). Its clinical relevance, as well as its pathophysiology and the clinical management of these patients are important subjects in the specialized literature. In the present review, we describe the current concepts on the pathophysiology of anemia in HF, its diagnostic criteria, and the recommendations for iron supplementation. Also, we make a critical analysis of the major studies showing evidences on the benefits of this supplementation. The four main components of anemia are addressed: chronic disease, dilutional, "renal" and malabsorption. In patients with HF, the diagnostic criteria are the same as those used in the general population: serum ferritin levels lower than 30 mcg/L in patients without kidney diseases and lower than 100 mcg/L or serum ferritin levels between 100-299 mcg/L with transferring saturation lower than 20% in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Finally, the therapeutic possibilities for anemia in this specific patient population are discussed. PMID:23917508

  13. "What an Affliction": Mary Todd Lincoln's Fatal Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2015-01-01

    To date, no single diagnosis has unified the psychiatric illness and the numerous poorly defined physical complaints that Mary Lincoln (née Todd, 1818-1882) suffered in adulthood. Here, I show that her physical ailments spanned 30 years and included sore mouth, pallor, paresthesias, the Lhermitte symptom, fever, headaches, fatigue, resting tachycardia, edema, episodic weight loss, progressive weakness, ataxia, and visual impairment. Long thought hypochondriacal, these findings, plus their time course and her psychopathology (irritability, delusions, hallucinations, with preserved clarity), are all consistent with vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia most probably caused this deficiency: she lacked risk factors for other causes, and her consanguineous parents both derived from a region of Scotland having a high incidence of pernicious anemia. A diagnosis of chronic multisystem pernicious anemia would clarify the conduct of Mary Lincoln as First Lady and widow, and illuminate challenges faced by her husband, President Abraham Lincoln. Her case highlights many forgotten features of the natural history of untreated pernicious anemia and is unique in the medical literature in demonstrating such a course extending over a lifetime.

  14. Effect of 131I on the anemia of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perlman, J.A.; Sternthal, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the National Thyrotoxicosis Therapy Follow-Up Study (NTTFS) are presented here to document the existence of anemia in hyperthyroidism, a mild and reversible anemia that is simultaneously ameliorated with reversal of the hyperthyroid state. Among 20,600 women entered into the NTTF study with no previous history of hematological disorders, the prevalence of anemia was found to range from 10-15%, appearing to be higher in those selected for treatment with 131I when compared to those selected for surgery. An attempt is made to verify the recent hypothesis that thyroid hormone levels in the supraphysiologic range may suppress erythrogenesis. Two statisticallymore » significant regression models are consistent with a hypothesis of thyrotoxic bone marrow suppression. However, both associations are weak enough to suggest that some other physiologic improvement underlies the amelioration of anemia when hyperthyroidism is reversed. The degree of improvement in hematological status is similar for women in both treatment groups. Among 4464 women for whom serial hematological tests are obtained, over 3/4 of anemic patients are no longer anemic after an average 6.2 yr of follow-up. Clinicians are reassured that radioactive iodine exposure causes no further insult to the bone marrow, no matter what the cumulative dosage. The highly fractionated low dose bone marrow exposures to radiation account for the minimal hematological risks of 131I treatment.« less

  15. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  16. Precursors of Executive Function in Infants With Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Alexandra M.; Telfer, Paul T.; Kirkham, Fenella J.; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Executive dysfunction occurs in sickle cell anemia, but there are few early data. Infants with sickle cell anemia (n = 14) and controls (n = 14) performed the “A-not-B” and Object Retrieval search tasks, measuring precursors of executive function at 9 and 12 months. Significant group differences were not found. However, for the A-not-B task, 7 of 11 sickle cell anemia infants scored in the lower 2 performance categories at 9 months, but only 1 at 12 months (P = .024); controls obtained scores at 12 months that were statistically comparable to the scores they had already obtained at 9 months. On the Object Retrieval task, 9- and 12-month controls showed comparable scores, whereas infants with sickle cell anemia continued to improve (P = .027); at 9 months, those with lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation passed fewer trials (R s = 0.670, P = .024) and took longer to obtain the toy (R s = –0.664, P = .013). Subtle delays in acquiring developmental skills may underlie abnormal executive function in childhood. PMID:22859700

  17. Precursors of executive function in infants with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Alexandra M; Telfer, Paul T; Kirkham, Fenella J; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    Executive dysfunction occurs in sickle cell anemia, but there are few early data. Infants with sickle cell anemia (n = 14) and controls (n = 14) performed the "A-not-B" and Object Retrieval search tasks, measuring precursors of executive function at 9 and 12 months. Significant group differences were not found. However, for the A-not-B task, 7 of 11 sickle cell anemia infants scored in the lower 2 performance categories at 9 months, but only 1 at 12 months (P = .024); controls obtained scores at 12 months that were statistically comparable to the scores they had already obtained at 9 months. On the Object Retrieval task, 9- and 12-month controls showed comparable scores, whereas infants with sickle cell anemia continued to improve (P = .027); at 9 months, those with lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation passed fewer trials (R s = 0.670, P = .024) and took longer to obtain the toy (R s = -0.664, P = .013). Subtle delays in acquiring developmental skills may underlie abnormal executive function in childhood.

  18. Isocitrate ameliorates anemia by suppressing the erythroid iron restriction response

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Chanté L.; Delehanty, Lorrie L.; Bullock, Grant C.; Rival, Claudia M.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Kimpel, Donald L.; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Goldfarb, Adam N.

    2013-01-01

    The unique sensitivity of early red cell progenitors to iron deprivation, known as the erythroid iron restriction response, serves as a basis for human anemias globally. This response impairs erythropoietin-driven erythropoiesis and underlies erythropoietic repression in iron deficiency anemia. Mechanistically, the erythroid iron restriction response results from inactivation of aconitase enzymes and can be suppressed by providing the aconitase product isocitrate. Recent studies have implicated the erythroid iron restriction response in anemia of chronic disease and inflammation (ACDI), offering new therapeutic avenues for a major clinical problem; however, inflammatory signals may also directly repress erythropoiesis in ACDI. Here, we show that suppression of the erythroid iron restriction response by isocitrate administration corrected anemia and erythropoietic defects in rats with ACDI. In vitro studies demonstrated that erythroid repression by inflammatory signaling is potently modulated by the erythroid iron restriction response in a kinase-dependent pathway involving induction of the erythroid-inhibitory transcription factor PU.1. These results reveal the integration of iron and inflammatory inputs in a therapeutically tractable erythropoietic regulatory circuit. PMID:23863711

  19. Anemia management in cancer patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Deak, Andras T; Troppan, Katharina; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common complication of cancer and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with decreased physical performance as well as poor prognosis for life expectancy. Renal and cancer-induced anemia share common features regarding pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies. It is typically treated with iron substitution, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and in refractory cases with red blood cell transfusions. However, studies of the past few years unveiled numerous setbacks in the use of ESAs. These included a higher risk of cerebrovascular events and increased mortality without the improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD. Moreover, particularly negative results were observed in patients with previous cancer history under ESA therapy. These unfavorable findings have forced the clinicians to reevaluate the management of renal anemia. This led to decrease of ESA usage, while iron substitution and alternative therapeutic options gained more significance. Iron supplementation is also accompanied with certain risks ranging from gastrointestinal complications to severe allergic reactions and increased rate of infections. Furthermore, the evaluation of the long-term safety of excessive iron therapy is still lacking, especially in CKD patients with cancer. In the absence of these clinical studies, this review aims to summarize the currently available therapeutic strategies in anemia management of CKD patients with concomitant cancer. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  1. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-09-21

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice.

  2. Prevention of Iatrogenic Anemia in Critical and Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Jakacka, Natalia; Snarski, Emilian; Mekuria, Selamawit

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic anemia caused by diagnostic blood sampling is a common problem in the intensive care unit, where continuous monitoring of blood parameters is very often required. Cumulative blood loss associated with phlebotomy along with other factors render this group of patients particularly susceptible to anemia. As it has been proven that anemia in this group of patients leads to inferior outcomes, packed red blood cell transfusions are used to alleviate possible threats associated with low hemoglobin concentration. However, the use of blood components is a procedure conferring a set of risks to the patients despite improvements in safety. Iatrogenic blood loss has also gained particular attention in neonatal care, where cumulative blood loss due to samples taken during the first week of life could easily equal or exceed circulating blood volume. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the causes of iatrogenic anemia and discusses the most common preventive measures taken to reduce diagnostic blood loss and the requirement for blood component transfusions in the aforementioned clinical situations.

  3. [Social determinants of intestinal parasitism, malnutrition, and anemia: systematic review].

    PubMed

    Cardona-Arias, Jaiberth Antonio

    2018-02-19

    Characterize the publications on social determinants of intestinal parasitism, malnutrition, and anemia at the global level. A systematic review was conducted of the scientific literature in Pubmed, Science Direct, SciELO, LILACS, and Google Scholar with eight search strategies, guaranteeing completeness and replicability, following the phases of the PRISMA guidelines. The review included 18 studies on malnutrition, three on parasitism, three on anemia, and two on both parasitism and malnutrition; 65.4% of the studies were from South America and 69.2% were carried out among children. The prevalence of intestinal parasitism ranged between 30.6% and 83.3%; anemia, 19.7% to 48.0%; and malnutrition, 0.0% to 67.8%. It was found that biological and psychosocial determinants were most frequently studied; the most frequently studied intermediate determinants were related to housing and income; and structural determinants were least investigated. The social determinants common to the three conditions include: living in homes with poor sanitary conditions, rural areas, inadequate housing, inadequate water supply, access barriers to the medical system, young parents with little schooling, precarious employment, and low income. The majority of publications do not conduct a multilevel analysis for individual, intermediate, or structural determinants. Greater efforts are needed in health policies that address the social determinants of inequality with respect to parasitism, malnutrition, and anemia, mainly in categories as macroeconomic policy, social class, labor market, culture, values, and territory.

  4. Anemia and undernutrition among preschool children in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Shally; Das, Rohini; Verma, Tuhina; Vir, Sheila

    2003-10-01

    This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of anemia among preschool children (3-5 years) and its association with malnutrition in rural Barabanki district of Uttar Pradesh, India. Three out of 18 sub-centers in Nindura block, Barabanki, each with six villages, were randomly selected for this survey and 654 boys and 546 girls were included. Mean hemoglobin level in g/dL among boys and girls was 10.1 (SD: 1.66) and 9.9 (SD: 1.67) (P <0.06) respectively. The proportion of anemic children (Hb <11 g/dL) was 70%. Boys were heavier and taller as compared to girls. Among the 67.3% underweight children the mean hemoglobin level was 9.85 (SD: 1.67) as compared to 10.39 (SD: 1.62) in those without malnutrition (P <0.0001). Likewise, stunted children (87.6%) had statistically significantly lower mean hemoglobin levels than those not stunted. The odds ratio of an underweight and stunted child having moderate to severe anemia was 1.66. While more than half caretakers knew about the term "anemia " and associated physical weakness with it, only very few (2.5%) knew that iron intake will improve it. They relied on "doctors" (86.7%) for anemia prevention.

  5. Individualized treatment for iron deficiency anemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting mankind, and iron deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age due to pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition or gut malabsorption. Iron deficiency anemia remains quite prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed upon consideration of patient specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based upon the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least one month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  6. Risk and Prevalence of Anemia among Women Attending Public and Private Universities.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marcelo Rodrigues; De Oliveira E Silva, Lília Maria Monteiro; Dos Santos Beserra Pessoa, Marcia Luiza; Da Mota Araújo, Marcos Antônio; Dos Reis Moreira-Araújo, Regilda Saraiva

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. Women are known to be more susceptible to anemia; however, no controlled study has yet assessed differences in the prevalence of anemia exclusively among women with higher education. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of anemia among women attending universities. The hemoglobin concentration of 140 women aged 18 to 45 years old from a private and a public university was measured. Anthropometric and socioeconomic data were also collected. The risk of developing anemia was almost threefold higher among the students attending the public university (OR: 2.71; p=.0248). The prevalence of anemia was much higher than in the overall female population (79%). The higher education was not a protective factor for anemia in women when analysed separately from the total population of women.

  7. Pharmacodynamic model for chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sukyung; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Jusko, William J

    2008-06-01

    Anticancer agents often cause bone marrow toxicity resulting in progressive anemia which may influence the therapeutic effects of erythropoietic-stimulating agents. The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to describe chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats. Anemia was induced in male Wistar rats with a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of 60 mg/kg carboplatin. Hematological responses including reticulocytes, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin, and endogenous rat erythropoietin (EPO) were measured for up to 4 weeks. A catenary, lifespan-based, indirect response model served as a basic PD model to represent erythroid cellular populations in the bone marrow and blood involved in erythropoiesis. The model assumed that actively proliferating progenitor cells in the bone marrow are sensitive to anti-cancer agents and subject to an irreversible removal process. The removal rate of the target cells is proportional to drug activity concentrations and the cell numbers. An additional RBC loss from the circulation resulting from thrombocytopenia was described by a first-order process. The turnover process of rat EPO and EPO-mediated feedback inhibition mechanism regulated by hemoglobin changes were incorporated. Reticulocyte counts decreased rapidly and reached a nadir by day 3 after administration of carboplatin and returned to the baseline by day 13. This was followed by a gradual increase and the rebound peak occurred at about day 15. The hemoglobin nadir was approximately 9 g/dl observed at about 11-13 days compared to its normal value of 13 g/dl and hemoglobin returned to the baseline by day 30. The increase in endogenous rat EPO mirrored inversely hemoglobin changes and the maximum increase was observed soon after the hemoglobin nadir. The carboplatin-treated rats exhibited progressive anemia. The proposed model adequately described the time course of hematological changes after carboplatin in rats and can be a useful tool to explore

  8. Pharmacodynamic model for chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sukyung; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer agents often cause bone marrow toxicity resulting in progressive anemia which may influence the therapeutic effects of erythropoietic-stimulating agents. The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to describe chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats. Anemia was induced in male Wistar rats with a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of 60 mg/kg carboplatin. Hematological responses including reticulocytes, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin, and endogenous rat erythropoietin (EPO) were measured for up to 4 weeks. A catenary, lifespan-based, indirect response model served as a basic PD model to represent erythroid cellular populations in the bone marrow and blood involved in erythropoiesis. The model assumed that actively proliferating progenitor cells in the bone marrow are sensitive to anti-cancer agents and subject to an irreversible removal process. The removal rate of the target cells is proportional to drug activity concentrations and the cell numbers. An additional RBC loss from the circulation resulting from thrombocytopenia was described by a first-order process. The turnover process of rat EPO and EPO-mediated feedback inhibition mechanism regulated by hemoglobin changes were incorporated. Reticulocyte counts decreased rapidly and reached a nadir by day 3 after administration of carboplatin and returned to the baseline by day 13. This was followed by a gradual increase and the rebound peak occurred at about day 15. The hemoglobin nadir was approximately 9 g/dl observed at about 11–13 days compared to its normal value of 13 g/dl and hemoglobin returned to the baseline by day 30. The increase in endogenous rat EPO mirrored inversely hemoglobin changes and the maximum increase was observed soon after the hemoglobin nadir. The carboplatin-treated rats exhibited progressive anemia. The proposed model adequately described the time course of hematological changes after carboplatin in rats and can be a useful tool to explore

  9. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S; Cheng, Sunfa; Desai, Akshay S; Diaz, Rafael; Maggioni, Aldo P; McMurray, John J V; O'Connor, Christopher; Pfeffer, Marc A; Solomon, Scott D; Sun, Yan; Tendera, Michal; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2013-03-28

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia. In this randomized, double-blind trial, we assigned 2278 patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia (hemoglobin level, 9.0 to 12.0 g per deciliter) to receive either darbepoetin alfa (to achieve a hemoglobin target of 13 g per deciliter) or placebo. The primary outcome was a composite of death from any cause or hospitalization for worsening heart failure. The primary outcome occurred in 576 of 1136 patients (50.7%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 565 of 1142 patients (49.5%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the darbepoetin alfa group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.90 to 1.13; P=0.87). There was no significant between-group difference in any of the secondary outcomes. The neutral effect of darbepoetin alfa was consistent across all prespecified subgroups. Fatal or nonfatal stroke occurred in 42 patients (3.7%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 31 patients (2.7%) in the placebo group (P=0.23). Thromboembolic adverse events were reported in 153 patients (13.5%) in the darbepoetin alfa group and 114 patients (10.0%) in the placebo group (P=0.01). Cancer-related adverse events were similar in the two study groups. Treatment with darbepoetin alfa did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and mild-to-moderate anemia. Our findings do not support the use of darbepoetin alfa in these patients. (Funded by Amgen; RED-HF ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00358215.).

  10. [Clinical study on viral hepatitis combined with aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Zhang, Yan-li; Shen, Ge; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Lin; Qiu, Guo-hua; Wu, Yun-zhong; Yang, Min; Li, Ming-hui

    2011-08-01

    To study the clinical features, outcomes and treatments of viral hepatitis combined with aplastic anemia. 25 cases diagnosed as viral hepatits combined with aplastic anemia in Beijing Ditan Hsopital between April 2004 and September 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. In this group of patients aplastic anemia was finally diagnosed by bone marrow aspiration. We collected clinical data of these patients, including a history of liver disease, drug allergies, hospital medication history, laboratory data, and then performed descriptive analysis. 25 patients with viral hepatitis were diagnosed as complicated with aplastic anemia by histopathological data. Among these patients, 17 were male and 8 were women. Viral hepatitis included: chronic hepatitis B (12 cases), chronic hepatitis C (4 cases), acute hepatits E (1 case), hepatitis caused by CMV infection (1 case), and unclassified hepatitis (7 cases). Among these patients, 7 were diagnosed as severe hepatits. Considering previous history, only 3 patients had history of short term interferon therapy before hospitalization, and the remaining patients did not use drug that affects blood system. Treatments were as followings: using colony stimulating factor in 6 patients, gamma globulin in 9 patients, glucocorticoids in 3 patients, erythropoietin in 1 patient, only oral drug to raise erythrocytes in 2 patients, red blood cells transfusion in 6 patients, platelets transfusion in 2 patients. As for clinical outcomes, 20 patients acquired improved condition and were dicharged, 3 patients were discharged voluntarily and 2 patients died of severe hepatits combined with other complications. Main treatments of viral hepatitis combined with aplastic anemia were to treat primary hepatopathy and nucleoside analogue-based antiviral therapy, to provide symptomatic and supportive treatment for blood diseases. Blood diseases would recover simultaneously while liver disease was improved, and the prognosis was good.

