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Sample records for anemia por deficiencia

  1. Anemias.

    PubMed

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia.

  2. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia.There are a few other types of ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia.Foods high in vitamin B12 include:meat ...

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction. ...

  4. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Anemia Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  5. Unusual Anemias.

    PubMed

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed.

  6. Microcytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Shine, J W

    1997-05-15

    Because anemia is a condition rather than a disease, an underlying cause must be determined when anemia is identified. Microcytic anemia is a common category of anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of microcytic anemia and is also the most common anemia. The clinical presentation of anemia varies according to its severity. Anemias resulting from chronic disease and thalassemia are also relatively common types of microcytic anemia and should be differentiated from iron deficiency to avoid repeated unnecessary trials of iron therapy. Low serum ferritin is the best single laboratory parameter for the diagnosis of iron deficiency. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity and hemoglobin electrophoresis, if necessary, can help differentiate the type of microcytic anemia in patients with normal or elevated levels of serum ferritin. If the evaluation identifies iron deficiency as the type of anemia, the underlying cause must be investigated.

  7. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  8. Neonatal anemia.

    PubMed

    Aher, Sanjay; Malwatkar, Kedar; Kadam, Sandeep

    2008-08-01

    Neonatal anemia and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal anemia can be due to blood loss, decreased RBC production, or increased destruction of erythrocytes. Physiologic anemia of the newborn and anemia of prematurity are the two most common causes of anemia in neonates. Phlebotomy losses result in much of the anemia seen in extremely low birthweight infants (ELBW). Accepting a lower threshold level for transfusion in ELBW infants can prevent these infants being exposed to multiple donors.

  9. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... Lead poisoning in children has been linked to iron-deficiency anemia . Teenagers also are at risk for anemia, ...

  10. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia , for example, red blood cells usually are ...

  11. Rheumatoid anemia.

    PubMed

    Masson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid anemia is a typical example of anemia of chronic disease. It differs from other forms of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia or iatrogenic anemia. Rheumatoid anemia is normochromic, normocytic or, less often, microcytic, aregenerative, and accompanied with thrombocytosis. Serum transferrin levels are normal or low, transferrin saturation is decreased, serum ferritin levels are normal or high, the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is not increased (a distinguishing feature with iron deficiency anemia), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio is lower than 1. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of rheumatoid anemia based on a review of the literature. Iron metabolism, absorption, diffusion, storage, and use by the bone marrow are described using published data on transferrin, ferritin, and hepcidin. Hepcidin is now recognized as a key factor in rheumatoid anemia, in conjunction with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Hepcidin is a hormone that lowers serum iron levels and regulates iron transport across membranes, preventing iron from exiting the enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes. In addition, hepcidin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes. The action of hepcidin is mediated by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin expression in the liver is dependent on the protein hemojuvelin. Inflammation leads to increased hepcidin production via IL-6, whereas iron deficiency and factors associated with increased erythropoiesis (hypoxia, bleeding, hemolysis, dyserythropoiesis) suppress the production of hepcidin. Data from oncology studies and the effects of recombinant human IL-6 support a causal link between IL-6 production and the development of anemia in patients with chronic disease. IL-6 diminishes the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow and lowers the serum iron level, and these abnormalities can be corrected by administering an IL-6 antagonist. IL-6 stimulates

  12. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system attacks the actual intrinsic factor protein or the cells in the lining of ...

  13. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia has three main causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, or high rates of red blood cell destruction. ...

  14. Nutritional anemias.

    PubMed

    Oski, F A

    1979-10-01

    The role of the metals, iron and copper, and the vitamins E, folic acid, and B12 in the genesis of nutritional anemias in infancy have been reviewed. All are preventable. The precise requirements for each of these trace elements and vitamins in the small premature infant remain to be defined. The nonhematologic consequences of these nutritional deficiencies require further study. Anemia may prove to be the least important manifestation of the deficiency states.

  15. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  16. Aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Kensuke

    Treatments of aplastic anemia are comprised of supportive therapy and aplastic anemia-specific therapy aimed at restoring hematopoiesis. Supportive therapies include transfusion, G-CSF, and the administration of iron chelation agents, as well as dealing specifically with individual symptoms. Aplastic anemia-specific treatments given with the aim of achieving hematopoietic recovery include immunosuppressive therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and anabolic hormone therapy. Although transplantation provides complete recovery of hematopoiesis (cure), there is a risk of death due to transplant-related complications. The most effective immunosuppressive therapy is a combination of anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. This treatment is also effective against the secondary, drug-induced and hepatitis-associated forms of aplastic anemia. In the management of aplastic anemia, a treatment is selected from among these options depending on the disease severity and the age of the individual case. The thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag appears to be effective and to provide tri-lineage recovery of hematopoiesis in some cases. Indications for its use are expected to expand in Japan.

  17. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ( ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ...

  18. Gestational anemia.

    PubMed

    Wahed, F; Latif, S A; Nessa, A; Bhuiyan, M R; Hossain, M B; Akther, A; Mahmud, M M

    2010-07-01

    Gestational anemia is a common public health problem in our country. Most anemia during pregnancy results from an increased need for iron as her body is making more blood. Often dietary supplementation does not provide enough iron to meet the extra needs. Also the growing baby takes all the iron it needs from mother, regardless of how much iron is stored in mother's blood. Gestational Anemia contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, IUGR, preterm delivery and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high proportion of women in both industrialized and developing countries become anemic during pregnancy. The most important cause of gestational anemia due to iron deficiency, because high iron requirements during pregnancy are not easily fulfilled by dietary intake. Adequate iron stores can help a pregnant women replace lost red blood cells. So, iron supplementation is strongly recommended for all pregnant women in developing countries. Oral iron intake is the treatment of choice and almost all pregnant women can be treated effectively with oral iron preparation during their pregnancy period.

  19. [Sideroblastic anemias].

    PubMed

    Matthes, T

    2006-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by the presence of sideroblasts in the bone marrow aspirate. Current classification schemes distinguish between diseases of the heme synthesis pathway and diseases of other mitochondrial pathways which can either be of primary origin (defects in mitochondrial DNA) or of secondary origin (defects in nuclear DNA). Although several distinct hereditary forms exist, sideroblastic anemias are most frequently acquired diseases and belong to the group of myelodysplastic syndromes with the propensity to develop into overt leukemia. Treatment is mainly supportive (vitamins, blood transfusions, cytokines) and only rarely are bone marrow transplantations performed. The molecular defects of a few hereditary forms have already been elucidated, but the genes involved in the acquired forms are still largely unknown.

  20. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  1. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  2. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  3. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... role in their lives. Welcome to the Cooley's Anemia Foundation Website The Cooley's Anemia Foundation is dedicated to serving people afflicted with ... major form of this genetic blood disease, Cooley's anemia/thalassemia major. Our mission is advancing the treatment ...

  4. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a drug or toxin. Anemia From Destruction of Red Blood Cells When the body destroys red blood cells (a ... but can affect all races. continue Anemia From Red Blood Cell Loss Blood loss can cause anemia — whether from ...

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in adolescents; a literature review.

    PubMed

    De Andrade Cairo, Romilda Castro; Rodrigues Silva, Luciana; Carneiro Bustani, Nadya; Ferreira Marques, Cibele Dantas

    2014-06-01

    Introducción: La anemia es una de las deficiencias nutricionales más importantes que afecta a varios estratos sociales y socioeconómicos. Es más frecuente en países en vías de desarrollo, estando los niños y los adolescentes en un riesgo significativamente mayor para padecer esta afección. Objetivo: Realizar una revisión bibliográfica sobre la anemia ferropénica en la adolescencia como un problema de salud pública y sobre los factores de riesgo que podrían contribuir en las deficiencias nutricionales, la detención del crecimiento y el desarrollo en este grupo de edad y poniendo el énfasis sobre la fisiopatología y las causas de la anemia, los diferentes abordajes diagnósticos y sus características clínicas, la prevención y el tratamiento. Metodología: Para este estudio, se consultaron las bases de datos LILACS-BIREME, SCIELO y PUBMED. Se seleccionaron los trabajos científicos publicados en español, portugués o inglés entre 2000 y 2013 sobre la anemia ferropénica. Se identificaron y evaluaron un total de 102 estudios publicados entre el 1º de enero de 2000 y el 30 de junio de 2013. Cuarenta y dos artículos que reunían los criterios de inclusión (adolescentes con anemia) se seleccionaron para esta revisión. Finalmente, se realizó un análisis y se evaluaron los artículos de acuerdo con los objetivos del estudio. Resultados y discusión: Los estudios revisados mostraron una prevalencia de anemia ferropénica cercana al 20 % en los adolescentes y describían los efectos deletéreos de la anemia en este grupo. Conclusión: Se requiere una acción preventiva con respecto a la anemia ferropénica. Los profesionales sanitarios deberían ser conscientes de la necesidad de un diagnóstico, profilaxis y tratamiento precoces.EL.

  6. [Refractory anemias].

    PubMed

    Efira, A; Azerad, M-A

    2013-09-01

    Refractory anemia, also known as myelodysplastic syndromes, forms a group of clonal diseases characterized by cytopenias with mostly rich bone marrow. Preferentially reaching an older population, the prognosis depends on both comorbidities and characteristics of the disease, which have been grouped into a score established in 1997 ("IPSS = International Prognostic Scoring System") and revised in 2012 ("R-IPSS = Revised IPSS"). Overall survival and risk of transformation into acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia can now be estimated fairly accurately. Based on these characteristics, the treatment will be mainly supportive or will use several new molecules: growth factors, lenalidomide, 5-azacitidine, etc. A minority of patients may also benefit from allogeneic BMT or sometimes immunosuppressive therapy.

  7. [Differential diagnosis of anemias].

    PubMed

    Szerafin, László; Jakó, János

    2005-02-13

    The authors describe the factors influencing of normal hemoglobin level, pathogenetic and morphological classification of anemias and the possibilities to distinguish their different types. They highlight features of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. They summarise in tables the basis of laboratory diagnosis and possibility of identification of different types of anemias.

  8. Nutritional anemias.

    PubMed

    Hoffbrand, A V; Herbert, V

    1999-10-01

    Folate, vitamin B12, and iron are the subjects of active biochemical and molecular research so that further understanding of their metabolism in health and in a wide variety of Inherited and acquired diseases can be achieved. The roles of folate and vitamin B12 in cardiovascular and neurologic diseases and in neural tube defects (NTDs) will be further explored in the next decade. The effects of prophylactic therapy and of food fortification with the vitamins on these diseases remain to be established. Iron deficiency is a public health problem in all countries and prevention or treatment, particularly in children in developing countries, are major goals. The increased recent understanding of iron metabolism and absorption may clarify the etiology of diseases of iron metabolism and of dietary iron overload. Improved iron chelation therapy for transfusion-dependent patients with refractory anemias will continue to be actively researched over the next decades.

  9. Anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Kari M; Ingardia, Charles J; Borgida, Adam F

    2013-06-01

    Hemodynamic changes occur in pregnancy to prepare for expected blood loss at delivery. Physiologic anemia occurs in pregnancy because plasma volume increases more quickly than red cell mass. Anemia is most commonly classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron deficiency anemia accounts for 75% of all anemias in pregnancy. Oral iron supplementation is the recommended treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Parenteral iron and erythropoietin can also be used in severe or refractory cases. Outcomes and treatments for other forms of inherited and acquired anemias in pregnancy vary by disease, and include nutritional supplementation, corticosteroids, supportive transfusions, and splenectomy.

  10. Anemia in thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Hernik, Aleksandra; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-03-28

    Anemia is a frequent, although often underestimated, clinical condition accompanying thyroid diseases. In spite of the fact that anemia and thyroid dysfunction often occur simultaneously, the causative relationship between these two disorders remains ambiguous. Thyroid hormones stimulate erythrocytes precursors proliferation directly, as well as via erythropoietin production enhancement, whereas iron-deficient anemia negatively influences thyroid hormonal status. Thus, different forms of anemia might emerge in the course of thyroid dysfunction. In fact, normocytic anemia is most common, while macrocytic or microcytic anemia occur less frequently. Anemia in hypothyroidism might result from bone marrow depression, decreased erythropoietin production, comorbid diseases, or concomitant iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. Altered iron metabolism and oxidative stress may contribute to anemia in hyperthyroidism. The risk of anemia in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) may be posed by pernicious anemia and atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune hemolytic syndrome, or rheumatic disorders. The simultaneous occurrence of anemia and thyroid disease, as well as their close relation, make the diseases an important clinical problem. The aim of the study is to provide a comprehensive review summarizing data on the prevalence, potential mechanisms, and therapy of anemia in the course of thyroid diseases from the clinical and pathogenetic perspective. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmune thyroid disease should be considered in differential diagnosis of treatment-resistant or refractory anemia, as well as in case of increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW). Of note is that the presence of AITD itself, independently from thyroid hormonal status, might affect hemoglobin level.

  11. Anemia in older persons.

    PubMed

    Bross, Michael H; Soch, Kathleen; Smith-Knuppel, Teresa

    2010-09-01

    Anemia in older persons is commonly overlooked despite mounting evidence that low hemoglobin levels are a significant marker of physiologic decline. Using the World Health Organization definition of anemia (hemoglobin level less than 13 g per dL [130 g per L] in men and less than 12 g per dL [120 g per L] in women), more than 10 percent of persons older than 65 years are anemic. The prevalence increases with age, approaching 50 percent in chronically ill patients living in nursing homes. There is increasing evidence that even mild anemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anemia warrants evaluation in all older persons, except those at the end of life or who decline interventions. About one third of persons have anemia secondary to a nutritional deficiency, one third have anemia caused by chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease, and one third have unexplained anemia. Nutritional anemia is effectively treated with vitamin or iron replacement. Iron deficiency anemia often is caused by gastrointestinal bleeding and requires further investigation in most patients. Anemia of chronic inflammation or chronic kidney disease may respond to treatment of the underlying disease and selective use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The treatment of unexplained anemia is difficult, and there is little evidence that treatment decreases morbidity and mortality, or improves quality of life. Occasionally, anemia may be caused by less common but potentially treatable conditions, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, malignancy, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

  12. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  13. [Common anemias in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Humbert, J; Wacker, P

    1999-01-28

    We describe the four most common groups of neonatal anemia and their treatments, with particular emphasis on erythropoietin therapy. The hemolytic anemias include the ABO incompatibility (much more frequent, nowadays, than the Rh incompatibility, which has nearly disappeared following the use of anti-D immunoglobulin in postpartum Rh-negative mothers), hereditary spherocytosis and G-6-PD deficiency. Among hypoplastic anemias, that caused by Parvovirus B19 predominates, by far, over Diamond-Blackfan anemia, alpha-thalassemia and the rare sideroblastic anemias. "Hemorrhagic" anemias occur during twin-to-twin transfusions, or during feto-maternal transfusions. Finally, the multifactorial anemia of prematurity develops principally as a result of the rapid expansion of the blood volume in this group of patients. Erythropoietin therapy, often at doses much higher than those used in the adult, should be seriously considered in most cases of non-hypoplastic neonatal anemias, to minimise maximally the use of transfusions.

  14. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  15. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anemia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  16. Myeloma and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Perillie, P E

    1978-01-01

    Four cases of pernicious anemia developing in association with multiple myeloma are described. The description now of 14 cases demonstrating the association of these two disorders suggest a causative relationship. These observations, in addition to the previously well-documented increased coincidence of pernicious anemia and benign monoclonal gammopathy and pernicious anemia and hypoglobulinemia, suggest that screening for vitamine B12 deficiency in patients with gammopathies and for protein abnormalities in patients with pernicious anemia is indicated.

  17. Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... don't get enough iron in their diets. Iron Deficiency Anemia Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia ... when a person's diet is lacking in iron. Iron deficiency — when the body's stores of iron are reduced — ...

  18. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child may not be able to play contact sports because there's a risk that the spleen could rupture or hemorrhage. Certain forms of anemia (such as sickle cell disease) need other, more specific kinds of care and treatment. How Can I Prevent Iron-Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Many kinds of anemia ...

  19. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Lulu; Narayanadas, K; Sunil, G

    2009-02-01

    This report describes a female child with thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (Rogers syndrome), presenting with anemia and diabetes mellitus responding to thiamine. She also had retinitis pigmentosa. The anemia improved and blood sugar was controlled with daily oral thiamine. Previously unreported olfactory abnormalities, as described in Wolfram syndrome, were also present in our patient.

  20. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  1. The Global Burden of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Anemia is an important cause of health loss. We estimated levels and trends of nonfatal anemia burden for 23 distinct etiologies in 188 countries, 20 age groups, and both sexes from 1990 to 2013. All available population-level anemia data were collected and standardized. We estimated mean hemoglobin, prevalence of anemia by severity, quantitative disability owing to anemia, and underlying etiology for each population using the approach of the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries and Risk Factors 2013 Study. Anemia burden is high. Developing countries account for 89% of all anemia-related disability. Iron-deficiency anemia remains the dominant cause of anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anemia, fatigue and aging.

    PubMed

    Balducci, L

    2010-12-01

    Aging is associated with increased incidence and prevalence of both cancer and anemia. Cancer and aging may conspire in making anemia more frequent and more severe. This article reviews the causes and the consequences of anemia in the older individual. The most common causes include chronic inflammation that is a typical manifestation of aging, iron deficiency that may be due to chronic hemorrhage, malabsorption and Helicobacter pylori infection, cobalamin deficiency from malabsorption and renal insufficiency. Other causes of anemia whose prevalence is not well established include myelodysplasia, copper deficiency, hypothyroidism, and sarcopenia. Anemia is associated with increased risk of mortality, functional dependence, dementia, falls, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. When correcting the anemia of older cancer patients one should remember that the erythropoietic stimulating agents (ESA) may stimulate cancer growth and cause thrombosis. These products may be safe when given exclusively to patients receiving chemotherapy and when the hemoglobin levels are maintained below 12 g/dL.

  3. [Fatigue and anemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Zeller, A

    2009-12-02

    We herein report on an 80-year old male patient with a history of muscle weakness, fatigue and weight loss since several months. Because of a pathologic synacthen test in combination with decreased levels of ACTH, we diagnosed a secondary chronic adrenal insufficiency. Because of a normochromic, normocytic, and hypo-proliferative anemia, bone marrow puncture was performed, showing an anemia of chronic disease. We initiated hydrocortisone and anemia and patients' symptoms were fully reconstituted.

  4. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-08-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI, also called anemia of chronic disease) is a common, typically normocytic, normochromic anemia that is caused by an underlying inflammatory disease. It is diagnosed when serum iron concentrations are low despite adequate iron stores, as evidenced by serum ferritin that is not low. In the setting of inflammation, it may be difficult to differentiate AI from iron deficiency anemia, and the 2 conditions may coexist. Treatment should focus on the underlying disease. Recent advances in molecular understanding of AI are stimulating the development of new pathophysiologically targeted experimental therapies.

  5. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated.

  6. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  7. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... babies are at risk for anemia because of iron deficiency. At-risk infants include those who are born ...

  8. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They don' ... problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two sickle cell genes, one ...

  9. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most people with a vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia lack intrinsic factor — a protein secreted by the stomach that is necessary for ...

  10. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  11. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  12. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Ramaswamy; Ezhilarasi, S; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Rajajee, Sarala

    2009-03-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is a clinical triad characterized by thiamine-responsive anemia, diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness. We report a 4-year-old girl with TRMA whose anemia improved following administration of thiamine and this case report sensitizes the early diagnosis and treatment with thiamine in children presenting with anemia, diabetes and deafness.

  13. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history.

  14. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  15. Hepcidin and sports anemia.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Na; Gao, Guofen; Chang, Yan-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin's function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed.

  16. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chinese, Filipino, Mediterranean, or African origin or descent. Hereditary Spherocytosis In this condition, a defect in the ... hemolytic anemia among people of Northern European descent. Hereditary Elliptocytosis (Ovalocytosis) Like hereditary spherocytosis, this condition also ...

  17. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cause anemia. Lack of Red Blood Cell Production Both acquired and inherited conditions and factors can ... damage the red blood cells' ability to carry oxygen. If the bone marrow is damaged, it can' ...

  18. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants ... November 1, 2011 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ...

  20. Anemia and heart failure.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Eileen; Murphy, Clare; McMurray, John J V

    2004-12-01

    Over the past few years, anemia has emerged as a powerful independent predictor of adverse outcomes in chronic heart failure (CHF). It affects up to 50% of patients with CHF, depending on the definition of anemia used and on the population studied. Even small reductions in hemoglobin are associated with worse outcome. However, the causes of anemia in CHF remain unclear, although impairment of renal function and inflammatory cytokines are proposed mechanisms. Both may act through impairment of the synthesis or action of erythropoietin. Preliminary studies have demonstrated improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance, quality of life, and reductions in hospitalizations when patients with severe CHF were treated with erythropoietin. The benefits and the potential risks of such therapies will be further addressed in upcoming larger randomized trials. The recent interest in anemia reflects a new perspective in heart failure therapy, focusing on non-cardiovascular comorbidities.

  1. Management of renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Peco-Antic, Amira

    2005-01-01

    Normochromic normocytic anemia is common in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) when their glomerular filtration rate is below 35 ml/min/1.73 m2 BSA, but it may develop earlier in some forms of renal disease. An inadequate erythropoiesis due to insufficient erythropoietin synthesis in the kidneys is the main cause of renal anemia. Other reasons include reduced red blood cell lifespan, chronic blood loss, iron deficiency, inhibitors of erythropoiesis, and malnutrition. The presence of anemia contributes to many of the symptoms of uremia, including decreased appetite, decreased energy, poor cardiac function, and poor school performance. Therefore, correction of anemia dramatically improves the life of the child with CRF. Presently, the goal of anemia management is to maintain hematocrit concentrations at 33% to 36% and a hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/L. This can be accomplished by intravenous or subcutaneous administration of recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO, 100-300 U/kg/week) and iron preparations. If adequate iron stores cannot be maintained with oral therapy (2-3, max 6 mg/kg/day), intravenous iron should be administered. In order to optimize anemia management in children with CRF, future research should be concentrated on the normalization of hemoglobin early in the course of CRF, and the long-term effects on the child's development.

  2. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  3. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia ...

  4. Special Education: Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Teramura; Mizoguchi

    1996-01-01

    WHAT IS HYPOPLASTIC ANEMIA? Aplastic anemia is a hematological disease characterized by pancytopenia and bone marrow hypoplasia. Acquired cases of aplastic anemia are almost all idiopathic and arise from unknown causes. Other cases of aplastic anemia are secondary and are caused by radiation, chemicals or viruses. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY: Aplastic anemia is manifested as a marked reduction in the number of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, but why this occurs is still uncertain. Some of the proposed causes include abnormalities of the hematopoietic stem cells, abnormalities in the hematopoietic microenvironment, and immunologically mediated damage to the hematopoietic stem cells (Figure 1). ABNORMALTIES OF THE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS: Patients with aplastic anemia, and long-term survivors in particular, are at increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute myelocytic leukemia. This suggests that, in at least some of these patients, the hematopoietic stem cells themselves are abnormal. It also suggests that in some of these patients the blood cells are clonal (that is, all the blood cells are derived from a single pluripotent stem cell). In short, what these findings imply is that aplastic anemia may be caused by the emergence of an abnormal clone. Clonal hematopoiesis, however, can also be considered nothing more than a consequence. In other words, it is possible that hematopoiesis in this kind of patient is performed by a lone pluripotent stem cell that somehow managed to survive eradication. No definitive interpretation of clonal hematopoiesis has been agreed upon, and it is still a topic for future research. ABNORMAL HEMATOPOIETIC MICROENVIRONMENT: The presence of stromal cells, which form the microenvironment of bone marrow, is very important in hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells proliferate and differentiate either by adhering to stromal cells or by being stimulated by the various

  5. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. American Journal of Hematology. 2006;81(1):65–67. [3] Sekeres M. ... KA, Leporrier M, Rinder HM. Marrow-Damage Anemia: Hematology in Clinical Practice. 5th ed. China: The McGraw- ...

  6. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen ... HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of ...

  7. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  8. Mechanisms of anemia in CKD.

    PubMed

    Babitt, Jodie L; Lin, Herbert Y

    2012-10-01

    Anemia is a common feature of CKD associated with poor outcomes. The current management of patients with anemia in CKD is controversial, with recent clinical trials demonstrating increased morbidity and mortality related to erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Here, we examine recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying anemia of CKD. These insights hold promise for the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies that directly target the pathophysiologic processes underlying this form of anemia.

  9. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  10. Megaloblastic anemia in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Maktouf, Chokri; Bchir, Attouma; Louzir, Hechmi; Mdhaffer, Moez; Elloumi, Moez; Ben Abid, Hela; Meddeb, Balkis; Makni, Faiza; Laatiri, Adnene; Soussi, Taoufik; Hafsia, Aicha; Dellagi, Koussay

    2006-07-01

    We prospectively studied 478 patients with megaloblastic anemia living in Tunisia. Overall, 98% of patients had vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia accounted for most of these cases, and median age at presentation was 45 years. Megaloblastic anemia occurred in 19 subjects under 15 years of age, and of these, nine had the Immerslund-Graesbeck syndrome.

  11. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  12. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  13. [Microcytic and hypochromic anemias].

    PubMed

    Chrobák, L

    2001-03-01

    In the majority of cases, microcytosis is the result of impaired hemoglobin synthesis. Disorders of iron metabolism and protoporphyrin and heme synthesis, as well as impaired globin synthesis, lead to defective hemoglobin production and to the generation of microcytosis and microcytic anemia. Iron deficiency anemie, anemia of chronic diseases, thalassemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias and homozygous HbE disease are the main representatives of microcytosis and microcytic anemias. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, transferrin receptor-ferritin index, and zinc-protoporhyrin concentration in erythrocytes are tests used for assessment of iron deficiency. The convention laboratory test for diagnosing iron deficiency is the measurement of serum ferritin. The most precise method for evaluating body iron stores is the examination for iron on aspirated bone marrow or marrow biopsy. Increased content of Hb A2 over 3.5% is diagnostic for beta-thalassemia. Presence of ringed sideroblasts is characteristic of sideroblastic anemias. Hemoglobin electrophoresis is required for the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy E. The optimal therapeutic regimen in iron deficiency anemia used in this country is to administer 100 mg of elemental iron twice daily separately from meals. Ferrous sulphate (Ferronat Retard tbl. or Sorbifer Dulures tbl.) which are slow-releasing iron formulations are preferred because of their low cost, high bioavailability and low side-effects. Parenteral iron therapy is justified only in patients who cannot absorb iron, who have blood losses that exceed the maximal absorptive capacity of their intestinal tract or who are totally intolerant of oral iron. However, parenteral iron therapy may be associated with serious and even fatal side-effects.

  14. Does anemia affect the predictive ability of bleeding risk scores in patients with acute coronary syndromes?

    PubMed

    Garay, Alberto; Ariza-Solé, Albert; Formiga, Francesc; Lorente, Victoria; Sánchez-Salado, José C; Salazar-Mendiguchía, Joel; Roura, Gerard; Muntané, Guillem; Alegre, Oriol; Fuentes, Lara; Gómez-Hospital, Joan A; Cequier, Angel

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and is associated with higher risk for both bleeding and ischemic complications. We aimed to assess the predictive ability of bleeding risk scores (Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the ACC/AHA guidelines [CRUSADE], Mehran and Acute Coronary Treatment and Intervention Outcomes Network [ACTION]) in ACS patients with anemia. All consecutive ACS patients were prospectively included. The primary outcome was in-hospital major bleeding according to the CRUSADE, Mehran and ACTION definitions. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <130 g/l in men and <120 g/l in women. The predictive ability of the bleeding risk scores was assessed by binary logistic regression, calculating receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their corresponding area under the curve (AUC). We included 2255 patients, mean age 62.4 years. Anemia was present in 550 patients (24.4%). Patients with anemia had a significantly higher prevalence of comorbidities. The three bleeding risk scores adequately predicted major bleeding in the whole cohort. No significant differences were observed regarding the predictive ability of each of the scores in patients with and without anemia (CRUSADE: AUC 0.73 without anemia vs. 0.74 with anemia, p=0.913; ACTION: AUC 0.68 without anemia vs. 0.73 with anemia, p=0.353; Mehran: AUC 0.69 without anemia vs. 0.61 with anemia, p=0.210). Only the Mehran score showed significantly lower predictive ability in patients with hemoglobin <11 g/dl (AUC 0.51, p=0.044). Anemia was a common comorbidity in patients with ACS from our series. Currently available bleeding risk scores showed an adequate predictive ability in patients with mild anemia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. The 2 main etiologies of iron deficiency are blood loss due to menstrual periods and blood loss due to gastrointestinal bleeding. Beyond anemia, lack of iron has protean manifestations, including fatigue, hair loss, and restless legs. The most efficient test for the diagnosis of iron deficiency is the serum ferritin. Iron replacement can be done orally, or in patients in whom oral iron is not effective or contraindicated, with intravenous iron. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  17. Anemia: Evaluation and Diagnostic Tests.

    PubMed

    Cascio, Michael J; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Anemia is among the most common medical problems and clinical and laboratory evaluation need to be approached logically. The complete blood count with red cell indices offers clues to diagnosis. Many anemias have characteristic red cell morphology. The reticulocyte count serves as a useful screen for hemolysis or blood loss. Testing for specific causes of the anemia is performed. Occasionally, examination of the bone marrow is required for diagnosis. Molecular testing is increasingly being use to aid the diagnostic process. This article reviews diagnostic tests for anemia and suggests a rational approach to determining the etiology of a patient's anemia.

  18. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Clinical Trials for Rare Blood Diseases (Neal Young, M.D.) 05/17/2012 In ... in the lives of people who have rare blood and bone marrow diseases, such as aplastic anemia. // Non Object? Updated: August ...

  19. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  20. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  1. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  2. Anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cindy N

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation arising from various etiologies, including infection, autoimmune disorders, chronic diseases, and aging, can promote anemia. The anemia of inflammation (AI) is most often normocytic and normochromic and is usually mild. Characteristic changes in systemic iron handling, erythrocyte production, and erythrocyte life span all contribute to AI. The preferred treatment is directed at the underlying disease. However, when the inflammatory insult is intractable, or the cause has not been diagnosed, there are limited options for treatment of AI. Because anemia is a comorbid condition that is associated with poor outcomes in various chronic disease states, understanding its pathogenesis and developing new tools for its treatment should remain a priority. Hepcidin antimicrobial peptide has taken center stage in recent years as a potent modulator of iron availability. As the technology for quantitative hepcidin analysis improves, hepcidin's role in various disease states is also being revealed. Recent insights concerning the regulatory pathways that modify hepcidin expression have identified novel targets for drug development. As the field advances with such therapeutics, the analysis of the impact of normalized hemoglobin on disease outcomes will confirm whether anemia is a reversible independent contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with inflammatory diseases.

  3. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  4. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  5. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  6. How to approach chronic anemia.

    PubMed

    Koury, Mark J; Rhodes, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    We present herein an approach to diagnosing the cause of chronic anemia based on a patient's history and complete blood cell count (CBC). Four patterns that are encountered frequently in CBCs associated with chronic anemias are considered: (1) anemia with abnormal platelet and/or leukocyte counts, (2) anemia with increased reticulocyte counts, (3) life-long history of chronic anemia, and (4) anemia with inappropriately low reticulocytes. The pathophysiologic bases for some chronic anemias with low reticulocyte production are reviewed in terms of the bone marrow (BM) events that reduce normal rates of erythropoiesis. These events include: apoptosis of erythroid progenitor and precursor cells by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, development of macrocytosis when erythroblast DNA replication is impaired, and development of microcytosis due to heme-regulated eIF2α kinase inhibition of protein synthesis in iron-deficient or thalassemic erythroblasts.

  7. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giannini, S; Martes, C

    2006-09-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A systematic review of the literature shows that the overall prevalence of anemia ranges from 8.8% to 73.7% but differs whether in a setting of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. A disabling complication of IBD, anemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. Different factors, including vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency, bone marrow suppression secondary to drug therapy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the coexistence of myelodysplastic syndromes are involved in the pathogenesis of anemia in IBD. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia accompanying chronic diseases. Correct diagnostic definition of anemia is a fundamental step in guiding the choice of therapeutic options, since the co-presence of different pathogenetic factors may sometimes require a more complex treatment plan. A review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on evidence from recent studies is the focus of this article.

  8. [Treatment of anemia in hip fracture surgery].

    PubMed

    García Pascual, E

    2015-06-01

    Repairing hip fractures is one of the most common surgical procedures and has greater morbidity and mortality. This procedure is also a process that involves a greater need for blood products. Numerous factors influence morbidity, mortality and the use of blood products: patient age, concomitant diseases and drug treatments that change hemostasis and hemorrhaging (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative), which are usually significant. On top of all this is the presence in a high percentage of cases of preoperative anemia, which can have one or more causes. It is therefore essential to establish an appropriate management of perioperative anemia and optimize the transfusion policy. The aim of this review is to briefly analyze the epidemiology of hip fractures as well as establish a basis for treating perioperative anemia and transfusion policies, proposing guidelines and recommendations for clinical management based on the most current studies. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Anemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  10. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  11. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  12. Anemia in severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Neha; Chandra, Jagdish; Pemde, Harish; Singh, Varinder

    2014-04-01

    India has the highest prevalence of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Severe anemia is one of the comorbidities responsible for increased mortality in severely malnourished children, yet it has not received the attention it should. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and type of anemia and to evaluate the possible etiologies for severe anemia, in these children. A cross-sectional study of patients with SAM in a tertiary care hospital in northern India over a period of 12 mo from Sept. 1, 2010 to Aug. 31, 2011 was conducted. We observed the prevalence of severe anemia (hemoglobin < 7 g/dL), morphologic type of anemia, number of patients requiring blood transfusion, hematologic profile of mothers, nature of feeding, duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and the demographic profile of these patients. Included in the study were 131 cases of SAM. The age group varied between 6 and to 59 mo. Of patients with SAM, 67.3% had severe anemia; 13.8% had moderate anemia. Of these patients, 25% required packed red blood cell transfusion. The most common type of anemia was microcytic (38.6%) followed by megaloblastic (30.5%). A high incidence of severe anemia in SAM with a large proportion (25%) requiring blood transfusion is a pointer toward nutritional anemia being a very common comorbidity of SAM requiring hospital admission. Because megaloblastic anemia closely followed microcytic anemia, supplementation with vitamin B12 in addition to iron and folic acid would be recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Breastfeeding FAQs: How Much and How Often Vegan Food Guide Vegetarianism Anemia Word! Anemia Vitamins About ... Vegetarian Blood Coping With Common Period Problems Anemia Vegan Food Guide Vitamins and Minerals Contact Us Print ...

  14. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  15. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically.

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, Toyomi

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia is defined as anemia due to a reduction of the RBC lifespan to less than the normal range of approximately 120 days. Patients with anemia and jaundice are often suspected to have hemolysis. Herein, different causes of hemolysis and the diagnostic algorithm are reviewed. Currently, there is no generic treatment for hemolytic anemia. Appropriate management of a patient with hemolytic anemia requires determination of the underlying cause. Treatments for the different causes of hemolytic anemia are also reviewed.

  17. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body ...

  19. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shanti; Dunlap, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF), and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether anemia is merely a marker of poor prognosis or whether anemia itself confers risk. The pathogenesis of anemia in HF is multifactorial. Iron deficiency also confers risk in HF, either with or without associated anemia, and treatment of iron deficiency improves the functional status of patients with HF. An ongoing large clinical trial studying the use of darbepoetin-alfa in patients with anemia and systolic HF is expected to provide information that should improve our understanding of anemia in HF.

  20. Anemia for the Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    Powell, Darryl J; Achebe, Maureen Okam

    2016-12-01

    Anemia denotes a reduced red blood cell (RBC) mass from any cause. The causes of anemia are numerous and due to decreased (or abnormal) erythropoesis, shortened RBC life span, or blood loss. The most common etiology of anemia is iron deficiency. A judicious work up of anemia includes evaluating the reticulocyte count and peripheral smear. The severity of illness of a patient with anemia is determined by the degree of anemia and the seriousness of the underlying disorder. Management of patients with hereditary and hemolytic anemias should involve a hematologist.

  1. Pseudomoyamoya in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Garza-Mercado, R

    1982-12-01

    Sickle cell (drepanocytic) anemia is a hereditary blood disease occurring very rarely in Mexico. A 13-year-old Mexican boy with sickle cell anemia eventually died of a cerebrovascular accident of the brain stem, as shown by computerized tomography (CT). A characteristic moyamoya-like angiographic pattern was demonstrated on bilateral carotid and left vertebral arteriograms. Moyamoya disease has no known etiology, but the characteristic angiographic features of moyamoya have been observed in conjunction with some other disease of known origin (including sickle cell anemia). It is therefore my belief that these latter cases should be referred to as pseudomoyamoya and not true moyamoya.