  11. The development of anemia of inflammation during acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Steinvil, Arie; Banai, Shmuel; Leshem-Rubinow, Eran; Rogowski, Ori; Halkin, Amir; Keren, Gad; Finkelstein, Ariel; Chundadze, Tamar; Berliner, Shlomo; Arbel, Yaron

    2012-04-19

    Anemia is associated with an unfavorable outcome in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). An acute phase response could contribute to the development of anemia in AMI patients. We have performed a cross-sectional analysis on prospectively collected data at a tertiary hospital catheterization laboratory. Multi-adjusted linear regression models were fitted for hemoglobin as the dependent variable. ANOVA tests were used to determine interactions between time cutoffs of the respective hemoglobin and the concentrations of two inflammatory proteins, namely C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. Anemia indices were analyzed in a subgroup of 138 male AMI patients for whom frozen serum samples were available. Enrolled were 1017 patients (340 with unstable angina pectoris [UAP] and 677 with AMI). Correlates of hemoglobin in the AMI group included age, male gender, the inflammatory proteins, as well as time from symptom onset to angiography (r(2)=0.47; p<0.001). A significant decrease in the concentration of hemoglobin with a parallel increase in the inflammatory proteins was observed between the time cutoff from symptom onset to angiography only in the AMI group for males and females, respectively. A pattern suggestive of anemia of inflammation including higher ferritin, lower transferring, lower transferrin saturation, and lower serum iron concentrations has been observed in anemic AMI patients ( all p<0.05). Inflammation-sensitive proteins are associated with lower hemoglobin concentrations in AMI patients. We therefore suggest the possibility that at least part of the hemoglobin drop in AMI prior to angiography is related to the anemia of inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Caregiver perceptions of iron deficiency anemia and iron replacement therapies in young children with nutritional iron deficiency anemia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the U.S., approximately 3% of young children develop iron deficiency anemia (IDA), with Hispanic/Latino children disproportionately affected. IDA is associated with inferior neurodevelopmental outcomes. Treatment with oral iron mitigates its consequences yet non-adherence often results in treatme...

  13. Association of Testosterone Levels With Anemia in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Cindy N.; Snyder, Peter J.; Stephens-Shields, Alisa J.; Artz, Andrew S.; Bhasin, Shalender; Cohen, Harvey J.; Farrar, John T.; Gill, Thomas M.; Zeldow, Bret; Cella, David; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cauley, Jane A.; Crandall, Jill P.; Cunningham, Glenn R.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Lewis, Cora E.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Molitch, Mark E.; Pahor, Marco; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Cifelli, Denise; Hou, Xiaoling; Resnick, Susan M.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Anton, Stephen; Basaria, Shehzad; Diem, Susan J.; Wang, Christina; Schrier, Stanley L.; Ellenberg, Susan S.

    2017-01-01

    Importance In one-third of older men with anemia, no recognized cause can be found. Objective To determine if testosterone treatment of men 65 years or older with unequivocally low testosterone levels and unexplained anemia would increase their hemoglobin concentration. Design, Setting, and Participants A double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with treatment allocation by minimization using 788 men 65 years or older who have average testosterone levels of less than 275 ng/dL. Of 788 participants, 126 were anemic (hemoglobin Š12.7 g/dL), 62 of whom had no known cause. The trial was conducted in 12 academic medical centers in the United States from June 2010 to June 2014. Interventions Testosterone gel, the dose adjusted to maintain the testosterone levels normal for young men, or placebo gel for 12 months. Main Outcomes and Measures The percent of men with unexplained anemia whose hemoglobin levels increased by 1.0 g/dL or more in response to testosterone compared with placebo. The statistical analysis was intent-to-treat by a logistic mixed effects model adjusted for balancing factors. Results The men had a mean age of 74.8 years and body mass index (BMI) (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 30.7; 84.9% were white. Testosterone treatment resulted in a greater percentage of men with unexplained anemia whose month 12 hemoglobin levels had increased by 1.0 g/dL or more over baseline (54%) than did placebo (15%) (adjusted OR, 31.5; 95% CI, 3.7-277.8; P = .002) and a greater percentage of men who at month 12 were no longer anemic (58.3%) compared with placebo (22.2%) (adjusted OR, 17.0; 95% CI, 2.8-104.0; P = .002). Testosterone treatment also resulted in a greater percentage of men with anemia of known cause whose month 12 hemoglobin levels had increased by 1.0 g/dL or more (52%) than did placebo (19%) (adjusted OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 2.1-31.9; P = .003). Testosterone treatment resulted in a hemoglobin concentration of more than 17

  14. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    PubMed Central

    Upma; Kumar, Parvinder; Raina, T. R.; Sharma, Kuldeep; Gupta, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes. PMID:20859508

  15. Iron deficient erythropoiesis might play key role in development of anemia in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Kihyun; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multifactorial pathogenesis is involved in anemia of cancer patients and defining the causes of anemia is not always simple. Methods The incidence of anemia among 4 major cancers (gastric, colorectal, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma), and biochemical features of anemia using ferritin, CRP, hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assessed. Anemia was defined either by hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11 g/dL or a drop of Hb 2 g/dL or more during anticancer treatment. Results Among the 345 patients including 152 lung cancer, 101 gastric cancer, 69 colorectal cancer and 23 hepatocellular carcinoma, 49 patients (14.2%) had anemia at their initial diagnosis of cancer. During treatment, 129 (37.4%) experienced anemia, and 34 (26.4%) were treated mostly by transfusion. Biochemical feature of anemia was examined with 39 patients' samples. When comparing to the reference value from general population, cancer patients showed numerically higher ferritin, sTfR, CRP and hepcidin level. Among the cancer patients, anemic patients had significantly higher ferritin (p = 0.050) and sTfR (p = 0.009) level compared to non-anemic patients. Conclusion Anemia is a common issue in cancer patients and is largely undertreated with sub-optimal diagnoses of cause. The rates of anemia increase significantly during anti-cancer treatment and appear to be largely associated with iron deficiency. PMID:26517509

  16. Investigation of the Etiology of Anemia in Thromboangiitis Obliterans.

    PubMed

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Ravari, Hassan; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Valizadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Bahare

    2016-09-01

    During a review of patients admitted with thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), there was evidence of normochromic normocytic anemia and abrupt changes in hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in patients with several hospital admissions. Therefore, the evidence of hemolytic anemia was evaluated based on 37 banked plasma samples taken from Caucasian male TAO patients during disease exacerbation between 2012 and 2014. The patients' hospital records, including clinical manifestations and complete blood count, were evaluated. The following tests were performed on all samples: indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), haptoglobin, indirect bilirubin, d-aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and d-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The mean age of the patients was 40 ± 7 years. Two patients underwent below-knee amputation. The mean hospital-documented Hgb of the patients was 12.9 ± 2.6 g/dL. CRP and IAT were positive in 75.6 and 70.2% of the samples, respectively. The tests and corresponding results were as follows: hsCRP, 14.07 ± 2.37 µg/mL; LDH, 2,552 ± 315 u/L; haptoglobin, 2.27 ± 1.1 g/L; indirect bilirubin, 0.09 ± 0.04 mg/dL; AST, 67 ± 7 u/L; and ALT, 26 ± 3 u/L. There was a significant inverse correlation between hsCRP and hospital-documented Hgb level (p = 0.03). Anemia with the positive IAT in most of the samples, high LDH and AST, and normal ALT are suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Normal indirect bilirubin is consistent with intravascular hemolysis. The positive CRP and elevated haptoglobin levels could be due to systemic inflammation in TAO. However, it is not known if an autoantigen or an infectious antigen is responsible for TAO systemic inflammation and induction hemolytic anemia. As such, the underlying mechanism of anemia in TAO could be part of the footprint of its main etiology.

  17. Investigation of the Etiology of Anemia in Thromboangiitis Obliterans

    PubMed Central

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Ravari, Hassan; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Valizadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Bahare

    2016-01-01

    During a review of patients admitted with thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), there was evidence of normochromic normocytic anemia and abrupt changes in hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in patients with several hospital admissions. Therefore, the evidence of hemolytic anemia was evaluated based on 37 banked plasma samples taken from Caucasian male TAO patients during disease exacerbation between 2012 and 2014. The patients' hospital records, including clinical manifestations and complete blood count, were evaluated. The following tests were performed on all samples: indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), haptoglobin, indirect bilirubin, d-aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and d-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The mean age of the patients was 40 ± 7 years. Two patients underwent below-knee amputation. The mean hospital-documented Hgb of the patients was 12.9 ± 2.6 g/dL. CRP and IAT were positive in 75.6 and 70.2% of the samples, respectively. The tests and corresponding results were as follows: hsCRP, 14.07 ± 2.37 µg/mL; LDH, 2,552 ± 315 u/L; haptoglobin, 2.27 ± 1.1 g/L; indirect bilirubin, 0.09 ± 0.04 mg/dL; AST, 67 ± 7 u/L; and ALT, 26 ± 3 u/L. There was a significant inverse correlation between hsCRP and hospital-documented Hgb level (p = 0.03). Anemia with the positive IAT in most of the samples, high LDH and AST, and normal ALT are suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Normal indirect bilirubin is consistent with intravascular hemolysis. The positive CRP and elevated haptoglobin levels could be due to systemic inflammation in TAO. However, it is not known if an autoantigen or an infectious antigen is responsible for TAO systemic inflammation and induction hemolytic anemia. As such, the underlying mechanism of anemia in TAO could be part of the footprint of its main etiology. PMID:27574381

  18. Recent Changes in Anemia Management: The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Anemia Guideline versus the Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN).

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Wazny, Lori; Wilson, Jo-Anne

    2014-01-01

    The management of anemia is important for health outcomes for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Global evidenced-based guidelines must be placed in the Canadian context to be relevant to guide practice. This paper summarizes the response of the Canadian Society of Nephrology to global anemia management guidelines in CKD and the implications for practice.

  19. Extreme storms during the last 6500 years from lagoonal sedimentary archives in the Mar Menor (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezileau, Laurent; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Blanchemanche, Philippe; Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Raji, Otmane; Martinez, Philippe; Marcos, Concepcion; Von Grafenstein, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Storms and tsunamis, which may seriously endanger human society, are amongst the most devastating marine catastrophes that can occur in coastal areas. Many such events are known and have been reported for the Mediterranean, a region where high-frequency occurrences of these extreme events coincides with some of the most densely populated coastal areas in the world. In a sediment core from the Mar Menor (SE Spain), we discovered eight coarse-grained layers which document marine incursions during periods of intense storm activity or tsunami events. Based on radiocarbon dating, these extreme events occurred around 5250, 4000, 3600, 3010, 2300, 1350, 650, and 80 years cal BP. No comparable events have been observed during the 20th and 21st centuries. The results indicate little likelihood of a tsunami origin for these coarse-grained layers, although historical tsunami events are recorded in this region. These periods of surge events seem to coincide with the coldest periods in Europe during the late Holocene, suggesting a control by a climatic mechanism for periods of increased storm activity. Spectral analyses performed on the sand percentage revealed four major periodicities of 1228 ± 327, 732 ± 80, 562 ± 58, and 319 ± 16 years. Amongst the well-known proxies that have revealed a millennial-scale climate variability during the Holocene, the ice-rafted debris (IRD) indices in the North Atlantic developed by Bond et al. (1997, 2001) present a cyclicity of 1470 ± 500 years, which matches the 1228 ± 327-year periodicity evidenced in the Mar Menor, considering the respective uncertainties in the periodicities. Thus, an in-phase storm activity in the western Mediterranean is found with the coldest periods in Europe and with the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation. However, further investigations, such as additional coring and high-resolution coastal imagery, are needed to better constrain the main cause of these multiple events.

  20. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  1. Copper deficiency, a new triad: anemia, leucopenia, and myeloneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Shoaib M; Ghobrial, Ibrahim

    2017-10-01

    Clinical copper deficiency is now more frequently recognized. Hematologically, it can present as anemia (microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic) and neutropenia. Thrombocytopenia is relatively rare. Neurologically, it can manifest as myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy simulating subacute combined degeneration. Bone marrow findings can mimic myelodysplasia resulting in occasional inappropriate referral for bone marrow transplantation. Other conditions with similar presentations include infections, drug toxicity, autoimmunity, B 12 deficiency, folate deficiency, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, and lymphoma with bone marrow involvement. Hematological, but not neurological, manifestations respond promptly to copper replacement, making early diagnosis essential for good outcome. Common risk factors for copper deficiency are foregut surgery, dietary deficiency, enteropathies with malabsorption, and prolonged intravenous nutrition (total parenteral nutrition). We present a unique case of copper deficiency, with no apparent known risk factors.

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM.

  3. Spatial and social factors drive anemia in Congolese women

    PubMed Central

    Messina, JP; Mwandagalirwa, K; Taylor, SM; Emch, M; Meshnick, SR

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is common in women of child-bearing age in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). As part of the 2007 DRC Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), 4,638 women of childbearing age (including 526 pregnant women) were tested for HIV and had the hemoglobin content of their blood recorded. We assessed malaria prevalence using laboratory methods. The DHS provided extensive information for individuals, as well as household cluster coordinates which enabled us to derive several spatial variables. Multilevel analyses were conducted to determine individual and contextual risk factors for anemia. Prevalence varied geographically and was associated with both one's ethnic group and the amount and type of nearby agriculture. In contrast, prevalence was not affected by HIV or malaria status. PMID:24042090

  4. LEUKEMIA, MULTIPLE MYELOMA, AND APLASTIC ANEMIA IN AMERICAN RADIOLOGISTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.B.

    1963-12-15

    A survey of 425 death certificates of radiologists dying between the ages of 35 and 74 during the years 1948 to 1961 revealed a statistically highly significant excess of deaths from leukemia, multiple myeloma, and aplastic anemia. That this excess is due to radiation exposure (or to some factor acting in a similar manner), rather than to an artifact of diagnosis is suggested by the absence of deaths ascribed to chronic lymphatic leukemia. (auth)

  5. Somatic Mutations and Clonal Hematopoiesis in Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Hosokawa, Kohei; Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Townsley, Danielle; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sato, Yusuke; Liu, Delong; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Wu, Colin O; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Clemente, Michael J; Kataoka, Keisuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Okuno, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Nagata, Yasunobu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Scheinberg, Phillip; Miyano, Satoru; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Nakao, Shinji; Young, Neal S; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-07-02

    In patients with acquired aplastic anemia, destruction of hematopoietic cells by the immune system leads to pancytopenia. Patients have a response to immunosuppressive therapy, but myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia develop in about 15% of the patients, usually many months to years after the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. We performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples obtained from 439 patients with aplastic anemia. We analyzed serial samples obtained from 82 patients. Somatic mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes were present in one third of the patients, in a limited number of genes and at low initial variant allele frequency. Clonal hematopoiesis was detected in 47% of the patients, most frequently as acquired mutations. The prevalence of the mutations increased with age, and mutations had an age-related signature. DNMT3A-mutated and ASXL1-mutated clones tended to increase in size over time; the size of BCOR- and BCORL1-mutated and PIGA-mutated clones decreased or remained stable. Mutations in PIGA and BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and longer and a higher rate of overall and progression-free survival; mutations in a subgroup of genes that included DNMT3A and ASXL1 were associated with worse outcomes. However, clonal dynamics were highly variable and might not necessarily have predicted the response to therapy and long-term survival among individual patients. Clonal hematopoiesis was prevalent in aplastic anemia. Some mutations were related to clinical outcomes. A highly biased set of mutations is evidence of Darwinian selection in the failed bone marrow environment. The pattern of somatic clones in individual patients over time was variable and frequently unpredictable. (Funded by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and others.).

  6. Prevalence of intestinal helminths, anemia, and malnutrition in Paucartambo, Peru.

    PubMed

    Cabada, Miguel M; Goodrich, Mary R; Graham, Brittany; Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Deichsel, Emily L; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; Clinton White, A

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections, anemia, and malnutrition among children in the Paucartambo province of Cusco region, Peru, in light of demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiologic contextual factors. Children from three to twelve years old from six communities in Huancarani district in the highlands of Peru were evaluated for helminth infections, anemia, and nutritional status. Data collected included demographic variables, socioeconomic status, exposures, complete blood counts, and direct and sedimentation stool tests. Of 240 children analyzed, 113 (47%) were infected with one or more parasites. Giardia (27.5%) and Fasciola (9.6%) were the most commonly identified organisms. Eosinophilia was encountered in 21% of the children. Anemia (48.8%) was associated with age (3-4 vs 5-12 years old; odds ratio (OR): 5.86; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.81-12.21). Underweight (10%) was associated with male sex (OR: 5.97; CI: 1.12-31.72), higher eosinophil count (OR: 4.67; CI: 1.31-16.68) and education of the mother (OR: 0.6; CI: 0.4-0.9). Stunting (31.3%) was associated with education of the mother (OR: 0.83; CI: 0.72-0.95); wasting (2.7%) was associated with higher eosinophil count (OR: 2.75; CI: 1.04-7.25). Anemia and malnutrition remain significant problems in the Peruvian highlands. These findings suggest that demographic factors, socio-economic status, and possibly parasitic infections intertwine to cause these health problems.

  7. The relation of maternal blood arsenic to anemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Atsuko; Ohtani, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the relationship of prenatal arsenic exposure to hemoglobin concentrations and anemia during pregnancy, a longitudinal study was conducted of 364 participants during early pregnancy from October 2006 to March 2011 in Tehran, Iran. Maternal whole blood (taken between 8-12 and 20-24 weeks of gestation, and at delivery) and umbilical cord blood samples were collected for arsenic measurement. The mean concentration of maternal blood arsenic in the first trimester of pregnancy was significantly lower in anemic women compared with non-anemic participants (mean ± SD: 12.4 ± 3.4 versus 14.8 ± 4.0 μg/L, respectively, p < 0.001). Maternal whole blood arsenic levels in the first and third trimesters were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with hemoglobin concentrations measured throughout gestation (r = 0.312, 0.424, and 0.183). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that increased maternal blood arsenic levels in the first trimester were significantly negatively associated to anemia during pregnancy (OR = 0.85, CI: 0.77-0.94, p < 0.01). The present study showed that prenatal blood arsenic exposure was not a risk factor for the occurrence of anemia.

  8. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome.

  9. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials.

  10. Urinary schistosomiasis and malaria associated anemia in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Deribew, Ketema; Tekeste, Zinaye; Petros, Beyene

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of anemia in children with urinary schistosomiasis, malaria and concurrent infections by the two diseases. Methods Urine and blood samples were collected from 387 children (216 males and 171 females) to examine urinary schistosomiasis and malaria and to determine hemoglobin concentration at Hassoba and Hassoba Buri village in Amibara woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia. Results The overall prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and Plasmodium falciparum malaria was 24.54% and 6.20% respectively. Only 2.84% of children carried concurrent infections of both parasites. There was high percentage of anemic patients (81.81%) in the coinfected cases than in either malaria (33.3%) or schistosomiasis (38.94%) cases. There was significantly low mean hemoglobin concentration in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected (P<0.05). The mean hemoglobin concentration between Plasmodium falciparum and S. haematobium infected children showed no significant difference (P>0.05). The level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs/10 mL urine (r=-0.6) and malaria parasitemia (r=-0.53). Conclusions The study showed that anemia is higher in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected. Furthermore, level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs and malaria parsitemia. Therefore, examination of hemoglobin status in patients co-infected with malaria and schistosomiasis is important to reduce the risk of anemia and to improve health of the community. PMID:23620856

  11. Urinary schistosomiasis and malaria associated anemia in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Deribew, Ketema; Tekeste, Zinaye; Petros, Beyene; Huat, Lim Boon

    2013-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of anemia in children with urinary schistosomiasis, malaria and concurrent infections by the two diseases. Urine and blood samples were collected from 387 children (216 males and 171 females) to examine urinary schistosomiasis and malaria and to determine hemoglobin concentration at Hassoba and Hassoba Buri village in Amibara woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia. The overall prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and Plasmodium falciparum malaria was 24.54% and 6.20% respectively. Only 2.84% of children carried concurrent infections of both parasites. There was high percentage of anemic patients (81.81%) in the coinfected cases than in either malaria (33.3%) or schistosomiasis (38.94%) cases. There was significantly low mean hemoglobin concentration in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected (P<0.05). The mean hemoglobin concentration between Plasmodium falciparum and S. haematobium infected children showed no significant difference (P>0.05). The level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs/10 mL urine (r=-0.6) and malaria parasitemia (r=-0.53). The study showed that anemia is higher in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected. Furthermore, level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs and malaria parsitemia. Therefore, examination of hemoglobin status in patients co-infected with malaria and schistosomiasis is important to reduce the risk of anemia and to improve health of the community.

  12. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  13. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  14. Hemolytic anemia in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toru; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Yasunobu; Tamura, Shinjiro; Okawa, Makoto; Yamasaki, Naohito; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori L

    2010-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and treatment of normocytic and normochromic anemia with hemoglobin level of 8.6 g/dL. A peripheral blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes. The patient was then referred to the department of cardiology because of systolic murmur, ECG abnormality, and red cell fragmentation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with particularly increased interventricular septal thickness of 24 mm and a hyperkinetic wall motion, resulting in marked obstruction to left ventricular outflow tract (pressure gradient of 200 mmHg). Mitral regurgitation due to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflets was also seen. The cause of anemia was thought to be mechanical intravascular hemolysis due to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and mitral regurgitation. She was treated with atenolol and the class Ia antiarrhythmic drug cibenzoline to relieve the outflow tract obstruction, and the pressure gradient was reduced to 70 mmHg. After 3 months of treatment, her hemoglobin level had increased to 11.4 g/dL without additional treatment for anemia. 2009 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phlebotomy-induced anemia alters hippocampal neurochemistry in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Diana J; Tkac, Ivan; Stucker, Sara; Ennis, Kathleen M; Sola-Visner, Martha; Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K

    2015-06-01

    Phlebotomy-induced anemia (PIA) is common in preterm infants. The hippocampus undergoes rapid differentiation during late fetal/early neonatal life and relies on adequate oxygen and iron to support oxidative metabolism necessary for development. Anemia shortchanges these two critical substrates, potentially altering hippocampal development and function. PIA (hematocrit <25%) was induced in neonatal mice pups from postnatal day (P)3 to P14. Neurochemical concentrations in the hippocampus were determined using in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy at 9.4T and compared with control animals at P14. Gene expression was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). PIA decreased brain iron concentration, increased hippocampal lactate and creatine concentrations, and decreased phosphoethanolamine (PE) concentration and the phosphocreatine/creatine ratio. Hippocampal transferrin receptor (Tfrc) gene expression was increased, while the expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IIα (CamKIIα) was decreased in PIA mice. This clinically relevant model of neonatal anemia alters hippocampal energy and phospholipid metabolism and gene expression during a critical developmental period. Low target hematocrits for preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may have potential adverse neural implications.

  16. Emerging Cellular and Gene Therapies for Congenital Anemias

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Leif S.; Khajuria, Rajiv K.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anemias comprise a group of blood disorders characterized by a reduction in the number of peripherally circulating erythrocytes. Various genetic etiologies have been identified that affect diverse aspects of erythroid physiology and broadly fall into two main categories: impaired production or increased destruction of mature erythrocytes. Current therapies are largely focused on symptomatic treatment and are often based on transfusion of donor-derived erythrocytes and management of complications. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative option currently available for the majority of congenital anemias. Recent advances in gene therapy and genome editing hold promise for the development of additional curative strategies for these blood disorders. The relative ease of access to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment, as well as the possibility of genetic manipulation ex vivo and subsequent transplantation in an autologous manner, make blood disorders among the most amenable to cellular therapies. Here we review cell-based and gene therapy approaches, and discuss the limitations and prospects of emerging avenues, including genome editing tools and the use of pluripotent stem cells, for the treatment of congenital forms of anemia. PMID:27792859

  17. Emerging cellular and gene therapies for congenital anemias.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Leif S; Khajuria, Rajiv K; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-12-01

    Congenital anemias comprise a group of blood disorders characterized by a reduction in the number of peripherally circulating erythrocytes. Various genetic etiologies have been identified that affect diverse aspects of erythroid physiology and broadly fall into two main categories: impaired production or increased destruction of mature erythrocytes. Current therapies are largely focused on symptomatic treatment and are often based on transfusion of donor-derived erythrocytes and management of complications. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative option currently available for the majority of congenital anemias. Recent advances in gene therapy and genome editing hold promise for the development of additional curative strategies for these blood disorders. The relative ease of access to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment, as well as the possibility of genetic manipulation ex vivo and subsequent transplantation in an autologous manner, make blood disorders among the most amenable to cellular therapies. Here we review cell-based and gene therapy approaches, and discuss the limitations and prospects of emerging avenues, including genome editing tools and the use of pluripotent stem cells, for the treatment of congenital forms of anemia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Children With Potential Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Repo, Marleena; Lindfors, Katri; Mäki, Markku; Huhtala, Heini; Laurila, Kaija; Lähdeaho, Marja-Leena; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Active screening for celiac disease frequently detects seropositive children with normal villous morphology (potential celiac disease). It remains unclear whether these subjects should be treated. We here investigated the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with potential and mucosal atrophy celiac disease. The prospective study involved 19 children with potential disease, 67 with partial or subtotal villous atrophy (P/SVA), and 16 with total villous atrophy (TVA). Twenty-three healthy children comprised the control group. The groups were compared for various clinical, histological, and laboratory parameters and hepcidin. The prevalence of abnormal parameters was as follows (controls, potential celiac disease, P/SVA, and TVA, respectively): anemia 0%, 15%, 22%, and 63%; low iron 5%, 0%, 14%, and 50%; increased transferrin receptor 1 5%, 16%, 20%, and 47%; low ferritin 0%, 21%, 35%, and 87%; and low transferrin saturation 10%, 11%, 41%, and 71%. One subject had low folate and none had low vitamin B12. The median values for hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were significantly lower and transferrin receptor 1 values higher in TVA group compared with other groups. After a median of 7 months on a gluten-free diet hemoglobin, total iron, ferritin, and albumin in children with P/SVA exceeded the baseline values in the potential celiac disease group. The development of anemia and iron deficiency in celiac disease is a continuum and may already be present in children with normal villous morphology, advocating an early diagnosis and possible dietary treatment of these patients.

  19. Phlebotomy-induced anemia alters hippocampal neurochemistry in neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Diana J.; Tkac, Ivan; Stucker, Sara; Ennis, Kathleen M.; Sola-Visner, Martha; Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Phlebotomy-induced anemia (PIA) is common in preterm infants. The hippocampus undergoes rapid differentiation during late fetal/early neonatal life and relies on adequate oxygen and iron to support oxidative metabolism necessary for development. Anemia shortchanges these two critical substrates, potentially altering hippocampal development and function. Methods PIA (hematocrit <25%) was induced in neonatal mice pups from postnatal day (P)3 to P14. Neurochemical concentrations in the hippocampus were determined using in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 9.4T and compared with control animals at P14. Gene expression was assessed using qRT-PCR. Results PIA decreased brain iron concentration, increased hippocampal lactate and creatine concentrations, and decreased phosphoethanolamine (PE) concentration and the phosphocreatine/creatine ratio. Hippocampal transferrin receptor (Tfrc) gene expression was increased, while the expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II alpha (CamKIIα) was decreased in PIA mice. Conclusion This clinically relevant model of neonatal anemia alters hippocampal energy and phospholipid metabolism and gene expression during a critical developmental period. Low target hematocrits for preterm neonates in the NICU may have potential adverse neural implications. PMID:25734245

  20. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  1. Phytomedicines and nutraceuticals: alternative therapeutics for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the "SS" individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β -globin subunit results in replacement of β 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper.

  2. Studies on the mechanism of the anemia of renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J W; Foley, J E; Moriyama, Y; Ohno, Y; Modder, B; Lertora, J J

    1. The present studies have demonstrated that the titers of erythropoietin may be elevated to varying degrees in patients with anemia associated with end-stage renal disease. However, the increase in erythropoietin titers was apparently not sufficient to meet the increase in demand for new red blood cells created by their shortened life span and the inhibitors of heme synthesis and/or erythroid colony forming cells (CFU-E). 2. Inhibitors of heme synthesis were demonstrated in the plasma of some but not all patients with anemia associated with renal disease and in rabbits 72 hrs following bilateral nephrectomy. 3. CFU-E were both increased and decreased in the bone marrows of the chronic anemic uremic rabbits, when compared with that of sham operated controls, 14 and 21 days after 5/6th nephrectomy and depended on the rate of regeneration of the renal erythropoietic and excretory functions. CFU-E in marrows of 5/6th nephrectomy rabbits were decreased after 35 days. 4. An inhibitor of CFU-E was increased in the sera from chronic anemic uremic rabbits, when compared with that of the sham-operated controls, 35 days after 5/6th nephrectomy. 5. It is possible that in the anemia of uremia in addition to inadequate production of erythropoietin there is a defect in the differentiation of the CFU-E into the heme synthesizing erythroid series due to the presence of a specific inhibitor of CFU-E and/or heme synthesis.

  3. New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Using a phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced hemolytic anemia mouse model, we showed that that GW7647 stimulates stress-induced erythroid lineage expansion...survive with a life-long, intermediate- to- severe hemolytic anemia , displaying many features of hereditary spherocytosis (Slatecka et. al. 2010...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0449 TITLE: New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding

  4. New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0449 TITLE: New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the Mechanisms of Stress Erythropoiesis...COVERED 1Sep2012 - 31Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER New Drugs for Anemia Treatment Based on a New Understanding of the...cell formation in "Nan" (neonatal anemia ) mice, raising the level of red cells to almost normal. It also causes an increase in the numbers of splenic

  5. Review article: risks of anemia and related management strategies: can perioperative blood management improve patient safety?

    PubMed

    Hare, Gregory M T; Freedman, John; David Mazer, C

    2013-02-01

    Anemia in both acute and chronic conditions is associated with an increased risk of organ injury (brain, heart, kidney) and mortality. Thus, anemia is not "safe". Impairment of tissue oxygen delivery likely contributes as a central mechanism; however, the existing treatments for anemia (i.e., transfusion, erythropoiesis stimulating agents, blood substitutes) have not produced a demonstrable improvement in patient outcomes despite their efficacy to increase blood oxygen content. Indeed, transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) has been attributed to increase mortality in non-bleeding patients. Thus, the pathophysiology of anemia-induced morbidity and mortality and its treatments are complex and incompletely understood. New knowledge continues to emerge regarding the cellular mechanisms that maintain oxygen homeostasis during anemia. Nevertheless, the application of this knowledge has not yet led to improvements in patient outcomes. As both anemia and transfusion are associated with increased mortality, utilization of multimodal patient blood management strategies may be effective in avoiding both of these predictors of adverse outcomes. We propose to review new strategies to avoid both anemia and transfusion with the goal of improving patient outcomes and safety. We reviewed several approaches that utilize patient blood management to improve patient outcomes, including 1) characterization of biomarkers of anemia-induced tissue hypoxia to identify appropriate patient-specific treatment thresholds or hemoglobin (Hb) triggers; 2) development of adequately powered clinical trials that will help to define appropriate guidelines for the perioperative treatment of anemia and optimal Hb thresholds for transfusion of RBCs in specific patient populations; and 3) demonstration that an established blood conservation program (ONTraC) can reduce RBC transfusion and its associated adverse outcomes. Anemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Ongoing initiatives to

  6. Prevalence of anemia and malnutrition and their association in elderly nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sevnaz; Tasar, Pinar Tosun; Simsek, Hatice; Çicek, Zeynep; Eskiizmirli, Hulya; Aykar, Fisun Senuzun; Sahin, Fahri; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2016-10-01

    Malnutrition is one of the most important geriatric syndromes in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between anemia and malnutrition in elderly nursing home residents. Local nursing home residents over 60 years old in the Izmir were included in the study. Blood samples were taken from study participants for hemogram, iron, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, vitamin B12 and folic acid analysis. WHO criteria were used to define anemia. Causes of anemia were classified as iron deficiency, vitamin B12 or folic acid deficiency, anemia of chronic disease or other hematologic causes. Anemia was defined as the dependent variable and malnutrition was defined as the independent variable. Correlation between MNA scores and Hb levels was determined using Pearson correlation analysis. The slope of causality between malnutrition and anemia was determined using the χ (2) test and logistic regression analysis. The study included 257 elderly nursing home residents with a mean age of 78.5 ± 7.8 years. The overall prevalence of anemia was 54.9 %; 35.8 % of the study participants were at risk of malnutrition and 8.2 % were malnourished. Anemia risk was 2.12-fold higher in participants at risk of malnutrition and 5.05-fold higher in those with malnutrition. In the participants with malnutrition or malnutrition risk, the most common cause of anemia was anemia of chronic disease (57.1 and 46.5 %, respectively). The prevalence of anemia among elderly nursing home residents is high in Turkey. Malnutrition and malnutrition risk increase the incidence of anemia.

  7. Impact of anemia on in-hospital complications after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wei, C-C; Zhang, S-T; Tan, G; Zhang, S-H; Liu, M

    2018-05-01

    In-hospital complications after stroke represent barriers to optimal recovery and are even potentially life-threatening. Anemia is common in stroke patients and is related to poor outcome after stroke. Less is known, however, of the association of anemia with complications. We aimed to investigate the impact of anemia on a series of in-hospital complications after ischemic stroke. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke within 7 days were included. Anemia on admission and its severity were defined according to World Health Organization criteria. Eight pre-specified complications, such as pneumonia, gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) and hemorrhagic transformation, were recorded during hospitalization. A total of 2647 patients were included. Anemia was present in 648 patients (24.5%), and 883 patients (33.4%) experienced at least one complication. Patients with anemia were more likely to experience one or more complications, pneumonia, GIB and thromboembolism (all P < 0.001) than patients without anemia. After adjustment for the confounders, patients with anemia had an adjusted odds ratio for at least one complication of 1.539 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.232-1.923], for pneumonia of 1.707 (95% CI, 1.345-2.167), for GIB of 2.245 (95% CI, 1.215-4.148) and for thromboembolism of 3.443 (95% CI, 1.668-7.108). The risk of at least one complication, pneumonia, GIB and thromboembolism increased with anemia severity (all P < 0.05). There was no significant association between anemia and urinary tract infection, hemorrhagic transformation, seizures and brain herniation. Anemia is an independent predictor of in-hospital complications following stroke, especially for pneumonia, GIB and thromboembolism. It remains to be studied whether prophylaxis and treatment of anemia would prevent in-hospital complications. © 2018 EAN.

  8. Severe hemolytic anemia caused by the NIPRO extracorporeal left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Ikuko; Kuwata, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Go; Ogawa, Hironaga; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Toyoda, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo; Fukuda, Hirotsugu

    2017-04-01

    A 56-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy underwent mitral and tricuspid annuloplasty, and simultaneous deployment of an extracorporeal left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Subsequently, she developed hemolytic anemia. Although the LVAD system was repeatedly exchanged and the mitral annular ring was removed, her hemolytic anemia did not improve. Finally, the NIPRO LVAD was replaced with Gyro Pump ® , and her anemia was ameliorated. It appears important to consider the possibility of hemolytic anemia as a LVAD-related complication, although it would be rare.

  9. Iron isotopic composition of blood serum in anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Anoshkina, Yulia; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Speeckaert, Marijn; Van Biesen, Wim; Delanghe, Joris; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2017-05-24

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a general term for disorders that affect the structure and function of the kidneys. Iron deficiency (ID) and anemia occur in the vast majority of CKD patients, most of whom are elderly. However, establishing the cause of anemia in CKD, and therefore making an informed decision concerning the corresponding therapeutic treatment, is still a challenge. High-precision Fe isotopic analysis of blood serum samples of CKD patients with and without ID/anemia was performed via multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) for such a purpose. Patients with CKD and/or iron disorders showed a heavier serum Fe isotopic composition than controls. Many clinical parameters used for the diagnosis and follow-up of anemia correlated significantly with the serum Fe isotopic composition. In contrast, no relation was observed between the serum Fe isotopic composition and the estimated glomerular filtration rate as a measure of kidney function. Among the CKD patients, the serum Fe isotopic composition was substantially heavier in the occurrence of ID anemia, while erythropoietin-related anemia did not exert this effect. The Fe isotopic composition can thus be useful for distinguishing these different types of anemias in CKD patients, i.e. ID anemia vs. erythropoietin-related anemia.