  2. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  3. Fanconi anemia: current management.

    PubMed

    Kook, Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosomal instability disorder, characterized by congenital anomalies, defective hematopoiesis and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia and certain solid tumors. All racial and ethnic groups are at risk, and at least 11 complementation groups have been identified and the genes defective in eight of these have been identified (FANCA, C, D2, E, F, G, L and BRCA2). FA-A is the most common complementation group, accounting for approximately 65% of all affected individuals. The gold-standard screening test for FA is based on the characteristic hypersensitivity of FA cells to the crosslinking agents, such as mitomicin C or diepoxybutane. Recent progress has been made in identifying the genes bearing pathogenetically relevant mutations, but slower progress has been made in defining the precise functions of the proteins in normal cells, in part because that the proteins are multifunctional. Molecular studies have established that a common pathway exist, both between the FA proteins and other proteins involved in DNA repair such as NBS1, ATM, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only option for establishing normal hematopoiesis. To reduce undue toxicities due to inherent hypersensitivity, nonmyeloablative conditioning for transplants has been advocated. This review summarizes the general clinical and hematologic features and the current management of FA. Fanconi anemia (FA) is the commonest type of inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with the birth incidence of around three per million. The inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive with the estimated heterozygote frequency being one in 300 in Europe and the US.

  4. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  5. [Therapeutic approach to postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Moltó, L

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative anemia is a common finding in patients who undergo major surgery, and it can affect early rehabilitation and the return to daily activities. Allogeneic blood transfusion is still the most widely used method for restoring hemoglobin levels rapidly and effectively. However, the potential risks of transfusions have led to the review of this practice and to a search for alternative measures for treating postoperative anemia. The early administration of intravenous iron appears to improve the evolution of postoperative hemoglobin levels and reduce allogeneic transfusions, especially in patients with significant iron deficiency or anemia. What is not clear is whether this treatment heavily influences rehabilitation and quality of life. There is a lack of well-designed, sufficiently large, randomized prospective studies to determine whether postoperative or perioperative intravenous iron treatment, with or without recombinant erythropoietin, has a role in the recovery from postoperative anemia, in reducing transfusions and morbidity rates and in improving exercise capacity and quality of life.

  6. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... If medicines are the cause of your pernicious anemia, your doctor may change the type or dose of medicine you take. Infants of strict vegetarian mothers may be given vitamin B12 supplements from ...

  7. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  8. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  9. [Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2008-03-01

    Anemia can result from deficient erythropoiesis [aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease (ACD), thalassemia, megaloblastic anemia, chronic renal failure, hematological malignancies, etc.], excessive RBC destruction [hereditary spherocytosis, inherited enzyme deficiency, hemoglobinopathies, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), etc.], and blood loss. Based on the measured red cell size(MCV), anemia is classified as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic. Iron parameters (serum iron, serum ferritin, etc.), reticulocyte count, bone marrow examination, Coombs test, serum vitamin B12 level, and Ham test are also useful in the differential diagnosis of anemia. Novel treatment of anemia includes lenalidomide for 5q(-)MDS, azacitidine for high-risk MDS, and eculizumab for PNH. Oral iron chelator(deferasirox) developed for the treatment of transfusional iron overload is also very useful for the management of patients with bone marrow failure syndromes.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , ...

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  12. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  13. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mahmoud; Jaberian, Sara; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Riazi, Sajedeh; Rangraz, Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber, Somayyeh

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 1252 patients with morbid obesity that randomly selected from all patients referred to Clinic of obesity at Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in 2014. The morbid obesity was defined according to the guideline as body mass index (BMI) equal to or higher than 40 kg/m2. Various laboratory parameters including serum levels of hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, folic acid, and vitamin B12 were assessed using the standard laboratory techniques. BMI was adversely associated with serum vitamin B12, but not associated with other hematologic parameters. The overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.8%. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was independent to patients' age and also to body mass index. The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was totally 20.9%. According to the multivariable logistic regression model, no association was revealed between BMI and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia adjusting gender and age. A similar regression model showed that higher BMI could predict occurrence of vitamin B12 deficiency in morbid obese patients. Although iron deficiency is a common finding among obese patients, vitamin B12 deficiency is more frequent so about one-fifth of these patients suffer vitamin B12 deficiency. In fact, the exacerbation of obesity can result in exacerbation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  15. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  16. Correlation between hepcidin level and renal anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, L-N; Zhang, P; Tang, F; Wang, G; Li, F-E

    2014-09-12

    Anemia in patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is related to the chronic inflammatory state, low iron absorption rate, and low utilization rate. As a key protein for iron metabolism, hepcidin plays an important role in CRI anemia. The study aimed to determine the correlation between hepcidin level and renal anemia. Ninety CRI anemia patients treated in our hospital from February 2012 to December 2012 were enrolled in the study to compare with a healthy control group of 40 cases by measuring the hepcidin level and analyzing the correlation between hepcidin level and CRI anemia. The hepcidin level was significantly higher in the CRI anemia group than the control group; there was a positive correlation between hepcidin level and serum ferritin as well as IL-6 level. Hepcidin level was significantly related to degree of anemia, indicating that an increase in hepcidin level will result in anemia.

  17. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... aplastic anemia and are pregnant or want to get pregnant, find an aplastic anemia specialist and an obstetrician (OB) who specializes in high-risk births. Every person and every pregnancy is different. Make sure you ...

  18. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction with their clinical experience to optimally manage patients with anemia. PMID:17245602

  19. Fanconi Anemia and its Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous recessive disorder characterized by diverse congenital malformations, progressive pancytopenia, and predisposition to both hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Congenital anomalies vary from patient to patient and may affect skeletal morphogenesis as well as any of the major organ systems. Although this highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, laboratory study of chromosomal breakage induced by diepoxybutane (DEB) or other crosslinking agents provides a unique cellular marker for the diagnosis of the disorder either prenatally or postnatally. Diagnosis based on abnormal response to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. This overview will present our present knowledge regarding the varied phenotypic manifestations of FA and procedures for diagnosis based upon abnormal DNA damage responses. PMID:19622403

  20. Optimal management of pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Emmanuel; Serraj, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (also known as Biermer’s disease) is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis, predominantly of the fundus, and is responsible for a deficiency in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) due to its malabsorption. Its prevalence is 0.1% in the general population and 1.9% in subjects over the age of 60 years. Pernicious anemia represents 20%–50% of the causes of vitamin B12 deficiency in adults. Given its polymorphism and broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, pernicious anemia is a great pretender. Its diagnosis must therefore be evoked and considered in the presence of neurological and hematological manifestations of undetermined origin. Biologically, it is characterized by the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibodies. Treatment is based on the administration of parenteral vitamin B12, although other routes of administration (eg, oral) are currently under study. In the present update, these various aspects are discussed with special emphasis on data of interest to the clinician. PMID:23028239

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  2. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics.

  3. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Clinico-aetiologic profile of macrocytic anemias with special reference to megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Vineetha; Dutta, Tarun Kumar; Badhe, Bhawana A; Bobby, Zachariah; Panigrahi, Ashish K

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to study the clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with macrocytic anemia and to determine the etiology of macrocytic anemia with special reference to megaloblastic anemia. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried over a period of 18 months on 60 adult patients (age ≥13 years) of macrocytic anemia. Macrocytic anemia was identified when peripheral blood examination showed anemia with a mean red blood corpuscular volume of >95 fl. The most common cause of macrocytic anemia was megaloblastic anemia (38.4%). The major causes of nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia were primary bone marrow disorders (35%), liver diseases (15%) and hemolytic anemia (8.3%). There was a significant male preponderance in the study (65%). The megaloblastic anemias observed were due to either vitamin B(12) deficiency (78.3%) or combined B(12) and folate deficiency (21.7%). A significant proportion of non-vegetarians (73.9%) had megaloblastic anemia. Patients with an MCV of >110fl were more likely to have megaloblastic anemia (p value 0.0007). Three patients (mean age 55 years) with a megaloblastic marrow did not respond to vitamin replacement and were found to have myelodysplastic syndrome. Megaloblastic anemia due to Vitamin B(12) or folate deficiency remains the most important cause of macrocytic anemia. In settings with limited laboratory facilities, a therapeutic trial of vitamins B(12) or folic acid is useful in determining the specific vitamin deficiency.

  5. Epidemiology of anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tang, W H Wilson; Yeo, P S Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Anemia is being increasingly recognized as an important comorbidity in patients with heart failure. Despite wide variations in defining anemia, approximately one-fifth to one-third of patients with heart failure may experience anemia at a given time. The prevalence may increase to more than half of patients in the setting of severe heart failure, and it may differ with different settings. Meanwhile, up to a fifth of patients may experience new-onset anemia, even though most cases may resolve over time. Different factors contribute to the development of anemia, including increasing age, renal insufficiency, hemodilution, chronic inflammation, and increasing heart failure disease severity.

  6. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  7. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ng) per milliliter may mean a person has iron deficiency that requires treatment. 2 The transferrin saturation score ... with kidney disease who have anemia caused by iron, vitamin B12, or folic acid deficiencies to include sources of these nutrients in their ...

  8. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  9. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  10. Erythema nodosum and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Milman, Perry J; Goldenberg, Steven P; Scheinfeld, Noah; Pereira, Frederick A

    2013-07-14

    Erythema nodosum (EN) often presents as a sudden onset of tender, erythematous, subcutaneous nodules on the legs and ankles. Although rare, pernicious anemia may be related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Discussion of this association in the context of a particular patient is presented.

  11. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  12. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate.

  13. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin.

  14. [Anemia in congestive heart failure].

    PubMed

    Abassade, P; Rabenirina, F; Garcon, P; Antakly, Y; Cador, R

    2009-11-01

    Anemia is a common disorder in congestive heart failure and an independant prognostic factor. The aims of this study are to evaluate the prevalence of anemia among a population of in-hospital congestive heart failure patients, to compare anemic patients (A) with non anemic patients (NA) and to study their cares. One hundred and thirty-two patients, 70 men (53%), et 62 women (47%) are enrolled. Mean age is 76.4+/-13.5 years. The prevalence of anemia (WHO criteria) is 49%. Patients A are older than NA: 79.1+/-13.8 years versus 73.8+/-12.9 years (p=0.025), renal function is more altered in A than in NA, creatinine clearance is 56.5 ml/min (A) versus 76.2 ml/min (NA) (p=0.003). Ejection fraction (EF) is lower in A than in NA: 35.1+/-15.3% versus 50.9+/-15.9%, (p<0.0001.) Anemia is less frequent in preserved EF (28%) than in low EF (63%) (p<0.0001). Hospitalization duration is longer in A than in NA: 10.7+/-10.1 days versus 6.9+/-3.7 days (p=0.005). There are more re hospitalized patients among A than NA: 38 versus 10 (p=0.0001). There is a significant difference of survival of NA versus A at day 614 (p=0.03). Anemia is frequent in our population, and is associated with others prognostic factors and comorbidity.

  15. Association of elevated α₁-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and the prevalence of anemia in Nicaraguan preschool children.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kevin M; Venugopalan, Balalakshmi; Jefferds, Maria E; Boy, Eric; Bonilla, Josefina; Sandino, Ivette; Halleslevens, Patricia

    2012-06-01

    Anemia status is frequently assessed in cross-sectional surveys. Recently, the assessment of acute phase proteins (APPs) has become more common, primarily for iron and vitamin A biomarkers. Although the so-called "anemia of infection" has been known for years, the relationship between APPs and anemia has been infrequently presented. To assess the relationship between elevated α₁-acidglycoprotein (AGP) and the prevalence of anemia among preschool children. A nationally representative household-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2003-05 in Nicaragua. Blood samples were collected from preschool children 6 to 59.9 months of age and tested for hemoglobin and AGP. Data were also obtained on sex, weight, height, use of iron supplements, maternal education, and urban or rural status. Among the 1420 children assessed, the overall prevalence of anemia was 20.2% and the prevalence of elevated AGP was 24.0%. Children with elevated AGP had an anemia prevalence of 27.9%, compared with 17.8% among those with a normal AGP, for a crude prevalence odds ratio (POR) of 1.8 (p = .010). Accounting for age, maternal educational level, and year of survey using logistic regression, the adjusted POR for the association between elevated AGP and anemia was 1.5 (p = .053). Children in this survey with an elevated AGP had a higher prevalence of anemia, although after controlling for covariates the p-value did not indicate a statistically significant difference (p = .053). It may be helpful to account for APPs, when this information is available, for purposes of comparing anemia prevalence across populations or within a population over time.

  16. Congenital sideroblastic anemia treated as thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R K; Miah, M Z; Morshed, M

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is a rare cause of microcytic hypochromic anemia. In Bangladesh, most common causes of microcytic anemia are iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic diseases and thalassemia. Serum ferritin is usually done to differentiate them. If serum ferritin is low, the diagnosis of iron deficiency is entertained. When serum ferritin is raised but erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are normal - anemia of chronic disease is excluded. The next investigation is Hb-electrophoresis. Normal Hb-electroporesis excludes thalassemia. Then bone marrow examination with iron stain is done for the diagnosis of sideroblastic anemia. Here we report a case of a 14 year old girl presenting with intermittent leg pain and anemia. Her blood flim showed microcytic hypochromic anemia with raised serum ferritin and normal Hb-electroporesis. Initially she was labeled as a case of unusual type of thalassemia and treated with blood transfusion. Finally bone marrow examination with iron stain was done and she was diagnosed as a case of congenital sideroblastic anemia. We reviewed the literature and discussed the management as well.

  17. Epidemiology of Anemia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48–63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one-third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B12 deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs. PMID:18809090

  18. Epidemiology of anemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kushang V

    2008-10-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48% to 63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B(12) deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs.

  19. [Anemia in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lausević, Mirjana; Nesić, Vidosava; Jovanović, Natasa; Stojimirović, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    A normocytic normochromic anemia is one of the first signs of renal failure. Since anemia increases morbidity and mortality, its elimination is one of the essential objectives of the treatment. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has changed the therapeutical approach to anemia. The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy of anemia correction in peritoneal dialysis patients depending on treatment and dialysis modality. The study is the retrospective analysis of 64 patients who presented to our Clinic in 2003. Eighteen (28.13%) patients were treated with rHuEPO, 14 (28%) underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 2 (100%)--automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and 2 (33.3%)--intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD). Mean hemoglobin level was 98.6 +/- 17.82 g/l in patients treated with rHuEPO versus 98.81 +/- 15.14 g/l in patients without rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin requirements were 3392.85 +/- 1211.77 IU/week All patients received iron supplementation during rHuEPO therapy. Mean serum ferritin levels were 463.41 +/- 360 ug/l. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) was 0.35 +/- 0.16%. No difference of serum iron and TSAT levels was found between CAPD and IPD patients. The degree of anemia significantly differed between CAPD and IPD patients. A total of 17.11% of PD patients were given blood transfusions, most frequently during the first three months after the onset of dialysis. Our conclusion is that the number of patients receiving rHuEPO should be increased, as 50% of our patients should be substituted, while only 28% are being treated. As 50% of patients receiving rHuEPO failed to reach target Hgb levels, higher EPO doses should be considered. Iron stores should be continuously monitored, particularly in patients receiving rHuEPO, since iron deficiency is an important problem for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, especially during erythropoietin therapy. Oral iron supplementation is satisfactory in the majority of patients, and iron

  20. Megaloblastic anemia: back in focus.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jagdish

    2010-07-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA), in most instances in developing countries, results from deficiency of vitamin B(12) or folic acid. Over the last two to three decades, incidence of MA seems to be increasing. Of the two micronutrients, folic acid deficiency contributed to MA in a large majority of cases. Now deficiency of B(12) is far more common. In addition to anemia, occurrence of neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia is increasingly being reported. Among cases presenting with pancytopenia, MA stands out as an important (commonest cause in some series) cause. This article focuses on these and certain other aspects of MA. Possible causes of increasing incidence of MA are discussed. Observations on other clinical features like neurocognitive dysfunction, associated hyperhomocysteinemeia and occurrence of tremors and thrombocytosis during treatment are highlighted.

  1. Coexistence of megaloblastic anemia and iron deficiency anemia in a young woman with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Chia-Sui; Yang, Chao-Ping; Lo, Fu-Sung; Hsu, Hsun-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Pernicious anemia is a megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and is the end-stage of autoimmune gastritis that typically affects persons older than 60 years. It is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia can also be diagnosed concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. We report the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia in a 22-year-old woman with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis for 10.5 years. Recently, she presented with microcytic anemia, and iron deficiency anemia was diagnosed initially. After administration of ferrous sulfate, macrocytic anemia was revealed and vitamin B12 deficiency was detected. Pernicious anemia was highly suspected because of the endoscopic finding of atrophic gastritis, and high titer of antigastric parietal cell antibody, as well as elevated serum gastrin level. After intramuscular injections of hydroxycobalamine 100 microg daily for 10 days, and monthly later, her blood counts returned to normal.

  2. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Amador-Medina, Lauro Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is almost unavoidable in the last stages of chronic kidney disease. It is defined as a condition where hemoglobin concentration is below 2 standard deviations from the mean hemoglobin level of the general population, corrected for age and sex (typically, hemoglobin < 13 g/dL in adults and 12 g/dL in women). Although the cause is multi-factorial, the most known is inadequate erythropoietin production. Anemia has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with several conditions such as cancer, chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure. Treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, such as erythropoietin, is a logical strategy that has enabled clinical improvement and reduced transfusion requirements for the patients; however, total correction of anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents has demonstrated an increase in the risk of mortality or cardiovascular complications associated with these agents. In randomized trials, the achievement of normal or nearly normal hemoglobin levels is not associated with improved survival and reduced cardiovascular risk; however the ideal hemoglobin level with the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents seems to be problematic. More information is needed in order to obtain definite conclusions; in the meantime, using the lowest possible dose of erythropoietin seems to be the most prudent approach.

  4. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  5. Anemia and transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal anemia is a frequent occurrence in neonatal intensive care units. Red blood cell transfusion criteria in case of blood loss are clearly defined but optimal hemoglobin or hematocrit thresholds of transfusion for anemia due to decreased production or increased destruction are less evident. This review focuses on the causes of anemia in the newborn period and the most recent evidence-based treatment options, including transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk About: Coaches Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About ... to stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: ...

  7. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  8. [Anemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M

    2012-12-01

    One of the most frequent extra-articular organ manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is anemia. As anemia in RA patients may result in severe symptoms and aggravation of other disease manifestations (e.g. arteriosclerosis), the influence on the course of RA is profound. However, the importance of anemia in RA patients is frequently underestimated. The etiology of anemia in RA is complex. Anemia of inflammation (AI) and iron deficiency anemia, alone or in combination are the most frequent forms of anemia in RA. Changes in iron metabolism are the leading causes of anemia in RA patients and mainly induced by the altered synthesis and function of hepcidin and ferroportin. Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver and immunocompetent cells, impairs the expression of ferroportin on iron-secreting cells, thus reducing iron bioavailability. The typical changes of iron metabolism and hepcidin synthesis in RA are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, primarily interleukin-6. Hence, the treatment of RA with cytokine antagonists has significant therapeutic implications on anemia in the context of inflammation and impaired iron metabolism.

  9. Anemia in children and adolescents with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chu, J Y; Monteleone, J A; Peden, V H; Graviss, E R; Vernava, A M

    1981-11-01

    In a review of 17 adolescents and children (excluding newborns) with definite clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings of hypothyroidism, 11 patients (65%) had anemia. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of the red blood cells was either macrocytic or normocytic. The hemoglobin did not correlate with the serum thyroxine level. Anemia occurred only in those patients with heights below the third percentile, but there was no similar correlation with weights. Of the 10 patients who had radiographs for bone age, all showed severe delay (47 to 103 months) and had heights below the third percentile. Nine of these patients were anemic, but the severity of the anemia did not correlate with the delay in bone age. Neither microcytic anemia nor pernicious anemia, noted in many adult hypothyroid patients, was found in the children and adolescents with hypothyroidism studied here. The "uncomplicated" anemia secondary to hypothyroidism responded to thyroid replacement therapy alone. Anemia can be the most prominent feature of hypothyroidism. In patients with mild to moderate anemia of unknown origin, especially those with fall-off in linear growth and increased MCV, hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the anemia.

  10. Megaloblastic Anemias: Nutritional and Other Causes.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Datta Mitra, Ananya

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies are major causes of megaloblastic anemia. Causes of B12 deficiency include pernicious anemia, gastric surgery, intestinal disorders, dietary deficiency, and inherited disorders of B12 transport or absorption. The prevalence of folate deficiency has decreased because of folate fortification, but deficiency still occurs from malabsorption and increased demand. Other causes include drugs and inborn metabolic errors. Clinical features of megaloblastic anemia include anemia, cytopenias, jaundice, and megaloblastic marrow morphology. Neurologic symptoms occur in B12 deficiency, but not in folate deficiency. Management includes identifying any deficiency, establishing its cause, and replenishing B12 or folate parenterally or orally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bay, Ali; Keskin, Mehmet; Hizli, Samil; Uygun, Hatice; Dai, Alper; Gumruk, Fatma

    2010-10-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) syndrome usually associated with diabetes mellitus, anemia and deafness, due to mutations in SLC19A2, encoding a thiamine transporter protein. The onset of disease is usually seen during infancy or at early childhood and most of the TRMA patients are originated from consanguineous families. In this case, we report a 5-month-old boy who had diagnosis of TRMA during evaluations for his anemia and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis of TRMA should be kept in mind in differential diagnosis of megaloblastic anemia especially in the populations where the consanguinity is frequent.

  12. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  13. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  14. Aplastica anemia and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-12-26

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  15. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  16. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  17. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  18. Megaloblastic anemia--a rare cause.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sanjib Kr; Aggarwal, Anju; Mittal, Hema

    2011-10-01

    A 2- year- old boy presented with non responsive megaloblastic anemia, growth failure and developmental delay. Blood levels of B(12), folic acid and iron were normal. Tandem mass spectroscopy for common inborn errors of metabolism did not reveal any abnormality. There was an increased excretion of orotic acid in urine. The authors report this as a rare cause of megaloblastic anemia.

  19. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  20. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  1. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  2. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  3. Case 40. Misdiagnosis of refractory macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Bain, Barbara

    2008-11-01

    A diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome, refractory anemia subtype, was made in an elderly Indian woman on the basis of a refractory macrocytic anemia with normal vitamin B(12) and folate assays, normal thyroid function, essentially normal liver function and normal cytogenetic analysis. Disease evolution revealed that the diagnosis was erroneous.

  4. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  5. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  6. [Anemia in candidates for heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Yanes Vidal, G J

    2015-06-01

    Heart surgery patients have a high prevalence of anemia. Its etiology is multifactorial, and iron deficiency is one of the most common correctable causes. Anemia is an independent risk factor for postsurgical morbidity and mortality. It also predisposes patients to a greater need for transfusions, which increases the associated complications and the use of resources. The etiological diagnosis of anemia is no different from that of other surgical procedures, but the time available for correcting it before surgery is shorter. Studies have been conducted on therapeutic regimens with iron deficiency replenishment with total dose and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which enable the rapid correction of anemia and reduce transfusion requirements. There is considerable variability in terms of dosage, adverse effects, administration time and routes, drug combinations and results. New studies are needed to investigate the most ideal regimens for correcting anemia in these patients.

  7. Anemias excluding cobalamin and folate deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Dublis, Stephanie; Shah, Shefali; Nand, Sucha; Anderes, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Anemias are one of the commonest maladies affecting humans. They result from either a failure of production by the bone marrow (hypoproliferative), or from premature destruction or loss (hyperproliferative) of red cells. Hypoproliferative anemias typically result from deficiencies of essential nutrients, stem cell abnormalities or deficiency, and infiltrative processes of the bone marrow. In the hyperproliferative forms, the bone marrow function is normal and anemia results from bleeding or shortened erythrocyte lifespan due to hemoglobinopathies, red cell enzyme disorders, membrane defects, or external factors such as antibodies, trauma, or heat injury. The etiology of anemia is frequently obvious, but when obscure, a systematic diagnostic approach frequently yields the answer. It is important to realize that anemias are usually a consequence of another disease process, which must be identified. Without correction of the underlying disease process, the treatment is likely to fail.

  8. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  9. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment.

  10. [Decreased transfusions in preterm infants with anemia treated with erythropoietin].

    PubMed

    López-Catzín, José Francisco; Bolado-García, Patricia Berenice; Gamboa-López, Gonzalo Jesús; Medina-Escobedo, Carolina Elizabeth; Cambranes-Catzima, Leydi Rubí

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el tratamiento de la anemia del prematuro consiste en la transfusión de glóbulos rojos y el uso de agentes estimulantes de la eritropoyesis. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar la correlación entre el número de transfusiones sanguíneas y el uso de eritropoyetina recombinante humana en prematuros con anemia. Métodos: se realizó un estudio de correlación en 80 expedientes de pacientes con anemia tratados con transfusiones y eritropoyetina, se aleatorizaron en dos grupos: uno fue tratado con transfusiones (T) y otro con transfusiones y eritropoyetina (E). Se midieron variables demográficas, hemoglobina y hematócrito al inicio y al final del tratamiento y número de transfusiones recibidas. La correlación se obtuvo por medio de la Rho de Spearman, considerándose una p < 0.05 como significativamente estadística. Resultados: el total de unidades transfundidas en cada grupo fue menor en el grupo E, que recibió dos unidades menos que el grupo T (p < 0.05). El promedio de CE transfundidos en el grupo E fue 4 ± 1.2 y de 7 ± 1.2 para el grupo T. Para el grupo E la correlación entre edad gestacional y número de transfusiones fue negativa moderada (-0.348); el peso al nacimiento y el número de concentrados de eritrocitos transfundidos fue negativa leve (-0.239). Para el grupo T la correlación entre las mismas variables negativa moderada (-0.300) y negativa leve (-0.109). Conclusiones: la eritropoyetina reduce el número de transfusiones sanguíneas en recién nacidos prematuros con anemia. Su uso no excluye la transfusión, el paciente continúa expuesto al riesgo de enfermedades transmisibles por esta vía.

  11. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  12. [Metallosis: A Rare Cause of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Joana; Correia, Lurdes; Simão, Adélia; Figueiredo, António; Carvalho, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A anemia hemolítica pode estar associada a múltiplas etiologias, nomeadamente a tóxicos, como os metais, sendo esta uma causa rara.Caso Clínico: Homem de 55 anos de idade, sujeito a artroplastia total da anca direita (prótese não cimentada com articulação cerâmica-cerâmica, cujo componente acetabular era constituído por uma cúpula metálica composta por uma liga de titânio, vanádio e alumínio na qual encaixava um insert cerâmico). Cerca de quatro anos após esta intervenção cirúrgica referia ruídos na prótese com os movimentos. Foi sujeito a revisão cirúrgica tendo-se constatado a presença de líquido espesso intracapsular de cor escura, fractura do insert acetabular cerâmico e sinais de desgaste da cúpula metálica acetabular. Procedeu-se a lavagem abundante e substituição do insert cerâmico fracturado por um insert de polietileno. Dois meses depois recorreu ao Serviço de Urgência por degradação do estado geral, flutuação na anca direita e icterícia muco-cutânea. Analiticamente evidenciava valores compatíveis com anemia hemolítica autoimune. Foi feita punção articular com saída de abundante líquido metalótico. A tomografia computorizada revelou extensa colecção heterogénea quística intrapélvica com múltiplos fragmentos de prótese no seu interior, sugestivos de metalose. A anemia hemolítica foi interpretada como consequência da toxicidade das partículas e iões metálicos oriundos do desgaste da prótese. Iniciou corticoterapia em altas doses e posteriormente quando houve condições procedeu-se à substituição de todos os componentes da prótese e drenagem do material acumulado intra-pélvico.Discussão: Após a fractura do insert cerâmico a cabeça cerâmica passou a articular directamente com o componente acetabular metálico, originando os ruídos e desgaste com libertação de partículas e iões. Este material formou uma coleção quística intrapélvica, que passou despercebida na

  13. Relationship of maternal knowledge of anemia with maternal and child anemia and health-related behaviors targeted at anemia among families in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Souganidis, Ellie S.; Sun, Kai; de Pee, Saskia; Kraemer, Klaus; Rah, Jee-Hyun; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Sari, Mayang; Bloem, Martin W.; Semba, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our specific aim was to characterize maternal knowledge of anemia and its relationship to maternal and child anemia and to behaviors related to anemia reduction. Methods We examined the relationship between maternal knowledge of anemia and anemia in the mother and the youngest child, aged 6–59 mo, in 7,913 families from urban slums and 37,874 families from rural areas of Indonesia. Knowledge of anemia was defined based upon the mother’s ability to correctly name at least one symptom of anemia and at least one treatment or strategy for reducing anemia. Hemoglobin was measured in both the mother and the child. Results In urban and rural areas, respectively, 35.8% and 36.9% of mothers had knowledge of anemia, 28.7% and 25.1% of mothers were anemic (hemoglobin <12 g/dL), and 62.3% and 54.0% of children were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dL). Maternal knowledge of anemia was associated with child anemia in urban and rural areas, respectively, (Odds Ratio [O.R.] 0.90, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 0.79, 1.02, P = 0.10; O.R. 0.93, 95% C.I. 0.87, 0.98, P = 0.01) in multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders. There was no significant association between maternal knowledge of anemia and maternal anemia. Maternal knowledge of anemia was significantly associated with iron supplementation during pregnancy and child consumption of fortified milk. There was no association of maternal knowledge of anemia with child deworming. Conclusions Maternal knowledge of anemia is associated with lower odds of anemia in children and with some health behaviors related to reducing anemia. PMID:22241619

  14. Anemia in the Neonate: The Differential Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nassin, Michele L; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-07-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the neonatal period. Presenting symptoms may suggest numerous possible diagnoses ranging from anemia seen as a normal part of development to anemia due to critical pathology. An illustrative case is presented to highlight the appropriate evaluation of the neonate with significant anemia. Several important features of the evaluation of neonatal anemia are highlighted. The constellation of signs and symptoms that occur in conjunction with the anemia are critical for the evaluation. The evaluation should be performed in a step-wise process that starts by eliminating common causes of anemia. Manual review of the peripheral blood smear with a hematologist can be helpful. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. [Sideropenic anemia in infants and toddlers].

    PubMed

    Jakovljević, G; Votava-Raić, A; Tjesić-Drinković, D; Rajić, L; Femenić-Kes, R; Konja, J; Goluza, I; Bilić, E; Leskovar, V

    2001-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common anemia in infants. In the routine pediatric care this problem is encountered every day. Numerous factors in infancy (low birth weight, rapid growth, insufficient nutrition) are involved in the development of iron-deficiency anemia, and they must be considered when establishing diagnosis, counselling parents, and prescribing oral iron preparations. Data on 119 patients aged up to two years treated in the Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Pediatric Department, University Hospital Centre Zagreb Salata between 1994 and 1999, were analyzed. We were prompted to do so because of great frequency of iron-deficiency anemia as one of associated diagnoses, and unfortunately often the only diagnosis requiring hospitalization. Out of 119 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, nine (7.7%) patients (four premature newborns and three from twin pregnancy) had to receive transfusion of erythrocyte concentrate due to very bad general condition and low red blood count, accompanied by clinical signs of anemic hypoxia. We also analyzed prenatal and perinatal history, socioeconomic living conditions of these children, i.e. their nutrition, and if they had previously received oral iron preparations. Some of the results, such as inadequate alimentation with flour, as well as insufficient prophylaxis of iron deficiency, which were found in most cases of severe anemia, point to the need of paying greater attention to this problem, better parents education, and more adequate screening for iron deficiency anemia.

  16. Erythropoietic stress and anemia in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhruv K; Winocour, Peter; Farrington, Ken

    2009-04-01

    Anemia is one of the world's most common preventable conditions, yet it is often overlooked, especially in people with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes-related chronic hyperglycemia can lead to a hypoxic environment in the renal interstitium, which results in impaired production of erythropoietin by the peritubular fibroblasts and subsequent anemia. Anemia in patients with diabetes mellitus might contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease and aggravate diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy. Anemia occurs earlier in patients with diabetic renal disease than in nondiabetic individuals with chronic kidney disease. Although erythropoietin has been used to treat renal anemia for nearly two decades, debate persists over the optimal target hemoglobin level. Most guidelines recommend that hemoglobin levels be maintained between 105g/l and 125g/l. The suggested role of anemia correction--to prevent the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with diabetes mellitus--is yet to be established. However, an emphasis on regular screening for anemia, alongside that for other diabetes-related complications, might help to delay the progression of vascular complications in these patients.

  17. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ohga, Shouichi

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  18. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration <110 g/L) and severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration <70 g/L) and individual-level (age, anthropometric measures, micronutrient deficiencies, malaria, and inflammation) and household-level predictors; we also examined the proportion of anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration <12 μg/L). Countries were grouped into 4 categories on the basis of risk and burden of infectious disease, and a pooled multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted for each group. Results: Iron deficiency, malaria, breastfeeding, stunting, underweight, inflammation, low socioeconomic status, and poor sanitation were each associated with anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body gets more iron than it needs? Iron overload happens when too much iron builds up in ... heart, and pancreas. Many problems can cause iron overload. Most people with hemochromatosis inherit it from their ...

  20. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jr, Silberstein LE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... 2/1/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. ...

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  2. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  3. Investigation of nonpoikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ward, P C

    1979-03-01

    When the mean corpuscular volume is normal in an anemic patient, examination of a blood smear becomes of paramount importance. When the RBCs are normochronic, normocytic, and nonpoikilocytic, the reticulocyte count determines the line of investigation. When the count is increased, either hemorrhage or hemolysis is present. When the count is not increased (ie, normal or low), the differential diagnosis includes anemias due to iron deficiency, chronic disease, renal disease, hemodilution, marrow infiltration, and marrow failure (aplastic anemia). Some morphologic clues to cause other than those pertaining to RBC morphology are discussed and illustrated. A working approach to the investigation of nonpoikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia is suggested.

  4. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2014-04-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with poor prognosis. Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, confers increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Along with the altered iron metabolism in HF patients, inflammation creates challenges in the interpretation of laboratory parameters used to diagnose anemia in HF. Since the RED-HF trial failed to demonstrate any benefit from the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) on mortality or morbidity in HF patients, ESAs are no longer considered a treatment option, although intravenous iron has potential as therapy for anemic and nonanemic HF patients.

  5. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  6. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  7. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  8. Metformin-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kirkiz, Serap; Yarali, Nese; Arman Bilir, Ozlem; Tunc, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    To report a rare side effect of metformin, an oral antidiabetic drug that is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A 17-year-old boy was hospitalized for receiving acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment that was composed of vincristine, L-asparaginase, daunorubicin, and prednisone. Hyperglycemia was determined without any clinical sign and metformin was started for steroid-induced insulin resistance. On the second day of metformin treatment, the patient's hemoglobin level decreased, and a direct Coombs test was positive for immunoglobulin G but negative for complement. An indirect Coombs test was negative. The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase level was within the normal range. Drug-induced hemolytic anemia was suspected and metformin was discontinued. The jaundice gradually disappeared and there was no requirement for red blood cell transfusions. This case showed that physicians should be aware of the potential side effect of metformin although it is infrequent. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    PubMed

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-09

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients.

  10. Sideroblastic anemias: variations on imprecision in diagnostic criteria, proposal for an extended classification of sideroblastic anemias.

    PubMed

    Koc, S; Harris, J W

    1998-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are caused by a diversity of hereditary, congenital, or acquired disorders. Criteria used in describing sideroblastic anemias vary widely among standard medical textbooks and even so have been imprecisely applied in the literature. Recent discoveries concerning the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms involving the molecular biology of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, erythroid ALA synthase (ALAS-2), and iron transport have made the classification of sideroblastic anemias very complex. We recommend a more precise evaluation and documentation of the components that characterize the sideroblastic abnormality and propose an extended classification of the sideroblastic anemias.

  11. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  12. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... AI/ACD may also be advised to take vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements. A person should talk ... and Nutrition People with anemia caused by iron, vitamin B12, or folic acid deficiencies are usually advised to ...

  13. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography ... visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 146,000 Source: National Hospital ...

  14. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  15. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  16. Anemia: progress in molecular mechanisms and therapies.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Vijay G; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to both the understanding of frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that are likely to benefit from new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease); rare genetic disorders of RBC production; and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new approaches to treatment include drugs that target recently defined pathways in RBC production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin-family gene expression, as well as gene therapies that use improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies.