  10. Anemia, bleeding, and blood transfusion in the intensive care unit: causes, risks, costs, and new strategies.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Michael T; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-11-01

    The definition of anemia is controversial and varies with the sex, age, and ethnicity of the patient. Anemia afflicts half of hospitalized patients and most elderly hospitalized patients. Acute anemia in the operating room or intensive care unit is associated with increased morbidity as well as other adverse outcomes, including death. The risks of anemia are compounded by the added risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells, the most common treatment for severe anemia. The causes of anemia in hospitalized patients include iron deficiency, suppression of erythropoietin and iron transport, trauma, phlebotomy, coagulopathies, adverse effects of and reactions to medications, and stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding. The types and causes of anemia and the increased health care utilization and costs associated with anemia and undetected internal bleeding are described. The potential benefits and risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells also are explored. Last, the strategies and new tools to help prevent anemia, allow earlier detection of internal bleeding, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusions are discussed.

  11. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    PubMed

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  12. Cobalamin deficiency associated with erythroblastic anemia and methylmalonic aciduria in a border collie.

    PubMed

    Morgan, L W; McConnell, J

    1999-01-01

    Anemia due to cobalamin deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that has been recognized in dogs only recently. This report concerns a 14-month-old border collie that presented for chronic, nonregenerative anemia. Cytological examination of a peripheral blood smear showed the presence of erythroblasts. Serum cobalamin levels were below reference ranges reported for clinically normal dogs. A methylmalonic aciduria was found on urinalysis. These signs are consistent with the anemia in Imerslund-Graesbeck syndrome reported in humans. Anemia due to cobalamin deficiency responds to parenteral vitamin B12 therapy, and affected animals have a good prognosis for recovery.

  13. Household food insecurity is associated with anemia in adult Mexican women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Nils C; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; Méndez-Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is a major cause of maternal mortality. Household food insecurity (HFI) may increase the risk of anemia among women of reproductive age although this hypothesis remains largely untested in representative samples from low- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to investigate the association of HFI with anemia in a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample of Mexican women of reproductive age (12-49 y old). We tested the association between HFI and anemia among 16,944 women of reproductive age using the multiple logistic regression among adolescent (12-20 y) and adult women (21-49 y). HFI was measured with the use of the Latin American and Caribbean Food Security Scale. Hemoglobin was measured with capillary hemoglobin with the use of HemoCue photometer (HemoCue, Inc.) and anemia was defined with the use of WHO standards. The association of HFI and anemia was not significant (P > 0.05) for adolescent women (12-20 y), whereas in adult women (21-49 y), the adjusted odds of having anemia were 31-43% higher among those living in mild to severely food insecure households than adult women residing in food secure households (P < 0.05). HFI is associated with anemia among adult Mexican women. Programs that reduce HFI may also be effective at reducing the risk of anemia among Mexican women. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Pulmonary hypertension in a case of Hb-Mainz hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lode, Holger N; Krings, Gregor; Schulze-Neick, Ingram; Dähmlow, Steffen; Schroeder, Ulrike; Bonnet, Ragnhild; DaPalma, Joao; Luck, Werner; Strauss, Gabriele; Berger, Felix; Gaedicke, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    The development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with thalassemia and sickle cell anemia and was reported to occur in hemolytic anemias such as hereditary stomatocytosis, and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Here, we report for the first time on the development of PAH in a patient with Hb-Mainz hemolytic anemia. Hb-Mainz is an unstable hemoglobin variant resulting from mutations at codon 98 of the beta chain gene (Val>Glu) characterized by severe chronic hemolytic anemia. The development of PAH in this patient further supports the contention that there is a clinical syndrome of hemolysis-associated development of PAH.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy and the postpartum period: Iron deficiency anemia working group consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Api, Olus; Breyman, Christian; Çetiner, Mustafa; Demir, Cansun; Ecder, Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is the most common disease, affecting >1.5 billion people worldwide. Furthermore, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) accounts for 50% of cases of anemia. IDA is common during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and can lead to serious maternal and fetal complications. The aim of this report was to present the experiences of a multidisciplinary expert group, and to establish reference guidelines for the optimal diagnosis and treatment of IDA during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Studies and guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of IDA published in Turkish and international journals were reviewed. Conclusive recommendations were made by an expert panel aiming for a scientific consensus. Measurement of serum ferritin has the highest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of IDA unless there is a concurrent inflammatory condition. The lower threshold value for hemoglobin (Hb) in pregnant women is <11 g/dL during the 1st and 3rd trimesters, and <10.5 g/dL during the 2nd trimester. In postpartum period a Hb concentration <10 g/dL indicates clinically significant anemia. Oral iron therapy is given as the first-line treatment for IDA. Although current data are limited, intravenous (IV) iron therapy is an alternative therapeutic option in patients who do not respond to oral iron therapy, have adverse reactions, do not comply with oral iron treatment, have a very low Hb concentration, and require rapid iron repletion. IV iron preparations can be safely used for the treatment of IDA during pregnancy and the postpartum period, and are more beneficial than oral iron preparations in specific indications. PMID:28913064

  16. The difference in endoscopic yield in patients with either iron-deficiency anemia or anemia with normal ferritin.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Judith A; van Oostveen, Catharina J; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Cleeren, Eva; Neerincx, Maarten; van der Hulst, René W M

    2018-04-01

    Current guidelines recommend a gastroduodenoscopy (GDS) and colonoscopy in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). However, in daily practice, patients with nonferriprive anemia are also referred for endoscopy. The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic yield of colonoscopy and GDS in patients with IDA and non-IDA. A retrospective single-center cohort study was carried out from January 2013 till February 2016 that included 917 patients with anemia. We compared the endoscopic yield in patients with IDA versus patients with anemia otherwise. Multivariate regression analyses were carried out to identify predictive factors for the diagnostic yield of GDS and colonoscopy. The yield of both GDS (25%) and colonoscopy (30%) was comparable in IDA and non-IDA patients. However, in patients without known gastrointestinal medical history and without concomitant indications for endoscopy (N=373), the diagnostic yield of GDS was three times higher in IDA patients compared with non-IDA patients (P<0.01). The diagnostic yield for colonoscopy was not significantly different between the two groups. Age and sex were recurrent predictive variables in the outcome of both GDS and colonoscopies. We recommend IDA as well as non-IDA as indications for GDS and colonoscopy. Only in patients without gastrointestinal history or localizing complaints a significant difference in the diagnostic yield is found between IDA and non-IDA patients. In this group, upper endoscopy can be omitted in non-IDA patients as they were three times less likely to have a bleeding source found on GDS compared with IDA patients.

  17. [Metallosis: A Rare Cause of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Joana; Correia, Lurdes; Simão, Adélia; Figueiredo, António; Carvalho, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia may be associated with multiple etiologies, including toxic substances, such as metals, which is a rare cause. 55-year-old male, who underwent a total arthroplasty of the right hip (uncemented prostheses with ceramic-ceramic articulation with an acetabular component consisting of a dome composed of an alloy of titanium, aluminum and vanadium into which fitted a ceramic 'insert'). Approximately 4 years after surgery the patient complained of noise originating from the prosthesis which occurred on movement. A surgical revision was performed and showed the presence of dark thick intracapsular fluid, fracture of the ceramic acetabular 'insert' and signs of wear of the acetabular metal dome. Extensive washing was carried out and the fractured ceramic 'insert' was replaced for a polyethylene 'insert'. Two months later he was referred to the Emergency Room due to worsening of his general health, floating in the right hip and mucocutaneous jaundice. Laboratory tests suggested autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Arthrocentesis was performed and a large volume of metal fluid was drained off. The CT scan showed a large heterogeneous pelvic cystic collection seeded with prosthesis fragments, suggestive of metallosis. Hemolytic anemia was explained as toxicity of the particles and metal ions caused by the wear of the prosthesis. The patient was started on a high-dose steroid treatment. Afterwards, when he was stable, prosthesis components replacement and drainage of pelvic debris fluid were carried out. After the fracture of the ceramic 'insert' the ceramic head began to articulate directly with the metallic acetabular component, causing noise and wear with release of particles and ions. This caused a cystic pelvic abscess, which went unnoticed on the first surgical revision. Surgical debridement lead to the cystic collection extending into the adjacent tissues and the systemic circulation, triggering serious systemic effects, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The

  18. Bovine hemoglobin: a nontraditional approach to the management of acute anemia in a Jehovah's Witness patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Shane D; Alexander, Earnest

    2013-06-01

    Management of severe symptomatic anemia in critically ill Jehovah's Witness patients remains a challenge. The paucity of therapeutic alternatives to human red blood cells has prompted the use of blood substitutes. A 19-year-old female Jehovah's Witness patient presented to the emergency department following several episodes of syncope. She was found to have a positive Coombs test and was diagnosed with warm-bodied autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Upon admission, her hemoglobin was 8.4 g/dL, then dropped to a nadir of 2.8 g/dL 4 days later. She received traditional management with corticosteroids, intravenous immune globulin, rituximab, and partial splenic artery embolization. Despite these therapies, hemoglobin levels failed to respond, and she experienced signs of marked ischemia. A decision was made to give 2 units of Hemopure, a bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier, and the hemoglobin levels increased to 8.7 g/dL 10 days later. The patient's overall clinical condition improved leading to subsequent hospital discharge. This case exemplifies the ingenuity that health care practitioners must use in critical situations involving the medical management of anemic Jehovah's Witness patients who refuse blood products. Hemopure was used as "bridging treatment" to help save a patient from the devastating effects of ischemia resulting from severe anemia.

  19. Prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia among the UAE adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities.

  20. [Prevalence and factors associated with anemia in pregnant women attending the General Hospital in Douala].

    PubMed

    Tchente, Charlotte Nguefack; Tsakeu, Eveline Ngouadjeu Dongho; Nguea, Arlette Géraldine; Njamen, Théophile Nana; Ekane, Gregory Halle; Priso, Eugene Belley

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a public health problem, prevalent among children and women of childbearing age. Our study aims to determine the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in pregnant women at Douala General Hospital. We conducted a cross sectional study from July 2012 to July 2013. All consenting pregnant women attending antenatal consultation and having undergone complete blood count (CBC) were included in the study. Sociodemographic characteristics, individual's obstetrical history and the results of the CBC were recorded on a pre tested data collection sheet. Anemia was defined according to the WHO criteria. After some descriptive statistics, we performed a bivariate analysis using the Chi-square test and Fisher exact probability test in order to determine the factors associated with anemia. P value <0.05 was considered significant. A total of 415 pregnant women were enrolled in the study. Anemia prevalence was 39,8%. The average age was 29,89±4,835 years. The mean hemoglobin level was 10.93 ± 1.23. Normochromic normocytic anemia (53,3%) was prevalent. Anaemia was severe in 2,4% of cases. Anemia in pregnancy was significantly associated with a personal history of chronic diseases (P = 0.02) and of anemia in a previous pregnancy (P = 0.003). Anemia was more frequently observed during the 3rd trimester (P = 0.04) and breastfeeding played a protective role (P = 0.02). The prevalence of anemia during pregnancy remains high. A better management of chronic diseases in pregnant women and of postpartum follow-up is necessary to treat anemia before a subsequent pregnancy.

  1. [Causes, diagnostics and course of disease in 194 cats with anemia].

    PubMed

    Merten, Nina; Weingart, Christiane; Kohn, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common hematological alteration in cats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of different types of anemia and the course of disease in cats with a hematocrit (hct) < 0.26 l/l. In a period of 18 months 194 cats were included and assigned to different anemia groups based on history, physical examination and laboratory parameters. Most cats had acute blood loss anemia (BA; 75/194; 38.7%). Frequent causes were trauma (39/75), hematuria (13/75) and hemostatic disorders (9/75). Anemia of inflammatory and neoplastic disease (AID) occurred in 22.2% (43/194) and hemolytic anemia (HA) in 18% (35/194). Half of those were presumptively immune-mediated (IHA). Four cats were diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma infection. Rare causes of anemia included anemia of renal disease (ARD; 18/194; 9.3%) and intramedullary non-regenerative anemia (INR; 13/194; 6.7%). The latter either had retroviral infection (6/13) or neoplasia (6/13). In cats with HA and INR anemia was often severe and very severe (Hct < 0.14 l/l) and in cats with AID and ARD usually mild (Hct 0.20-0.25 l/l). Cats with BA had significantly lower total protein concentrations than those with INR (p = 0,001), HA, AID and CNE (p < 0,001) and those with HA most often had hyperbilirubinemia (21/27). Blood transfusions were primarily given to cats with BA (37/75) and HA (19/35), especially those with IHA (13/17). 69% of the patients survived the first 14 days after the anemia was detected for the first time. Cats with HA had the highest survival rate.

  2. Prevalence of anemia in chronic kidney disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Melissa E; Fan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is one of the many complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the current prevalence of anemia in CKD patients in the United States is not known. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 were used to determine the prevalence of anemia in subjects with CKD. The analysis was limited to adults aged >18 who participated in both the interview and exam components of the survey. Three outcomes were assessed: the prevalence of CKD, the prevalence of anemia in subjects with CKD, and the self-reported treatment of anemia. CKD was classified into 5 stages based on the glomerular filtration rate and evidence of kidney damage, in accordance with the guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation. Anemia was defined as serum hemoglobin levels ≤12 g/dL in women and ≤13 g/dL in men. We found that an estimated 14.0% of the US adult population had CKD in 2007-2010. Anemia was twice as prevalent in people with CKD (15.4%) as in the general population (7.6%). The prevalence of anemia increased with stage of CKD, from 8.4% at stage 1 to 53.4% at stage 5. A total of 22.8% of CKD patients with anemia reported being treated for anemia within the previous 3 months-14.6% of patients at CKD stages 1-2 and 26.4% of patients at stages 3-4. These results update our knowledge of the prevalence and treatment of anemia in CKD in the United States.

  3. [Can anemia be corrected in hemodialysis patients with thalassaemia minor? ].

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, B; Guastaferro, P; Gironda, A; Marano, V; Morrongiello, L; Cillo, N; Zito, B; Nigro, F; Frieri, A; Rubino, R; Bellizzi, V

    2002-01-01

    Anemia is an important negative prognostic factor for dialysis patients, whose correction reduces hospitalisation and mortality. Besides, the presence of the thalassaemia minor (Thal-m) in haemodialysed patients causes erythropoietin resistance and more serious anemia. The goal of this study is the correction of anemia (Hb >11 g/dL) in haemodialysed Thal-m patients. Multicentric, prospective and controlled 12-month study for the correction of anemia (up to values ranging from 11 to 12 g/dL) followed by a 12-month observation period. Ten Thal-m patients with inadequate anemia correction were studied after therapy with rHuEPO. Their age at the beginning of the study was 62.8+/-4 years while their dialytic age was 89+/-20 months. During the study we observed no changes in dry weight (p=NS), no increase in interdialytic weight (p=NS), cardiac frequency (p=NS), serum albumin (p=NS), serum aluminium (p=NS), PTH (p=NS), URR (p=NS), flow FAV (p=NS), TSAT (p=NS) and ferritin (p=NS) (maintained at their optimal values by means of intravenous therapy with trivalent iron. The hypotensive therapy (1.6 drug/patient/year) required no modifications during the 24-month study. The rHuEPO dose varied from 200.3+/-94.3 to 286.6+/-116.2, 317.0+/-119.5, 446.9+/-142.3, and 407.0+/-130.5 U/kg/wk (p < 0.0001 vs. initial value) (from the start to the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th month, respectively). The dose was subsequently reduced to 385.2+/-119.7 U/kg/wk at 15 months (p < 0.0001 vs. initial value) and remained unchanged until the end of the study. Simultaneously, the Hb values at corresponding times were 9.2+/-0.9, 9.4+/-1.1, 10.2+/-1.4, 10.9+/-1.5, 11.2+/-1.4 and 11.0+/-1.4 (p=0.002 vs. initial value). The correction of anemia produced progressive reduction in cardiac mass from 141+/-12 to 120+/-10 and 110+/-8 g/mq at the beginning, 12th month and 24th month (p < 0.0001), respectively. During the study the hospitalisation time was 4.3+/-1.2 day/patient/year during the 3-month run-in period

  4. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-03-03

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman.

  5. Frequency of nutritional anemia among female medical students of Faisalabad

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Shireen; Tariq, Sundus; Tariq, Saba; Kamal, Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Anemia is a common health problem worldwide. This problem is most commonly faced by 18 to 25 years of females. Medical students especially female hostelites poses high risk of anemia because of their poor eating habits, breakfast skipping, long schedule in college, burden of medical studies, clinical postings, and extra-curricular activities. Therefore the current study was designed to determine the hemoglobin status in young female medical students. We also elucidate its association with BMI. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at The University of Faisalabad during December 2015 to February 2016. A total of 221 female students were recruited by convenient sampling technique. All relevant information about participants was taking by administering structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized as hostelities and day scholars for comparison. Study subjects were also sub grouped on the bases of their BMI. Hemoglobin, MCV, MCH and MCHC were estimated at Madina Teaching Hospital Faisalabad. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS 20. Results: Mean age of the study subjects was 19.92 ±0.93. 33.4% of the students were found to be anemic. Significantly high number of hostelites (39.2%) were anemic as compared to day scholars (23.1%) (P value= 0.015*). On analyzing by BMI categories, greater number of underweight subjects was found to be anemic as compared to normal and overweight subjects. Conclusion: Anemia is more prevalent in hostelites as compared to day scholar female medical students which might also affect the efficiency of these students. PMID:28523045

  6. Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Morton, Jordan M; George, James N

    2016-06-01

    The unexpected occurrence of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, in a patient with cancer requires urgent diagnosis and appropriate management. TMA is a term used to describe multiple syndromes caused by microvascular thrombosis, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), Shiga toxin-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome, and complement-mediated TMA. In patients with cancer, systemic microvascular metastases and bone marrow involvement can cause microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. This occurs most often in patients with known metastatic cancer, but microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia may occur unexpectedly in patients without known metastatic disease or be the presenting features of undiagnosed cancer. TMA may also be caused by commonly used chemotherapy agents, either through dose-dependent toxicity or an acute immune-mediated reaction. These causes of TMA must be distinguished from TTP, which results from a severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 and is the most common cause of TMA among adults without cancer. The importance of this distinction is to avoid inappropriate use of plasma exchange, which is associated with major complications. Plasma exchange is the essential treatment for TTP, but it has no known benefit for patients with cancer-induced or drug-induced TMA. We will describe cancer-induced and drug-induced TMA using the experience of the Oklahoma TTP-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Registry and data from a systematic review of all published reports of drug-induced TMA. We will illustrate the principles of evaluation and management of these disorders with patients' stories. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole use.

    PubMed

    Frieder, Jillian; Mouabbi, Jason Aboudi; Zein, Rami; Hadid, Tariq

    2017-06-15

    A case report of drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) triggered by exposure to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is presented along with a brief review of the pathophysiology of DIIHA and diagnostic considerations. A 58-year-old woman recently initiated on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for treatment of a urinary tract infection presented to the emergency department with generalized weakness and fatigue. Initial laboratory studies were significant for the following values: hemoglobin concentration, 5.6 g/dL (reference range, 12-15 g/dL); mean corpuscular volume, 116.9 μm 3 (reference range, 80-100 μm 3 ); and reticulocyte count, 16% (reference range, 0.5-1.5%). An elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase concentration (646 U/L [reference range, 50-150 U/L]) and a low haptoglobin concentration (<10 mg/dL [reference range, 30-200 mg/dL]) indicated a hemolytic process. A peripheral blood smear revealed spherocytosis. Serologic testing showed antibodies to both immunoglobulin G (IgG) and complement component C3b. An antibody identification panel was nonspecifically positive for a warm-reacting autoantibody (IgG). The combination of clinically evident hemolytic anemia, recent exposure to a newly initiated drug, and serologic evidence strongly suggested DIIHA. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was promptly discontinued, a total of 6 units of packed red blood cells were transfused, and the patient was treated with methylprednisolone sodium succinate. Clinical and hematologic improvements were observed within a few days. Results of follow-up antibody screening and direct antiglobulin testing 4 weeks after discharge were negative. A 58-year-old woman developed warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for 5 days. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Do Blood Tests Cause Anemia in Hospitalized Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Bagai, Akshay; Ebidia, Albert; Detsky, Allan S; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether phlebotomy contributes to changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in hospitalized general internal medicine patients. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING General internal medicine inpatient service at a tertiary care hospital. PARTICIPANTS All adult patients discharged from the Toronto General Hospital's internal medicine service between January 1 and June 30, 2001. A total of 989 hospitalizations were reviewed and 404 hospitalizations were included in our analysis. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Mean (SD) hemoglobin and hematocrit changes during hospitalization were 7.9 (12.6) g/L (P<.0001) and 2.1% (3.8%) (P<.0001), respectively. The mean (SD) volume of phlebotomy during hospital stay was 74.6 (52.1) mL. On univariate analysis, changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit were predicted by the volume of phlebotomy, length of hospital stay, admission hemoglobin/hematocrit value, age, Charlson comorbidity index, and admission intravascular volume status. The volume of phlebotomy remained a strong predictor of drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit after adjusting for other predictors using multivariate analysis (P<.0001). On average, every 100 mL of phlebotomy was associated with a decrease in hemoglobin and hematocrit of 7.0 g/L and 1.9%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Phlebotomy is highly associated with changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit levels for patients admitted to an internal medicine service and can contribute to anemia. This anemia, in turn, may have significant consequences, especially for patients with cardiorespiratory diseases. Knowing the expected changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit due to diagnostic phlebotomy will help guide when to investigate anemia in hospitalized patients. PMID:15987327

  9. Individualized Anemia Management Reduces Hemoglobin Variability in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, George R.; Jacobs, Alfred A.; Rai, Shesh N.; Brier, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    One-size-fits-all protocol-based approaches to anemia management with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) may result in undesired patterns of hemoglobin variability. In this single-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, we tested the hypothesis that individualized dosing of ESA improves hemoglobin variability over a standard population-based approach. We enrolled 62 hemodialysis patients and followed them over a 12-month period. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ESA doses guided by the Smart Anemia Manager algorithm (treatment) or by a standard protocol (control). Dose recommendations, performed on a monthly basis, were validated by an expert physician anemia manager. The primary outcome was the percentage of hemoglobin concentrations between 10 and 12 g/dl over the follow-up period. A total of 258 of 356 (72.5%) hemoglobin concentrations were between 10 and 12 g/dl in the treatment group, compared with 208 of 336 (61.9%) in the control group; 42 (11.8%) hemoglobin concentrations were <10 g/dl in the treatment group compared with 88 (24.7%) in the control group; and 56 (15.7%) hemoglobin concentrations were >12 g/dl in the treatment group compared with 46 (13.4%) in the control group. The median ESA dosage per patient was 2000 IU/wk in both groups. Five participants received 6 transfusions (21 U) in the treatment group, compared with 8 participants and 13 transfusions (31 U) in the control group. These results suggest that individualized ESA dosing decreases total hemoglobin variability compared with a population protocol-based approach. As hemoglobin levels are declining in hemodialysis patients, decreasing hemoglobin variability may help reduce the risk of transfusions in this population. PMID:24029429

  10. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia as a Complication of Nivolumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Palla, Amruth R; Kennedy, Devin; Mosharraf, Hossain; Doll, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunotherapeutic drugs, including PD-1 inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), PD-L1 inhibitors (atezolizumab, avelumab), and CTLA4 inhibitors (ipiliumumab), have emerged as important additions to the armamentarium against certain malignancies and have been incorporated into therapeutic protocols for first-, second-, or third-line agents for these metastatic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is currently FDA approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic malignant melanoma [Redman et al.: BMC Med 2016;14: 20], metastatic non-small cell lung cancer [Guibert and Mazières: Expert Opin Biol Ther 2015;15: 1789-1797], metastatic renal cell cancer [Farolfi et al.: Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 2016;12: 1089-1096], and relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin's lymphoma [Villasboas and Ansell: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther 2016;16: 5-12]. Given the current and increasing indications for these drugs, it is essential for all physicians to become well versed with their common adverse effects and to be observant for other less documented clinical conditions that could be unmasked with the use of such medications. A definite association between autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab has not been clearly documented, although a few cases have been reported recently [Kong et al.: Melanoma Res 2016;26: 202-204; Schwab et al.: Case Rep Oncol 2016;9: 373-378; Tardy et al.: Hematol Oncol 2016, DOI: 10.1002/hon.2338]. We report a case of fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia refractory to steroids in a patient treated with nivolumab for metastatic lung cancer, and reflect on the other reported cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the use of nivolumab.

  11. Individualized anemia management reduces hemoglobin variability in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gaweda, Adam E; Aronoff, George R; Jacobs, Alfred A; Rai, Shesh N; Brier, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    One-size-fits-all protocol-based approaches to anemia management with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) may result in undesired patterns of hemoglobin variability. In this single-center, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, we tested the hypothesis that individualized dosing of ESA improves hemoglobin variability over a standard population-based approach. We enrolled 62 hemodialysis patients and followed them over a 12-month period. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ESA doses guided by the Smart Anemia Manager algorithm (treatment) or by a standard protocol (control). Dose recommendations, performed on a monthly basis, were validated by an expert physician anemia manager. The primary outcome was the percentage of hemoglobin concentrations between 10 and 12 g/dl over the follow-up period. A total of 258 of 356 (72.5%) hemoglobin concentrations were between 10 and 12 g/dl in the treatment group, compared with 208 of 336 (61.9%) in the control group; 42 (11.8%) hemoglobin concentrations were <10 g/dl in the treatment group compared with 88 (24.7%) in the control group; and 56 (15.7%) hemoglobin concentrations were >12 g/dl in the treatment group compared with 46 (13.4%) in the control group. The median ESA dosage per patient was 2000 IU/wk in both groups. Five participants received 6 transfusions (21 U) in the treatment group, compared with 8 participants and 13 transfusions (31 U) in the control group. These results suggest that individualized ESA dosing decreases total hemoglobin variability compared with a population protocol-based approach. As hemoglobin levels are declining in hemodialysis patients, decreasing hemoglobin variability may help reduce the risk of transfusions in this population.

  12. Malaria and Anemia among Children in a Low Resource Setting In Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oladeinde, BH; Omoregie, R; Olley, M; Anunibe, JA; Onifade, AA; Oladeinde, OB

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed at determining the prevalence of malaria and anemia among children in rural community of Okada, Edo State Nigeria, as well as to assess the level of use of Insecticide treated bed nets and its impact on prevalence of malaria and anemia among study population. Methods Thick blood films from 226 children with signs and symptoms of malaria in Okada community were stained and examined for presence of malaria parasites. Hemoglobin concentration of all children was also determined using standard method. Result A total of 185 (81.9%) children were infected with malaria parasite. Malaria parasitaemia was significantly affected by age (P =0.003). A significantly higher number of positive cases of malaria and anemia was observed in rainy season as compared to dry season (P<0.05). The prevalence of anemia in children was 47.3%. Malaria was a risk factor for development of anemia in children (OR=2.551; 95% CI=1.227, 5.305; P=0.015). Use of insecticide treated bed nets was recorded in 11(4.9%) of children studied, and did not significantly reduce the prevalence of malaria and anemia. However among malaria parasite infected children, its use significantly reduced the prevalence of anemia (OR=0.126; 95%CI=0.015, 1.047; P=0.031). Conclusion Malaria and anemia among children was high malaria intervention progammes by relevant agencies is strongly advocated. PMID:23109959

  13. Comprehensive Review of Preschool Age Anemia in the Pacific Island Jurisdictions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiffany F; Huang, James N; Cash, Haley L

    2017-12-01

    Anemia can be an indicator of poor nutrition and health, and it can have significant consequences. Children are disproportionately affected by anemia. This comprehensive review summarizes the available literature on anemia prevalence in young children in the islands of the Oceania region. The anemia prevalence, the criteria used for diagnosis, the date the data was reported, and the types of samples collected were reviewed. Anemia prevalence estimates were reported for eighteen of the Pacific Island Jurisdictions. From the fifteen data sources that were evaluable, anemia prevalence ranged from 12.3% to over 70%. A major limitation in the data is a lack of representative primary data from many of the jurisdictions in the region. Prevalance estimates reported for those jurisdictions are estimated by regression analysis from the World Health Organization (WHO). Moreover, the primary data available does not use standardized reporting criteria. Nevertheless, this review serves as a new baseline for further investigations on the prevalence of anemia and a baseline for evaluating public health prevention and treatment measures to detect and improve anemia prevalence in the Pacific.

  14. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and β thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias. PMID:19181781

  15. Shared genetic susceptibility to breast cancer, brain tumors, and Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Offit, Kenneth; Levran, Orna; Mullaney, Brian; Mah, Katherine; Nafa, Khedoudja; Batish, Sat Dev; Diotti, Raffaella; Schneider, Hildegard; Deffenbaugh, Amie; Scholl, Thomas; Proud, Virginia K; Robson, Mark; Norton, Larry; Ellis, Nathan; Hanenberg, Helmut; Auerbach, Arleen D

    2003-10-15

    Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations, and predisposition to cancer. The breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 was recently found to be associated with Fanconi anemia complementation group D1 (FA-D1). We examined four kindreds afflicted with Fanconi anemia for the presence of germline BRCA2 mutations. One kindred, of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, had five members who were diagnosed with breast cancer and two cousins who were BRCA2*6174delT/C3069X compound heterozygotes and had Fanconi anemia and brain tumors. In another kindred of Ashkenazi Jewish and Lithuanian Catholic ancestry, a child with Fanconi anemia and a medulloblastoma was a BRCA2*6174delT/886delGT compound heterozygote. Two other kindreds each contained a Fanconi anemia-afflicted child who developed medulloblastoma; one child was of Latin American ancestry and a compound heterozygote for BRCA2*I2490T/ 5301insA and the other was African American and a compound heterozygote for BRCA2*Q3066X/E1308X. Median age of the Fanconi anemia-afflicted children at brain tumor diagnosis was 3.5 years. The co-occurrence of brain tumors, Fanconi anemia, and breast cancer observed in one of these kindreds constitutes a new syndromic association. Individuals who carry a germline BRCA2 mutation and who plan to have children with a partner of Ashkenazi Jewish descent should consider undergoing genetic counseling.

  16. [Etiopathogenesis of aplastic anemia and of the severe form treated with immunosuppression and bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Dulley, F L; Lotério, H A; Massumoto, C M; Llacer, P E; Chamone, D de A

    1989-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a condition characterized by bone marrow hipoplasia and pancytopenia. Various etiologic agents are related to the acquired form of this disease but in many cases the causative agents remain obscure. Severe aplastic anemia has been treated by immunosuppression and allogeneic marrow transplantation.

  17. In anemia of multiple myeloma hepcidin is induced by increased bone-morphogenetic protein-2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contrib...

  18. Anemia in postmenopausal women: dietary inadequacy or non-dietary factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Postmenopausal women are disproportionately affected by anemia, and the prevalence in females > 65 years of age in the United States is approximately 10%. The manifestation of anemia in older populations is associated with dietary inadequacy, blood loss, genetics, alterations in bioavailability, ren...

  19. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  20. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

  1. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  2. X-linked Sideroblastic Anemia in a Malay Boy With ALAS2 S568G Mutation.

    PubMed

    Susanto, Thomas A K; Bhattacharyya, Rajat

    2017-07-01

    Dimorphism in peripheral blood film was noted in a 16 year old Malay boy with anemia who was eventually diagnosed with X-linked sideroblastic anemia. A mutation in ALAS2 S568G was identified which has not been described previously in a Malay ethnic group.

  3. Prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and its effect on neonatal outcomes in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bora, Reeta; Sable, Corey; Wolfson, Julian; Boro, Kanta; Rao, Raghavendra

    2014-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and characterize its effect on neonatal outcome in Northeast India. Four hundred and seventy mothers and their newborn infants during a one month period were included. The association between maternal hemoglobin (Hb) at delivery and neonatal outcomes were determined. Anemia (Hb < 110 g/L) was present in 421 (89.6%) mothers with 35 (8.3%) having severe anemia(Hb < 70 g/L). After adjusting for maternal and neonatal variables, each 10 g/L decrease in maternal Hb was associated with 0.18 week decrease in gestational length (p = 0.003) and 21 g decrease in birth weight (p = 0.093). Severe maternal anemia was associated with 0.63 week (95% CI, 0.03-1.23week) shorter gestation, 481 g (95% CI, 305-658 g) lower birth weight and 89% increased risk of small-for-gestation (OR 1.89, 95% CI, 1.25-2.86)in the offspring, compared with those born to mothers without anemia (p < 0.001). Maternal anemia was highly prevalentin this population. Lower gestational age and birth weight, and increased risk of small-for-gestation were associated with maternal anemia, especially when maternal Hb was <80 g/L. Maternal anemia needs urgent attention to improve neonatal outcome in this population.

  4. Anemias beyond B12 and iron deficiency: the buzz about other B's, elementary, and nonelementary problems.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The term "unexplained anemia" appears frequently in a request for a hematology consultation. Although most anemia consultations are fairly routine, they occasionally represent challenging problems that require an amalgam of experience, insight, and a modicum of "out-of-the-box" thinking. Problem anemia cases and pitfalls in their recognition can arise for one of several reasons that are discussed in the cases presented herein. "Anemias beyond B12 and iron deficiency" covers a vast domain of everything that lies beyond the commonly encountered anemias caused by simple deficiencies of 2 currently major hematologically relevant micronutrients. However, even these deficiencies may be obscured when they coexist or are not considered because of misleading distractions. They may also be mistakenly identified when other less common nutrient deficiencies occur. I present herein case examples of such situations: a young patient with pancytopenia and schistocytes who was responsive to plasmapheresis, but in whom pernicious anemia was not suspected because of ethnicity and age; a bicytopenic patient with anemia and myelodysplastic features caused by copper deficiency after gastric reduction surgery; and a patient with BM hypoplasia and a dimorphic blood smear who was found to have paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. These "pearls" represent but 3 examples of the many varieties of problems in anemia diagnosis and are used to illustrate potential pitfalls and how to avoid them.