  17. Addison, pernicious anemia and adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Graner, John L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1849 Thomas Addison described the clinical entity now known as pernicious anemia. In 1855 he reported several cases of adrenal insufficiency, or Addison's disease. Considering the importance of these works, there remains a great deal of confusion about them. Contrary to what many historians have written, a review of Addison's original publications demonstrates a firm appreciation of the distinction between pernicious anemia and adrenal insufficiency, based particularly on the discoloration of the skin in these conditions. Three major sources of possible confusion for historians who are attempting to understand Addison's views include Addison's early attempts to link pernicious anemia with disease of the supra-renal capsules, Addison's redefinition of pernicious anemia in his monograph on adrenal disease, and several confusing statements made by Wilks and Daldy in the first reprint of Addison's monograph. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:3902186

  18. Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

    2015-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... developing certain cancers, including a cancer of blood-forming tissue known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ... proteins may increase the self-destruction of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, resulting in anemia. ...

  20. [Equine infectious anemia--a review].

    PubMed

    Haas, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    This article combines essential facts of equine infectious anemia. Beside etiology and epidemiology, emphasis is put on the clinical course and laboratory diagnosis. Finally, control measures and prophylactic issues are discussed.

  1. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia.

  2. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  3. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico.

  4. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  6. Mitochondrial iron metabolism and sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sheftel, Alex D; Richardson, Des R; Prchal, Josef; Ponka, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by mitochondrial iron overload in developing red blood cells. The unifying characteristic of all sideroblastic anemias is the ring sideroblast, which is a pathological erythroid precursor containing excessive deposits of non-heme iron in mitochondria with perinuclear distribution creating a ring appearance. Sideroblastic anemias may be hereditary or acquired. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias are caused by defects in genes present on the X chromosome (mutations in the ALAS2, ABCB7, or GRLX5 gene), genes on autosomal chromosomes, or mitochondrial genes. Acquired sideroblastic anemias are either primary (refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts, RARS, representing one subtype of the myelodysplastic syndrome) or secondary due to some drugs, toxins, copper deficiency, or chronic neoplastic disease. The pathogenesis of mitochondrial iron loading in developing erythroblasts is diverse. Ring sideroblasts can develop as a result of a heme synthesis defect in erythroblasts (ALAS2 mutations), a defect in iron-sulfur cluster assembly, iron-sulfur protein precursor release from mitochondria (ABCB7 mutations), or by a defect in intracellular iron metabolism in erythroid cells (e.g. RARS).

  7. Advancements in anemias related to chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Gian Cesare; Lechi Santonastaso, Clara

    2010-09-01

    Anemia of chronic disease (ACD), the most frequent anemia among hospitalized patients, occurs in chronic inflammatory disorders, such as chronic infections, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Different causes contribute to ACD including diversion of iron traffic, diminished erythropoiesis, blunted response to erythropoietin, erythrophagocytosis, hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. A particular case of ACD is represented by anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACD is characterized by hyposideremia and altered iron transport. Cytokines are implicated in the ACD by reducing erythropoiesis and increasing iron sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The regulation of iron absorption across the epithelium of the proximal small intestine is essential for maintaining body iron concentrations within a physiologically defined range. Hepcidin controls cellular iron efflux by binding to the iron export protein ferroportin, causing ferroportin to be phosphorylated and degraded in lysosomes. Finally, hepcidin inhibits iron release from the reticulo-endothelial system. Increased expression of hepcidin leads to decreased iron absorption and iron deficient anemia. Hepcidin, therefore, is a negative regulator of iron transport in plasma. Causes of anemia in patients with CKD are multifactorial, but the most well-known cause is inadequate erythropoietin production. In these patients, anemia increases the risk of either cardiovascular disease or renal failure.

  8. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1–2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1–2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  9. Concomitant severe normocytic and normochromic anemia in poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Sudoh, Mariko; Watanabe, Makoto; Fujino, Osamu

    2009-10-01

    Although anemia frequently occurs in poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN), severe anemia is rare. We report severe normocytic, normochromic anemia (hematocrit, 19.8%) in PSAGN in a 6-year-old girl with edema, macrohematuria, and proteinuria for 1 month. The potential causes of severe anemia found in this case were: 1) longer duration of massive hematuria from onset of macrohemauria to treatment, 2) a level of erythropoietin much lower than that in cases of iron deficiency anemia, and 3) hemodilution. We speculate that these factors combined to cause an unusual case of severe anemia in PSAGN.

  10. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation? : Differential diagnosis and mechanisms of anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body's iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear phagocytes system in liver and spleen. This results in iron-limited erythropoiesis and anemia. This review summarizes current diagnostic and pathophysiological concepts of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of inflammation, as well as combined conditions, and provides a brief outlook on novel therapeutic options.

  11. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  12. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  13. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  14. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P < .001 for both) and iron deficiency anemia group (165 ± 103 and 138 ± 39 U/L, respectively; P < .05, P < .001), whereas there were no significant differences between iron deficiency anemia and control groups (P > .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P < .001; r = .445, P < .001). Our results suggest that vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia causes important reductions in paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  15. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  16. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2009-10-01

    Inherited sideroblastic anemia comprises several rare anemias due to heterogeneous genetic lesions, all characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow. This morphological aspect reflects abnormal mitochondrial iron utilization by the erythroid precursors. The most common X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA), due to mutations of the first enzyme of the heme synthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), has linked heme deficiency to mitochondrial iron accumulation. The identification of other genes, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette B7 (ABCB7) and glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), has strengthened the role of iron sulfur cluster biogenesis in sideroblast formation and revealed a complex interplay between pathways of mitochondrial iron utilization and cytosolic iron sensing by the iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs). As recently occurred with the discovery of the SLC25A38-related sideroblastic anemia, the identification of the genes responsible for as yet uncharacterized forms will provide further insights into mitochondrial iron metabolism of erythroid cells and the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia.

  17. Anemia among school children in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Tamang, Man Kumar; Shakya, Prem Raj; Lamsal, Madhab; Baral, Nirmal

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is one of the most common public health problems in developing countries like Nepal. This study was done to find the prevalence of anemia among the children aged 4-13 years in eastern Nepal. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in four districts (Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam) of eastern Nepal to find the prevalence of anemia among the school children of eastern Nepal. Children aged 4-13 years were selected randomly from different schools of above districts and 618 venous blood samples were collected. Hemoglobin level was estimated by using cyanmethemoglobin method. The mean hemoglobin level was 12.2 ± 1.82 gm/dl. About 37.9% (n = 234) children were found anemic. Anemia prevalence was 42.4% (n = 78), 31.6% (n = 60), 45.3% (n = 48) and 34.8% (n = 48) among school children of Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam district, respectively. The study finds anemia as a significant health problem among the school children of eastern Nepal.

  18. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  19. Neonatal hemolytic anemia due to pyknocytosis.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Martens, Daniëlle; van de Leur, Sjef J; van Wijk, Richard

    2014-12-01

    A newborn boy was referred to our hospital because of hemolytic anemia and severe hyperbilirubinemia. Extensive investigations aimed at determining the cause of hemolysis was initiated at the time of admission and 3 months after blood transfusion. Notably, no intrinsic erythrocyte abnormalities could be detected. The only possible cause explaining the progressive anemia and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia was the finding of pyknocytes, severely distorted erythrocytes, on the blood film at hospital admission. We propose a role for an increased free fraction of plasma unconjugated bilirubin in the formation of pyknocytes through bilirubin membrane toxicity with subsequent anemia and progressive hyperbilirubinemia. Pyknocytosis is a transitory erythrocyte-related condition which can result in severe anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Recognition of pyknocytes by microscopic analysis of a blood film is essential for a correct diagnosis. Treatment consists of correction of the anemia by top-up blood transfusion and light therapy to prevent toxic bilirubin buildup. High levels of free unconjugated bilirubin could be the underlying cause for the formation of pyknocytes.

  20. Management of anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Stamos, Thomas D; Silver, Marc A

    2010-03-01

    Anemia is a relatively common finding in heart failure. Anemia in heart failure patients has been independently associated with reduced exercise tolerance, increased heart failure hospitalizations and increased all-cause mortality. Anemia would appear to be a reasonable treatment target for patients with heart failure. The review will discuss the potential causes of anemia in heart failure patients and give an up-to-date overview of treatment trials. Studies assessing the pathophysiology of anemia in heart failure patients have recently demonstrated the potential importance of iron deficiency, abnormal iron metabolism and hemodilution. Treatment studies have focused on the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, with recent trials showing mixed results. Despite initial studies indicating a possible beneficial effect of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in the treatment of anemic heart failure patients, clinical trial data, to date, have failed to show convincing evidence for morbidity or mortality benefit, and information on the long-term safety is lacking. Ongoing large-scale trials will have the potential to provide such information in the future.

  1. Craving and Chewing Ice: A Sign of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and chewing ice (pagophagia) is often associated with iron deficiency anemia, although the reason is unclear. At least ... ice chewing might increase alertness in people with iron deficiency anemia. Less commonly, other nutritional problems may cause ...

  2. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  3. [Pernicious anemia in an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M; Dumont, C

    2009-04-01

    The most frequent organ-specific autoimmune diseases associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus in children are hypothyroidism and celiac disease. Among adults, other associations exist, notably with pernicious anemia, which is extremely rare in children. We relate the observation of an adolescent with type 1 diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism, admitted for severe anemia in addition to chronic anemia caused by autoimmune gastritis. Blood cell count showed severe aregenerative anemia with pancytopenia, with signs of non-autoimmune hemolysis. Vitamin B12 levels were low, bone marrow aspiration revealed erythroid hyperplasia, and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were positive, providing the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Treatment with intramuscular vitamin B12 produced brisk reticulosis after 6 days, with a subsequent rapid resolution of the anemia. Follow-up of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children requires screening for organ-specific autoimmune diseases; in case of unexplained anemia, autoimmune gastritis must be suggested. It can evolve into pernicious anemia.

  4. Early severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sismanlar, Tugba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Köse, Mehmet; Pekcan, Sevgi; Ezgü, Fatih Süheyl; Budakoğlu, Işıl İrem; Yenicesu, İdil

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study aimed to determine the factors associated with early severe anemia in infants with CF. This study included 231 infants with CF from 3 pediatric CF centers ten year period that were retrospectively reviewed in terms of severe anemia as the first sign of CF. Factors that could affect anemia, such as age, pancreatic insufficiency, mutations, vitamin A and E, and albumin level were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory findings in CF patients that presented with severe anemia and no respiratory symptoms were compared to those in CF patients that did not present with severe anemia. Severe anemia as the first sign of CF was noted in 17 of 231 patients. Patient age, prolonged PT/INR and the albumin level differed significantly between the 2 groups of patients (P < 0.001). Feeding pattern, pancreatic insufficiency, vitamin E and A levels, and the types of genetic mutations did not differ between the 2 groups. The mean hemoglobin level was 5.59 ± 0.21 g/dL and respiratory symptoms began a mean 6.3 months after diagnosis of CF in the anemia group. In early infancy severe anemia in the absence of respiratory symptoms can be the first sign of CF. CF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe anemia in infants. Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF and may be caused due to several reasons. • Severe anemia as a first sign is reported to occur rarely in patients with cystic fibrosis. • Although anemia is well known in cystic fibrosis, factors that cause severe anemia are not known clearly. What is New: • This study shows the importance of severe anemia as the first sign of cystic fibrosis. • Anemia can occur several months before respiratory symptoms in patients with CF.

  5. [Ambroxol-induced immune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Guitard, M; Giannoli, C; Bachet, P; Vial, T

    2006-10-01

    Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia is a rare cause of hemolytic anemia. A 68-year-old male patient developed an acute intravascular hemolysis with acute renal failure. Common causes of hemolysis were ruled out and the patient rapidly improved. An immune mechanism was confirmed by the positivity of the direct antiglobulin test with anti-IgA in the presence of ambroxol only, one of the drug the patient had received during 6 days before hospitalization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ambroxol-induced immune hemolytic anemia. This case also underlined that the direct antiglobulin test should also be performed with anti-IgA to rule out any false negative.

  6. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients.

  8. Determinants of Nutritional Anemia in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Deena; Chandra, Jagdish; Sharma, Sunita; Jain, Anju; Pemde, Harish K

    2015-10-01

    To associate the severity of nutritional anaemia with serum levels of ferritin, vitamin B12 and folate; and to determine demographic, socio-economic and nutritional correlates for nutritional anemia in adolescents. Cross-sectional hospital-based study among 200 adolescents (10-18 y) with anemia. Dietary intake (24-h recall), and serum levels of folate, vitamin B12 and ferritin were estimated. Iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency was present in 30.5% 79.5% and 50% of adolescents, respectively. Statistically significant association was observed between severity of anemia and serum vitamin B12 levels, iron intake, folate intake, Vitamin B12 intake, vegetarian diet, attainment of menarche and history of worm infestation. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies are more common than iron deficiency in anemic adolescents. Low dietary intake of these nutrients seems to be a significant determinant of their deficiencies.

  9. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  10. The prevalence and evolution of anemia associated with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei Won; Kang, Young Ae; Yoon, Young Soon; Um, Sang-Won; Lee, Sang Min; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2006-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) may produce abnormalities in the peripheral blood, including anemia. However, the evolution of TB-associated anemia with short-term combination anti-TB chemotherapy has not been well elucidated. The aim of this study was to characterize TB-associated anemia by clarifying its prevalence, characteristics, and evolution, through involving large numbers of patients with TB. The medical records of adult patients with TB diagnosed between June 2000 and May 2001 were reviewed. Among 880 patients with TB, 281 (31.9%) had anemia on diagnosis of TB, however, the hemoglobin concentration was less than 10 g/dL in only 45 patients (5.0%). Anemia was more frequently associated with the female and old age. Good treatment response, young age (< or =65 yr-old) and initial high hemoglobin were the predictive factor for resolution of anemia. In 202 patients with anemia (71.9%), anemia was normocytic and normochromic. During or after anti-TB treatment, anemia was resolved in 175 (64.6%) out of 271 patients without iron intake. The mean duration of resolution from the initiation of anti-TB treatment was 118.8+/-113.2 days. In conclusion, anemia is a common hematological abnormality in patients with TB and close observation is sufficient for patients with TB-associated anemia, because TB-associated anemia is usually mild and resolves with anti-TB treatment.

  11. Anti-hepcidin therapy for iron-restricted anemias.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Cooke et al demonstrate the potential of a fully human anti-hepcidin antibody as a novel therapeutic for iron-restricted anemias such as anemia of inflammation, cancer, or chronic kidney disease (formerly known as “anemia of chronic diseases”).

  12. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Presenting with Neonatal Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri; Woolfrey, Ann; Fleming, Mark; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  13. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Postpartum anemia I: definition, prevalence, causes, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils

    2011-11-01

    This review provides a status on the definition, prevalence, causes, and consequences of anemia in women who have given childbirth, i.e., postpartum anemia. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia relies on a full blood count including hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum soluble transferrin receptor, which appear to be reliable indicators of anemia and iron status 1 week postpartum while serum transferrin saturation is an unreliable indicator several weeks after delivery. It is recommended that postpartum anemia should be defined by hemoglobin <110 g/L at 1 week postpartum and <120 g/L at 8 weeks postpartum. The major causes of postpartum anemia are prepartum anemia combined with acute bleeding anemia due blood losses at delivery. Normal peripartum blood losses are approximately 300 ml, but hemorrhage >500 ml occur in 5-6% of the women. In healthy women after normal delivery, the prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin <110 g/L) 1 week postpartum is 14% in iron-supplemented women and 24% in non-supplemented women. In consecutive series of European women, the prevalence of anemia 48 h after delivery is approximately 50%. In developing countries, the prevalence of postpartum anemia is in the range of 50-80%. Postpartum anemia is associated with an impaired quality of life, reduced cognitive abilities, emotional instability, and depression and constitutes a significant health problem in women of reproductive age.

  15. Levofloxacin-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young R; Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Probasco, James M; Crawley, Peter G

    2003-01-01

    To report a case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) secondary to levofloxacin. An 82-year-old white man was treated with levofloxacin 500 mg/d for cellulitis. Three days following completion of levofloxacin therapy, the patient presented to the emergency department with severe jaundice, dizziness, and loss of vision. He received packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and was discharged home. Two days later at the follow-up visit, he was diagnosed with AIHA secondary to levofloxacin. The patient was hospitalized and treated with a tapering dose of prednisone and additional PRBC infusion. He was discharged from the hospital in stable condition after 3 days. Repeated hematologic laboratory studies following discharge demonstrated that the hemolytic anemia had resolved. Hemolytic anemia due to levofloxacin is an extremely rare, but potentially fatal, adverse drug event. An objective causality assessment revealed that the adverse reaction was probable. To our knowledge, this is the first published case of levofloxacin-induced AIHA. However, there are published case reports of hemolytic anemia with other fluoroquinolones including ciprofloxacin (n = 12) and temafloxacin (n = 95). Temafloxacin was withdrawn from the market in 1992 due to this adverse effect. The mechanism by which levofloxacin triggers hemolytic anemia is unknown. We believe that an immune-mediated reaction is most likely. Levofloxacin-induced AIHA is a rare but serious complication of therapy. Immediate discontinuation of the offending medication and treatment of the hemolytic anemia are essential. Until more information is available, levofloxacin should not be prescribed for patients with previous reactions to any fluoroquinolone.

  16. Anemia in pregnancy in Western Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Saidah; Earland, Dominique; Sakhuja, Swati; Junkins, Anna; Franklin, Sarah; Padilla, Luz; Aung, Maung; Jolly, Pauline E

    2017-01-01

    Background Anemia is one of the most prevalent problems in pregnancy. In 2011, 29.9% of all pregnant women in Jamaica were diagnosed with anemia. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of anemia in pregnancy in Western Jamaica. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 293 mothers attending post-natal clinics in Western Jamaica. A questionnaire was administered to the mothers, and an abstraction form was used to collect clinical data from the mothers’ records. Results The prevalence of anemia among the women was 37.6%. Younger mothers (aged 18–24 years) were more likely to be anemic compared to those ≥35 years (odds ratio [OR]: 3.44, 95% CI: 1.07–11.06). Mothers who reported not always washing their hands after using the toilet were almost 10 times more likely to be anemic (OR: 9.7, 95% CI: 1.72–54.78) compared to those who reported always washing their hands. Mothers who attended a public facility for antenatal care were 2.3 times more likely to be anemic (OR: 2.31, 95% CI: 1.03–5.18) compared to those who obtained care at a private facility, and mothers who reported being told that they were anemic by a health care provider (HCP) were almost six times more likely to be anemic compared with those who were not told (OR: 5.58, 95% CI: 1.73–17.93). Conclusion The results of the study indicate that early identification and treatment of anemia, especially among younger pregnant women, should be a priority. HCP should ensure that women understand the need to be cured of their anemia and to adhere to preventive hygienic practices. PMID:28652822

  17. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  18. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-18

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10(9)L(-1), haptoglobin <5mg/dL, reticulocytosis, and positive direct antiglobulin test (IgG, C3d, warm). Additional workup revealed serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) <0.01μIU/mL and serum free-T4 (FT4) level 7.8ng/dL. Our patient was diagnosed with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  20. Multiple mechanisms for hereditary sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru

    2002-02-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited anemic disorders which is characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, microcytic hypochromic anemia and typically its X-linked inheritance in patients. It has been shown that a deficiency of the erythroid-specific delta-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS-E) activity is responsible for pyridoxine-responsive HSA in many patients, however, the pathogenesis of other types of HSA remains still unknown. In this article, recent evidence suggesting multiple causes for HSA is summarized and discussed.

  1. Idiopathic aplastic anemia: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Dolberg, Osnat Jarchowsky; Levy, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a disease characterized by pancytopenia and hypoplastic bone marrow caused by the decrease of hematopoietic stem cells. The pathogenesis of AA is complex and involves an abnormal hematopoietic microenvironment, hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell deficiencies and immunity disorders. Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive and biologic drugs, and supportive care. Herein, we will update the main issues concern AA according to our literature review.

  2. Carboxyhemoglobin elevation due to hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Neil B

    2007-07-01

    A critically ill man with drug-induced hemolytic anemia and hepatic failure was hospitalized at a private academic medical center in Seattle, Washington. Intravascular hemolysis with associated endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) production resulted in elevation of the patient's carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level to as high as 9.7%. Serial measurements of the patient's COHb level were obtained and compared with other conventional measures of hemolytic activity. With the availability of new non-invasive measurement technology to detect COHb elevations, emergency clinicians are likely to see COHb elevation as a manifestation of hemolytic anemia.

  3. Megaloblastic anemia presenting with massive reversible splenomegaly.

    PubMed

    Behera, Vineet; Randive, Makarand; Sharma, Praveen; Nair, Velu

    2015-06-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA) is a common disorder with varied manifestations. It generally results in mild to moderate splenomegaly which is due to sequestration of macrocytic erythrocytes in spleen. Massive splenomegaly is generally seen in infections, myeloproliferative diseases, neoplasms, storage disorders or hematological conditions; but is not heard of and has rarely been reported in MA. We discuss a case of massive splenomegaly who presented with symptomatic anemia and was found to have MA. He was extensive evaluated for all other causes of massive splenomegaly which was normal. Further, after a therapeutic trial of MA he showed a regression in spleen size confirming that the massive splenomegaly was attributable to MA.

  4. Prevalence of Anemia among Chinese Rural Residents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Hu, Yichun; Mao, Deqian; Wang, Rui; Chen, Jing; Li, Weidong; Yang, Xiaoguang; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Lichen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the level of blood hemoglobin and the rates of anemia in Chinese rural residents in the 2010–2012 National Nutrition and Health Survey, and the change in its prevalence in rural residents during the last ten years. Our methodology included data from the Chinese Nutrition and Health Surveillance in 2010–2012, where samples were selected through the method of probability proportion to size. The study objects were from 150 sites in provinces, autonomous regions, or municipalities in China. The concentration of blood hemoglobin was determined using the cyanmethemoglobin method. Anemia was judged by the anemia standard recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), combined with elevation correction standard. The level of blood hemoglobin, the prevalence of anemia, and the 95% CI (Confidence interval) value were analyzed using complex sampling weighted processing, combined with the population figures released by the National Bureau of Statistics in 2009. Our results indicate that the level of blood hemoglobin of the Chinese rural area population was 145.92 ± 0.83 g/L, with the prevalence of anemia in the Chinese rural population at 9.7% (95% CI: 9.4%–10.0%). The prevalence of anemia in children 6–11 years old was 5.5% (95% CI: 5.0%–6.0%), 8.1% (95% CI: 7.5%–8.7%) for 12–17-year-old teenagers, 10.0% (95% CI: 9.4%–10.6%) for 18–44-year-old adults, 9.6% (95% CI: 9.0%–10.1%) for 45–59-year-old adults, and 12.6% (95% CI: 11.9%–13.3%) for the elderly above 60 years old. Our conclusion shows that the prevalence of anemia in the Chinese rural population in 2010–2012 had obviously decreased compared to the last decade; however, women of reproductive age and the elderly still had a high prevalence of anemia. PMID:28245576

  5. [Anemia impact on treatments of cervical carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Marchal, C; Rangeard, L; Brunaud, C

    2005-03-01

    During the treatments of carcinomas of the cervix, anemia is relatively frequent and its origin is complex combining often hemorrhage, iron deprivation, inflammatory reactions and infection. The frequency of the primary anemia (hemoglobin level<12 g/dl) is correlated with clinical stage and varies from one publication to another, mainly from 25% for stage I, to 33% for stage II and can approach 40% for stage III. Anemia is correlated with patient survival and it appears to be one of the most powerful prognostic factor after clinical stage and tumor size. Anemia is a bad prognostic factor related to stage and tumor size but it has not been proven to be an independent factor. Anemia increases hypoxia of cervix carcinomas, which is an independent prognostic factor for patients N0. Moreover, we know that the oxygenation of these tumors is correlated with hemoglobin levels. The normalization of Hb levels by transfusion could certainly modify the prognosis of patients anemic before treatment, or of those becoming anemic during radiotherapy treatment. For smokers, anemia is certainly more important that we can appreciate from the Hb levels only, by the presence of carboxyhemoglobin. Concomitant chemotherapies with cisplatin compounds are actually standards and they can largely increase the risk of inducing anemia, therefore more than 50% of patients will experiment it during their different treatments. Transfusion is recommended by the SOR (Standards Options and Recommendations of the Fédération nationale des centres de lutte contre le cancer) under 10 g/dl. The use of erythropoietin is a therapeutic option for Hb levels between 10 and 12 g/dl and strongly recommended after a Hb normalization by blood transfusion. For 70% of patients who respond to erythropoietin, a better control of the Hb level is obtained. The impact of this anemia on quality of life and treatments compliance justifies the use of erythropoietin, especially in cancers for which treatments induce a

  6. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Anemia in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Powell, Harley Robert; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of anemia in stable pediatric renal transplant recipients and to examine the association of anemia with renal function, immunosuppressants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and growth, as well as iron, vitamin B(12), and folate stores. This is a cross-sectional study of the 50 renal transplant recipients currently followed at our center. Patient data were collected regarding hematological parameters, growth, medications, renal function, underlying renal disease, delayed graft function, episodes of rejection, and iron or erythropoietin therapy post transplantation. The mean hemoglobin level (Hb) was 110 g/l and the overall prevalence of anemia was 60%, including 30% who were severely anemic (Hb<100 g/l). There was a high rate of iron deficiency (34%) and serum iron was the parameter of iron metabolism most closely associated with anemia. Hb in patients with low serum iron was 90.7 g/l versus 114.4 g/l in those with normal serum iron ( P<0.01). Both univariate and multiple linear regression determined tacrolimus dose and creatinine clearance to be significant factors associated with anemia. Tacrolimus dose correlated with a 10 g/l reduction in Hb for every increase of tacrolimus dose of 0.054 mg/kg per day ( P=0.001). The dose of mycophenolate was positively correlated with Hb, but this was likely to be confounded by our practice of dose reduction in the setting of anemia. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use was not associated with anemia. Severely anemic patients tended to be shorter, with a mean Z-score for height of -1.8 compared with -0.9 for those with normal Hb ( P=0.02). Anemia is a significant and common problem in pediatric renal transplant patients. Deteriorating renal function is an important cause, but other factors like iron deficiency and immunosuppression are involved. Definition of iron deficiency is difficult and serum iron may be a valuable indicator. Medication doses

  8. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  9. Determining the cause of anemia. General approach, with emphasis on microcytic hypochromic anemias.

    PubMed

    Brown, R G

    1991-05-01

    In the vast majority of cases, the cause of microcytic hypochromic anemia is clearly suggested by the patient history, physical examination results, red cell indexes, and peripheral blood smear. Thus, further diagnostic testing, if necessary, can be very selective. When the underlying cause of anemia is obscure, the serum ferritin concentration should be measured first. If it is normal or increased, serum iron and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels can be determined. The serum iron level is low in anemias caused by iron deficiency and chronic disease but normal or elevated in those resulting from the thalassemias, hemoglobin E disorders, and lead toxicity. The free erythrocyte protoporphyrin level is elevated with iron deficiency, the anemia of chronic disease, and lead toxicity but normal with thalassemias and hemoglobin E disorders. Results of these two test indicate which of the more specific tests is most likely to yield the correct diagnosis.

  10. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia.

  11. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  13. Severe hypochromic microcytic anemia in a patient with congenital atransferrinemia.

    PubMed

    Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Rezaei, Nima; Arzanian, Mohammad Taghi; Alavi, Samin; Khojasteh, Omid; Eghbali, Aziz

    2009-01-01

    Congenital atransferrinemia or hypotransferrinemia is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by a deficiency of transferrin, resulting in hypochromic, microcytic anemia and hemosiderosis. The authors describe a 10-year-old Iranian girl with hypochromic microcytic anemia. The age presentation of anemia was 3 months. Further evaluations indicate severe hypochromic microcytic anemia with decreased serum levels of iron, TIBC, and increased serum level of ferritin in this patient. The serum level of transferrin was decreased. The diagnosis of atransferrinemia was confirmed. Although atransferrinemia is a rare condition, it should be considered in the cases with hypochromic microcytic anemia, decreased serum levels of iron, TIBC, and increased serum level of ferritin.

  14. Update of nutrient-deficiency anemia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Federici, Laure; Serraj, Khalid; Kaltenbach, Georges

    2008-11-01

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level < 13 g/dL in men and < 12 g/dL in women, is an important healthcare concern among the elderly. Nutrient-deficiency anemia represents one third of all anemias in elderly patients. About two thirds of nutrient-deficiency anemia is associated with iron deficiency and most of those cases are the result of chronic blood loss from gastrointestinal lesions. The remaining cases of nutrient-deficiency anemia are usually associated with vitamin B12, most frequently related to food-cobalamin malabsorption, and/or folate deficiency and are easily treated (nutrient-deficiency replacement).

  15. Refractory pancytopenia and megaloblastic anemia due to falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Varun; Maheshwari, Anu; Rath, Bimbadhar; Kumar, Praveen; Basu, Srikanta

    2011-08-01

    Anemia is a common complication in malarial infection. Direct destruction and ineffective erythropoesis does not adequately explain the cause of anemia in malaria. We present a case with refractory megaloblastic anemia with asymptomatic falciparum malaria. We hypothesize that promoter variants in the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene might be the cause of severe refractory megaloblastic anemia and pancytopenia in our patient. Malaria should always be kept in mind as a cause of anemia especially in endemic areas even if the child is asymptomatic or there is no demonstrable parasite on routine smear examination.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  17. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  18. Fanconi anemia proteins in telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jaya; Liu, Yie

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres. Telomeres ensure genome stability by preventing chromosome termini from being recognized as DNA damage. Telomere length homeostasis is inevitable for telomere maintenance because critical shortening or over-lengthening of telomeres may lead to DNA damage response or delay in DNA replication, and hence genome instability. Due to their repetitive DNA sequence, unique architecture, bound shelterin proteins, and high propensity to form alternate/secondary DNA structures, telomeres are like common fragile sites and pose an inherent challenge to the progression of DNA replication, repair, and recombination apparatus. It is conceivable that longer the telomeres are, greater is the severity of such challenges. Recent studies have linked excessively long telomeres with increased tumorigenesis. Here we discuss telomere abnormalities in a rare recessive chromosomal instability disorder called Fanconi Anemia and the role of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in telomere biology. Reports suggest that Fanconi Anemia proteins play a role in maintaining long telomeres, including processing telomeric joint molecule intermediates. We speculate that ablation of the Fanconi Anemia pathway would lead to inadequate aberrant structural barrier resolution at excessively long telomeres, thereby causing replicative burden on the cell. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. [Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: a rare diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Brahem-Jmili, N; Salem, N; Abdelkefi, S; Champ, B Grand; Bekri, S; Sboui, H; Mahjoub, T; Yacoub, S; Kortas, M

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary sideroblastic anemia is a very rare disease recessive and X-linked that affect heme biosynthesis by deficit or decreased of delta aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) activity. We report a case of a six-month-old boy, admitted in the hospital for anemic syndrome. The hemogram showed anemia (hemoglobin: 4.5 g/dL), frankly hypochronic microcytic and a regenerated (mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration: 26 g/dL, mean cell volume: 53 fl, reticulocytes: 10 x 10(9)/L) with red cells morphologic disorders in smears (anisopoikylocytosis) without attack of the other lineages; white blood cells: 11 x 10(9)/L (neutrophils: 64% and lymphocytes: 35%); platelets: 350 x 10(9)/L. Examination of bone marrow showed an important erythroid hyperplasia (about 69%) with dyserythropoiesis. Perls stain revealed intense siderosis with 90% of ringed sideroblasts and a large number of siderocytes. Exploration of ALAS2 and ABC7 genes on the DNA of the infant was not found abnormalities. Treatment with pyridoxine corrects moderately the anemia. By the way, we proposed to remind that iron deficiency, inflammatory syndrome and thalassemia are the common microcytic anemia. However, it's mandatory to explore other causes if diagnosis is not solved.

  20. Investigational drugs in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Kotiah, Sandy D; Ballas, Samir K

    2009-12-01

    Sickle cell anemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases in the world. Patients with sickle cell anemia have variable penetrance and it is hard to predict the risk and timing of complications. It is characterized by a point mutation in the beta-globin gene (GAG --> GTG) and the production of hemoglobin S. The latter leads to decreased deformability of the red blood cells (RBCs) that adhere to endothelia cells culminating in vascular occlusion and its sequelae of tissue ischemia and organ damage. Moreover, sickled RBCs undergo intravascular hemolysis and accelerated erythropoesis. The hallmarks of this disease are shortened RBC survival and vaso-occlusive crises. For the past ten years, the pathophysiology of this disease has been better elucidated and has led to significant improvements in the standard of care. Vaso-occlusion is now understood to be a complex event that involves abnormal interactions between RBCs, leukocytes, endothelial cells and the coagulation pathways. The field of translational research in sickle cell anemia has expanded greatly and has led to new clinical trials with new therapeutic agents and strategies. In this paper, we review the drugs that are now being investigated in the treatment of sickle cell anemia.

  1. Treatment of acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Seiji

    2012-04-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is an uncommon but serious disorder characterized by pancytopenia resulting from non-function of the bone marrow. The incidence of AA is approximately 3 fold more common in East Asia than in Europe and United States where yearly incidence rates are approximately two patients per one million.

  2. Aplastic anemia associated with lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, A. G.; Chaudhry, Z. A.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of fatal aplastic anemia developing in a 50-year-old woman who received lithium carbonate in the generally accepted dosage for a manic-depressive disorder. The serum lithium had been determined at regular intervals and never exceeded what is considered a safe level. Patients for whom lithium is prescribed should have periodic hematologic examinations. PMID:4691107

  3. The anemia of achylia gastrica revisited.

    PubMed

    Hershko, Chaim; Patz, Julian; Ronson, Aharon

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune atrophic gastritis is encountered in 20-27% of patients with obscure, or refractory iron deficiency anemia and is 4 to 6 times more common than celiac disease causing unexplained iron deficiency. The unique clinical features of iron deficiency anemia associated with achlorhydria and mucosal atrophy sparing the gastric antrum have all been accurately described by Faber and others over 100 years ago, including its refractoriness to oral iron treatment, female predominance, relatively young age, increased prevalence of thyroid disease and tendency to progress to pernicious anemia. A significant new development is the relation between autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection. H. pylori per se impairs gastric acid secretion and it is quite likely that a proportion of patients described originally as achylia gastrica represented H. pylori and not autoimmune gastritis. The demonstration of H. pylori antibodies in atrophic gastritis directed against epitopes on gastric mucosal cells implies an autoimmune mechanism triggered by H. pylori and directed against gastric parietal cells by antigenic mimicry of H+K+-ATPase, the most common autoantigen in pernicious anemia. These findings introduce a new element into the 100-year-old saga of achylia gastrica and open new options for its prevention and management.

  4. A short review of malabsorption and anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Monzón, Helena; Forné, Montserrat

    2009-10-07

    Anemia is a frequent finding in most diseases which cause malabsorption. The most frequent etiology is the combination of iron and vitamin B12 deficiency. Celiac disease is frequently diagnosed in patients referred for evaluation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), being reported in 1.8%-14.6% of patients. Therefore, duodenal biopsies should be taken during endoscopy if no obvious cause of iron deficiency (ID) can be found. Cobalamin deficiency occurs frequently among elderly patients, but it is often unrecognized because the clinical manifestations are subtle; it is caused primarily by food-cobalamin malabsorption and pernicious anemia. The classic treatment of cobalamin deficiency has been parenteral administration of the vitamin. Recent data suggest that alternative routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) may be useful in some cases. Anemia is a frequent complication of gastrectomy, and has been often described after bariatric surgery. It has been shown that banding procedures which maintain digestive continuity with the antrum and duodenum are associated with low rates of ID. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection may be considered as a risk factor for IDA, mainly in groups with high demands for iron, such as some children and adolescents. Further controlled trials are needed before making solid recommendations about H. pylori eradication in these cases.

  5. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Philippe, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is diagnosed in the presence of anemia, usually macrocytic and of variable intensity, reticulocytosis, and a positive direct and/or indirect antiglobulin test, after ruling out other types of hemolytic anemia. A positive direct antiglobulin test alone is not sufficient to diagnose AIHA and may be positive in many patients without anemia or negative in some patients with AIHA. AIHA may be classified into two major categories according to the optimal temperature of antibody activity: warm-reacting autoantibodies (usually IgG) optimal around 37 degrees C and cold-reacting autoantibodies, optimal at 4 degrees C (usually IgM). This classification guides the selection of tests and treatment. AIHA is widely reported to be associated with a variety of other diseases, although these associations are often fortuitous. A minimal set of useful investigations is appropriate since AIHA may be secondary to viral infections, lymphoid malignancies, or autoimmune disorders such as lupus. Transfusion should remain rare in AHAI, but close contact with the transfusion service is necessary if it is to succeed. As for many autoimmune and/or systemic diseases, numerous types of treatment have been proposed but have not been validated in controlled multicenter studies. These are necessary to improve the management of these rare disorders.