  5. Perspective: What Makes It So Difficult to Mitigate Worldwide Anemia Prevalence?

    PubMed

    Schümann, Klaus; Solomons, Noel W

    2017-05-01

    Anemia can be related to decreased production or increased loss of erythrocytes, or both, leading to many underlying and often overlapping causes. A largely cereal-based diet with plenty of phytates, polyphenols, and other ligands that inhibit intestinal iron absorption predominated in preindustrial Europe and predominates in present-day developing countries alike. In both situations, we find poor hygienic conditions, which frequently lead to anemia of inflammation. The large number of possible causes and their interaction shows why it is so difficult to mitigate anemia prevalence. Diagnostic biomarkers are required to differentiate the different types of anemia and to treat them appropriately. Some of them are well established in adults [e.g., concentrations of serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and serum iron or the ratio of sTfR to log ferritin]. Others, such as serum hepcidin, hold considerable promise, although they are not yet widely used. A particular issue is to establish reference values for biomarkers in infants and children at different ages. The fact that resource-rich postindustrial societies have a very low prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia offers hope that common types of anemia can be eliminated. In contrast, inborn forms of anemia, such as thalassemia, and anemias related to underlying diseases (e.g., bleeding tumors or peptic ulcers, gynecologic blood losses, or renal diseases) require an operational health system to be addressed appropriately. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A neglected issue with relevant effects

    PubMed Central

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  7. Assesment of the patients presenting with severe anemia to the emergency internal medicine clinic

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Seydahmet; Ergin, Ercan; Kazan, Sinan; Tukel, Nurgul Keskin; Aydin, Didem Kilic; Tekce, Mustafa; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Etiological evaluation of the patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of severe anemia (Hb<7 gr/dl) in the emergency internal medicine clinic between January and July, 2013. METHODS: In this study, 112 patients who were hospitalized in Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Education and Research Hospital emergency internal medicine clinic with severe anemia between January and July 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients’ initial complaints, underlying causes of their anemia and prognosis of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS: The etiology of anemia was iron deficiency in 60 (53.6%), chronic kidney failure in 16 (14.2%), hematologic malignancies in 12 (10.7%), liver cirrhosis in 12 (10.7%) and other non-malignant hematologic disorders in 4 (3.6%) patients. CONCLUSION: The most common cause of anemia in patients who apply to emergency internal medicine clinic with severe anemia is iron deficiency. The most common complaints on admission are subjective ones such as weakness, fatigue and lassitude. Chronic disease anemia does not cause severe anemia as much as iron deficiency. PMID:28058308

  8. A Study of Anemia Among Adolescent Females in the Urban Area of Nagpur

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sanjeev M; Dhage, Vasant R

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among adolescent females and to study the socio-demographic factors associated with anemia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in an urban area under Urban Health Training Center, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur. A total of 296 adolescent females (10–19 years old) were included in this study. The study took place from October 2002 to March 2003 (6 months). Statistical analyses were done using percentage, standard error of proportion, Chi-square test, and Student‘s ‘t’ test. Results: The prevalence of anemia was found to be 35.1%. A significant association of anemia was found with socio-economic status and literacy status of parents. Mean height and weight of subjects with anemia was significantly less than subjects without anemia. Conclusions: A high prevalence of anemia among adolescent females was found, which was higher in the lower socio-economic strata and among those whose parents were less educated. It was seen that anemia affects the overall nutritional status of adolescent females. PMID:19876498

  9. A study of anemia among adolescent females in the urban area of nagpur.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sanjeev M; Dhage, Vasant R

    2008-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of anemia among adolescent females and to study the socio-demographic factors associated with anemia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in an urban area under Urban Health Training Center, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur. A total of 296 adolescent females (10-19 years old) were included in this study. The study took place from October 2002 to March 2003 (6 months). Statistical analyses were done using percentage, standard error of proportion, Chi-square test, and Student's 't' test. The prevalence of anemia was found to be 35.1%. A significant association of anemia was found with socio-economic status and literacy status of parents. Mean height and weight of subjects with anemia was significantly less than subjects without anemia. A high prevalence of anemia among adolescent females was found, which was higher in the lower socio-economic strata and among those whose parents were less educated. It was seen that anemia affects the overall nutritional status of adolescent females.

  10. The association of pagophagia with Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between pagophagia (compulsive ice eating) and H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. We identified H. pylori infection using the (13)C-urea breath test in 45 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (group 1) and 55 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia (group 2). Subgroups for testing oral intestinal iron absorption were randomly assigned from both groups. These subgroups consisted of (a) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, (b) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia, (c) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, pagophagia, and H. pylori infection before the eradication of H. pylori and (d) subgroup c after eradication therapy. There was no difference in the rate of H. pylori infection in the iron-deficiency anemia groups, with or without pagophagia. Furthermore, oral intestinal iron absorption was not influenced by pagophagia and/or H. pylori infection. Pagophagia did not increase the risk of H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Pagophagia and H. pylori infection do not synergistically affect the development of intestinal iron absorption abnormalities.

  11. Association of Living Arrangement Conditions and Socioeconomic Differentials with Anemia Status among Women in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shangfeng; Hossain, Akmal; Fan, Yang; Akter, Mahmuda

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and remains a significant public health concern. Being a high anemia prevalent country, numerous efforts have been made to confront the issue especially among women and children by both local and international actors. Though the situation has substantially improved in recent years, a staggering number of adult women are currently living with anemia. The etiology of anemia is a multifactorial problem and has been proposed to be associated with various household, societal, economic, cultural factors apart from dietary habits. However, evidence regarding the household arrangements and socioeconomic determinants of anemia is scarce, especially in the context of Bangladesh. To this end, we utilized the 2011 demographic and health survey data to explore the association between anemia status and selected demographic, socioeconomic, and household characteristics. Our result showed significant correlation of anemia with both sociodemographic and household characteristics. Among the sociodemographic variables the following were found to be significantly associated with anemia status: age (p = 0.014; OR = 1.195; 95% CI = 1.036–1.378) and microcredit membership (p = 0.014; OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.037–1.386). Regarding the household arrangements, women utilizing biomass fuel for cooking (p < 0.019; OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 0.981–2.460) were more likely to be anemic. PMID:27517045

  12. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  13. Seizure disorders and anemia associated with chronic borax intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. S.; Prichard, J. S.; Freedman, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    During the course of investigation of two infants with seizure disorders it was discovered that both had been given large amounts of a preparation of borax and honey which resulted in chronic borate intoxication. In one child a profound anemia developed as well. The symptoms of chronic borate intoxication are different from those of the acute poisoning with which we are more familiar. The borax and honey preparations are highly dangerous and should no longer be manufactured or distributed for sale. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4691106

  14. Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

  15. Problems in the diagnosis and investigation of megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Shojania, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia and the differentiation of folate and vitamin B12 deficiency require, in addition to careful attention to the history and physical findings, the use of laboratory tests. In this paper the commonly ordered tests for such a diagnosis are discussed, with emphasis on the conditions that may cause false-positive or false-negative results in the complete blood count, examination of a peripheral blood smear and a bone marrow specimen, serum and erythrocyte folate assays, serum vitamin B12 assays, tests of vitamin B12 absorption and gastric analysis. PMID:6768440

  16. Characterization of isolates of equine infectious anemia virus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tigre, Dellane Martins; Brandão, Camila Fonseca Lopes; de Paula, Fabiana Lopes; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Campos, Gubio Soares; Sardi, Silvia Ines

    2017-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an important infectious disease that affects equids worldwide. Control of the disease is currently based on detection of anti-p26 EIAV by Agar Gel Immunodiffusion (AGID). In this work, 62 animals were examined by AGID and nested-PCR using primers for the gag gene. Fifty-three samples (85.5%) were positive by nested-PCR, whereas only 33 samples (53%) were positive for AGID. Fifteen amplicons obtained by nested-PCR were sequenced and the aligned results subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The analysis suggests that the Brazilian EIAV form a cluster with WSU5, EIAVUK and Wyoming strains from United States.

  17. Coexistence of Obesity and Anemia in Older Mexican Adults.

    PubMed

    Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Michaels-Obregon, Alejandra; Wong, Rebeca

    2011-12-08

    INTRODUCTION: Developing countries in Latin America (LA) are experiencing rapid aging as a result of advances in medical interventions. This rapid aging has not occurred with comparable improvements in standards of living. Chronic conditions are becoming highly prevalent while exposure to infectious communicable diseases is very common. This unique situation where communicable and non-communicable diseases coexist in the presence of low socioeconomic status place countries in LA in a unique epidemiological situation. Mexico presents a very good example where the impact of this situation on health warrants further analysis. METHODS: We use data from the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANut 2006), a cross-sectional study representative of all urban and rural areas of Mexico. A total of 5,605 adults older than 60 years of age with valid values for Body Mass Index and Hemoglobin were analyzed. We first included a descriptive analysis of the coexistence of anemia and obesity by age, gender and characteristics of the living environment. We reported the weighted percentages for each covariate by each of four nutritional condition categories (obese and anemic, only-obese, only-anemic, not obese and not anemic). We used multinomial logit regressions to determine the association of socioeconomic characteristics, health status and the living environment with the presence of the three nutritional condition categories. RESULTS: In the ENSANut cohort 10.3% of older adults are anemic, 25.0% are obese and 2.6% are both anemic and obese. Approximately 62% has neither anemia nor obesity. Within the 38% that fall in the three nutritional condition categories, the co-existence of obesity & anemia appears to be associated with metropolitan area residence, living alone, being male, having relatively high wealth, and reporting two or more chronic health conditions. Analyzing the effect of the covariates to distinguish between outcome categories, living environment, age

  18. Coexistence of Obesity and Anemia in Older Mexican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Michaels-Obregon, Alejandra; Wong, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Developing countries in Latin America (LA) are experiencing rapid aging as a result of advances in medical interventions. This rapid aging has not occurred with comparable improvements in standards of living. Chronic conditions are becoming highly prevalent while exposure to infectious communicable diseases is very common. This unique situation where communicable and non-communicable diseases coexist in the presence of low socioeconomic status place countries in LA in a unique epidemiological situation. Mexico presents a very good example where the impact of this situation on health warrants further analysis. Methods We use data from the Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANut 2006), a cross-sectional study representative of all urban and rural areas of Mexico. A total of 5,605 adults older than 60 years of age with valid values for Body Mass Index and Hemoglobin were analyzed. We first included a descriptive analysis of the coexistence of anemia and obesity by age, gender and characteristics of the living environment. We reported the weighted percentages for each covariate by each of four nutritional condition categories (obese and anemic, only-obese, only-anemic, not obese and not anemic). We used multinomial logit regressions to determine the association of socioeconomic characteristics, health status and the living environment with the presence of the three nutritional condition categories. Results In the ENSANut cohort 10.3% of older adults are anemic, 25.0% are obese and 2.6% are both anemic and obese. Approximately 62% has neither anemia nor obesity. Within the 38% that fall in the three nutritional condition categories, the co-existence of obesity & anemia appears to be associated with metropolitan area residence, living alone, being male, having relatively high wealth, and reporting two or more chronic health conditions. Analyzing the effect of the covariates to distinguish between outcome categories, living environment, age

  19. Study of serum hepcidin in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    El Beshlawy, Amal; Alaraby, Ibrahim; Abdel Kader, Mohamed S E M; Ahmed, Dina H; Abdelrahman, Hossam E M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the level of hepcidin in hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias and to correlate the serum hepcidin levels to the need for blood transfusions (frequency of blood transfusions and the serum ferritin level). Seventy pediatric patients with hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias, attending to hematology clinics of Cairo University and Misr University for Science and Technology (MUST) hospitals were the subjects of this study [53 patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM), 10 patients with β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), four patients with congenital spherocytosis and three patients with sickle cell disease) (38 males and 32 females)]; their ages ranged from 1-14 years. Seventy normal children, age- and sex-matched, served as the control group. The results of this study revealed decreased hepcidin levels in patients (all types of congenital chronic hemolytic anemias) [mean ± SD (standard deviation) = 22.9 ± 6.0] compared to controls (mean ± SD = 132.4 ± 16.7) with highly significant statistical difference in between. Hepcidin levels were higher in β-TM patients (mean ± SD = 23.7 ± 6.2) than in β-TI patients (mean ± SD = 21.8 ± 4.0), the hepcidin to ferritin ratio was significantly less than one. In β-TM patients, the mean ± SD was 0.03 ± 0.004, and in β-TI patients the mean ± SD = 0.025 ± 0.002, with highly significant statistical difference with hepcidin-to-ferritin ratios in controls being mean ± SD = 2.3 ± 0.7. Hepcidin and hepcidin/ferritin ratios can be used as good markers of hemolytic anemia and iron overload as they have very high sensitivity (99.0 and 99.0%, respectively) and very high specificity (98.0 and 97.0%, respectively). Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of hepcidin measurement as a diagnostic tool. The use of hepcidin as an adjuvant therapy with iron chelators is important as it has a vital role in combating hemosidrosis.

  20. [Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia presenting with hematuria and severe anemia].

    PubMed

    Paz, A; Goren, E; Segal, M

    1995-07-01

    A patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was admitted with hematuria and severe anemia after mild recurrent episodes of epistaxis. Telangiectasias were found in the skin and buccal and nasal mucosa. No defect in the coagulation mechanism was found; thrombocyte count and function were normal. On cystoscopy, tortuous engorged vessels, some actively bleeding, were seen in the trigonal mucosa. Biopsy showed enlarged vessels in the lamina propria. Electrocoagulation of the bleeding vessels stopped hematuria, but 6 months later it recurred. This time Nd-YAG laser was used to stop the bleeding after electrocoagulation was ineffective.

  1. [Aplastic anemia and occupational factors in Japanese industries].

    PubMed

    Shima, S; Kato, Y; Tachikawa, S; Yoshida, T; Watanabe, K; Kurita, H; Nagaoka, K; Yuri, T; Hosoda, H; Ochiai, A

    1987-03-01

    Four mail questionnaire surveys were conducted on the incidence of aplastic anemia among industrial workers throughout Japan in collaboration with industrial doctors during a period from 1970 to 1983. The following major results were obtained. 1. Response rates were 55.5% (874/1,574 enterprises) in the first mail questionnaire survey in 1970-1972, 65.3% (294/450) in the second survey in 1973, 49.1% (170/346) in the third survey in 1976-1980, and 76.6% (242/316) in the fourth survey in 1981-1983. There was no significant difference in industrial types among the four surveys. 2. The numbers of aplastic anemia patients newly diagnosed were 145 (112 males/33 females) in the first survey, 21 (16/5) in the second survey, 51 (41/10) in the third survey and 30(24/6) in the fourth survey. Incidence rates per million were 14.7 (14.4 males/15.5 females) in the first and second survey, 14.2 (13.5/18.3) in the third survey and 9.1 (8.6/11.9) in the fourth survey. The rates were almost constant from 1970 through 1980, but the rates decreased thereafter. The rate was higher in females than in males, but the difference was not significant. 3. Incidence rates were high in rubber industry (26.8 per million), paper industry (24.8), and petroleum industry (22.5), but there was no industrial type demonstrating a constantly higher incidence in every survey. Manufacturing industries showed a higher incidence (14.6) than nonmanufacturing industries (11.7). 4. By type of work, non-productive work (67.2%), i.e., clerical (30.8%), administrative (8.9%), technical (7.7%), were the main jobs of 247 registered aplastic anemia patients (193 males and 54 females). 5. Thirty patients had been exposed to noxious agents such as organic solvents (21 cases including 3 exposed to benzene), metals (6), and radiation (1). However, in these cases no causal relationship between exposure and disease onset could be demonstrated. 6. Thirty-nine cases had a drug-intake history before onset of the disease

  2. Successful creation of an anemia management algorithm for hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kazuhiro; Mizutani, Yasuhide; Kodera, Hitoshi; Miyake, Masato; Yasuda, Yoshiki; Ohara, Sanae

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several anemia guidelines for hemodialysis patients have recommended a target hemoglobin (Hb) range of 10–12 g/dL. However, maintaining Hb values continuously within a narrow target has been difficult, and there has been no generally accepted anemia management algorithm for hemodialysis patients. Methods In our study, we created an anemia management algorithm that considers the length of erythrocyte lifetimes, focuses on the combination of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent management and iron administration, and prevents iron deficiency and overload. Our algorithm established a target Hb range of 10–12 g/dL. Results We evaluated our algorithm in 49 patients for 6 months. The mean Hb values were approximately 11 g/dL during our study period. The percentage of patients in the target Hb range of 10–12 g/dL increased from 77.6% (38 of 49) at baseline to 85.7% (42 of 49) at 4–6 months. Throughout monthly regular blood tests during 1–6 months after we introduced our algorithm, Hb values remained within the target range in 55.1% (27 of 49) of patients. The standard deviation of Hb values significantly decreased at 5 and 6 months (P=0.013 and P=0.047, respectively; 1 g/dL at 0 month, 0.7 g/dL at 5 months, and 0.7 g/dL at 6 months). Our algorithm also succeeded in suppressing cumulative doses of iron (≤800 mg) and decreasing the ferritin values significantly (P=0.011). There were no significant differences in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent doses between 0 and 6 months (P=0.357). Conclusion Our anemia management algorithm successfully increased the number of patients in the target Hb range, significantly decreased the Hb standard deviation, suppressed cumulative doses of iron, and decreased ferritin values. These results suggest a better prognosis for hemodialysis patients. Further studies are required to evaluate our algorithm. PMID:26150734

  3. [Diagnostic workup in front of an atypical non hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Colin, J Y; Vignon, G; Mottaz, P; Labrousse, J; Carrere, F; Augereau, P F; Aucher, P; Lellouche, F

    2018-04-13

    The most potential causes of "non hemolytic" anemias are iron, folate or vitamin B 12 deficiencies, severe renal impairment, endocrine diseases, inflammation and medullary disorders. In a non-exceptionnal way no cause is found, sometimes because of a wrong interpretation of analysis results and sometimes because of a little known etiology. The goal of this review is to point out analytical difficulties and to remember some rarer etiologies. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed

  5. Persistent injury-associated anemia in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Tyler J; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Carter, Christy S; Plazas, Jessica M; Mira, Juan C; Brakenridge, Scott C; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Efron, Philip A; Mohr, Alicia M

    2018-03-01

    Hypercatecholaminemia and bone marrow dysfunction have been implicated in the pathophysiology of persistent-injury associated anemia. The elderly may be vulnerable to this phenomenon due to high basal and peak catecholamine levels, impaired erythroid progenitor growth, and baseline anemia. We hypothesized that aged F344-BN rats subjected to severe trauma and chronic stress would have persistent injury-associated anemia. Male F344-BN rats age 25months were randomly allocated to: naïve (n=8), lung contusion (LC, n=9), LC followed by daily chronic restraint stress (LC/CS, n=9), LC followed immediately by hemorrhagic shock (LCHS, n=8), and LCHS followed by daily CS (LCHS/CS, n=8). Urine norepinephrine was measured on days one and seven. Locomotor testing was performed on day five. Bone marrow cellularity, hematopoietic progenitor growth, and peripheral blood hemoglobin levels were assessed at sacrifice on day seven. Data are presented as mean±standard deviation, *p<0.05 vs. naïve. Norepinephrine levels (ng/mL) were significantly elevated one day after LCHS (420±239* vs. naïve: 97±71) and LCHS/CS (375±185*), and remained significantly elevated on day seven for LCHS/CS (359±99*), but not LCHS (212±130). On locomotor testing, groups subjected to CS traveled shorter distances at lower velocities and spent less time in the center of the cage. Colony forming units-erythroid (colonies/plate), representing late erythroid progenitors, were significantly decreased after LC/CS (40±1* vs. naïve: 47±4), LCHS (40±1*), and LCHS/CS (38±3*). LCHS/CS animals had significantly lower hemoglobin (g/dL) than naïve animals (13.3±1.3* vs. naïve: 15.2±0.9). Persistent injury-associated anemia occurs in aged rats. Further research is needed to determine whether the pathophysiology of this phenomenon differs from that of younger rats, and to translate these findings to elderly trauma patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anemia in children: prevalence, causes, diagnostic work-up, and long-term consequences.

    PubMed

    Allali, Slimane; Brousse, Valentine; Sacri, Anne-Sylvia; Chalumeau, Martin; de Montalembert, Mariane

    2017-11-01

    Anemia in children is a major public health problem throughout the world. It is often multifactorial, iron deficiency being the most frequent etiology. Consequences are diverse and largely under evaluated. Areas covered: This paper briefly reviews the main causes and focus on the potential consequences of acute and chronic anemia in children. Expert commentary: Anemia in children should never be trivialized. Even if iron deficiency is frequently involved, other potentially life-threatening causes are possible and should be looked for. The exact contribution of anemia to child mortality and morbidity is difficult to assess because of overlapping comorbidities. Chronic anemia may impair growth, cardiac function and cognitive development in infants but other consequences are rather poorly described and should be explored more thoroughly.

  7. Anemia in rural China's elementary schools: prevalence and correlates in Shaanxi province's poor counties.

    PubMed

    Luo, Renfu; Kleiman-Weiner, Max; Rozelle, Scott; Zhang, Linxiu; Liu, Chengfang; Sharbono, Brian; Shi, Yaojiang; Yue, Ai; Martorell, Reynaldo; Lee, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Despite growing wealth in China, a significant share of children across rural China still have no access to iron-rich foods, vitamins, and other micronutrients. Such poor diets may result in high incidences of nutritional problems, including anemia. The objective of the study was to increase understanding of the extent of anemia, and identify structural correlates of anemia in poor Shaanxi province's primary schools. The article shows that the overall anemia rate is 21.5 percent when using a blood hemoglobin cutoff of 115 g/L (39 percent with a cutoff of 120 g/L). We find that those students that are boarding at school and eat lunch away from home are more likely to be anemic. Children with anemia are found to have lower height for age (HAZ) scores. If this part of Shaanxi province is representative of all poor counties in China, these findings mean millions of children in poor rural China may be anemic.

  8. Revisiting post-gastrectomy anemia with a brief survey among a group of Turkish medical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Eren, Orhan Onder; Sonmez, Ozlem Uysal; Ozkan, Hasan Atilla; Oyan, Basak

    2015-01-01

    Total or subtotal gastrectomy are performed as curative or palliative treatment in patients with gastric cancer. Anemia is a frequent complication of gastrectomy. Patients undergoing total or subtotal gastrectomy should be carefully monitored for the development of anemia and be given appropriate treatment when indicated. This survey-based study aimed to determine the level of knowledge about post-gastrectomy anemia in Turkish medical oncologists. The study included 110 Turkish medical oncologists that agreed voluntarily to participate in the survey and answer an 8-item questionnaire. The survey was distributed as a questionnaire during the 5th Turkish Medical Oncology Congress in March 2014. All participants completed the questionnaire. Most of the participants would not recommend oral iron or cobalamin replacement after gastrectomy. The results of the survey indicate that Turkish medical oncologists have some knowledge about post-gastrectomy anemia, but need to learn more about appropriate follow-up and replacement therapies for post-gastrectomy anemia.

  9. Prevalence of Anemia in Subjects Randomized into Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass or Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kheniser, Karim G; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Lam, Eddie T C; Kullman, Emily S

    2017-05-01

    Although bariatric surgery fosters heightened excess weight loss values, nutritional deficiencies are prominent; one of the most common being iron deficiency anemia. The purpose is to elucidate the frequency of anemia in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy subjects. A retrospective analysis was conducted, in subjects (N = 100) diagnosed with type II diabetes who were randomized into sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and intensive medical therapy. Anemia was more common in female subjects who underwent sleeve gastrectomy-roughly half developed microcytosis at 24 months and thereafter. The etiology of anemia appears to be iron-related and precipitated by the female sex. Scant iron supplementation is likely causative. However, anemia of chronic inflammation cannot be discounted as being somewhat causal. Subsequently, the aggregate may have had a synergistic influence.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  11. Multi-gene panel testing improves diagnosis and management of patients with hereditary anemias.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberta; Andolfo, Immacolata; Manna, Francesco; Gambale, Antonella; Marra, Roberta; Rosato, Barbara Eleni; Caforio, Paola; Pinto, Valeria; Pignataro, Piero; Radhakrishnan, Kottayam; Unal, Sule; Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Forni, Gian Luca; Iolascon, Achille

    2018-02-03

    Mutations in more than 70 genes cause hereditary anemias (HA), a highly heterogeneous group of rare/low frequency disorders in which we included: hyporegenerative anemias, as congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia; hemolytic anemias due to erythrocyte membrane defects, as hereditary spherocytosis and stomatocytosis; hemolytic anemias due to enzymatic defects. The study describes the diagnostic workflow for HA, based on the development of two consecutive versions of a targeted-NGS panel, including 34 and 71 genes, respectively. Seventy-four probands from 62 unrelated families were investigated. Our study includes the most comprehensive gene set for these anemias and the largest cohort of patients described so far. We obtained an overall diagnostic yield of 64.9%. Despite 54.2% of cases showed conclusive diagnosis fitting well to the clinical suspicion, the multi-gene analysis modified the original clinical diagnosis in 45.8% of patients (nonmatched phenotype-genotype). Of note, 81.8% of nonmatched patients were clinically suspected to suffer from CDA. Particularly, 45.5% of the probands originally classified as CDA exhibited a conclusive diagnosis of chronic anemia due to enzymatic defects, mainly due to mutations in PKLR gene. Interestingly, we also identified a syndromic CDA patient with mild anemia and epilepsy, showing a homozygous mutation in CAD gene, recently associated to early infantile epileptic encephalopathy-50 and CDA-like anemia. Finally, we described a patient showing marked iron overload due to the coinheritance of PIEZO1 and SEC23B mutations, demonstrating that the multi-gene approach is valuable not only for achieving a correct and definitive diagnosis, but also for guiding treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Increased Risk of Severe Infant Anemia Following Exposure to Maternal HAART, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Shapiro, Roger L.; Hughes, Michael D.; Powis, Kathleen; Ogwu, Anthony; Moffat, Claire; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Lockman, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT), but may increase the risk for infant anemia. Methods The incidence of first severe anemia (Grade 3 or 4, Division of AIDS 2004 Toxicity Table) was assessed among HIV-uninfected infants in the Mashi and Mma Bana MTCT prevention trials in Botswana. Severe anemia rates were compared between 3 groups: infants exposed to maternal HAART in utero and during breastfeeding and 1 month of postnatal zidovudine (HAART-BF); infants exposed to maternal zidovudine (ZDV) in utero, 6 months of postnatal ZDV, and breastfeeding (ZDV-BF); and infants exposed to maternal ZDV in utero, 1 month of postnatal ZDV, and formula-feeding (ZDV-FF). Results A total of 1719 infants were analyzed— 691 HAART-BF, 503 ZDV-BF, and 525 ZDV-FF. Severe anemia was detected in 118 infants (7.4%). By 6 months, 12.5% of HAART-BF infants experienced severe anemia, compared with 5.3% of ZDV-BF (P<0.001) and 2.5% of ZDV-FF infants (P<0.001). In adjusted analysis, HAART-BF infants were at greater risk of severe anemia than ZDV-BF or ZDV-FF infants (adjusted odds ratios 2.6 and 5.8, respectively; P < 0.001). Most anemias were asymptomatic and improved with iron/multivitamin supplementation and cessation of ZDV exposure. However, 11 infants (0.6% of all infants) required transfusion for symptomatic anemia. Microcytosis and hypochromia were common among infants with severe anemia. Conclusions Exposure to maternal HAART starting in utero was associated with severe infant anemia. Confirmation of this finding and possible strategies to mitigate hematologic toxicity warrant further study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00197587 and NCT00270296. PMID:21266910

  13. Determinants of Anemia among School-Aged Children in Mexico, the United States and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Addo, O Yaw; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Ashour, Fayrouz A Sakr; Ziegler, Thomas R; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2016-06-23

    Anemia affects approximately 25% of school-aged children (SAC-aged 5.00-14.99 years) globally. We determined in three countries the prevalence and determinants of anemia in SAC. Data on sociodemographics, inflammation and nutrition status were obtained from the 2006 Mexican National Nutrition Survey, the 2003-6 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and the 2010 Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición Situación Colombia. In the US, vitamin A and iron deficiency (ID) were available only for girls aged 12.00-14.99 years to which our analysis was limited. Associations were evaluated by country using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for confounders and complex survey design. The prevalence of anemia and ID were: Mexico 12% (ID 18%), n = 3660; US 4% (ID 10%), n = 733; and Colombia 4% (ID 9%), n = 8573. The percentage of anemia associated with ID was 22.4% in Mexico, 38.9% in the US and 16.7% in Colombia. In Mexico, anemia was associated with ID (adjusted OR: 1.5, p = 0.02) and overweight (aOR 0.4, p = 0.007). In the US, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 14.1, p < 0.0001) and ID (aOR: 8.0, p < 0.0001). In Colombia, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.005), lowest socio-economic status quintile (aOR: 1.8, p = 0.0005), ID (aOR: 2.7, p < 0.0001), and being stunted (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.02). While anemia was uniformly associated with iron deficiency in Mexico, Columbia, and the United States, other measured factors showed inconsistent associations with anemia. Additional data on anemia determinants in SAC are needed to guide interventions.

  14. Prevalence and associated factors of anemia among pregnant women of Mekelle town: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abriha, Abrehet; Yesuf, Melkie Edris; Wassie, Molla Mesele

    2014-12-09

    Nutritional anemia is the most common type of anemia worldwide and mainly includes iron, folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin C deficiencies. Anemia is a global public health problem affecting people in all age groups but the burden of the problem is higher in pregnant women. The study aimed to assess prevalence of anemia and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care in governmental health institutions in mekele town. Institution based cross-sectional study was employed. Systematic random sampling procedure was employed to select 619 study subjects. Pretested questionnaire were used to collect the data. The predictive value of the variable to Anemia was identified by bivariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. The overall prevalence of anemia among pregnant women was 19.7%. Meal frequency less than two per day [AOR 3.93 95% CI (2.0,7.9)], Low Dietary Diversity score [AOR 12.8 95% CI (6.4,25.6)], Medium Dietary Diversity score [AOR 2.4 95% CI (1.2,4.8)], Parity [AOR 2.3 95% CI (1.4,3.8)] and Meat consumption less than once per week [AOR 2.2 95% CI (1.0,4.9)] were found to be factors affecting Anemia in pregnant women. Anemia among pregnant women is found to be mild public health problem in the study area. Parity, meal frequency, dietary diversity and meat consumption were significantly and independently affect anemia of pregnant women. Using family planning methods and improved meat consumption contributes for decreasing prevalence of anemia. Moreover, Diversifying food intake and increasing meal frequency of pregnant women is highly recommended.

  15. Determinants of Anemia among School-Aged Children in Mexico, the United States and Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Sana; Addo, O. Yaw; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Ashour, Fayrouz A. Sakr; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia affects approximately 25% of school-aged children (SAC—aged 5.00–14.99 years) globally. We determined in three countries the prevalence and determinants of anemia in SAC. Data on sociodemographics, inflammation and nutrition status were obtained from the 2006 Mexican National Nutrition Survey, the 2003-6 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and the 2010 Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición Situación Colombia. In the US, vitamin A and iron deficiency (ID) were available only for girls aged 12.00–14.99 years to which our analysis was limited. Associations were evaluated by country using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for confounders and complex survey design. The prevalence of anemia and ID were: Mexico 12% (ID 18%), n = 3660; US 4% (ID 10%), n = 733; and Colombia 4% (ID 9%), n = 8573. The percentage of anemia associated with ID was 22.4% in Mexico, 38.9% in the US and 16.7% in Colombia. In Mexico, anemia was associated with ID (adjusted OR: 1.5, p = 0.02) and overweight (aOR 0.4, p = 0.007). In the US, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 14.1, p < 0.0001) and ID (aOR: 8.0, p < 0.0001). In Colombia, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.005), lowest socio-economic status quintile (aOR: 1.8, p = 0.0005), ID (aOR: 2.7, p < 0.0001), and being stunted (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.02). While anemia was uniformly associated with iron deficiency in Mexico, Columbia, and the United States, other measured factors showed inconsistent associations with anemia. Additional data on anemia determinants in SAC are needed to guide interventions. PMID:27347992

  16. [Prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases in Spain].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; González-Galilea, Ángel; Gisbert, Javier P; Cucala, Mercedes; Ponce, Julio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and iron deficiency in patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal diseases. An epidemiological, multicenter, mixed design study (retrospective review of randomized clinical records and prospective visits) conducted between February 2010 and March 2011 in 22 Spanish gastroenterology departments. Severe anemia was defined as Hb < 10g/dL, mild/moderate as Hb ≥ 10g/dL, and iron deficiency as ferritin < 30ng/ml or transferrin saturation < 16%. We included 379 patients. The mean±SD age was 57±19 years and 47% were men. The prevalence of anemia at admission was 60% (95% CI 55 to 65), and anemia was severe (Hb <10g/dl) in half the patients. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 54% of evaluable patients (95% CI 47 to 61). Gastrointestinal bleeding at admission was found in 39% of the patients, of whom 83% (121/146) were anemic. At discharge, the proportion of anemic patients was unchanged (from 60% at admission to 58% at discharge) (95% CI 53 to 63) and iron deficiency was found in 41% (95% CI 32 to 50): anemia was severe in 17% and mild/moderate in 41%. During follow-up, at 3-6 months after admission, 44% (95% CI 39 to 50) of evaluable patients continued to have iron deficiency and 28% (95% CI 23 to 32) were still anemic: 5% severe and 23% mild/moderate. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 44% (95% CI: 39-50). During admission, 50% of patients with anemia did not receive treatment. At discharge, 55% were untreated. The prevalence of anemia in patients hospitalized for gastroenterological diseases was very high. Anemia persisted in over a quarter of patients at the follow-up visit. Only half of hospitalized patients received treatment for anemia, even when the anemia was severe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  17. A participatory approach for selecting cost-effective measures in the WFD context: the Mar Menor (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Perni, Angel; Martínez-Paz, José M

    2013-08-01

    Achieving a good ecological status in water bodies by 2015 is one of the objectives established in the European Water Framework Directive. Cost-effective analysis (CEA) has been applied for selecting measures to achieve this goal, but this appraisal technique requires technical and economic information that is not always available. In addition, there are often local insights that can only be identified by engaging multiple stakeholders in a participatory process. This paper proposes to combine CEA with the active involvement of stakeholders for selecting cost-effective measures. This approach has been applied to the case study of one of the main coastal lagoons in the European Mediterranean Sea, the Mar Menor, which presents eutrophication problems. Firstly, face-to-face interviews were conducted to estimate relative effectiveness and relative impacts of a set of measures by means of the pairwise comparison technique. Secondly, relative effectiveness was used to estimate cost-effectiveness ratios. The most cost-effective measures were the restoration of watercourses that drain into the lagoon and the treatment of polluted groundwater. Although in general the stakeholders approved the former, most of them stated that the latter involved some uncertainties, which must be addressed before implementing it. Stakeholders pointed out that the PoM would have a positive impact not only on water quality, but also on fishing, agriculture and tourism in the area. This approach can be useful to evaluate other programmes, plans or projects related to other European environmental strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Six-month mortality and cardiac catheterization in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients with anemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Chih; Waring, Molly E; Lessard, Darleen; Yarzebski, Jorge; Gore, Joel; Goldberg, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    It is unknown how anemia influences the invasive management of patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and associated mortality. We investigated whether receipt of cardiac catheterization relates to 6-month death rates among patients with different severity of anemia. We used data from the population-based Worcester Heart Attack Study, which included 2634 patients hospitalized with confirmed NSTEMI, from three percutaneous coronary intervention-capable medical centers in the Worcester (Massachusetts, U.S.A.) metropolitan area, during five biennial periods between 1997 and 2005. Severity of anemia was categorized using admission hematocrit levels: less than or equal to 30.0% (moderate-to-severe anemia), 30.1-39.0% (mild anemia), and more than 39.0% (no anemia). Propensity matching and conditional logistic regression adjusting for hospital use of aspirin, heparin, and plavix compared 6-month postadmission all-cause mortality rates in relation to cardiac catheterization during NSTEMI hospitalization. Compared with patients without anemia, patients with anemia were less likely to undergo cardiac catheterization {adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67-0.95] for mild anemia and 0.45 (95% CI: 0.42-0.49) for moderate-to-severe anemia}. After propensity matching, cardiac catheterization was associated with lower 6-month death rates only in patients without anemia [AOR 0.26 (95% CI: 0.09-0.79)] but not in patients with mild anemia [AOR 0.55 (95% CI: 0.25-1.23)]. The small number of patients rendered data inconclusive for patients with moderate-to-severe anemia. Anemia at the time of hospitalization for NSTEMI was associated with lower utilization of cardiac catheterization. However, cardiac catheterization use was associated with a decreased risk of dying at 6 months after hospital admission only in patients without anemia.

  19. Aflatoxin Exposure During Pregnancy, Maternal Anemia, and Adverse Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura E; Prendergast, Andrew J; Turner, Paul C; Humphrey, Jean H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2017-04-01

    AbstractPregnant women and their developing fetuses are vulnerable to multiple environmental insults, including exposure to aflatoxin, a mycotoxin that may contaminate as much as 25% of the world food supply. We reviewed and integrated findings from studies of aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy and evaluated potential links to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We identified 27 studies (10 human cross-sectional studies and 17 animal studies) assessing the relationship between aflatoxin exposure and adverse birth outcomes or anemia. Findings suggest that aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy may impair fetal growth. Only one human study investigated aflatoxin exposure and prematurity, and no studies investigated its relationship with pregnancy loss, but animal studies suggest aflatoxin exposure may increase risk for prematurity and pregnancy loss. The fetus could be affected by maternal aflatoxin exposure through direct toxicity as well as indirect toxicity, via maternal systemic inflammation, impaired placental growth, or elevation of placental cytokines. The cytotoxic and systemic effects of aflatoxin could plausibly mediate maternal anemia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal loss, and preterm birth. Given the widespread exposure to this toxin in developing countries, longitudinal studies in pregnant women are needed to provide stronger evidence for the role of aflatoxin in adverse pregnancy outcomes, and to explore biological mechanisms. Potential pathways for intervention to reduce aflatoxin exposure are urgently needed, and this might reduce the global burden of stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birthweight.