  6. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  7. Diagnosing and treating severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    McKee, Natasha

    2015-09-01

    Severe aplastic anemia is a disorder of stem cell failure, leading to pancytopenia. The condition is characterized by an impairment of the function of hematopoietic stem cells. Patients typically have fatigue, infections, and increased or unusual bleeding. A bone marrow biopsy establishes the diagnosis. Treatment includes hematopoietic stem cell transplant or immunosuppressive therapy.

  8. Management of anemia in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tim Goodnough, Lawrence; Comin-Colet, Josep; Leal-Noval, Santiago; Ozawa, Sherri; Takere, Jacqueline; Henry, David; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Hohmuth, Benjamin; Bisbe, Elvira; Gross, Irwin; Shander, Aryeh

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is an independent risk factor for adverse patient outcomes. There are no guidelines for management of anemia in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), despite its high incidence. Four objectives were defined by the International Anemia Management and Clinical Outcomes Expert Panel (AMCO), a multinational group of interdisciplinary experts identified by the Society for the Advancement of Blood Management (SABM) to: determine the prevalence of anemia in outpatients; to determine the prevalence of hospital-acquired anemia; to assess the impact of anemia management on clinical outcomes such as quality of life and functional status; and to provide recommendations for primary care physicians and specialists for the diagnosis, evaluation, and management of anemia in patients with CHF. Anemia and iron deficiency were confirmed to be highly prevalent in patients with CHF. Intravenous iron therapy improves anemia, cardiac function and exercise tolerance, leading to improvement in quality of life. Anemia management has been demonstrated to be cost-effective. Clinical care pathways to manage anemia in patients with CHF are recommended as best practices in order to improve patient outcomes. Am. J. Hematol. 92:88-93, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location. PMID:21960747

  10. Risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location.

  11. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  12. Anemia of immobility: caused by adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Payne, Michael W C; Uhthoff, Hans K; Trudel, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Anemia of chronic disease has long been used to classify a non-regenerative, low-grade, chronic, normocytic, normochromic anemia that presents with no obvious etiology. Within this group, some patients have a chronic inflammatory condition that limits erythrocyte generation or access to iron stores. This specific type of anemia has been termed anemia of chronic inflammation. However, a substantial remainder of patients diagnosed with anemia of chronic disease present with no active inflammation. These include many clinical populations with reduced limb loading, such as spinal cord injured patients, astronauts, elderly people with limited mobility and experimental bed-rest subjects. In some populations with decreased mobility, accumulation of fat in the bone marrow has been demonstrated. We hypothesize that adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow both passively and actively impairs erythropoiesis and thus defines a new type of anemia called anemia of immobility. The non-specific umbrella term anemia of chronic disease thus becomes obsolete in favour of either the diagnosis of anemia of immobility or anemia of chronic inflammation according to the distinct mechanism involved.

  13. Characteristics of anemia in subclinical and overt hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Mehmet, Erdogan; Kösenli, Aybike; Aybike, Kosenli; Ganidagli, Sencer; Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Mustafa, Kulaksizoglu

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones stimulate directly or indirectly growth of erythroid colonies through erythropoietin. Anemia is often the first sign of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can cause a wide variety of anemic disorders. Numerous mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of these anemias that can be microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic. We designed this study to investigate the anemia frequency and if present, etiology of anemia in hypothyroid patients. 100 patients with overt hypothyroid, 100 patients with subclinical hypothyroid, and 200 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Overt hypothyroidism diagnosis is done when elevated TSH and low levels of free T4 and/or free T3 have been observed. Subclinical hypothyroidism is defined as elevated serum TSH with normal free T(4) and free T(3) levels. Peripheral smears of the anemic patients were examined. Anemia prevalence was 43% in the overt hypothyroid group, 39% in the subclinical hypothyroid group, and 26% in the control group (p=0.0003 and p=0.021 respectively related to controls). Thus, the frequency of anemia in subclinical hypothyroidism is as high as that in overt hypothyroidism. There was no difference between the hypothyroid groups in terms of anemia. Vitamin B12, Fe, and folic acid were similar between these groups. According to our findings, anemia of chronic disease is the most common type of anemia in hypothyroid patients. Suspicion of hypothyroidism should be considered in anemias with uncertain etiology.

  14. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Martin, Alison; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of “anemia of unknown etiology” and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders. Methods This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient’s anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities. Conclusions We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology. PMID:27310832

  15. Treatment for anemia in people with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan; Peña-Martí, Guiomar E; Comunián-Carrasco, Gabriella

    2011-10-05

    Anemia is common in persons with HIV infection and is associated with poor prognosis. There is a need to assess the effects of anemia treatments, and to determine whether these interventions are beneficial. To determine the efficacy and safety of treatments for anemia in people with HIV infection and AIDS. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 10, 2010), MEDLINE (1980-November 25, 2010), EMBASE (1980-November 25, 2010), LlLACS (1982 to November 25, 2010), Africa Index Medicus (up to November 9, 2010), ISI Web of Knowledge (2005 to October 9, 2010), Scirus (October 9, 2010) reference lists of relevant articles. We asked the Cochrane HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy and Childbirth Groups to check their Specialised Registers. We also checked the reference lists of all trials identified by the above methods. Randomized trials assessing the effects of treatments for anemia in people diagnosed with HIV infection. There were no age restrictions. Two authors independently assessed relevant studies for inclusion. Data extraction and quality assessment of relevant studies was performed by two authors and checked by the other two authors. Six trials with a high risk of bias, including 537 patients, met the inclusion criteria. These trials only covered recombinant Human erythropoietin alfa (rHuEPO). Two of them including adult and paediatric participants (84 participants and 4 events) comparing rHuEPO to placebo did not reduce the risk of mortality with a follow up to 12 weeks (pooled RR 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 4.05, I(2) = 0%). Any trials that compared rHuEPO to placebo did not show any benefit on hematological values response, number of patients transfused, or number of packed red cell transfused. Two trial compared the effects of two rHuEPO dosing regimens on hemoglobin value and quality of life, but the effects are unclear. Three RCT reported high risk of attrition bias; therefore, were not included in a meta-analysis. This

  16. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Firehiwot; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included randomly selected primary school students. Hemoglobin concentration was measured using a Hemocue haemoglobinometer. A child was identified as anemic if the hemoglobin concentration was <11.5 g/dl for children (5-11 yrs) and < 12 g/dl for child older than 12 years age. Poisson regression model with robust variance was used to calculate prevalence ratios. The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.1% (95% CI: 24.98, 29.14): 13.8% had mild, 10.8% moderate, and 2.3% severe anemia. Children with in the age group of 5-9 years (APR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.044-1.124) were at higher risk for anemia. Paternal education (Illiterate, 1.109; 1.044-1.178) was positively associated with anemia. Children who had irregular legume consumption (APR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.022-1.118) were at higher risk for anemia. About a quarter of school children suffer from anemia and their educational potential is likely to be affected especially for those with moderate and severe anemia. Child age, irregular legume consumption, and low paternal schooling were associated with anemia. Intervention programmes aimed to reduce anemia among school children are crucial to ensure proper growth and development of children.

  17. Iron Deficiency Anemia Coexists with Cancer Related Anemia and Adversely Impacts Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Sawhney, Ritica; Varghese, Jeeva; Britto, Madonna; Shet, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related anemia (CRA) adversely affects patient Quality of Life (QoL) and overall survival. We prospectively studied the prevalence, etiology and the impact of anemia on QoL in 218 Indian cancer patients attending a tertiary referral hospital. The study used the sTfR/log Ferritin index to detect iron deficiency anemia and assessed patient QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) tool, standardized for language. Mean patient age was 51±13 years and 60% were female. The prevalence of cancer related anemia in this setting was 64% (n = 139). As expected, plasma ferritin did not differ significantly between anemic (n = 121) and non-anemic cancer patients (n = 73). In contrast, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in anemic cancer patients compared to non-anemic cancer patients (31 nmol/L vs. 24 nmol/L, p = 0.002). Among anemic cancer patients, using the sTfR/log Ferritin index, we found that 60% (n = 83) had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Interestingly, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in cancer patients with CRA+IDA (n = 83) compared with patients having CRA (n = 38) alone (39 nmol/L vs. 20 nmol/L, p<0.001). There was a significant linear correlation between Hb and QoL (Spearman ρ = 0.21; p = 0.001) and multivariate regression analysis revealed that every gram rise in Hb was accompanied by a 3.1 unit increase in the QoL score (95% CI = 0.19–5.33; p = 0.003). The high prevalence of anemia in cancer patients, a major portion of which is due to iron deficiency anemia, the availability of sensitive and specific biomarkers of iron status to detect IDA superimposed on anemia of inflammation, suggests an urgent need to diagnose and treat such patients. Despite the potential negative consequences of increasing metabolically available plasma iron in cancer, our clinical data suggest that detecting and treating IDA in anemic cancer patients will have important consequences to their QoL and overall survival. Clinical

  18. Serum transferrin receptor distinguishes the anemia of chronic disease from iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, B J; Skikne, B S; Simpson, K M; Baynes, R D; Cook, J D

    1992-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the serum transferrin receptor is a sensitive, quantitative measure of tissue iron deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine the serum transferrin receptor's ability to distinguish iron-deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic inflammation and to identify iron deficiency in patients with liver disease. The mean transferrin receptor level in 17 normal controls was 5.36 +/- 0.82 mg/L compared with 13.91 +/- 4.63 mg/L in 17 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (p less than 0.001). The mean serum receptor level was normal in all 20 patients with acute infection, including five with acute hepatitis, and was also normal in 8 of 10 anemic patients with chronic liver disease. Receptor levels were in the normal range in all but 4 of 41 patients with anemia of chronic disease. We conclude that unlike serum ferritin levels, which are disproportionately elevated in relation to iron stores in patients with inflammation or liver disease, the serum transferrin receptor level is not affected by these disorders and is therefore a reliable laboratory index of iron deficiency anemia.

  19. Management of anemia by convective treatments.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Manzoni, Celestina; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Di Filippo, Salvatore; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Anemia secondary to chronic kidney disease is a complex syndrome. Adequate dialysis can contribute to its correction by removing small and possibly medium/large molecules that may inhibit erythropoiesis. A clear relationship among hemoglobin, erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) dose and increase in dialysis dose has been pointed out by a number of prospective and retrospective studies. Increasing attention has also been paid to the relationship between dialysis, increased inflammatory stimulus and ESA response, as dialysate contamination and low compatible treatments may increase cytokine production and consequently inhibit erythropoiesis. As medium/large molecular weight inhibitors can be removed only by more permeable membranes, convective treatment sand, particularly, online treatments, could theoretically improve anemia correction by two mechanisms: higher removal of medium and large solutes (possibly containing bone marrow inhibitors) and reduced microbiological and pyrogenic contamination of the dialysate. Unfortunately, available results are conflicting. Large, prospective, randomized studies on this topic are still needed.

  20. Schilling evaluation of pernicious anemia: current status

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckier, L.S.; Chervu, L.R.

    1984-09-01

    The Schilling examination remains a popular means of evaluating in vivo absorption of vitamin B/sub 12/. When absorption is abnormally low, the test may be repeated with addition to exogenous intrinsic factor (IF) in order to correct the IF deficiency that characterizes pernicious anemia. A dual-isotope variation provides a means of performing both stages of the test simultaneously, thereby speeding up the test and reducing dependence on complete urine collection. In vivo studies indicate that, when administered simultaneously, the absorption of unbound B/sub 12/ is elevated, and IF-bound B/sub 12/ is reduced, in pernicious-anemia patients, relative to the classic two-stage examination. A number of clinical studies indicate significant difficulty in resolving clincial diagnoses with the dual-tracer test. An algorithm is offered for selecting the most suitable variation of the Schilling test to improve the accuracy of test results and the ease of performance.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in infants and toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Keun Young; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ji-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background In Korea, the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among older infants and young children remains high. To detect IDA early and to reduce its adverse impact, we assessed the characteristics of infants and young children who had IDA or were at risk of developing IDA, or who exhibited characteristics associated with severe anemia. Methods Among the 1,782 IDA-affected children aged 6 months to 18 years who visited the hospital, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records and laboratory data of 1,330 IDA-affected children aged 6–23 months who were diagnosed between 1996 and 2013. We excluded patients with a C-reactive protein level ≥5 mg/dL. Results IDA was predominant in boys (2.14:1) during infancy and early childhood. The peak IDA incidence was noted among infants aged 9–12 months. Only 7% patients exhibited symptoms of IDA, while 23.6% patients with severe IDA demonstrated classic symptoms/signs of IDA. Low birth weight (LBW) infants with IDA demonstrated low adherence to iron supplementation. In a multivariate analysis, prolonged breastfeeding without iron fortification (odds ratio [OR] 5.70), and a LBW (OR 6.49) were identified as risk factors of severe anemia. Conclusion LBW infants need more attention in order to increase their adherence to iron supplementation. For the early detection of IDA, nutritional status of all infants, and iron batteries of high-risk infants (LBW infants, infants with prolonged breastfeeding, picky eaters, and/or infants with the presence of IDA symptoms) should be evaluated at their health screening visits. PMID:28090490

  2. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  3. Renal Anemia - Risk Factor for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cană-Ruiu, Daniela; Moţa, E.; Istrate, Natalia; Văduva, Cristina; Trican, Eliza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyze the influence of anemia on renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease. Were monitored for 12 months 165 patients with chronic kidney disease, 96 patients had anemia and a control group of 69 patients had no anemia. A value of hemoglobin under 120 g/L in women and under 130 g/L in men on admission defined anemia. Anemia was associated with a more severe renal damage, a lower residual diuresis, especially in the presence of other risk factors such as diabetes, inflammation or secondary hyperparathyroidism, so early diagnosis and correction of anemia is important for prognosis and evolution of these patients. PMID:24778860

  4. Postdonation Anemia in Living Kidney Donors.

    PubMed

    Shah, S; Lankowsky, B; Gao, T; Zaky, Z; Stephany, B R; Poggio, E D

    2017-10-01

    The effect of nephrectomy on development of anemia in living kidney donation has not been well studied. We hypothesized that the remaining kidney volume and function after donation are determinants of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration and postdonation anemia (PDA). We studied 398 living kidney donors (LKDs) who donated from January 2001 to December 2013. Demographic variables, hematologic variables, renal mass, and renal function were investigated as factors associated with PDA with the use of univariate and multivariable logistical regression analysis. Renal mass was determined from kidney volume measured with the use of computerized tomographic scans. Prevalence of PDA in LKDs was 11.8% at a median follow-up time of 601 days. In univariate analyses, PDA was more prevalent in women than in men (72% vs 28%; P = .048). Age and race were not associated factors. Kidney volume was lower in donors with PDA than in those without PDA (326 ± 52 mL vs 368 ± 70 mL; P < .001). Donors with and without PDA had similar predonation and postdonation glomerular filtration rates. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, total kidney volume and predonation anemia remained as independent factors associated with PDA. PDA is prevalent after living kidney donation, with donor kidney volume and predonation hemoglobin levels being independent determinants for PDA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Anemia and limping in a vegetarian adolescent].

    PubMed

    Chiron, R; Dabadie, A; Gandemer-Delignieres, V; Balençon, M; Legall, E; Roussey, M

    2001-01-01

    A vegan diet in the child and adolescent can induce severe bone sequelae by rickets and osteomalacia and megaloblastic anemia by cobalamin deficiency. A 15-year-old adolescent was hospitalized because of lameness and pallor. The lameness was explained by femoral epiphysiolysis caused by rickets with severe hypocalcemia. The pallor, jaundice and splenomegalia were due to cobalamin-deficiency megaloblastic anemia. A prolonged supplemental diet with calcium, vitamins D and B12 as well as orthopedic treatment stabilized the bone lesions. The megaloblastic anemia was cured by parenteral cobalamin. The adolescent and his brother were victims of a diet imposed by a cult and a lack of care due to their parents refusing that a vegan diet was the cause of the deficient pathology. Penal proceedings led to the incarceration of the parents and to the placement of the children. Deficiencies in calcium and vitamins D and B12 may be severe in a child's development with a vegan diet. This case report reveals the social and legal problems of an inappropriate diet in infancy imposed by parents who are followers of a fundamentalist church. Beyond the management of children in cults, health professionals have to prevent, screen and supplement the deficient diet.

  6. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Gal; Boodhan, Sabrina; Wurman, Ilana; Koren, Gideon; Bitnun, Ari; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Ito, Shinya

    2014-12-01

    To describe a case of ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia (CIIHA) in a 6 year-old boy with sickle cell disease (SCD) and perform a systematic literature review to delineate the clinical and laboratory features of this condition. EMBASE (1947-January 2014), MEDLINE (1946-January 2014), and databases from the US Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada were searched, using anemia, hemolytic anemia, hemolysis, and ceftriaxone as search terms. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. All case reports and observational studies describing clinical and laboratory features of CIIHA were included. A total of 37 eligible reports of CIIHA were identified, including our index case, and 70% were children. Mortality was 30% in all age groups and 64% in children. The majority of patients had underlying conditions (70%), of which SCD was most commonly reported. Previous ceftriaxone exposure was reported in 65%. Common features included elevated lactate dehydrogenase (70%); early, new-onset hemoglobinuria (59%); acute renal failure (46%); positive direct antibody testing (70%); and anticeftriaxone antibodies (68%). Also, 32% had a preceding, unrecognized, hemolytic episode associated with ceftriaxone. Given the common use of ceftriaxone worldwide, knowledge of CIIHA, which often goes undiagnosed until late in the course, is essential for clinicians. Based on the findings of this review, we suggest obtaining past history of ceftriaxone exposures and screening for new-onset hemoglobinuria during ceftriaxone therapy in selected patients as potential methods for early diagnosis of this rare but potentially fatal condition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Renal failure in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Y; Elliott-Mills, D; Powars, D

    1996-12-01

    ESRD is a major complication in young adults with sickle cell anemia. As more patients with sickle cell anemia reach the third and fourth decades of life, the incidence of clinically apparent renal insufficiency will increase. As we understand the pathophysiology of renal damage and the effects of various therapies on the sickle renal vasculature, we can tailor specific management without further compromising already impaired renal function. Diagnostic clues must be recognized prior to the onset of irreversible damage, with appropriate intervention initiated at each age group. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the only available cure for SCA at the present time. The demonstration that several distinct haplotypes of the beta s gene cluster on chromosome 11 influence the clinical expression of sickle cell anemia may be useful in delineating children who are at high risk for severe disease, and hence candidates for such hazardous therapeutic interventions as BMT prior to onset of clinically discernable disease. Current BMT preparative regimens can produce renal cortical and pulmonary toxicity, posing a patient selection problem in those cases in which the vasculopathy of the major organs is at an early stage and might be potentially repairable. Gene therapy without toxic preparative regimens is the ultimate answer. The challenge for the near future is the development of effective early therapeutic intervention during childhood and young adulthood.

  8. Unusual case of thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Tinsa, Faten; Ben Amor, Saadia; Kaabachi, Naziha; Ben Lasouad, Mehdi; Boussetta, Khadija; Bousnina, Souad

    2009-02-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder defined by the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and neurosensoriel deafness, responding in varying degrees to thiamine treatment. Report an unusual case of this rare disorder We report the case of a four-year-old boy who presented unusual features of thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia. In addition to the typical triad of the syndrome, he presented leuconeutropenia, hepatosplenomegalia, cardiac abnormalities including absent P waves, mitral and tricuspid insufficiency, retinitis pigmentosa, nystagmus, developmental delay and a brain Magnetic resonance imaging ischemic lesion. Lactate levels in serum and the lactate/pyruvate ratio were increased. The mitochondrial mutation m.3243A > G located in MTTL1 gene encoding for transfer RNA leucine (tRNALeu(UUR)) was not found. Treatment with thiamine resulted in normalisation of the haemoglobin level, white cell count, and glucose and lactate levels. On three years follow up, the patient did not need insulinotherapy. These data sign the crucial role that thiamine plays for many cells and tissues and its importance in the activity of the respiratory chain.

  9. Bone healing under experimental anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Giglio, M J; Gorustovich, A; Guglielmotti, M B

    2000-01-01

    The effects of anemia on different physiological parameters have been the object of permanent study. There are no studies in the literature on the effects of this disorder on the process on bone healing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, histologically and histomorphometrically, the process of osteogenesis in the post-extraction alvcolus of the lower molar, and in the peri-implant environment of rats. Twenty male Wistar rats (body weight (b.w.): 60 +/- 7 g) were grouped into two experimental sets. The control group (n:10) was given 0.5 mL saline solution i.p. The anemic group (n:10) was injected with 6 mg/100 g of b.w. or 3 mg/100 g b.w. phenylhidrazine, a well known hemolytic agent. Under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia the rats were submitted to extraction of the first lower molars, and to implantation in the tibia in keeping with the "laminar test" procedure. Other parameters, i.e. body weight (b.w.), food intake (FI), hematocrit (Htc), and hemoglobinemia (Hb) were monitored every 48 hs. The results showed a reduction in b.w., FI, Htc and Hb in the experimental group. The histological and histomorphometrical data show that the condition of anemia affects osteogenesis quali-quantitatively in the post-extraction alveolus and peri-implant microenvironment. Both bone reparative situations showed that ostegenesis is "sensitive" to anemia and/or the associated conditions, causing a delay in bone healing.

  10. Cochlear implant and thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hagr, Abdulrahman Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder defined by the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and bilateral sensorineural deafness, responding in varying degrees to thiamine treatment. We report a precedence case for the treatment of deafness associated with the typical triad of thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia in a 4-year-old boy who showed a poor use of preoperative hearing aids but demonstrated significant improvements in hearing ability 1 year after receiving a cochlear implant.

  11. Diabetic acido-ketosis revealing thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bouyahia, O; Ouderni, M; Ben Mansour, F; Matoussi, N; Khaldi, F

    2009-12-01

    Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus and progressive sensorineural deafness. We report the cases of two infants, aged 4 and 5 months, hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis requiring insulin therapy. Laboratory tests revealed megaloblasic anemia, thrombocytopenia and normal thiamine level. Neurosensorial investigations showed bilateral deafness and ophthalmic involvement. Treatment with oral thiamine normalized hematological disorders and controlled diabetes; however, thiamine therapy had no impact on neurosensorial disorders.

  12. Hepcidin expression in anemia of chronic disease and concomitant iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pan-pan; Jiao, Xiao-yang; Wang, Xue-hua; Lin, Jing-hua; Cai, Ying-mu

    2011-03-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone governing mammalian iron homeostasis and may be directly or indirectly involved in the development of most iron deficiency/overload and inflammation-induced anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease. To characterize serum hepcidin, iron and inflammatory indicators associated with anemia of chronic disease (ACD), we studied ACD, ACD concomitant iron-deficiency anemia (ACD/IDA), pure IDA and acute inflammation (AcI) patients and analyzed the associations between hepcidin levels and inflammation parameters in various types of anemia. Serum hepcidin levels in patient groups were statistically different, from high to low: ACD, AcI > ACD/IDA > the control > IDA. Serum ferritin levels were significantly increased in ACD and AcI patients but were decreased significantly in ACD/IDA and IDA. Elevated serum EPO concentrations were found in ACD, ACD/IDA and IDA patients but not in AcI patients and the controls. A positive correlation between hepcidin and IL-6 levels only existed in ACD/IDA, AcI and the control groups. A positive correlation between hepcidin and ferritin was marked in the control group, while a negative correlation between hepcidin and ferritin was noted in IDA. The significant negative correlation between hepcidin expression and reticulocyte count was marked in both ACD/IDA and IDA groups. All of these data demonstrated that hepcidin might play role in pathogenesis of ACD, ACD/IDA and IDA, and it could be a potential marker for detection and differentiation of these anemias.

  13. Anemia Among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang Cojulun, Alicia; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Sutherland, Laura J; Mungai, Peter L; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H

    2015-11-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9-11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia.

  14. Medical and functional consequences of anemia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lipschitz, David

    2003-03-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the elderly, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in this population. It also has a negative effect on quality of life. Recent findings have shown that anemia can lead to cardiovascular and neurological complications, such as congestive heart failure and impaired cognitive function. In addition, anemia has been implicated in functional impairment and falls. Available data have shown that the successful management of this condition will not only improve patients' quality of life, but may also prevent the anemia from worsening.

  15. Predictors of anemia among pregnant women in Westmoreland, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Alyson M.; Campbell-Stennett, Dianne; Yatich, Nelly; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2010-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is a worldwide problem, but it is most prevalent in the developing world. This research project was conducted to determine the predictors of anemia in pregnant women in Westmoreland, Jamaica. A cross-sectional study design was conducted and descriptive, bivariate, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Body mass index, Mid-upper arm circumference, and the number of antenatal care visits showed a statistically significant association with anemia. Based on the results, we believe that maintaining a healthy body weight, and frequently visiting an antenatal clinic, will help to lower the prevalence of anemia among pregnant women in Westmoreland. PMID:20526925

  16. Anemia among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cojulun, Alicia Chang; Bustinduy, Amaya L.; Sutherland, Laura J.; Mungai, Peter L.; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9–11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  17. Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines anemia as the point at which the amount of hemoglobin in the circulation falls below World Health Organization cutoffs for specific age and sex groups. Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the community. The important biomarkers are the automated red cell counts, tests for nutritional deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies, and inflammation. Diseases are important potential initiators of anemia, but biomarkers of specific diseases are not included in this review, only the underlying feature common to all disease - namely, inflammation.

  18. Determinants of Anemia among Preschool Children in Rural, Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Ruth, Laird J.; Oremo, Jared; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Williams, Thomas N.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2013-01-01

    Although anemia in preschool children is most often attributed to iron deficiency, other nutritional, infectious, and genetic contributors are rarely concurrently measured. In a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 858 children 6–35 months of age in western Kenya, we measured hemoglobin, malaria, inflammation, sickle cell, α-thalassemia, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, anthropometry, and socio-demographic characteristics. Anemia (Hb < 11 g/dL) and severe anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL) prevalence ratios (PRs) for each exposure were determined using multivariable modeling. Anemia (71.8%) and severe anemia (8.4%) were common. Characteristics most strongly associated with anemia were malaria (PR: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5–1.9), iron deficiency (1.3; 1.2–1.4), and homozygous α-thalassemia (1.3; 1.1–1.4). Characteristics associated with severe anemia were malaria (10.2; 3.5–29.3), inflammation (6.7; 2.3–19.4), and stunting (1.6; 1.0–2.4). Overall 16.8% of anemia cases were associated with malaria, 8.3% with iron deficiency, and 6.1% with inflammation. Interventions should address malaria, iron deficiency, and non-malarial infections to decrease the burden of anemia in this population. PMID:23382166

  19. [Anemia in workers exposed to lead: update on differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L; Soleo, L; Cassano, F; Elia, G; Schiavulli, N; Martino, M G; Corfiati, M; Bulfaro, D; Apostoli, P

    2005-01-01

    Occupational lead exposure can cause anemia at blood lead levels >50 microg/dl, as high as rarely occurs in industrialized countries nowadays. Whereas other forms of anemia are fairly probable to be found in lead exposed workers, especially in areas highly endemicfor extraoccupational anemias, such as beta thalassemia and iron deficiency anemia. The etiology of anemias has to be correctly defined in order to assess suitable therapeutical approaches and medicolegal consequences. The objective of this study is to verify in male lead exposed workers whether an accurate evaluation of hemocromocytometric parameters and of usual biological indices of lead exposure and effect on heme can differentiate the most common forms of anemia in Southern Italy. 68 workers occupationally exposed to low to moderate lead doses were studied and 59 workers of an alimentary plant have been taken as control group. On venous blood samples collected from these workers a complete hemocromocytometric test was performed and blood lead and erythrocytic zincoprotoporphyrin were determined. Anemia (Hb anemia. Moreover a diagnostic algorithm was developed based on literature that seems to be able to discriminate lead poisoning from other causes of anemia in lead exposed workers in this study.

  20. Nutrient Intake and Anemia Risk in the WHI Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanaway, Jeffrey; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Snetselaar, Linda G.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Arendell, Leslie; Chen, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Background Nutritional anemia among post-menopausal women is preventable; recent data on prevalence are limited. Objective To investigate the association between nutrient intakes and anemia prevalence, in relation to both incidence and persistence, in a longitudinal sample of post-menopausal women. We hypothesized that anemia prevalence, incidence and persistence would be greater among women reporting lower intake of B12, folate and iron. Design Prospective cohort analysis. Participants/setting Observational Cohort of the Women’s Health Initiative(WHI-OS) including 93,676 postmenopausal women, age 50 to 79 years, were recruited across the United States at 40 clinical study sites. Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1998; data collection for these analyses continued through 2000. Main outcome measures Anemia was defined as a blood hemoglobin concentration of <12.0 mg/dL. Persistent anemia was defined as anemia present at each measurement time point. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire for iron, folate, B12, red meat and cold breakfast cereal; inadequacies were based on dietary reference intakes for women over age 50 years. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) were used to characterize the population demographics, anemia rates and diet. Unconditional logistic regression was used to investigate associations between diet and incident and persistent anemia. Associations are presented as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Anemia was identified in 3,979 women or 5.5% of the cohort. Inadequate intakes of multiple anemia-associated nutrients were less frequent in non-Hispanic whites (7.4%) than other race/ethnic groups (inadequacies demonstrated in 14.6 to 16.3% of sample). Age, body mass index and smoking were associated with anemia. Women with anemia reported lower intakes of energy, protein, folate, B12, iron, vitamin C and red meat. Multiple (more than a single nutrient) dietary deficiencies

  1. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40–49 years and 80–85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80–85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003–2004 to 2011–2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention. PMID:27846276

  2. Equine infectious anemia and equine infectious anemia virus in 2013: a review.

    PubMed

    Cook, R F; Leroux, C; Issel, C J

    2013-11-29

    A detailed description of equine infectious anemia virus and host responses to it are presented. Current control and eradication of the infection are discussed with suggestions for improvements to increase their effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Natasha; Duffy, Patrick E.; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to co-infections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world. PMID:24910614

  4. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: the puzzling phenotype.

    PubMed

    Beshlawi, Ismail; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Bashir, Wafa; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Alrawas, Abdulhakim; Wali, Yasser

    2014-03-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is characterized by a triad of megaloblastic anemia, non-type 1 diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness. Other clinical findings have been described in few cases. The SLC19A2 gene on chromosome 1q 23.3 is implicated in all cases with TRMA. Our aim is to discuss the clinical manifestations of all Omani children diagnosed with TRMA and determine genotype-phenotype relationship. Clinical and laboratory data of all patients diagnosed in Oman were retrospectively collected. Mutation analysis of affected families was conducted using two Microsatellite markers. Genotyping was performed with fluorescent-labeled PCR primers. To define the deletion breakpoint region, PCR reactions were carried out using different primer pairs located at the introns 3 and 3'-untranslated region with Expand Long Template PCR kit. A total of six children have been diagnosed with this syndrome. They were five females and one male. They all presented with sensorineural deafness at birth while the age of anemia presentation ranged between 6 weeks to 19 months. They all belong to same family with complex interfamilial marriages and presented with the typical triad. Of interest is the very rare presentation of one patient with Uhl cardiac anomaly (total absence of right ventricular myocardium with apposition of endocardium and pericardium) that has never been described before in patients with TRMA. All patients have a novel large deletion of 5,224 bp involving exons 4, 5, and 6 of SLC19A2. TRMA is a disease of expanding phenotypic spectrum with poor genotype-phenotype correlation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Post-Babesiosis Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Ann E; Montgomery, Mary W; Savage, William J; Achebe, Maureen O; Dunford, Kathleen; Villeda, Sarah; Maguire, James H; Marty, Francisco M

    2017-03-09

    Background Babesiosis, a tickborne zoonotic disease caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus babesia, is characterized by nonimmune hemolytic anemia that resolves with antimicrobial treatment and clearance of parasitemia. The development of warm-antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (also known as warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia [WAHA]) in patients with babesiosis has not previously been well described. Methods After the observation of sporadic cases of WAHA that occurred after treatment of patients for babesiosis, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all the patients with babesiosis who were cared for at our center from January 2009 through June 2016. Data on covariates of interest were extracted from the medical records, including any hematologic complications that occurred within 3 months after the diagnosis and treatment of babesiosis. Results A total of 86 patients received a diagnosis of babesiosis during the 7.5-year study period; 18 of these patients were asplenic. WAHA developed in 6 patients 2 to 4 weeks after the diagnosis of babesiosis, by which time all the patients had had clinical and laboratory responses to antimicrobial treatment of babesiosis, including clearance of Babesia microti parasitemia. All 6 patients were asplenic (P<0.001) and had positive direct antiglobulin tests for IgG and complement component 3; warm autoantibodies were identified in all these patients. No alternative explanation for clinical hemolysis was found. WAHA required immunosuppressive treatment in 4 of the 6 patients. Conclusions We documented post-babesiosis WAHA in patients who did not have a history of autoimmunity; asplenic patients appeared to be particularly at risk.

  6. Neonatal anemia associated with Southeast Asian ovalocytosis.

    PubMed

    Laosombat, Vichai; Dissaneevate, Supaporn; Wongchanchailert, Malai; Satayasevanaa, Benjamas

    2005-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the reliability of the previously described diagnostic criteria for Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO) in adults in the diagnosis of SAO in newborns and to describe the role of SAO in newborn infants presenting with pallor and jaundice. The inclusion criteria in this retrospective descriptive study were that the patient be a newborn with pallor or jaundice and with ovalocytes in the peripheral blood smear (PBS). The exclusion criteria were newborn status with other causes of neonatal hemolysis or anemia. Controls were age-matched newborn infants who did not have SAO or other causes of neonatal anemia or hemolysis. Hematological data were assessed with a hematology analyzer. DNA analysis for SAO band 3 was done by polymerase chain reaction. Among 107 newborn infants with SAO, 30 infants were excluded from the study. The exclusions were premature infants, an infant with congenital syphilis, low-birth-weight infants, infants with ABO blood group incompatibility, infants with 3-thalassemia, infants with hemoglobin E heterozygote or homozygotes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient infants, and infants with fetomaternal hemorrhage. The DNA analysis for SAO band 3 was done in 56 newborns, and 54 had positive results for SAO band 3 gene deletion. Approximately one half of the 54 newborn infants with SAO had hyperbilirubinemia, and 3 had severe hyperbilirubinemia. The mean hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, and red blood cell (RBC) count in the infants with SAO in the first week of life were significantly lower than those in control infants. The mean absolute number of reticulocytes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and red cell volume distribution width in infants with SAO band 3 in the first week of life were significantly higher than those in control infants. The neonatal diagnosis of SAO can be made by examination of RBC morphology in the PBS with the presence of stomatocytes, theta cells, and > or = 25

  7. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; de Winter, Johan P; Medhurst, Annette L; Wallisch, Michael; Waisfisz, Quinten; van de Vrugt, Henri J; Oostra, Anneke B; Yan, Zhijiang; Ling, Chen; Bishop, Colin E; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Joenje, Hans; Wang, Weidong

    2003-10-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage response pathway involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 1,2). A key step in this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in the redistribution of FANCD2 to nuclear foci containing BRCA1 (ref. 3). The underlying mechanism is unclear because the five Fanconi anemia proteins known to be required for this ubiquitination have no recognizable ubiquitin ligase motifs. Here we report a new component of a Fanconi anemia protein complex, called PHF9, which possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vivo. Because PHF9 is defective in a cell line derived from an individual with Fanconi anemia, we conclude that PHF9 (also called FANCL) represents a novel Fanconi anemia complementation group (FA-L). Our data suggest that PHF9 has a crucial role in the Fanconi anemia pathway as the likely catalytic subunit required for monoubiquitination of FANCD2.

  8. Factors Associated with Anemia in the Institutionalized Elderly

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Emanuelle Cruz; Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; Eickemberg, Michaela; Mello, Adriana Lima; Côrtes, Elvira Barbosa Quadros; Feitosa, Caroline Alves; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Ramos, Lílian Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    As a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), anemia affects 25–63% of the elderly. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and its associated factors in the institutionalized elderly. The cross-sectional study was carried out with three hundred thirteen individuals aged ≥ 60 years, of both genders, living in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Poisson regression (PR) with robust variance estimates was used to assess the factors related to anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 38%. Mild anemia was predominant in both genders (male: 26.8%; female: 21.1%), as normocytic and normochromic anemia, with no anisocytosis (69.75%). Anemia was associated with thinness (PR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04–2.72) and with moderate (PR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.07–3.63) and total (PR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.34–5.07) dependence in the final model. Severe dependence exhibited borderline significance (PR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.00–3.77). The prevalence of anemia was high in the institutionalized elderly in both genders, with characteristics suggesting chronic diseases as the causal factor, and the frequency of occurrence was higher in thinness elderly with moderate to total dependence. PMID:27607057

  9. Factors Associated with Anemia in the Institutionalized Elderly.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emanuelle Cruz da; Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; Eickemberg, Michaela; Mello, Adriana Lima; Côrtes, Elvira Barbosa Quadros; Feitosa, Caroline Alves; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Ramos, Lílian Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    As a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), anemia affects 25-63% of the elderly. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and its associated factors in the institutionalized elderly. The cross-sectional study was carried out with three hundred thirteen individuals aged ≥ 60 years, of both genders, living in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Poisson regression (PR) with robust variance estimates was used to assess the factors related to anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 38%. Mild anemia was predominant in both genders (male: 26.8%; female: 21.1%), as normocytic and normochromic anemia, with no anisocytosis (69.75%). Anemia was associated with thinness (PR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04-2.72) and with moderate (PR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.07-3.63) and total (PR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.34-5.07) dependence in the final model. Severe dependence exhibited borderline significance (PR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.00-3.77). The prevalence of anemia was high in the institutionalized elderly in both genders, with characteristics suggesting chronic diseases as the causal factor, and the frequency of occurrence was higher in thinness elderly with moderate to total dependence.

  10. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia with Ferro-Folgamma.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Mihaela Maria

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a hypochromic anemia in which hemoglobin poor synthesis is due to a decrease in the amount of iron in the body. The decrease of iron quantity has many causes: insufficient intake of aliments rich in iron (meat, viscera, green vegetables), increased necessities during growth period, pregnancy, erythrocytes hyperregeneration, high-performance sportsmen, increased loss by digestive way, genito-urinary way, respiratory, hemorrhagic syndromes. Clinically, symptoms and signs specific to all types of anemia and those specific to lack of iron occur besides the symptoms and signs of the underlying disease: atrophic glositis, angular stomatitis, sideropenic dysphagia, pica, skin and nails changes. Laboratory investigations useful for diagnosis are: microcytic, hypochromic anemia, decreased serum iron level, total capacity of iron binding increased, medullar iron store absent, good response to iron therapy. Ferro-Folgamma is one of the most indicated medicines in iron deficiency anemia. Due to its components this medicine has many indications: insufficient alimentary intake concerning iron, folic acid, B12 vitamin, vegetarian alimentation, increased needs during growth period, iron deficiency anaemia secondary to chronic hemorrhages, malnutrition, anemias associated with chronic alcohol intake, preventive treatment of iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia during pregnancy and lactation.

  11. Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Janz, Timothy G; Johnson, Roy L; Rubenstein, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is a common worldwide problem that is associated with nonspecific complaints. The initial focus for the emergency evaluation of anemia is to determine whether the problem is acute or chronic. Acute anemia is most commonly associated with blood loss, and the patient is usually symptomatic. Chronic anemia is usually well tolerated and is often discovered coincidentally. Once diagnosed, the etiology of anemia can often be determined by applying a systematic approach to its evaluation. The severity of the anemia impacts clinical outcomes, particularly in critically ill patients; however, the specific threshold to transfuse is uncertain. Evaluation of the current literature and clinical guidelines does not settle this controversy, but it does help clarify that a restrictive transfusion strategy (ie, for patients with a hemoglobin < 6-8 g/dL) is associated with better outcomes than a more liberal transfusion strategy. Certain anemias may have well-defined treatment options (eg, sickle cell disease), but empiric use of nutritional supplements to treat anemia of uncertain etiology is discouraged.

  12. Acute Psychosis: A Presentation of Cyanocobalamin Deficiency Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, A. K.; Himanshu, D.

    2010-01-01

    Cyanocobalamin deficiency is not rare in India. Patients present with megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia and sometimes neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subacute combined degeneration of the cord, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychotic depression and paranoid schizophrenia are well reported. We are reporting a case of cyanocobalamine deficiency anemia who presented with acute psychosis which readily reversed on cyanocobalamin replacement. PMID:21886392

  13. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. So you know how to treat iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Stanley L

    2015-10-22

    In this issue of Blood, Moretti et al provide data that challenge the entrenched oral treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The paper shows how the newer understanding of hepcidin and iron metabolism in general can lead to very practical improvements in the management of iron deficiency anemia, a disorder that may affect as many as 1 billion people.

  15. Students with Sickle Cell Anemia Participating in Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Matthew D.; Devlin, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The participation of a student with Sickle Cell Anemia in recess can often be both challenging and rewarding for the student and teacher. This paper will address common characteristics of students with Sickle Cell Anemia and present basic solutions to improve the experience of these students in the recess setting. Initially the definition,…

  16. Prevalence of anemia and related factors among women in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Saydam, Birsen Karaca; Genc, Rabia Ekti; Sarac, Fulden; Turfan, Esin Ceber

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of anemia and related factors among women in Turkey. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at the outpatient clinics of the Department of Internal Medicine, Ege University Medical School. Randomly selected women were given questionnaires regarding their socio-demographic and obstetric characteristics. The data were coded and analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 software. Statistical analyses with 95% confidence intervals were considered to be significant if p<0.05. Results: The study results showed an anemia prevalence of 27.8% in the study sample. Among all anemia diagnoses among the participants, 56.0% were determined to have iron deficiency, 37.1% iron-deficiency anemia, and 6.9% severe anemia. It was observed that anemia was detected among women who were 15-49 years of age (p<0.05), menstruating (p<0.05), had a history of Cesarean section (p<0.05), and had not entered menopause (p<0.05). Based on forward-stepwise-logistic regression analysis, the most important parameter was concluded to be age group, which was followed by menopausal status. Conclusions: The study results suggest that the anemia prevalence rate is specifically higher among women of reproductive age. To prevent anemia at a low cost, it is recommended to provide women with relevant information and well-planned interactive educational programs. PMID:28523051

  17. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  18. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  19. Multivariable Discriminant Analysis for the Differential Diagnosis of Microcytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Urrechaga, Eloísa; Aguirre, Urko; Izquierdo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia are the most common causes of microcytic anemia. Powerful statistical computer programming enables sensitive discriminant analyses to aid in the diagnosis. We aimed at investigating the performance of the multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) to the differential diagnosis of microcytic anemia. Methods. The training group was composed of 200 β-thalassemia carriers, 65 α-thalassemia carriers, 170 iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and 45 mixed cases of thalassemia and acute phase response or iron deficiency. A set of potential predictor parameters that could detect differences among groups were selected: Red Blood Cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and RBC distribution width (RDW). The functions obtained with MDA analysis were applied to a set of 628 consecutive patients with microcytic anemia. Results. For classifying patients into two groups (genetic anemia and acquired anemia), only one function was needed; 87.9% β-thalassemia carriers, and 83.3% α-thalassemia carriers, and 72.1% in the mixed group were correctly classified. Conclusion. Linear discriminant functions based on hemogram data can aid in differentiating between IDA and thalassemia, so samples can be efficiently selected for further analysis to confirm the presence of genetic anemia. PMID:24093062

  20. [Evaluation of treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    O'Farrill-Santoscoy, Fernando; O'Farrill-Cadena, Marcela; Fragoso-Morales, Lilia Esperanza

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy is a condition that predisposes women to anemia, a problem which is easily solved with the identification of susceptible patients and with proper treatment. To determine the prevalence of anemia in the study group, the characteristics of the patients, and assess the impact of iron therapy in anemic pregnant women. A retrospective study was done in 98 pregnant patients who attended a medical office in San Luis Potosi, S.L.P, between 2010 and 2011. The studied variables were: hemoglobin and hematocrit concentration for anemia diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info-7 for the association between variables. The prevalence of anemia found in the study was 4.08% in the first weeks of gestation. 75% of those patients were overweight or obese, and as the pregnancy progressed prevalence increased to 16.32%. The patients whose anemia was detected between weeks 28-33 of gestation had 4.58 times the risk of having it than those who were detected in the first trimester (p < .05). While anemia was more frequent among women with overweight or obesity 5% (n = 3), no statistically significant difference with normal weight women was observed in early pregnancy. The prevalence of anemia increased as pregnancy progressed, therefore It is necessary that the physician requests the patient 3 or 4 blood studies to keep adequate prenatal care and have the opportunity for early detection of anemia.

  1. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  2. An Etiologic Profile of Anemia in 405 Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  3. Diagnosing anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: beyond the established markers.

    PubMed

    Oustamanolakis, Pantelis; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    The main types of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of inflammatory etiology, or anemia of chronic disease (ACD). In the management of IBD patients with anemia it is essential for the physician to diagnose the type of anemia in order to decide in an evidence-based manner for the appropriate treatment. However, the assessment of iron status in IBD in many cases is rather difficult due to coexistent inflammation. For this assessment several indices and markers have been suggested. Ferritin, seems to play a central role in the definition and diagnosis of anemia in IBD and transferrin, transferrin saturation (Tsat), and soluble transferrin receptors are also valuable markers. All these biochemical markers have several limitations because they are not consistently reliable indices, since they are influenced by factors other than changes in iron balance. In this review, in addition to them, we discuss the newer alternative markers for iron status that may be useful when serum ferritin and Tsat are not sufficient. The iron metabolism regulators, hepcidin and prohepcidin, are still under investigation in IBD. Erythrocytes parameters like the red cell distribution width (RDW) and the percentage of hypochromic red cells as well as reticulocyte parameters such as hemoglobin concentration of reticulocytes, red blood cell size factor and reticulocyte distribution width could be useful markers for the evaluation of anemia in IBD.

  4. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies.

  5. Carriers of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Coggins, L

    1984-02-01

    Presently available data continue to support the idea that once a horse is infected with equine infectious anemia virus it remains infected indefinitely. Infection may not always be demonstrated by inoculation of plasma, serum, or whole blood transfusions into susceptible recipients, but transfusions of fresh whole blood will be infective in at least 95% of the horses testing positive in the agar gel immunodiffusion test. For detection of infectivity in a small percentage of inapparent carriers, it appears necessary to inoculate washed leukocytes collected over a period of time.

  6. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with mesenteric teratoma].

    PubMed

    Ntanishyan, K I; Sabirov, K R; Shcherbakova, O V; Vybornykh, D E; Shupletsova, I A; Tsvetaeva, N V

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in a 27-year-old woman whose examination revealed mesenteric teratoma. AIHA was characterized by a hypertensive crisis and a temporary response to corticosteroid therapy that was complicated by the development of somatogenic psychosis and discontinued. A relapse of hemolysis developed 6 months later. The patient underwent laparoscopic splenectomy and removal of mesenteric root teratoma. Immediately after surgery, a hematological response was obtained as relief of hemolysis and restoration of a normal hemoglobin level. There is a sustained remission of AIHA for the next 16 months.

  7. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Anemia of chronic disorder - pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment].

    PubMed

    Demarmels Biasiutti, Franziska

    2010-05-01

    After iron deficiency anemia the anemia of chronic disorder is the second most frequent anemia, and in hospitalized patients and/or patients suffering from chronic disease, especially infection, cancer and autoimmune disorders it is even the most frequent anemia. Morphologically it belongs to the normochromic, normocytic, hyporegeneratoric anemias. Pathogenetically it is induced by the upregulation of hepcidin, a recently detected acute phase protein with most important regulatory function in the iron-household. As a consequence of elevated hepcidin at the same time iron absorption in the bowel as well as iron release from macrophages are reduced, resulting in sequestration of iron in the RES and therefore functional iron deficiency. The other reason is a blunted release of erythropoetin (EPO) with at the same time reduced effectiveness due to down-regulation of EPO-receptors on erythroid cells. Treatment consists first of all in the therapy of the underlying disease and possibly in the combined application of EPO and iron.

  9. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  10. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-06-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes.

  11. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-06-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated.

  12. Management and prevention of neonatal anemia: current evidence and guidelines.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, Jeannette S; Lopriore, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal anemia is a common disorder, particularly in (very) preterm neonates. Management of neonatal anemia is based principally on red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Although the use of blood products is nowadays widespread in neonatal medicine, evidence on the potential benefit is extremely limited. Recent studies suggest that RBC transfusions in newborns may be associated with an increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, transfer of infectious agents and negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. Whether the benefits of RBC transfusions outweigh the risks is controversial and requires further studies. In this review, we summarize the current evidence on the management of neonatal anemia and compare the various international guidelines. In addition, we discuss the various strategies to prevent neonatal anemia and reduce the need for RBC transfusions and discuss important trials currently enrolling patients to improve the management in neonatal anemia.

  13. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  15. Anemia and hemoglobin levels among Indigenous Xavante children, Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aline Alves; Santos, Ricardo Ventura; Souza, July Anne Mendonça de; Welch, James R; Coimbra, Carlos E A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of anemia, mean hemoglobin levels, and the main nutritional, demographic, and socioeconomic factors among Xavante children in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. A survey was conducted with children under 10 years of age in two indigenous Xavante communities within the Pimentel Barbosa Indigenous Reserve. Hemoglobin concentration levels, anthropometric measurements, and socioeconomic/demographic data were collected by means of clinical measurements and structured interviews. The cut-off points recommended by the World Health Organization were used for anemia classification. Linear regression analyses with hemoglobin as the outcome and Poisson regression with robust variance and with the presence or absence of anemia as outcomes were performed (95%CI). Lower mean hemoglobin values were observed in children under 2 years of age, without a significant difference between sexes. Anemia was observed among 50.8% of children overall, with the highest prevalence among children under 2 years of age (77.8%). Age of the child was inversely associated with the occurrence of anemia (adjusted PR = 0.60; 95%CI 0.38-0.95) and mean hemoglobin values increased significantly with age. Greater height-for-age z-score values reduced the probability of having anemia by 1.8 times (adjusted PR = 0.59; 95%CI 0.34-1.00). Presence of another child with anemia within the household increased the probability of the occurrence of anemia by 52.9% (adjusted PR = 1.89; 95%CI 1.16-3.09). Elevated levels of anemia among Xavante children reveal a disparity between this Indigenous population and the national Brazilian population. Results suggest that anemia is determined by complex and variable relationships between socioeconomic, sociodemographic, and biological factors.

  16. Hypocholesterolemia in chronic anemias with increased erythropoietic activity.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Knobler, Hilla; Tamary, Hannah

    2007-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemia of unknown etiology has been previously described in various chronic anemias. Few small studies also suggested that those patients have a lower incidence of atherosclerotic events. The aim of our study was to determine the extent of hypocholesterolemia in various types of anemias. We studied 59 patients with chronic anemias associated with high-erythropoietic activity (thalassemia intermedia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, congenital spherocytosis), 8 patients with low-erythropoietic activity anemias (acquired aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia), and 20 healthy controls. Mean serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (STR), and serum erythropoietin levels were determined in each patient. All patients with chronic anemia and increased erythropoietic activity had hypocholesterolemia, whereas none of those with low erythropoietic activity was hypocholesterolemic. Mean serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels were found to be significantly lower in the high-erythropoietic activity group (80+/-19 mg/dl; 31+/-10 mg/dl; 35+/-14 mg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.001, respectively) and the low-erythropoietic activity group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.01, respectively). Significant inverse correlation (R2=0.507) was observed between serum cholesterol and STR levels, which in the absence of iron deficiency reflect bone marrow activity. Taken together, our results imply that hypocholesterolemia accompanies anemias with high-erythropoietic activity. We suggest that the high-erythropoitic activity-associated hypocholesterolemia is due to increased cholesterol requirements by the proliferating erythoid cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and the possible clinical consequences of this phenomenon.

  17. Clozapine and anemia: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimmy; Bies, Robert; Bhaloo, Amaal; Powell, Valerie; Remington, Gary

    2015-12-01

    Clozapine's association with agranulocytosis led to the implementation of stringent and mandatory hematologic monitoring guidelines in most countries. Although other hematologic aberrations such as eosinophilia and neutropenia have been previously described, clozapine's impact on the erythroid lineage has not been studied. There is a suspicion that a higher rate of anemia is observed in patients receiving clozapine; therefore, we hypothesized that there would be a higher rate of anemia in patients receiving clozapine therapy. All individuals initiated on clozapine at our center from 2009 to 2010 were recruited. Information on age, gender, medical comorbidities, and smoking status was extracted from the medical records. Data from complete blood counts over a 2-year follow-up period were extracted, with anemia defined as a hemoglobin value below 120 g/L for women and 130 g/L for men. Time to anemia event was calculated and Cox regression was employed to identify predictors of anemia. We found a high incidence of anemia in the first 2 years following clozapine initiation; of the 94 individuals (68 men, 26 women) recruited, 23 (24.5%) developed anemia. Higher baseline hemoglobin level (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.86, P = .002) and smoking status (HR = 0.21, P = .021) were identified as significant protective factors against anemia in men but not in women (HR = 0.92, P = .184, and HR = 0.52, P = .467 for baseline hemoglobin and smoking, respectively). Although smoking appears to lower the risk of anemia, we believe this is due to smoking's up-regulation of hemoglobin levels. Further studies are warranted in light of the present findings; for example, we cannot exclude the possibility that anemia was an epiphenomenon, characterizing instead a population with severe mental illness. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Socio-economic and demographic determinants of childhood anemia.

    PubMed

    Goswmai, Sankar; Das, Kishore K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate socio-economic and demographic determinants of anemia among Indian children aged 6-59 months. Statistical analysis was performed on the cross-sectional weighted sample of 40,885 children from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey by using multinomial logistic regression to assess the significance of some risk factors in different degrees of child anemia. Anemia was diagnosed by World Health Organization (WHO) cut-off points on hemoglobin level. Pearson's chi-squared test was applied to justify the associations of anemia with different categories of the study population. The prevalence of anemia was 69.5%; 26.2% mild, 40.4% moderate, and 2.9% severe anemia. Overall prevalence rate, along with mild and moderate cases, showed an increasing trend up to 2 years of age and then decreased. Rural children had a higher prevalence rate. Of 28 Indian states in the study, 10 states showed very high prevalence, the highest being Bihar (77.9%). Higher birth order, high index of poverty, low level of maternal education, mother's anemia, non-intake of iron supplements during pregnancy, and vegetarian mother increased the risks of all types of anemia among children (p<0.05). Christian population was at lower risk; and Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, and Other Backward Class categories were at higher risk of anemia. The results suggest a need for proper planning and implementation of preventive measures to combat child anemia. Economically under-privileged groups, maternal nutrition and education, and birth control measures should be priorities in the programs. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Diamond-Blackfan anemia, ribosome and erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, L. Da; Moniz, H.; Simansour, M.; Tchernia, G.; Mohandas, N.; Leblanc, T.

    2010-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (5 to 7 cases/million live births) characterized by an are generative, usually macrocytic anemia with an absence or less than 5% of erythroid precursors (erythroblastopenia) in an otherwise normal bone marrow. The platelet and the white cell counts are usually normal but neutropenia, thrombopenia or thrombocytosis have been noted at diagnosis. In 40 to 50% of DBA patients, congenital abnormalities mostly in the cephalic area and in thumbs and upper limbs have been described. Recent analysis did show a phenotype/genotype correlation. Congenital erythroblastopenia of DBA is the first human disease identified to result from defects in ribosomal biogenesis. The first ribosomal gene involved in DBA, ribosomal protein (RP) gene S19 (RPS19 gene), was identified in 1999. Subsequently, mutations in 12 other RP genes out of a total of 78 RP genes have been identified in DBA. All RP gene mutations described to date are heterozygous and dominant inheritance has been documented in 40 to 45% of affected individuals. As RP mutations are yet to be identified in approximately 50% of DBA cases, it is likely that other yet to be identified genes involved in ribosomal biogenesis or other pathways may be responsible for DBA phenotype. PMID:20655265

  20. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  1. Anemia and erythropoietin in space flights.

    PubMed

    De Santo, Natale G; Cirillo, Massimo; Kirsch, Karl A; Correale, Giacomo; Drummer, Christian; Frassl, Waltraud; Perna, Alessandra F; Di Stazio, Enzo; Bellini, Luigi; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2005-11-01

    Since the very early manned missions in space, a state of anemia associated with reduced erythropoietin levels and reduced plasma volume was disclosed. The reduction in red blood cell mass is driven by a process of selective hemolysis, which has been named neocytolysis. This phenomenon also occurs in people living at a high altitude who descend rapidly to sea level. The origin of the signal leading to destruction of newly produced red blood cells probably is located in central circulation, but the operating mechanism is unknown. The importance of plasma cell volume reduction in the genesis of a lower red cell mass also is supported by the inverse correlation seen at moderate altitude. People arriving at moderate altitude have increased erythropoietin concentration that decreases after a few days and is in inverse correlation with central venous pressure. Studies under simulated microgravity conditions in human beings (bed rest, head-down tilt at -6 degrees , water immersion) and in rats provide further insight in unraveling the mechanism of astronauts' anemia, a problem difficult to study in space because of the limited availability of spaceflights.

  2. Erythremia with special reference to sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Taki, T; Wakabayashi, T; Kishimoto, H

    1980-07-01

    An autopsy case of erythremia with sideroblastic tumor cell proliferation is described. A 60-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to general fatigue and anorexia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed abnormalities in erythropoiesis (megaloblasts, 4%; sideroblasts, 84%; ring-formed, 39%, and PAS-positive, 5%). Therapy was directed to pulmonary tuberculosis. Anemia was not improved despite repeated whole blood and platelet transfusions. Serum iron and percentage saturation of the total iron-binding capacity rose during the course. Administration of vitamin B12, B6 or folic acid was inefffective. INAH was replaced by its derivative, IHMS, during the course, but the population of sideroblasts especially of ring-sideroblasts was invariably large (78%-100% and 39%-65% for total sideroblasts and ring-sideroblasts, respectively). He died with increasing abdominal pain and jaundice after three months' hospitalization. Main autopsy findings were: diffuse proliferation of atypical erythroblasts in the bone marrow, systemic lymph nodes, liver, spleen and kidneys. Most of the cells positively stained with iron. Tuberculosis of lungs with cavity formation. Discussion is focussed on the relationship between erythremia and sideroblastic anemia.

  3. Supplementary iron dose in pregnancy anemia prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Reddaiah, V P; Raj, P P; Ramachandran, K; Nath, L M; Sood, S K; Madan, N; Rusia, U

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the optimum dose of supplemental iron for prophylaxis against pregnancy anemia. One hundred and ten pregnant women were randomly allocated to three groups: Group A receiving equivalent of 60 mg, group B 120 mg and Group C 240 mg, elemental iron as ferrous sulphate daily; the content of folic acid was constant in all the three groups (0.5 mg). These women had at least consumed 90 tablets in 100 +/- 10 days. Blood was drawn at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Fifty percent were anemic (less than 11 g/100 ml). The hemoglobin levels rose similarly in all groups and the differences were statistically not significant. Fifty-six percent had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin value less than 12 micrograms/l) at the beginning of the study. Following therapy a statistically significant increase in iron stores was observed in group B and C as compared to group A. The difference between group B and C was not significant. The side effects increased with increasing doses of iron; 32.4%, 40.3% and 72% in group A, B and C respectively. Based on these findings, the authors advocate that optimum dose of iron should be 120 mg instead of 60 mg as is currently being used in the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme.

  4. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajat; Bonfim, Carmem; George, Biju

    2017-09-04

    Improvements in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with better donor selection, conditioning regimens and graft vs. host disease prophylaxis make it reasonable to move HCT earlier in the algorithm for management of severe aplastic anemia (SAA). Recent progress in transplantation is reviewed whereas issues related to developing countries are also addressed. Multiple research centers are reporting on clonality, mutations and RK1 telomere disorders in SAA, which may help to choose the most appropriate therapy upfront. Eltrombopag, in combination with immunosuppressive therapy (IST), has shown remarkable improvement over historical IST, and long-term follow-up is awaited. In younger patients and in experienced centers, matched unrelated-donor (MUD) and related haploidentical transplants (haplo-HCT) are being reported with survival approaching that seen with sibling transplants. Literature from resource-limited countries highlight the need to modify guidelines to make them affordable and cost-effective. Bone marrow remains the graft source of choice; peripheral blood stem cells may be acceptable in special circumstances in resource-constrained countries. The potential of novel research findings and new therapeutic trials should be maximized by validation in different centers, countries and patient populations to provide personalized care to patients with aplastic anemia.

  5. Initial diagnosis of anemia from sore mouth and improved classification of anemias by MCV and RDW in 30 patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shin-Yu; Wu, Hong-Cheng

    2004-12-01

    Thirty patients with a wide range of sore mouth that led to the diagnosis of iron deficiency in 12 patients, pernicious anemia in 8 patients, combined deficiency of iron and vitamin B12 in 2 patients, and anemia of chronic disease in 8 patients were investigated. The oral signs and symptoms included glossitis, glossodynia, angular cheilitis, recurrent oral ulcer, oral candidosis, diffuse erythematous mucositis, and pale oral mucosa. The values of hemoglobin in 30 patients varied from normal to severe life-threatening levels, but none had developed generalized symptoms sufficiently advanced to arouse suspicions of anemia before they visited the Oral Medicine Clinic. The aim of this paper is to describe a retrospective study of 30 patients with oral changes as the initial manifestation of nutritional deficiency or anemia of chronic diseases. Improved diagnosis and classification of anemia based on the mean and heterogeneity of red cell size will be discussed.

  6. ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY: IMPACT ON WEIGHT AND IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANEMIA IN NEWBORN.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Solange Augusta; Willner, Erica; Duraes Pereira, Tatiane Aguiar; de Souza, Vanessa Rosse; Teles Boaventura, Gilson; Blondet de Azeredo, Vilma

    2015-11-01

    nutritional deficiencies are still a common problem during pregnancy causing anemia. Gestational anemia is still considered a public health problem in Brazil, because it is hazardous to both mother and fetus, and is associated with increased risk of maternal-fetal morbidity, as well as the nutritional status of child. to evaluate the frequency of maternal gestational anemia in newborns and its relation to the nutritional status of the child at birth. anthropometric data of pregnant women and their newborns were obtained. Blood was collected from pregnant women and the umbilical cord of newborns for analysis of hemoglobin, hematocrit, RDW, iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation index in automatic devices. The results are presented such as the arithmetic mean and the standard deviation. GraphPadinStat Software version 3.0 was used, with a maximum significance level of 5%. the frequency of maternal anemia was 53.7%, and 32.6% in newborns. Half the newborns were anemic children of anemic mothers. 79.3% of the anemic pregnant women had mild anemia and in 20.7% moderate. The average concentration of hemoglobin and hematocrit was lower in anemic pregnant women (9.7 ± 0.9 g/dL and 29.8 ± 3.2%) compared with non-anemic (11.9 ± 0.7 g/ dL and 36.5 ± 2.7%). The maternal iron was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.3889, p = 0.01) from umbilical cord blood. The newborns' weight, length and head circumference of anemic mothers were 3 375.9 ± 506,9 g, 51.2 ± 1.7 cm and 34.5 ± 1.5 cm, respectively, while of nonanemic mothers were 3 300.2 ± 458,4 g, 50.3 ± 2.0 cm and 34.2 ± 2.0 cm, respectively. There were no significant correlations between maternal hemoglobin, iron and ferritin with weight, length and head circumference of newborns. the results of this study show that maternal iron deficiency anemia (mild to moderate) can affect the blood profile and iron concentrations in umbilical cord blood of newborns, but without interfering with the child

  7. Risk of infant anemia is associated with exclusive breast-feeding and maternal anemia in a Mexican cohort.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Altaye, Mekibib; Ortega-Gallegos, Hilda; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2006-02-01

    The WHO recommends exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) for the first 6 mo of life to decrease the burden of infectious disease. However, some are concerned about the effect of EBF >6 mo on iron status of children in developing countries in which anemia is prevalent. This study examines the risk of anemia in relation to the duration of EBF and maternal anemia in a birth cohort studied between March 1998 and April 2003. All infant birth weights were >or=2.2 kg. All mothers received home-based peer counseling to promote EBF. Infant feeding data were collected weekly. Nurses measured hemoglobin (Hb) values every 3 mo. Hb was measured in 183 infants at 9 mo of age. Anemia at 9 mo was defined as a Hb value <100 g/L. EBF was defined by WHO criteria and ranged in duration from 0 to 31 wk. At 9 mo, Hb (mean +/- SEM) was 114 +/- 0.9 g/L; 23 children (12.5%) had Hb levels <100 g/L. EBF >6 mo, but not EBF 4-6 mo, was associated with increased risk of infant anemia compared with EBF <4 mo (odds ratio=18.4, 95% CI=1.9, 174.0). Maternal anemia was independently (P=0.03) associated with a 3-fold increased risk of infant anemia. These associations were not explained by confounding with other maternal or infant factors. By linear regression, a lower infant Hb at 9 mo was associated with increased EBF duration among mothers who had a history of anemia (beta=-0.07, P=0.003), but not among mothers with no history of anemia. Infants who are exclusively breast-fed for >6 mo in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia, especially among mothers with a poor iron status; greater attention to this issue is warranted.

  8. Hypocholesterolemia and nonregenerative, suspected immune-mediated, anemia: Report of 3 canine cases.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rachel; Viviano, Katrina R

    2017-10-01

    This report describes hypocholesterolemia in 3 dogs with nonregenerative, suspected immune-mediated anemias. Common causes of hypocholesterolemia were ruled out, raising suspicion for a mechanistic link between anemia and hypocholesterolemia in dogs. As observed in humans with concurrent anemia and hypocholesterolemia, cholesterol concentrations increased to within the reference interval once the dogs' anemia resolved.

  9. [Iron deficency and anemia among donors in Kinshassa].

    PubMed

    Nzengu-Lukusa, Franck; Yuma-Ramazani, Sylvain; Sokolua-Mvika, Eddy; Dilu-Keti, Angèle; Malenga-Nkanga, Blanchard; Shuli, Jean Baptiste; Nzongola-Nkasu, Donatien Kayembe; Mbayo-Kalumbu, Ferdinand; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve

    2016-01-01

    In the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the practice of blood transfusion is common with more than two hundred thousand one million blood donation per year has been made between 2007 and 2011. However, no report on iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia as a result of a donation blood in DS is available in this country. This study aimed to estimate the extend of iron deficiency, anemia and iron deficiency anemia in volunteer blood donors (DS) in the National Blood Transfusion Center (CNTS) in Kinshasa, DRC. A cross-sectional study was conducted in CNTS where Kinshasa volunteer blood donors were included. Socio demographic information and blood samples were collected. Hematological parameters and Serum ferritin was assessed using respectively standard colorimetric and ELISA techniques. A total of 386 DS were included in this study. The prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia were respectively 63.2% (244/386) and 25.9% (100/386) of DS. Anemia was found in 36.5% (141/386) at the time of blood donation. Anemia, iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia are highly prevalent among blood donors in Kinshasa, DRC. Hence the needs to review the screening tests for the selection of blood donors and also include serum ferritin measurement for the routine assessment of blood donors, especially among regular blood donors.

  10. [Iron deficiency and pernicious anemia: a rare association?].

    PubMed

    Zulfiqar, Abrar-Ahmad; Dramé, Moustapha; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Novella, Jean-Luc; Vogel, Thomas; Andres, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency among patients with pernicious anemia. We realized a retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 including 55 patients suffering from pernicious anemia who were followed in Reims and Strasbourg university hospitals. Inclusion criteria were histological diagnosis of immune atrophic fundic gastritis and criteria of gastric autoimmuninty, and for which ferritin was measured. Iron deficiency is defined as serum ferritin level <20 μg/L in women and <30 μg/L in men. 45 (81.8%) patients were female. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years (range: 25/98).There was anemia in 32 patients (58.2%). Macrocytosis was noted, with or without anemia, in 30 patients (54.5%); microcytosis, with or without anemia, was noted in 8 (14.5%) patients. 17 patients (30.9%) had normal mean corpuscular volume. Vitamin B12 deficiency was objectived in 42 patients (76.4%) in our series. 16 patients (29%) had iron deficiency. 14 patients were female. They were significantly younger than female subjects without iron deficiency (p =0.004). In conclusion, iron deficiency is not rare in patients with pernicious anemia. It could be a complication of achlorhydria. We suggest a dosage of serum ferritin for all patients with pernicious anemia.

  11. Prevalence of anemia in First Nations children of northwestern Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, E. A.; Caulfield, L. E.; Harris, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among First Nations children of northwestern Ontario. DESIGN: Retrospective review of all hemoglobin determinations between 1990 and 1992 in the Sioux Lookout Zone. SETTING: The Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital, a secondary care referral hospital for 28 remote First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario, affiliated with the University of Toronto's Sioux Lookout Program. PARTICIPANTS: All First Nations children age 3 to 60 months who had produced venipuncture or fingerprick blood samples between 1990 and 1992 (614 children had a total of 1223 hemoglobin determinations). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of anemia by age, sex, geographical location, and diagnosis. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin value less than 110g/L. RESULTS: Prevalence of anemia peaked in the age range of 6 to 24 months with prevalence rates of 51.7% to 79.3%. Conditions most commonly associated with anemia were respiratory tract infections. Children living in communities in the western part of the Sioux Lookout Zone were 1.64 times more likely to have anemia (95% confidence interval 1.15, 2.35) than children in the other communities. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia appears to be a serious public health problem among preschool children in the Sioux Lookout Zone. PMID:9111982

  12. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina'am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-07-31

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0-5, 5-11, 12-14, 15-19, 20-49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5-11 years) and 9% (12-14 years) and 23% (15-19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence.

  13. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  14. Stimulating erythropoiesis in inflammatory bowel disease associated anemia

    PubMed Central

    Tsiolakidou, Georgia; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and is associated with decreased quality of life and increased rate of hospitalization. The primary therapeutic targets of IBD-associated anemia are iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. An important prognostic parameter of the success or failure of therapy is the outcome of the underlying disease. Iron deficiency should be appropriately managed with iron supplementation. However, the use of oral iron therapy is limited by several problems, the most important being gastrointestinal side effects leading occasionally to disease relapse and poor iron absorption. Intravenous iron preparations are more reliable, with iron sucrose demonstrating the best efficacy and tolerability. Treatment with erythropoietin or darbepoetin has been proven to be effective in patients with anemia, who fail to respond to intravenous iron. Patients with ongoing inflammation have anemia of chronic disease and may require combination therapy comprising of intravenous iron sucrose and erythropoietin. After initiating treatment, careful monitoring of hemoglobin levels and iron parameters is needed in order to avoid recurrence of anemia. In conclusion, anemia in the setting of IBD should be aggressively diagnosed, investigated, and treated. Future studies should define the optimal dose and schedule of intravenous iron supplementation and appropriate erythropoietin therapy in these patients. PMID:17828809

  15. Prevalence of anemia among urban school children of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Verma, M; Chhatwal, J; Kaur, G

    1998-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of anemia among urban school children of Punjab. Cross sectional study. Urban schools of Ludhiana, Punjab. Two thousand school children of 5-15 years age. Relevant history was taken and a complete physical examination done in all the children. Hemoglobin was estimated using cynmethemoglobin method and peripheral blood smears were also examined. Anemia was diagnosed when hemoglobin was less than 11 g/dl for children of 5-6 years age and 12 g/dl for more than 6 years age. Overall prevalence of anemia was 51.5%. Girls had a significantly higher prevalence of anemia except at 5 years and 10-12 years age. More menarcheal girls were anemic as compared to non-menarcheal ones. The prevalence of anemia was high (38%) even in higher socioeconomic groups. Nearly half (47.6%) of well nourished children were anemic. The mean Hb also was lower than expected normal values in both nutritional groups. Compared to non-vegetarians (38%), more vegetarians (65.9%) were anemic. The commonest blood picture seen was microcytic hypochromic (55.4%). The present study revealed a high prevalence of anemia among healthy urban school children of higher socio-economic classes. Vegetarians and girls, especially after menarche were more at risk to develop anemia.

  16. Predictors of anemia in women of reproductive age: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Bradley A; Petry, Nicolai; Macdonald, Barbara; Aaron, Grant J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anemia in women of reproductive age (WRA) (age range: 15–49 y) remains a public health problem globally, and reducing anemia in women by 50% by 2025 is a goal of the World Health Assembly. Objective: We assessed the associations between anemia and multiple proximal risk factors (e.g., iron and vitamin A deficiencies, inflammation, malaria, and body mass index) and distal risk factors (e.g., education status, household sanitation and hygiene, and urban or rural residence) in nonpregnant WRA. Design: Cross-sectional, nationally representative data from 10 surveys (n = 27,018) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed individually and pooled by the infection burden and risk in the country. We examined the severity of anemia and measured the bivariate associations between anemia and factors at the country level and by infection burden, which we classified with the use of the national prevalences of malaria, HIV, schistosomiasis, sanitation, and water-quality indicators. Pooled multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for each infection-burden category to identify independent determinants of anemia (hemoglobin concertation <120 g/L). Results: Anemia prevalence was ∼40% in countries with a high infection burden and 12% and 7% in countries with moderate and low infection burdens, respectively. Iron deficiency was consistently associated with anemia in multivariate models, but the proportion of anemic women who were iron deficient was considerably lower in the high-infection group (35%) than in the moderate- and low-infection groups (65% and 71%, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, inflammation, vitamin A insufficiency, socioeconomic status, and age were also significantly associated with anemia, but malaria and vitamin B-12 and folate deficiencies were not. Conclusions: The contribution of iron deficiency to anemia varies according to a country’s infection

  17. Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Bryder, David; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2012-09-13

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by a functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding for ribosomal proteins. Recently, a case study reported a patient who became transfusion-independent in response to treatment with the amino acid L-leucine. Therefore, we have validated the therapeutic effect of L-leucine using our recently generated mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA. Administration of L-leucine significantly improved the anemia in Rps19-deficient mice (19% improvement in hemoglobin concentration; 18% increase in the number of erythrocytes), increased the bone marrow cellularity, and alleviated stress hematopoiesis. Furthermore, the therapeutic response to L-leucine appeared specific for Rps19-deficient hematopoiesis and was associated with down-regulation of p53 activity. Our study supports the rationale for clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA.

  18. Iron deficiency, anemia, and mortality in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Eisenga, Michele F; Minović, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2016-11-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality in RTR. Cox regression analyses were used to investigate prospective associations. In 700 RTR, prevalences of anemia, IDA, and ID were 34%, 13%, and 30%, respectively. During follow-up for 3.1 (2.7-3.9) years, 81 (12%) RTR died. In univariable analysis, anemia [HR, 1.72 (95%CI: 1.11-2.66), P = 0.02], IDA [2.44 (1.48-4.01), P < 0.001], and ID [2.04 (1.31-3.16), P = 0.001] were all associated with all-cause mortality. In multivariable analysis, the association of anemia with mortality became weaker after adjustment for ID [1.52 (0.97-2.39), P = 0.07] and disappeared after adjustment for proteinuria and eGFR [1.09 (0.67-1.78), P = 0.73]. The association of IDA with mortality attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders. In contrast, the association of ID with mortality remained independent of potential confounders, including anemia [1.77 (1.13-2.78), P = 0.01]. In conclusion, ID is highly prevalent among RTR and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of anemia. As ID is a modifiable factor, correction of ID could be a target to improve survival. © 2016 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  19. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed.

  20. Relation between blood lead levels and childhood anemia in India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nitin B; Laden, Francine; Guller, Ulrich; Shankar, Anoop; Kazani, Shamsah; Garshick, Eric

    2005-05-15

    Lead pollution is a substantial problem in developing countries such as India. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has defined an elevated blood lead level in children as > or = 10 microg/dl, on the basis of neurologic toxicity. The US Environmental Protection Agency suggests a threshold lead level of 20-40 microg/dl for risk of childhood anemia, but there is little information relating lead levels <40 microg/dl to anemia. Therefore, the authors examined the association between lead levels as low as 10 mug/dl and anemia in Indian children under 3 years of age. Anemia was divided into categories of mild (hemoglobin level 10-10.9 g/dl), moderate (hemoglobin level 8-9.9 g/dl), and severe (hemoglobin level <8 g/dl). Lead levels <10 mug/dl were detected in 568 children (53%), whereas 413 (38%) had lead levels > or = 10-19.9 microg/dl and 97 (9%) had levels > or = 20 microg/dl. After adjustment for child's age, duration of breastfeeding, standard of living, parent's education, father's occupation, maternal anemia, and number of children in the immediate family, children with lead levels > or = 10 microg/dl were 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 1.7) times as likely to have moderate anemia as children with lead levels <10 microg/dl. Similarly, the odds ratio for severe anemia was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.6). Health agencies in India should note the association of elevated blood lead levels with anemia and make further efforts to curb lead pollution and childhood anemia.

  1. Anemia management: development of a rapidaccess anemia and intravenous iron service.

    PubMed

    Radia, Deepti; Momoh, Ibrahim; Dillon, Richard; Francis, Yvonne; Cameron, Laura; Fagg, Toni-Lee; Overland, Hannah; Robinson, Susan; Harrison, Claire N

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the initiation and evolution of the Rapid-Access Anemia Clinic (RAAC) at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London, UK. This clinic was set up to provide diagnosis and treatment, and to coordinate investigative procedures, where necessary, into the underlying causes of anemia. Initially piloted with anemic preoperative orthopedic patients, the clinic now treats a wide range of conditions, deriving from both internal and external referrals. Treatment includes dietary advice, supplementation with iron, vitamin B12 and folate, and blood transfusion. Most patients at the RAAC need iron replacement, the majority of which require intravenous (IV) iron. Therefore the first-line IV iron-administration protocol is carefully considered to ensure viability of the service and patient satisfaction. Four IV irons available in the UK are discussed, with explanation of the benefits and drawbacks of each product and the reasoning behind the IV iron choice at different stages of the RAAC's development. Costs to the service, affected by IV iron price and administration regimen, are considered, as well as the product's contraindications. Finally, the authors reflect on the success of the RAAC and how it has improved patients' quality-of-treatment experience, in addition to benefiting the hospital and National Health Service in achieving specific health-care mandates and directives. Drawing from the authors' experiences, recommendations are given to assist others in setting up and providing a successful rapid-access anemia service or similar facility.

  2. Isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis presenting with severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Burzyantseva, Olga; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Gastric polyps exist in a wide variety of types, most of which are small and often benign. Discovery of gastric polyps during Endoscopy necessitates biopsies. Case presentation We present a case report of an isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis in a 26 years old Hispanic female when she was investigated for profound anemia. The Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous gastric polyps filling the entire stomach. She was treated with near-total gastrectomy and her anemia resolved Conclusion Isolated diffuse hyperplasic gastric polyposis with normal gastrin level is a rare entity and can present with severe anemia. PMID:18755016

  3. Severe anemia owing to occult pulmonary hemorrhage: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Milen; Kovacs, Julia; Wiesbauer, Peter; Dekan, Gerhard; Gadner, Helmut

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to increase the awareness about pulmonary hemorrhage as a possible cause of microcytic hypochromic anemia and to delineate diagnostic difficulties and possible pitfalls. An instructive case of anemia of unclear origin referred to our institution for a hematologic workup is presented. Microcytic hypochromic anemia owing to repeated occult alveolar hemorrhages was the only clinical sign of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis in this case. The laboratory finding constellation in such cases may be misleading and may lead to misinterpretation. Awareness about this condition among pediatricians and hematologists can optimize and accelerate the diagnostic process.

  4. Pernicious anemia: Fundamental and practical aspects in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tun, Aung Myint; Thein, Kyaw Zin; Myint, Zin War; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2017-02-03

    Pernicious anemia (PA), the most common cause of cobalamin deficiency anemia worldwide, is an autoimmune disease of multifactorial etiologies involving complex environmental and immunological factors. Although it was first reported by Addison in 1849 with subsequent advances in understanding of pathogenesis and molecular biology, diagnosis of pernicious anemia is still challenging for clinicians because of its complexity and diverse clinical presentations. Herein, we provide an overview of PA, mainly focusing on its scientific and practical aspects in diagnosis. We also discuss the limitations of currently available diagnostic tools for evaluation of cobalamin deficiency and PA.

  5. [New insights on hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Dan; Zhou, Dao-Bin

    2009-12-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is normocytic and normochromic. One of the mechanisms is misbalance of iron metabolism. Hepcidin, a kind of protein secreted by liver is considered to be the hormone regulating iron metabolism. It binds to ferroportin and induces the latter one's internalization. Thus, iron transportation from iron storage cells to serum is reduced. Cytokines are elevated in chronic disease. They stimulate hepcidin expression in liver through JAK2/STAT3 pathway. As a result, iron absorption and reabsorption is blocked, which leads to the misbalance of iron metabolism in anemia of chronic disease. In this article, the hepcidin and its relation to iron metabolism and anemia in chronic disease are reviewed.

  6. [Iron deficiency anemia. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia. Preschooler children are particularly vulnerable; a recent analysis reported a prevalence rate higher than 35% among children below 2 year of age. Its early detection, right treatment, and suitable prophylaxis is currently a priority in our country. This guideline establishes the definition of anemia in relation to chronological age, gestational age, and habitat, reviews principal aspects of iron metabolism, enumerates main causes of iron deficiency, and set guidelines for diagnosis, detection, differential diagnosis, treatment and prevention of iron deficiency anemia.

  7. Mild anemia as a protective factor against pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Buzyan, L O

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is traditionally considered to be a pathological condition during pregnancy. According to the standards, prescription of iron supplements to pregnant women is required at hemoglobin levels of 110 g/l and lower. Numerous studies at different periods showed the relationship of anemia and premature birth [5], preeclampsia [1], low birth-weight [2]. Meanwhile, physiological hemodilution carries in pregnancy an important adaptive function. It is well known, that in the second half of pregnancy physiological hypercoagulability develops (increased activity of the plasma clotting factors, platelet aggregation, decreased activity and blood concentrations of physiological anticoagulants) aimed at implementing adequate hemostasis in labor. Under these conditions, moderate hemodilution is an effective mechanism for preventing the development of severe disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in labor, during surgery, in various forms of obstetric pathology. To study the effect of anemia of varying severity on the pregnancy course and outcomes. We conducted a "case-control" study based on cohort. The study included 421 pregnant women who received outpatient care under the monitoring of pregnancy in the antenatal clinic of the South Ural State Medical University and the antenatal clinic of Chelyabinsk Clinical Hospital №6. The inclusion period was from January to March 2014. Inclusion criteria were: confirmed pregnancy, informed consent to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria were multiple pregnancy, induced pregnancy, late first appearance in the antenatal clinic (after 25 weeks' gestation), change of residence and medical supervision during pregnancy, the presence of severe mental disorders, severe somatic diseases in decompensation stage, HIV infection, cancer, active tuberculosis. Study design complies with the legislation of the Russian Federation, international ethical standards and was approved by the Ethics Committee of the South Ural

  8. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kollipara, Venkateswara K.; Brine, Patrick L.; Gemmel, David; Ingnam, Sisham

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case. PMID:27609735

  9. Antibodies in the treatment of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, David; Jaime-Pérez, Jose Carlos; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies have been the cornerstone of treatment of acquired aplastic anemia for more than 25 years. Treatment with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is considered pivotal and the addition of cyclosporine improves the overall response rate. This antibody is heterogeneous and horse ATG is apparently more effective than rabbit ATG. Several issues remain unsolved in relation to the combination of ATG and cyclosporine: cost, toxicity and late clonal disorders. In recent years, alternative immunosuppressive therapy has been proposed and new antibodies have emerged: porcine ATG, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, and rituximab. Experience with these antibodies is limited to a few studies with alemtuzumab being the most promising, but the results are interesting and provocative. More studies are needed to find the perfect antibody.

  10. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  11. [Genetic aspects of sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Labie, D

    1992-10-01

    The genetics of sickle cell anemia may be considered as a model. Its mendelian transmission was hypothesized even before the molecular era. Once the mutation identified, it could be studied at the protein and DNA level; a consistent pathophysiological mechanism was proposed; the various genetic forms of the disease could be identified; the way by which a balanced polymorphism with Plasmodium falciparum malaria is obtained was analyzed. More recently, investigations were run in order to understand how modulating, or epistatic factors could modify the pathophysiological mechanism and contribute to the high clinical diversity of the disease. Several factors have been identified, among which a concomitant alpha-thalassemia, an overproduction of fetal hemoglobin, due either to an activation of the gamma genes or to an increase of the F-cell number, and finally a quantitative control of the beta s chains themselves. Such a high number of genetic active factors questions the concept itself of a monogenic disease.

  12. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Megaloblastic Anemias

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Ralph

    1978-01-01

    The diagnostic approach to megaloblastic anemia involves four usually sequential steps. The first step, recognition of megaloblastosis, requires attention to altered blood cell size and morphology. These changes may sometimes be subtle or masked. The cornerstone of the second step, identification of the specific vitamin deficiency, is assay of serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels, although they may occasionally be misleading. The third step, identification of the specific disease entity responsible for the vitamin deficiency, generally revolves around tests of absorption and gastric function. The fourth step, reevaluation after replacement therapy, is often not thought of as a diagnostic step but carries important diagnostic implications and is sometimes the only way in which coexisting abnormalities can be unmasked and identified. PMID:351964

  13. [Advances in the treatment of aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Morales Polanco, M R; Sánchez Valle, E; Chávez Sánchez, G; Guillén Mariscal, C; Gómez Morales, E; Pizzuto Chávez, J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current advances in the pathogenesis, classification and treatment of acquired aplastic anemia (AA). The therapeutical experience obtained at the Servicio de Hematología, Centro Medico Nacional, Siglo XXI is described. Bone marrow transplantation is the first choice therapy for severe AA. This procedure succeeds in obtaining complete remission in nearly 80% of the cases. Nevertheless, few patients are eligible for such therapy, consequently other treatments should be considered. In this context some immunosuppressive therapies such as antilymphocyte globulin had shown to produce favorable responses in 60% of the patients. In addition, androgens and immunosuppressive drugs like methylprednisolone bolus and cyclosporin A do not have a definitive place in severe AA. Finally, it is important to describe the experience with lymphocytapheresis, a new procedure, that decreases the immunological response against the normal hematopoiesis by removing the population of T-lymphocytes inducing complete remission in a few patients.

  14. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  15. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  16. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  17. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality.

  18. [Management of anemia in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    López Gómez, J M

    2008-01-01

    1. All patients with anemia secondary to CKD should be treated and evaluated for possible treatment, irrespective of underlying disease, associated comorbidity or possibility of kidney replacement therapy. 2. In patients treated with ESAs, Hb concentrations should be monitored at least monthly. 3. Hb targets: In all patients with CKD, Hb concentration should be > 11 g/dl and there is no evidence to justify total correction of anemia on a routine basis. Normalization of Hb levels in CKD is associated with an improvement in health-related quality of life, but without differences in mortality or the rate of loss of kidney function (Strength of Recommendation A). 4. Indications for iron therapy: Iron therapy is required in the large majority of patients with CKD treated with ESAs to achieve a Hb equal to or greater than 11 g/dl (Strength of Recommendation B). The recommended serum concentration of ferritin is > 100 mg/dl, which should be associated with a TSI > 20% (Strength of Recommendation C). Iron therapy in patients with CKD can be given orally or intravenously, although the IV route is more effective (Strength of Recommendation A). 5. The initial dose of ESA and its adjustments will depend on the patients clinical condition, baseline Hb levels, the Hb target and the rate of increase in Hb levels observed (Strength of Recommendation C). 6. In all cases and for all ESAs, the subcutaneous route is the recommended route of administration for patients with CKD (Strength of Recommendation C). 7. Resistance to ESAs: A hyporesponse to ESAs is considered to be present when an Hb level of 11 g/dl is not achieved with a dose of epoetin > 300 IU/kg/week or a dose of darbepoetin alpha > 1.5 microg/kg/week (Strength of Recommendation B). 8. There is insufficient evidence in patients with CKD to justify routine use of coadjuvant treatments.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome ...

  20. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important.

  1. Refractory anemia in human immunodeficiency virus: Expect the unexpected.

    PubMed

    Mirgh, Sumeet Prakash; Mishra, Vikas A; Shah, Virti D; Sorabjee, Jehangir Soli

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon hematological disorder affecting selectively the erythroid cell lines. PRCA is defined as anemia with normal leukocyte and platelet counts, a corrected reticulocyte count <1%, <5% erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and an absence of hemolysis. We describe a case of Zidovudine (AZT) induced PRCA causing severe anemia in a patient taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) after 4 months of starting therapy and in whom all other causes were excluded. The hematological abnormalities resolved after AZT was replaced with tenofovir and the patient remained transfusion independent thereafter. A slowly progressive normocytic-normochromic anemia and reticulocytopenia, without leukopenia and thrombocytopenia in a patient, should raise the suspicion of PRCA. Search for underlying diseases, infections and drugs may help in the diagnosis and etiology of acquired PRCA. Elimination of potentially causative factors may induce complete recovery. AZT is a well-known cause of anemia and thus should be used with caution in the initiation of ART.

  2. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  3. STUDIES ON BARTONELLA MURIS ANEMIA OF ALBINO RATS

    PubMed Central

    Perla, David; Marmorston-Gottesman, J.

    1930-01-01

    Autoplastic splenic transplants were made in adult albino rats 4 weeks and 7 weeks prior to splenectomy and the protective effects against infection with the Bartonella muris anemia observed. 1. One-fourth of the spleen left in situ will protect adult albino rats against the Bartonella muris anemia. 2. Autotransplantation of splenic tissue in adult rats is successful in over 90 per cent of instances. 3. Autoplastic splenic transplants performed 7 weeks prior to splenectomy afford protection against Bartonella muris anemia in more than 50 per cent of instances, whereas 4 week old transplants do not protect. 4. A comparative histological study of the transplants of protected and unprotected rats reveals a regeneration of the pulp cells in the protected rats and an exhaustion destruction of the pulp in the unprotected rats. 5. The reticular cells play a specific rôle in protecting the adult albino rat against Bartonella muris anemia. PMID:19869746

  4. Diphyllobothrium pacificum Infection is Seldom Associated with Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit. PMID:22987655

  5. Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: a novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz Agladioglu, S; Aycan, Z; Bas, V N; Peltek Kendirci, H N; Onder, A

    2012-01-01

    The thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus, megaloblastic anemia and sensorineural hearing loss due to mutations in SLC 19A2 that encodes a thiamine transporter protein. The disease can manifest at any time between infancy and adolescence, and not all cardinal findings are present initially. The anemia typically improves significantly with pharmacological doses of thiamine. Variable improvement in diabetes is also noted. However, the hearing loss is apparently irreversible, although a delay in the onset of deafness may be possible. We present a 2-year old girl with non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus and anemia in whom we found a novelc.95T>A (leu32X) mutation in the SLC19A2 gene in this study.Our patient with this new mutation did not suffer from hearing loss.

  6. Diphyllobothrium pacificum infection is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Juan A; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H

    2012-11-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit.

  7. Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines anemia as the point at which the amount of hemoglobin in the circulation falls below World Health Organization cutoffs for specific age and sex groups. Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the community. The important biomarkers are the automated red cell counts, tests for nutritional deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies, and inflammation. Diseases are important potential initiators of anemia, but biomarkers of specific diseases are not included in this review, only the underlying feature common to all disease – namely, inflammation. PMID:23687454

  8. [Associated factors and clinical implications of post transplant renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Mónica; Chiurchiu, Carlos; Capra, Raúl; Eckhardt, Andrea; De La Fuente, Jorge; Douthat, Walter; De Arteaga, Javier; Massari, Pablo U

    2013-01-01

    A considerable percentage of patients exhibit anemia post kidney transplant. Its origin is multifactorial and the main causes involved depend on the post transplant period considered. We studied in a group of 134 consecutive patients the associated factors and the clinical implications of "late anemia" (6 months post transplant). Multiple regression analysis showed that post transplant oliguria and acute rejection episodes were significantly associated with anemia. Graft survival at 36 months was significantly reduced in the anemic group (83 % versus 96%, p < 0.01). No differences in patients survival or rate of cardiovascular events were observed. We concluded that anemia at 6 months post transplant is independently and significantly associated with events that reduced functioning renal mass and kidney survival.

  9. Anemia: a cause of intolerance to thyroxine sodium.

    PubMed

    Shakir, K M; Turton, D; Aprill, B S; Drake, A J; Eisold, J F

    2000-02-01

    Usual causes of intolerance to thyroxine sodium include coronary artery disease, advanced age, untreated adrenal insufficiency, and severe hypothyroidism. We describe 4 patients with iron deficiency anemia and primary hypothyroidism. After treatment with thyroxine sodium, these patients developed palpitations and feelings of restlessness, which necessitated discontinuation of the thyroid hormone. After the anemia was treated with ferrous sulfate for 4 to 7 weeks, they were able to tolerate thyroxine sodium therapy. Iron deficiency anemia coexisting with primary hypothyroidism results in a hyperadrenergic state. In such patients, we postulate that thyroid hormone administration causes palpitations, nervousness, and feelings of restlessness. Correction of any existing pronounced anemia in hypothyroid patients who are intolerant to thyroxine sodium therapy may result in tolerance to this agent.

  10. Megaloblastic anemia in a vegetarian taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Green, J D

    1975-02-01

    A case is reported of megaloblastic anemia resulting from folate deficiency in a vegetarian who had been taking oral contraceptives for eight years. A brief report of the pertinent literature is included,

  11. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  12. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.

  13. Anemia in heart failure: pathophysiologic insights and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Terrovitis, John V; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Kaldara, Elissavet; Drakos, Stavros G; Nanas, Serafeim N; Nanas, John N

    2009-01-01

    Anemia has been recognized as a very common and serious comorbidity in heart failure, with a prevalence ranging from 10 to 79%, depending on diagnostic definition, disease severity and patient characteristics. A clear association of anemia with worse prognosis has been confirmed in multiple heart failure trials. This finding has recently triggered intense scrutiny in order to identify the underlying pathophysiology and the best treatment options. Etiology is multifactorial, with iron deficiency and cytokine activation (anemia of chronic disease) playing the most important roles. Treatment is aimed at not only restoring hemoglobin values back to normal, but also at improving the patient's symptoms, functional capacity and hopefully the outcome. Iron supplementation and erythropoietin-stimulating agents have been used for this purpose, either alone or in combination. In this review, the recent advances in elucidating the mechanisms leading to anemia in the setting of heart failure are presented and the evidence supporting the use of different treatment approaches are discussed.

  14. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  15. [Spatial analysis of gestational anemia in Peru, 2015].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Antiporta, Daniel A; Cortés, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    To establish regional prevalences of anemia in pregnant women receiving care at public clinics in Peru in 2015 and identify high-prevalence district conglomerates. An ecological study was carried out on data from pregnant women with anemia registered on the Nutritional Status Information System (SIEN) who received care in 7703 public clinics in 2015. Regional and district prevalences of gestational anemia were calculated. District conglomerates with a high prevalence of gestational anemia were identified using the Moran Index. Information was gathered from 311,521 pregnant women distributed in 1638 districts in Peru. The national prevalence of anemia was 24.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 24.0-24.3%), the rural prevalence was 30.5%, and the urban prevalence was 22.0%. The regions of Huancavelica (45.5%; 95% CI: 44.2-46.7%), Puno (42.8%; 95% CI: 41.9-43.7%), Pasco (38.5%; 95% CI: 36.9-40.0%), Cusco (36.0%; 95% CI: 35.3-36.8%), and Apurímac (32.0%; 95% CI: 30.8-33.1%) had the highest prevalences of anemia. The local Moran Index identified 202 high-priority districts (hot spots) (12.3% of total; 44 urban and 158 rural) located in Ancash, Apurímac, Arequipa, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huancavelica, Huánuco, Junín, La Libertad, Lima, Pasco, and Puno containing high-prevalence district conglomerates. Gestational anemia in Peru has its highest prevalence rates in rural and southern mountainous areas. The district conglomerates with high prevalence rates of gestational anemia coincide with the areas of high regional prevalence.

  16. Neonatal outcome after fetal anemia managed by intrauterine transfusion.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, C; Rakza, T; Thomas, D; Wibaut, B; Vaast, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V

    2015-11-01

    In-utero transfusion is now well under control and improves the survival of foetuses monitored for fetal anemia with a survival rate of more than 80 %. The aim was to evaluate short-term neonatal outcome after fetal severe anemia managed by intrauterine transfusions. We did a retrospective study of all neonates born after management of severe fetal anemia (n = 93) between January 1999 and January 2013 in our regional center. The two main causes of anemia were maternal red blood cell alloimmunization (N = 81, 87 %) and Parvovirus B19 infection (N = 10, 10.8 %). In the alloimmunization group, phototherapy was implemented in 85.2 % of cases with a maximum level of bilirubin of 114.4 ± 60.7 (mg/dl). Transfusion and exchange transfusion were, respectively, required in 51.9 % and in 34.6 % of cases. One neonate presented a convulsive episode, and we observed three neonatal deaths. In the parvovirus group, none of the child had anemia at birth and no management was necessary. Contemporary management of Rhesus disease is associated with encouraging neonatal outcomes. In case of Parvovirus infection, no specific management is necessary at. But, in all cases of fetal anemia, children should be followed up with particular attention to neurologic development. • In-utero transfusion is now well under control and improves the survival of fetuses monitored for fetal anemia. • Limited studies are available on the effect of IUT on postnatal outcome in infants with a history of fetal anemia. What is New: • Contemporary management of severe Rhesus disease is associated with encouraging neonatal outcomes. • The majority of infants can be managed with phototherapy and a limited number of top-up transfusions and exchange transfusions. In case of Parvovirus infection, the short-term neonatal outcome is excellent.

  17. Equine Infectious Anemia Virus from Infected Horse Serum

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideo; Yoshino, Tomoo; Ushimi, Chuzo

    1974-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus was purified from infected horse serum samples. Electron microscope observation on negatively stained preparations of purified virus showed roughly spherical particles sized between 100 and 200 nm in diameter. In disrupted particles, an envelope was visible but no internal structure could be resolved. Since the purified virus fraction had a strong antigenic activity to antiserum in immunodiffusion reaction, these particles are thought to be the causative virus of equine infectious anemia. Images PMID:4372175

  18. Posttransplantation anemia in kidney transplant recipients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Ayalon-Dangur, Irit; Cooper, Lisa; Shochat, Tzippy; Rahamimov, Ruth; Gafter, Uzi; Mor, Eytan; Grossman, Alon

    2017-08-01

    We sought to assess the frequency and predictors of early and late posttransplantation anemia (PTA). In addition, we aimed to assess the outcomes of patients with anemia and to assess the impact of anemia on mortality, graft function, and graft failure.Patients who underwent kidney transplantation in a single center during a 4-year period were included. Predictors associated with the development of anemia at 6 months (early PTA) or 2 years (late PTA) were evaluated in a univariate and multivariate analyses. The effects of anemia and other variables on mortality and graft function were assessed.A total of 266 kidney transplant recipients were included. The prevalence of PTA at 6 months (early PTA) was 51.3% and at 2 years (late PTA) was 36.6%. Female sex was significantly associated with early PTA. Patients with early PTA proceeded to late PTA. Patients with both early and late PTA had a higher mortality rate at 4 years compared to patients without anemia. On multivariable analysis, lower Hb at 2 years posttransplantation (hazard ratio [HR] 0.716, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.541-0.948, for every increment of 1 g/dL) was significantly associated with mortality. Patients with late PTA suffered a decline in eGFR compared to patients without anemia (P = .026). Furthermore, a lower Hb at 2 years posttransplantation was also associated with graft failure (HR 0.775, 95% CI 0.619-0.969, for every increment of 1 g/dL).Post-transplantation anemia is significantly associated with late mortality, with a decline in graft function and with an increased incidence of graft failure.

  19. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  20. Transferrin loss into the urine with hypochromic, microcytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Hancock, D E; Onstad, J W; Wolf, P L

    1976-01-01

    Anemia developing during the course of chronic renal disease is a frequent complication often necessitating periodic transfusion therapy. A number of etiologic factors have been implicated, including decreased production of erythropoietin; decreased erythrocyte life span secondary to uremia and splenomegaly; increased bleeding tendency due to platelet dysfunction; and acquired lack of folic acid and iron. This paper concerns the problem of acquired hypochromic, microcytic anemia secondary to heavy urinary loss of iron and transferrin in a child with the nephrotic syndrome. The patient had microcytic, hypochromic anemia with serum iron, 12 mug. per dl. and a serum iron-binding capacity of 12 mug. per dl. There was no evidence of major bleeding resulting in a chronic hemorrhagic anemia. Urinary iron was 64 mug. per dl., with a urinary iron-binding capacity of 366 mug. per dl. Renal biopsy showed mesangio-proliferative glomerulonephritis. Evaluation of any patient with the nephrotic syndrome should include careful analysis of the various serum and urinary proteins and determination of serum and urinary iron and iron-binding capacity. This information would offer a more precise evaluation of the underlying cause of anemia in the nephrotic patient who may develop urinary loss of iron and transferrin and subsequent hypochromic, microcytic anemia.

  1. Solid fuel use is associated with anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Accinelli, Roberto A; Leon-Abarca, Juan A

    2017-10-01

    Over 3 billion people use solid fuels as a means of energy and heating source, and ~ 50% of households burn them in inefficient, poorly ventilated stoves. In 2010, ~ 43% of the 640 million preschool children in 220 countries suffered from a certain degree of anemia, with iron deficiency as the main cause in developed countries whereas its causes remained multifactorial in the undeveloped group. In this study, we explore the relations of country-wide variables that might affect the people's health status (from socioeconomic status to more specific variables such as water access). We found independent relationship between solid fuel use and anemia in children under five years old (p < 0.0001), taking into account the prevalence of anemia in pregnant woman and the access to improved water sources. Countries in which the population uses solid fuel the most have over three times higher anemia rates in children than countries with the lowest prevalence of solid fuels use. There is still a complex relationship between solid fuels use and anemia, as reflected in its worldwide significance (p < 0.05) controlled for measles immunization, tobacco consumption, anemia in pregnant mothers, girl's primary education, life expectancy and improved water access but not (p > 0.05) when weighing for sanitation access or income per capita. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. p,p'-DDT induces microcytic anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Mariko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Fukumori, Junko; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Kojima, Sayuri; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Ohnuma-Koyama, Aya; Takahashi, Naofumi; Takeuchi-Kashimoto, Yukiko; Kuwahara, Maki; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Ohtsuka, Ryoichi; Takeda, Makio; Kosaka, Tadashi; Harada, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that chronic exposure to DDT and its derivatives is associated with a variety of human disorders such as anemia. The present study demonstrated that p,p'-DDT caused microcystic anemia in a dose-dependent manner (0, 5, 50, and 500 ppm) in the long-term study up to 2 years. To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which p,p'-DDT induces anemia, certain hematological parameters were assessed in rats fed specific doses of p,p'-DDT for 2 weeks, and the effect of lipopolysaccharide on anemia of inflammation was also examined in p,p'-DDT-treated rats. The parameters included the content of hemoglobin per reticulocyte, mean corpuscular volume of reticulocytes and mature erythrocytes, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration mean of mature erythrocytes, and saturation levels of transferrin and iron. During the 2-week treatment period, hypochromic microcytic reticulocytes and hypochromic normocytic mature erythrocytes were observed in p,p'-DDT-treated rats, with no evidence of alteration in plasma iron levels. p,p'-DDT enhanced microcytosis of reticulocytes, as well as mature erythrocytes, which occurred due to severe hypoferremia resulting from anemia of inflammation; however, plasma iron levels were attenuated probably through the inhibition of interleukin-6. Our data suggests that long-term treatment with p,p'-DDT induces microcytic anemia, possibly because of the impairment of iron utility in erythrocytes.

  3. Determinants of anemia clustering among mothers and children in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Souganidis, Ellie S; Sun, Kai; de Pee, Saskia; Kraemer, Klaus; Rah, Jee-Hyun; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Sari, Mayang; Bloem, Martin W; Semba, Richard D

    2012-06-01

    To describe risk factors for clustering of anemia among mothers and children in Indonesia. An anemia cluster was defined as hemoglobin <12 g/dl in the mother and <11 g/dl in the youngest child, aged 6-59 months. Anemia clustering occurred in 4907 (18.3%) of 26 809 urban families and 12 756 (15.5%) of 82 291 rural families. Maternal overweight/obesity, older child age, consumption of fortified milk by the child, use of iodized salt, vitamin A supplementation, paternal smoking and greater expenditure on animal and plant source foods were associated with lower odds of anemia clustering. Older maternal age, maternal underweight, ≥2 children in the family and >4 individuals eating from the same kitchen were associated with greater odds of anemia clustering. Fortified milk, iodized salt, vitamin A supplementation and greater expenditure on plant and animal foods are among modifiable risk factors associated with lower risk of anemia clustering in Indonesia.

  4. Combined megaloblastic and immunohemolytic anemia associated--a case report.

    PubMed

    Vucelić, Vesna; Stancić, Vladimir; Ledinsky, Mario; Getaldić, Biserka; Sović, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Grbac, Ljiljana; Gaćina, Petar; Rincić, Goran; Carzavec, Dubravka

    2008-12-01

    A 55-year-old female with a history of psychosis and rheumatoid arthritis was admitted to the hospital for fatigue and dizziness. At admission, macrocytic anemia, high serum lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) and gastrin concentrations, decreased serum vitamin B12 concentration, with macroovalocytes and poikilocytes in peripheral blood smear suggested the diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was negative. Surprisingly, treatment by vitamin B12 and folic acid administered for two weeks was ineffective and followed by transitory worsening of hemoglobin concentration on day 8. Repeat direct antiglobulin test (DAT) and IAT were positive. This immunotransfusion conversion, suggesting the presence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, could be explained by change in the macroblastic erythrocyte population, i.e. emerging red cells with completely exposed membrane antigens due to vitamin B12 treatment and/or higher degree of dysregulation of the lymphocyte clone secreting erythrocyte autoantibodies. We proposed the coexistence of pernicious and autoimmune hemolytic anemia; therefore, methylprednisolone was added to vitamin B12 treatment. This therapy successfully improved hemoglobin and erythrocyte concentration. Although megaloblastic-pernicious anemia is a common disease, association of pernicious and autoimmune hemolytic anemia with two mechanisms of hemolysis (ineffective erythropoiesis and immune mechanism) is a rare condition, with only several dozens of cases described so far.

  5. Elevated Serum S-Adenosylhomocysteine in Cobalamin Deficient Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M.; Morita, Olga E.; Pagliusi, Regina A.; Blaia-d’Avila, Vera L.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired methylation due to accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) may contribute to the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficient anemia. We assayed serum S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), SAH, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA) in 15 subjects with cobalamin deficient megaloblastic anemia and compared results to 19 subjects with anemia/pancytopenia due to other causes. Cobalamin deficient subjects had a median hematocrit of 20% and mean cell volume of 111.7 fL. The median serum cobalamin was 37 pg/mL, MMA 3030 nmol/L and tHcy 62.0 umol/L. SAH was elevated in 13 of 15 subjects (median value 42 nmol/L) and the median SAM was normal (103 nmol/L) but SAM/SAH ratio was low, 2.5. The SAH was higher and SAM/SAH ratio lower in cobalamin deficient subjects as compared to those with other anemias after excluding 4 patients with renal insufficiency. SAM concentrations were not low in cobalamin deficiency. Cobalamin injections corrected anemia, MMA, tHcy, SAM/SAH ratio and SAH. Some hematologic variables were inversely correlated with SAH and cobalamin but not tHcy or MMA. In conclusion, serum SAH is elevated in cobalamin deficient subjects with megaloblastic anemia and corrects with parenteral cobalamin therapy. PMID:17292722

  6. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-03-03

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children's Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants.

  7. Urology and nephrology update: anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at all stages, and it is nearly universal among patients with stage 5 CKD. Nonetheless, anemia of CKD is a diagnosis of exclusion. When anemia is detected in a patient with CKD, etiologies other than CKD must be considered and ruled out. Iron deficiency also is common among patients with CKD, and iron replenishment improves the anemia and the response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Current guidelines for managing anemia of CKD recommend a hemoglobin goal of 11 to 12 g/dL, but lower hemoglobin may be acceptable for asymptomatic patients. Some patients do not benefit from erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, or they lose their responsiveness to treatment and transfusions must be considered. Other agents are being investigated as management for anemia of CKD, with vitamin C (ascorbic acid) showing some promise. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  8. HMGB1 mediates anemia of inflammation in murine sepsis survivors.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Ferrer, Sergio I; Papoin, Julien; Dancho, Meghan E; Olofsson, Peder; Li, Jianhua; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Avancena, Patricia; Yang, Huan; Zou, Yong-Rui; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Volpe, Bruce T; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Diamond, Betty; Andersson, Ulf; Steinberg, Bettie M; Blanc, Lionel; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-12-29

    Patients surviving sepsis develop anemia but the molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we observed that mice surviving polymicrobial Gram-negative sepsis develop hypochromic, microcytic anemia with reticulocytosis. The bone marrow of sepsis survivors accumulates polychromatophilic and orthochromatic erythroblasts. Compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis in the spleen is defective during terminal differentiation. Circulating TNF and IL-6 are elevated for five days after the onset of sepsis, and serum HMGB1 levels are increased from day seven until at least day 28. Administration of recombinant HMGB1 to healthy mice mediates anemia with extramedullary erythropoiesis and significantly elevated reticulocyte counts. Moreover, administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibodies after sepsis significantly ameliorates the development of anemia (hematocrit 48.5±9.0% versus 37.4±6.1%, p<0.01, hemoglobin 14.0±1.7g/dL versus 11.7±1.2g/dL, p<0.01). Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 mediates anemia by interfering with erythropoiesis, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for anemia in sepsis.

  9. [Megaloblastic-vitamin B12 deficiency anemia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Mtvarelidze, Z G; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A N; Kvezereli-Kopadze, M A

    2009-05-01

    Megaloblastic anemias are basically caused by vitamin B(12) and/or folic acid deficiency. Childhood vitamin B(12) deficiency is extremely rare. There are congenital and acquired forms of vitamin B(12)-deficiency anemias. The article captures findings of 10 year observation of 3 patients with Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (congenital chronic megaloblastic anemia with proteinuria), in which the diagnosis was established by us in early childhood and due to correct treatment and prevention complete clinical-laboratory remission is kept so far. We have also observed rare case of acquired megaloblastic anemia - 14 years old vegetarian patient, who was diagnosed with vitamin B(12)-deficiency anemia based on history, clinical and para-clinical data. It was caused by strict vegetarianism of the patient. Therefore first of all the diet was corrected. In 5 days of specific treatment with vitamin B(12) "reticulocyte crisis" was manifested (proving the correctness of diagnosis and treatment) and complete clinical-hematological remission was achieved in 2 weeks. The given cases are interesting as megaloblastic anemias in childhood are both rare and difficult to diagnose. In such cases timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention tactics should be based on cause-and-effect relation of disease.

  10. Prevalence of anemia among healthy women in 2 metropolitan areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Kusumi, Eiji; Shoji, Midori; Endou, Shigeyuki; Kishi, Yukiko; Shibata, Taro; Murashige, Naoko; Hamaki, Tamae; Matsumura, Tomoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Yoneyama, Akiko; Kami, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    Anemia is common among young women, and iron deficiency is one of the leading causes. In Europe and the US, the iron fortification of flour increased oral iron intake and decreased anemia prevalence from 30% to 10%. The National Nutrition Survey in Japan revealed that anemia prevalence among young Japanese women is increasing; however, no nationwide preventive policy has been aimed at iron deficiency anemia. The endpoint of this study was the estimation of anemia prevalence among healthy Japanese woman, based on a large sample size. We collected data from the consecutive check-up examination records of apparently healthy women (n = 13,147). We defined hemoglobin lower than 12 g/dL as anemia, hemoglobin lower than 10 g/dL as severe anemia, and a mean corpuscular volume lower than 80 fl as microcytic anemia. Of the 13,147 persons, anemia was identified in 2331 (17.3 %), and severe and microcytic anemia in 438 (3.3 %) and 700 (5.2 %), respectively. Among women younger than 50 years, anemia was identified in 22.3 %, and 25.2 % of them had severe anemia. In conclusion, the prevalence of anemia and severe anemia among young women is high in Japan. Some action needs to be considered to improve women's quality of life.

  11. The incidence of gastrointestinal pathology and subsequent anemia in young men presenting with iron deficiency without anemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Bardan, Eytan; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Avidan, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of iron deficiency (ID) without anemia in young men is unclear, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for the required gastrointestinal (GI) evaluation. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of significant GI pathology and the development of anemia during the follow-up of young men presenting with ID, but without anemia. All young men (18-30 years) who served in the Israel Defense Forces during the years 2005-2013 and had at least a single laboratory test indicative of ID without anemia were followed until the diagnosis of significant GI pathology or discharge from military service. The study population included 2061 young men (mean age 20.7±1.8). During follow-up of 3150 person years, significant GI pathologies were diagnosed in 39 patients: inflammatory bowel disease in 25 (1.2%), celiac disease in 8 (0.4%), and peptic disease in 4 (0.1%). No cases of GI-related cancer were diagnosed. ID anemia developed during follow-up in 203 (9.8%). Lower baseline hemoglobin levels, lower ferritin levels, and younger age at diagnosis were more common among those who developed anemia. The development of anemia was a predisposing factor for the diagnosis of GI pathology (risk ratio=3.60, 95% confidence interval 1.34-8.32, P=0.012). Significant GI pathology is very uncommon in young men presenting with ID. Overt anemia developed in close to 10% of the study cohort. Therefore, we advise simple GI evaluation (celiac serology, C-reactive protein or fecal calprotectin, and urease breath test) as well as follow-up in this population.

  12. The efficacy of ELISA commercial kits for the screening of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Irene; Cipolini, Fabiana; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Trono, Karina; Barrandeguy, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    The most used and reliable indicator of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection is the detection of its specific antibodies in horse serum. In the present study, the performance of two commercial ELISA tests for the detection of EIAV antibodies as well as the potential advantages of their use as an EIAV infection screening tool were evaluated in 302 horse serum samples. Both ELISA assays showed 100% diagnostic sensitivity, and 92.3-94.3% diagnostic specificity. Discordant results were analyzed by immunoblot. The results showed that both ELISA tests are very efficient at detecting EIAV infected animals, allowing to identify a higher number of positive horse cases. Thus, ELISA assays can be useful tools in EIA control and eradication. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia in chronic celiac disease in children].

    PubMed

    Bel'mer, S V; Mitina, E V; Karpina, L M; Smetanina, N S

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in celiac disease (CD) may be associated with deficiency of iron, vitamins, macro- and micronutrients. It is also possible the development of chronic disease anemia (CDA), associated with activation of proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this work is to optimize the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children on the basis of study of iron metabolism disorders heterogeneity, including the role of CDA. We observed 34 children with CD aged 1.5 to 17 years, 27 of them children were observed both in the active stage of the disease and in remission. The control group included 25 children aged 1.2 to 17 years who were previously excluded for any chronic (including autoimmune) disease: these children were observed with chronic functional gastrointestinal motility disorders. Special methods of examination were study of iron metabolism, including the determination of the serum hepcidin level, as well as the determination of the serum proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] -α, interleukin [IL] -2, IL-6, IL-10). In active CD in 14.71% of children anemia of varying severity (mild or moderate) were diagnosed. Among these children we observed mild decrease of serum iron in the range 2.2-8.0 g/ml in 15 of 34 children (44%) and a marked reduction in serum ferritin level in 59% of children. In the active celiac disease in the majority of children there is a decrease in the serum hepcidin, but approximately in 20% of children serum hepcidin level was increased. This indicates the development of CDA in these children. During the active stage the average values of IL-2 was significantly increased (p < 0.05). Thus, the iron metabolism disorders in celiac disease is a result of immunopathological process which results in a reduction in iron absorption in the gut due to the intestinal mucosa villous atrophy and to improve the hepcidin production by liver cells and iron depot blocking with the CDA development in 20% of children.

  14. Association between Anemia and COPD in Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Zavarreh, Roshanak Hasheminasab; Zahmatkesh, Mohammad-Mehdi; Vakili, Masood; Shahriari-Ahmadi, Ali; Zohal, Mohammad Ali; Arabi, Mohsen; Mahmoudian, Alireza; Gheisuri, Abbas; Kian, Abdolhamed; Fahimi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in adults. Anemia is known as comorbidity in many chronic diseases that can increase morbidity and mortality of COPD. Recent studies have shown that anemia may be more prevalent than expected in COPD patients and can increase disabilities of COPD. In this study we have evaluated the correlation between anemia and the severity of COPD in patients referred to teaching hospitals of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study the severity of COPD in 760 patients with dyspnea who referred to teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and 96 stable COPD patients were categorize using a GOLD criteria from mild to moderate, severe and very severe. Anemia was determined as hemoglobin <13 g/dL in men and <12 g/dL in women, respectively. Demographic characteristics, spirometry parameters and laboratory findings were compared between anemic and non-anemic groups using Student t-test and regression tests (SPSS v.18 software). Results The Mean age of patients was 65 ± 13.07 years (59.4% male). Overall prevalence of anemia was 27% and there was no correlation between severity of COPD and anemia. Anemic patients were significantly older than non-anemic patients (71.1 ± 8.5 years vs. 65.4± 12.8 years; p = 0.030). RBC count of anemic patients were significantly lower than non-anemic group (4.3 ± 0.5 vs. 5.02± 0.8 ×106/µL; p < 0.001). Erythropoietin levels in anemic group was significantly higher than non-anemic group (16.33±2.43 vs. 10.22 ± 2.67 mu/ml; p < 0.001) and there was a significant inverse correlation of hemoglobin vs erythropoietin (r= −0.8). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of anemia in COPD patients. Anemia can increase disabilities of COPD. Thus, treatment of anemia may improve quality of life in these patients. Further comprehensive studies are

  15. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Go, Ronald S; Winters, Jeffrey L; Kay, Neil E

    2017-03-30

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon entity that presents diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic dilemmas despite being a well-recognized entity for over 150 years. Because of significant differences in the rates of hemolysis as well as associated diseases and cause there is considerable clinical heterogeneity. In addition there is a lack of clinical trials required to refine and update standardized and evidence-based therapeutic approaches. To aid the clinician in AIHA management we present four vignettes that represent and highlight distinct clinical presentations with separate diagnostic and therapeutic pathways that we utilize in our clinical practice setting. We also review the parameters present in diagnostic testing that allows for prognostic insight and present algorithms for both diagnosis and treatment of the AIHA patient in diverse situations. This is done in the hope that this review may offer guidance in regard to personalized therapy recommendations. A section is included for the diagnosis of suspected AIHA with negative testing, a relatively infrequent but challenging situation in order to assist in the overall evaluation spectrum for these patients.

  16. Overcoming reprogramming resistance of Fanconi anemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Lars U. W.; Milsom, Michael D.; Harris, Chad E.; Vyas, Rutesh; Brumme, Kristina M.; Parmar, Kalindi; Moreau, Lisa A.; Schambach, Axel; Park, In-Hyun; London, Wendy B.; Strait, Kelly; Schlaeger, Thorsten; DeVine, Alexander L.; Grassman, Elke; D'Andrea, Alan; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive syndrome characterized by progressive fatal BM failure and chromosomal instability. FA cells have inactivating mutations in a signaling pathway that is critical for maintaining genomic integrity and protecting cells from the DNA damage caused by cross-linking agents. Transgenic expression of the implicated genes corrects the phenotype of hematopoietic cells, but previous attempts at gene therapy have failed largely because of inadequate numbers of hematopoietic stem cells available for gene correction. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) constitute an alternate source of autologous cells that are amenable to ex vivo expansion, genetic correction, and molecular characterization. In the present study, we demonstrate that reprogramming leads to activation of the FA pathway, increased DNA double-strand breaks, and senescence. We also demonstrate that defects in the FA DNA-repair pathway decrease the reprogramming efficiency of murine and human primary cells. FA pathway complementation reduces senescence and restores the reprogramming efficiency of somatic FA cells to normal levels. Disease-specific iPSCs derived in this fashion maintain a normal karyotype and are capable of hematopoietic differentiation. These data define the role of the FA pathway in reprogramming and provide a strategy for future translational applications of patient-specific FA iPSCs. PMID:22371882

  17. Recent advances in treatment of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sung Eun; Lee, Jong Wook

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of aplastic anemia (AA) made most of patients to expect to achieve a long-term survival. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) from HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD-SCT) is a preferred first-line treatment option for younger patients with severe or very severe AA, whereas immunosuppressive treatment (IST) is an alternative option for others. Horse anti-thymocyte globuline (ATG) with cyclosporin A (CsA) had been a standard IST regimen with acceptable response rate. Recently, horse ATG had been not available and replaced with rabbit ATG in most countries. Subsequently, recent comparative studies showed that the outcomes of patients who received rabbit ATG/CsA were similar or inferior compared to those who received horse ATG/CsA. Therefore, further studies to improve the outcomes of IST, including additional eltrombopag, are necessary. On the other hand, the upper age limit of patients who are able to receive MSD-SCT as first-line treatment is a current issue because of favorable outcomes of MSD-SCT of older patients using fludarabine-based conditioning. In addition, further studies to improve the outcomes of patients who receive allogeneic SCT from alternative donors are needed. In this review, current issues and the newly emerging trends that may improve their outcomes in near futures will be discussed focusing the management of patients with AA.

  18. [History of the therapy of pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Jeney, András

    2013-11-03

    Increased blood cell regeneration in exsanguinated experimental animals treated either with liver or with aqueous liver extracts was reported by Whipple and by Jeney and Jobling, respectively. These findings stimulated Minot and Murphy to provide evidence for the efficacy of liver against anaemia in clinical studies. After oral administration of liver (45-50 g per day) for 45 patients with anaemia perniciosa improvement of the hematological status was demonstrated. Consequently, for proving the therapeutic value of liver therapy Whipple, Minot and Murphy received Nobel price in 1934. The isolation of the antianemic factor from the liver has been succeeded in 1948 and designated as vitamin B12. At the same time Lucy Wills applied yeast for the treatment of pregnant women with anemia related to undernourishment. The conclusions of this study inspired the discovery of folate. The detailed investigation of the mode of action of vitamin B12 and folate enriched our knowledge in the area of pathophysiology and extended the clinical application of these two drugs.

  19. [Diagnosis of hypochromic microcytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, M; Bresson, J-L; Brouzes, C; Ruemmele, F-M; Puy, H; Beaumont, C

    2012-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most frequent cause of hypochromic microcytic anemia in children, but other causes, some of them requiring specific management, may be involved. Checking the iron-status is absolutely mandatory. When iron-status parameters are low, inadequate intake, malabsorption, blood loss, and abnormal iron utilization must be tested. In absence of iron deficiency, α- and β-globin and heme biosynthetic gene status must be checked. Assessing the iron stock level is difficult, because there is an overlap between the values observed in iron-replete and iron-deprived patients, so that at least 2 iron-status parameters must be below normal for diagnosing iron deficiency. Furthermore, inflammation may also mimic some characteristics of iron deficiency. Diagnosing iron deficiency leads to prescribing iron supplementation with follow-up at the end and 3 months after cessation of treatment. When iron stores are not replete at the end of treatment, compliance and dosage must be reevaluated and occult bleeding sought. The latter is also required when the iron store decreases 3 months after cessation of iron replacement. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  1. Nutritional Anemia and Megaloblastosis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Louis; Brunton, Lauder; Hsieh, Yang-Shu

    1966-01-01

    Macrogranulocytic and/or erythroid megaloblastic bone marrow changes which could not be accurately predicted from the hematologic findings in the blood were present in 25% of 305 mildly to moderately anemic pregnant women attending a public antepartum clinic in Montreal. Iron deficiency was the primary cause of anemia in most instances. Serum folate activity of less than 4.1 ng./ml. and/or serum vitamin B12 levels of less than 100 pg./ml. were present in 90% of the 77 patients having these bone marrow changes, whereas approximately one-third of 228 patients with normoblastic marrow had these low values. Red cell folate did not correlate as well as serum folate activity with bone marrow changes. After treatment with oral folic acid in the range of 0.2 mg. to 0.8 mg., daily, for seven to 14 days, the megaloblastic and macrogranulocytic changes in patients with low serum folate activity and normal serum vitamin B12 values disappeared in 15 of 21 patients. Of five women having both low folate and vitamin B12 values, three failed to respond and two showed only partial improvement after 0.4 mg. of folic acid daily, per os, for 10 days. The average diet of these anemic women was suboptimal in folate and in iron. PMID:5907944

  2. Infections in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jessica M; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S; Walsh, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of death in patients with aplastic anemia (AA). There are differences between the immunocompromised state of a patient with AA and the patient who is neutropenic due to chemotherapy and this leads to a difference in the infections that they incur. Prolonged neutropenia is one of the largest risk factors for the development of infections with the invasive mycoses and bacteria. Recovery from neutropenia is directly related to survival, and supportive care plays a large role in protection while the patient is in a neutropenic state. The most common invasive mycoses include the Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Candida spp., and Fusarium spp. Bacterial infections that are seen in patients with AA include gram-positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus, Staphylococus aureus, Clostridium spp., Micrococcus, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, and Bacillus cereus. Gram-negative infections including gram-negative bacilli, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Bacteroides fragilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumonia, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio vulnificus. Viral infections are much less common but include those that belong to the Herpesviridae family, community-acquired respiratory viral infection, and the viral hepatitides A, B, and C. Evidence of the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis has also been documented. This review discusses the major invasive fungal infections, bacterial pathogens, parasites, and viral infections that are found in patients with AA who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy. The specific immune impairment and current treatment parameters for each of these classes of infection will also be discussed.

  3. Virulence determinants of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susan L; Fuller, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that rapidly Induces disease in experimentally infected horses. Because EIAV infection and replication is centered on the monocyte/macrophage and has a pronounced acute disease stage, it is a useful model system for understanding the contribution of monocyte/macrophages to other lentivirus-induced diseases. Genetic mapping studies utilizing chimeric proviruses in which parental viruses are acutely virulent or avirulent have allowed the identification of important regions that influence acute virulence. U3 regions in the viral LTR, surface envelope (SU) protein and the accessory S2 gene strongly influence acute disease expression. While the chimeric proviruses provide insight into genes or genome regions that affect viral pathogenesis, it is then necessary to further dissect those regions to focus on specific virus-host mechanisms that lead to disease expression. The V6 region of the viral env protein is an example of one identified region that may interact with the ELR-1 receptor in an important way and we are currently identifying S2 protein motifs required for disease expression.

  4. Equine infectious anemia: prospects for control.

    PubMed

    Issel, C J; McManus, J M; Hagius, S D; Foil, L D; Adams, W V; Montelaro, R C

    1990-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia has been managed in most countries by the imposition of testing and quarantine regulations. In the United States, about 700,000 of the more than 7,000,000 horses are tested annually. As long as the status of greater than 90% of the horse population remains unknown and horses are transported and congregate in a relatively unrestricted manner, EIA will continue to exact its toll. Therefore, it is incumbent on the scientific community to continue to develop and refine practical and sensitive diagnostic tests for EIA which will be used in an expanding market, to reduce the number of untested horses and to increase the accuracy of test results. Under ideal conditions, EIA can spread rapidly in a localized population with potentially devastating results. Although strict adherence to sanitary regulations will minimize the likelihood of epizootics, the existence of a large reservoir of untested horses with occasional contact with uninfected test-negative horses will ensure the continued transmission of EIAV. The change of this transmission occurring as a result of human intervention can be eliminated but it is not possible to eliminate the threat posed by blood feeding insects. If these "chance encounters" between an untested EIAV infected horse and a test-negative horse occur under field conditions where horse flies are abundant and the proximate distance between the horses is minimal, transmission is efficient if the quantity of EIAV in the blood of the donor horse is high.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. [High altitude anemia: validity of definition criteria].

    PubMed

    Yepez, R; Estevez, E; Galan, P; Chauliac, M; Davila, M; Calle, A; Estrella, R; Masse-Raimbault, A M; Hercberg, S

    1994-01-01

    The effect of iron and folate supplementation on the hemoglobin response and iron status was studied in male and female equatorian medical students: 66 in Quito (2,800 m altitude) and 40 in Guayaquil (sea level). At the end of the supplementation, there was a nearly complete disappearance of biochemical evidence of iron deficiency in the two groups of students. In Quito, 30% of the men and 26% of the women increased their hemoglobin concentration by more than 1 g/dl after one month of supplementation and could be considered as true anemics, compared to 31% of the men and 29% of the women in Guayaquil. This study shows that at sea level, cut-off points defined by WHO for hemoglobin, taking as reference the impact of a supplementation trial, have a specificity of 100% but poor sensitivity (58%). For people living at high altitudes, cut-off limits adjusted for altitude seem unsuitable: the specificity is 98% but the sensitivity is 0%. Studies taking into account all the factors impacting on the hemoglobin level could be useful for defining cut-off points for high-altitude anemia better than those currently recommended.

  6. Epidemiology of aplastic anemia: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Montané, Eva; Ibáñez, Luisa; Vidal, Xavier; Ballarín, Elena; Puig, Ramon; García, Nuria; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    2008-04-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare and severe disease. Its incidence varies considerably worldwide. We aimed at describing the epidemiology of this disease, including the incidence, mortality and survival trends, in a well-defined population. Since 1980, a case-control surveillance study of aplastic anemia has been carried out by a cooperative group, in the metropolitan area of Barcelona. Inclusion is dependent on the patient having at least two of the following features: white blood cell count < or = 3.5 x 10(9)/L, platelet count < or = 50 x 10(9)/L, hemoglobin <10 g/L or hematocrit of <30%; when only one of these last two criteria is fulfilled, a reticulocyte count of < or = 30 x 10(9)/L is also required. The bone marrow biopsy has to be compatible with the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. Between 1980 and 2003, a total of 235 cases of aplastic anemia were identified. The overall incidence was 2.34 per million inhabitants per year and the incidence increased with age. Most of the cases were classified as severe or very severe aplastic anemia. Survival rates at 3 months, and at 2 and 15 years after the diagnosis were 73%, 57%, and 51%, respectively. Advanced age and more severe disease at the time of diagnosis were associated with a lower survival rate. There was a trend to a better 2-year survival rate among patients treated with bone marrow transplantation. Forty-nine cases (20.8%) were exposed to drugs reported to be associated with aplastic anemia, and 21 (8.9%) to toxic agents. The incidence of aplastic anemia in Barcelona is low but the case fatality rate is high. Advanced age and severe disease at the time of diagnosis were associated with decreased survival.

  7. Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000 1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8 000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

  8. Determinants of anemia among young children in rural India.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Black, James; Muthayya, Sumithra; Shet, Anita; Bhat, Vijay; Nagaraj, Savitha; Prashanth, N S; Sudarshan, H; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Shet, Arun S

    2010-07-01

    More than 75% of Indian toddlers are anemic. Data on factors associated with anemia in India are limited. The objective of this study was to determine biological, nutritional, and socioeconomic risk factors for anemia in this vulnerable age group. We conducted a cross-sectional study of children aged 12 to 23 months in 2 rural districts of Karnataka, India. Children were excluded if they were unwell or had received a blood transfusion. Hemoglobin, ferritin, folate, vitamin B(12), retinol-binding protein, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were determined. Children were also tested for hemoglobinopathy, malaria infection, and hookworm infestation. Anthropometric measurements, nutritional intake, family wealth, and food security were recorded. In addition, maternal hemoglobin level was measured. Anemia (hemoglobin level < 11.0 g/dL) was detected in 75.3% of the 401 children sampled. Anemia was associated with iron deficiency (low ferritin level), maternal anemia, and food insecurity. Children's ferritin levels were directly associated with their iron intake and CRP levels and with maternal hemoglobin level and inversely associated with continued breastfeeding and the child's energy intake. A multivariate model for the child's hemoglobin level revealed associations with log(ferritin level) (coefficient: 1.20; P < .001), folate level (0.05; P < .01), maternal hemoglobin level (0.16; P < .001), family wealth index (0.02; P < .05), child's age (0.05 per month; P < .005), hemoglobinopathy (-1.51; P < .001), CRP level (-0.18; P < .001), and male gender (-0.38; P < .05). Wealth index and food insecurity could be interchanged in this model. Hemoglobin level was primarily associated with iron status in these Indian toddlers; however, maternal hemoglobin level, family wealth, and food insecurity were also important factors. Strategies for minimizing childhood anemia must include optimized iron intake but should simultaneously address maternal anemia, poverty, and food

  9. Anemia, nutritional status, and inflammation in hospitalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Alfons; Jonsson, Palmi V; Bjornsson, Sigurbjorn; Thorsdottir, Inga

    2008-01-01

    Anemia (hemoglobin <120 g/L) in elderly patients is a health problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of anemia and associations of anemia with nutritional status and inflammation in hospitalized elderly. Sixty patients from the Department of Geriatrics were randomly assigned to participate. Blood samples were drawn and analyzed at the laboratory of the University Hospital in Reykjavik. Nutritional status was assessed using anthropometric and hematologic parameters. The prevalence of anemia was 36.7%. Female participants were more frequently anemic than male participants (47.4% versus 18.2%, P = 0.024). Anemic patients had a lower albumin level (31.3 versus 33.4 g/L, P = 0.019) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (29.6 versus 16.0 mm/h, P = 0.005) and were more often malnourished (81.8% versus 44.7%, P = 0.005) than non-anemic patients. Hemoglobin correlated with prealbumin (rho = 0.338, P = 0.008) and albumin (rho = 0.250, P = 0.054) levels, but negatively with age (rho = -0.310, P = 0.016) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (rho = -0.412, P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and nutritional status were significant predictors of hemoglobin (R(2) = 34.0%). This cross-sectional analysis provides evidence of anemia in 36.7% of patients hospitalized at the Landspitali-University Hospital in Reykjavik and shows an association among anemia, deteriorated nutritional status, and inflammation. Future prospective studies are needed to assess the efficacy of adjuvant nutritional support to stabilize or improve nutritional status including anemia in hospitalized elderly.

  10. Prevalence of anemia and effects on mortality in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lindenfeld, Joann

    2005-03-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease, the adverse cardiovascular effects of anemia have been well established. New data are emerging to suggest anemia may represent an important treatable cause of cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure. To improve the understanding of the problem of anemia in heart failure, it is important to assess the factors that influence the prevalence of anemia and to assess the consistency of the association of anemia and mortality in various populations of patients with heart failure. A systematic review of the literature was conducted by performing detailed searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE, searching the bibliographies of the articles retrieved during the database search, and conferring with heart-failure experts involved in clinical trials. Twenty-eight publications from 26 studies that evaluated anemia prevalence with or without effects on mortality in patients with heart failure were identified. The definition of anemia used in each study was tabulated along with pertinent patient characteristics, the prevalence of anemia, and the association between anemia and mortality. Anemia is common among patients with heart failure. The prevalence of anemia increases with increasing severity of heart failure, declining renal function, and increasing age. Anemia is consistently associated with poorer survival in all patient populations, but there are substantial differences in the patient populations and definition of anemia. To clarify the prognostic relationship of anemia in patients with heart failure, a standard definition of anemia should be adopted accounting for the menopausal status of women. Age, severity of heart failure, evaluation of kidney function, important comorbidities, and use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors should be included, and correctable causes of anemia should be excluded. Inclusion of these factors should allow better definition of the relationship between anemia and prognosis in

  11. THE ETIOLOGY OF BARTONELLA MURIS ANEMIA OF THE ALBINO RAT

    PubMed Central

    Marmorston-Gottesman, J.; Perla, David

    1932-01-01

    1. Bartonella muris has been isolated in pure culture on Noguchi's leptospira medium from the blood of the splenectomized adult rat suffering with Bartonella muris anemia. 2. Bartonella muris is a small, actively motile, Gram-negative bacillus. It grows best on media containing blood and on Noguchi's leptospira medium. The optimal temperature for growth is 20–25°C. It produces neither gas nor acid on media containing sugars. It does not hemolyze blood in artificial media. Viability of the cultures in leptospira media was maintained for 36 days. 3. With this culture a severe anemia was produced in rats weighing 30 gm., with the occasional appearance of Bartonella muris bodies on the red cells. The anemia occurred within 24 hours, and lasted for 3 to 5 days with recovery of the rat. Bartonella muris was recovered in pure culture from the blood of these animals. The blood of these rats was infectious for other 30 gm. rats. 4. 3 week old rabbits were infected with cultures of Bartonella muris, a severe anemia resulting after an incubation period of 48 hours. The organism was recovered from the blood on the 5th day after injection. Bartonella muris is non-pathogenic for adult rabbits. 5. A severe anemia was produced in young guinea pigs with cultures of Bartonella muris within 48 hours. The organism was recovered on the 2nd and 5th days after injection. Postmortem examination revealed changes in the organs similar to those found in splenectomized rats suffering with spontaneous Bartonella muris anemia. 6. The infection was reproduced in white mice. In one instance a severe anemia developed on the 5th and 6th days. The organism was recovered on the 6th day. 7. The anemia was produced in splenectomized adult rats of non-carrier stock. The organism was recovered from the blood stream of these rats. A marked leukocytosis was noted (65,000) at the peak of the anemia as is found in the spontaneous disease in infected splenectomized adult rats. 8. Serological tests have

  12. Preoperative anemia in colon cancer: assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; Gannon, Christopher J; Osborn, Tiffany M; Taylor, Michelle D; Malone, Debra L; Napolitano, Lena M

    2002-06-01

    Anemia is common in cancer patients and is associated with reduced survival. Recent studies document that treatment of anemia with blood transfusion in cancer patients is associated with increased infection risk, tumor recurrence, and mortality. We therefore investigated the incidence of preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer and assessed risk factors for anemia. Prospective data were collected on 311 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer over a 6-year period from 1994 through 1999. Patients were stratified by age, gender, presenting complaint, preoperative hematocrit, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and TNM classification. Discrete variables were compared using Pearson's Chi-square analysis. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t test. Differences were considered significant when P < 0.05. The mean age of the study cohort was 67 +/- 9.2 with 98 per cent of the study population being male. The mean AJCC stage was 2.2 +/- 1.2 and the mean preoperative hematocrit was 35 +/- 7.9 with an incidence of 46.1 per cent. The most common presenting complaints were hematochezia (n = 59), anemia (n = 51), heme-occult-positive stool (n = 33), bowel obstruction (n = 26), abdominal pain (n = 21), and palpable mass (n = 13). Preoperative anemia was most common in patients with right colon cancer with an incidence of 57.6 per cent followed by left colon cancer (42.2%) and rectal cancer (29.8%). Patients with right colon cancer had significantly lower preoperative hematocrits compared with left colon cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 36 +/- 7.4; P < 0.01) and rectal cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 38 +/- 6.0; P < 0.0001). Patients with right colon cancer also had significantly increased stage at presentation compared with left colon cancer (2.3 +/- 1.3 vs 2.1 +/- 1.2; P < 0.02). Age was not a significant risk factor for preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer. We conclude that there is a high incidence of anemia in patients with colon cancer. Patients with right colon

  13. Association of Preoperative Anemia With Postoperative Mortality in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Goobie, Susan M; Faraoni, David; Zurakowski, David; DiNardo, James A

    2016-09-01

    Neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery are at risk for adverse outcomes. Preoperative anemia is a strong independent risk factor for postoperative mortality in adults. To our knowledge, this association has not been investigated in the neonatal population. To assess the association between preoperative anemia and postoperative mortality in neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery in a large sample of US hospitals. Using data from the 2012 and 2013 pediatric databases of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, we conducted a retrospective study of neonates undergoing noncardiac surgery. Analysis of the data took place between June 2015 and December 2015. All neonates (0-30 days old) with a recorded preoperative hematocrit value were included. Anemia defined as hematocrit level of less than 40%. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to assess the association between preoperative hematocrit and mortality, and the Youden J Index was used to determine the specific hematocrit cutoff point to define anemia in the neonatal population. Demographic and postoperative outcomes variables were compared between anemic and nonanemic neonates. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with postoperative neonatal mortality. An external validation was performed using the 2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Neonates accounted for 2764 children (6%) in the 2012-2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases. Neonates inlcuded in the study were predominately male (64.5%), white (66.3%), and term (69.9% greater than 36 weeks' gestation) and weighed more than 2 kg (85.0%). Postoperative in-hospital mortality was 3.4% in neonates and 0.6% in all age groups (0-18 years). A preoperative hematocrit level of less than 40% was the optimal cutoff (Youden) to predict in-hospital mortality

  14. Anemia of chronic disease is the more frequent type of anemia seen in patients with chronic idiopathic neutropenia of adults.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, H A; Eliopoulos, D G; Valatas, V; Eliopoulos, G D

    2001-04-01

    This study describes the frequency and the type of anemia seen in patients with nonimmune chronic idiopathic neutropenia of adults (NI-CINA). We found that NI-CINA patients had low hemoglobin levels and increased serum concentrations of erythropoietin (EPO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The hemoglobin levels correlated positively with the number of circulating neutrophils and inversely with the levels of EPO and TNF-alpha but not of IL-1beta. Anemia, defined as the reduction of the hemoglobin below 12.0 g/dl for women and 13.3 g/dl for men, was found in 23 out of 148 patients studied, a proportion of 15.5%. Two of the anemic patients had iron deficiency anemia (8.7%), 11 had anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 47.8%) presenting with normal or slightly reduced erythrocytic indices, low serum iron, and increased serum ferritin, and the remaining ten had anemia of undefined pathogenesis (AUP; 43.5%) with normal or slightly decreased erythrocytic indices, serum iron ranging from 43 to 88 microg/dl, and ferritin values ranging from 12 to 50 ng/ml. We conclude that ACD is the more frequent type of anemia seen in patients with NI-CINA, and that pro-inflammatory cytokines, notably TNF-alpha, may be involved in the pathogenesis of both ACD and AUP, given that serum levels of the cytokine were significantly increased and that the EPO response to anemia was blunted in these patients. These findings further support our previously reported suggestion for the possible existence, in NI-CINA patients, of an unrecognized low-grade chronic inflammatory process that may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

  15. Prevalence, characteristics and prognostic significance of anemia in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Terrier, B; Resche-Rigon, M; Andres, E; Bonnet, F; Hachulla, E; Marie, I; Rosenthal, E; Cacoub, P

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of anemia has been studied in well-defined populations, but no large study is available for less restricted populations with various disorders. Two-phase nationwide study: (i) a cross-sectional study including 1351 patients aimed to define the prevalence and characteristics of anemic patients seen in France, and (ii) a prospective longitudinal study of 398 anemic patients aimed to define factors associated with survival. Anemia was present in 874 (65%) patients according to WHO criteria, and 573 (42%) patients had hemoglobin levels <110 g/l. Characteristics independently associated with anemia were the presence of cancer, hematological disorder, renal failure and inflammatory syndrome. Baseline factors negatively associated with the 3-month survival were cancer, older age and a lower target hemoglobin level defined at baseline. Negative predictive factors at Month 3 of the 6-month survival were older age and the absence of correction of anemia according to the target hemoglobin level defined at baseline. Anemia is frequent and is associated with cancer, hematological disorders, renal failure and inflammatory syndrome. At baseline, prognostic factors of 3-month survival include cancer, older age and lower target hemoglobin level, whereas reaching the target hemoglobin level at Month 3 has a favorable prognostic impact on 6-month survival.

  16. Anemia and Helicobacter pylori Seroreactivity in a Rural Haitian Population

    PubMed Central

    Shak, Joshua R.; Sodikoff, Jamie B.; Speckman, Rebecca A.; Rollin, Francois G.; Chery, Marie P.; Cole, Conrad R.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is a significant health concern worldwide and can be the result of nutritional, environmental, social, and infectious etiologies. We estimated the prevalence of anemia in 336 pre-school children and 132 adults in the rural Central Plateau of Haiti and assessed associations with age, sex, household size, water source, sanitation, and Helicobacter pylori seroreactivity using logistic regression analysis; 80.1% (269/336) of children and 63.6% (84/132) of adults were anemic. Among children, younger age was associated with increased prevalence of anemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5–11.1 for children 6–11 months compared with children 48–59 months). Among adults, 50.8% were H. pylori-seropositive, and seropositivity was inversely associated with anemia (aOR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2–0.9). Anemia prevalence in this region of Haiti is very high and not attributable to sanitary conditions or a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. PMID:22049049

  17. Evidencing the Role of Erythrocytic Apoptosis in Malarial Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Totino, Paulo R. R.; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio T.; Ferreira-da-Cruz, Maria de Fátima

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade it has become clear that, similarly to nucleated cells, enucleated red blood cells (RBCs) are susceptible to programmed apoptotic cell death. Erythrocytic apoptosis seems to play a role in physiological clearance of aged RBCs, but it may also be implicated in anemia of different etiological sources including drug therapy and infectious diseases. In malaria, severe anemia is a common complication leading to death of children and pregnant women living in malaria-endemic regions of Africa. The pathogenesis of malarial anemia is multifactorial and involves both ineffective production of RBCs by the bone marrow and premature elimination of non-parasitized RBCs, phenomena potentially associated with apoptosis. In the present overview, we discuss evidences associating erythrocytic apoptosis with the pathogenesis of severe malarial anemia, as well as with regulation of parasite clearance in malaria. Efforts to understand the role of erythrocytic apoptosis in malarial anemia can help to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention based on apoptotic pathways and consequently, mitigate the harmful impact of malaria in global public health. PMID:28018860

  18. [Blunted erythropoietic response in the anemia of anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Juncà, Jordi; Sorigué, Marc; Rodríguez-Hernández, Inés; Aldea, Marta; Granada, María Luisa; Sánchez-Planell, Lluis

    2015-11-20

    The cause of the anemia in anorexia nervosa (AN) has not been fully ascertained. Ferritin, folate and cobalamin values are usually within normal ranges. Anemia does not have a relationship with bone marrow changes and erythropoietin (EPO) levels have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the EPO response in a small group of AN patients. EPO levels were measured in serum samples of 41 female AN patients (11 with anemia, and 30 with normal blood cell count). The adequacy of EPO response was assessed by comparing the increase observed in a group of normal weight patients with anemia. EPO concentrations in anemic AN patients were higher than in non-anemic: 20.63mU/mL (4.04-28.46) vs 8.7mU/mL (3.9-20.93), P=.0088, but the increase in EPO was lower than expected (27.85mU/mL [17.7-118.9]), P=.014. BMI and the difference between actual and expected EPO were inversely correlated. Inadequate EPO response may partly explain anemia in AN, but further studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Ceftriaxone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia in a Jehovah's Witness.

    PubMed

    Tasch, James; Gonzalez-Zayaz, Pedro

    2017-04-21

    BACKGROUND Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is a rare condition that may result from the administration of an antibiotic, most notably the cephalosporin class, commonly used in both the adult and pediatric populations. A delay in recognition by a provider may lead to continuation of the offending agent and possibly result in fatal outcomes. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 65-year-old woman on ceftriaxone infusions after being diagnosed with acute mitral valve endocarditis 3 weeks prior, which presented with severe anemia and bilateral transient vision loss. Being a Jehovah's Witness, the patient refused blood product transfusions and was managed with alternative therapies. The etiology of the symptoms was suspected to be a hemolytic anemia directly related to her ceftriaxone infusions. CONCLUSIONS This report demonstrates the importance of close vigilance while prescribing drugs known to cause hemolytic anemia. Although rare, drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia caused by ceftriaxone may be a potentially fatal condition, but with early recognition and withdrawal of the offending agent, successful treatment may ensue. Serological tests should be utilized to obtain a definitive diagnosis.

  20. Role of Gas6 in erythropoiesis and anemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Burnier, Laurent; Lambrechts, Diether; Fish, Richard J.; Tjwa, Marc; Plaisance, Stéphane; Sugamele, Rocco; DeMol, Maria; Martinez-Soria, Eduardo; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Lemke, Greg; Goff, Stephen P.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Earp, H. Shelton; Chanson, Marc; Collen, Désiré; Izui, Shozo; Schapira, Marc; Conway, Edward M.; Carmeliet, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Many patients with anemia fail to respond to treatment with erythropoietin (Epo), a commonly used hormone that stimulates erythroid progenitor production and maturation by human BM or by murine spleen. The protein product of growth arrest–specific gene 6 (Gas6) is important for cell survival across several cell types, but its precise physiological role remains largely enigmatic. Here, we report that murine erythroblasts released Gas6 in response to Epo and that Gas6 enhanced Epo receptor signaling by activating the serine-threonine kinase Akt in these cells. In the absence of Gas6, erythroid progenitors and erythroblasts were hyporesponsive to the survival activity of Epo and failed to restore hematocrit levels in response to anemia. In addition, Gas6 may influence erythropoiesis via paracrine erythroblast-independent mechanisms involving macrophages. When mice with acute anemia were treated with Gas6, the protein normalized hematocrit levels without causing undesired erythrocytosis. In a transgenic mouse model of chronic anemia caused by insufficient Epo production, Gas6 synergized with Epo in restoring hematocrit levels. These findings may have implications for the treatment of patients with anemia who fail to adequately respond to Epo. PMID:18188450

  1. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias in adults.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich

    2010-09-16

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a heterogeneous disease with respect to the type of the antibody involved and the absence or presence of an underlying condition. Treatment decisions should be based on careful diagnostic evaluation. Primary warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to steroids, but most patients remain steroid-dependent, and many require second-line treatment. Currently, splenectomy can be regarded as the most effective and best-evaluated second-line therapy, but there are still only limited data on long-term efficacy and adverse effects. The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab is another second-line therapy with documented short-term efficacy, but there is limited information on long-term efficacy and side effects. The efficacy of immunosuppressants is poorly evaluated. Primary cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to rituximab but are resistant to steroids and splenectomy. The most common causes of secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemias are malignancies, immune diseases, or drugs. They may be treated in a way similar to primary autoimmune hemolytic anemias, by immunosuppressants or by treatment of the underlying disease.

  2. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia.

    PubMed

    Crispino, John D; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2014-05-15

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits.

  3. Anemia of chronic disease: illness or adaptive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Županić-Krmek; Sučić, Mirna; Bekić, Dinko

    2014-09-01

    The anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is the most prevalent anemia after iron deficiency anemia. It is associated with infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disease. ACD is a medical condition caused by the release of cytokines which mediate inflammatory and immune response (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins 1 and 6, and interferon). Abnormal iron metabolism with iron trapping in reticuloendothelial cells is primarily the cause of this condition, making iron unavailable for erythropoiesis although iron tissue reserves are elevated. Disorder in erythropoietin secretion and shortening of red cell life span also play a role in the pathogenesis of ACD. The main therapy is treatment of the underlying disorder and red cell transfusions in severe anemia. In more severe (protracted) anemias that lead to impaired quality of life and have an impact on the mortality and survival rate, erythropoiesis stimulating agents are used. Recently, new possibilities are being evaluated in terms of therapy for ACD in defined conditions, such as chelating agents, as well as hepcidin antagonist and other erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

  4. [Megaloblastic anemia associated with salazosulfapyridine treatment for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Kobayashi, Kichinosuke; Hirata, Yuji; Hara, Satoshi; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Tsuji, Motomu; Takubo, Takayuki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2008-12-01

    A 70-year-old man was diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 2005. He was treated with 1 g salazosulfapyridine (SASP) daily for two years. Hematological investigations conducted since 2005 demonstrated hemoglobin concentrations of 8 approximately 9 g/dl, which then dropped to 4.9 g/dl on November 21, 2007, following which he was admitted to our hospital. Megaloblastic anemia associated with SASP treatment and anemia of chronic disorders were diagnosed on the basis of folate deficiency and bone marrow examination. This report describes a case of megaloblastic anemia, which developed two years after starting SASP and promptly recovered after its withdrawal and treatment with folic acid and prednisolone. The doses of SASP prescribed for RA in Japan are less than those prescribed abroad. Megaloblastic anemia associated with SASP treatment for RA is not usually detected in Japan. Currently, SASP is widely used and one of the key drugs in the treatment of RA. This case suggests that SASP therapy in RA might result in megaloblastic anemia.

  5. Abnormal erythrocyte membrane protein pattern in severe megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, S K

    1978-01-01

    The erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of patients with megaloblastic anemia was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. In severe megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid or vitamin B12 deficiency, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was grossly abnormal, lacking bands 1, 2 (spectrin), and 3 and having several diffuse, faster migrating bands. After adequate vitamin replacement therapy, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern returned to normal. In mild megaloblastic anemia, secondary either to folic acid of vitamin B12 deficiency, and in severe iron deficiency anemia, the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern was normal. Erythrocyte membrane protein pattern of normal membranes did not change after mixing with abnormal membranes before polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Protease activity extracted from membranes of megalocytes was not different from normal. These findings indicate that the erythrocyte membrane protein pattern is abnormal in severe megaloblastic anemia and that this abnormality is not secondary to increased activity of the endogenous erythrocyte membrane proteinase. Images PMID:659579

  6. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  7. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  8. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  9. Macrocytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia Induced by Orlistat

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Martinez, David; Garcia-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Montero-Santamaria, Nieves; Villar-Ruiz, Olga Patricia; Ruiz-Garcia, Antonio; Diaz-Alonso, Raquel Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The overall incidence of obesity and its prevalence is increasing continuously. The obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor whose importance is increasing too. It is associated with many chronic conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular diseases. The obesity is also implicated as a risk factor for several kinds of cancer such as esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, breast cancer in menopausal women. The treatment of the obesity may reduce the incidence of these diseases. The mainstray of the treatment of obesity is changing the lifestyles, but obesity´s treatment may need drug therapy or even though surgical treatment. Orlistat is a specific inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, which stops fat absortion. It is used along with a hypocaloric diet, for obesity´s treatment. The beneficial effects of orlistat include weight loss, the improvement of blood pressure´s control, it may delay the development of diabetes mellitus, and it may reduce HbA1c. Case Report: Besides the interaction with other drugs (mainly warfarin and amiodarone). Orlistat´s mainly side effects are gastrointestinal disorders such as the existence of oily spotting from the rectum, abdominal pain or discomfort, fecal urgency. There are also side effects at other levels, like flu symptoms, hypoglycemia, heathache or upper respiratory infections. There are other side effects with very low incidence but clinically relevant like pancreatitis, subacute liver failure, severe liver disease, myopathy, or tubular necrosis secondary to oxalate nephropathy induced by Orlistat. Discussion: In this case report appears a new adverse effect of Orlistat that has not been described above: thrombopenia and macrocytic anemia. PMID:24719628

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  11. The hepcidin-ferroportin system as a therapeutic target in anemias and iron overload disorders.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2011-01-01

    The review summarizes the current understanding of the role of hepcidin and ferroportin in normal iron homeostasis and its disorders. The various approaches to therapeutic targeting of hepcidin and ferroportin in iron-overload disorders (mainly hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia) and iron-restrictive anemias (anemias associated with infections, inflammatory disorders, and certain malignancies, anemia of chronic kidney diseases, and iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia) are also discussed.

  12. Evaluation of Reticulocyte Parameters in Iron Deficiency, Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Mixed Anemia.

    PubMed

    Balci, Yasemin Isik; Akpinar, Funda Ozgurler; Polat, Aziz; Uzun, Utku; Ergin, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Reticulocytes are the youngest erythrocytes released from the bone marrow into the blood and they circulate for 1-2 days before becoming mature erythrocytes. In literature, there were studies about reticulocyte parameters that could help in differentiation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from vitamin B12 deficiency anemia. However, in those studies there were no data about differentiation of mixed anemia (vitamin B12 deficiency and IDA). The purpose of this study is to explore a response to 'could reticulocyte parameters help in differential diagnosis of mixed anemia?' in 6-12 years old children. The study enrolled 26 patients with IDA, 22 patients with mixed anemia, 32 patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, and 32 age and gender matched healthy controls. Blood for hematological parameters such as complete blood count, reticulocyte count, CHr, MCVr, CHCMr were collected into standard tubes containing EDTA. There is a statistically significant difference of both MCV (mean corpuscular volume)/MCVr (Reticulocyte mean corpuscular volume) ratio and MCVr between IDA and controls; in controls and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; in controls and mixed anemia; in IDA and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; in IDA and mixed anemia. Also in terms of both CHr and CHCMr (Corpuscular mean hemoglobin concentration of reticulocyte), there is a statistically significant difference between controls and IDA; controls and mixed anemia; IDA and mixed anemia; IDA and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia. In mixed anemia, MCV could be normal or decreased, and in peripheral blood smear erythrocytes cells could be morphologically normal. For this reason diagnosis of mixed anemia is not easy and needs additional laboratory investigations. Our results suggest that in a differential diagnosis of mixed anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency, IDA, and healthy controls, CHr, CHCMr, and MCVr (together with MCV and individually) could be useful. So, with a simple and cheap laboratory parameter, differentiation of

  13. Deferasirox Decreases Liver Iron Concentration in Iron-Overloaded Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Aplastic Anemia and Other Rare Anemias.

    PubMed

    Kohgo, Yutaka; Urabe, Akio; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Agaoglu, Leyla; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Miyamura, Koichi; Lim, Lay Cheng; Glaser, Sabine; Wang, Candace; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with rare anemias can be managed with chelation therapy. This study evaluated deferasirox efficacy and safety in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), aplastic anemia (AA) or other rare anemias. A 1-year, open-label, multicenter, single-arm, phase II trial was performed with deferasirox (10–40 mg/kg/day, based on transfusion frequency and therapeutic goals), including an optional 1-year extension. The primary end point was a change in liver iron concentration (LIC) after 1 year. Secondary end points included changes in efficacy and safety parameters (including ophthalmologic assessments) overall as well as in a Japanese subpopulation. Overall, 102 patients (42 with MDS, 29 with AA and 31 with other rare anemias) were enrolled; 57 continued into the extension. Mean absolute change in LIC was –10.9 mg Fe/g dry weight (d.w.) after 1 year (baseline: 24.5 mg Fe/g d.w.) and –13.5 mg Fe/g d.w. after 2 years. The most common drug-related adverse event was increased serum creatinine (23.5%), predominantly in MDS patients. Four patients had suspected drug-related ophthalmologic abnormalities. Outcomes in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall population. Results confirm deferasirox efficacy in patients with rare anemias, including a Japanese subpopulation. The safety profile was consistent with previous studies and ophthalmologic parameters generally agreed with baseline values (EUDRACT 2006-003337-32).

  14. Factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in Brazilian preschool children.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Carlos A N de; Ricco, Rubens G; Ciampo, Luiz A del; Souza, Ana M; Pinho, Adriana P; Oliveira, José E Dutra de

    2004-01-01

    To examine the determining factors of anemia and iron deficiency in children attending two day care centers in the town of Pontal, southeast of Brazil. Cross-sectional study was conducted in 192 children aged 12 to 72 months. Personal data (age, sex, use of medicinal iron supplements, duration of breast-feeding, type of delivery, prenatal care, weight, and height), and socioeconomic data (number of co-inhabitants, parental schooling, and per capita family income) were obtained and evaluated together with hemoglobin, serum transferrin receptor, ferritin, and iron deficiency anemia. Age was the variable that most affected iron nutritional status, with higher hemoglobin values, lower transferrin receptor concentrations, higher ferritin values and lower iron deficiency anemia being detected with increasing age. The other studied variables did not show any correlation with iron nutritional status. The obtained data suggest that control strategies for this preschool population should be especially directed at younger children.

  15. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  16. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  17. Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G. Univ. of Maryland, College Park Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC )

    1991-03-11

    The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severe signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.

  18. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  19. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Ya-Ting

    2012-04-01

    Hemolysis is a common feature in patients with β-thalassemia major. As a result, autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicating β-thalassemia is easily overlooked. Here, the authors described the clinical features and management of 7 patients with β-thalassemia major and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. These patients had fever, cough, and tea-colored urine on admission. The laboratory investigations showed a significant drop in hemoglobin and increased serum bilirubin. Coombs' tests revealed that anti-immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-C3 was positive in 7 and 5 cases, respectively, whereas anti-Rh E alloantibody was positive in 3 cases. All the patients received corticosteroids treatments and blood transfusions. Patients with anti-Rh E alloantibodies also received immunoglobulin treatments. Six of the patients responded well to the management, but 1 patient developed recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia that required cyclosporin A treatment. All the patients remained well by following up for more than 6 months.

  20. A metastatic breast carcinoma presenting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Adorno, G; Girelli, G; Perrone, M P; Arista, M C; Coluzzi, S; Masi, M; Giudiceandrea, P; Papa, G

    1991-10-31

    The authors describe the case of a 75-year-old female who was hospitalized for anemia of unknown origin. Physical examination revealed a swelling in the right mammary region, where a mastectomy scar was present from surgery for a breast carcinoma. On admission, laboratory tests disclosed anemia (Hb, 8.5 g/dl), with a reticulocyte count of 65,000/mm3 and slightly increased bilirubin. Immunohematologic study revealed the presence of a red cell autoantibody with anti-D specificity in the serum and in the eluate from the patient's erythrocytes. A biopsy of the swelling was performed and histologic examination showed the presence of metastatic cells of breast carcinoma. The patient was given chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At this writing the anemia was absent, the immunohematologic study was negative, the swelling was greatly reduced, and no other metastatic lesions of breast carcinoma were present.

  1. Reproductive endocrine issues in men with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, A W; Muneyyirci-Delale, O

    2017-07-01

    In patients with sickle cell anemia, the sickling of red blood cells is known to cause end-organ damage by infarction. In some men who are affected by sickle cell anemia, the obstruction of venous outflow of the penis causes priapism, which could lead to erectile dysfunction. There is also evidence that the disease is linked to other reproductive issues in men-specifically delayed puberty, low testosterone, and sperm abnormalities-although the causes of these problems are less clear. Treatment of sickle cell anemia can have effects on the reproductive system as well. This review summarizes the findings from various publications pertaining to reproductive endocrinology, along with their conclusions and discrepancies. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  2. Trisomy 1q in a patient with severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Prodromos; Kojouri, Kiarash; Lee, Jiyun; Kern, William; Mulvihill, John J; Li, Shibo

    2006-08-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare, serious disease characterized by hypocellular bone marrow and pancytopenia in the peripheral blood. Most cases are acquired, idiopathic, and without gross cytogenetic abnormalities. A few chromosome abnormalities have recurred among a small subset of patients, most commonly trisomy 8 and monosomy 7. Some of these chromosome abnormalities have prognostic and therapeutic significance, although for most the clinical relevance is not known. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with idiopathic severe aplastic anemia in bone marrow cells with trisomy of the whole long arm of chromosome 1 due to an unbalanced translocation between chromosomes 1 and 15 at breakpoints of q10 and 15q10. This clonal abnormality (which, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported in a patient with aplastic anemia) suggests that genes on 1q may be involved in marrow aplasia.

  3. Laboratory testing for cobalamin deficiency in megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Oberley, Matthew J; Yang, David T

    2013-06-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia in Western populations. Laboratory evaluation of megaloblastic anemia frequently includes the assessment of patient cobalamin and folate status. Current total serum cobalamin measurements are performed in the clinical laboratory with competitive binding luminescence assays, whose results may not always accurately reflect actual cobalamin stores. Surrogate markers of cobalamin deficiency such as methylmalonic acid and homocysteine have been utilized to improve diagnostic accuracy; however, the specificity of these tests by themselves is rather low. Measurement of the biologically active fraction of cobalamin, holotranscobalamin, has been proposed as a replacement for current total cobalamin assays. Although holotranscobalamin measurements appear to have slighter better sensitivity, the specificity of this assay remains to be determined. The relative merits and demerits of commonly available methods to assess cobalamin deficiency in patients with suspected megaloblastic anemia are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Megaloblastic Anemia Associated with Surgically Produced Gastrointestinal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, James A.

    1955-01-01

    Two of the mechanisms for vitamin B12 deficiency, leading to megaloblastic anemia, are the result of surgically produced abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract. The basic mechanism is different for each lesion. Total gastrectomy results in complete lack of intrinsic factor which is necessary for vitamin B12 absorption. It is believed that if patients survive long enough and are not given prophylactic vitamin B12 therapy, all would develop megaloblastic anemia. Intestinal anastomosis leading to stasis of intestinal contents, with overgrowth of bacteria may cause vitamin B12 deficiency through bacterial interference with the utilization of vitamin B12. Use of radioactive vitamin B12 (cobalt60-labeled B12) has led to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of both types of megaloblastic anemia. The radioactive vitamin provides a useful tool for study of its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:13250423

  5. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  6. [Severe chronic anemia and endocrine disorders in children].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Michael; Theintz, Gérald

    2007-04-18

    Hemolytic anemias can induce various anomalies of the endocrine glands which can already be observed in children. Endocrine dysfunction is also found in the course of therapy for aplastic anemias, usually as undesirable side effects. In Europe, 2-9% of the population belongs to ethnic minorities at risk for developing hemolytic anemia. Pituitary affinity to iron deposition explains the high incidence of hypogonadism, puberty delay and growth retardation although other factors have to be considered. Growth hormone deficiency has to be ruled out as it can occur in a minority of subjects with thalassemia and sickle-cell disease (drepanocytosis). Diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism may also develop. Follow-up includes close monitoring of growth and pubertal development in order to guide therapeutic interventions.

  7. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  8. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus.

  9. Pharmacogenetics of ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, Javier; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenetics assesses inherited genetic differences in drug metabolic pathways and its role in medicine is growing. Ribavirin (RBV) and peginterferon were the standard of care therapy in hepatitis C virus infection during 15 years, with the addition of first-generation protease inhibitors at the beginning of 2010s. New direct-acting agents are the new standard of care, but RBV remains important in some scenarios. The main adverse effect of RBV is anemia, which requires dose reduction and even stopping treatment in some patients. Pharmacogenetics has identified ITPA and SLC28/29 genes to be closely related to RBV-induced anemia. The routine evaluation of these genes could help to identify those patients at risk of developing anemia during the hepatitis C virus treatment.

  10. Portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, POR-006 SKID D storage plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, O.D.

    1997-09-04

    This document provides a storage plan for portable exhausters POR-004 SKID B, POR-005 SKID C, AND POR-006 SKID D. The exhausters will be stored until they are needed by the TWRS (Tank Waste Remediation Systems) Saltwell Pumping Program. The storage plan provides criteria for portable exhauster storage, periodic inspections during storage, and retrieval from storage.

  11. Characterization and pathogenesis of anemia in glycogen storage disease type Ia and Ib

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David Q.; Carreras, Caroline T.; Fiske, Laurie M.; Austin, Stephanie; Boree, Danielle; Kishnani, Priya S.; Weinstein, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to characterize the frequency and causes of anemia in glycogen storage disease type I. Methods Hematologic data and iron studies were available from 202 subjects (163 with glycogen storage disease Ia and 39 with glycogen storage disease Ib). Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentrations less than the 5th percentile for age and gender; severe anemia was defined as presence of a hemoglobin <10 g/dl. Results In glycogen storage disease Ia, 68/163 patients were anemic at their last follow-up. Preadolescent patients tended to have milder anemia secondary to iron deficiency, but anemia of chronic disease predominated in adults. Severe anemia was present in 8/163 patients, of whom 75% had hepatic adenomas. The anemia improved or resolved in all 10 subjects who underwent resection of liver lesions. Anemia was present in 72% of patients with glycogen storage disease Ib, and severe anemia occurred in 16/39 patients. Anemia in patients with glycogen storage disease Ib was associated with exacerbations of glycogen storage disease enterocolitis, and there was a significant correlation between C-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels (P = 0.036). Conclusion Anemia is a common manifestation of both glycogen storage disease Ia and Ib, although the pathophysiology appears to be different between these conditions. Those with severe anemia and glycogen storage disease Ia likely have hepatic adenomas, whereas glycogen storage disease enterocolitis should be considered in those with glycogen storage disease Ib. PMID:22678084

  12. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  13. Severe anemia associated with Mycoplasma wenyonii infection in a mature cow

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Velguth, Karen E.; Snider, Timothy A.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Simpson, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment of clinical anemia in a mature Angus cow infected with the hemoplasma Mycoplasma wenyonii are described. Mycoplasma wenyonii has been previously reported to cause clinical anemia in young or splenectomized cattle; however, infection has not been associated with severe anemia in mature animals. PMID:22379205

  14. Fetal Anemia With Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension: A Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Shah, Piyush; Thompson, Kirsten; Rao, Shripada

    2015-04-01

    Fetal anemia may cause tissue hypoxia and hence has the potential to predispose to persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Review articles and textbooks do not include severe anemia as a cause of PPHN. We report 3 cases of fetal anemia complicated by severe PPHN.

  15. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  16. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  17. Is there any relation between Duration of breastfeeding and anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, H; Baghersalimi, A; Dalili, S; Pakdaman, F; Hassanzadeh Rad, A; Abbasi Kakroodi, M; Rezvany, SM; Koohmanaei, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background In the early months of life, Breastfeeding increases chance of survival, reduces recovery time after disease and mortality due to infections such as diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. However, infants who are exclusively breast-fed for more than 6 months in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia. Therefore, the aim of study was to assess the relation between duration of breastfeeding and anemia. Materials and Methods In this analytical cross-sectional study, 400 neonates registered in primary health care system since birth time. Complete blood count and serum ferritin were obtained. Data were analyzed by chi- square test and regression analysis. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant and 95% confidence interval was noted. Results Results of this study showed that 199 infants were anemic (Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration <11 mg/dl). Ten percent of anemic patients reported Ferritin< 12ng/dl and %25 of anemic children had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In Binominal logistic regression, merely kind of delivery and duration of breastfeeding were effective factors. Binominal logistic regression also showed that natural vaginal delivery and exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months had a significant influence on anemia. Exclusive breast feeding for 6 months or more increased the likelihood of anemia. In addition, 4 months exclusive breastfeeding decreased 0.686 fold the likelihood of anemia. Conclusion According to the results, it seems that revision of health program recommendations for iron supplementation can be constructive. National planning to promote the level of knowledge regarding natural vaginal delivery and appropriate period for clamping can be recommended. PMID:26985355

  18. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia.

  19. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  20. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  1. [A young child with acute abdomen and iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L; Liniger, B; Schibli, S; Cholewa, D

    2006-05-31

    The case of a 20 month-old girl that was admitted to the emergency ward because of worsening of her general condition in the setting of acute non-bloody gastroenteritis is reported. The clinical examination revealed signs of severe dehydration and a prominent tender abdomen. Laboratory evaluation showed leucocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein and severe hypochromic microcytic anemia. Abdominal X-ray revealed diffuse meteorism. The child underwent laparascopic evaluation. A perforated Meckel's diverticulum was found. Perforation and anemia due to occult bleeding are unusual presentations of Meckel's diverticulum. The differential diagnosis of children presenting with an acute abdomen with special focus on Meckel's diverticulum is discussed.

  2. Peginesatide for the treatment of anemia in the nephrology setting.

    PubMed

    Graul, A I

    2012-06-01

    Anemia is a major complication in patients with chronic kidney disease, as the damaged kidney is unable to produce enough erythropoietin. Peginesatide (formerly known as Hematide™) is a synthetic, peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent linked to polyethylene glycol. Based on extensive preclinical and clinical data substantiating the efficacy and safety of this agent, it was approved in the U.S. in March 2012 for the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease in adult patients on dialysis. Peginesatide (Omontys®) was launched in the U.S. in April 2012. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  3. Fanconi Anemia: A Rarely Considered Cause of Macrocytosis During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Deniz

    2017-10-01

    We describe a Turkish boy newly diagnosed with Fanconi anemia with mutation in the FANCA gene. The patient, with normal clinical phenotype and negative chromosomal breakage test result, presented with macrocytosis. No clinical or laboratory changes were observed in a follow-up period of 4 years. The diagnosis was confirmed molecularly after a prolonged and exhaustive investigation. He was found to be a compound heterozygote for 2 mutations in the FANCA gene (1 of which is novel, c.4261-2A>C). We present this experience to alert physicians that Fanconi anemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of otherwise unexplained macrocytosis during childhood.

  4. [A 74-year-old woman with macrocytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Picardi, A; Navajas, F; Spoto, S; Palma Modoni, A; De Galasso, L; Costantino, S

    2002-01-01

    A seventy-four years old woman is assessed for asthenia, fatigue, non ulcerous dyspepsia with macrocytic anemia. The patient's medical history taking in Binswanger disease--diagnosed 5 aa before-, epilepsy-2 aa before- and a previous episode of TVP of the left leg, suggested the hypothesis that a B12 deficiency, by a chronic gastritis, would involve an increase of homocysteine cause of the clinical manifestations of megaloblastic anemia, Binswanger disease, tardive epilepsy and previous TVP. The fisic and blood and instrumental exams confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The patient is having vitamin B12.

  5. Adult patent ductus arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination.

  6. Case of megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal taeniasis.

    PubMed

    Vuylsteke, Peter; Bertrand, Celine; Verhoef, Gregor E G; Vandenberghe, Peter

    2004-07-01

    A 61-year-old eutrophic male was diagnosed with vitamin B12 deficiency and megaloblastic anemia. A modified Schilling test suggested intestinal malabsorption unrelated to intrinsic factor deficiency. Subsequent colonoscopy revealed the presence of a Taenia tapeworm. The anemia resolved within days under therapy with niclosamide and temporary vitamin B12 supplements. The present case suggests that, in addition to other well-known parasitic agents, e.g., Diphyllobothrium latum and Giardia lamblia, Taenia infestation can also be a cause of intestinal vitamin B12 malabsorption.

  7. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  8. EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ANEMIA IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Schrier, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of adverse outcomes in the elderly, including hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. What constitutes appropriate evaluation and management for an elderly patient with anemia, and when to initiate a referral to a hematologist, are significant issues. Attempts to identify suggested hemoglobin levels for blood transfusion therapy have been confounded for elderly patients with their co-morbidities. Since no specific recommended hemoglobin threshold has stood the test of time, prudent transfusion practices to maintain hemoglobin thresholds of 9–10 g/dl in the elderly are indicated, unless or until evidence emerges to indicate otherwise. PMID:24122955

  9. Erythropoiesis: Case Report: Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type II in a Woman Presenting with Jaundice, Anemia, and Splenomegaly.

    PubMed

    Abali, HÜSEYIN; Haznedaroglu, IBRAHIM C.; Sayinalp, NILGÜN; Kosar, ALI; Büyükasik, YAHYA; Özatli, DÜZGÜN; Batman, FIGEN

    1999-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are extremely rare types of hemolytic anemias that share similar morphological findings and are characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis. CDAs are divided into three major groups and few variants. The most frequently encountered type is CDA type II (HEMPAS: Hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity associated with a positive acidified serum test). We herein report a case of CDA type II, who presents with a mild anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, cholelithiasis and hemolysis. CDA type II, about 120 cases have been reported so far, has recently been discovered to be due to the defective glycolization of membrane proteins on the erythrocyte progenitors. The responsible gene has been found to be located on the Chromosome 20q only a few years ago.

  10. Association of mild anemia with hospitalization and mortality in the elderly: the Health and Anemia population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Mosconi, Paola; Apolone, Giovanni; Gandini, Francesca; Nobili, Alessandro; Tallone, Maria Vittoria; Detoma, Paolo; Giacomin, Adriano; Clerico, Mario; Tempia, Patrizia; Guala, Adriano; Fasolo, Gilberto; Lucca, Ugo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mild anemia is a frequent laboratory finding in the elderly usually disregarded in everyday practice as an innocent bystander. The aim of the present population-based study was to prospectively investigate the association of mild grade anemia with hospitalization and mortality. Design and Methods A prospective population-based study of all 65 to 84 year old residents in Biella, Italy was performed between 2003 and 2007. Data from a total of 7,536 elderly with blood tests were available to estimate mortality; full health information available to evaluate health-related outcomes was available for 4,501 of these elderly subjects. Mild grade anemia was defined as a hemoglobin concentration between 10.0 and 11.9 g/dL in women and between 10.0 and 12.9 g/dL in men. Results The risk of hospitalization in the 3 years following recruitment was higher among the mildly anemic elderly subjects than among subjects who were not anemic (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.32; 95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.60). Mortality risk in the following 3.5 years was also higher among the mildly anemic elderly (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.86; 95% confidence interval: 1.34–2.53). Similar results were found when slightly elevating the lower limit of normal hemoglobin concentration to 12.2 g/dL in women and to 13.2 g/dL in men. The risk of mortality was significantly increased in mild anemia of chronic disease but not in that due to β-thalassemia minor. Conclusions After controlling for many potential confounders, mild grade anemia was found to be prospectively associated with clinically relevant outcomes such as increased risk of hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Whether raising hemoglobin concentrations can reduce the risks associated with mild anemia should be tested in controlled clinical trials. PMID:19001283

  11. Peginesatide in patients with anemia undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, Steven; Schiller, Brigitte; Locatelli, Francesco; Covic, Adrian C; Provenzano, Robert; Wiecek, Andrzej; Levin, Nathan W; Kaplan, Mark; Macdougall, Iain C; Francisco, Carol; Mayo, Martha R; Polu, Krishna R; Duliege, Anne-Marie; Besarab, Anatole

    2013-01-24

    Peginesatide, a synthetic peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), is a potential therapy for anemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. We conducted two randomized, controlled, open-label studies (EMERALD 1 and EMERALD 2) involving patients undergoing hemodialysis. Cardiovascular safety was evaluated by analysis of an adjudicated composite safety end point--death from any cause, stroke, myocardial infarction, or serious adverse events of congestive heart failure, unstable angina, or arrhythmia--with the use of pooled data from the two EMERALD studies and two studies involving patients not undergoing dialysis. In the EMERALD studies, 1608 patients received peginesatide once monthly or continued to receive epoetin one to three times a week, with the doses adjusted as necessary to maintain a hemoglobin level between 10.0 and 12.0 g per deciliter for 52 weeks or more. The primary efficacy end point was the mean change from the baseline hemoglobin level to the mean level during the evaluation period; noninferiority was established if the lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval was -1.0 g per deciliter or higher in the comparison of peginesatide with epoetin. The aim of evaluating the composite safety end point in the pooled cohort was to exclude a hazard ratio with peginesatide relative to the comparator ESA of more than 1.3. In an analysis involving 693 patients from EMERALD 1 and 725 from EMERALD 2, peginesatide was noninferior to epoetin in maintaining hemoglobin levels (mean between-group difference, -0.15 g per deciliter; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.30 to -0.01 in EMERALD 1; and 0.10 g per deciliter; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.26 in EMERALD 2). The hazard ratio for the composite safety end point was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.89 to 1.26) with peginesatide relative to the comparator ESA in the four pooled studies (2591 patients) and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.17) in the EMERALD studies. The proportions of patients with adverse and serious

  12. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. The Significance of Serum Transferrin Receptor Levels in the Diagnosis of the Coexistence of Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yokus, Osman; Yilmaz, Bilal; Albayrak, Murat; Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Sennaroglu, Engin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common cause of microcytic anemia throughout the world. Ferritin levels are good indicators of iron stores; however, levels may increase irrespective of iron stores in cases of chronic disease. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose iron deficiency anemia coexisting with anemia of chronic disease. Materials and Methods: To determine the level of transferrin receptor in subjects, 30 patients with iron deficiency anemia, 30 patients with anemia of chronic disease and 30 patients with both diseases were included in the study. Results: Mean serum transferrin receptor levels were 5.99±2.98 mg/L in the iron deficiency anemia group, 1.90±1.15 mg/L in the anemia of chronic disease group and 3.07±0.90 mg/L in the combination group. Comparing groups with each other revealed significant differences (p<0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that the assessment of serum transferrin receptor levels is a useful method for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia in patients. PMID:25610152

  14. The significance of serum transferrin receptor levels in the diagnosis of the coexistence of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yokus, Osman; Yilmaz, Bilal; Albayrak, Murat; Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Sennaroglu, Engin

    2011-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common cause of microcytic anemia throughout the world. Ferritin levels are good indicators of iron stores; however, levels may increase irrespective of iron stores in cases of chronic disease. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose iron deficiency anemia coexisting with anemia of chronic disease. To determine the level of transferrin receptor in subjects, 30 patients with iron deficiency anemia, 30 patients with anemia of chronic disease and 30 patients with both diseases were included in the study. Mean serum transferrin receptor levels were 5.99±2.98 mg/L in the iron deficiency anemia group, 1.90±1.15 mg/L in the anemia of chronic disease group and 3.07±0.90 mg/L in the combination group. Comparing groups with each other revealed significant differences (p<0.05). It is concluded that the assessment of serum transferrin receptor levels is a useful method for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia in patients.

  15. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  16. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  17. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  18. Effect of 131I on the anemia of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perlman, J.A.; Sternthal, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the National Thyrotoxicosis Therapy Follow-Up Study (NTTFS) are presented here to document the existence of anemia in hyperthyroidism, a mild and reversible anemia that is simultaneously ameliorated with reversal of the hyperthyroid state. Among 20,600 women entered into the NTTF study with no previous history of hematological disorders, the prevalence of anemia was found to range from 10-15%, appearing to be higher in those selected for treatment with 131I when compared to those selected for surgery. An attempt is made to verify the recent hypothesis that thyroid hormone levels in the supraphysiologic range may suppress erythrogenesis. Two statistically significant regression models are consistent with a hypothesis of thyrotoxic bone marrow suppression. However, both associations are weak enough to suggest that some other physiologic improvement underlies the amelioration of anemia when hyperthyroidism is reversed. The degree of improvement in hematological status is similar for women in both treatment groups. Among 4464 women for whom serial hematological tests are obtained, over 3/4 of anemic patients are no longer anemic after an average 6.2 yr of follow-up. Clinicians are reassured that radioactive iodine exposure causes no further insult to the bone marrow, no matter what the cumulative dosage. The highly fractionated low dose bone marrow exposures to radiation account for the minimal hematological risks of 131I treatment.

  19. Individualized treatment for iron deficiency anemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting mankind, and iron deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age due to pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition or gut malabsorption. Iron deficiency anemia remains quite prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed upon consideration of patient specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based upon the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least one month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  20. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673