  20. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Georges, George E; Storb, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    There has been a steady improvement in outcomes with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for severe aplastic anemia (SAA), because of progress in optimization of the conditioning regimens, donor hematopoietic cell source, and supportive care. Here, we review recently published data that highlight the improvements and current issues in the treatment of SAA. Approximately one-third of aplastic anemia patients treated with immune suppressive therapy (IST) have acquired mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes. Because of the greater probability for eventual failure of IST, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor BMT is the first-line of treatment for SAA. HLA-matched unrelated donor (URD) BMT is generally recommended for patients who have failed IST. However, in younger patients for whom a 10/10-HLA-allele matched URD can be rapidly identified, there is a strong rationale to proceed with URD BMT as first-line therapy. HLA-haploidentical BMT using posttransplant cyclophosphamide conditioning regimens is now a reasonable second-line treatment for patients who failed IST. Improved outcomes have led to an increased first-line role of BMT for treatment of SAA. The optimal cell source from an HLA-matched donor is bone marrow. Additional studies are needed to determine the optimal conditioning regimen for HLA-haploidentical donors.

  2. Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E.

    1991-03-15

    The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences inmore » tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.« less

  3. Circulatory and metabolic effects of anemia in hyperinsulinemic ovine fetuses.

    PubMed

    Papparella, A; Berard, D; Stonestreet, B S

    1994-01-01

    Infants born to women with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus have an increased incidence of perinatal asphyxia, cardiovascular abnormalities, elevated catecholamines, and sudden fetal death. Although hyperinsulinemic fetuses of diabetic women often exhibit polycythemia, they may also develop anemia because of pregnancy- and/or delivery-related complications. Experimental fetal hyperinsulinemia results in cardiovascular changes and a surge in catecholamines. We hypothesized that reductions in fetal O2 availability via anemic hypoxia limits O2 transport and compromises the hemodynamically and metabolically stressed but compensated hyperinsulinemic fetus. Chronically catheterized fetuses receiving insulin (n = 9) or placebo (n = 5) for 48 h were rendered anemic by an isovolemic exchange transfusion. In the hyperinsulinemic state, anemic-hypoxia augmented the insulin-mediated surge in norepinephrine concentration and increases in blood flow to brain, heart, and adrenal glands. Insulin-related increase in the combined ventricular output was sustained during anemia. O2 delivery to the fetus decreased, extraction increased, and O2 uptake did not change. Regional O2 delivery to the brain, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, muscle, fat, pancreas, spleen, and carcass decreased. Hyperinsulinemic ovine fetus exposed to anemic hypoxia demonstrated an accentuated surge in norepinephrine, a sustained increase in the combined ventricular output, preservation of systemic O2 uptake, and compromised regional O2 delivery to certain vascular regions. We conclude that the hyperinsulinemic fetus was able to compensate for anemic hypoxia by increased or sustained regional vascular perfusion.

  4. Clinical relevance of erythrocyte ferritin in microcytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Vagace, Jose M; Peças, Antonio; Groiss, Jorge; Bento, Celeste; Ribeiro, Maria Leticia; Gervasini, Guillermo

    2015-03-10

    Erythrocyte ferritin (EF) reflects the balance between iron supply and its utilization for hemoglobin synthesis. This balance is altered in microcytosis. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of both EF and the ratio (FRR) plasma ferritin (PF)/EF in these disorders. A total of 231 subjects participated in the study. Samples from 93 adult patients with different causes of microcytosis, 57 healthy subjects and 81 full-term newborns were analyzed to determine EF and PF concentrations and other hematological parameters. In patients with iron deficiency, and in contrast to PF, EF decreased only in the presence of anemia and in direct correlation with the degree of microcytosis (Pearson's p<0.001). EF values for thalassemia patients were higher than those observed in controls (p<10e-5), while PF concentrations were similar between these groups. This EF increase was more marked in the delta-beta thalassemia group (p<0.05). Finally, FRR was much higher in patients with anemia of inflammation than in those with thalassemia (p<10e-5), thus helping to discriminate between these disorders. EF and FRR are tools that may be useful in the diagnosis of the main causes of microcytosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aflatoxin Exposure During Pregnancy, Maternal Anemia, and Adverse Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laura E.; Prendergast, Andrew J.; Turner, Paul C.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Pregnant women and their developing fetuses are vulnerable to multiple environmental insults, including exposure to aflatoxin, a mycotoxin that may contaminate as much as 25% of the world food supply. We reviewed and integrated findings from studies of aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy and evaluated potential links to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We identified 27 studies (10 human cross-sectional studies and 17 animal studies) assessing the relationship between aflatoxin exposure and adverse birth outcomes or anemia. Findings suggest that aflatoxin exposure during pregnancy may impair fetal growth. Only one human study investigated aflatoxin exposure and prematurity, and no studies investigated its relationship with pregnancy loss, but animal studies suggest aflatoxin exposure may increase risk for prematurity and pregnancy loss. The fetus could be affected by maternal aflatoxin exposure through direct toxicity as well as indirect toxicity, via maternal systemic inflammation, impaired placental growth, or elevation of placental cytokines. The cytotoxic and systemic effects of aflatoxin could plausibly mediate maternal anemia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal loss, and preterm birth. Given the widespread exposure to this toxin in developing countries, longitudinal studies in pregnant women are needed to provide stronger evidence for the role of aflatoxin in adverse pregnancy outcomes, and to explore biological mechanisms. Potential pathways for intervention to reduce aflatoxin exposure are urgently needed, and this might reduce the global burden of stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birthweight. PMID:28500823

  6. Oral cancer in Fanconi anemia: Review of 121 cases.

    PubMed

    Furquim, Camila Pinheiro; Pivovar, Allana; Amenábar, José Miguel; Bonfim, Carmem; Torres-Pereira, Cassius Carvalho

    2018-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by aplastic anemia, progressive pancytopenia, congenital anomalies, and increased risk of cancer development. After hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), patients have an estimated 500-fold increase in the risk of developing head and neck cancer compared to a non-affected, and the oral cavity is affected in one-third of cases. Thus, this study aimed to better understand the natural history of oral cavity cancer in patients affected by FA. After conducting a keyword search on MEDLINE, we found 121 cases of oral cavity cancer in patients who had been affected by FA. In conclusion, HSCT may increase the risks of oral cancer development, especially after 5 years after the transplant. In the normal population, the tongue is the most affected area. FA patients should be informed of the risks of oral malignant transformation and encouraged to be undergo medical surveillance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Early Reticulocytosis and Anemia Are Associated with Abnormal and Conditional Transcranial Doppler Velocities in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Emily Riehm; Fasano, Ross M; Estrada, Monica; He, Jianping; Luban, Naomi L C; McCarter, Robert

    2016-02-01

    To improve prediction of sickle cell anemia severity at an early age, we evaluated whether absolute reticulocyte count (ARC) or hemoglobin (Hb) levels during early infancy (2-6 months of age) in patients with sickle cell anemia predict the risk of later developing an abnormal (abTCD) or conditional (cdTCD) Transcranial Doppler (TCD). We used chart review to identify 121 consecutive patients who underwent TCD screening and had steady state ARC and Hb levels recorded between 2 and 6 months of age. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between ARC, Hb levels, and risk of developing cdTCD/abTCD over time. Mean ARC in early infancy was highest and mean Hb lowest in those children with abTCDs and cdTCDs. Cox regression analysis revealed that those subjects with an ARC ≥200 K/μL in early infancy had nearly 3 times the risk of having an abTCD/cdTCD than the group with an ARC <200 K/μL, and patients with a Hb <8.5 g/dL had 2.7 times the risk of having an abTCD/cdTCD. These data suggest that both elevated ARC and low baseline Hb during early infancy are associated with an increased risk of developing a cdTCD or abTCD later in childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  9. MCPIP1 Deficiency in Mice Results in Severe Anemia Related to Autoimmune Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhou; Miao, Ruidong; Huang, Shengping; Elder, Brandon; Quinn, Tim; Papasian, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jifeng; Fan, Daping; Chen, Y. Eugene; Fu, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an organ-specific autoimmune disease of the stomach associated with pernicious anemia. The previous work from us and other groups identified MCPIP1 as an essential factor controlling inflammation and immune homeostasis. MCPIP1-/- developed severe anemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain unclear. In the present study, we found that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice resulted in severe anemia related to autoimmune mechanisms. Although MCPIP1 deficiency did not affect erythropoiesis per se, the erythropoiesis in MCPIP1-/- bone marrow erythroblasts was significantly attenuated due to iron and vitamin B12 (VB12) deficiency, which was mainly resulted from autoimmunity-associated gastritis and parietal cell loss. Consistently, exogenous supplement of iron and VB12 greatly improved the anemia phenotype of MCPIP1-/- mice. Finally, we have evidence suggesting that autoimmune hemolysis may also contribute to anemia phenotype of MCPIP1-/- mice. Taken together, our study suggests that MCPIP1 deficiency in mice leads to the development of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia. Thus, MCPIP1-/- mice may be a good mouse model for investigating the pathogenesis of pernicious anemia and testing the efficacy of some potential drugs for treatment of this disease. PMID:24324805

  10. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  11. Meta-analysis of Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Jiang, Ting; Hao, Cao; Gao, Zongshuai; Sun, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia therapy remains difficult, due to lack of effective treatment regimens. In recent years, Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia has been reported in many clinical trials. Considering that Huangqi injection may be a novel approach to aplastic anemia treatment, we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical controlled trials to assess the clinical value of Huangqi injection in the treatment of aplastic anemia. We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Full-text Database (VIP), Wanfang Database, PubMed and EMBASE database to collect the data about the trials of Huangqi injection combined with androgens for treating aplastic anemia. A total of ten studies involving 720 patients with aplastic anemia were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed significant increases in the pool effectiveness rate, white blood cells (WBC), haematoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), and reticulocytes (Ret) between the experimental group versus the control group. No severe side effects were found in this study. However, the lower Jadad scores and asymmetric funnel plot degrades the validity of the meta-analysis as the clinical evidence. Therefore, Huangqi injection may significantly enhance the efficacy of androgens for aplastic anemia, suggesting that the novel approach of Chinese traditional medicine combined with Western medicine is promising. The exact outcome required confirmation with rigorously well-designed multi-center trials. PMID:26379817

  12. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. A case study of an older adult with severe anemia refusing blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C Michelle; Coleman, Harriet R; Morritt Taub, Leslie-Faith

    2007-01-01

    To discuss the diagnosis and treatment of severe anemia in an older adult who presents the challenge of declining blood transfusion in a real-world scenario where critical thinking, evidence-based care, and collaboration with other providers must come together to serve this patient's unique needs. Extensive review of the scientific literature on anemia and the situation in which a patient refuses blood transfusion presented in a case study format. A thorough physical assessment, complete health history, and appropriate diagnostic workup should be used to distinguish the normal effects of senescence from the signs and symptoms of anemia. Common conditions that cause anemia in the elderly include chronic disease, iron deficiency, and gastrointestinal bleeding. These conditions may result in profound anemia. The challenge can be compounded when, because of religious tenets, a patient does not accept a blood transfusion. This case study challenges nurse practitioners to apply knowledge, seek guidance, and make appropriate referrals to care for a patient in order to render care within the parameters of the patient's belief system. The astute primary care provider recognizes that anemia is not an expected physiological change associated with aging but a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Fatigue, weakness, and dyspnea are all symptoms of anemia that may be overlooked and attributed to the aging process. Further, in keeping with the principles of autonomy and self-determination, it is the clinician's duty to work with all patients to restore them to a state of optimal health while respecting deeply held spiritual beliefs.

  14. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Lora L.; Delnatus, Jacques R.; Odom, Audrey R.; Eaton, Jacob C.; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3–13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30–4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes. PMID:26350448

  15. The prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and its associated risk factors in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, S.; Fujiati, I. I.; Keumalasari, D.; Daulay, M.; Martina, S. J.; Syarifah, S.

    2018-03-01

    The gestation period is the period that determines the quality of human resources in the future because the development of the child is determined from the time of the fetus in utero. The most common nutrition problems suffered by pregnant women in Indonesia is Chronic Energy Deficiency (CED) and anemia. The aim of this research to determine the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women and the risk factors associated with anemia in urban and rural areas of North Sumatera Province. This research is as descriptive analyticwith cross-sectional approach. Total sample 140 pregnant women from the Medan City, Langkat District and South Labuhan Batu District, and was from June to October 2016. Data collected by using interviews, hemoglobinometer tool and analyzed with Chi-square test. Anemia was in 40.7% of pregnant women, and the incidence of anemia is more common in pregnant women in urban areas than in rural areas. The factors associated with anemia in pregnant women is parity, knowledge of nutrition, diet and the risk of chronic energy deficiency (p <0.05). This study concludes that the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women in North Sumatra was higher than the national prevalence.

  16. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F.; Rodrigues, Pedro N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia. PMID:27100629

  17. Low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia between 1981 and 2010 in Chilean women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Castillo, Israel; Brito, Alex; Olivares, Manuel; López-de Romaña, Daniel; Pizarro, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anemia and iron status among Chilean women of childbearing age between 1981 and 2010. Calculation of the prevalence of anemia and iron status was based on multiple cross-sectional iron absorption studies performed in 888 women during this period of time. All studies included measurements of hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, zinc protoporphyrin, percentage of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin. Data were grouped by decade (1981-1990, 1991-2000, and 2001-2010). Prevalence of anemia for these decades was 9, 6 and 10%, respectively (p=NS). Iron deficiency anemia was the main cause of anemia in all periods (55, 85 and 75%, respectively; p=NS). A high prevalence of women with normal iron status was observed for all periods (64, 69, and 67, respectively; p=NS). Prevalence of iron deficiency without anemia in 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 was 7, 20 and 12%, respectively (p<0.05). Finally, prevalence of iron depleted stores was 20, 6 and 10%, respectively (p<0.05). Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Chilean women of childbearing age was mild between 1981 and 2010. More than 60% of childbearing age women presented normal iron status in all periods. However, prevalence of iron depleted stores was moderate during 1981-1990, and was mild during 1991-2000 and 2001-2010.

  18. Anemia or low hemoglobin levels preceding Parkinson disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Savica, R; Grossardt, B R; Carlin, J M; Icen, M; Bower, J H; Ahlskog, J E; Maraganore, D M; Steensma, D P; Rocca, W A

    2009-10-27

    It has been suggested that anemia may be a risk factor for dementia, for restless legs syndrome, and for Parkinson disease (PD). Thus, we investigated the association of anemia with the subsequent risk of PD using a case-control study design. We used the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify 196 subjects who developed PD in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1976 through 1995. Each incident case was matched by age (+/-1 year) and sex to a general population control. We reviewed the complete medical records of cases and controls in the system to detect anemia defined using the World Health Organization criteria. Anemia was more common in the history of cases than of controls (odds ratio 2.00, 95% confidence interval 1.31-3.06, p = 0.001). The association remained significant after adjustment for cigarette smoking, exposure to pesticides, or hysterectomy (in women). The association was not significantly different between men and women, or between PD patients with or without rest tremor. Analyses stratified by time of onset of anemia showed a greater association for anemia that started 20 to 29 years before the onset of PD. Hemoglobin levels were slightly but consistently lower in cases than in controls across all ages. Our results support an association between anemia experienced early in life and the later development of Parkinson disease. The interpretation of this association remains uncertain.

  19. α-Thalassemia frequency and mutations in children with hypochromic microcytic anemias and relation with β-thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Huseyin; Hanimeli, Ozlem; Karaca, Ozlem; Taneli, Fatma

    2012-04-01

    The majority of the anemias during childhood are hypochromic and microcytic. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of α-thalassemia mutations and its association with other etiologies, such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait, that are frequently seen hypochromic microcytic anemias in children. Children with hypochromic microcytic anemias were included in the study. Serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin levels, and hemoglobin electrophoresis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method were analyzed. Reverse hybridization of biotinylated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product method was used for detection of α-globin gene mutations. Of the 46 patients involved in the study, 54.3% (n = 25) were boys, and 45.7% (n = 21) were girls. Iron deficiency anemia and β-thalassemia trait were diagnosed in 67.4% (n = 31) and 19.5% (n = 9), respectively. In 17.4% there were α-thalassemia mutations (in 10.9% 3.7 single-gene heterozygote mutation, in 4.3% 20.5-kb double-gene deletion mutation, and in 2.2% α-2 poly-A-1 heterozygote mutation was detected). In 2 patients (4.3%) no etiology was determined. In 2 patients (4.3%) association between iron deficiency anemia and α-thalassemia, in 1 patient (2.2%) association between β and α-thalassemia was detected. In conclusion, α-thalassemia carrier status and its association with other etiologies are frequently seen in Manisa. So, α-thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypochromic microcytic anemias, especially in cases without iron deficiency (ID) and β-thalassemia carrier state.

  20. Predictors of anemia after bariatric surgery using multivariate adaptive regression splines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chih; Lee, Tian-Shyug; Lee, Wei-Jei; Lin, Yang-Chu; Lee, Chia-Ko; Liew, Phui-Ly

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is the most common nutritional deficiency after bariatric surgery. The predictors of anemia have not been clearly identified. This issue is useful for selecting an appropriate surgery procedure for morbid obesity. From December 2000 to October 2007, a retrospective study of 442 obese patients after bariatric surgery with two years' follow-up data was conducted. Anemia was defined by hemoglobin (Hb) under 13mg/dL in male and 11.5mg/dL in female. We analyzed the clinical information and laboratory data during the initial evaluation of patients referred to bariatric surgery for predictors of anemia development after surgery. All data were analyzed by using multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) method. Of the patients, the mean age was 30.8±8.6 years; mean BMI was 40.7±7.8kg/m2 and preoperative mean hemoglobin (Hb) was 13.7±1.5g/ dL. The prevalence of anemia increased from preoperatively 5.4% to 38.0% two years after surgery. Mean Hb was significantly lower in patients receiving gastric bypass than in restrictive type surgery (11.9mg/dL vs. 13.1mg/dL, p=0.040) two years after surgery. Besides, the preoperative optimal value of hemoglobin to predict future anemia in MARS model is 15.6mg/dL. The prevalence of anemia increased to 38.0% two years after bariatric surgery. We obtained an optimal preoperative value of hemoglobin 15.6mg/dL to predict postoperative anemia, which was important in preoperative assessment for bariatric surgery. Patients undergone gastric bypass surgery developed more severe anemia than gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy.