Science.gov

Sample records for anesthetic management techniques

  1. Pollution of ambient air by volatile anesthetics: a comparison of 4 anesthetic management techniques.

    PubMed

    Barberio, Joy C; Bolt, Jason D; Austin, Paul N; Craig, William J

    2006-04-01

    Long-term exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG) may lead to health problems. The purpose of this study was to compare WAG concentrations resulting from 4 combinations of fresh gas flow (FGF) and vaporizer settings during a simulated intravenous induction in which the anesthetic is deepened using a volatile anesthetic delivered via mask ventilation before intubation. By using a lung model, WAG was sampled 3 times each using 4 combinations and 3 volatile anesthetics: 3% sevoflurane, 2% isoflurane, and 6% desflurane. The combinations were FGF off/vaporizer on, FGF on/vaporizer off, both on, and both off. WAG was measured using a MIRAN Ambient Air Analyzer placed at a level approximating the anesthetist's head. One-way analysis of variance with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test was used to compare the concentration of WAG among the combinations of FGF/vaporizer settings for each agent. Regardless of the agent, only the FGF on/vaporizer on combination at 60 seconds resulted in a statistically greater WAG level (P < .005). The results support using 3 of the 4 combinations examined when mask ventilation with a volatile agent accompanies intravenous induction. Future studies should examine other methods of controlling WAG levels and use time-weighted averages to help address clinical significance.

  2. Montgomery T-tube: anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Payal, Y S; Sharma, J P; Meher, Ravi; Varshney, Saurabh

    2007-03-01

    The Montgomery T-tube is a device used as a combined tracheal stent and airway after laryngotracheoplasty. It is a valuable option in the management of upper and mid-tracheal lesions. Because its use is sporadic, many anesthesiologists may not be familiar with this device, and its anesthetic management may pose a challenge. Safe management of such patients requires careful planning. We describe different techniques of anaesthetic management in two cases of injuries to the throat, for which this tube was inserted as a tracheal stent.

  3. Pediatric Mastocytosis: Routine Anesthetic Management for a Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melody C.; Uzzaman, Ashraf; Scott, Linda M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Quezado, Zenaide

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pediatric mastocytosis consists of a spectrum of clinical variants characterized by increased numbers of resident mast cells in various organ systems. Mast cells are instrumental in mediating anaphylaxis and patients with mastocytosis are at risk to develop provoked and unprovoked episodes of anaphylaxis. METHODS The authors examined peri-anesthetic records of patients with pediatric mastocytosis who were anesthetized for diagnostic and surgical procedures from 1993 to 2006. In addition, the authors conducted a literature review of the experience of the use anesthetics in pediatric mastocytosis. RESULTS Twenty-two patients with pediatric mastocytosis, with a median age of 3.2 years (range 6 months to 20 years) at the time of the procedure, were anesthetized for 29 diagnostic and surgical procedures. All variants of the disease are represented in this series. Most patients had a history of flushing, pruritus, GERD and abdominal pain; one patient had history of spontaneous anaphylaxis. Routine anesthetic techniques were used and despite the complexity of the disease, the peri-operative courses were uncomplicated and without serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS We review the main features of pediatric mastocytosis, its anesthetic and perioperative implications, and describe a practical approach to the anesthetic management of pediatric patients with the disease. While many drugs used routinely in anesthesia reportedly cause mast cell degranulation, deviations from routine anesthesia techniques are not necessarily warranted. However, an understanding of the anesthetic implications of the disease and meticulous preparation to treat possible adverse events are advised. PMID:18633019

  4. Anesthetic management of a horse with traumatic pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Chesnel, Maud-Aline; Aprea, Francesco; Clutton, R Eddie

    2012-06-01

    A traumatic pneumothorax and severe hemorrhage were present in a mare with a large thoracic wall defect, lung perforation, and multiple rib fractures. General anesthesia was induced to allow surgical exploration. We describe the anesthetic technique, and discuss the management of the ventilatory, hemodynamic, and metabolic disturbances encountered.

  5. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Takayasu Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Toru; Shiiba, Shunji; Harano, Nozomu; Sago, Teppei; Nunomaki, Masahito; Watanabe, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a rare chronic progressive panendarteritis involving the aorta and its main branches. Anesthesia in patients with this disease can be complicated by severe uncontrolled hypertension, end-organ dysfunction, and stenosis of major blood vessels. In this case, general anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and remifentanil without complications. To prevent intraoperative complications, we conducted intubation with a rigid video laryngoscope with careful consideration of the concentrations of analgesics and sedatives used. This case demonstrates the importance of anesthetic techniques for maintaining adequate tissue perfusion without hemodynamic changes in the anesthetic management of patients with Takayasu arteritis. PMID:26866409

  6. Pulmonary hypertension: a review of pathophysiology and anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a condition that can result in serious complications in patients undergoing any type of anesthesia during the perioperative period. By definition, pulmonary artery hypertension is caused by a persistent rise in mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg with Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mm Hg or exercise mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥35 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistance ≥ 3 wood unit's. The severity of the complications depends on the severity of the underlying condition, other comorbidities, and type of procedure, anesthetic technique, and anesthetic drugs. In this article, we briefly review the pulmonary vascular physiology, pathophysiology of the disease, clinical assessment and diagnosis, treatment options, and the anesthetic management of these patients.

  7. Anesthetic management of pregnant women with stroke.

    PubMed

    Yoshitani, Kenji; Inatomi, Yuzuru; Kuwajima, Ken; Ohnishi, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Stroke during pregnancy is rare, but after occurring, most patients develop serious neurological conditions. Hemorrhagic stroke, including intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, often requires emergency surgical intervention. In addition to significant maternal physiological changes, the potential for fetal harm should be considered during anesthetic management of these patients. Whether cesarean section or neurosurgical intervention should be prioritized or performed simultaneously in pregnant women with stroke is an important issue. Whether the patients receive general or spinal and epidural anesthesia is another clinically significant issue. Finally neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, and obstetricians should cooperate to manage pregnant women with stroke.

  8. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  9. Bilateral fetal hydrothorax requiring intrauterine fetal thoracoamniotic shunts: anesthetic considerations and management.

    PubMed

    Hache, John J; Emery, Stephen P; Vallejo, Manuel C

    2009-06-12

    After prenatal diagnosis of bilateral fetal hydrothorax, ascites, and polyhydramnios, bilateral thoracoamniotic shunts were placed at 29 weeks gestation using an ultrasound-guided, minimally invasive technique. Anesthetic care was managed using intravenous sedation and local anesthesia infiltration. The anesthetic considerations for such procedures are discussed.

  10. Moyamoya disease: a review of the disease and anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Parray, Tariq; Martin, Timothy W; Siddiqui, Saif

    2011-04-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare chronic cerebrovascular disease seen both in children and adults. It has a progressive course, but may have a variable clinical presentation. The disease causes ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, headache, seizures, and transient ischemia attack in children and in adults. Although the pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown, research suggests a genetic predisposition. There are also undefined systemic processes involved in this vasculopathy. Better noninvasive diagnostic techniques for diagnosis of the Moyamoya disease have been developed, but medical treatment can still be challenging. However, various surgical revascularization procedures have shown to provide symptomatic benefit in a majority of these patients. In addition, the anesthetic management of these patients has evolved over the years with an increased understanding of the disease. These have specifically resulted from the identification of risk factors for perioperative complications and outcomes related to the use of anesthetic agents. Finally, research in the last 3 decades has led to the recognition of the importance of pain control, the increased use of regional anesthesia, and better monitoring techniques in providing high quality and safe patient care to patients with Moyamoya disease. This article will provide a comprehensive review of the disease and its anesthetic management.

  11. Anesthetic management of a case of Sanjad-Sakati syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alshoaiby, AN; Rafiq, M; Jan, R; Shahbaz, M; Faqeeh, A; Alsohaibani, MA

    2016-01-01

    Sanjad-Sakati syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder first described in Saudi Arabia. Anesthetic management of these patients is challenging due to airway difficulties, electrolyte imbalance, growth and mental retardation, and seizures. The anesthetic management of the syndrome is described in this case report. PMID:27833494

  12. Huntington's disease: review and anesthetic case management.

    PubMed

    Cangemi, C F; Miller, R J

    1998-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a dominantly inherited progressive autosomal disease that affects the basal ganglia. Symptoms appear later in life and manifest as progressive mental deterioration and involuntary choreiform movements. Patients with Huntington's disease develop a progressive but variable dementia. Dysphagia, the most significant related motor symptom, hinders nutrition intake and places the patient at risk for aspiration. The combination of involuntary choreoathetoid movements, depression, and apathy leads to cachexia. Factors of considerable concern to the anesthesiologist who treats patients with Huntington's disease may include how to treat frail elderly people incapable of cooperation, how to treat patients suffering from malnourishment, and how to treat patients with an increased risk for aspiration or exaggerated responses to sodium thiopental and succinylcholine. The successful anesthetic management of a 65-yr-old woman with Huntington's disease who presented for full-mouth extractions is described.

  13. The Anesthetic Effect of Anterior Middle Superior Alveolar Technique (AMSA)

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Tolentino, Lívia; Barbisan Souza, André; Girardi, Ana Alice; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Araújo, Maurício Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia of the soft and hard tissues of the maxilla may require up to 5 injections. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) and supraperiosteal injection techniques during subgingival scaling and root planing (SRP). Thirty individuals with periodontitis were scheduled for SRP on the buccal aspect of teeth in the anterior maxilla. Before SRP, on a randomly chosen side of the maxilla, the supraperiosteal injection was performed in 1 session, while the AMSA injection was conducted in the contralateral side of the same patient in another session. Immediately after each SRP session, patients rated their pain perception during the procedure with a visual analog scale. No statistically significant differences in mean pain ratings during SRP were found after both anesthetic techniques (P > .05). This preliminary study demonstrated that the AMSA and supraperiosteal injection techniques provided similar anesthetic comfort during SRP. The AMSA injection could be an alternative to anesthetize the buccal aspect of maxilla, without the undesirable effects on facial structures such as the upper lip, nostrils, and lower eyelids. However, further randomized clinical trials with larger samples are necessary to confirm such results. PMID:26650493

  14. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards.

  15. Anesthetic management of a child with Apert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Metodiev, Yavor; Gavrilova, Nadezhda; Katzarov, Atanas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an anesthetic technique for a child with Apert syndrome, presenting to the operating room for a syndactyly separation. The anesthetic approach is innovative for the clinic and is a combination of intravenous anesthesia and two regional techniques (axillary block and transversus abdominis plane block, respectively). They were performed under ultrasound guidance and provided analgesia in the two body regions, which were to be operated. PMID:21655026

  16. [Anesthetic management of patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a genetic cardiomyopathy characterized by replacement of right ventricular myocardium by fibrofatty infiltrates, leading to significant ventricular arrhythmias with sudden death and right ventricular dysfunction. Elective operations should be postponed, until the arrhythmias and myocardial function are well tolerated. There has been no guideline on the anesthetic management of this serious, despite rare, disease and there are a few reports of the patients undergoing operation under either general or regional anesthesia. The most important issue of the anesthetic management is to avoid excessive sympathetic stimulation, especially beta stimulation which can easily induce life-threatening arrhythmias. Also, it is better to avoid adrenalin as an adjunct to the local anesthetics. Anesthetic maintenance was performed with volatile anesthetics except halothane, opiates, muscle relaxants except pancuronium and intravenous anesthetics including propofol, ketamine and benzodiazepines. Invasive monitoring of arterial blood pressure and central venous pressure is recommended and transesophageal echocardiography, if available, provides diagnostic information for an intraoperative cardiac event. It is essential to apply alpha-adrenergic agonists instead of beta-agonists for intraoperative hemodynamic support. The arrhythmias should be managed with beta-blockers or amiodarone. Adequate control of postoperative analgesia and nausea/vomiting is also important to suppress sympathetic activities.

  17. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  18. Anesthetic management of craniosynostosis repair in patient with Apert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Arora, Shubhangi; Bindra, Ashish; Goyal, Keshav

    2014-01-01

    Apert syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia and syndactyly. In general, patients present in early childhood for craniofacial reconstruction surgery. Anesthetic implications include difficult airway, airway hyper-reactivity; however, possibility of raised intracranial pressure especially when operating for craniosynostosis and associated congenital heart disease should not be ignored. Most of the cases described in literature talk of management of syndactyly. We describe the successful anesthetic management of a patient of Aperts syndrome with craniosynostosis posted for bicornual strip craniotomy and fronto-orbital advancement in a 5-year-old child. PMID:25191197

  19. Pain management in the special operations environment: regional anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Calkins, M D; Kuzma, P J; Larkin, T M; Green, D L

    2001-03-01

    Pain relief is an essential component of combat casualty care. For the injured soldier, analgesia is not only a matter of comfort. Alleviating pain may allow the soldier to remain quiet when noise discipline is at a premium. It may also allow that person to continue to move, thus avoiding detection and potentially permitting the mission to carry on. Regional anesthetics provide an alternative to systemic medications and thus may avoid a clouded sensorium, limit narcotic administration, and provide superior pain relief. Standard local anesthetics and newer agents with potential field applicability are discussed along with their side effect profiles. Simple nerve block techniques that can be used by Army Special Forces medics, Navy SEAL and Reconnaissance corpsmen, and Air Force pararescuemen in the far forward environment are described step by step. The advantages of these regional anesthetic methods should make their use a must for every special operations medical care provider.

  20. [Anesthetic management of a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mashio, H; Ito, Y; Yanagita, Y; Fujisawa, E; Hada, K; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H

    2000-02-01

    A 49-year-old male with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was scheduled for gastrectomy. Anesthetic management was performed under general anesthesia with sevoflurane and epidural anesthesia with lidocaine. He showed increased response to vecuronium under monitoring of neuromuscular block. But he responded favorably to anticholineesterase. He had little pain and showed no progress in neurological symptoms in the postoperative period. Neuromuscular monitoring is essential in administrating non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents to patients with ALS, and epidural anesthesia may be useful for perioperative management of patients with ALS.

  1. Anesthetic Management for Resection of Bilateral Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hoogma, Danny; Meyns, Bart; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Van de Velde, Marc; Missant, Carlo; Rex, Steffen

    2015-08-15

    We describe a patient who presented with a bilateral pulmonary artery sarcoma, initially treated as pulmonary embolism, that necessitated concomitant pulmonary endarterectomy and pneumonectomy. We reviewed the anesthetic management used for this procedure, which bears many similarities to the management of patients undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Right ventricular failure, pulmonary hemorrhage, and cerebral ischemia due to circulatory arrest are life-threatening perioperative complications. The anesthesiologist can play a key role in the prevention (or timely recognition and treatment) of these perioperative complications by establishing adequate hemodynamic, echocardiographic, and neurologic monitoring and by optimizing cardiopulmonary function and coagulation.

  2. Anesthetic and Dental Management of a Child With IMAGe Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindemeyer, Rochelle G.; Rashewsky, Stephanie E.; Louie, Phillip J.; Schleelein, Laura

    2014-01-01

    IMAGe syndrome (OMIM 300290) is a rare multisystem disorder that has a broad phenotypic presentation. Though variable, this disorder mainly consists of Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital abnormalities. Patients with IMAGe syndrome present as an uncommon yet important challenge for dentists and anesthesiologists due to their wide range of dysmorphic facial features, adrenal insufficiency, electrolyte imbalances, and need for steroid replacement. The purpose of this case report is to describe the successful anesthetic management of a pediatric patient diagnosed with IMAGe syndrome who presented for full mouth dental rehabilitation. PMID:25517553

  3. Review article: anesthetic management of patients undergoing deep brain stimulator insertion.

    PubMed

    Venkatraghavan, Lashmi; Luciano, Michelle; Manninen, Pirjo

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation is used for the treatment of patients with neurologic disorders who have an alteration of function, such as movement disorders and other chronic illnesses. The insertion of the deep brain stimulator (DBS) is a minimally invasive procedure that includes the placement of electrodes into deep brain structures for microelectrode recordings and intraoperative clinical testing and connection of the DBS to an implanted pacemaker. The anesthetic technique varies depending on the traditions and requirements of each institution performing these procedures and has included monitored anesthesia with local anesthesia, conscious sedation, and general anesthesia. The challenges and demands for the anesthesiologist in the care of these patients relate to the specific concerns of the patients with functional neurologic disorders, the effects of anesthetic drugs on microelectrode recordings, and the requirements of the surgical procedure, which often include an awake and cooperative patient. The purpose of this review is to familiarize anesthesiologists with deep brain stimulation by discussing the mechanism, the effects of anesthetic drugs, and the surgical procedure of DBS insertion, and the perioperative assessment, preparation, intraoperative anesthetic management, and complications in patients with functional neurologic disorders.

  4. Anesthetic management of robot-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Karlekar, Anil; Dutta, Devesh; Saxena, Ravindra; Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare disorder involving neuromuscular junction. In conjunction with medical therapy, thymectomy is a known modality of treatment of MG and has shown to increase the probability of remission and overall symptomatic improvement. For minimally invasive thymectomy, video-.assisted thoracoscopic surgery has been the preferred surgical approach till recently. The robotic surgical procedure must necessarily bring new challenges to the anesthesiologists to effectively meet the specific requirements of the technique. At present, there is a paucity of literature regarding the anesthetic concerns of robotic assisted thymectomy, patient in question specifically posed a challenge since different maneuvers and techniques had to be tried to obtain optimum surgical conditions with stable ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters. Concerns of patient positioning and hemodynamic monitoring have also been discussed. PMID:27625494

  5. [Anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Takayuki; Takahata, Osamu; Takayama, Koji; Sengoku, Kazufumi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We experienced the anesthetic management of a 39 year-old-male with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) associated with pain due to pes cavus. He underwent orthomorphia ostectomy and tenodesis. Preoperative neurological examination revealed that he had slight dementia, symptoms of the pyramidal tract, lower limb bathyhypesthesia, and neurogenic bladder in addition to spastic paraplegia, and he was diagnosed as having combined type of HSP. Spinocerebellar degeneration is often accompanied with this type of HSP. To avoid the use of muscle relaxants and narcotics, we tried to induce anesthesia with inhalation of nitrous oxide (N2O), oxygen and sevoflurane (sevo). A laryngeal mask (LM) was inserted at the expiratory concentration of sevo 3.5%. Anesthesia was maintained by N2O, oxygen and sevo (2-3%) under spontaneous respiration. The patient recovered from anesthesia after the end of surgery, and the LM was removed smoothly. The patient's respiratory condition was stable, and no problems were found in the postoperative period.

  6. [Anesthetic management for caesarean delivery in a parturient with achondroplasia].

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Hishinuma, Norimasa; Shirotori, Toru; Sasao, Junichi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kawamata, Mikito

    2014-06-01

    A 27-year-old parturient (height, 130 cm; weight, 43 kg) with achondroplasia, which is characterized by rhizomeric short stature, large head and frontal bossing, was scheduled for elective caesarean section (C/S) because of her contracted pelvis. Her first delivery had been performed by C/S under general anesthesia at a regional hospital 6 years before. Preoperative airway assessment showed normal mouth opening and mobile cervical spine. Since she had anxiety about needle puncture and refused neuraxial blockade and since we considered the trachea could be intubated, we decided to perform C/S under general anesthesia at 37 weeks of gestation. The patient and baby had an uneventful perioperative course. Underdevelopment of bone formation results in characteristic craniofacial and vertebral abnormalities in patients with achondroplasia. Anesthetic management of achondroplastic parturients should be specified to individual basis based on careful preoperative assessment of craniofacial and vertebral deformities.

  7. Pain management via local anesthetics and responsive hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Kyle R; Hanenbaum, Curt L; Carbone, Erica J; Lo, Kevin WH; Laurencin, Cato T; Walker, Joseph; Nair, Lakshmi S

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain control is a significant clinical challenge that has been largely unmet. Local anesthetics are widely used for the control of post-operative pain and in the therapy of acute and chronic pain. While a variety of approaches are currently used to prolong the duration of action of local anesthetics, an optimal strategy to achieve neural blockage for several hours to days with minimal toxicity has yet to be identified. Several drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microparticles and nanoparticles have been investigated as local anesthetic delivery vehicles to achieve prolonged anesthesia. Recently, injectable responsive hydrogels raise significant interest for the localized delivery of anesthetic molecules. This paper discusses the potential of injectable hydrogels to prolong the action of local anesthetics. PMID:25690085

  8. Severe preeclampsia: anesthetic implications of the disease and its management.

    PubMed

    Turner, Judi A

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a significant, multifactorial, multiorgan disease affecting 6%-8% of all pregnancies in the United States and is the third leading cause of maternal mortality. As such, it is incumbent upon any anesthesia provider involved in obstetric cases to be familiar with the varied manifestations of the disease, management goals from an obstetric standpoint, and the implications for provision of anesthesia in this patient group. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and management of preeclampsia, severe complications can occur in both the mother and the fetus. A systematic approach to the anesthetic evaluation is therefore necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve outcomes. The potential pitfalls of general anesthesia, including failed intubation, in these complicated patients make regional anesthesia the preferred choice in many cases. Recent studies have shown that spinal anesthesia is often appropriate for preeclamptic patients, even in severe cases. Nevertheless, it is important to be aware of the potential contraindications to neuraxial anesthesia and to prepare for the possibility of encountering a difficult airway.

  9. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    PubMed

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall.

  10. Modern Spirometry Supports Anesthetic Management in Small Animal Clinical Practice: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Calice, Ivana; Moens, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Modern spirometry, like no other monitoring technique, allows insight into breath-to-breath respiratory mechanics. Spirometers continuously measure volume, airway pressure, and flow while calculating and continuously displaying respiratory system compliance and resistance in the form of loops. The aim of this case series is to show how observation of spirometric loops, similar to electrocardiogram or CO2 curve monitoring, can improve safety of anesthetic management in small animals. Spirometric monitoring cases described in this case series are based on use of the anaesthesia monitor Capnomac Ultima with a side stream spirometry sensor. The cases illustrate how recognition and understanding of spirometric loops allows for easy diagnosis of iatrogenic pneumothorax, incorrect ventilator settings, leaks in the system, kinked or partially obstructed endotracheal tube, and spontaneous breathing interfering with intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. The case series demonstrates the potential of spirometry to improve the quality and safety of anesthetic management, and, hence, its use can be recommended during intermittent positive-pressure ventilation and procedures in which interference with ventilation can be expected.

  11. Tumescent local anesthetic technique for inguinal hernia repairs

    PubMed Central

    Chyung, Ju Won; Kwon, Yujin; Cho, Dong Hui; Lee, Kyung Bok; Park, Sang Soo; Yoon, Jin; Jang, Yong Seog

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the adequacy and feasibility of a tumescent solution containing lidocaine and bupivacaine for inguinal hernia repairs. Methods The medical records of 146 consecutive inguinal hernia patients with 157 hernia repairs using the tumescent local anesthesia technique performed by a single surgeon between September 2009 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The mean operation time (±standard deviation) and hospital stay were 64.5 ± 17.6 minutes and 2.7 ± 1.5 days. The postoperative complication rate was 17.8%. There were four cases of recurrences (2.5%) at a mean follow-up of 24 ± 14 months. Conclusion Our results suggest that local anesthesia with the tumescent technique is an effective and safe modality for inguinal hernia repairs. PMID:25485241

  12. Anesthetic management of a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome undergoing oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Mikiko; Furuya, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    This case involves a possible complication of excessive bleeding or rupture of hemangiomas. Problems and anesthetic management of the patient are discussed. A 35-year-old man with Sturge-Weber syndrome was to undergo teeth extraction and gingivectomy. Hemangiomas covered his face and the inside of the oral cavity. We used intravenous conscious sedation with propofol and N2O-O2 to reduce the patient's emotional stress. It was previously determined that stress caused marked expansion of this patient's hemangiomas. Periodontal ligament injection was chosen as the local anesthesia technique. Teeth were extracted without excessive bleeding or rupture of hemangiomas, but the planned gingivectomies were cancelled. Deep sedation requiring airway manipulation should be avoided because there are possible difficulties in airway maintenance. Because this was an outpatient procedure, propofol was selected as the sedative agent primarily because of its rapid onset and equally rapid recovery. Periodontal ligament injection with 2% lidocaine containing 1: 80,000 epinephrine was chosen for local anesthesia. Gingivectomy was cancelled because hemostasis was challenging. As part of preoperative preparation, equipment for prompt intubation was available in case of rupture of the hemangiomas. The typically seen elevation of blood pressure was suppressed under propofol sedation so that expansion of the hemangiomas and significant intraoperative bleeding was prevented. Periodontal ligament injection as a local anesthetic also prevented bleeding from the injection site.

  13. Anesthetic management of a rare case of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Pratibha, S. D.; Katti, Vijay; Patil, Basvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetic management of pheochromocytoma is complicated and challenging. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor that produces, stores and secretes catecholamines. The main-stay in the management of pheochromocytoma surgeries is Preoperative preparation which has improved perioperative outcome. Modern anesthetic drugs with advanced monitoring have contributed to intraoperative stability. Resection of the tumor results in acute withdrawal of catecholamines, which may lead to severe hypotension. In perioperative period, adequate hydration should be maintained. Beta-blockers, nitroglycerine, sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine are required to avoid hemodynamic fluctuations and should be used appropriately. PMID:26957701

  14. Dental anesthetic management of a patient with ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A; Siegelman, L I

    1998-01-01

    During routine deep sedation for endodontic therapy, a dentist-anesthesiologist observed premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) on a 62-yr-old woman's electrocardiogram (EKG) tracing. The dentist was able to complete the root canal procedure under intravenous (i.v.) sedation without any problems. The dentist-anesthesiologist referred the patient for medical evaluation. She was found to be free from ischemic cardiac disease with normal ventricular function. The patient was cleared to continue her dental treatment with deep sedation. She subsequently continued to undergo dental treatment with deep intravenous sedation without incident, although her EKG exhibited frequent PVCs, up to 20 per minute, including couplets and episodes of trigeminy. This article will review indications for medical intervention, antiarrhythmic medications, and anesthetic interventions for perioperative PVCs.

  15. Anesthetic management of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ambi, Uday S.; Adarsh, E. S.; Hatti, Ramesh; Samalad, Vijaymahantesh

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases. PMID:22754447

  16. Anesthetic management of a patient with giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma: case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dandan; Xu, Fangxia; Wang, Meng; Gu, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhengliang

    2015-01-01

    Patients with giant retroperitoneal liposarcomas are considered at great risks of perioperative complications and require meticulous anaesthetic management. There have been few reports about anaesthetic management of giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma. We present the case of a 66-year-old patient who suffered from a giant retroperitoneal liposarcoma (diameter 45 cm and weigh 4.5 kg), needing a resection surgery under general anesthesia. We successfully managed anesthesia procedures in this patient using FloTrac/VigileoTM monitoring system without major perioperative complications. The surgery was completed uneventfully and the patient recovered smoothly. After reviewing the literature, we summarize FloTrac/VigileoTM monitoring system is useful to help anaesthesiologists adjust infusion rate to maintain the stability of circulatory state. Anesthetic monitoring, fluid management and temperature control need to be focused in the anesthetic management. PMID:26770605

  17. [Perioperative risk factors and anesthetic management of patients for carotid endarterectomy].

    PubMed

    Niinai, H; Nakagawa, I; Shima, T; Kubota, M; Yamada, K; Kamiya, T; Yoshida, A; Yasuda, T

    1997-05-01

    Data from the records of 142 patients for carotid endarterectomy at Chugoku Rosai General Hospital between 1983 and 1995, were evaluated concerning perioperative risk factors and anesthetic management. As a preoperative anesthetic risk, the incidence of hypertension was the commonest (76%), and there was a significant incidence of ischemic heart disease (18%). Fentanyl and isoflurane have been used for anesthesia recently and the patients were closely observed and cared in the intensive care unit postoperatively. In order to prevent cerebral ischemia during the occlusion of the internal carotid artery, we measured somatosensory evoked potential as well as jugular venous oxygen saturation, and used near infrared spectophotometry. As a result, postoperative mortality and morbidity were 0% and 2%, respectively. The candidates for CEA have potentially high perioperative risks, and it is important to evaluate the coexisting diseases and to select proper anesthetic technic and monitors.

  18. Intraosseous injection as an adjunct to conventional local anesthetic techniques: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohamed; Sakkir, Nasil; Naik, Kishore Gopalakrishna; Jayaram, Nandakishore Kunijal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The achievement of successful local anesthesia is a continual challenge in dentistry. Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection (the Stabident system and the X-tip system) have been proposed to be advantageous in cases where the conventional local anesthetic techniques have failed. Aim: A clinical study was undertaken using intraosseous injection system by name X-tip to evaluate its effectiveness in cases where inferior alveolar nerve block has failed to provide pulpal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients selected were to undergo endodontic treatment for a mandibular molar tooth. Inferior alveolar nerve block was given using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Twenty-four patients (40%) had pain even after administration of IAN block; intraosseous injection was administered using 4% articaine containing 1:100,000 epinephrine, using the X-tip system. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analog scale ratings ≤ 54 mm) on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. Results: Intraosseous injection technique was successful in 21 out of 24 patients (87.5%), except three patients who had pain even after supplemental X-tip injection. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, we can conclude that supplemental intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine has a statistically significant influence in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:25298642

  19. Anesthetic management of the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heeseung; Ryu, Jung Wan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Lee, Guie Yong

    2010-12-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure is a very rare technique performed in cases of fetal congenital malformations. The EXIT procedure increases the rate of survival at delivery by maintaining the uteroplacental circulation until the airway of the fetus is secured. To maintain the uteroplacental circulation, a higher dose of inhalational anesthetics and/or intravenous nitroglycerin can be used as compared to conventional Cesarean section. The aim of this report is to share our anesthetic experience during the EXIT procedure with members of the Korean society of anesthesiology for the first time, and to highlight the maternal implications of the use of inhalational anesthetics and nitroglycerin during Cesarean section for the EXIT procedure.

  20. Anesthetic Concerns of Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William T.

    1999-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are acutely aware of the fact that, although a given surgical procedure may be relatively simple, the required anesthetic care is, in certain cases, extremely complex. This principle is particularly evident when one ponders the difficulties involved in providing even basic anesthetic care in microgravity. In this issue some of these difficulties through the evaluation of airway management techniques during water immersion are confronted, a simulation of the gravito-inertial conditions of space flight. As prelude for this paper, I would like to outline some of the challenges to be overcome before surgical, anesthetic, and critical care can be delivered beyond our home planet.

  1. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  2. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  3. Anesthetic management for repair of adult Bochdalek hernia by laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Kazuhide; Nakahara, Yumi; Ando, Satoko; Hasegawa, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2005-01-01

    This report describes anesthetic management of a case (a 64-year-old man) who was originally diagnosed as paraesophageal hernia before surgery and later diagnosed as Bochdalek hernia during laparoscopic surgery. Anesthesia was started with oxygen, nitrous oxide, and sevoflurane, and respiration was managed using controlled mechanical ventilation. Although left pneumothorax was noticed during laparoscopic surgery (aeroperitonia pressure: 10 cmH2O), the surgery was performed using the same anesthesia procedure, because hardly any changes were observed on the monitor and vital signs were stable. The surgery was completed without incident. However, postoperative chest X-rays revealed the residual large pneumothorax. A chest drain tube was inserted immediately, after which the pneumothorax was improved. Pneumothorax is considered to be inevitable in cases of laparoscopic repair of Bochdalek hernia. To prevent exacerbation of pneumothorax, anesthetic management should consist of discontinuing the use of nitrous oxide and lowering the aeroperitonia pressure concomitently with the use of positive airway pressure.

  4. [Anesthetic management of an infant with giant abdominal neuroblastoma].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ríos, Manuel Ángel; Nuño, Federico Curt; Barreto-Calvo, Purísima

    Neuroblastoma is the most common, non-central nervous system tumor of childhood. It has the potential to synthesize catecholamines. However, the presences of hypertension are uncommon. We report the perioperative management of a 15-month-old infant with giant abdominal neuroblastoma who presented severe hypertension. The pathophysiological alterations of neuroblastoma are reviewed and perioperative management presented.

  5. Anesthetic management of an infant with giant abdominal neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ríos, Manuel Ángel; Nuño, Federico Curt; Barreto-Calvo, Purísima

    Neuroblastoma is the most common, non-central nervous system tumor of childhood. It has the potential to synthesize catecholamines. However, the presences of hypertension are uncommon. We report the perioperative management of a 15-month-old infant with giant abdominal neuroblastoma who presented severe hypertension. The pathophysiological alterations of neuroblastoma are reviewed and perioperative management presented.

  6. Anesthetic management of a patient with Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mifsud, Stephanie; Bezzina, Maureen; Paris, Simon

    2016-08-01

    The use of suxamethonium in our case was uneventful and despite craniofacial anomalies, airway management was straightforward. This case illustrates that pediatric patients with trisomy 18, presenting with potentially acute life-threatening conditions and requiring emergency major surgery can be managed successfully with a multidisciplinary approach.

  7. Anesthetic Management of the Adult Patient with Concomitant Cardiac and Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Radosevich, Misty A; Brown, Daniel R

    2016-12-01

    Several common diseases of the cardiac and pulmonary systems and the interactions of the two in disease and anesthetic management are discussed. Management of these disease processes in isolation is reviewed and how the management of one organ system impacts another is then explored. For example, in a patient with acute lung injury and right heart failure, lung-protective ventilation may directly conflict with strategies to minimize right heart afterload. Such challenging clinical scenarios require appreciation of each disease entity, their appropriate management, and the balance between competing priorities.

  8. Influence of two anesthetic techniques on blood sugar level in head injury patients: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, Manoj; Malviya, Deepak; Malviya, P. S.; Kumar, Virendra; Tyagi, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Head injury presents a major worldwide social, economic, and health problem. Hyperglycemia is a significant indicator of the severity of injury and predictor of outcome, which can easily be prevented. There has been a long-standing controversy regarding the use of inhalational or intravenous (i.v.) anesthetic agents for surgery of head injury cases and impact of these agents on blood sugar level. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to find out anesthetic drugs and technique having minimal or no effect on the blood sugar, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of patients with a head injury by comparing two types of anesthetic techniques in surgery of head injury patients. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, and comparative study, conducted on 60 adult head injury patients. The patients were divided into two groups of 30 each. Group I patients received induction with sevoflurane and then had O2 + air + sevoflurane for maintenance with controlled ventilation. Group II patients received induction with i.v. propofol and then had O2 + air + propofol for maintenance with controlled ventilation. Injection fentanyl was used in both the groups at the time of induction and in intermittent boluses in maintenance. In observation, blood sugar level and mean arterial pressure were assessed at different time periods perioperatively in both groups while GCS was analyzed pre- and post-operatively. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Microsoft Excel 2010 using t-test for comparison between the two groups and Z-test for comparison of proportions. Results and Conclusion: Blood sugar level was found significantly higher in patients of sevoflurane group at 30 min after induction, at the end of surgery, and 1 h after the end of anesthesia than propofol group patients. This increase of blood sugar level did not have any significant alteration in the GCS profile of the patients in sevoflurane group as compared to propofol group

  9. Surgical and anesthetic management of patients with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Joseph L

    2004-09-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are primary defects in bio-energy metabolism. They are a heterogeneous group of diseases. The specific constellation of symptoms that will manifest in the effected individual depends on the type of genetic defect in the mitochondria. The goals of medical management, expressed in a highly simplified fashion, are to maintain a normal acid-base balance and to avoid those medical conditions and situations that add extra stress to a compromised bio-energy production system. Infection is a common stress that may cause a crisis in a patient with mitochondrial dysfunction. Treatment and avoidance of infections is a goal of both medical and surgical management. Common childhood illness such as otitis media, tonsillitis and sinusitis are example of such stress inducing infections.

  10. Anesthetic management in a case of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikkiliineni, Venkata Rama Rao; Panidapu, Nagarjuna; Parasa, Mrunalini; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody (APLA) syndrome is one of the most common thrombocytophilias but, unfortunately, goes unrecognized most often. It is an auto-immune disorder in which thrombotic events and a recurrent fetal loss occur in the presence of antibodies to phospholipids. It is the most common acquired hyper-coagulable state. There is a limited literature on peroperative management of patients with this syndrome. We report a case of APLA syndrome in a parturient due to its rarity and complexity.

  11. [Anesthetic management of a Dialysis Patient with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Hara, Koji; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-11-01

    We report the successful management of anesthesia in a 46-year-old male dialysis patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). He underwent an osteosynthesis of the ankle joint using general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia. The anesthetic concerns in patients with CIDP are the possibility of postoperative respiratory dysfunction due to anesthetics or muscle relaxants and that of postoperative neurological deterioration due to spinal or epidural anesthesia. In this case, sevoflurane (1.5-2%) did not cause respiratory dysfunction postoperatively and muscle relaxant effect of rocuronium was effectively reversed by sugammadex. Epidural anesthesia using ropivacaine (0.2-0.375%) and fentanyl did not worsen the neurological symptoms of CIDP post-operatively.

  12. Anesthetic considerations in diabetic patients. Part II: intraoperative and postoperative management of patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Yuji

    2010-10-01

    Some studies have reported that tight glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing major surgery improves perioperative morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, however, large randomized studies have shown such control increases the mortality rate, since aggressive glycemic control induces more frequent incidences of hypoglycemia. Diabetic patients have cerebral complications during the perioperative period more often than their nondiabetic counterparts. Further, anesthetic agents have some effects on cerebral circulation and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity. Hence, anesthesiologists should have adequate knowledge about anesthetic agents that maintain the integrity of the cerebral circulation. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have an increased susceptibility to perioperative infections. Recent work confirmed that a combination of intravenous and subcutaneous insulin as a glucose management strategy had beneficial effects identical with intravenous insulin therapy alone on the reduction of infection rates during the postoperative period.

  13. Anesthetic Management in Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Naeini, Payam S.; Razavi, Mehdi; Collard, Charles D.; Tolpin, Daniel A.; Anton, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation is increasingly being used to treat patients who have ventricular tachycardia, and anesthesiologists frequently manage their perioperative care. This narrative review is intended to familiarize anesthesiologists with preprocedural, intraprocedural, and postprocedural implications of this ablation. Ventricular tachycardia typically arises from structural heart disease, most often from scar tissue after myocardial infarction. Many patients thus affected will benefit from radiofrequency catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory to ablate the foci of arrhythmogenesis. The pathophysiology of ventricular tachycardia is complex, as are the technical aspects of mapping and ablating these arrhythmias. Patients often have substantial comorbidities and tenuous hemodynamic status, necessitating pharmacologic and mechanical cardiopulmonary support. General anesthesia and monitored anesthesia care, when used for sedation during ablation, can lead to drug interactions and side effects in the presence of ventricular tachycardia, so anesthesiologists should also be aware of potential perioperative complications. We discuss variables that can help anesthesiologists safely guide patients through the challenges of radiofrequency catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia. PMID:28100967

  14. Anesthetic management of intestinal obstruction: A postgraduate educational review

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S.; Sripriya, R.; Krishnaveni, N.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal obstruction is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Scientific assessment of the cause, site of obstruction, appropriate correction of the fluid deficit and electrolyte imbalance with preoperative stabilization of blood gases is ideal as a preoperative workup. Placement of a preoperative epidural catheter especially in the thoracic interspace takes care of perioperative pain and stress reduction. Intraoperative management by controlled general anesthesia administering a relative high inspired fraction of oxygen with invasive monitoring in selected sick cases is mandatory. Preoperative monitoring and stabilizing raised intra-abdominal pressure reduces morbidity. Caution should be exercised during opening and closure of abdomen to avoid cardiorespiratory ill effects. There should be an emphasis on avoiding hypothermia. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may worsen sick, fragile patients. The use of sugammadex rather than neostigmine will obscure certain controversies in the healing of intestinal anastomotic site. Replacement of blood loss continued correction of fluids and electrolytes with possible postoperative mechanical ventilation in sick cases may improve outcomes in these patients. PMID:27746522

  15. [Anesthetic management of massive endobronchial hemorrhage after pulmonary embolectomy].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shin; Miyabe, Masayuki; Tabata, Kouya; Toyooka, Hidenori

    2003-08-01

    We report a case of massive endobronchial hemorrhage after pulmonary embolectomy. A 63-year-old woman underwent emergency pulmonary embolectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During partial CPB, we found massive blood gushing out from the endotracheal tube. Approximately 2,000 ml of blood was aspirated in 10 minutes. To ensure adequate oxygenation, emergent percutaneous cardiopulmonary support system (PCPS) was started. After neutralization of heparin and the institution of 10 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure, the bleeding diminished. Institution of PCPS allows performance of unhurried bronchoscopy to identify the actual bleeding point and to lavage the airway. In addition to this management, we administrated steroids and neutrophil elastase inhibitor to stabilize pulmonary capillary membrane. Without complications, the patient was extubated 2 days after operation and the following course was uneventful. Immediate institution of PEEP and pharmacological interventions to reduce pulmonary blood pressure were beneficial in arresting hemorrhage. The bleeding begins usually at the time of discontinuation of CPB. We should recognize the possible occurrence of endobronchial bleeding after pulmonary embolectomy and prepare to protect the airway and to maintain oxygenation and cardiac function.

  16. Anesthetic management of a parturient with Stiff person syndrome for urgent cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, B T; Muravyea, M; Kuo, C; Drexler, C; Pagel, P S

    2016-08-01

    Stiff person syndrome is a rare neurologic disorder with an estimated incidence of 1:1000000. The underlying pathophysiology is truncal and proximal limb muscle stiffness resulting from continuous co-contracture of agonist and antagonist muscle groups concomitant with superimposed episodic muscle spasms. Loss of gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition creates chronic excitation manifested by tonic agonist-antagonist muscle contraction. To date, only three case reports referred indirectly to the anesthetic management of parturients with Stiff person syndrome. The authors describe their management of a parturient with Stiff person syndrome who underwent urgent cesarean delivery under epidural anesthesia.

  17. An Anesthesiologist's Perspective on the History of Basic Airway Management: The "Artisanal Anesthetic" Era: 1846 to 1904.

    PubMed

    Matioc, Adrian A

    2017-03-01

    This second installment of the history of basic airway management covers the early-artisanal-years of anesthesia from 1846 to 1904. Anesthesia was invented and practiced as a supporting specialty in the context of great surgical and medical advances. The current-day anesthesia provider tends to equate the history of airway management with the history of intubation, but for the first 58 yr after the introduction of ether anesthesia, airway management was provided by basic airway techniques with or without the use of a face mask. The jaw thrust and chin lift were described in the artisanal years and used primarily with inhalation anesthesia in the spontaneously breathing patient and less often with negative-pressure ventilation in the apneic victim. Positive-pressure ventilation and intubation stayed at the fringes of medical practice, and airway techniques and devices were developed by trial and error. At the beginning of the 20th century, airway management and anesthetic techniques lagged behind surgical requirements.

  18. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984-2013.

    PubMed

    Vlassakov, Kamen V; Kissin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific), representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index) or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index); index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009-2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0), only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1). Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009-2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100) and a high index of expectations (25.0), reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress.

  19. The anesthetic management of children with pulmonary hypertension in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Twite, Mark D; Friesen, Robert H

    2014-03-01

    Children need cardiac catheterization to establish the diagnosis and monitor the response to treatment when undergoing drug therapy for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Children with PAH receiving general anesthesia for cardiac catheterization procedures are at significantly increased risk of perioperative complications in comparison with other children. The most acute life-threatening complication is a pulmonary hypertensive crisis. It is essential that the anesthesiologist caring for these children understands the pathophysiology of the disease, how anesthetic medications may affect the patient's hemodynamics, and how to manage an acute pulmonary hypertensive crisis.

  20. Repeated Anesthetic Management for a Patient With Klippel-Feil Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hase, Yuri; Kamekura, Nobuhito; Fujisawa, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare disease characterized by a classic triad comprising a short neck, a low posterior hairline, and restricted motion of the neck due to fused cervical vertebrae. We report repeated anesthetic management for orthognathic surgeries for a KFS patient with micrognathia. Because KFS can be associated with a number of other anomalies, we therefore performed a careful preoperative evaluation to exclude them. The patient had an extremely small mandible, significant retrognathia, and severe limitation of cervical mobility due to cervical vertebral fusion. As difficult intubation was predicted, awake nasal endotracheal intubation with a fiberoptic bronchoscope was our first choice for gaining control of the patient's airway. Moreover, the possibility of respiratory distress due to postoperative laryngeal edema was considered because of the surgeries on the mandible. In the operating room, tracheotomy equipment was always kept ready if a perioperative surgical airway control was required. Three orthognathic surgeries and their associated anesthetics were completed without a fatal outcome, although once the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit for precautionary postoperative airway management and observation. Careful preoperative examination and preparation for difficult airway management are important for KFS patients with micrognathia. PMID:25191983

  1. Repeated anesthetic management for a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hase, Yuri; Kamekura, Nobuhito; Fujisawa, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare disease characterized by a classic triad comprising a short neck, a low posterior hairline, and restricted motion of the neck due to fused cervical vertebrae. We report repeated anesthetic management for orthognathic surgeries for a KFS patient with micrognathia. Because KFS can be associated with a number of other anomalies, we therefore performed a careful preoperative evaluation to exclude them. The patient had an extremely small mandible, significant retrognathia, and severe limitation of cervical mobility due to cervical vertebral fusion. As difficult intubation was predicted, awake nasal endotracheal intubation with a fiberoptic bronchoscope was our first choice for gaining control of the patient's airway. Moreover, the possibility of respiratory distress due to postoperative laryngeal edema was considered because of the surgeries on the mandible. In the operating room, tracheotomy equipment was always kept ready if a perioperative surgical airway control was required. Three orthognathic surgeries and their associated anesthetics were completed without a fatal outcome, although once the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit for precautionary postoperative airway management and observation. Careful preoperative examination and preparation for difficult airway management are important for KFS patients with micrognathia.

  2. Randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing two anesthetic techniques for ultrasound-guided transvaginal follicular puncture

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gilvandro Lins; Serralheiro, Fernando Cesar; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Ribeiro, Onésimo Duarte; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the anesthetic techniques using propofol and fentanyl versus midazolam and remifentanil associated with a paracervical block with lidocaine in performing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte aspiration. Methods: A randomized double-blind clinical trial (#RBR-8kqqxh) performed in 61 women submitted to assisted reproductive treatment. The patients were divided into two groups: anesthetic induction with 1mcg/kg of fentanyl associated with 1.5mg/kg of propofol (FP Group, n=32), in comparison with anesthetic induction using 0.075mg/kg of midazolam associated with 0.25mcg/kg/min of remifentanil, and paracervical block with 3mL of 2% lidocaine (MRPB Group, n=29). Main outcome measures: human reproduction outcomes, modified Aldrete-Kroulik index, hemodynamic parameters, and salivary cortisol. Results: The results revealed a higher number of embryos formed in the FP Group (p50=2 versus 1; p=0.025), gestation rate two times higher in the FP Group (44.4% versus 22.2%; p=0.127), less time to reach AK=10 in the MRPB Group (p50=10 versus 2; p<0.001), and lower mean of hemodynamic parameters in the MRPB Group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol as well as with midazolam, remifentanil, and paracervical block offered satisfactory anesthetic conditions when performing assisted reproduction procedures, providing comfort for the patient and physician. PMID:27759816

  3. Comparison of noninvasive blood pressure measurement techniques via the coccygeal artery in anesthetized cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Hall, Natalie H; Kass, Philip H; Citino, Scott B

    2013-12-01

    Two indirect blood pressure measurement techniques, Doppler (DOP) sphygmomanometry and oscillometry, applied at the ventral coccygeal artery were compared with simultaneous direct blood pressure measurements at the dorsal pedal artery in 10 anesthetized, captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). The DOP method was moderately accurate, with relatively little bias (mean difference 3.8 mmHg) and 88.6% of the DOP systolic arterial pressure measurements being within 10 mmHg of the direct systolic arterial measurement. With the oscillometric (OM) method, 89.2% of the mean arterial pressure measurements were within 10 mmHg of the direct measurement and had the least bias (mean difference 2.3 mmHg), 80.7% of the systolic measurements were within 10 mmHg of the direct measurement and had the second least bias (mean difference 2.3 mmHg), and 59% of the diastolic measurements were within 10 mmHg of the direct measurement and had significant bias (mean difference 7.3 mmHg). However, DOP showed relatively poor precision (SD 11.2 mmHg) compared with OM systolic (SD 8.0 mmHg), diastolic (SD 8.6 mmHg), and mean (SD 5.7 mmHg). Both techniques showed a linear relationship with the direct technique measurements over a wide range of blood pressures. The DOP method tended to underestimate systolic measurements below 160 mmHg and overestimate systolic measurements above 160 mmHg. The OM method tended to underestimate mean pressures below 160 mm Hg, overestimate mean pressures above 160 mmHg, underestimate systolic pressures below 170 mmHg, overestimate systolic pressures above 170 mmHg, and underestimate diastolic pressures throughout the measured blood pressure range. Indirect blood pressure measurement using the ventral coccygeal artery, particularly when using an OM device for mean and systolic arterial pressure, may be useful in the clinical assessment of cheetahs when monitoring trends over time, but caution should be taken when interpreting individual values.

  4. Anesthetic management of staged thoracoscopic repair of bilateral eventration of diaphragm in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Subramanian Hari; Natarajan, Saravanan; Pallavi, Vyapaka

    2016-01-01

    Congenital eventration of the diaphragm is a rare disorder, the perioperative management of which is challenging. The introduction of thoracoscopic repair of these defects has considerably reduced the perioperative morbidity and mortality in these patients. In spite of the advantages of thoracoscopy which include smaller chest incisions, reduced postoperative pain, and more rapid postoperative recovery compared with thoracotomy, it is still inherent with complications unique to it. A clear understanding of the pathophysiologic changes, potential complications and institution of appropriate monitoring and good planning is essential for the safe conduct of thoracoscopic procedures in neonates. We describe the anesthetic management of staged thoracoscopic repair of bilateral congenital eventration of the diaphragm in a neonate. PMID:26957704

  5. Anesthetic management of a case of Gilbert's syndrome for mitral and aortic valve replacement: Role of transesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, P. S.; Singh, Naveen G.; Subash, S.; Manjunatha, N.; Prabhushankar, C. G.; Sathish, N.

    2017-01-01

    Gilbert's syndrome (GS) is an autosomal inherited disorder characterized by relative deficiency of glucuronyl transferase and poor uptake of unconjugated bilirubin by hepatocytes. Cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in these patients triggers further hepatic dysfunction. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and Doppler assessment of hepatic vein help in assessing hepatic blood flow (HBF) during cardiac surgery. Here, we discuss anesthetic management and role of TEE in maintaining HBF perioperatively in a 25-year-old male patient with GS undergoing double valve replacement with tricuspid valve plasty. TEE-guided HBF monitoring and management of hepatic perfusion by modifying anesthetic and CPB protocol resulted in the favorable outcome. PMID:28217062

  6. [Successful anesthetic management of a patient with giant pheochromocytoma using high-dose landiolol hydrochloride].

    PubMed

    Kitano, Manabu; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Sawai, Toshiyuki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    We report successful anesthetic management of a patient with pheochromocytoma using high-dose landiolol hydrochloride. A 55-year-old man was scheduled to undergo resection of giant pheochromocytoma. Epidural anesthesia was not performed due to anticoagulant therapy for lower limb thrombus. Tracheal intubation was performed with the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope. Preoperative screening revealed urine adrenaline 2.567.0 microg x day(-1) urine noradrenaline 1,734.0 microg x day(-1), and a tumor diameter of 96 x 60 mm. Catecholamine surge was controlled with 50 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) continuous infusion of landiolol hydrochloride and IV bolus phentolamine. On tumor resection, although systemic blood pressure increased to 294 mmHg and was unresponsive to repeated phentolamine administration, the heart rate remained at 70-105 beats x min(-1) and there were no significant ST changes.

  7. Case report: anesthetic management of acute fatty liver of pregnancy in the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Spence, Dennis

    2010-06-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) is a potentially fatal metabolic disorder that manifests during the third trimester. Early diagnosis, termination of pregnancy, and treatment of complications associated with AFLP significantly reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. While most cases of AFLP occur before delivery, some may occur after vaginal delivery. Anesthesia providers should have a high level of suspicion for AFLP in a patient with altered mental status and elevated liver function test results in the postpartum period. Anesthetic implications include early recognition of liver dysfunction and aggressive resuscitation and treatment of hypoglycemia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, and other associated complications and reduction or avoidance of medications with substantial hepatic metabolism. This is a case report describing the management of a woman with AFLP in whom acute liver failure rapidly developed after a vaginal delivery with epidural analgesia at a small overseas hospital.

  8. Anesthetic management of urgent cesarean delivery in a parturient with acute malaria infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Anna, Antonio Maria; Catarci, Stefano; Frassanito, Luciano; Vagnoni, Salvatore; Draisci, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in Africa, Southeast Asia and South America. Nonetheless, several cases of malaria have been reported in Western countries involving travelers from endemic areas, though very few involve pregnant women. In this article, we report a case of a young woman born in Sierra Leone who had been living in Italy for two years. She was admitted to our hospital with malaise; worsening of her condition led to Plasmodium falciparum infection diagnosis early during her hospital stay, as well as an urgent cesarean delivery. We briefly discuss the features of malaria in pregnancy, the difficulties associated with early diagnosis, and the possible fetal and maternal implications, and also consider how the disease may affect anesthetic management. PMID:27066212

  9. [Two cases of congenital airway obstruction managed with ex utero intrapartum treatment procedures: anesthetic implications].

    PubMed

    Manrique, S; Blasco, J; Munar, F; Andreu, E; Mateo, M D; Suescun, M C; López Gil, M V

    2007-01-01

    An ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure provides sufficient time to gain control of the potentially obstructed fetal upper airway while uterine placental circulation is maintained during cesarean section. We report 2 cases in which fetal congenital upper airway obstruction was managed without complications during EXIT procedures. We also discuss general considerations concerning the obstetric patient and the performance of intramuscular fetal anesthesia. Before the hysterotomy, sevoflurane at 1.5 minimum alveolar concentration was administered to assure sufficient uterine relaxation during EXIT. The 2 parturients remained hemodynamically stable during the procedure and uterine and placental perfusion was adequate. Nasotracheal intubation was possible in 1 fetus after a cervical mass was dissected. In the other, a tracheostomy was created. After the umbilical cord was clamped, the concentration of sevoflurane anesthetic gas was reduced and oxytocin and methylergometrine were administered to induce adequate uterine contractions within a few minutes. Both neonates survived the EXIT procedure with no complications.

  10. Anesthetic management of patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombocytopenia for vaginal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Gaurav; Gupta, Kapil; Kashyap, Chandni; Nayar, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a female having systemic lupus erythematosus, who was on steroid therapy and was scheduled for vaginal hysterectomy. She presented with breathlessness on mild exertion, a characteristic facial malar rash, and a platelet count 56,000 cells/cu mm. The patient was given a subarachnoid block with 2.8 ml 0.5% bupivacaine heavy in L3-L4 intervertebral space. Inj. Hydrocortisone 25 mg was given I.V. intraoperatively and repeated every 6 hours for 24 hours. Anesthetic management included considerations of systemic organ involvement, thrombocytopenia, and perioperative steroid replacement. Spinal block can be given with platelet count > 50,000/cumm. Strict asepsis should be maintained for invasive procedures. Maintenance of normothermia decreases the impact of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  11. Anesthetic management of patient with hemophilia a undergoing emergency ventriculoperitoneal shunting: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Hussain, Altaf; Khan, Mueen Ullah; Hajnour, Muhammad; Qureshi, Sadia; Aqil, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a hemorrhagic trend almost exclusively affecting males (X-related recessive disease). In 85% of cases, it is caused by factor VIII deficiency, called hemophilia A or classic hemophilia. Successful anesthetic management depends on the special care and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals informed about the disease, including qualified hematologist, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. PMID:27833501

  12. The influence of ventilation strategies and anesthetic techniques on regional cerebral oximetry in the beach chair position: a prospective interventional study with a randomized comparison of two anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Picton, Paul; Dering, Andrew; Alexander, Amir; Neff, Mary; Miller, Bruce S.; Shanks, Amy; Housey, Michelle; Mashour, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Beach chair positioning during general anesthesia is associated with cerebral oxygen desaturation. Changes in cerebral oxygenation resulting from the interaction of inspired oxygen fraction, end-tidal carbon dioxide and anesthetic choice have not been fully evaluated in anesthetized patients in the beach chair position. Methods This was a prospective interventional within-group study of patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position that incorporated a randomized comparison between two anesthetics. Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive desflurane or total intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Following induction of anesthesia and positioning, inspired oxygen fraction (Fio2) and minute ventilation were sequentially adjusted for all patients. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) was the primary outcome and was recorded at each of five set points. Results While maintaining Fio2 at 0.3 and end tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) at 30mmHg there was a decrease in rSO2 from 68%, SD 12 to 61%, SD 12 (p<0.001) following beach chair positioning. The combined interventions of increasing Fio2 to 1.0 and increasing Petco2 to 45mmHg resulted in a 14% point improvement in rSO2 to 75%, SD 12 (p <0.001) for patients anesthetized in the beach chair position. There was no significant interaction effect of the anesthetic at the study intervention points. Conclusions Increasing Fio2 and Petco2 resulted in a significant increase in rSO2 that overcomes desaturation in patients anesthetized in the beach chair position and that appears independent of anesthetic choice. PMID:26244887

  13. Anesthetic Techniques Influence the Induction of Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage During Diagnostic Ultrasound Scanning in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Puhnonary apillary hemorrhage can be induced by diagnostic ultrasonnd (US) during direct pulmonary US scanning in rats. The influence of specific anesthetic tedmiques on this bioeffect was examined. Methods Ketamine plus xylazine has been used previously. In this study, the influence of intraperitoneal injections of ketamine and pentobarbital, inhalational isoflurane, and the supplemental use of xylazine with ketamine and isollurane was tested. A diagnostic US machine with a7.6-MHz linear array was used to image the right lung of anesthetized rats in a warmed water bath at different mechanical index (MI) settings. Pulmonary capillary hemorrhage was assessed by measuring comet tail artifacts in the image and by morphometry of the hemorrhagic areas on excised lungs. Results Pulmonary capillary hemorrhage was greatest for pentobarbital, lower for inhalational isoflurane, and lowest for ketamine anesthesia, with occurrence thresholds at at Mis of about 0.44, 0.8, and 0.8, respectively. Addition of xylazine produced a substantial increaseinhemorrhageanda significant proportion of hemorrhage occurrence for ketamineat an MI of 0.7 (P < .01) and forisofluraneat an MI of 0.52 (P < .01). Conclusions Ketamine plus xylazine and pentobarbital yield lower thresholds than ketamine or isoflurane alone by nearly a factor of 2 in MI. These results suggest that the choice of the anesthetic agent substantially modifies the relative risks of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage from pulmonary US. PMID:25614402

  14. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L.; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D.; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D.; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based. PMID:26345202

  15. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based.

  16. [Ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and pregnancy: what anesthetic technique should be preferred for a scheduled cesarean section?].

    PubMed

    Peláez Romero, R; Grigorov, I; Giménez, I; Aguilar, J L; Atanassoff, P

    2010-03-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare cardiac abnormality rupture the right sinus and if ruptured open into the right ventricle or atrium. Usually silent, may cause significant hemodynamic changes. Few cases of ruptured Valsalva sinus aneurysm have been reported in the literature, and the course of this condition during pregnancy and anesthetic management have scarcely been mentioned. We report the case of a primipara with a Valsalva sinus aneurysm that ruptured into the right ventricle. Cardiac function worsened as pregnancy progressed. A cesarean section under spinal anesthesia was scheduled.

  17. Local anesthetic update.

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, T. A.; Young, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of new local anesthetics has not been an area of particularly active research for a number of years. However, as the use of regional anesthesia has expanded, additional anesthetic requirements and techniques have stimulated the search for newer drugs and ways of modifying existing ones. This article reviews some of the more recent developments in this field. PMID:8185087

  18. Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Anesthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to highlight the clinical characteristics of the patient population; to assess multivariate risk factor analysis and the invasive/non-invasive techniques available for risk factor identification and management in this high-risk surgical population; to assess the major hemodynamic, metabolic, and regional blood flow changes associated with aortic cross-clamping/unclamping procedures and techniques for their modification or attenuation; and to assess the influence of perioperative anesthetic techniques and management on patient outcome. PMID:1814052

  19. Severe post-burn neck contracture release and skin graft harvest using tumescent local anaesthesia as the sole anesthetic technique.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Mukesh Kumar; Puneet, Pulak; Rani, Kanchan; Shree, Divya

    2012-02-01

    Severe post-burn contractures in the neck often cause anatomical distortion and restriction of neck movements, resulting in varying degrees of difficulty in airway management. Any mode of anesthesia that may obviate the need for imperative airway control may be desirable in such situations in which a difficult airway may be anticipated. Here we present one such situation where tumescent local anesthesia was employed to manage a case of severe post-burn neck contractures posted for contracture release and split-skin grafting. The other benefits of this method were minimal blood loss and excellent postoperative analgesia. In conclusion, it can be emphasized that the application of tumescent anesthesia is an important anesthetic tool in patients with predicted difficult airway management.

  20. Anesthetic management of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eriko; Murata, Hiroaki; Minami, Hitomi; Sumikawa, Koji

    2014-06-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a newly developed, less invasive treatment for esophageal achalasia that requires general anesthesia under positive pressure ventilation. In this retrospective case series, we describe the anesthetic management of 28 consecutive patients who underwent POEM for esophageal achalasia. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil under positive pressure ventilation through a tracheal tube. Retained contents in the esophagus were evacuated just before anesthesia induction to prevent regurgitation into the trachea. The POEM procedure was performed using an orally inserted flexible fiberscope. Elevation of end-tidal carbon dioxide after initiating esophageal carbon dioxide insufflation was observed in all patients and was treated by minute adjustments to the ventilation volume. Scopolamine butylbromide-induced tachycardia in one patient was treated with landiolol hydrochloride, which is a short-acting beta 1-selective blocker. Minor subcutaneous emphysema around the neck was observed in one patient. POEM was successfully completed, and tracheas were extubated immediately after the procedure in all patients. Our findings suggest that prevention of aspiration pneumonia during anesthesia induction, preparation for carbon dioxide insufflation-related complications, and treatment of scopolamine butylbromide-induced tachycardia play important roles in safe anesthesia management of POEM for esophageal achalasia.

  1. Do Anesthetic Techniques Influence the Threshold for Glomerular Capillary Hemorrhage induced in Rats by Contrast Enhanced Diagnostic Ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Glomerular capillary hemorrhage (GCH) can be induced by ultrasonic cavitation during contrast enhanced diagnostic ultrasound (CEDUS), an important nonthermal ultrasound bioeffect. Recent studies of pulmonary ultrasound exposure have shown that thresholds for another nonthermal bioeffect of ultrasound, pulmonary capillary hemorrhage, is strongly influenced by whether or not xylazine is included in the specific anesthetic technique. Methods In this study, anesthesia with ketamine only was compared to ketamine plus xylazine for the induction of GCH in rats by 1.6 MHz intermittent diagnostic ultrasound with contrast agent (similar to Definity). GCH was measured as a percentage of glomeruli with hemorrhage found in histological sections for groups of rats scanned at different peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes. Results There was a significant difference between the magnitude of the GCH between the two anesthetics at 2.3 MPa with 45.6 % GCH for ketamine only, increasing to 63.2 % GCH for ketamine plus xylazine anesthesia (P<0.001). However, the thresholds for the two anesthesia methods were virtually identical at 1.0 MPa, based on linear regression of the exposure response data. Conclusions Therefore, thresholds for CEDUS induced injury of the microvasculature appears to be minimally affected by anesthesia methods. PMID:26764276

  2. Anesthetic Implications of Ebola Patient Management: A Review of the Literature and Policies.

    PubMed

    Missair, Andres; Marino, Michael J; Vu, Catherine N; Gutierrez, Juan; Missair, Alfredo; Osman, Brian; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2015-09-01

    As of mid-October 2014, the ongoing Ebola epidemic in Western Africa has affected approximately 10,000 patients, approached a 50% mortality rate, and crossed political and geographic borders without precedent. The disease has spread throughout Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone. Isolated cases have arrived in urban centers in Europe and North America. The exponential growth, currently unabated, highlights the urgent need for effective and immediate management protocols for the various health care subspecialties that may care for Ebola virus disease patients. We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature to identify key areas of anesthetic care affected by this disease. The serious potential for "high-risk exposure" and "direct contact" (as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) of anesthesiologists caring for Ebola patients prompted this urgent investigation. A search was conducted using MEDLINE/PubMed, MeSH, Cochrane Review, and Google Scholar. Key words included "anesthesia" and/or "ebola" combined with "surgery," "intubation," "laryngoscopy," "bronchoscopy," "stethoscope," "ventilation," "ventilator," "phlebotomy," "venous cannulation," "operating room," "personal protection," "equipment," "aerosol," "respiratory failure," or "needle stick." No language or date limits were applied. We also included secondary-source data from government organizations and scientific societies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, American Society of Anesthesiologists, and American College of Surgeons. Articles were reviewed for primary-source data related to inpatient management of Ebola cases as well as evidence-based management guidelines and protocols for the care of Ebola patients in the operative room, infection control, and health care worker personal protection. Two hundred thirty-six articles were identified using the aforementioned terminology in the scientific database search engines. Twenty articles

  3. Truncal blocks for perioperative pain management: a review of the literature and evolving techniques.

    PubMed

    Go, Ramon; Huang, Yolanda Y; Weyker, Paul D; Webb, Christopher Aj

    2016-10-01

    As the American healthcare system continues to evolve and reimbursement becomes tied to value-based incentive programs, perioperative pain management will become increasingly important. Regional anesthetic techniques are only one component of a successful multimodal pain regimen. In recent years, the use of peripheral and paraneuraxial blocks to provide chest wall and abdominal analgesia has gained popularity. When used within a multimodal regimen, truncal blocks may provide similar analgesia when compared with other regional anesthetic techniques. While there are other reviews that cover this topic, our review will also highlight the emerging role for serratus plane blocks, pectoral nerve blocks and quadratus lumborum blocks in providing thoracic and abdominal analgesia.

  4. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    PubMed

    Ohshita, Naohiro; Oka, Saeko; Tsuji, Kaname; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Morita, Shosuke; Momota, Yoshihiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD) is a hereditary peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by progressive muscle atrophy and motor-sensory disorders in all 4 limbs. Most reports have indicated that major challenges with general anesthetic administration in CMTD patients are the appropriate use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants and preparation for malignant hyperthermia in neuromuscular disease. Moderate sedation may be associated with the same complications as those of general anesthesia, as well as dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, reduced perioperative respiratory function, difficulty in positioning, and sensitivity to intravenous anesthetic agents. We decided to use intravenous sedation in a CMTD patient and administered midazolam initially and propofol continuously, with total doses of 1.5 mg and 300 mg, respectively. Anesthesia was completed in 3 hours and 30 minutes without adverse events. We suggest that dental anesthetic treatment with propofol and midazolam may be effective for patients with CMTD.

  5. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohshita, Naohiro; Oka, Saeko; Tsuji, Kaname; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Morita, Shosuke; Momota, Yoshihiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M.

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD) is a hereditary peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by progressive muscle atrophy and motor-sensory disorders in all 4 limbs. Most reports have indicated that major challenges with general anesthetic administration in CMTD patients are the appropriate use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants and preparation for malignant hyperthermia in neuromuscular disease. Moderate sedation may be associated with the same complications as those of general anesthesia, as well as dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, reduced perioperative respiratory function, difficulty in positioning, and sensitivity to intravenous anesthetic agents. We decided to use intravenous sedation in a CMTD patient and administered midazolam initially and propofol continuously, with total doses of 1.5 mg and 300 mg, respectively. Anesthesia was completed in 3 hours and 30 minutes without adverse events. We suggest that dental anesthetic treatment with propofol and midazolam may be effective for patients with CMTD. PMID:27269665

  6. Case Report: Genetic analysis and anesthetic management of a child with Niemann-Pick disease Type A

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Priti G.; Coleman, Melissa; Horst, Meagan; Rocourt, Dorothy; Ladda, Roger L.; Janicki, Piotr K.

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old child, recently diagnosed with Niemann-Pick disease type A, presented for a laparoscopic placement of a gastrostomy tube under general anesthesia. The disease was confirmed and further characterized by genetic testing, which revealed evidence of the presence of two known pathogenic mutations in the SMPD1 gene, and enzyme studies showed a corresponding very low level of enzymatic activity of acidic sphingomyelinase. The anesthetic management involved strategies to manage an anticipated difficult intubation and avoid post-operative ventilation. PMID:26913189

  7. Comparison of anesthetic management and outcomes of robot-assisted versus open radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Trentman, Terrence L; Fassett, Sharon L; McGirr, Dustin; Anderson, Brad; Chang, Yu-Hui H; Nateras, Rafael Nunez; Castle, Erik P; Rosenfeld, David M

    2013-09-01

    Robot-assisted cystectomy surgery may be advantageous for patients. The purpose of this study was to compare anesthetic management and outcomes in patients undergoing robot-assisted versus open radical cystectomy. In a retrospective review of 256 cystectomy procedures, procedure duration, blood loss, respiratory parameters, recovery room opiate consumption, pain scores and antiemetic use in the recovery room, and hospital length of stay were compared. After exclusions, 96 robot-assisted and 102 open procedures were analyzed. Anesthesia and surgery duration were significantly longer in the robot-assisted group, while the length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the robot-assisted group: 7.1 ± 5.8 versus 9.8 ± 5.03 days, p = 0.0005. Estimated blood loss was 601.8 ± 491.4 ml in the open group versus 257.7 ± 164.3 ml in the robot-assisted group, p < 0.0001. Recovery room opiate consumption was significantly less in the robot-assisted group: 9.5 ± 8.9 versus 12.6 ± 9.9 mg (morphine equivalents), p = 0.02. The highest recorded respiratory rate was significantly higher in the robot-assisted group, as was the highest recorded peak airway pressure. Among patients with arterial blood gas data, the highest arterial partial pressure of CO2 was significantly greater in the robot-assisted group than in the open surgery group: 42.6 ± 5.6 versus 37.4 ± 4.8 mmHg CO2, p = 0.0001. Surgeons and anesthesia providers can expect robot-assisted radical cystectomy surgery to last longer than traditional open surgery, but to be associated with less pain and blood loss. Positioning and abdominal insufflation for robot-assisted surgery may contribute to ventilation challenges.

  8. Anesthetic management of a parturient with type III Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, G; Manabat, E; Huffnagle, S; Huffnagle, H J

    2011-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is believed to occur from failure of normal segmentation of cervical somites during gestation. We present the case of a 38-year-old primiparous woman with type III Klippel-Feil syndrome for elective cesarean delivery. Our patient had a short webbed neck, short stature, limited neck flexion and extension, and thoraco-lumbar abnormalities. A multidisciplinary approach, involving obstetrics, medical subspecialties, anesthesiology, otolaryngology, and radiology, were utilized to evaluate and manage this patient. Pulmonary function testing revealed a restrictive defect, but transthoracic echocardiography was normal without pulmonary hypertension. We planned a combined spinal-epidural technique; however, only the epidural technique was obtained. Cesarean delivery was commenced with favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. Post-operative pain management was provided with intravenous morphine patient-controlled analgesia.

  9. Anesthetic management of a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Laura M

    2013-10-01

    Pain protects the body from damaging effects of harmful stimuli. Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare inherited disorder characterized by diminished or absent sensitivity to pain, touch, and pressure that leads to frequent trauma and self-mutilation. The disorder is part of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) family, in which 5 types have been recognized. Research and case reports of anesthetic risks and analgesic needs of these patients is limited due to the infrequent nature of the disorder. Recommendations for anesthesia include modification of intraoperative opioid requirements, use of anesthetics to ensure cooperation and immobility, and intraoperative temperature monitoring. It is imperative for anesthesia providers to understand which type of HSAN their patient experiences and to conduct a thorough preoperative interview because a different interpretation of sensory loss may occur in each HSAN category. This article reports the case of a patient with HSAN type 2 who presented for knee arthroscopy.

  10. Anesthetic management of an orangutan (Pongo abelii/pygmaeus) undergoing laparoscopic tubal ligation.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Paula K

    2006-12-01

    An adult hybrid orangutan (Pongo abelii/pygmaeus) was presented to a veterinary teaching hospital for laparoscopic tubal ligation. The orangutan was immobilized with the use of injectable anesthetic agents, then orotracheally intubated. Anesthesia was maintained with the use of isoflurane in oxygen, and positive-pressure ventilation was used to ensure adequate gas exchange. Parameters monitored included arterial blood pressure, ECG, capnometry, and arterial blood gases. Anesthesia was uneventful, and recovery was smooth.

  11. Anesthetic management of an 8-month-old infant with osteogenesis imperfecta undergoing liver transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwon; Kim, Anna; Yoo, Seokha; Shin, Seung-Yeon; Kang, Sun-Hye; Jeong, Jinyoung; Yoo, Yongjae

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetic management of pediatric liver transplantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) requires tough decisions and comprehensive considerations of the cascade of effects that may arise and the required monitoring. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil was chosen as the main anesthetic strategy. Malignant hyperthermia (MH), skeletal fragility, anhepatic phase during liver transplantation, uncertainties of TIVA in children, and propofol infusion syndrome were considered and monitored. There were no adverse events during the operation. Despite meticulous precautions with regard to the risk of MH, there was an episode of high fever (40℃) in the ICU a few hours after the operation, which was initially feared as MH. Fortunately, MH was ruled out as the fever subsided soon after hydration and antipyretics were given. Although the delivery of supportive care and the administration of dantrolene are the core principles in the management of MH, perioperative fever does not always mean a MH in patients at risk for MH, and other common causes of fever should also be considered. PMID:25006373

  12. Anesthetic Considerations in Hepatectomies under Hepatic Vascular Control

    PubMed Central

    Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Tsaroucha, Athanassia; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Vassiliou, Ioannis; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hazards of liver surgery have been attenuated by the evolution in methods of hepatic vascular control and the anesthetic management. In this paper, the anesthetic considerations during hepatic vascular occlusion techniques were reviewed. Methods. A Medline literature search using the terms “anesthetic,” “anesthesia,” “liver,” “hepatectomy,” “inflow,” “outflow occlusion,” “Pringle,” “hemodynamic,” “air embolism,” “blood loss,” “transfusion,” “ischemia-reperfusion,” “preconditioning,” was performed. Results. Task-orientated anesthetic management, according to the performed method of hepatic vascular occlusion, ameliorates the surgical outcome and improves the morbidity and mortality rates, following liver surgery. Conclusions. Hepatic vascular occlusion techniques share common anesthetic considerations in terms of preoperative assessment, monitoring, induction, and maintenance of anesthesia. On the other hand, the hemodynamic management, the prevention of vascular air embolism, blood transfusion, and liver injury are plausible when the anesthetic plan is scheduled according to the method of hepatic vascular occlusion performed. PMID:22690040

  13. Aerospace management techniques: Commercial and governmental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, J. G.; Morrison, E. J.

    1971-01-01

    A guidebook for managers and administrators is presented as a source of useful information on new management methods in business, industry, and government. The major topics discussed include: actual and potential applications of aerospace management techniques to commercial and governmental organizations; aerospace management techniques and their use within the aerospace sector; and the aerospace sector's application of innovative management techniques.

  14. [Anesthetic management of the ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure for giant epignathus and of the tumor excision].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tadashi; Nakata, Jun; Sakakibara, Michiko; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Hara, Masato; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Maseki, Megumi; Teramoto, Yuzo

    2008-10-01

    We report an anesthetic management of the ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure performed in a fetus with giant epignathus due to laryngeal atresia at 28 weeks' gestation. Anesthesia of the mother was induced with thiamylal and vecuronium, and maintained with 4% sevoflurane in 100% oxygen before delivery. Sevoflurane provided excellent uterine relaxation. To maintain the arterial pressure, the patient received acetate Ringer and ephedrine 4mg. After hysterotomy, a pulse oxymeter and an ultrasound transducer were applied to monitor fetal Sp(O2) and heart rate. No anesthetic agents were injected into the fetus in addition to transplacental sevoflurane. Tracheostomy was performed on the fetus by pediatric surgeons on placental support. The uterine tone improved soon after discontinuing sevoflurane, intramyometrial injection of oxytocin and ergometrine infusion after delivery. Excision of the tumor was performed on day 2 of life. Pediatric surgeons tried to excise it totally, but it was hard to differentiate the tumor from the normal tissue, and partial excision was performed. After the excision, the neonate weighed 944 g and excised specimen weighed 253 g. Though the neonate was immature and the tumor was very large, no perioperative complications were associated with EXIT and the tumor excision.

  15. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  16. [New anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of cocaine local analgesia in 1886, and the subsequent development of procaine (1904) and other closely related ester-type compounds, dentistry has prided itself on being as close to 'painless' as possible. In the late 1940s the newest group of the local anesthetic compounds, the amides, was introduced. The initial amide local analgesic, lignocaine (Xylocaine), revolutionised pain control in dentistry worldwide. In succeeding years other amide-type local anesthetics, mepivacaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine and etidocaine, were introduced. They gave the dental practitioner a local anesthetic armamentarium which provided pulpal analgesia for periods of from 20 minutes (mepivacaine) to as long as three hours (bupivacaine and etidocaine with adrenaline). In addition these popular drugs proved to be more rapid-acting than the older ester-type drug and, at least from the perspective of allergenicity, more safe. In 1976, in Germany, the newest amide local analgesic, carticaine HCl was introduced into dentistry. Articaine (the generic name was changed) possesses properties similar to lignocaine but has additional properties which made the drug quite attractive to the general dental practitioner. In 1986 articaine was introduced in North America (Canada) where it has become the most used local anesthetic, supplanting lignocaine. Articaine has been approved for use in the United Kingdom. In this introductory discussion we review the development of articaine and discuss its place in the dental local analgesic armamentarium.

  17. Limitations and vulnerabilities of the neonatal cardiovascular system: considerations for anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrew R; Humphry, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Development of the cardiovascular system through the last trimester of pregnancy and the subsequent neonatal period is profound. Morphological changes within the myocardium make the heart vulnerable to challenges such as fluid shifts and anesthetic drugs. The sensitivity of the myocardium to metabolic challenges and potential harm of drugs needed to maintain adequate blood pressure and cardiac output are highlighted. Traditional monitoring under anesthesia has focussed on maintaining oxygenation and heart rate in the neonate with less attention paid to blood pressure, cardiac output, and more importantly organ well-being. There is now a better understanding of the limitations of blood pressure homeostasis in the neonate and the potential consequences of marginal hypoperfusion. This article highlights some of these vulnerabilities particularly as they relate to anesthesia and surgery in the very young.

  18. [Anesthetic management of a patient with stiff-person syndrome undergoing thymectomy].

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takahiro; Yamashita, Soichiro; Ishigaki, Maiko; Takahashi, Shinji; Tanaka, Makoto

    2012-02-01

    Stiff-person syndrome is an uncommon disease characterized by muscular rigidity and painful spasms in the axial and limb muscles. We report a 58-year-old woman with stiff-person syndrome undergoing thymectomy under general anesthesia. Before surgery, her medications were 25 mg of diazepam, 2 mg of clonazepam, and 15 mg of gabapentin per day. After epidural catheterization for the postoperative analgesia, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with continuous remifentanil infusion and propofol with target controlled infusion. With train-of-four ratio (TOFR) monitoring by stimulating the ulnar nerve, her trachea was intubated after 0.6mg x kg(-1) of rocuronium intravenous administration. Since then, additional rocuronium was not given for 4 hours. After surgery, she was fully awake and TOFR recovered to 100%, but tidal volume was too low to remove the tracheal tube, and mechanical ventilation was continued in ICU. On the next day, the tracheal tube was removed, and she was discharged from ICU. Because anesthetics may delay the recovery of respiratory function in a patient with stiff-person syndrome, careful assessment of respiratory function is needed at the emergence from general anesthesia.

  19. Anesthetic management of a newborn with occipital meningocele for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Neeta, S.; Upadya, Madusudhan; Pachala, Sri Sruthi

    2015-01-01

    Cranial Meningocoele is a term which represents herniation of meninges and cerebrospinal fluid through the congenital defect in the cranium. Anaesthetic challenges in the management of neonates with occipital meningocoele include airway management and proper positioning of the neonate without pressure on the meningocoele sac so as to preventthe rupture of the membranes. Associated congenital anomalies also can cause anaesthesia and procedure related complications. Other difficulties include performing a difficult airway case in an unfamiliar environment outside operation theatre. We report a case of 6 day old neonate with occipital meningocoele posted for MRI brain and the successful anaesthetic management. PMID:26417133

  20. [Anesthetic management for gastrectomy in two gastric cancer patients after coronary artery bypass grafting using right gastroepiploic artery].

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Naomitsu; Mishima, Yasunori; Itoh, Takahiko; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2010-07-01

    We report two cases for anesthetic management of gastrectomy for gastric cancer which took place after receiving coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA). The first patient was a 75-year-old man after CABG using the RGEA 14 years before. He was diagnosed with gastric cancer and was scheduled for total gastrectomy. Preoperative coronary angiography (CAG) showed complete occlusion of the right coronary artery (RCA), whereas RGEA was patent. Because percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was hard to perform on the occluded RCA, proximal gastrectomy was carried out without lymph node dissection. The surgeons judged the surgery enough for radical treatment. Surgery was accomplished without any problems. The second patient was a 76-year-old man after CABG using the RGEA 15 years before. He was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and was scheduled for distal gastrectomy. Preoperative CAG showed the RCA partially occluded and the RGEA remaining patent. He received the scheduled surgery after confirmation of the success of PCI, performed preoperatively for reperfusion of the occluded segments. Although the RGEA was incised during the surgery, gastrectomy was accomplished without any problems in the cardiac function.

  1. Anesthetic Management of a Surgical Patient with Chronic Renal Tubular Acidosis Complicated by Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Haruyuki; Yasumura, Rie; Wada, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old man with chronic renal tubular acidosis and subclinical hypothyroidism underwent lower leg amputation surgery under general anesthesia. Perioperative acid-base management in such patients poses many difficulties because both pathophysiologies have the potential to complicate the interpretation of capnometry and arterial blood gas analysis data; inappropriate correction of chronic metabolic acidosis may lead to postoperative respiratory deterioration. We discuss the management of perioperative acidosis in order to achieve successful weaning from mechanical ventilation and promise a complete recovery from anesthesia. PMID:27648310

  2. Anesthetic approaches in carotid body tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavakli, Ali Sait; Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid body tumors (CBT) are benign tumors that originate from neural non-chromaffin cells that are typically localized near carotid bifurcation. Surgical removal of the tumor is the most appropriate treatment. General anesthesia is preferred anesthetic technique for CBT surgery. Basic elements of anesthetic management are protection of hemodynamic stability and maintaining cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The aim of this study was to evaluate anesthetic management of CBT surgery and present the literature knowledge. METHODS: The study included 10 consecutive patients with diagnosis of CBT who underwent surgery at Antalya Training and Research Hospital, in Antalya, Turkey, between 2013 and 2016. Preoperative demographic details; comorbidities; side of surgical site; duration of operation; length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay; change of intraoperative blood pressure; use of inotropic drugs, blood products, and analgesics; postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score; and complications were recorded. RESULTS: According to Shamblin classification, 3 tumors were type I and the remaining 7 were type II. Tumors were located on right side in 6 patients, and on left in 4. Blood loss sufficient to require transfusion was observed in 1 patient. Average intraoperative blood loss was 287±68 mL. Tachycardia and hypertension were observed in 1 patient; bradycardia and hypotension were seen in 4 patients. Infusion for inotropic support was administered to 1 patient. Mean duration of operation was 109±20 minutes. Mean VAS score was 4±1, mean ICU tramadol consumption was 80±25 mg. Duration of stay in ICU and hospital were 2.4±1.1 hours and 3.8±0.7 days, respectively. Mortality and neurological complications were not seen in postoperative period. CONCLUSION: CBT surgery requires close and complex anesthesia management. Protection of hemodynamic stability against sudden hemodynamic changes, monitoring, and maintaining CPP are the most

  3. Different anesthetic agents-soaked sinus packings on pain management after functional endoscopic sinus surgery: which is the most effective?

    PubMed

    Haytoğlu, Süheyl; Kuran, Gökhan; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Arıkan, Osman Kürşat

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of local anesthetics soaked non-absorbable sinus packs on pain management after functional endoscopic surgery (FESS). One hundred and fifty patients with the diagnosis of bilateral chronic sinusitis with or without nasal polyps who underwent FESS were included into the study. Their pre-operative Lund-Mackay computerized tomography (CT) Scores were similar. We applied anesthetic agents of 2 % lidocaine HCl, 0.25 % Bupivacaine HCl, 0.2 % Ropivacaine, 2 % Prilocaine and 0.9 % NaCl (Saline) in groups 1-5 onto the sinus packs after FESS. At postoperative period, acetaminophen (250 mg/5 ml) was used in 10-15 mg/kg per dose (4 times a day). Bleeding grade, operation duration, postoperative number of gauze/24 h, additional painkiller need, pain values at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h were noted. Lund-Kennedy endoscopic scores were also evaluated at 1st, 2nd and 4th weeks postoperatively. In saline group, 93.3 % of the patients needed additional painkiller. Whereas, in Bupivacaine group, additional painkiller use (20.0 %) is less than the other groups. In Bupivacaine group, number of gauze/24 h use was lower than lidocaine, ropivacaine and prilocaine groups. In our study, except 1st and 24th hours, pain values of groups can be written in ascending order (from less to higher) as Bupivacaine, Lidocaine, Prilocaine, Ropivacaine and Saline. In the first hour, pain values of groups can be written in ascending order (from less to higher) as Lidocaine, Prilocaine, Bupivacaine, Ropivacaine and Saline. In the 2nd week, in the Bupivacaine and Lidocaine Groups separately, postoperative Lund-Kennedy scores were lower than the Prilocaine and Saline Groups. In the 1st month, Lidocaine Group's Lund-Kennedy scores were significantly lower than the Saline Group. Synechia values were not different between groups. Bupivacaine help the lower pain values and less additional painkiller need after FESS. Therefore, we recommend to use

  4. Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  5. [Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  6. Anesthetic Management of the Parturient for Lumbar Disc Surgery in the Prone Position

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Colleen G.; Volpi-Abadie, Jacqueline; Ural, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Background While back pain is common in pregnancy, urgent surgical intervention is rarely required. Case Report A parturient in the third trimester presented with foot drop and sensory deficits. Surgical intervention was deemed necessary and was performed in the prone position to facilitate exposure. A multidisciplinary approach was vital to the management plan. Conclusion For any pregnant patient undergoing nonobstetric surgery, the care provided should be individualized and thoughtful, keeping in mind both the mother and fetus. PMID:26412999

  7. Anesthetic management of a child with Aicardi syndrome undergoing laparoscopic Nissen's fundoplication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Yui; Miwa, Takaaki; Mizuno, Yoshiko; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru; Ka, Koui

    2011-02-01

    Aicardi syndrome (AS) is a rare congenital syndrome and is characterized by the triad of infantile spasm, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and anomaly of chorioretinal lacunae. We here report a case of a patient with AS under general anesthesia. Although there is no report in which muscle relaxants were used in AS patients, vecuronium bromide was used for artificial pneumoperitoneum in this case. Careful management is important for AS patients during an operation that significantly affects respiratory function. In addition, it is possible that muscle relaxants be administered safely in AS patients. Careful monitoring such as epileptiform electroencephalogram and bispectral index monitors may be needed for the early detection of epileptic activities.

  8. Anesthetic management of a patient undergoing an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choleva, Abbie J

    2011-12-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure involves partial delivery of the fetus with the fetal-placental circulation maintained. This allows for management of the obstructed fetal airway via direct laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, tracheostomy, or surgical intervention. These complex and often challenging procedures have been performed about 100 times in the United States to date. Recent advances in prenatal diagnosis of fetal congenital malformations, in particular, abnormalities involving the fetal airway, have allowed for the development of the EXIT strategy to convert potentially catastrophic situations during fetal delivery to a controlled environment. Indications for the EXIT procedure have expanded to a variety of congenital abnormalities, including fetal neck masses, lung or mediastinal tumors, congenital high airway obstruction syndrome, conjoined twin separation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring transitioning from EXIT to extracorporeal membrane oxygen transitioning. Various considerations must be managed by the anesthesia provider during the EXIT procedure to ensure positive maternal and fetal outcomes. Careful attention to achieving adequate uterine relaxation, maintaining maternal blood pressure, avoiding placental abruption, prioritizing fetal airway establishment, and providing return of uterine tone when indicated are examples of these considerations. In this case report, a parturient presented for an EXIT procedure secondary to fetal cystic hygroma.

  9. [Anesthetic management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the perioperative management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The presence of a history or signs of heart failure and un-diagnosed DCM preoperatively, may be associated with an increased risk during non-cardiac surgery. In these patients, preoperative assessment of LV function, including echocardiography, and assessment of an individual's capacity to perform a spectrum of common daily tasks may be recommended to quantify the severity of systolic function. It is important to prevent low cardiac output and arrhythmia for the perioperative management of patients with DCM. Sympathetic hyperactivity often causes atrial or ventricular tachyarrhythmia, which could worsen systemic hemodynamics in these patients. In particular, the prevention of life-threatening arrhythmia, such as, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation is important. To prevent perioperative low output syndrome, inotropic support, using catecholamines or phosphodiesterase inhibitors with or without vasodilators should be performed under careful monitoring. It is desirable to use a pulmonary-artery catheter during moderate to high risk surgery, because the optimum level of left ventricular pre-load is very narrow in these patients. Every effort must be made to detect postoperative heart failure by careful monitoring, including PAC, and physical examination.

  10. Anesthetic management of robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery (TECAB).

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Seema P; Lehr, Eric; Odonkor, Patrick; Bonatti, Johannes O; Kalangie, Maudy; Zimrin, David A; Grigore, Alina M

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade, TECAB has matured into a reproducible technique associated with low incidence of both mortality and morbidity, as well as superior quality of life, when compared with open CABG surgery. However, TECAB also is associated with important and specific challenges for the anesthesiology team, particularly with regard to the physiologic stresses of OLV, placement of special catheters, and induced capnothorax. As the technology supporting robotic surgery evolves and familiarity with, and confidence in, TECAB increases, the authors anticipate increasingly widespread use of these procedures in an increasingly fragile and problematic patient population who will require the support of a skilled and vigilant anesthesiology team.

  11. Classroom Management Techniques and Student Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Walter

    This paper reviews concepts and research findings on classroom management techniques and explores how these techniques are related to student discipline strategies. The first section surveys descriptive and experimental research recently accumulated on classroom management practice, concentrating on strategies for monitoring and guiding classroom…

  12. [Anesthetic management of a child with dilated cardiomyopathy associated with congenital fiber-type disproportion].

    PubMed

    Kawaraguchi, Yoshitaka; Taniguchi, Akihiro; Fukumitsu, Kazuo; Kinouchi, Keiko; Miyamoto, Yoshikazu; Hirao, Osamu; Kitamura, Seiji

    2002-04-01

    A 3-year-old girl, who presented with dilated cardiomyopathy in conjunction with congenital fiber-type disproportion, underwent open reduction for congenital dislocation of the hip. Preoperative echocardiography demonstrated left ventricular dilatation with an ejection fraction (EF) of 0.33. Anesthesia was induced with intravenous ketamine and fentanyl, and maintained with fentanyl administered incrementally to a total dose of 10 micrograms.kg-1 and 1-1.5% isoflurane. During operation, we continuously monitored left ventricular wall motion and measured left ventricular diastolic dimension (LVDd), systolic dimension (LVDs), cardiac output (CO), EF, and fractional shortening (FS) with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). At the end of surgery, preload (LVDd) and LV contractility (CO, EF, FS) decreased, but LV wall motion remained almost stable throughout the procedure. In conclusion, TEE was useful for intraoperative management of a child with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  13. Complete heart block in pregnancy: case report, analysis, and review of anesthetic management.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Lalitha; Hochman Cohn, Jennifer; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma

    2016-09-01

    Maternal complete heart block can pose significant challenges for the anesthesiologist in the antepartum, peripartum, and postpartum periods. Some patients may present for the first time in the puerperium with dizziness, weakness, syncope, or congestive heart failure as a result of the additional hemodynamic burden that accompanies pregnancy. Although there is an increase in permanent pacemaker placement in young symptomatic patients before pregnancy, prophylactic placement of pacemakers in asymptomatic parturients is not always indicated. The need for temporary or permanent pacemakers in asymptomatic women should be assessed on a case-by-case basis; many of these patients may be safely managed during labor and delivery without pacing. The parturient with complete heart block must be followed vigilantly during pregnancy and post delivery, as the need for pacemaker insertion can also arise in the postpartum period. We present a case of third-degree heart block in a 26-year-old parturient.

  14. Systems management techniques and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Report is reviewed which discusses history and trends of systems management, its basic principles, and nature of problems that lend themselves to systems approach. Report discusses systems engineering as applied to weapons acquisition, ecology, patient monitoring, and retail merchandise operations.

  15. [Anesthetic management of a patient with 8 trisomy mosaic combined with cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuko; Yakushiji, Tsutomu; Ryo, Jyunkei; Higashimoto, Soken; Sasaki, Kotatsu

    2014-04-01

    We administered general anesthesia for a patient with 8 trisomy mosaic and cerebral palsy. Constitutional 8 trisomy mosaic has been associated with syndromic dysmorphology, corneal opacities, leukemia and trophoblastic disease. In Japan only 4 reports of general anesthesia related with 8 trisomy were found. This patient was a 24-year-old woman (140 cm, 35 kg), with mental retardation, poor body development and severe scoliosis. Since she suffered from repeated serious asthma and pneumonia since childhood, tracheotomy was performed at the age of 9. Epileptic seizures were also seen and antiepileptics were prescribed. This time, general anesthesia was scheduled for the extraction of a maxillary cyst. Anesthesia was induced slowly with sevoflurane from the tracheotomy, followed by rocuronium 25 mg i.v., and maintained with sevoflurane 1.5-2 % and remifentanil 0.05-0.2 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) Throughout the operation, BIS score fluctuated between 40-60, and stable anesthesia was maintained. We reversed the rocuronium with sugammadex 140 mg promptly. The 8 trisomy mosaic patient is known to have various complications related to circulation and respiration. Careful management is necessary in anesthesia for an 8 trisomy patient.

  16. [Anesthetic management of a patient with transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yuko; Wada, Hiroki; Oshima, Takashi; Aramaki, Yoshihiko; Kikuta, Yoshinori; Iwasaki, Yasuji

    2008-08-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is characterized by pulmonary edema and hypoxemia within 6 hours of transfusion in the absence of other causes of acute lung injury or circulatory overload and is now considered the leading cause of transfusion-related death. We report a female patient who showed hypoxemia after transfusion without any other causes of acute lung injury. The patient is a 43-year-old woman, who received emergency transurethral hemostasis for bladder hemorrhage with hematuria and low hemoglobin concentration (3.2 g x dl(-1)). General anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, remifentanil, and vecuronium. Two units of RBC were transfused during operation. Since she showed high blood pressure, tachycardia, and a painful expression after operation, we extubated her. Although we gave her O2 6 l x min(-1) after extubation, she showed low oxygen saturation (90%), thus we started bag-mask ventilation. However, she complained of dyspnea and the chest X-ray revealed bilateral diffuse pulmonary edema following hypoxemia (80%). Thus we inserted endotracheal tube and started positive pressure assist ventilation. The next day, hypoxemia was improved under PEEP therapy. The anti-HLA antibody in the transfused plasma was positive. We conclude that the early recognition and management of TRALI is essential during and after operation.

  17. [Anesthetic management of a patient with Rett syndrome associated with trismus and apnea attacks].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Eri; Mishima, Yasunori; Ito, Takahiko; Ito, Asuka; Takaseya, Hikari; Kameyama, Naomitsu; Fukugasako, Hisato; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a congenital neurological disorder associated with mutations in the gene encoding MECP2 on the X chromosome. An 18-year-old woman (150 cm in height and 29 kg in weight) had been diagnosed with RTT and showed myotonic trismus, frequent attacks of apnea, mental retardation, spastic paraplegia, scoliosis, and microcephalus with micrognathia. She was scheduled to undergo laparoscopic fundoplication and gastrostomy under general anesthesia. Nasal bronchofiberscopic intubation (BFI) was planned because difficult airway due to trismus and micrognathia was expected. Referring to the bispectral index (BIS), anesthesia was induced with intermittent intravenous thiopental (total 125 mg), resulting in successful opening of the mouth by 1.5 of a finger width and establishment of manual ventilation. Following intravenous administration of rocuronium (20 mg), oral BFI was easily accomplished despite Cormack grade III. Anesthesia was satisfactorily maintained with inhalation of sevoflurane (1.0-1.5%) and continuous infusion of remifentanil (0.1-0.2 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) with the BIS value ranging from 30 to 50. She recovered smoothly from anesthesia using sugammadex (50 mg). However, she immediately demonstrated trismus and an attack of apnea with shivering, which were successfully resolved by warming the body and intravenous fentanyl (50 microg bolus and subsequent infusion at a rate of 10 microg x hr(-1)). The postoperative course was uneventful. Characteristically, RTT shows an extremely wide range of neurological symptoms. Therefore, it is of great importance to respond to each of those symptoms during the perioperative management of patients with RTT.

  18. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work.

  19. Modern Reservoir Sedimentation Management Techniques with Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annandale, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of reservoir sedimentation management approaches results in a win-win scenario, it assists in enhancing the environment by preserving river function downstream of dams while concurrently providing opportunities to sustainably manage water resource infrastructure. This paper summarizes the most often used reservoir sedimentation management techniques with examples of where they have been implemented. Three categories can be used to classify these technologies, i.e. catchment management, sediment routing and sediment removal. The objective of catchment management techniques is to minimize the amount of sediment that may discharge into a reservoir, thereby reducing the loss of storage space due to sedimentation. Reservoir routing is a set of techniques that aim at minimizing the amount of sediment that may deposit in a reservoir, thereby maximizing the amount of sediment that may be passed downstream. The third group consists of techniques that may be used to remove previously deposited sediment from reservoirs. The selection of reservoir sedimentation management approaches is site specific and depends on various factors, including dam height, reservoir volume, reservoir length, valley shape, valley slope, sediment type and hydrology. Description of the different reservoir sedimentation management techniques that are used in practice will be accompanied by case studies, including video, illustrating criteria that may be used to determine the potential success of implementing the techniques.

  20. Stress Management Techniques for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Francesca M.

    The director of a not-for-profit nursery school adapted the adult stress management techniques of exercise and relaxation for use with 3- to 5-year-old children. Specifically, children were taught visualization techniques and yoga exercises involving deep breathing. The goal of the practicum was to rechannel children's negative stress-related…

  1. Injection techniques in the management of local pain.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A A

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of local anesthetic (LA) injections and infiltrations particularly combined with 'needling' for management of local musculoskeletal pain. New techniques are described including preinjection blocks (PIBs) which consist of blocking the sensory input from an area prior to giving an injection. PIBs prevent pain which would be caused by needle penetration of sensitive tissue. Needling and infiltration (N and I) with 1% lidocaine has been performed after PIB in 179 tender spots (TSs), trigger points (TrPs), and muscle spasms by the author, in 123 patients with the goal to relieve pain and promote healing. The immediate effect after the procedure as well as long-term results from 1 week to 7 months have been evaluated independently by a physiatrist experienced with injections (Dr. Tae Mo Chang). N and I extending over the entire taut band of abnormal muscle fibers, caused effective relief of pain and functional improvement in tender spots (TSs), trigger points (TrPs) and in muscle spasm caused by a variety of conditions including: acute and chronic sports and work injuries, motor vehicle accidents, muscle and ligament sprains (supraspinous, sacroiliac), overuse and repetitive stress syndromes, tennis elbow; local injuries or radicular irritation; and local inflammations such as bursitis, tendinitis, and osteoarthritis; and traumatic dystrophy, a type of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Needling and infiltration of trigger areas and tender spots is effective treatment in several conditions. Pre-injection blocks allow the performance of the N and I of tender areas without pain.

  2. Anesthetic management for magnetic resonance imaging in a pediatric patient addicted to palm wine: An alcoholic beverage.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Monu; Ram, A Anand; Srikanth, I; Gopinath, Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of drug and alcohol abuse is on rise despite increasing awareness and education about health hazards related to it. Anesthesiologist may come across patients with alcohol abuse in elective as well as emergency situations. We report a rare case of excessive requirement of anesthetics in a pediatric patient of only six years for MRI, addicted to palm wine, an alcoholic beverage created from the sap of various species of palm tree.

  3. Environmental implications of anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment.

  4. To characterize the incidence of airway misplacement of nasogastric tubes in anesthetized intubated patients by using a manometer technique.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shao-Wei; Chen, Hung-Shu; Chen, Yi-Ting; Hung, Kuo-Chuan

    2017-04-01

    This study characterized the incidence of airway misplacement of nasogastric (NG) tubes in surgical patients, and the benefit of using a manometer to discriminate gastric placement from airway placement of NG tubes. Subjects included adult patients scheduled for abdominal surgery. After tracheal intubation, a 16 Fr. NG tube was inserted blindly through the nostril, and its position was assessed using the auscultation (10-ml air insufflation) or manometer (attached to NG tubes) techniques. Briefly, a biphasic pressure change synchronous with airway pressure during mechanical ventilation indicated airway misplacement. The presence of a notable pressure change while compressing the epigastric area indicated a gastric placement. A surgeon made the final confirmation of NG tube placement within the stomach using manual palpation of the tube immediately after laparotomy. The first-attempt success rate was 82.7 % in 104 patients. There were 29 misplacements of 130 attempted insertions (oral cavity, n = 23; trachea, n = 3; distal esophagus, n = 3). The incidence of airway misplacement was 2.9 % (3 of 104 cases). For confirmation of gastric placement, the auscultation technique had a sensitivity of 100.0 % and a specificity of 79.3 %. In contrast, the manometer technique had a sensitivity of 100.0 % and a specificity of 100.0 % in the discrimination of gastric placement from airway placement of NG tubes. Airway misplacement of NG tubes is not uncommon in surgical patients, and the manometer technique may be a reliable and safe method to discriminate gastric placement from airway placement of NG tubes.

  5. Cervical Vagal Schwannoma: Anesthetic Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Suman; Sabharwal, Nikki; Agrawal, Nidhi; Singh, Bhupender

    2017-01-01

    Schwannomas arising from cervical vagus nerve is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. The majority of patients present with insidiously growing lateral neck mass without neurological deficit. We report a case of symptomatic cervical vagal nerve schwannoma in a 32-year-old female. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. However, anesthetic management of these tumors can be challenging. We describe here the complications experienced during the management of the patient.

  6. Anesthetic management of an elderly patient with kyphoscoliosis and dilated cardiomyopathy posted for abdominal hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Suvidha; Kamath, Manjunath R.; Shetty, Anil S.

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old kyphoscoliotic female patient presented with severe pain and sudden acute abdominal distension for 1-week and was diagnosed to have right-sided massive twisted ovarian cyst. The patient was a known case of hypertension, dilated cardiomyopathy with low 20% cardiac ejection fraction. Though very few incidences of multiple co-morbid conditions existing together in a single elderly patient have been reported in the past, it is important to titrate the dosage, type of anesthetic agents and their routes of administration in high risk patients. PMID:26543469

  7. Anesthetic Management of a Patient With Antimuscle-Specific Kinase Antibody-Positive Myasthenia Gravis Undergoing an Open Cholecystectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Akatsu, Masahiko; Ikegami, Yukihiro; Tase, Choichiro; Nishikawa, Koichi

    2017-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the production of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor, muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), or other proteins at the neuromuscular junction. MG with antibodies against MuSK (MuSK-MG) has been described recently. Here, we report the first case of anesthetic management of a patient with MuSK-MG undergoing an open cholecystectomy. In our case, propofol and remifentanil-based anesthesia were used for successful management without using muscle relaxants. Patients with MuSK-MG have predominantly ocular, bulbar, and respiratory symptoms that may increase the risk of aspiration. Anesthesiologists need to pay attention to perioperative respiratory failure and respiratory crisis.

  8. Lipid Emulsion for Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ciechanowicz, Sarah; Patil, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The accidental overdose of local anesthetics may prove fatal. The commonly used amide local anesthetics have varying adverse effects on the myocardium, and beyond a certain dose all are capable of causing death. Local anesthetics are the most frequently used drugs amongst anesthetists and although uncommon, local anaesthetic systemic toxicity accounts for a high proportion of mortality, with local anaesthetic-induced cardiac arrest particularly resistant to standard resuscitation methods. Over the last decade, there has been convincing evidence of intravenous lipid emulsions as a rescue in local anesthetic-cardiotoxicity, and anesthetic organisations, over the globe have developed guidelines on the use of this drug. Despite this, awareness amongst practitioners appears to be lacking. All who use local anesthetics in their practice should have an appreciation of patients at high risk of toxicity, early symptoms and signs of toxicity, preventative measures when using local anesthetics, and the initial management of systemic toxicity with intravenous lipid emulsion. In this paper we intend to discuss the pharmacology and pathophysiology of local anesthetics and toxicity, and the rationale for lipid emulsion therapy. PMID:21969824

  9. (Low-level radioactive waste management techniques)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Kennerly, J.M.; Williams, L.C.; Lingle, W.N.; Peters, M.S.; Darnell, G.R.; USDOE Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN; Du Pont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant; Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1988-08-08

    The US team consisting of representatives of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River plant (SRP), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations participated in a training program on French low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management techniques. Training in the rigorous waste characterization, acceptance and certification procedures required in France was provided at Agence Nationale pour les Gestion des Dechets Radioactif (ANDRA) offices in Paris.

  10. Anesthetic implications of Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blaine Easley, R; Sanders, Devin; McElrath-Schwartz, Jamie; Martin, Jackie; Mark Redmond, J

    2006-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome (JS), also known as 11q-syndrome, is a congenital disorder associated with a deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. Patients with JS characteristically exhibit multiple dysmorphic features, developmental delay, cardiac anomalies, and platelet abnormalities. Anesthetic issues related to the care of patients with JS concern airway management secondary to short neck, abnormal mouth shape and micrognathia/retrognathia, a high incidence of cardiac anomalies, and platelet dysfunction. Importantly, platelet abnormalities affect 95% of reported JS patients and involve platelet number, size and function. Two children with JS who required open heart surgery are presented and anesthetic management issues discussed. These patients represent the first reports regarding the perioperative issues in caring for patients with JS.

  11. Anesthetic management of a patient with polycythemia vera undergoing emergency repair of a type-A aortic dissection and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hyeongwoo; Yang, Jaeyoung; Lee, Sangmin Maria; Lee, Jong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Polycythemia vera is a chronic progressive myeloproliferative disease characterized by increased circulating red blood cells, and the hyperviscosity of the blood can lead to an increased risk of arterial thrombosis. In a previous survey regarding postoperative outcomes in polycythemia vera patients, an increased risk of both vascular occlusive and hemorrhagic complications have been reported. Aortic surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass may be associated with the development of a coagulopathy, and as a result, the occurrence of thrombotic complications should be avoided after coronary anastomosis. Thus, optimizing the hemostatic balance is an important concern for anesthesiologists. However, only a few cases of anesthetic management in polycythemia vera patients undergoing concomitant aorta and coronary arterial bypass surgery have ever been reported. Here, we experience a polycythemia vera patient who underwent an emergency repair of a type-A aortic dissection and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, and report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26634086

  12. Face transplantation: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Face transplantation is a complex vascular composite allotransplantation (VCA) surgery. It involves multiple types of tissue, such as bone, muscles, blood vessels, nerves to be transferred from the donor to the recipient as one unit. VCAs were added to the definition of organs covered by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule and National Organ Transplant Act. Prior to harvest of the face from the donor, a tracheostomy is usually performed. The osteotomies and dissection of the midface bony skeleton may involve severe hemorrhagic blood loss often requiring transfusion of blood products. A silicon face mask created from the facial impression is used to reconstruct the face and preserve the donor’s dignity. The recipient airway management most commonly used is primary intubation of an existing tracheostoma with a flexometallic endotracheal tube. The recipient surgery usually averages to 19-20 h. Since the face is a very vascular organ, there is usually massive bleeding, both in the dissection phase as well as in the reperfusion phase. Prior to reperfusion, often, after one sided anastomosis of the graft, the contralateral side is allowed to bleed to get rid of the preservation solution and other additives. Intraoperative product replacement should be guided by laboratory values and point of care testing for coagulation and hemostasis. In face transplantation, bolus doses of pressors or pressor infusions have been used intraoperatively in several patients to manage hypotension. This article reviews the anesthetic considerations for management for face transplantation, and some of the perioperative challenges faced. PMID:28058213

  13. Anesthetic management of a child with complete atrioventricular septal defect and single ventricle posted for noncardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Aabid Hussain; Ali, Zulfiqar; Dar, Bashir Ahmad; Naqash, Imtiaz A.; Bashir, Samreena

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are associated with various physiological disturbances. They pose anesthetic challenges for both cardiac and noncardiac surgeries. Atrioventricular septal defects are due to a developmental failure in the separation of atria and the ventricles into separate chambers and failure in the separation of mitral and tricuspid valves. We present a case of a child (1½ years), weighing 10 kg, diagnosed as congenital hydrocephalus who was planned for ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Child was having an oxygen saturation of 76% on room air. Anesthesia was induced with morphine and propofol. After tracheal intubation, saturation improved to 93%. Anesthesia was maintained with a combination of oxygen and nitrous oxide along with isoflurane. Measures were taken to maintain normovolemia and avoid hypotension, hypoxia, tachycardia, cardiac dysrhythmias and acidosis. The patient remained hemodynamically stable, maintaining arterial blood gasses within normal limits. The overall intraoperative course remained uneventful. At the end of the procedure, patient was reversed with neostigmine 60 mcg/kg and glycopyrrolate 10 mcg/kg. Extubation was done after the child was alert and opening eyes and was shifted to intensive care on oxygen inhalation for further monitoring. PMID:27746571

  14. [Brain protection by anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoto

    2006-05-01

    Many investigators have attempted to protect the brain against ischemia by reducing the cerebral metabolic rate using anesthetic agents. However, the magnitude of suppression of the cerebral metabolic rate does not correlate with neuroprotective effects of anesthetics, suggesting that other factors besides reduction in the cerebral metabolic rate contribute to the protection. Facilitation of protein synthesis, GABAergic activity, and anti-oxidant action are likely factors responsible for beneficial effects of barbiturates and propofol. Although the brain is protected during anesthesia, anesthetics cannot provide effects sufficiently enough to recover damage caused by severe ischemia. Further, no desired outcome has been reported by treatments after ischemic events.

  15. [Anesthetic management of a patient with aortocaval fistula caused by rupture of a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm into the inferior vena cava].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motonari; Kawashima, Akira; Kuremoto, Yoshito; Tanada, Kazuko

    2013-12-01

    Aortocaval fistula is a rare complication of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. We report anesthetic management of a patient with aortocaval fistula caused by rupture of a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm into the inferior vena cava. A 51-year-old man who had complained of low back pain and general fatigue was referred to our hospital because of his liver damage. Aortocaval fistula due to rupture of a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed from physical examination, enhanced computed tomography and color Doppler ultrasonography. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and rocuronium, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. After induction of anesthesia, the central venous pressure and cardiac index showed remarkably high values because of arteriovenous shunt. When the aneurysm was incised after the clamping of the abdominal aorta, massive venous bleeding occurred from the fistula and caused severe hypotension. Blood pressure recovered by digital compression of the bleeding point and the use of an autotransfusion device. After the repair of the aortocaval fistula, the hemodynamics became stable. The patient had a high output but a good cardiac function in preoperative examination. Therefore anesthesia was managed successfully without worsening high-output heart failure.

  16. Local Anesthetic Microcapsules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-15

    III Chemical Structure of Local Anesthetics 12 Table IV Processing Summary of Lidocaine Microencapsulation 15 Table V Lidocaine Microcapsule Size...Distribution 17 Table VI Processing Summary of Etidocaine Microencapsulation 18 Table VII Etidocaine Microcapsule Size Distribution 19 Table VIII Lidocaine...REPORT I PERIOD COVERED Annual Local Anesthetic Microcapsules 1 July 1980-30 March 1981 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 2106-1 7. AUTHOR() S

  17. Anesthetizing animals: Similar to humans yet, peculiar?

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Madhuri S.; Ramaswamy, Ashwini H.

    2015-01-01

    From time immemorial, animals have served as models for humans. Like humans, animals too have to undergo several types of elective and emergency surgeries. Several anesthetic techniques and drugs used in humans are also used in animals. However, unlike humans, the animal kingdom includes a wide variety of species, breeds, and sizes. Different species have variable pharmacological responses, anatomy, temperament, behavior, and lifestyles. The anesthetic techniques and drugs have to suit different species and breeds. Nevertheless, there are several drugs and many peculiar anesthetic techniques used in animals but not in human beings. Keeping this in mind, literature was hand searched and electronically searched using the words “veterinary anesthesia,” “anesthetic drugs and techniques in animals” using Google search engine. The interesting information so collected is presented in this article which highlights some challenging and amazing aspects of anesthetizing animals including the preanesthetic assessment, preparation, premedication, monitoring, induction of general anesthesia, intubation, equipment, regional blocks, neuraxial block, and perioperative complications. PMID:26712963

  18. Perioperative anesthetic management of a patient with biliary atresia, situs inversus totalis, and kartegener syndrome for hepatobiliary surgery

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Goila, Ajay; Sood, Rajesh; Pawar, Mridula; Borthakur, Biplob

    2011-01-01

    Patients with genetic disorders associated with multiple congenital anomalies present unique challenges to the anesthesiologist. We report the successful perioperative management of a child with biliary atresia, situs inversus totalis, and Kartegener syndrome scheduled for corrective biliary surgery. We recommend that patients with multiple congenital anomalies need to be thoroughly and cautiously evaluated. The perioperative management should be individualized based on associated anomalies along with appropriate monitoring. PMID:21772694

  19. Anesthetic issues for robotic cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Wendy K.; Walker, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    As innovative technology continues to be developed and is implemented into the realm of cardiac surgery, surgical teams, cardiothoracic anesthesiologists, and health centers are constantly looking for methods to improve patient outcomes and satisfaction. One of the more recent developments in cardiac surgical practice is minimally invasive robotic surgery. Its use has been documented in numerous publications, and its use has proliferated significantly over the past 15 years. The anesthesiology team must continue to develop and perfect special techniques to manage these patients perioperatively including lung isolation techniques and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). This review article of recent scientific data and personal experience serves to explain some of the challenges, which the anesthetic team must manage, including patient and procedural factors, complications from one-lung ventilation (OLV) including hypoxia and hypercapnia, capnothorax, percutaneous cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass, TEE guidance, as well as methods of intraoperative monitoring and analgesia. As existing minimally invasive techniques are perfected, and newer innovations are demonstrated, it is imperative that the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist must improve and maintain skills to guide these patients safely through the robotic procedure. PMID:25566713

  20. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  1. Anesthetic management of a parturient with placenta previa totalis undergoing preventive uterine artery embolization before placental expulsion during cesarean delivery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Woo; Song, In Ae; Ryu, Junghee; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Jeon, Young-Tae; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2014-10-01

    Placenta previa totalis can cause life-threatening massive postpartum hemorrhage, and careful anesthetic management is essential. Preventive uterine artery embolization (UAE) before placental expulsion was introduced to reduce postpartum bleeding in cases of placenta previa totalis. We describe the case of a 40-year-old woman (gravida 0, para 0) with placenta previa totalis and uterine myomas who underwent intraoperative UAE, which was preoperatively planned at the strong recommendation of the anesthesiologist, immediately after delivery of a fetus and before removal of the placenta during cesarean delivery under spinal-epidural anesthesia. After confirming embolization of both uterine arteries, removal of the placenta resulted in moderate bleeding. The estimated blood loss was 2.5 L, and 5 units of red blood cells were transfused. The parturient was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 4. This case shows that the bleeding risk is reduced by intraoperative UAE in a patient with placenta previa totalis, and anesthesiologists have an important role in a multidisciplinary team approach.

  2. Anesthetic management of a parturient with placenta previa totalis undergoing preventive uterine artery embolization before placental expulsion during cesarean delivery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Song, In Ae; Ryu, Junghee; Jeon, Young-Tae; Hwang, Jung-won

    2014-01-01

    Placenta previa totalis can cause life-threatening massive postpartum hemorrhage, and careful anesthetic management is essential. Preventive uterine artery embolization (UAE) before placental expulsion was introduced to reduce postpartum bleeding in cases of placenta previa totalis. We describe the case of a 40-year-old woman (gravida 0, para 0) with placenta previa totalis and uterine myomas who underwent intraoperative UAE, which was preoperatively planned at the strong recommendation of the anesthesiologist, immediately after delivery of a fetus and before removal of the placenta during cesarean delivery under spinal-epidural anesthesia. After confirming embolization of both uterine arteries, removal of the placenta resulted in moderate bleeding. The estimated blood loss was 2.5 L, and 5 units of red blood cells were transfused. The parturient was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 4. This case shows that the bleeding risk is reduced by intraoperative UAE in a patient with placenta previa totalis, and anesthesiologists have an important role in a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:25368788

  3. Anesthetic consideration for nonintubated VATS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jen-Ting; Hung, Ming-Hui; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2014-01-01

    In the recent decade, nonintubated-intubated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been extensively performed and evaluated. The indicated surgical procedures and suitable patient groups are steadily increasing. Perioperative anesthetic management presents itself as a fresh issue for the iatrogenic open pneumothorax, which is intended for unilateral lung collapse to create a steady surgical field, and the ensuing physiologic derangement involving ventilatory and hemodynamic perspectives. With appropriate monitoring, meticulous employment of regional anesthesia, sedation, vagal block, and ventilatory support, nonintubated VATS is proved to be a safe alternative to the conventional intubated general anesthesia. PMID:24455170

  4. Data Management Techniques for Acoustical Planetary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Tokano, T.; Jernej, I.; Stachel, Manfred; Besser, B. P.; Aydogar, Oe.

    We discuss data management techniques for acoustical data obtained from future atmospheric planetary in-situ probes with the aim of event oriented scientific analysis. The immediate objec-tive is the localisation (acoustic wave telescope) and characterisation of acoustic phenomena of atmospheres and surfaces, e.g. in the frame of the proposed NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) with the Acoustic Sensor Package (ACU) multi-microphone array. Contrary to huge amounts of source data obtained through the electromagnetic windows, acoustical sig-nals are seldom recorded and few files exist. One example is pressure sensor data from the instrument HASI/PWA during Huygens descent, mission Cassini-Huygens. Nevertheless, a lot of acoustic point and noise sources, e.g. caused by rain, drizzle or wind abound in Titan's atmosphere. In almost all cases, due to limitations in telemetry rate, a careful strategy for onboard event handling and data reduction -the first step in data management -has to be selected, e.g. sampling rates in kHz range or averaging in the frequency domain. This pre-processing together with complementary investigations at the space segment directly influences the scientific data return in terms of long-term continuous or short-term event based studies. The database at the ground segment with science data and metadata entries after final calibra-tion has to support the combined investigations with other instruments. This second step in data management fully explores the acoustic environment of planetary atmospheres in terms of background noise and spacecraft generated disturbances, location and characterisation of source regions and correlation between the experiments. Currently we're running databases for magnetic field data from various ground-based and satellite related experiments, historical balloon data included. Comparisons of data between experiments are possible. This framework based on dependability considerations with several different

  5. A Review of the Usefulness of R & D Management Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    could also be classified as a "style" of management. A management technique according to John Argenti is "a recognized method of analyzing or solving a...toward Accountability for Performance. Homewood, Illinois: Ricnard D. Irwin, Inc., 1978, pp. 82-87. 3. Argenti , John. Management Techniques: A Practical

  6. Relationship between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in patients undergoing general anesthesia: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takamitsu; Uchida, Kanji; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Nagase, Takahide; Oba, Koji; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2017-01-01

    Surgery patients in Japan undergo routine spirometry testing prior to general anesthesia. The use of a flow sensor during general anesthesia has recently become common. However, it is not certain whether the information derived from flow-volume curves is being adequately used for mechanical ventilation management during general anesthesia. So far, there have been no attempts to calculate airway resistance using flow-volume curves. Therefore, we performed a prospective, observational study to investigate the relationship between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia. We calculated pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in each patient, based on the slopes of flow-volume curves obtained prior to and during general anesthesia. We also calculated endotracheal tube resistance to correct the intra-anesthetic airway resistance values calculated. A total of 526 patients were included in the study, and 98 patients had a forced expiratory volume in the first second/forced vital capacity ratio of < 70%. Pre-anesthetic airway resistance was significantly higher in patients with airflow obstruction than in those without airflow obstruction (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference in intra-anesthetic airway resistance was found between patients with and without airflow obstruction during mechanical ventilation (p = 0.48). Pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance values were closer to each other in patients without airflow obstruction, with a mean difference < 1.0 cmH2O L-1s-1, than in those with airflow obstruction, although these respiratory parameters were significantly different (p < 0.001). Intra-anesthetic airway resistance was not related to the FEV1/FVC ratio, regardless of the degree to which the FEV1/FVC ratio reflected pre-anesthetic airway resistance. As compared with patients with airflow obstruction, the mean difference between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic

  7. Relationship between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in patients undergoing general anesthesia: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takamitsu; Uchida, Kanji; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Nagase, Takahide; Oba, Koji; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2017-01-01

    Surgery patients in Japan undergo routine spirometry testing prior to general anesthesia. The use of a flow sensor during general anesthesia has recently become common. However, it is not certain whether the information derived from flow-volume curves is being adequately used for mechanical ventilation management during general anesthesia. So far, there have been no attempts to calculate airway resistance using flow-volume curves. Therefore, we performed a prospective, observational study to investigate the relationship between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia. We calculated pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance in each patient, based on the slopes of flow-volume curves obtained prior to and during general anesthesia. We also calculated endotracheal tube resistance to correct the intra-anesthetic airway resistance values calculated. A total of 526 patients were included in the study, and 98 patients had a forced expiratory volume in the first second/forced vital capacity ratio of < 70%. Pre-anesthetic airway resistance was significantly higher in patients with airflow obstruction than in those without airflow obstruction (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference in intra-anesthetic airway resistance was found between patients with and without airflow obstruction during mechanical ventilation (p = 0.48). Pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic airway resistance values were closer to each other in patients without airflow obstruction, with a mean difference < 1.0 cmH2O L-1s-1, than in those with airflow obstruction, although these respiratory parameters were significantly different (p < 0.001). Intra-anesthetic airway resistance was not related to the FEV1/FVC ratio, regardless of the degree to which the FEV1/FVC ratio reflected pre-anesthetic airway resistance. As compared with patients with airflow obstruction, the mean difference between pre-anesthetic and intra-anesthetic

  8. Neurometric assessment of intraoperative anesthetic

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1998-07-07

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for collecting EEG data, reducing the EEG data into coefficients, and correlating those coefficients with a depth of unconsciousness or anesthetic depth, and which obtains a bounded first derivative of anesthetic depth to indicate trends. The present invention provides a developed artificial neural network based method capable of continuously analyzing EEG data to discriminate between awake and anesthetized states in an individual and continuously monitoring anesthetic depth trends in real-time. The present invention enables an anesthesiologist to respond immediately to changes in anesthetic depth of the patient during surgery and to administer the correct amount of anesthetic. 7 figs.

  9. Neurometric assessment of intraoperative anesthetic

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for collecting EEG data, reducing the EEG data into coefficients, and correlating those coefficients with a depth of unconsciousness or anesthetic depth, and which obtains a bounded first derivative of anesthetic depth to indicate trends. The present invention provides a developed artificial neural network based method capable of continuously analyzing EEG data to discriminate between awake and anesthetized states in an individual and continuously monitoring anesthetic depth trends in real-time. The present invention enables an anesthesiologist to respond immediately to changes in anesthetic depth of the patient during surgery and to administer the correct amount of anesthetic.

  10. Successful anesthetic management of a child with blepharophimosis syndrome and atrial septal defect for reconstructive ocular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Khanna, Puneet; Kumar, Anil; Shende, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Blepharophimosis syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by eyelid malformation, involvement of reproductive system and abnormal facial morphology leading to difficult airway. We report a rare association of blepharophimosis syndrome and atrial septal defect in a 10-year-old girl who came for reconstruction surgery of eyelid. The child had dyspnea on exertion. Atrial septal defect was identified preoperatively by clinical examination and echocardiography. Anesthesia management was complicated by failure in laryngeal mask airway placement and Cobra perilaryngeal airway was subsequently used. PMID:22096296

  11. [Anesthetic Management of an Infant who Underwent Awake-intubation for Her Pharyngeal Injury Caused by a Toothbrush].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Arai, Takero; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    A 2-year-and-4-month-old female infant, 12 kg in weight and 90 cm in height fell off from a table, which was about 1 m height with a toothbrush in her mouth without her parents noticing. Urgent CT scan showed that it penetrated the left side of her oropharyngeal wall to the bifurcation of her right carotid artery. According to the initial assessment, carotid artery seemed intact and there seemed to be no sign of CNS involvement. She underwent general anesthesia for further investigation and operation. We could detect vocal code with ease by inserting Glidescope between her tongue and the toothbrush. After the intubation, we administered fentanyl 25 μg rocuronium 15 mg and sevoflulane 3-5% to her, and then she underwent arteriography. The neurosurgeon found no sign of major arterial injury nor traumatic aneurysm nor CNS involvement. She went to the ICU intubated after the removal of the toothbrush. She was extubated 5 days after operation. One of the benefits of the Glidescope is that we can share the visual image, and we chose it this time. When we expect a difficult airway during management for oropharyngeal trauma, we have to consider the way to manage the airway.

  12. Anesthetic implications of laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy aims to minimize the trauma of any interventional process but still achieve a satisfactory therapeutic result. The development of "critical pathways," rapid mobilization and early feeding have contributed towards the goal of shorter hospital stay. This concept has been extended to include laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernia repair. Reports have been published confirming the safety of same day discharge for the majority of patients. However, we would caution against overenthusiastic ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the rational but unproven assumption that early discharge will lead to occasional delays in diagnosis and management of postoperative complications. Intraoperative complications of laparoscopic surgery are mostly due to traumatic injuries sustained during blind trocar insertion and physiologic changes associated with patient positioning and pneumoperitoneum creation. General anesthesia and controlled ventilation comprise the accepted anesthetic technique to reduce the increase in PaCO2. Investigators have recently documented the cardiorespiratory compromise associated with upper abdominal laparoscopic surgery, and particular emphasis is placed on careful perioperative monitoring of ASA III-IV patients during insufflation. Setting limits on the inflationary pressure is advised in these patients. Anesthesiologists must maintain a high index of suspicion for complications such as gas embolism, extraperitoneal insufflation and surgical emphysema, pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Postoperative nausea and vomiting are among the most common and distressing symptoms after laparoscopic surgery. A highly potent and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, has proven to be an effective oral and IV prophylaxis against postoperative emesis in preliminary studies. Opioids remain an important component of the anesthesia technique, although the introduction of newer potent NSAIDs may diminish their use. A preoperative

  13. Fault Management Techniques in Human Spaceflight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hagan, Brian; Crocker, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses human spaceflight fault management operations. Fault detection and response capabilities available in current US human spaceflight programs Space Shuttle and International Space Station are described while emphasizing system design impacts on operational techniques and constraints. Preflight and inflight processes along with products used to anticipate, mitigate and respond to failures are introduced. Examples of operational products used to support failure responses are presented. Possible improvements in the state of the art, as well as prioritization and success criteria for their implementation are proposed. This paper describes how the architecture of a command and control system impacts operations in areas such as the required fault response times, automated vs. manual fault responses, use of workarounds, etc. The architecture includes the use of redundancy at the system and software function level, software capabilities, use of intelligent or autonomous systems, number and severity of software defects, etc. This in turn drives which Caution and Warning (C&W) events should be annunciated, C&W event classification, operator display designs, crew training, flight control team training, and procedure development. Other factors impacting operations are the complexity of a system, skills needed to understand and operate a system, and the use of commonality vs. optimized solutions for software and responses. Fault detection, annunciation, safing responses, and recovery capabilities are explored using real examples to uncover underlying philosophies and constraints. These factors directly impact operations in that the crew and flight control team need to understand what happened, why it happened, what the system is doing, and what, if any, corrective actions they need to perform. If a fault results in multiple C&W events, or if several faults occur simultaneously, the root cause(s) of the fault(s), as well as their vehicle-wide impacts, must be

  14. Original Solution for Middle Ear Implant and Anesthetic/Surgical Management in a Child with Severe Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    PubMed Central

    Bianchin, Giovanni; Tribi, Lorenzo; Reverzani, Aronne; Formigoni, Patrizia; Polizzi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    We describe the novel solution adopted in positioning middle ear implant in a child with bilateral congenital aural atresia and craniofacial dysmorphism that have posed a significant challenge for the safe and correct management of deafness. A five-year-old child, affected by a rare congenital disease (Van Maldergem Syndrome), suffered from conductive hearing loss. Conventional skin-drive bone-conduction device, attached with a steel spring headband, has been applied but auditory restoration was not optimal. The decision made was to position Vibrant Soundbridge, a middle ear implant, with an original surgical application due to hypoplasia of the tympanic cavity. Intubation procedure was complicated due to child craniofacial deformities. Postoperative hearing rehabilitation involved a multidisciplinary team, showing improved social skills and language development. PMID:26491591

  15. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  16. Representation of Knowledge on Some Management Accounting Techniques in Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golyagina, Alena; Valuckas, Danielius

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the coverage of management accounting techniques in several popular management accounting texts, assessing each technique's claimed position within practice, its benefits and limitations, and the information sources substantiating these claims. Employing the notion of research genres, the study reveals that textbooks in their…

  17. Group decision-making techniques for natural resource management applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coughlan, Beth A.K.; Armour, Carl L.

    1992-01-01

    This report is an introduction to decision analysis and problem-solving techniques for professionals in natural resource management. Although these managers are often called upon to make complex decisions, their training in the natural sciences seldom provides exposure to the decision-making tools developed in management science. Our purpose is to being to fill this gap. We present a general analysis of the pitfalls of group problem solving, and suggestions for improved interactions followed by the specific techniques. Selected techniques are illustrated. The material is easy to understand and apply without previous training or excessive study and is applicable to natural resource management issues.

  18. Rehabilitation techniques to maximize spasticity management.

    PubMed

    Logan, Lynne Romeiser

    2011-01-01

    Improvement in functional skills is typically a goal of spasticity management. Spasticity management alone will improve the positive signs of the upper motor neuron syndrome without functional change. In this review, we demonstrate that a variety of therapy modalities are required to facilitate these improvements and impact the negative signs of the upper motor neuron syndrome. The evidence for neuromuscular electrical stimulation, surface electromyography training, serial casting, body weight-supported treadmill training, constraint-induced movement therapy, strengthening, and endurance training is reviewed as it relates to spasticity management.

  19. Economic Techniques of Occupational Health and Safety Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, Aleksandr I.; Beregovaya, Irina B.; Khanzhina, Olga A.

    2016-10-01

    The article deals with the issues on economic techniques of occupational health and safety management. Authors’ definition of safety management is given. It is represented as a task-oriented process to identify, establish and maintain such a state of work environment in which there are no possible effects of hazardous and harmful factors, or their influence does not go beyond certain limits. It was noted that management techniques that are the part of the control mechanism, are divided into administrative, organizational and administrative, social and psychological and economic. The economic management techniques are proposed to be classified depending on the management subject, management object, in relation to an enterprise environment, depending on a control action. Technoeconomic study, feasibility study, planning, financial incentives, preferential crediting of enterprises, pricing, profit sharing and equity, preferential tax treatment for enterprises, economic regulations and standards setting have been distinguished as economic techniques.

  20. ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Darwiche, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    This presentation presents status and results of research on Software Health Management done within the NRA "ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management." Topics include: Ingredients of a Guidance, Navigation, and Control System (GN and C); Selected GN and C Testbed example; Health Management of major ingredients; ISWHM testbed architecture; and Conclusions and next Steps.

  1. Project management techniques for highly integrated programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. F.; Bauer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The management and control of a representative, highly integrated high-technology project, in the X-29A aircraft flight test project is addressed. The X-29A research aircraft required the development and integration of eight distinct technologies in one aircraft. The project management system developed for the X-29A flight test program focuses on the dynamic interactions and the the intercommunication among components of the system. The insights gained from the new conceptual framework permitted subordination of departments to more functional units of decisionmaking, information processing, and communication networks. These processes were used to develop a project management system for the X-29A around the information flows that minimized the effects inherent in sampled-data systems and exploited the closed-loop multivariable nature of highly integrated projects.

  2. Practical anesthetic considerations in patients undergoing tracheobronchial surgeries: a clinical review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Sanchit; Cohen, Barak; Hinkelbein, Jochen; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial surgeries require close cooperation and extensive communication between the anesthesia providers and the surgeons. Anesthetic management of tracheal and bronchial pathologies differ basically from regular upper airways management, due access to the patients airway is limited, mostly even practically impossible for the anesthesia providers. As a consequence, the surgeon overtakes responsibility for the airway access from the anesthesia provider in the variety of the cases. Preoperative recognition of a difficult airway, detailed planning and being aware of plan B and plan C are the elementary keys to success. Providers have to be aware, that preoperative airway assessment does not always correlate with the ease of oxygenation and ventilation. Therefore, various methods have been described in the literature and several authors have adopted unique ways to manage the airways in a successful manner. With the advancement of surgical techniques over the years, anesthetic management has also evolved tremendously to match the needs. The commonly encountered conditions requiring surgical interventions include post-intubation stenosis and foreign body aspiration. In this review we will discuss the most common pathologies of tracheobronchial lesions and specific anesthetic management considerations related to them. PMID:28066624

  3. Optimization Techniques for College Financial Aid Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Palumbo, George; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of a theoretical model of expected profit maximization, this paper shows how historic institutional data can be used to assist enrollment managers in determining the level of financial aid for students with varying demographic and quality characteristics. Optimal tuition pricing in conjunction with empirical estimation of…

  4. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures.

  5. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures. PMID:27746520

  6. Mini cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Alsatli, Raed A.

    2012-01-01

    This review article is going to elaborate on the description, components, and advantages of mini-cardiopulmonary bypass (mini-CPB), with special reference to the anesthetic management and fast track anesthesia with mini-CPB. There are several clinical advantages of mini-CPB like, reduced inflammatory reaction to the pump, reduced need for allogenic blood transfusion and lower incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There are certainly important points that have to be considered by anesthesiologists to avoid sever perturbation in the cardiac output and blood pressure during mini-CPB. Fast-track anesthesia provides advantages regarding fast postoperative recovery from anesthesia, and reduction of postoperative ventilation time. Mini bypass offers a sound alternative to conventional CPB, and has definite advantages. It has its limitations, but even with that it has a definite place in the current practice of cardiac surgery. PMID:25885494

  7. Optical Techniques for Space Environment Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, B.; Bennett, J.; Smith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Space Environment Research Centre (SERC) is a fully-funded multi-national research collaboration for the management and mitigation of space debris using optical technologies. SERC is tasked with developing mitigation strategies for the many debris objects not amenable to space-based interventions. SERC research leverages very accurate information from a new optical space tracking network to develop viable near-term strategies to manage debris using only ground-based infrastructure. SERC has sufficient resources to conduct full-scale on-orbit testing of candidate approaches. We report on SERC progress in astrodynamics, precision catalogs, conjunction processing, adaptive optics and high power lasers as well as the architecture of the research effort.

  8. Sequestrated caudal catheter in a child: An anesthetic nightmare and surgical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Eu, Chong Soon; Kumar, Shyamala V.; Ali, Saedah; Hassan, Shamsul Kamalrujan

    2017-01-01

    The usage of epidural infusion for intraoperative and postoperative pain relief is widely used in certain pediatric anesthetic practice because of the effectiveness and advantages. However, there is drawback for these techniques due to its potential complications such as inadvertent intrathecal placement, local anesthetic toxicity, catheter migration, infection, and breakage of epidural catheter. Though occur infrequently, epidural catheters have been known to snap during insertion or removal. The retained catheter tip may lead to multiple complications, including nerve injury, infection, and even catheter migration. Although there are literatures recommend options for management of removal of retained catheter, there are limited reports of these occurrences, especially among children. We report a case of sequestrated sheared epidural catheter segment in a child, aiming to share this experience for the future management of patients under similar condition. PMID:28217061

  9. [Use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway in a patient with spontaneous ventilation for anesthetic management in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting by lower-end sternal splitting approach].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kappei

    2006-10-01

    Use of the laryngeal mask airway in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting is controversial, largely because of a concern about increased risk for derangement in pulmonary mechanics. The author used the ProSeal LMA in a patient with spontaneous respiration for anesthetic management of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting by the lower-end sternal splitting approach. There were no critical hypercapnea, hypoxia, ventilatory problems and pulmonary hypertension. This method provided suitable conditions for maintenance and emergence of anesthesia, providing shorter stay of less than 22 hours in ICU.

  10. PBPC collections: Management, techniques and risks.

    PubMed

    Gašová, Zdenka; Bhuiyan-Ludvíková, Zdeňka; Böhmová, Martina; Marinov, Iuri; Vacková, Blanka; Pohlreich, David; Trněný, Marek

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated the efficiency, safety and risks of three techniques which were used for autologous PBPC collections: (a) large-volume leukapheresis (LVL), (b) standard collections, and (c) a new modified technique which was named as "Mixed" collections. In spite of the fact that the standard and LVL collection techniques are used routinely, there may occur special conditions in which the procedures cannot be recommended. Some patients may suffer from serious clinical complications and they cannot tolerate either standard procedures with administration of higher doses of ACD-A, or the high extent of procedure in the course of LVL. We tried to find the safe and efficient collection technique which could help this group of patients to overcome their problems. The "Mixed" collection technique could be such a choice. The numbers of 136 autologous PBPC collections were performed in 98 patients who suffered from hemato-oncological diseases. We evaluated the results of (a) 93 LVL (more than 3 TBV, total blood volumes of the patients were processed; anticoagulation: ACD-A and Heparin), (b) 16 Standard procedures (less than 3 TBV were processed; anticoagulation: ACD-A), and (c) 27 "Mixed" collections (less than 3 TBV of patients were processed; anticoagulation: ACD-A+ Heparin). Collections were performed by the use of separator Cobe Spectra, Caridian. In patients (a) with a good effect of mobilization (precollection CD 34+ cells in blood higher than 20×10(3)/mL) we prepared almost the same median dose of CD 34+ cells from the standard and "Mixed" collections, 3.8 and 4×10(6)/kg, respectively. In LVL the median yield of CD 34+ cells was 8.2×10(6)/kg. In patients (b) who were mobilized weakly (precollection CD 34+ cells in blood lower than 20×10(3)/mL), LVL enabled to prepare 1.5×10(6) of CD 34+/kg from one collection, while the median yield of CD 34+ cells from the standard and "Mixed" collections was 0.9 and 1.2×10(6)/kg. All the standard, LVL and "Mixed" procedures were

  11. Living with lipoedema: reviewing different self-management techniques.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, Amy; Wise, Christine

    2015-10-01

    At present, there is no proven cure for lipoedema. Nevertheless, much can be done to help improve symptoms and prevent progression. Many of these improvements can be achieved by patients using self-management techniques. This article describes the range of self-management techniques that community nurses can discuss with patients, including healthy eating, low-impact exercise, compression garments, self-lymphatic drainage, and counselling.

  12. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block combined with sciatic nerve block as an anesthetic technique for hindfoot and ankle surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joe, Han Bum; Choo, Ho Sik; Yoon, Ji Sang; Oh, Sang Eon; Cho, Jae Ho; Park, Young Uk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A femoral nerve block (FNB) in combination with a sciatic nerve block (SNB) is commonly used for anesthesia and analgesia in patients undergoing hindfoot and ankle surgery. The effects of FNB on motor function, related fall risk, and rehabilitation are controversial. An adductor canal block (ACB) potentially spares motor fibers in the femoral nerve, but the comparative effect on hindfoot and ankle surgeries between the 2 approaches is not yet well defined. We hypothesized that compared to FNB, ACB would cause less weakness in the quadriceps and produce similar pain scores during and after the operation. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for hindfoot and ankle surgeries (arthroscopy, Achilles tendon surgery, or medial ankle surgery) were stratified randomized for each surgery to receive an FNB (FNB group) or an ACB (ACB group) combined with an SNB. The primary outcome was the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score at each stage. Secondary outcomes included quadriceps strength, time profiles (duration of the block procedure, time to full anesthesia and time to full recovery), patients’ analgesic requirements, satisfaction, and complications related to peripheral nerve blocks such as falls, neurologic symptoms, and local anesthetic systemic toxicity were evaluated. The primary outcome was tested for the noninferiority of ACB to FNB, and the other outcomes were tested for the superiority of each variable between the groups. Results: A total of 31 patients received an ACB and 29 received an FNB. The VAS pain scores of the ACB group were not inferior during and after the operation compared to those of the FNB group. At 30 minutes and 2 hours after anesthesia, patients who received an ACB had significantly higher average dynamometer readings than those who received a FNB (34.2 ± 20.4 and 30.4 ± 23.7 vs 1.7 ± 3.7 and 2.3 ± 7.4, respectively), and the results were similar at 24 and 48 hours after anesthesia. There were no differences

  13. Managing difficult polyps: techniques and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Tholoor, Shareef; Tsagkournis, Orestis; Basford, Peter; Bhandari, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    There is no standardized definition of difficult polyps. However, polyps become difficult and challenging to remove endoscopically when they are large in size, flat in nature, situated in a high-risk location and when access to them is very awkward. Recently, an SMSA (Size, Morphology, Site, Access) classification has been proposed that helps to qualify the degree of difficulty by scoring on the above parameters. This article reviews the features that make polyps difficult to remove and provides some practical tips in managing these difficult polyps. We believe that ‘difficult polyp’ is a relative term and each endoscopist should define their own level of difficulty and what they would be able to handle safely. However, in expert trained hands, most difficult polyps can be safely removed by an endoscopic approach. PMID:24714799

  14. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  15. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs, clinical update 2006.

    PubMed

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2006-12-01

    Local anesthetics are the safest most effective drugs in medicine for the control and management of pain. They also represent the most important drugs in dentistry. Today, dentistry has a spectrum of local anesthetics that permit pain control to be tailored to the specific needs of the patient: short-, intermediate-, and long-acting drugs. Bupivacaine has become a standard part of the armamentarium for postsurgical pain control while articaine has become the second-most used local anesthetic in the United States since its introduction in 2000. Despite an increase in anecdotal reports of paresthesia since articaine's introduction there is yet, no supporting scientific evidence.

  16. Coping Styles as Mediators of Teachers' Classroom Management Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Ramon; Roache, Joel; Romi, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the relationships between coping styles of Australian teachers and the classroom based classroom management techniques they use to cope with student misbehaviour. There is great interest internationally in improving educational systems by upgrading the quality of teachers' classroom management. However, the relationship between…

  17. Behavior Management Techniques in Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Pediatric Dentistry Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Gary K.; Tilliss, Terri S.

    1993-01-01

    A survey determined the extent to which selected pediatric dental behavior management techniques are taught both didactically and clinically in 46 predoctoral and 45 postdoctoral programs. Results and trends are reported within the four categories of sedation, restraint, parental presence, and communications behavior management. (GLR)

  18. USING BIOASSAYS TO EVALUATE THE PERFORMANCE OF RISK MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Often, the performance of risk management techniques is evaluated by measuring the concentrations of the chemials of concern before and after risk management effoprts. However, using bioassays and chemical data provides a more robust understanding of the effectiveness of risk man...

  19. Classroom Management Through the Application of Behavior Modification Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferinden, William E., Jr.

    The primary aim of this book is to bring to the grade school teacher a survey of the most recent techniques and ideas of behavior modification which are applicable to good classroom management. All of the approaches and techniques presented could be of interest to teachers working at all grade levels. Since research has shown that the systematic…

  20. Capitalizing on Stress Management Techniques in Developmental Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Elsa C.

    Mastering stress management techniques can help college developmental class educators protect themselves from burnout. These techniques can also be taught to students in developmental classes to enable them to maximize the benefits from these classes. This paper outlines the causes of stress, identifies stressors, describes responses to stress,…

  1. Calcaneal Fracture Management: Extensile Lateral Approach Versus Small Incision Technique.

    PubMed

    Kiewiet, Nathan J; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2017-03-01

    Calcaneal fracture management has historically been a controversial topic and represents an area of sustained interest over the past several decades. The authors review current methods for calcaneal fracture fixation with an extensile lateral approach and small incision techniques. Early reports of small incision techniques have reported promising outcomes and reduced risks for complications. These techniques may be beneficial to reduce the risk of soft tissue complications and improve the rate of recovery.

  2. Advanced thermal management techniques for space power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Angel Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Modern electronic systems used in space must be reliable and efficient with thermal management unaffected by outer space constraints. Current thermal management techniques are not sufficient for the increasing waste heat dissipation of novel electronic technologies. Many advanced thermal management techniques have been developed in recent years that have application in high power electronic systems. The benefits and limitations of emerging cooling technologies are discussed. These technologies include: liquid pumped devices, mechanically pumped two-phase cooling, capillary pumped evaporative cooling, and thermoelectric devices. Currently, liquid pumped devices offer the most promising alternative for electronics thermal control.

  3. Respiratory anesthetic emergencies in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Gesek, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory anesthetic emergencies are the most common complications encountered during the administration of anesthesia in both the adult and pediatric populations. Regardless of the depth of anesthesia, a thorough review of the patients' health history, including the past medical history, edication list, prior anesthesia history, and complex physical examination, is critical in the promotion of safety in the oral and maxillofacial surgery office. The effective management of respiratory anesthetic emergencies includes both strong didactic and clinical skills.

  4. Contingency Management: Development of Management Problems X Techniques Matrix.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    develops preventive actions to avoid those adverse consequences. B-3 15. Organizational Mirror This technique (a) identifies a target group and two or...more other groups to serve as "mirrors" for this group, (b) collects data concerning perceptions of human processes in the target group , (c) analyzes...34 groups discuss their perceptions of the target group in the presence of the target group , but without its involvement, to clarify, understand, and

  5. [Interaction of anesthetics and analgesics with tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Bundscherer, A; Malsy, M; Bitzinger, D; Graf, B M

    2014-04-01

    The results of preclinical and clinical studies indicate that the perioperative period is a vulnerable period for cancer progression and metastasis. The risk of cancer cell dissemination is enhanced by the combination of surgical manipulation and perioperative immunosuppression. Whether the oncological outcome of cancer patients can be influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques is still a matter of debate. This review summarizes the molecular characteristics of cancer and interaction of anesthetic and analgesic drugs with cancer cells.

  6. Blood profiles in unanesthetized and anesthetized guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Williams, Wendy R; Johnston, Matthew S; Higgins, Sarah; Izzo, Angelo A; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig is a common animal model that is used in biomedical research to study a variety of systems, including hormonal and immunological responses, pulmonary physiology, corticosteroid response and others. However, because guinea pigs are evolutionarily a prey species, they do not readily show behavioral signs of disease, which can make it difficult to detect illness in a laboratory setting. Minimally invasive blood tests, such as complete blood counts and plasma biochemistry assays, are useful in both human and veterinary medicine as an initial diagnostic technique to rule in or rule out systemic illness. In guinea pigs, phlebotomy for such tests often requires that the animals be anesthetized first. The authors evaluated hematological and plasma biochemical effects of two anesthetic agents that are commonly used with guinea pigs in a research setting: isoflurane and a combination of ketamine and xylazine. Hematological and plasma biochemical parameters were significantly different when guinea pigs were under either anesthetic, compared to when they were unanesthetized. Plasma proteins, liver enzymes, white blood cells and red blood cells appeared to be significantly altered by both anesthetics, and hematological and plasma biochemical differences were greater when guinea pigs were anesthetized with the combination of ketamine and xylazine than when they were anesthetized with isoflurane. Overall these results indicate that both anesthetics can significantly influence hematological and plasma biochemical parameters in guinea pigs.

  7. [Transdermal Local Anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kazuo; Arita, Hideko; Nagase, Masaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Ogawa, Sestsuro

    2015-11-01

    Taking EMLA cream and Penles tape 18 mg as examples, this article describes the conditions for skin penetration of topical anesthetics, with their onset time of action, duration of effect and a precautions for their use. EMLA cream is a unique cream for topical anesthesia which is the eutectic mixture of lidocaine and propitocaine to increase skin penetration. The safety study demonstrated that blood concentrations of active ingredients of EMLA cream were below toxic levels. EMLA cream, with confirmed high skin penetrability and safety, should be used for pain reduction of various treatments for many diseases. Here in Japan, EMLA cream has indications not only for pain reduction of skin laser therapy but also for reduction of needle puncture pain. This means the use of topical anesthesia would be expanded to wider ranges of treatments.

  8. Power Management Techniques for Data Centers: A Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2014-07-01

    With growing use of internet and exponential growth in amount of data to be stored and processed (known as ``big data''), the size of data centers has greatly increased. This, however, has resulted in significant increase in the power consumption of the data centers. For this reason, managing power consumption of data centers has become essential. In this paper, we highlight the need of achieving energy efficiency in data centers and survey several recent architectural techniques designed for power management of data centers. We also present a classification of these techniques based on their characteristics. This paper aims to provide insights into the techniques for improving energy efficiency of data centers and encourage the designers to invent novel solutions for managing the large power dissipation of data centers.

  9. Hoshin Kanri: a technique for strategic quality management.

    PubMed

    Tennant, C; Roberts, P A

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for Strategic Quality Management (SQM), known as Hoshin Kanri, which has been operated as a management system in many Japanese companies since the 1960s. It represents a core aspect of Japanese companies' management systems, and is stated as: the means by which the overall control system and Total Quality Management (TQM) are deployed. Hoshin Kanri is not particularly unique in its concept of establishing and tracking individual goals and objectives, but the manner in which the objectives and the means to achieve them are developed and deployed is. The problem with applying the concept of Strategic Quality Management (SQM) using Hoshin Kanri, is that it can tend to challenge the traditional authoritarian strategic planning models, which have become the paradigms of modern business. Yet Hoshin Kanri provides an appropriate tool for declaration of the strategic vision for the business while integrating goals and targets in a single holistic model. There have been various adaptations of Hoshin Kanri to align the technique to Western thinking and management approaches, yet outside Japan its significance has gone largely unreported. It is proposed that Hoshin Kanri is an effective methodology for SQM, which has a number of benefits over the more conventional planning techniques. The benefits of Hoshin Kanri as a tool for Strategic Quality Management (SQM) compared to conventional planning systems include: integration of strategic objectives with tactical daily management, the application of the plan-do-check-act cycle to business process management, parallel planning and execution methodology, company wide approach, improvements in communication, increased consensus and buy-in to goal setting, and cross-functional-management integration.

  10. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH. PMID:25473457

  11. Nitrous oxide-oxygen: a new look at a very old technique.

    PubMed

    Malamed, Stanley F; Clark, Moris S

    2003-05-01

    Inhalation sedation utilizing nitrous oxide-oxygen has been a primary technique in the management of dental fears and anxieties for more than 150 years and remains so today. Though other, more potent, anesthetics have been introduced, nitrous oxide is still the most used gaseous anesthetic in the world. Administered properly with well-maintained equipment, the nitrous oxide-oxygen technique has an extremely high success rate coupled with a very low rate of adverse effects and complications.

  12. Advanced endoscopic ultrasound management techniques for preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Bharmal, Sheila; Duman, Deniz Guney; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Turner, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions can be benign, premalignant or malignant. The recent increase in detection and tremendous clinical variability of pancreatic cysts has presented a significant therapeutic challenge to physicians. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are of particular interest given their known malignant potential. This review article provides a brief but comprehensive review of premalignant pancreatic cystic lesions with advanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) management approaches. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases. Preneoplastic pancreatic cystic lesions include mucinous cystadenoma and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. The 2012 International Sendai Guidelines guide physicians in their management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Some of the advanced EUS management techniques include ethanol ablation, chemotherapeutic (paclitaxel) ablation, radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy. In future, EUS-guided injections of drug-eluting beads and neodymium:yttrium aluminum agent laser ablation is predicted to be an integral part of EUS-guided management techniques. In summary, International Sendai Consensus Guidelines should be used to make a decision regarding management of pancreatic cystic lesions. Advanced EUS techniques are proving extremely beneficial in management, especially in those patients who are at high surgical risk. PMID:27574295

  13. Perioperative and Anesthetic Considerations in Ebstein's Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ross, Faith J; Latham, Gregory J; Richards, Michael; Geiduschek, Jeremy; Thompson, Douglas; Joffe, Denise

    2016-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a complex and heterogeneous form of congenital heart disease characterized by malformation and apical displacement of the tricuspid valve leaflets. Patients may present at any time from the neonatal period to adulthood with symptoms ranging from cardiac failure and cyanosis to paroxysmal arrhythmias. Depending on the timing of presentation, various surgical options are available for the management of symptomatic patients. This review will discuss the perioperative and anesthetic management of patients with Ebstein's anomaly with reference to the more common surgical approaches.

  14. Selected Antimicrobial Activity of Topical Ophthalmic Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Margaret M.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin; Pulido, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endophthalmitis is a rare complication of intravitreal injection (IVI). It is recommended that povidone-iodine be the last agent applied before IVI. Patients have reported povidone-iodine application to be the most bothersome part of IVIs. Topical anesthetics have been demonstrated to have antibacterial effects. This study compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of topical anesthetic eye drops (proparacaine 0.5%, tetracaine 0.5%, lidocaine 2.0%) and the antiseptic, 5.0% povidone-iodine, against two organisms causing endophthalmitis after IVI. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration values of topical anesthetics, povidone-iodine, preservative benzalkonium chloride (0.01%), and saline control were determined using five isolates of each Staphylococcus epidermidis and viridans group Streptococcus species (VGS). A broth microdilution technique was used with serial dilutions. Results Lidocaine (8.53 × 10−5mol/mL) had MICs of 4.27 to 8.53 × 10−5 mol/mL, and tetracaine (1.89 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 9.45 × 10−6 mol/mL for all isolates. Proparacaine (1.7 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.32 to 5.3 × 10−7 and 4.25 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively). Benzalkonium chloride (3.52 × 10−7 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.86 × 10−9 to 1.1 × 10−8 and 4.40 × 10−8 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Povidone-iodine (1.37 × 10−4 mol/mL) had MICs of 2.14 to 4.28 × 10−6 and 8.56 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Conclusion Proparacaine was the anesthetic with the lowest MICs, lower than that of povidone-iodine. Benzalkonium chloride had lower MICs than proparacaine. All tested anesthetics and povidone-iodine inhibited growth of S. epidermidis and VGS at commercially available concentrations. Translational Relevance For certain patients, it could be possible to use topical anesthetic after povidone-iodine for comfort without inhibiting and perhaps contributing additional antimicrobial

  15. Self Management Techniques and Disclosure of Sero Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falaye, Ajibola; Afolayan, Joel Adeleke

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at using Self Management Technique (SMT) to promote self-disclosure of Sero status in Kwara State, Nigeria. A pre-test, post-test and control group quasi experimental design using a 2x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted. Sixty participants were sampled by balloting from two HIV/AIDS screening centres. Four instruments were used such…

  16. Structured Information Management Using New Techniques for Processing Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Forbes; Smart, Godfrey

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development of a software system, SIMPR (Structured Information Management: Processing and Retrieval), that will process documents by indexing them and classifying their subjects. Topics discussed include information storage and retrieval, file inversion techniques, modelling the user, natural language searching, automatic indexing,…

  17. Conflict Management Techniques for Kindergarten through Fourth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Edith Janell Rudd

    An elementary school teacher discusses conflict management techniques appropriate for use with children in kindergarten through the fourth grade. Discussion first recapitulates developmental theory from several perspectives, including those of Freud, Erikson, Piaget, and profiles conflict theory. Illustrative contemporary social problems that…

  18. New technique for the management of vesicorectal fistulas

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, G.; Jacobs, W.H.

    1988-08-01

    We report a new technique for the management of the complications of vesicorectal fistulas. The patient we present had a fistula and severe skin excoriation. The fistula was caused by carcinoma of the prostate that had been treated by radiation therapy. The fistula was patched with a rectal prosthesis similar to that used to patch esophageal-tracheal and esophageal-bronchial fistulas.

  19. Using Powerpoint Animations to Teach Operations Management Techniques and Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treleven, Mark D.; Penlesky, Richard J.; Callarman, Thomas E.; Watts, Charles A.; Bragg, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the value of using complex animated PowerPoint presentations to teach operations management techniques and concepts. To provide context, literature covering the use of PowerPoint animations in business education is briefly reviewed. The specific animations employed in this study are identified and their expected benefits to…

  20. Lenses for learning: visual techniques in natural resource management.

    PubMed

    Petheram, L; High, C; Campbell, B M; Stacey, N

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we explored the use of selected visual techniques (e.g. video, photography, diagramming) in facilitating learning among Indigenous communities living in remote protected areas at sites in Vietnam and Australia. The techniques were employed during interviews and workshops aimed at accessing and enhancing local peoples' perspectives on their landscape and on specific natural resource management issues. The effectiveness of the different techniques for enabling learning varied markedly with the context, highlighting the need for facilitator skill and flexibility in application of techniques. Visual techniques helped to engage participants; encourage unrestrained and lateral thinking; provide opportunities for self-expression and reflection; and to expose participants to perspectives of other community members. Valuable insights emerged on broad aspects of learning and these were incorporated into a simple model that highlights three types of conceptualisation found to be important in these processes.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of the cutaneous vasodilator response to a local external pressure application detected by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique on anesthetized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koitka, Audrey; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2003-10-01

    The laser Doppler flowmetry technique has recently been used to report a significant transient increase of the cutaneous blood flow signal when a local non-noxious pressure is applied progressively on the skin (11.1 Pa/s). The present work analyses the dynamic characteristics of this vasodilatory reflex response on anaesthetised rats. A de-noising algorithm using wavelets is proposed to obtain accurate values of these dynamic characteristics. The blood flow peak and the time to reach this peak are computed on the de-noised recordings. The results show that the mean time to reach the peak of perfusion is 85.3 s (time t = 0 at the beginning of the pressure application). The mean peak value is 188.3 arbitrary units (a.u.), whereas the mean value of the perfusion before the pressure application is 113.4 a.u. The mean minimum value obtained at the end of the experiment is 60.7 a.u. This latter value is, on the average, reached 841.3 s after the beginning of the pressure application. The comparison of the dynamic characteristics, computed with the de-noising algorithm on signals obtained in other situations, will give a better understanding on some cutaneous lesions such as those present on diabetic people.

  2. Choices of local anesthetics for ocular surgery.

    PubMed

    Cass, Gary D

    2006-06-01

    This article will help clinicians to be aware of their choices of local anesthetic solutions before they make their ocular anesthetic plan based on the specific requirements of the patient, the surgical procedure, and the properties of the local anesthetic. Choices of local anesthetic solutions and additives for both topical anesthesia and conduction blockade are discussed.

  3. Allergy to local anesthetics: Reality or myth?

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Jean-Marc; Chiriac, Anca M; Tacquard, Charles; Mertes, Paul Michel; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of allergic reactions to local anesthetics is low. Most cases involve a psychogenic reaction rather than an allergic reaction. Additives and preservatives added to local anesthetics may cause allergic reactions. Vascular resorption of epinephrine-containing local anesthetics may produce cardiovascular signs similar to an allergic reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to local anesthetics must be established by skin testing and provocative challenge.

  4. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  5. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  14. Anesthetic Considerations for the Parturient After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moaveni, Daria M; Cohn, Jennifer H; Hoctor, Katherine G; Longman, Ryan E; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma

    2016-08-01

    Over the past 40 years, the success of organ transplantation has increased such that female solid organ transplant recipients are able to conceive and carry pregnancies successfully to term. Anesthesiologists are faced with the challenge of providing anesthesia care to these high-risk obstetric patients in the peripartum period. Anesthetic considerations include the effects of the physiologic changes of pregnancy on the transplanted organ, graft function in the peripartum period, and the maternal side effects and drug interactions of immunosuppressive agents. These women are at an increased risk of comorbidities and obstetric complications. Anesthetic management should consider the important task of protecting graft function. Optimal care of a woman with a transplanted solid organ involves management by a multidisciplinary team. In this focused review article, we review the anesthetic management of pregnant patients with solid organ transplants of the kidney, liver, heart, or lung.

  15. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinomas: A new spectrum of anesthetic experience at a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Faisal; Asghar, Ali; Tauheed, Saman; Yahya, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique of tumor destruction for patients with hepatic cancer who are not candidates for conventional therapy. The therapy required general anesthesia (GA) or sedation to ensure patient safety and comfort. The study is aimed to report and evaluate factors that influenced the periprocedural anesthetic management, drugs used, and complications during and immediately after RFA procedure for hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: For this retrospective study, we included 46 patients who underwent percutaneous RFA under GA or conscious sedation from January 2010 to June 2013 in Aga Khan University Hospital, Pakistan. The patients' characteristics, hepatic illness severity (Child-Pugh classification), anesthetic techniques, drugs, and complications of procedure were collected on a predesigned approved form. The data were assessed and summarized using descriptive statistics. Results: The majority of patients were female (57%) and mostly classified as American Society of Anesthesiologist III (65.2%). The preoperative hepatic illness severity in most patients was Child-Pugh Class A (76.10%). Thirty-eight patients (69.09%) had only single lesion and majority number of lesions were <3 cm (65.45). GA was the main anesthetic technique (87%) with laryngeal mask airway as an airway adjunct predominantly (70%). The mainly used anesthetic agents for hypnosis and analgesia were propofol and fentanyl, respectively. Pain was the only significant complaint in postoperative period but only in nine (19%) patients and mild in nature. Conclusions: Percutaneous RFA is a safe treatment of hepatocellular cancer. The procedure required good anesthetic support in the form of sedation-analgesia or complete GA that ensures maximum patient comfort and technical success of the procedure. PMID:28217048

  16. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) hosted a two-day Risk Management Techniques and Practice (RMTAP) workshop held September 18-19 at the Hotel Nikko in San Francisco. The purpose of the workshop, which was sponsored by the SC/Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)/Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, was to assess current and emerging techniques, practices, and lessons learned for effectively identifying, understanding, managing, and mitigating the risks associated with acquiring leading-edge computing systems at high-performance computing centers (HPCCs). Representatives from fifteen high-performance computing (HPC) organizations, four HPC vendor partners, and three government agencies attended the workshop. The overall workshop findings were: (1) Standard risk management techniques and tools are in the aggregate applicable to projects at HPCCs and are commonly employed by the HPC community; (2) HPC projects have characteristics that necessitate a tailoring of the standard risk management practices; (3) All HPCC acquisition projects can benefit by employing risk management, but the specific choice of risk management processes and tools is less important to the success of the project; (4) The special relationship between the HPCCs and HPC vendors must be reflected in the risk management strategy; (5) Best practices findings include developing a prioritized risk register with special attention to the top risks, establishing a practice of regular meetings and status updates with the platform partner, supporting regular and open reviews that engage the interests and expertise of a wide range of staff and stakeholders, and documenting and sharing the acquisition/build/deployment experience; and (6) Top risk categories include system scaling issues, request for proposal/contract and acceptance testing, and

  17. Management of segmental skeletal defects by the induced membrane technique

    PubMed Central

    El-Alfy, Barakat Sayed; Ali, Ayman M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical reconstruction of segmental skeletal defects represents a true challenge for the orthopedic surgeons. Recently, Masquelet et al. described a two-stage technique for reconstruction of bone defects, known as the induced membrane technique. The aim of this study is to assess the results of the induced membrane technique in the management of segmental skeletal defects resulting from debridement of bone infection. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with segmental skeletal defects were treated in our institution by the induced membrane technique. The average age of the patients was 43 years (range 26- 58 years). The causes of the defects were infected gap nonunion in 12 cases and debridement of osteomyelitis in 5 cases. The defects were located in the tibia (n = 13) and the femur (n = 4). The mean defect was 7 cm (range 4 cm - 11 cm). All cases were treated by the induced membrane technique in two-stages. Results: Bone union happened in 14 patients. The limb length discrepancy did not exceed 2.5 cm in the healed cases. The mean time of healing was 10 months (range 6-19 months). The complications included nonunion of the graft in five cases, failure of graft maturation in two cases, reactivation of infection in two cases and refracture after removal of the frame in one case. These complications were managed during the course of treatment and they did not affect the final outcome in all patients except three. Conclusion: The induced membrane technique is a valid option for the management of segmental skeletal defects. It is a simple and straight forward procedure, but the time required for growth and maturation of the graft is relatively long. PMID:26806972

  18. Project TEAMS (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills): Independent Business Owner/Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platte Technical Community Coll., Columbus, NE.

    These Project TEAMS (Techniques and Education for Achieving Managerial Skills) instructional materials consist of five units for use in training independent business owner/managers. The first unit contains materials which deal with management skills relating to personal characteristics of successful business people, knowledge of self and chosen…

  19. Efficacy of Postoperative Pain Management Using Continuous Local Anesthetic Infusion at the Iliac Crest Bone Graft Site in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Parallel, Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Samartzis, Dino; Bow, Cora; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Sham, Phoebe; Mak, Kin-Cheung; Cheung, Wai-Yuen; Wong, Yat-Wa; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Lawmin, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common spinal deformity that affects every population. In severe deformity, surgical intervention is performed. Autogenous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) harvesting remains a common procedure worldwide for scoliosis surgery. Postoperative pain at the ICBG donor site is a major concern in patients undergoing spine surgery that affects postoperative functional outcome and consumes health care resources. Previous studies have noted a decrease in pain and postoperative analgesic use with the application of continuous infusion of anesthetic at the ICBG site in comparison with placebo. However, there is lack of evidence addressing the efficacy of continuous anesthetic infusion at the ICBG site in young patients and in particular those with spinal deformity, such as AIS. As such, this parallel, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial addressed the pain management efficacy of continuous anesthetic infusion versus saline at the ICBG site in patients with AIS during the immediate postoperative period. Methods Participants were randomized into two groups. Group A (control subjects) received 3 mL per hour of saline locally at the ICBG site, and group B (treatment subjects) received a constant rate of infusion of 3 mL per hour of 0.25% levobupivacaine. Both groups received their postoperative intervention for 47 hours. All subjects and outcome assessors were blinded to the type of intervention. Utilizing the visual analog pain scale, pain was assessed at the primary spine surgical site, ICBG site, and contralateral ICBG site. Overall physical pain was assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The degree of analgesic use and complications were also evaluated. All outcomes were assessed up until the fourth day of the patients' hospitalization following surgery. Results Twelve subjects were recruited (five in group A; seven in group B). No difference was noted at baseline

  20. Modified Surgical Techniques for Managing Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charukamnoetkanok, Puwat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a modified surgical strategy in the management of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome-associated iris prolapse. Methods. Prolapsed iris is left as is and a new corneal incision near the original wound but at a different site is created. Depending on the location of the original incision and the surgeon's preference, this additional incision can be used as a new port for phacoemulsification tip or can be the new site for the iris to securely prolapse, allowing for the surgery to proceed safely. Results. We present 2 cases of iris prolapse and inadequate pupil dilation in patients with IFIS. Along with our modified technique, additional iris retractors were placed to increase the workspace for the phacoemulsification tip. The cataract surgery was performed successfully without further complications in both cases. Conclusion. This surgical technique could be an adjunct to allow the surgeons to expand the armamentarium for the management of IFIS-associated iris prolapse. PMID:27999697

  1. A prosthetic management technique for osteopetrosis affecting the maxilla.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Karun; Bishop, Karl; Hollisey-Mclean, David

    2007-06-01

    Bony anatomical anomalies can complicate the construction and successful wearing of removable prostheses. Osteopetrosis is a group of diseases that affect the growth and continuous remodelling of bone which in turn can result in gross irregular alveolar bone morphology. This paper describes the management of a patient with this problem and emphasises the challenges in constructing a successful complete maxillary removable prosthesis. The utilisation of a flexible base plate material as an alternative to traditional materials will be highlighted. Irregular bony morphology is a recognised potential obstacle to the successful construction of removable prostheses. In most cases the problem can be overcome but in extreme and less common circumstances, management of these features can be more problematic. This paper describes a technique used to manage extreme alveolar irregularity which may perhaps be applied to those problems more commonly encountered in every day clinical practice but are less extreme then those described in this paper.

  2. Wetland assessment, monitoring and management in India using geospatial techniques.

    PubMed

    Garg, J K

    2015-01-15

    Satellite remote sensing and GIS have emerged as the most powerful tools for inventorying, monitoring and management of natural resources and environment. In the special context of wetland ecosystems, remotely sensed data from orbital platforms have been extensively used in India for the inventory, monitoring and preparation of action plans for conservation and management. First scientific inventory of wetlands in India was carried out in 1998 by Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad using indigenous IRS (Indian Remote Sensing Satellite) data of 1992-93 timeframe, which stimulated extensive use of geospatial techniques for wetland conservation and management. Subsequently, with advances in GIS, studies were carried out for development of Wetland Information System for a state (West Bengal) and for Loktak lake wetland (a Ramsar site) as a prelude to National Wetland Information System. Research has also been carried out for preparation of action plans especially for Ramsar sites in the country. In a novel research, use of the geospatial technology has also been demonstrated for biodiversity conservation using landscape ecological metrics. A country-wide estimate of emission of methane, a Green House Gas, from wetlands has also been made using MODIS data. Present article critically reviews the work carried out in India for wetland conservation and management using geospatial techniques.

  3. Anesthetic Considerations in a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy for Hip Labral Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, David; Ludwin, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) affects multiple organ systems. Disorders such as hyperthyroidism, progressive musculoskeletal weakness, cardiac dysrhythmias, hypoventilation, and cognitive-behavioral disorders may be present in these patients. Thorough preoperative assessment and anesthetic planning are required to minimize the risk of anesthetic complications. Patients with DM can exhibit exquisite sensitivity to sedatives, neuromuscular blocking agents, and volatile anesthetics, resulting in potential postoperative complications. There is limited literature available on successful anesthetic techniques for the DM patient. We present this case report to add to our current fund of knowledge. PMID:28316843

  4. Anesthetic Considerations in a Patient with Myotonic Dystrophy for Hip Labral Repair.

    PubMed

    Go, Ramon; Wang, David; Ludwin, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) affects multiple organ systems. Disorders such as hyperthyroidism, progressive musculoskeletal weakness, cardiac dysrhythmias, hypoventilation, and cognitive-behavioral disorders may be present in these patients. Thorough preoperative assessment and anesthetic planning are required to minimize the risk of anesthetic complications. Patients with DM can exhibit exquisite sensitivity to sedatives, neuromuscular blocking agents, and volatile anesthetics, resulting in potential postoperative complications. There is limited literature available on successful anesthetic techniques for the DM patient. We present this case report to add to our current fund of knowledge.

  5. Integrating modal-based NDE techniques and bridge management systems using quality management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorsky, Charles S.

    1997-05-01

    The intent of bridge management systems is to help engineers and managers determine when and where to spend bridge funds such that commerce and the motoring public needs are satisfied. A major shortcoming which states are experiencing is the NBIS data available is insufficient to perform certain functions required by new bridge management systems, such as modeling bridge deterioration and predicting costs. This paper will investigate how modal based nondestructive damage evaluation techniques can be integrated into bridge management using quality management principles. First, quality from the manufacturing perspective will be summarized. Next, the implementation of quality management in design and construction will be reinterpreted for bridge management. Based on this, a theory of approach will be formulated to improve the productivity of a highway transportation system.

  6. Anesthetics and the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Yudkowitz, Francine S

    2010-03-01

    In the past decade, concern has been raised about the safety of anesthetic agents on the developing brain. Animal studies have shown an increase in apoptosis in the developing brain when exposed to N-methyl-D-asparate receptor blockers and/or gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor agonists that is related to the dose and duration of anesthetic agents. Whether these studies can be extrapolated to humans is being investigated. The Food and Drug Administration in 2007 convened an advisory committee to look at this issue. They found that the animal data available were inadequate to extrapolate to humans and determined that human studies were necessary. Human studies are underway but the challenge they face is how to delineate the effects of anesthesia from those of the underlying medical condition and surgery itself. At this time, we must continue to make decisions based on the known risks and benefits of anesthetics and apply it on an individual basis.

  7. The proposed mechanism of action during different pain management techniques on expression of cytolytic molecule perforin in patients after colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Golubovic, S; Golubovic, V; Sotosek-Tokmadzic, V; Sustic, A; Petkovic, M; Bacic, D; Mrakovcic-Sutic, I

    2011-03-01

    The postoperative period is accompanied with neuroendocrine, metabolic and immune alteration which is caused by tissue damage, anesthesia, postoperative pain and psychological stress. Postoperative pain contributes to dysfunction of immune response as a result of interaction between central nervous and immune system. The postoperatively activated hypotalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, sympathic and parasympathic nerve systems are important modulators of immune response. According to bidirectional communication of immune and nervous system, appropriate postoperative pain management could affect immune response in postoperative period. Although the postoperative suppression of immune response has been reported, a very little are known about the influences of different pain management techniques on cytotoxic function of immune cells in patients with colorectal cancer in early postoperative period. Perforin is a cytotoxic molecule expressed by activated lymphocytes which has a crucial role in elimination of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, mostly during the effector's phase of immune response. Immune compromise during the postoperative period could affect the healing processes, incidence of postoperative infections and rate and size of tumor metastases disseminated during operation. The pharmacological management of postoperative pain in patients with malignancies uses very different analgesic techniques whose possible influence on cytotoxic functions of immune cells are still understood poor. For decades the most common way of treating postoperative pain after colorectal cancer surgery was intravenous analgesia with opiods. In the last decade many investigations pointed out that opiods can also contribute to postoperative suppression of immune response. Epidural analgesia is a regional anesthesia technique that acts directly on the origin of pain impulses and pain relief can be achieved with small doses of opiods combined with local anesthetics. Local

  8. Hemostatic Techniques for Laparoscopic Management of Cornual Pregnancy: Double-Impact Devascularization Technique.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Yousri; Mahmud, Ayesha; Fatma, Alfia

    2016-02-01

    Cornual pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy, accounting for up to 2% to 4% of all ectopic pregnancies, with a mortality range of 2.0% to 2.5%. Hemorrhage is a key concern in the management of such pregnancies. Traditional treatment options include a conservative approach, failing which patients are offered surgical options such as cornual resection at laparotomy, which carries a high risk of hysterectomy. In recent years newer laparoscopic cornual resection or cornuotomy techniques have been used successfully to achieve better outcomes with fewer complications. We present the double-impact devascularization (DID) technique for laparoscopic management of cornual ectopic pregnancies. This technique permits hemostatic control by compression effect, which in turn allows reduction in procedure-related patient morbidity and mortality. We also provide an overview of other reported methods of hemostatic control used in similar laparoscopic procedures. DID appears to be a useful, safe, minimally invasive technique that can be used in both laparoscopic and open surgical procedures.

  9. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  10. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  11. Mobility management techniques for the next-generation wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junzhao; Howie, Douglas P.; Sauvola, Jaakko J.

    2001-10-01

    The tremendous demands from social market are pushing the booming development of mobile communications faster than ever before, leading to plenty of new advanced techniques emerging. With the converging of mobile and wireless communications with Internet services, the boundary between mobile personal telecommunications and wireless computer networks is disappearing. Wireless networks of the next generation need the support of all the advances on new architectures, standards, and protocols. Mobility management is an important issue in the area of mobile communications, which can be best solved at the network layer. One of the key features of the next generation wireless networks is all-IP infrastructure. This paper discusses the mobility management schemes for the next generation mobile networks through extending IP's functions with mobility support. A global hierarchical framework model for the mobility management of wireless networks is presented, in which the mobility management is divided into two complementary tasks: macro mobility and micro mobility. As the macro mobility solution, a basic principle of Mobile IP is introduced, together with the optimal schemes and the advances in IPv6. The disadvantages of the Mobile IP on solving the micro mobility problem are analyzed, on the basis of which three main proposals are discussed as the micro mobility solutions for mobile communications, including Hierarchical Mobile IP (HMIP), Cellular IP, and Handoff-Aware Wireless Access Internet Infrastructure (HAWAII). A unified model is also described in which the different micro mobility solutions can coexist simultaneously in mobile networks.

  12. Current techniques in the management of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Carter S; O'Toole, John E

    2014-04-01

    Posterior decompressive procedures are a fundamental component of the surgical treatment of symptomatic cervical degenerative disease. Posterior approaches have the appeal of avoiding complications associated with anterior approaches such as esophageal injury, recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, dysphagia, and adjacent-level disease after fusion. Although open procedures are effective, the extensive subperiosteal stripping of the paraspinal musculature leads to increased blood loss, longer hospital stays, and more postoperative pain, and potentially contributes to instability. Minimally invasive access has been developed to limit approach-related morbidity. This article reviews current techniques in minimally invasive surgical management of cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy.

  13. An improved coding technique for image encryption and key management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xu; Ma, Jie; Hu, Jiasheng

    2005-02-01

    An improved chaotic algorithm for image encryption on the basis of conventional chaotic encryption algorithm is proposed. Two keys are presented in our technique. One is called private key, which is fixed and protected in the system. The other is named assistant key, which is public and transferred with the encrypted image together. For different original image, different assistant key should be chosen so that one could get different encrypted key. The updated encryption algorithm not only can resist a known-plaintext attack, but also offers an effective solution for key management. The analyses and the computer simulations show that the security is improved greatly, and can be easily realized with hardware.

  14. Surgical management of abdominal compartment syndrome; indications and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Leppäniemi, Ari

    2009-01-01

    The indications for surgical decompression of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are not clearly defined, but undoubtedly some patients benefit from it. In patients without recent abdominal incisions, it can be achieved with full-thickness laparostomy (either midline, or transverse subcostal) or through a subcutaneous linea alba fasciotomy. In spite of the improvement in physiological variables and significant decrease in IAP, however, the effects of surgical decompression on organ function and outcome are less clear. Because of the significant morbidity associated with surgical decompression and the management of the ensuing open abdomen, more research is needed to better define the appropriate indications and techniques for surgical intervention. PMID:19366442

  15. Adverse reactions triggered by dental local anesthetics: a clinical survey.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E.; Goharian, S.; Katz, Y.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients completed a questionnaire focusing on adverse reactions to dental local anesthetics as manifested by 16 signs and symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the participants reported having at least 1 adverse reaction. It was found that most of the adverse reactions occurred within the first 2 hours following the injection of local anesthetics. Pallor, palpitations, diaphoresis, and dizziness were the most common adverse reactions reported in the study. The results pointed to a significant relationship between anxiety, gender, injection technique, and procedure with a higher incidence of adverse reactions. PMID:11432179

  16. Cleft lift procedure for pilonidal disease: technique and perioperative management.

    PubMed

    Favuzza, J; Brand, M; Francescatti, A; Orkin, B

    2015-08-01

    Pilonidal disease is a common condition affecting young patients. It is often disruptive to their lifestyle due to recurrent abscesses or chronic wound drainage. The most common surgical treatment, "cystectomy," removes useful tissue unnecessarily and does not address the etiology of the condition. Herein, we describe the etiology of pilonidal disease and our technique for definitive management of pilonidal disease using the cleft lift procedure. In this paper, we present our method of performing the cleft lift procedure for pilonidal disease including perioperative management and surgical technique. We have used the cleft lift procedure in nearly 200 patients with pilonidal disease, in both primary and salvage procedures settings. It has been equally successful in both settings with a high rate of success. It results in a closed wound with relatively minimal discomfort and straightforward wound care. We have described our current approach to recurrent and complex pilonidal disease using the cleft lift procedure. Once learned, the cleft lift procedure is a straightforward and highly successful solution to a chronic and challenging condition.

  17. Comparison of thermal management techniques for semiconductor disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giet, S.; Kemp, A. J.; Burns, D.; Calvez, S.; Dawson, M. D.; Suomalainen, S.; Harkonen, A.; Guina, M.; Okhotnikov, O.; Pessa, M.

    2008-02-01

    Semiconductor Disk Lasers (SDLs) are compact lasers suitable for watt to multi-watt direct generation in the 670- 2350nm waveband and frequency-doubled operation in the ultraviolet and visible regions. This is, however, critically dependent on the thermal management strategy used as, in this type of laser, the pump is absorbed over micrometer lengths and the gain and loss are temperature sensitive. In this paper, we compare the two heat dissipation techniques that have been successfully deployed to-date: the "thin device" approach where the semiconductor active mirror is bonded onto a heatsink and its substrate subsequently removed, and the "heatspreader" technique where a high thermal conductivity platelet is directly bonded onto the active part of the unprocessed epilayer. We show that for SDLs emitting at 1060nm with pump spots of ~80µm diameter, the heatspreader approach outperforms the thin-device alternative, with the best results being obtained with a diamond heatspreader. Indeed, the thermal resistances are measured to be 4.9, 10.4 and 13.0 K/W for diamond-bonded, SiC-bonded and flip-chip devices respectively. It is also observed, as expected, that the thermal management strategy indirectly affects the optimum output coupling and thus the overall performance of these lasers.

  18. Introducing Risk Management Techniques Within Project Based Software Engineering Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Port, Daniel; Boehm, Barry

    2002-03-01

    In 1996, USC switched its core two-semester software engineering course from a hypothetical-project, homework-and-exam course based on the Bloom taxonomy of educational objectives (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation). The revised course is a real-client team-project course based on the CRESST model of learning objectives (content understanding, problem solving, collaboration, communication, and self-regulation). We used the CRESST cognitive demands analysis to determine the necessary student skills required for software risk management and the other major project activities, and have been refining the approach over the last 5 years of experience, including revised versions for one-semester undergraduate and graduate project course at Columbia. This paper summarizes our experiences in evolving the risk management aspects of the project course. These have helped us mature more general techniques such as risk-driven specifications, domain-specific simplifier and complicator lists, and the schedule as an independent variable (SAIV) process model. The largely positive results in terms of review of pass / fail rates, client evaluations, product adoption rates, and hiring manager feedback are summarized as well.

  19. Genotoxicity of Anesthetics Evaluated In Vivo (Animals)

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Mariana G.; Karahalil, Bensu

    2015-01-01

    The anesthesia has been improved all over the years. However, it can have impact on health, in both patients and animals anesthetized, as well as professionals exposed to inhaled anesthetics. There is continuing effort to understand the possible effects of anesthetics at molecular levels. Knowing the effects of anesthetic agents on genetic material could be a valuable basic support to better understand the possible mechanisms of these agents. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the genotoxic potential, evaluated in animal models, of many anesthetics that have already been used and those currently used in anesthesia. PMID:26199936

  20. Techniques for Efficiently Managing Large Geosciences Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, A.; Krajewski, W. F.; Bradley, A. A.; Smith, J. A.; Baeck, M. L.; Steiner, M.; Lawrence, R. E.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Weber, J.; Delgreco, S. A.; Domaszczynski, P.; Seo, B.; Gunyon, C. A.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed techniques and software tools for efficiently managing large geosciences data sets. While the techniques were developed as part of an NSF-Funded ITR project that focuses on making NEXRAD weather data and rainfall products available to hydrologists and other scientists, they are relevant to other geosciences disciplines that deal with large data sets. Metadata, relational databases, data compression, and networking are central to our methodology. Data and derived products are stored on file servers in a compressed format. URLs to, and metadata about the data and derived products are managed in a PostgreSQL database. Virtually all access to the data and products is through this database. Geosciences data normally require a number of processing steps to transform the raw data into useful products: data quality assurance, coordinate transformations and georeferencing, applying calibration information, and many more. We have developed the concept of crawlers that manage this scientific workflow. Crawlers are unattended processes that run indefinitely, and at set intervals query the database for their next assignment. A database table functions as a roster for the crawlers. Crawlers perform well-defined tasks that are, except for perhaps sequencing, largely independent from other crawlers. Once a crawler is done with its current assignment, it updates the database roster table, and gets its next assignment by querying the database. We have developed a library that enables one to quickly add crawlers. The library provides hooks to external (i.e., C-language) compiled codes, so that developers can work and contribute independently. Processes called ingesters inject data into the system. The bulk of the data are from a real-time feed using UCAR/Unidata's IDD/LDM software. An exciting recent development is the establishment of a Unidata HYDRO feed that feeds value-added metadata over the IDD/LDM. Ingesters grab the metadata and populate the Postgre

  1. Fish discards management: pollution levels and best available removal techniques.

    PubMed

    Antelo, Luis T; Lopes, Carla; Franco-Uría, Amaya; Alonso, Antonio A

    2012-07-01

    Fish discards and by-catch issues are highly topical subjects that are permanently under a social focus. Two main approaches are being considered to address this discard problem: reducing the by-catch and increasing by-catch utilization. Interest in increased by-catch valorization may arise from a greater demand for fish products, such as the development of new markets for previously discarded species, the use of low-value specimens for aquaculture or the creation of value-added fish products for the food, pharmaceutical or cosmetic industries. However, contaminants present in fish discards may be transferred to their valorized products, leading to possible long-term bioaccumulation and subsequent adverse health effects. In this valorization framework, the aim is to promote responsible and sustainable management of marine resources. The pollutant levels in catches from European fisheries and the best available decontamination techniques for marine valorized discards/by-products are compiled and analyzed in this work.

  2. Role of Endoscopic Gastroplasty Techniques in the Management of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yunho

    2017-01-01

    Health and wellness represent a major global concern. Trends such as a lack of exercise and excessive consumption of calories are major causes of the rapid increase in obesity worldwide. Obesity should be controlled because it can result in other illnesses, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, coronary artery disease, stroke, breathing disorders, or cancer. However, many people have difficulty in managing obesity through exercise, dietary control, behavioral modifications, and drug therapy. Bariatric surgery is not commonly used due to a variety of complications, even though it has been demonstrated to produce reliable results with respect to adequate weight loss when performed using an open or a laparoscopic approach. Endoscopic bariatric procedures are emerging techniques that are less invasive and safer compared with current surgical approaches. However, the evaluation of endoluminal procedures is limited by the small number of studies and their short-term follow-up. PMID:28147478

  3. Role of Endoscopic Gastroplasty Techniques in the Management of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yunho

    2017-01-01

    Health and wellness represent a major global concern. Trends such as a lack of exercise and excessive consumption of calories are major causes of the rapid increase in obesity worldwide. Obesity should be controlled because it can result in other illnesses, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, coronary artery disease, stroke, breathing disorders, or cancer. However, many people have difficulty in managing obesity through exercise, dietary control, behavioral modifications, and drug therapy. Bariatric surgery is not commonly used due to a variety of complications, even though it has been demonstrated to produce reliable results with respect to adequate weight loss when performed using an open or a laparoscopic approach. Endoscopic bariatric procedures are emerging techniques that are less invasive and safer compared with current surgical approaches. However, the evaluation of endoluminal procedures is limited by the small number of studies and their short-term follow-up.

  4. Inhaled anesthetics: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Francis X; Bacon, Douglas R; Smith, Hugh M

    2005-09-01

    Inhalational agents have played a pivotal role in anesthesia history. The first publicly demonstrated anesthetic of the modern era, diethyl ether, was an inhalational anesthetic. The attributes of a good agent, ability to rapidly induce anesthesia, with limited side effects has led research efforts for over a hundred and fifty years. The explosion hazard was largely conquered with the development of the halogenated agents in the 1950s. Rapid emergence, with limited nausea and vomiting continue to drive discovery efforts, yet the 'modern' agents continue to improve upon those in the past. The future holds promise, but perhaps the most interesting contrast over time is the ability to rapidly introduce new agents into practice. From James Young Simpson's dinner table one evening to the operating suite the next day, modern agents take decades from first synthesis to clinical introduction.

  5. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  6. Crop management techniques to enhance harvest index in rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianchang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-07-01

    A major challenge in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production is to enhance water use efficiency (WUE) and maintain or even increase grain yield. WUE, if defined as the biomass accumulation over water consumed, may be fairly constant for a given species in given climate. WUE can be enhanced by less irrigation. However, such enhancement is largely a trade-off against lower biomass production. If WUE is defined as the grain production per unit amount of water irrigated, it would be possible to increase WUE without compromising grain yield through the manipulation of harvest index. Harvest index has been shown to be a variable factor in crop production, and in many situations, it is closely associated with WUE and grain yield in cereals. Taking rice as an example, this paper discussed crop management techniques that can enhance harvest index. Several practices such as post-anthesis controlled soil drying, alternate wetting and moderate soil drying regimes during the whole growing season, and non-flooded straw mulching cultivation, could substantially enhance WUE and maintain or even increase grain yield of rice, mainly via improved canopy structure, source activity, sink strength, and enhanced remobilization of pre-stored carbon reserves from vegetative tissues to grains. All the work has proved that a proper crop management holds great promise to enhance harvest index and, consequently, achieve the dual goal of increasing grain production and saving water.

  7. Translocations of amphibians: Proven management method or experimental technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seigel, Richard A.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    In an otherwise excellent review of metapopulation dynamics in amphibians, Marsh and Trenham (2001) make the following provocative statements (emphasis added): If isolation effects occur primarily in highly disturbed habitats, species translocations may be necessary to promote local and regional population persistence. Because most amphibians lack parental care, they areprime candidates for egg and larval translocations. Indeed, translocations have already proven successful for several species of amphibians. Where populations are severely isolated, translocations into extinct subpopulations may be the best strategy to promote regional population persistence. We take issue with these statements for a number of reasons. First, the authors fail to cite much of the relevant literature on species translocations in general and for amphibians in particular. Second, to those unfamiliar with current research in amphibian conservation biology, these comments might suggest that translocations are a proven management method. This is not the case, at least in most instances where translocations have been evaluated for an appropriate period of time. Finally, the authors fail to point out some of the negative aspects of species translocation as a management method. We realize that Marsh and Trenham's paper was not concerned primarily with translocations. However, because Marsh and Trenham (2001) made specific recommendations for conservation planners and managers (many of whom are not herpetologists or may not be familiar with the pertinent literature on amphibians), we believe that it is essential to point out that not all amphibian biologists are as comfortable with translocations as these authors appear to be. We especially urge caution about advocating potentially unproven techniques without a thorough review of available options.

  8. Surgical Tips in Frozen Abdomen Management: Application of Coliseum Technique.

    PubMed

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis D; Manatakis, Dimitrios K; Stamos, Nikolaos; Stoidis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Wound dehiscence is a serious postoperative complication, with an incidence of 0.5-3% after primary closure of a laparotomy incision, and represents an acute mechanical failure of wound healing. Relatively recently the concept of "intentional open abdomen" was described and both clinical entities share common pathophysiological and clinical pathways ("postoperative open abdominal wall"). Although early reconstruction is the target, a significant proportion of patients will develop adhesions between abdominal viscera and the anterolateral abdominal wall, a condition widely recognized as "frozen abdomen," where delayed wound closure appears as the only realistic alternative. We report our experience with a patient who presented with frozen abdomen after wound dehiscence due to surgical site infection and application of the "Coliseum technique" for its definitive surgical management. This novel technique represents an innovative alternative to abdominal exploration, for cases of "malignant" frozen abdomen due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Lifting the edges of the surgical wound upwards and suspending them under traction by threads from a retractor positioned above the abdomen facilitates approach to the peritoneal cavity, optimizes exposure of intra-abdominal organs, and prevents operative injury to the innervation and blood supply of abdominal wall musculature, a crucial step for subsequent hernia repair.

  9. Architectural Techniques For Managing Non-volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2013-01-01

    As chip power dissipation becomes a critical challenge in scaling processor performance, computer architects are forced to fundamentally rethink the design of modern processors and hence, the chip-design industry is now at a major inflection point in its hardware roadmap. The high leakage power and low density of SRAM poses serious obstacles in its use for designing large on-chip caches and for this reason, researchers are exploring non-volatile memory (NVM) devices, such as spin torque transfer RAM, phase change RAM and resistive RAM. However, since NVMs are not strictly superior to SRAM, effective architectural techniques are required for making them a universal memory solution. This book discusses techniques for designing processor caches using NVM devices. It presents algorithms and architectures for improving their energy efficiency, performance and lifetime. It also provides both qualitative and quantitative evaluation to help the reader gain insights and motivate them to explore further. This book will be highly useful for beginners as well as veterans in computer architecture, chip designers, product managers and technical marketing professionals.

  10. Machine Learning Techniques for Decision Support in Intelligent Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Miller, J.; Ramapriyan, H.; Isaac, D.; Harberts, R.

    2002-12-01

    NASA's growth in remote sensing data volumes has kept pace with Moore's Law, i.e., doubling every 18 months, with future growth likely from new instruments. Also, advances in instrumental design (e.g., hyperspectral scanners) and science algorithms are enabling more near-real-time applications of the data. The confluence of low-latency requirements with high data volumes and numbers of files poses major challenges for archive data management. In order to make the right data available at the right time, an archive will need to apply knowledge of the data content in its data management decisions. This decision support domain includes aspects such as automatic quality assessment, feature detection to support caching decisions, and content-based metadata to support efficient data selection. In this study, we evaluate a variety of machine learning algorithms for use in several decision support roles in intelligent data management. Machine learning algorithms such as neural networks and clustering have been used for decision support in business and policy domains. These techniques have found some use in remote sensing, e.g., for cloud and land cover classification. Yet most research on remote sensing data rests on science-based algorithms, such as those based on radiative transfer equations. Machine learning for scientific applications faces challenges such as discretization constraints, non-physical basis, and the difficulty of assembling training sets. However, these difficulties may be less significant in the decision support role. For instance, it is often enough to know whether a data attribute exceeds a certain threshold when selecting it for an application, without knowing the exact value. The training data problem can be surmounted by using products output by the science-based algorithms. On the other hand, an advantage of machine learning algorithms for decision support is their speed once they have been trained. Data management decisions must be made while the

  11. Autonomous management of distributed information systems using evolutionary computation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, Martin J.

    1999-03-01

    As the size of typical industrial strength information systems continues to rise, particularly in the arena of Internet based management information systems and multimedia servers, the issue of managing data distribution over clusters or `farms' to overcome performance and scalability issues is becoming of paramount importance. Further, where access is global, this can cause points of geographically localized load contention to `follow the sun' during the day. Traditional site mirroring is not overly effective in addressing this contention and so a more dynamic approach is being investigated to tackle load balancing. The general objective is to manage a self-adapting, distributed database so as to reliably and consistently provide near optimal performance as perceived by client applications. Such a management system must be ultimately capable of operating over a range of time varying usage profiles and fault scenarios, incorporate considerations for communications network delays, multiple updates and maintenance operations. It must also be shown to be capable of being scaled in a practical fashion to ever larger sized networks and databases. Two key components of such an automated system are an optimiser capable of efficiently finding new configuration options, and a suitable model of the system capable of accurately reflecting the performance (or any other required quality of service metric) of the real world system. As conditions change in the real world system, these are fed into the model. The optimiser is then run to find new configurations which are tested in the model prior to implementation in the real world. The model therefore forms an evaluation function which the optimiser utilises to direct its search. Whilst it has already been shown that Genetic Algorithms can provide good solutions to this problem, there are a number of issues associated with this approach. In particular, for industrial strength applications, it must be shown that the GA employed

  12. An evolutionary outlook of air traffic flow management techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistan, Trevor; Gardi, Alessandro; Sabatini, Roberto; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Batuwangala, Eranga

    2017-01-01

    In recent years Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) has become pertinent even in regions without sustained overload conditions caused by dense traffic operations. Increasing traffic volumes in the face of constrained resources has created peak congestion at specific locations and times in many areas of the world. Increased environmental awareness and economic drivers have combined to create a resurgent interest in ATFM as evidenced by a spate of recent ATFM conferences and workshops mediated by official bodies such as ICAO, IATA, CANSO the FAA and Eurocontrol. Significant ATFM acquisitions in the last 5 years include South Africa, Australia and India. Singapore, Thailand and Korea are all expected to procure ATFM systems within a year while China is expected to develop a bespoke system. Asia-Pacific nations are particularly pro-active given the traffic growth projections for the region (by 2050 half of all air traffic will be to, from or within the Asia-Pacific region). National authorities now have access to recently published international standards to guide the development of national and regional operational concepts for ATFM, geared to Communications, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management and Avionics (CNS+A) evolutions. This paper critically reviews the field to determine which ATFM research and development efforts hold the best promise for practical technological implementations, offering clear benefits both in terms of enhanced safety and efficiency in times of growing air traffic. An evolutionary approach is adopted starting from an ontology of current ATFM techniques and proceeding to identify the technological and regulatory evolutions required in the future CNS+A context, as the aviation industry moves forward with a clearer understanding of emerging operational needs, the geo-political realities of regional collaboration and the impending needs of global harmonisation.

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  14. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  15. Local anesthetics for facial plastic procedures.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Karen K; Frodel, John L

    2002-02-01

    The use of local anesthetic in facial plastic surgical procedures is well established as an effective and safe mode of anesthesia delivery. Local infiltration of anesthesia may be used alone for minor surgical procedures, or it may be used with general anesthesia or intravenous sedation and analgesia for more complex, lengthy procedures. When considered independently, the use of local anesthetic agents has undeniable limitations. Local anesthetics can cause toxicity and side effects. Injection of local anesthetics for subcutaneous infiltration frequently is painful until sensory anesthesia occurs. Local anesthetics have limited efficacy with respect to the intensity and duration of sensory blockade that can be achieved. In some situations, use of local anesthesia with the maintenance of an awake patient also may be undesirable for the surgeon and impractical for the patient. Despite these shortcomings, local anesthetics are fundamentally ideal for use in facial plastic surgery.

  16. Anesthetic implications for video assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    El-Dawlatly, Abdelazeem A; Al Kattan, Khaled; Hajjar, Waseem; Essa, Mohamed; Delvi, Bilal; Khoja, Abdulaziz

    2005-06-01

    Thymectomy is an established therapy in the management of generalized myasthenia gravis (MG). However, the optimal surgical approach to thymectomy has remained controversial. There are advocates for transternal, transcervical approaches for "maximal" thymectomy. Video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy (VATT) presents new approach to thymectomy. By minimizing chest wall trauma, VATT not only causes less postoperative pain, shortens hospital stay, gives better cosmetic results but also leads to wider acceptance by patients for earlier surgery. Anesthesia for thymectomy in MG is challenging. Currently we are using non-muscle relaxant technique (NMRT) which we adopted in 1994, for maximal thymectomy. In this paper, we present our limited experience with two cases of VATT using two different NMRTs. Two cases of MG underwent VATT under general anesthesia (GA) and one lung ventilation (OLV) using double lumen tube (DLT). In both cases NMRT was used which encompass, light GA plus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) in one case and without TEA in the other case. We believe that the use of NMRT provides good operative and postoperative conditions. In this report we have described two different NMRTs, one with TEA and the other without. Further studies are needed on large number of cases to establish an anesthetic protocol for VATT.

  17. Project TEAMS (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills): Business and Industrial Supervisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platte Technical Community Coll., Columbus, NE.

    These Project TEAMS (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills) instructional materials consist of five units for use in training business and industrial supervisors. Unit 1 is designed to help managers in business or industry increase management skills in regard to leadership techniques, problem solving and decision making, and…

  18. Local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Thomas; Xu, Hua; Siegel, Cory D; Krichevsky, Igor E

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell apoptosis contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in neuronal and lymphocytic cell lines. We examined the effects of chronic (48 h) local anesthetic treatment (lidocaine, bupivacaine and tetracaine) on human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. Apoptosis induction was assessed by detecting poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase fragmentation, caspase activation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, DNA laddering and by cellular morphology. Cell death was quantified by measuring neutral red dye uptake and lactate dehydrogenase released into the cell culture medium. All 3 local anesthetics caused concentration-dependent cell death, induced HK-2 cell apoptosis and potentiated TNF-alpha induced apoptosis. Local anesthetics induced HK-2 cell apoptosis by activation of caspases 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9. ZVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked the local anesthetic induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. Local anesthetics also inhibited the activities of anti-apoptotic kinases protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated mitrogen-activated protein kinase. Local anesthetic's pro-apoptotic effects are independent of sodium channel inhibition as tetrodotoxin, a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, failed to mimic local anesthetic-mediated induction or potentiation of HK-2 cell apoptosis. We conclude that local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptotic signaling by caspase activation and via inhibition of pro-survival signaling pathways.

  19. Distribution of local anesthetics between aqueous and liposome phases.

    PubMed

    Ruokonen, Suvi-Katriina; Duša, Filip; Rantamäki, Antti H; Robciuc, Alexandra; Holma, Paula; Holopainen, Juha M; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2017-01-06

    Liposomes were used as biomimetic models in capillary electrokinetic chromatography (EKC) for the determination of distribution constants (KD) of certain local anesthetics and a commonly used preservative. Synthetic liposomes comprised phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol phospholipids with and without cholesterol. In addition, ghost liposomes made from red blood cell (RBC) lipid extracts were used as pseudostationary phase to acquire information on how the liposome composition affects the interactions between anesthetics and liposomes. These results were compared with theoretical distribution coefficients at pH 7.4. In addition to 25°C, the distribution constants were determined at 37 and 42°C to simulate physiological conditions. Moreover, the usability of five electroosmotic flow markers in liposome (LEKC) and micellar EKC (MEKC) was studied. LEKC was proven to be a convenient and fast technique for obtaining data about the distribution constants of local anesthetics between liposome and aqueous phase. RBC liposomes can be utilized for more representative model of cellular membranes, and the results indicate that the distribution constants of the anesthetics are greatly dependent on the used liposome composition and the amount of cholesterol, while the effect of temperature on the distribution constants is less significant.

  20. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  1. Anesthetic related advances with cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Mark; McDonough, John

    2007-03-02

    Cyclodextrins encapsulate and electrostatically bind to lipophilic molecules. The exterior of cyclodextrins are water-soluble and maintain aqueous solubility despite encapsulation of non-aqueous soluble molecules. This unique ability to encapsulate lipophilic molecules and maintain water solubility confers numerous pharmacologic advantages for both drug delivery and removal. Cyclodextrins, a component part of supramolecular chemistry, may be in its infancy of anesthetic application but recent advances have been described as novel and revolutionary. A review of current research coupled with an understanding of cyclodextrin properties is necessary to fully appreciate the current uses and future potentials of these unique molecules.

  2. The Post-Anesthetic Care of Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Gangadharan, Meera; Hartke, Lopa P; Twite, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    Few conditions make even the most experienced pediatric anesthesiologists take pause. Pulmonary hypertension is one such condition due to the associated high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Much is written about the intraoperative management of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This article will instead focus on postoperative care and review the evidence in support of a risk stratification approach for the post-anesthetic disposition of these patients. The total risk for post-anesthetic adverse events includes the patient's baseline risk factors and the incremental risks imposed by the procedure and anesthetic. A proposal with recommendations to guide practitioners and a table summarizing relevant factors are provided. Last, the readers' attention is drawn to the heterogeneity of pulmonary hypertensive disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (precapillary) differs significantly from pulmonary venous hypertension (postcapillary); the anesthetic management for one may be relatively contraindicated in the other. Their dissimilarities justify the need to distinguish them for study and research endeavors.

  3. Technical management techniques for identification and control of industrial safety and pollution hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R.; Dyer, M. K.; Hoard, E. G.; Little, D. G.; Taylor, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Constructive recommendations are suggested for pollution problems from offshore energy resources industries on outer continental shelf. Technical management techniques for pollution identification and control offer possible applications to space engineering and management.

  4. Neurotoxic effects of local anesthetics on the mouse neuroblastoma NB2a cell line.

    PubMed

    Mete, M; Aydemir, I; Tuglu, I M; Selcuki, M

    2015-04-01

    Local anesthetics are used clinically for peripheral nerve blocks, epidural anesthesia, spinal anesthesia and pain management; large concentrations, continuous application and long exposure time can cause neurotoxicity. The mechanism of neurotoxicity caused by local anesthetics is unclear. Neurite outgrowth and apoptosis can be used to evaluate neurotoxic effects. Mouse neuroblastoma cells were induced to differentiate and generate neurites in the presence of local anesthetics. The culture medium was removed and replaced with serum-free medium plus 20 μl combinations of epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor containing tetracaine, prilocaine, lidocaine or procaine at concentrations of 1, 10, 25, or 100 μl prior to neurite measurement. Cell viability, iNOS, eNOS and apoptosis were evaluated. Local anesthetics produced toxic effects by neurite inhibition at low concentrations and by apoptosis at high concentrations. There was an inverse relation between local anesthetic concentrations and cell viability. Comparison of different local anesthetics showed toxicity, as assessed by cell viability and apoptotic potency, in the following order: tetracaine > prilocaine > lidocaine > procaine. Procaine was the least neurotoxic local anesthetic and because it is short-acting, may be preferred for pain prevention during short procedures.

  5. Gum chewing during pre-anesthetic fasting.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Thomas J

    2012-03-01

    Many ad hoc fasting guidelines for pre-anesthetic patients prohibit gum chewing. We find no evidence that gum chewing during pre-anesthetic fasting increases the volume or acidity of gastric juice in a manner that increases risk, nor that the occasional associated unreported swallowing of gum risks subsequent aspiration. On the contrary, there is evidence that gum chewing promotes gastrointestinal motility and physiologic gastric emptying. Recommendations against pre-anesthetic gum chewing do not withstand scrutiny and miss an opportunity to enhance comfort and sense of wellbeing for patients awaiting anesthesia. Gum chewing during the pre-anesthetic nil per os (NPO) period would also permit the development of gum-delivered premedications and should be permitted in children old enough to chew gum safely. Gum chewing should cease when sedatives are given and all patients should be instructed to remove any chewing gum from the mouth immediately prior to anesthetic induction.

  6. Do anesthetics harm the developing human brain? An integrative analysis of animal and human studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Erica P; Lee, Jeong-Rim; Lee, Christopher S; Deng, Meng; Loepke, Andreas W

    Anesthetics that permit surgical procedures and stressful interventions have been found to cause structural brain abnormalities and functional impairment in immature animals, generating extensive concerns among clinicians, parents, and government regulators regarding the safe use of these drugs in young children. Critically important questions remain, such as the exact age at which the developing brain is most vulnerable to the effects of anesthetic exposure, whether a particular age exists beyond which anesthetics are devoid of long-term effects on the brain, and whether any specific exposure duration exists that does not lead to deleterious effects. Accordingly, the present analysis attempts to put the growing body of animal studies, which we identified to include >440 laboratory studies to date, into a translational context, by integrating the preclinical data on brain structure and function with clinical results attained from human neurocognitive studies, which currently exceed 30 studies. Our analysis demonstrated no clear exposure duration threshold below which no structural injury or subsequent cognitive abnormalities occurred. Animal data did not clearly identify a specific age beyond which anesthetic exposure did not cause any structural or functional abnormalities. Several potential mitigating strategies were found, however, no general anesthetic was identified that consistently lacked neurodegenerative properties and could be recommended over other anesthetics. It therefore is imperative, to expand efforts to devise safer anesthetic techniques and mitigating strategies, even before long-term alterations in brain development are unequivocally confirmed to occur in millions of young children undergoing anesthesia every year.

  7. Jihadist Terrorist Use of Strategic Communication Management Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    terrorism studies, defense planning, arms control, peacekeeping, crisis management, regional and cooperative security. The Marshall Center...and with our partners and allies, to harmonize international efforts in the global war on terror within a grand strategy ( Opheim & Bowen 2008). This...Perceptions and the Future Perspectives of Strategic Information Management. The Development of Crisis Communication from the Kosovo Operation “Allied

  8. Utilizing Project Management Techniques in the Design of Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of instructional design in large organizations highlights a project management approach. Topics addressed include the role of the instructional designer; project team selection; role of the team members; role of the project manager; focusing on what employees need to know; types of project teams; and monitoring time and responsibility.…

  9. Case Report of a Patient With Idiopathic Hypersomnia and a Family History of Malignant Hyperthermia Undergoing General Anesthesia: An Overview of the Anesthetic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Aflaki, Sena; Hu, Sally; Kamel, Rami A; Chung, Frances; Singh, Mandeep

    2017-03-17

    The pathophysiologic underpinnings of idiopathic hypersomnia and its interactions with anesthetic medications remain poorly understood. There is a scarcity of literature describing this patient population in the surgical setting. This case report outlines the anesthetic considerations and management plan for a 55-year-old female patient with a known history of idiopathic hypersomnia undergoing an elective shoulder arthroscopy in the ambulatory setting. In addition, this case offers a unique set of considerations and conflicts related to the patient having a family history of malignant hyperthermia. A combined technique of general and regional anesthesia was used. Anesthesia was maintained with total intravenous anesthesia via the use of propofol and remifentanil. The depth of anesthesia was monitored with entropy. There were no perioperative complications.

  10. New and Common Perioperative Pain Management Techniques in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    Optimal pain control in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is imperative for good rehabilitation and functional outcomes. However, despite technological advancements, surgeons continue to struggle with adequate pain management in their patients. Current modalities in use, such as patient-controlled analgesia, opioids, and epidural anesthetics, provide good pain relief but can be associated with side effects and serious complications. As a result, newer pain control modalities have been used to try to reduce the use of opioids while providing adequate pain relief. Currently, there are no clear guidelines or evidence for an optimum postoperative TKA analgesic regimen. Our aim was to evaluate the recent literature and provide a summary of the newer perioperative analgesic modalities. Evidence suggests that analgesics, such as newer oral medications, peripheral nerve blocks, and periarticular injections, may improve pain management, rehabilitation, and patient satisfaction, as well as reduce opioid consumption. The literature has also highlighted that a multimodal approach to pain management may provide the best results. However, determining which modalities provide superior pain control is still being extensively studied, and further research is needed.

  11. Software-Enabled Project Management Techniques and Their Relationship to the Triple Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elleh, Festus U.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between software-enabled project management techniques and the triple constraints (time, cost, and scope). There was the dearth of academic literature that focused on the relationship between software-enabled project management techniques and the triple constraints (time, cost, and scope). Based on the gap…

  12. Predicting Student Misbehavior, Responsibility and Distraction from Schoolwork from Classroom Management Techniques: The Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Van Dat

    2015-01-01

    This study reports students' perceptions of the classroom management techniques utilized in fourteen classrooms at eight junior high schools in one province in Vietnam. It examines data from 498 students in fifteen high schools in one district in Vietnam in grades 10 to 12 to identify how teachers' use of various management techniques, and the…

  13. Comprehensive and Conservative Management of Talon Cusp: A New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lodha, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Talon cusp is a common dental anomaly affecting maxillary central incisors. Gradual grinding of this additional cusp is commonly followed now. Advocated below is a new technique explaining the use of air abrasion and putty index during the stepwise reduction of the cusp. The technique is advantageous in preventing patient discomfort and tracking the amount of reduction in a predictable way. PMID:28105377

  14. Study of systems and techniques for data base management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data management areas were studied to identify pertinent problems and issues that will affect future NASA data users in terms of performance and cost. Specific topics discussed include the identifications of potential NASA data users other than those normally discussed, consideration affecting the clustering of minicomputers, low cost computer system for information retrieval and analysis, the testing of minicomputer based data base management systems, ongoing work related to the use of dedicated systems for data base management, and the problems of data interchange among a community of NASA data users.

  15. Exertional rhabdomyolysis and heat stroke: Beware of volatile anesthetic sedation

    PubMed Central

    Heytens, Karel; De Bleecker, Jan; Verbrugghe, Walter; Baets, Jonathan; Heytens, Luc

    2017-01-01

    In view of the enormous popularity of mass sporting events such as half-marathons, the number of patients with exertional rhabdomyolysis or exercise-induced heat stroke admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) has increased over the last decade. Because these patients have been reported to be at risk for malignant hyperthermia during general anesthesia, the intensive care community should bear in mind that the same risk of life-threatening rhabdomyolysis is present when these patients are admitted to an ICU, and volatile anesthetic sedation is chosen as the sedative technique. As illustrated by the three case studies we elaborate upon, a thorough diagnostic work-up is needed to clarify the subsequent risk of strenuous exercise, and the anesthetic exposure to volatile agents in these patients and their families. Other contraindications for the use of volatile intensive care sedation consist of known malignant hyperthermia susceptibility, congenital myopathies, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and intracranial hypertension. PMID:28224104

  16. Integrating RFID technique to design mobile handheld inventory management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yo-Ping; Yen, Wei; Chen, Shih-Chung

    2008-04-01

    An RFID-based mobile handheld inventory management system is proposed in this paper. Differing from the manual inventory management method, the proposed system works on the personal digital assistant (PDA) with an RFID reader. The system identifies electronic tags on the properties and checks the property information in the back-end database server through a ubiquitous wireless network. The system also provides a set of functions to manage the back-end inventory database and assigns different levels of access privilege according to various user categories. In the back-end database server, to prevent improper or illegal accesses, the server not only stores the inventory database and user privilege information, but also keeps track of the user activities in the server including the login and logout time and location, the records of database accessing, and every modification of the tables. Some experimental results are presented to verify the applicability of the integrated RFID-based mobile handheld inventory management system.

  17. Hypersensitivity dermatitis following suction-assisted lipectomy: a complication of local anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Fine, P G; Dingman, D L

    1988-06-01

    We report a case of severe dermatitis involving the abdomen and thighs following suction-assisted lipectomy of these areas wherein local anesthetic containing the preservative methylparaben was used for infiltrative anesthesia. This use of local anesthetics with epinephrine can be of value in the performance of suction-assisted lipectomy to reduce blood loss, serve as an adjunct to other intraoperative anesthetic techniques, and for postoperative analgesia. Local anesthetic solutions commonly contain additives, which serve as antioxidants and antimicrobials. The most common of these preservatives is methylparaben, which can cause delayed hypersensitivity reactions. These reactions may be neither recognized nor clinically significant in small areas of infection, whereas in large body surface infiltrative procedures, such as suction-assisted lipectomy, these reactions may be of considerable consequence. This article reviews the pathophysiology and treatment of these reactions and gives recommendations for avoiding them.

  18. Management of excessive movable tissue: a modified impression technique.

    PubMed

    Shum, Michael H C; Pow, Edmond H N

    2014-08-01

    Excessive movable tissue is a challenge in complete denture prosthetics. A modified impression technique is presented with polyvinyl siloxane impression material and a custom tray with relief areas and perforations in the area of the excessive movable tissue.

  19. Magnamosis: a novel technique for the management of rectal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Katie W; Rollins, Michael D; Feola, G Peter; Scaife, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of rectal atresia treated using magnets to create a rectal anastomosis. This minimally invasive technique is straightforward and effective for the treatment of rectal atresia in children. PMID:25096648

  20. Benzocaine as an anesthetic for striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, Philip A.; Lemm, Carol A.; Woods, L. Curry

    1991-01-01

    Benzocaine was tested as an anesthetic on juvenile and mature adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis ). Concentrations of 55 mg/L at 22 degree C to 80 mg/L at 11 degree C effectively anesthetized fish in about 3 min. Recovery was more rapid as temperature increased. Fish survived concentrations of twice the effective concentration and exposure times up to 60 min at the effective concentration. Striped bass required higher concentrations for anesthetization than had been previously demonstrated for salmonid fishes, but safety margins for both concentration and exposure time were wider than for the salmonids.

  1. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  2. Research to Develop Effective Teaching and Management Techniques for Severely Disturbed and Retarded Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, James M.; Birnbrauer, Jay S.

    The final report of a project on teaching and management techniques with severely disturbed and/or retarded children presents analysis of single subject research using contingent imitation of the child as an intervention technique. The effects of this technique were examined on the following behaviors: toyplay and reciprocal imitation, self…

  3. Surgical management of metastatic long bone fractures: principles and techniques.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John Alan; Lackman, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Management of metastatic long bone fractures requires identification of the lesion and the use of sound fracture fixation principles to relieve pain and restore function. The treating surgeon must understand the principles of pathologic fracture fixation before initiating treatment. Because these fractures occur in the context of a progressive systemic disease, management typically involves a multidisciplinary approach. When considering surgical stabilization of these fractures, the abnormal (or absent) healing environment associated with diseased bone and the overall condition of the patient must be taken into account. The goal of surgery is to obtain a rigid mechanical construct, which allows for early mobility and weight bearing. This can be achieved using internal fixation with polymethyl methacrylate cement or segmental resection and joint reconstruction. Prosthetic joint arthroplasty is a more reliable means of fracture management when insufficient bone is present for fixation. Prophylactic stabilization of impending pathologic fractures can reduce the morbidity associated with metastatic lesions.

  4. A Survey Of Techniques for Managing and Leveraging Caches in GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2014-09-01

    Initially introduced as special-purpose accelerators for graphics applications, graphics processing units (GPUs) have now emerged as general purpose computing platforms for a wide range of applications. To address the requirements of these applications, modern GPUs include sizable hardware-managed caches. However, several factors, such as unique architecture of GPU, rise of CPU–GPU heterogeneous computing, etc., demand effective management of caches to achieve high performance and energy efficiency. Recently, several techniques have been proposed for this purpose. In this paper, we survey several architectural and system-level techniques proposed for managing and leveraging GPU caches. We also discuss the importance and challenges of cache management in GPUs. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers insights into cache management techniques for GPUs and motivate them to propose even better techniques for leveraging the full potential of caches in the GPUs of tomorrow.

  5. Case Management and Rehabilitation Counseling: Procedures and Techniques. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    2006-01-01

    "Case Management and Rehabilitation Counseling" discusses procedures that are useful to rehabilitation professionals working in many settings. Specifically, this book reviews the finer points relating to diagnosing, arranging services, monitoring program outcomes, arranging for placement, planning for accommodations, ethical decision making,…

  6. Contemporary behavior management techniques in clinical pediatric dentistry: out with the old and in with the new?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kelly; Manton, David John

    2015-01-01

    Effective behavior management guides children through the complex social context of dentistry utilizing techniques based on a current understanding of the social, emotional, and cognitive development of children. Behavior management techniques facilitate effective communication and establish social and behavioral guidelines for the dental environment. Contemporary parenting styles, expectations, and attitudes of modern parents and society have influenced the use of behavior management techniques with a prevailing emphasis on communicative techniques and pharmacological management over aversive techniques.

  7. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  8. SYSTEMIC TOXIC REACTIONS TO LOCAL ANESTHETICS

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Daniel C.; Green, John

    1956-01-01

    The topical use of anesthetic agents involves an element of risk. Systemic toxic reactions are rare, but they do occur and may result in death. When a reaction occurs from a topical application, it usually progresses rapidly to respiratory and cardiovascular collapse, and thus therapy must be instituted with more haste to avoid deaths. Fatal systemic toxic reactions from topically administered anesthetic drugs are, in effect, usually not due to well informed use of the drug but to misuse owing to less than complete understanding of absorption. Emphasis is placed on the causes, prophylaxis and treatment of severe systemic toxic reactions which follow the topical application of local anesthetic drugs. If systemic toxic reactions resulting from a safe dose of a local anesthetic agent are correctly treated, there will usually follow an uneventful recovery rather than a catastrophe. PMID:13343009

  9. General Anesthetics and Molecular Mechanisms of Unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chin, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    General anesthetic agents are unique in clinical medicine, because they are the only drugs used to produce unconsciousness as a therapeutic goal. In contrast to older hypotheses that assumed all general anesthetics produce their central nervous system effects through a common mechanism, we outline evidence that general anesthesia represents a number of distinct pharmacological effects that are likely mediated by different neural circuits, and perhaps via different molecular targets. Within the context of this neurobiological framework, we review recent molecular pharmacological and transgenic animal studies. These studies reveal that different groups of general anesthetics, which can be discerned based on their clinical features, produce unconsciousness via distinct molecular targets and therefore via distinct mechanisms. We further postulate that different types of general anesthetics selectively disrupt different critical steps (perhaps in different neuronal circuits) in the processing of sensory information and memory that results in consciousness. PMID:18617817

  10. Anesthetic considerations in robotic mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Andre, J. Valery; Ritter, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    The robotic approach to cardiac surgery offers patients numerous potential advantages compared with a traditional sternotomy approach including shorter hospital length of stay, reduced pain, fewer blood transfusions, and a quicker return to normal daily activities. At the same time, robotic cardiac surgery requires that the anesthesiologist employs several subspecialty skillsets in order to provide optimal care for these patients. Multiple different regional anesthesia techniques may be used to improve analgesia, reduce opioid dosages, and facilitate rapid extubation at the conclusion of the case. Several peripheral cannulation strategies for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) exist and the anesthesia team may assist with percutaneous cannulation of the superior vena cava (SVC) or positioning of an endo-pulmonary vent. Similarly the anesthesiologist may be asked to percutaneously cannulate the coronary sinus for retrograde cardioplegia delivery. The need for one-lung ventilation (OLV) and heavy reliance on transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) occupy much of the anesthesiologist’s attention during these cases. Variations in institutional practice exist. Reviews of current practice and future studies may help refine the anesthetic approach to robot-assisted cardiac surgery. PMID:28203541

  11. Maintaining Sanity in the Classroom. Classroom Management Techniques. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreikurs, Rudolf; Brunwald, Bernice Bronia; Pepper, Floy C.

    This book, based on Adlerian psychology, applies the techniques of motivation modification to realistic classroom problems, dealing step-by-step with handling behavior difficulties and providing the background that enables student teachers to understand the group dynamics of various classroom situations. The book is divided into five parts with 30…

  12. Regional environmental analysis and management: New techniques for current problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honea, R. B.; Paludan, C. T. N.

    1974-01-01

    Advances in data acquisition and processing procedures for regional environmental analysis are discussed. Automated and semi-automated techniques employing Earth Resources Technology Satellite data and conventional data sources are presented. Experiences are summarized. The ERTS computer compatible tapes provide a very complete and flexible record of earth resources data and represent a viable medium to enhance regional environmental analysis research.

  13. Comprehensive Flood Plain Studies Using Spatial Data Management Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    and subbasin hydraulic length. The technique adopted is a modest extension and automation of the method developed for San Diego County (Franziniet al...land classified as 14 I ____.4_ natural vegetation under existing conditions is 272 acres while the total amount of landA classified as natural

  14. Diphenhydramine as an Alternative Local Anesthetic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Pavlidakey, Peter G.; Brodell, Erin E.

    2009-01-01

    Patients who present with a history of “allergy” to local anesthetics are common in clinical practice. Injectable 1% diphenhydramine is a safe, inexpensive, and effective local anesthetic for simple dermatological procedures in patients who report “caine” allergies. Utilizing this agent permits the dermatologist to operate at the time of the initial visit and schedule a referral to the allergist for definitive sensitivity testing at the patient’s convenience. PMID:20725573

  15. Interactions of some local anesthetics and alcohols with membranes.

    PubMed

    Frangopol, P T.; Mihăilescu, D

    2001-09-01

    A review of the results obtained by our group in the last decade regarding the interactions of procaine, lidocaine, dibucaine and tetracaine with membranes is presented in the context of the literature data. The action upon membranes, in first approximation monomolecular film of stearic acid spread at the air/water interface used as a membrane model, the modification of biomembrane structure and function using diffraction methods, lipid phase transition, fluidity of lipids and proteins, membrane expansion and platelet aggregation were studied. The thermodynamic knowledge of membrane-alcohol interactions improved by using highly sensitive calorimetric techniques are briefly reported. One of the main conclusions is that the physical state of a monolayer model membrane was the result of competitive interactions between film-film and film-substrate interactions. It was taken into account that local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, carbisocaine, mesocaine, showed changes in the bilayer structure, reflected in macroscopic mechanical properties. This restructuring of the lipid bilayer has a significant influence on the operation of functional subunits, e.g. ionic channels formed by gramicidin. The results support the concept of non-specific interactions of local anesthetics with lipid bilayers. The theoretical modeling of the interactions of local anesthetics is closely compared with experimental data. Our new theory of relaxation for these interactions is using a non-archimedean formalism based on a process resulting from superpositions of different component processes which take place at different scales of time.

  16. Improved outage management techniques for better plant availability

    SciTech Connect

    Bemer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    To maintain high availability of nuclear generating units is one of the most important management objectives. The duration of outages-whether planned or unplanned-is the main parameter impacting on plant availability, but the planned outages, and essentially the refueling outages, are the most important in this respect, and they also have a heavy impact on the economics of plant operation. The following factors influence the duration of the outages: (1) modifications; (2) preventive maintenance operations; and (3) corrective maintenance operations of generic faults. In this paper, the authors examine how the outage management organization of Electricite de France (EdF) plants is tending to optimize the solutions to the above-mentioned points.

  17. Charles bonnet syndrome, management with simple behavioral technique.

    PubMed

    Issa, Baba Awoye; Yussuf, Abdullahi Dasliva

    2013-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome occurs in visually impaired but cognitively normal individuals. This report describes a condition of vivid visual hallucination (phantom images) in an 85-year-old conscious man, who had been blind by bilateral progressively worsening glaucoma. This common, but rarely reported, condition was managed by behavioral approach of repeated blinking, intermittent eyes closure, and reassurance. While emotional, mood and cognitive disorders need to be ruled out, the condition, though frightening to the afflicted, is benign and remediable with simple, inexpensive approach. Health workers managing people with terminal blindness should always ask for the presence of hallucinations from their patients to forestall a preventable distress resulting from wrong perception without visual stimulus.

  18. Irreversible pulpitis and achieving profound anesthesia: Complexities and managements

    PubMed Central

    Modaresi, Jalil; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid; Sabzian, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry. Irreversible pulpitis and further root canal therapy might cause an untolerated pain to the patients. The improvements in anesthetic agents and techniques were one of the advantages of studying nerve biology and stimulation. This article tried to overview of the nerve activities in inflammatory environments or induced pain. Furthermore, the proper advises, and supplementary techniques were reviewed for better pain management of irreversible pulpitis. PMID:26957681

  19. Blepharoplasty techniques in the management of orbito-temporal neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Lin, Ming; Shao, Chunyi; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to present blepharoplasty techniques we used for severe orbito-temporal neurofibromatosis (NF). A retrospective noncomparative single-center case study was undertaken on patients with orbito-temporal NF. Twenty-two patients with orbito-temporal NF treated at the Department of Ophthalmology of Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital between 2007 and 2011 participated in the study. They underwent a standard ophthalmologic assessment for orbito-temporal NF involving both the orbito-temporal soft tissue and bony orbits. The orbits were examined with three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) and all 22 patients underwent tumor debulking, blepharoplasty, and orbital reconstruction. We modified the conventional procedures. Our reconstructive techniques included eyelid reduction; lateral canthal reattachment; for patients with collapse of the lateral orbital margin, reconstruction of the orbital margin to be performed before reattaching the lateral canthus to the implanted titanium mesh; anterior levator resection; and frontalis suspension according to preoperative levator muscle function. Visual acuity, tumor recurrence, and postoperative palpebral fissure and orbital appearance were evaluated to assess outcomes. Acceptable cosmetic results were obtained in 22 patients after debulking of the orbito-temporal NF and surgical reconstruction. There was no loss of vision or visual impairment postoperatively. All patients did not display recrudescence after a follow-up period of >1 year. Three patients with residual ptosis were successfully treated with a second ptosis repair. We believe that the blepharoplasty techniques described in the treatment of orbito-palpebral NF may provide both functional and esthetic benefits.

  20. Precautionary practices for administering anesthetic gases: A survey of physician anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologist assistants.

    PubMed

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L

    2016-10-02

    nurse anesthetists compared to the other anesthesia care providers. Successful management of waste anesthetic gases should include scavenging systems, hazard awareness training, availability of standard procedures to minimize exposure, regular inspection of anesthesia delivery equipment for leaks, prompt attention to spills and leaks, and medical surveillance.

  1. A Comparison of Perceived Crisis Training Management and Optimum Training Management Techniques in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-27

    Ambiguity and Time Management relating to crisis management are key issues for consideration in the development of this investigation. These concepts are...themselves to be optimum-management-oriented. The study indicates the possibility of continuing problems in the areas of time management contributing to

  2. Techniques for cash management in scheduling manufacturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morady Gohareh, Mehdy; Shams Gharneh, Naser; Ghasemy Yaghin, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The objective in traditional scheduling is usually time based. Minimizing the makespan, total flow times, total tardi costs, etc. are instances of these objectives. In manufacturing, processing each job entails a cost paying and price receiving. Thus, the objective should include some notion of managing the flow of cash. We have defined two new objectives: maximization of average and minimum available cash. For single machine scheduling, it is demonstrated that scheduling jobs in decreasing order of profit ratios maximizes the former and improves productivity. Moreover, scheduling jobs in increasing order of costs and breaking ties in decreasing order of prices maximizes the latter and creates protection against financial instability.

  3. Pediatric Enteric Feeding Techniques: Insertion, Maintenance, and Management of Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Nijs, Els L. F.; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2010-12-15

    Enteral feeding is considered a widespread, well-accepted means of delivering nutrition to adults and children who are unable to consume food by mouth or who need support in maintaining adequate nutrition for a variety of reasons, including acute and chronic disease states. Delivery of enteral feeding to nutritionally deprived patients may be achieved by several means. In this article, the indications and insertion of enteral access in children will be reviewed. In addition, common complications and management of problems will be discussed.

  4. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 1: Techniques, Procedures and Data Bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, J. O. (Editor); Schiffman, Y. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Topics dealing with the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information system for application in energy resources management are discussed. Associated remote sensing and image analysis techniques are also addressed.

  5. Techniques for early diagnosis and management of cervicofacial necrotising fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Judy W; Immerman, Sara B; Morris, Luc GT

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervicofacial necrotising fasciitis carries high rates of morbidity and mortality, and is not often initially suspected due to its rarity and misleadingly innocuous presentation. We propose an algorithm for the timely diagnosis and management of cervicofacial necrotising fasciitis. Methods Retrospective review of seven patients ultimately diagnosed with cervicofacial necrotising fasciitis. Results In these seven patients, common presenting symptoms included sore throat, fever and neck pain. On initial examination and imaging, only three had obvious findings. One patient’s diagnosis was facilitated via a bedside cut-down procedure. Six patients underwent surgical debridement. Four required tracheotomy, and five wounds closed via secondary intention. There were two deaths. Conclusion The severity of cervical necrotising fasciitis and its rapid spread necessitate early diagnosis and timely surgical management. The presentation often appears benign. A high index of clinical suspicion should be maintained in cases of neck cellulitis with nonspecific clinical findings, especially in diabetic or otherwise immunocompromised patients. A normal computed tomography scan does not rule out necrotising fasciitis. A cut-down procedure may be critical to early diagnosis in some cases. PMID:20298644

  6. Statistical and Economic Techniques for Site-specific Nematode Management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Griffin, Terry; Kirkpatrick, Terrence L

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in precision agriculture technologies and spatial statistics allow realistic, site-specific estimation of nematode damage to field crops and provide a platform for the site-specific delivery of nematicides within individual fields. This paper reviews the spatial statistical techniques that model correlations among neighboring observations and develop a spatial economic analysis to determine the potential of site-specific nematicide application. The spatial econometric methodology applied in the context of site-specific crop yield response contributes to closing the gap between data analysis and realistic site-specific nematicide recommendations and helps to provide a practical method of site-specifically controlling nematodes.

  7. Thermal Management Techniques for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; DellaCorte, Chris; Zeszotek, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate three different methods of utilizing air to provide thermal management control for compliant journal foil air bearings. The effectiveness of the methods was based on bearing bulk temperature and axial thermal gradient reductions during air delivery. The first method utilized direct impingement of air on the inner surface of a hollow test journal during operation. The second, less indirect method achieved heat removal by blowing air inside the test journal to simulate air flowing axially through a hollow, rotating shaft. The third method emulated the most common approach to removing heat by forcing air axially through the bearing s support structure. Internal bearing temperatures were measured with three, type K thermocouples embedded in the bearing that measured general internal temperatures and axial thermal gradients. Testing was performed in a 1 atm, 260 C ambient environment with the bearing operating at 60 krpm and supporting a load of 222 N. Air volumetric flows of 0.06, 0.11, and 0.17 cubic meters per minute at approximately 150 to 200 C were used. The tests indicate that all three methods provide thermal management but at different levels of effectiveness. Axial cooling of the bearing support structure had a greater effect on bulk temperature for each air flow and demonstrated that the thermal gradients could be influenced by the directionality of the air flow. Direct air impingement on the journal's inside surface provided uniform reductions in both bulk temperature and thermal gradients. Similar to the direct method, indirect journal cooling had a uniform cooling effect on both bulk temperatures and thermal gradients but was the least effective of the three methods.

  8. Flight test configuration for verifying inertial sensor redundancy management techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. H.; Morrell, F. R.; Bailey, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Redundant Strapdown Inertial Measurement Unit presently tested in flight configuration consists of a semioctahedral array of four dynamically tuned, two-degree-of-freedom (TDOF) gyros and four TDOF accelerometers which can provide dual, fail-operational performance for integrated avionics systems. Attention is given to the multilevel algorithm used for the detection and isolation of three ranges of sensor failure in an integrated avionics context. A technique for the generation of accelerometer and gyro error thresholds which is sensitive to dynamic sensor errors and separation effects is presented, together with simulation results. Emphasis is placed on the ensuring of highly reliable data for flight control/navigation functions, while minimizing false or missed alarms.

  9. Suitability of online 3D visualization technique in oil palm plantation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat, Ruzinoor Che; Nordin, Norani; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir; Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Oil palm industry has been the backbone for the growth of Malaysia economy. The exports of this commodity increasing almost every year. Therefore, there are many studies focusing on how to help this industry increased its productivity. In order to increase the productivity, the management of oil palm plantation need to be improved and strengthen. One of the solution in helping the oil palm manager is by implementing online 3D visualization technique for oil palm plantation using game engine technology. The potential of this application is that it can helps in fertilizer and irrigation management. For this reason, the aim of this paper is to investigate the issues in managing oil palm plantation from the view of oil palm manager by interview. The results from this interview will helps in identifying the suitable issues could be highlight in implementing online 3D visualization technique for oil palm plantation management.

  10. Anesthetic Approach for a Patient with Jeune Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buget, Mehmet I.; Ozkan, Emine; Edipoglu, Ipek S.; Kucukay, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Jeune syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive disease also known as asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy. A narrow bell-shaped thoracic wall and short extremities are the most typical features of the syndrome. Prognosis in JS depends on the severity of the pulmonary hypoplasia caused by the chest wall deformity. Most patient deaths are due to respiratory problems at early ages. Herein, we report a case of JS patient, who was scheduled for femoral extension under general anesthesia. The severity of respiratory problems in JS patients is thought to diminish with age. Our case supported this theory, and we managed the anesthetic process uneventfully. PMID:26366306

  11. Information Landscaping: Information Mapping, Charting, Querying and Reporting Techniques for Total Quality Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Bor-sheng

    2003-01-01

    Total quality management and knowledge management are merged and used as a conceptual model to direct and develop information landscaping techniques through the coordination of information mapping, charting, querying, and reporting. Goals included: merge citation analysis and data mining, and apply data visualization and information architecture…

  12. Teaching Natural Resource Management-Teaching Techniques and Difficulties in Greek Vocational Lyceum: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsoukos, Marios; Mouratidis, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the teaching techniques applied, as well as the difficulties, with which educators in teaching Natural Resource Management are confronted. For research purposes, a case study was conducted on teaching Natural Resource Management in the Third Grade of Vocational Lyceum (EPAL) in Northern Greece. It was…

  13. Managing Age Discrimination: An Examination of the Techniques Used when Seeking Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ellie D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines the age-related management techniques used by older workers in their search for employment. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from interviews with individuals aged 45-65 years (N = 30). Results: Findings indicate that participants develop "counteractions" and "concealments" to manage perceived age discrimination.…

  14. The Impact of Teachers' Aggressive Management Techniques on Students' Attitudes to Schoolwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romi, Shlomo; Lewis, Ramon; Roache, Joel; Riley, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that teachers' aggressive classroom management impacts negatively on students. The authors compared student reaction to teachers' use of aggressive management techniques in Australia, China, and Israel. Reactions included distraction negativity toward teachers and perceptions that teachers' responses were unjustified,…

  15. Moisture Management in an Active Sportswear: Techniques and Evaluation—A Review Article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Mani; Sampath, M. B.; Ramachandran, T.

    2013-07-01

    Moisture management property is an important aspect of any fabric meant for active sportswear, which decides the comfort level of that fabric. Every human being sweats during different kinds of activities. An important feature of any fabric is how it transports this water out of the body, so as to make the wearer feel comfortable. This paper reports the concept of moisture management, various production techniques and evaluation of the moisture management characteristics on fabrics for active sportswear.

  16. First Approximations of Prescribed Fire Risks Relative to Other Management Techniques Used on Private Lands

    PubMed Central

    Twidwell, Dirac; Wonkka, Carissa L.; Sindelar, Michael T.; Weir, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Fire is widely recognized as a critical ecological and evolutionary driver that needs to be at the forefront of land management actions if conservation targets are to be met. However, the prevailing view is that prescribed fire is riskier than other land management techniques. Perceived risks associated with the application of fire limits its use and reduces agency support for prescribed burning in the private sector. As a result, considerably less cost-share support is given for prescribed fire compared to mechanical techniques. This study tests the general perception that fire is a riskier technique relative to other land management options. Due to the lack of data available to directly test this notion, we use a combination of approaches including 1) a comparison of fatalities resulting from different occupations that are proxies for techniques employed in land management, 2) a comparison of fatalities resulting from wildland fire versus prescribed fire, and 3) an exploration of causal factors responsible for wildland fire-related fatalities. This approach establishes a first approximation of the relative risk of fatality to private citizens using prescribed fire compared to other management techniques that are readily used in ecosystem management. Our data do not support using risks of landowner fatalities as justification for the use of alternative land management techniques, such as mechanical (machine-related) equipment, over prescribed fire. Vehicles and heavy machinery are consistently leading reasons for fatalities within occupations selected as proxies for management techniques employed by ranchers and agricultural producers, and also constitute a large proportion of fatalities among firefighters. Our study provides the foundation for agencies to establish data-driven decisions regarding the degree of support they provide for prescribed burning on private lands. PMID:26465329

  17. Remote sensing techniques for monitoring and managing irrigated lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. A.

    Agriculture in semi-arid tracts of the world depends on water to sustain its irrigation systems. Such agricultural systems either derive from government investments in the control of surface flow or they have been developed through the exploitation of groundwater sometimes by a large community of unsupervised individuals seeking to maximise their own advantage without concern for the resource upon which they depend in the medium and long term. In both cases government agencies need data on the area irrigated and the volume of water used. In countries with highly developed scientific and agricultural institutions the contribution of remote sensing, though significant, may only provide between five and ten per cent of the data required to guide regional and national managers. In countries without such institutions the proportion contributed by remote sensing can be very much higher, as shown in a recent study in North Africa. The paper will emphasise the importance of carefully structured sampling procedures, both to improve the areal estimates from satellite imagery and the estimates of water use based upon them. The role of satellite imagery in providing information on the status of water resources, on trends in water use and in the implementation of policies to extend or diminish irrigated land are discussed.

  18. Investment, regulation, and uncertainty: managing new plant breeding techniques.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Stuart J; McDonald, Jillian; Falck-Zepeda, Jose

    2014-01-01

    As with any technological innovation, time refines the technology, improving upon the original version of the innovative product. The initial GM crops had single traits for either herbicide tolerance or insect resistance. Current varieties have both of these traits stacked together and in many cases other abiotic and biotic traits have also been stacked. This innovation requires investment. While this is relatively straight forward, certain conditions need to exist such that investments can be facilitated. The principle requirement for investment is that regulatory frameworks render consistent and timely decisions. If the certainty of regulatory outcomes weakens, the potential for changes in investment patterns increases.   This article provides a summary background to the leading plant breeding technologies that are either currently being used to develop new crop varieties or are in the pipeline to be applied to plant breeding within the next few years. Challenges for existing regulatory systems are highlighted. Utilizing an option value approach from investment literature, an assessment of uncertainty regarding the regulatory approval for these varying techniques is undertaken. This research highlights which technology development options have the greatest degree of uncertainty and hence, which ones might be expected to see an investment decline.

  19. Regulatory effects of anesthetics on nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenguo; Liu, Qin; Zhu, Xiao; Wu, Zhi; Li, Dongpei; Huang, Fang; He, Hongwen

    2016-04-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas in the biological system, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family. NO acts as a biological mediator and plays important roles in different systems in humans. The NO/NOS system exerts a broad spectrum of signaling functions involved in vasodilation, inflammation, oxidative stress, cardioprotection and neuroprotection. It has been demonstrated that intravenous and volatile anesthetics (such as propofol, ketamine, midazolam, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane, etc.) modulate NO production through multiple mechanisms that may influence physiological and pathophysiological processes. This review focuses on the effects of different anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation in different disease conditions. Possible cellular mechanisms and intermediate role of NO/NOS in anesthetic-mediated organ protection are also discussed. It would be interesting to clarify the impact of anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation. This review gives an overview of the effects of different anesthetics on NO/NOS regulation and function in different physiologic and pathophysiologic states.

  20. Pregnancy termination: techniques, risks, and complications and their management.

    PubMed

    Castadot, R G

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the current modalities of pregnancy termination, as well as their risks and complications, in 3 phases of pregnancy: 1) up to 49 days past the last menstrual period, 2) 8-15 weeks, and 3) 16-24 weeks. Before 8 weeks of pregnancy, suction dilatation and curettage (D and C) is the preferred method. However, a medical approach, possibly self-administered, is viewed as more satisfactory and requires only an improvement in side effects. From 8-15 weeks' gestation, suction D and C and dilatation and evacuation (D and E) are the methods of choice. The use of laminaria tents improves both the facility and safety of these procedures in nulliparous patients and perhaps in multiparous patients. Priming of the cervix with prostaglandin could further decrease the difficulty and risks of these procedures. The use of a hydrogel compound is especially worthy of consideration. There is controversy about the preferred method between 16-20 weeks' gestation. D and E appears to have fewer complications and to be more cost-effective than hypertonic saline injection. Urea-prostaglandin has fewer and less severe complications than saline injection, and seems to be more cost-effective than saline injection in terms of duration of hospitalization. The high frequency of failure and side effects, combined with the possibility of expulsion of a live fetus, make prostaglandin-only injection less desirable. After 20 weeks' gestation, urea-prostaglandin injection is probably the safer method. Given the rapid increase in complications with passing weeks, any delay in providing late abortion services should be avoided. 2nd trimester pregnancy terminations, especially those after 18 weeks' gestation, are associated with increased mortality and morbidity and should be performed at specialized centers where providers are better equipped to manage complications.

  1. [Intravenous regional anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics. An update].

    PubMed

    Atanassoff, P G; Lobato, A; Aguilar, J L

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia is a widely used technique for brief surgical interventions, primarily on the upper limbs and less frequently, on the lower limbs. It began being used at the beginning of the 20th century, when Bier injected procaine as a local anesthetic. The technique to accomplish anesthesia has not changed much since then, although different drugs, particularly long-acting local anesthetics, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in low concentrations, were introduced. Additionally, drugs like opioids, muscle relaxants, paracetamol, neostigmine, magnesium, ketamine, clonidine, and ketorolac, have all been investigated as adjuncts to intravenous regional anesthesia, and were found to be fairly useful in terms of an increased onset of operative anesthesia and longer lasting perioperative analgesia. The present article provides an overview of current knowledge with emphasis on long-acting local anesthetic drugs.

  2. Informing Parents about the Pharmacological and Invasive Behavior Management Techniques Used in Pediatric Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Paryab, Mehrysa; Afshar, Hossein; Mohammadi, Razie

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Parental acceptance and consent are important parameters in selecting the required behavior management technique during pediatric dental treatment. The present study sought to assess the effect of three different informing methods on the parental acceptance, consent and concern regarding the pharmacological and invasive behavior management techniques used in pediatric dentistry. Materials and methods. Ninety mothers of 3-6-year-old uncooperative children were selected and randomly assigned to three study groups. The parents in each group were initially asked to answer three questions related to their levels of 'acceptance','consent', and 'concern' toward the five behavior management techniques. Then, the information about the techniques was presented through a piece of writing in group I, verbal presentation in group II and showing a film in group III. At last, the parents answered the same three questions again. Score changes were analyzed by using ANOVA, correlations, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis methods. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in score changes of parental acceptance, consent and concern between the three groups, overall and in relation to each behaviour management technique (P > 0.05). Mothers with aca-demic education revealed more statistically significant concern following presentation of information by film (P < 0.05). Conclusion. None of the presentation methods had a significant preference over the others; in selecting the behavioral management techniques, it is advisable to observe individual factors, such as the level of education of the mothers.

  3. Challenges in the transfer of contingency management techniques: comment on Silverman et al. (2001).

    PubMed

    Petry, N M

    2001-02-01

    This article critiques K. Silverman, D. Svikis, E. Robles, M. L. Stitzer, and G. E. Bigelow's (2001) study of a contingency management intervention for reinforcing development of job-related skills in substance abusing women. The strengths of Silverman et al.'s study include studying a patient population of major public health concern, expanding contingency management techniques to a vocational training setting, reinforcing gradual approximations, implementing the intervention for a long duration, and carefully designing and executing the experimental procedures. However, many of these strengths may also be interpreted as weaknesses if the ultimate goal is to apply contingency management techniques in self-sustaining, community-based settings. The need to evaluate long-term cost-effectiveness of these procedures is described, and the difficulties in transferring contingency management techniques to real-world settings is discussed.

  4. A survey of techniques for architecting and managing GPU register file

    DOE PAGES

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2016-04-07

    To support their massively-multithreaded architecture, GPUs use very large register file (RF) which has a capacity higher than even L1 and L2 caches. In total contrast, traditional CPUs use tiny RF and much larger caches to optimize latency. Due to these differences, along with the crucial impact of RF in determining GPU performance, novel and intelligent techniques are required for managing GPU RF. In this paper, we survey the techniques for designing and managing GPU RF. We discuss techniques related to performance, energy and reliability aspects of RF. To emphasize the similarities and differences between the techniques, we classify themmore » along several parameters. Lastly, the aim of this paper is to synthesize the state-of-art developments in RF management and also stimulate further research in this area.« less

  5. A survey of techniques for architecting and managing GPU register file

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2016-04-07

    To support their massively-multithreaded architecture, GPUs use very large register file (RF) which has a capacity higher than even L1 and L2 caches. In total contrast, traditional CPUs use tiny RF and much larger caches to optimize latency. Due to these differences, along with the crucial impact of RF in determining GPU performance, novel and intelligent techniques are required for managing GPU RF. In this paper, we survey the techniques for designing and managing GPU RF. We discuss techniques related to performance, energy and reliability aspects of RF. To emphasize the similarities and differences between the techniques, we classify them along several parameters. Lastly, the aim of this paper is to synthesize the state-of-art developments in RF management and also stimulate further research in this area.

  6. Buffered local anesthetics and epinephrine degradation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, C S; Odland, P B; Ross, B K

    1994-03-01

    Lidocaine with epinephrine is currently the most common local anesthetic agent used for facial soft tissue surgery. This combination is generally safe and effective in providing complete anesthesia and adequate hemostasis. Because epinephrine is unstable at physiologic pH, the commercial preparation is formulated with a low pH (3.5-5.5). Unfortunately, this acidic pH causes significant pain during infiltration. To reduce pain, clinicians sometimes buffer acidic local anesthetic agents with sodium bicarbonate. However, little is known about the stability of epinephrine when the pH of epinephrine is clinically altered. Using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), epinephrine levels were measured after the addition of sodium bicarbonate. Our results indicate a significant amount of epinephrine degradation occurs in some of these specimens. Recommendations regarding the use of buffered local anesthetic agents are made.

  7. Knowledge about local anesthetics in odontology students.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Alvarez, Rodrigo; Campos Sepúlveda, Alfonso Efraín; Martínez González, Adrian Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the level of knowledge of local anesthetics frequently used in the surgical clinic by third and fourth year dental students in daily practice. The importance of pharmacology in dental practice in underscored by potential drug toxicity. The study was performed with 244 third and fourth grade career dental students (CDS). Eleven items regarding the knowledge over local anesthetics at the clinic; i.e., the appropriate doses, possible toxic effects and side effects were examined. The reference questionnaire which is in a validation process, is a way to evaluate student knowledge about most drugs used in odontology practice such as: NSAIDs, antibiotics and local anesthetics. The results were found to be unsatisfactory with a high percentage of students failing (less than six of eleven items correct). We conclude that determination of practice knowledge is an essential step in informing the institution about cognitive deficiencies identified in order to plan learning solutions.

  8. Long-acting local anesthetics in dentistry.

    PubMed Central

    Sisk, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    Long-acting local anesthetics have proved to be effective for the suppression of both intraoperative and postoperative pain. They are useful for lengthy dental treatments and for prevention of severe pain following many types of surgical procedures. Although the currently available long-acting local anesthetics for dentistry have minimal side effects in the doses usually employed, there are potential problems. Bupivacaine, for example, can cause significant cardiac depressant and dysrhythmogenic responses. Etidocaine has less pronounced effects on the cardiovascular system, but its use may be associated with inadequate control of intraoperative bleeding. A new long-acting local anesthetic, ropivacaine, appears to offer advantages over either of the currently used long-acting agents. PMID:1308373

  9. Long-acting local anesthetics in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sisk, A L

    1992-01-01

    Long-acting local anesthetics have proved to be effective for the suppression of both intraoperative and postoperative pain. They are useful for lengthy dental treatments and for prevention of severe pain following many types of surgical procedures. Although the currently available long-acting local anesthetics for dentistry have minimal side effects in the doses usually employed, there are potential problems. Bupivacaine, for example, can cause significant cardiac depressant and dysrhythmogenic responses. Etidocaine has less pronounced effects on the cardiovascular system, but its use may be associated with inadequate control of intraoperative bleeding. A new long-acting local anesthetic, ropivacaine, appears to offer advantages over either of the currently used long-acting agents.

  10. Independent Business Owner/Managers. Project TEAMS. (Techniques and Education for Achieving Management Skills).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platte Technical Community Coll., Columbus, NE.

    Prepared as part of Platte Technical Community College's project to help managers and supervisors develop practical, up-to-date managerial skills in a relatively short time, this instructional workbook provides information and exercises applicable to on-the-job situations encountered by independent business owner/managers. Unit I provides…

  11. Focused suggestion with somatic anchoring technique: rapid self-hypnosis for pain management.

    PubMed

    Donatone, Brooke

    2013-04-01

    This article details a self-hypnosis technique designed to teach patients how to manage acute or chronic pain through directed focus. The focused suggestion with somatic anchoring technique has been used with various types of pain, including somatic pain (arthritis, post-injury pain from bone breaks, or muscle tears), visceral pain (related to irritable bowel disease), and neuropathic pain (related to multiple sclerosis). This technique combines cognitive restructuring and mindfulness meditation with indirect and direct suggestions during hypnosis. The case examples demonstrate how the focused suggestion with somatic anchoring technique is used with both acute and chronic pain conditions when use of long-term medication has been relatively ineffective.

  12. Hypersensitive reactions to local dental anesthetics and patient information: critical review of a drug leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Simonet, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the case of a patient who experienced adverse reactions to a local anesthetic. It reviews symptoms of adverse reactions, possible causes, patient management, and alternative anesthesia modes. The second part of the paper discusses the product leaflet information and the associated legal issues. PMID:22915891

  13. Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) with intra-alveolar syngnathia: a discussion of anesthetic and surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Gahm, Caroline; Kuylenstierna, Richard; Papatziamos, Georgios

    2007-10-01

    Popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) is a rare genetic disorder that involves the association of a popliteal web with a combination of craniofacial, genitourinary and extremity malformations. In this article, we describe a patient with PPS complicated with multiple intra-alveolar syngnathia. We discuss the anesthetic and the surgical management of this case and review the literature regarding PPS and intra-alveolar syngnathia.

  14. Anesthetic agents in patients with very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Charlotte; Stewart, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrongenase deficiency (VLCADD) is a rare disorder of fatty acid metabolism that renders sufferers susceptible to hypoglycemia, liver failure, cardiomyopathy, and rhabdomyolysis. The literature about the management of these patients is hugely conflicting, suggesting that both propofol and volatile anesthesia should be avoided. We have reviewed the literature and have concluded that the source papers do not support the statements that volatile anesthetic agents are unsafe. The reports on rhabdomyolysis secondary to anesthesia appear to be due to inadequate supply of carbohydrate not volatile agents. Catabolism must be avoided with minimal fasting, glucose infusions based on age and weight, and attenuation of emotional and physical stress. General anesthesia appears to be protective of stress-induced catabolism and may offer benefits in children and anxious patients over regional anesthesia. Propofol has not been demonstrated to be harmful in VLCADD but is presented in an emulsion containing very long-chain fatty acids which can cause organ lipidosis and itself can inhibit mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. It is therefore not recommended. Suxamethonium-induced myalgia may mimic symptoms of rhabdomyolysis and cause raised CK therefore should be avoided. Opioids, NSAIDS, regional anesthesia, and local anesthetic techniques have all been used without complication.

  15. Test monkeys anesthetized by routine procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test monkeys are safely anesthetized for five minutes by confining them for less than six minutes in enclosures containing a controlled volume of ether. Thus the monkeys can be properly and safely positioned on test couches and fitted with electrodes or other devices prior to physiological tests.

  16. Local anesthetics adsorbed onto infusion balloon.

    PubMed

    Mizogami, Maki; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Takakura, Ko

    2004-09-01

    We compared the adsorption of different local anesthetics onto infusion balloons and studied one of the possible mechanisms for adsorption. After injection of lidocaine, bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine solutions (1 mM each; pH 7.4) into balloons of 100-mL volume, their concentrations in effluents flowing out at 4 mL/h were determined over time by high-performance liquid chromatography. All were adsorbed in a structure-dependent manner, and the concentration decreased by 6%-14% within 5 min. Bupivacaine was most strongly adsorbed, followed by lidocaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. QX-314, a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine, was only weakly adsorbed compared with the parent compound lidocaine. The extent of adsorption of local anesthetics was related to their hydrophobicity (evaluated by reversed-phase chromatography) and was much more at pH 7.4 than at pH 6.0. A hydrophobic interaction with balloon materials appears to be responsible for the adsorption of local anesthetics. When infusion balloons are used for the continuous administration of local anesthetics, attention should be paid to the possibility that their actual concentrations in effluents are smaller than those present when they are initially prepared.

  17. Prevention and management of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a look at complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Mamaril, Myrna E; Windle, Pamela E; Burkard, Joseph F

    2006-12-01

    Complementary modalities, used alone or in combination with pharmacologic therapies, play an important role in the prevention and management of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and post discharge nausea and vomiting (PDNV). This article will review the evidence for the effective use of complementary modalities: acupuncture and related techniques, aromatherapy, and music therapy that may be integrated in the perianesthesia nurse's plan of care to prevent or manage PONV.

  18. Field use of isoflurane as an inhalant anesthetic in the American marten (Martes americana).

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion; Cheveau, Marianne; Imbeau, Louis; Lair, Stéphane

    2007-10-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness and practicality of using isoflurane as an inhalation anesthetic with oxygen as a gas carrier for American martens (Martes americana) in a field setting. Sixty-eight martens were trapped in the Waswanipi Cree Model Forest (Québec, Canada) from October to November 2005 and anesthetized with isoflurane in 100% oxygen (1 l/min) using a face mask. Induction setting of isoflurane was 3% for all animals. Mean (+/-SD) length of induction was 1.8+/-1.2 min. Maintenance isoflurane settings ranged from 1% to 4%. Procedures lasted an average of 16.4+/-7.1 min and were uneventful. Length of recovery, defined as the interval between the end of the procedure and animal release, was short (6.3+/-2.8 min), and well below reported lengths of recovery using injectable anesthetics (>/=70 min). As compared to open drop administration of isoflurane described in previous studies, the use of an anesthesia machine prevents the risk of potential fatal anesthetic overdose. We conclude that among anesthesia techniques currently available, isoflurane with oxygen as a gas carrier is a safe and useful field anesthetic in martens, when issues with equipment portability can be overcome.

  19. Comparative analysis of tissue reactions to anesthetic solutions: histological analysis in subcutaneous tissue of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Paulo Domingos; Sanches, Marcio Giampietro; Okamoto, Tetuo

    2003-01-01

    Postanesthetic pain is a relatively common complication after local anesthesia. This complication may be caused by the anesthetic technique or by the anesthetic solution used. Tissue reactions induced by the anesthetic solutions may be one of the factors resulting in pain after anesthesia. The objective of this study was to comparatively analyze tissue reactions induced by different anesthetic solutions in the subcutaneous tissue of rats. The following solutions were utilized: 2% lidocaine without vasoconstrictor; a 0.5% bupivacaine solution with 1:200,000 adrenaline; a 4% articaine solution and 2% mepivacaine, both with 1:100,000 adrenaline; and a 0.9% sodium chloride solution as a control. Sterilized absorbent paper cones packed inside polyethylene tubes were soaked in the solutions and implanted in the subcutaneous region. The sacrifice periods were 1, 2, 5, and 10 days after surgery. The specimens were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological analysis. The results showed that there is a difference in tissue irritability produced by the local anesthetic solutions. The results also showed that there is no relation between the concentration of the drug and the inflammatory intensity, that the mepivacaine and articaine solutions promoted less inflammatory reaction than the bupivacaine, and that the lidocaine solution produced the least intense inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:14959905

  20. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  1. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section 111.105-37...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46...

  2. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  3. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  5. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  6. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section 111.105-37...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  8. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section 111.105-37...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  11. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  13. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  14. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section 111.105-37...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46...

  15. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section 111.105-37...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46...

  16. Comparison of subarachnoid anesthetic effect of emulsified volatile anesthetics in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiao; Zhou, Cheng; Liang, Peng; Huang, Han; Li, Fengshan; Chen, Xiangdong; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord is an important target of volatile anesthetics in particular for the effect of immobility. Intrathecal injection of volatile anesthetics has been found to produce subarachnoid anesthesia. The present study was designed to compare spinal anesthetic effects of emulsified volatile anesthetics, and to investigate the correlation between their spinal effects and general effect of immobility. In this study, halothane, isoflurane, enflurane and sevoflurane were emulsified by 30% Intralipid. These emulsified volatile anesthetics were intravenously and intrathecally injected, respectively. ED50 of general anesthesia and EC50 of spinal anesthesia were determined. The durations of general and spinal anesthesia were recorded. Correlation analysis was applied to evaluate the anesthetic potency of volatile anesthetics between their spinal and general effects. ED50 of general anesthesia induced by emulsified halothane, isoflurane, enflurane and sevoflurane were 0.41 ± 0.07, 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.74 ± 0.11 and 0.78 ± 0.08 mmol/kg, respectively, with significant correlation to their inhaled MAC (R2 = 0.8620, P = 0.047). For intrathecal injection, EC50 of spinal anesthesia induced by emulsified halothane, isoflurane, enflurane and sevoflurane were 0.35, 0.27, 0.33 and 0.26 mol/L, respectively, which could be predicted by the product of inhaled MAC and olive oil/gas partition coefficients (R2 = 0.9627, P = 0.013). In conclusion, potency and efficacy of the four emulsified volatile anesthetics in spinal anesthesia were similar and could be predicted by the product of inhaled MAC and olive oil/gas partition coefficients (MAC × olive oil/gas partition coefficients). PMID:25674241

  17. Successful intraoperative spinal cord monitoring during scoliosis surgery using a total intravenous anesthetic regimen including dexmedetomidine.

    PubMed

    Anschel, David J; Aherne, Andrew; Soto, Roy G; Carrion, Wesley; Hoegerl, Carl; Nori, Palgun; Seidman, Peggy A

    2008-02-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) during corrective spinal surgery is widely used. Because of the possible interference with the recording of evoked potentials by inhalational anesthetics, total intravenous anesthetic (TIVA) regimens have been advocated. TIVA regimens may be difficult to use in pediatric populations due to metabolic factors. We report on the results of multimodality IONM during 18 cases in which a TIVA regimen incorporating dexmedetomidine (Precedex, Hespira, Lake Forest, IL) was used. Monitoring techniques included sensory (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP), as well as pedicle screw stimulation. SSEPs were maintained within an acceptable range of baseline amplitude (50%) and latency (10%), and MEPs remained elicitable throughout each case. We therefore found that the anesthetic regimen did not significantly interfere with any of the monitoring modalities used and conclude that IONM in the presence of dexmedetomidine is feasible under appropriate conditions.

  18. A Study of the Applicability of Scientific Management Techniques for the Administration of Small, Private Church-Related Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Albert S.

    Experiences with various modern management techniques and practices in selected small, private church-related colleges were studied. For comparative purposes, practices in public colleges and universities were also assessed. Management techniques used in small companies were identified through review of the literature and the management seminars…

  19. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  20. An Anesthesiologist's Perspective on the History of Basic Airway Management: The "Preanesthetic" Era-1700 to 1846.

    PubMed

    Matioc, Adrian A

    2016-02-01

    Basic airway management modern history starts in the early 18th century in the context of resuscitation of the apparently dead. History saw the rise and fall of the mouth-to-mouth and then of the instrumental positive-pressure ventilation generated by bellows. Pulmonary ventilation had a secondary role to external and internal organ stimulation in resuscitation of the apparently dead. Airway access for the extraglottic technique was to the victim's nose. The bellows-to-nose technique was the "basic airway management technique" applicable by both medical and nonmedical personnel. Although the techniques had been described at the time, very few physicians practiced glottic (intubation) and subglottic (tracheotomy) techniques. Before the anesthetic era, positive-pressure ventilation was discredited and replaced by manual negative-pressure techniques. In the middle of the 19th century, physicians who would soon administer anesthetic gases were unfamiliar with the positive-pressure ventilation concept.

  1. Allergic response to metabisulfite in lidocaine anesthetic solution.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. R.; Maestrello, C. L.; Campbell, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    True allergies to local anesthetics are rare. It is common for practitioners to misdiagnose a serious adverse event to local anesthetics as an allergic reaction. The most likely causes for an allergic response are the preservative, antioxidant, or metabolites and not the anesthetic itself. This case report illustrates the need for practitioners to understand the many potential allergens in local anesthetics and to correctly diagnose patients that are truly allergic to the local anesthetic. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:11495401

  2. State of the art: regional anesthesia using anesthetic admixtures.

    PubMed

    Fetzer-Fowler, S

    1992-08-01

    Aging, high-risk, and ambulatory patients comprise a growing population of surgical candidates. The advantages of regional anesthesia for these patients has promoted technological and pharmacological advances. As new anesthetic agents are developed, methods to improve existing local anesthetics continue. This article reviews the current practice of local anesthetic admixtures. The physiological action of the local anesthetics and their additives is explained relative to their chemical properties. The advantages and risks when adding bicarbonate and epinephrine are described. Nursing implications for the care of the patient receiving regional anesthesia using admixtures are reviewed. An actual case report is presented to demonstrate the clinical application of local anesthetic admixtures.

  3. Results of a Survey Software Development Project Management in the U.S. Aerospace Industry. Volume II. Project Management Techniques, Procedures and Tools.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-18

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT IN THE U.S. AEROSPACE INDUSTRY Volume I1 PROJECT MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES, PROCEDURES AND TOOLS RICHARD Hf. THAYER SACRAMENTO AIR...MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES USED IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS BY THE US AEROSPACE INDUSTRY BY Richard H. Thayer and John H. Lehman This report...contains the results of a survey conducted in 1977 and 1978 on how the US Aerospace Industry manages its software development projects. The sample of

  4. Review of Budgeting Techniques in Academic and Research Libraries. ARL Management Supplement Volume One, Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Univ. Library Management Studies.

    Recent years have seen increased interest in extending the concept of budgeting to include activities related to planning, coordinating, and monitoring the entire operation of a library. There is strong evidence that the budgeting technique used can affect management potential. About 80% of total libraries use traditional line item or lump sum…

  5. Management of Giant Cell Tumour Radius in a Three Year old Child with an Improvised Technique

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumours of immature skeleton have a very low incidence and epi-metaphyseal location. We are presenting giant cell tumour distal radius in a skeletally immature patient; an uncontained defect with a large soft tissue component which was managed by wide excision and reconstruction with an improvised technique. PMID:25654002

  6. Techniques of Document Management: A Review of Text Retrieval and Related Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews present and possible future developments in the techniques of electronic document management, the major ones being text retrieval and scanning and OCR (optical character recognition). Also addresses document acquisition, indexing and thesauri, publishing and dissemination standards, impact of the Internet, and the document management…

  7. The Use of Contingency Management Techniques--An Applied Classroom Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dianne Knotts; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Describes a Title I project whose purpose was "to determine if a series of three group and three individual instruction sessions with classroom teachers were adequate to train them in the use of basic behavioral modification techniques, by judging whether or not this instruction was evidenced by their management of children in the classroom."…

  8. Cultural Variations in Mothers' Acceptance of and Intent to Use Behavioral Child Management Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mah, Janet W. T.; Johnston, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    We examined cultural differences in mothers' acceptance of and intent to use behavioral parenting techniques for managing disruptive child behavior, and the possible roles of parenting styles and implicit theories in explaining these cultural differences. A community sample of 117 Euro-Canadian and Chinese-immigrant mothers of boys aged 4- to…

  9. An examination of the potential applications of automatic classification techniques to Georgia management problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rado, B. Q.

    1975-01-01

    Automatic classification techniques are described in relation to future information and natural resource planning systems with emphasis on application to Georgia resource management problems. The concept, design, and purpose of Georgia's statewide Resource AS Assessment Program is reviewed along with participation in a workshop at the Earth Resources Laboratory. Potential areas of application discussed include: agriculture, forestry, water resources, environmental planning, and geology.

  10. Classroom Management: Teaching Techniques and Strategies for Dealing with Discipline Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Teacher Corps Consortium, GA.

    Techniques and activities for effective classroom management are presented in this module. The stated objectives of the module are to promote appropriate student behavior, to develop good interpersonal relationships and a positive socioemotional climate, and to establish and maintain a productive classroom organization. Samples of pre-post…

  11. Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy and Dor Fundoplication for Esophageal Achalasia: Technique and Perioperative Management.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Ciro; Fisichella, P Marco

    2016-11-01

    Surgical correction of achalasia using laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication is argued to be the gold standard treatment for patients with achalasia. The goal of this technical report is to illustrate our preferred approach to patients with achalasia and to provide the reader with a detailed description of our operative technique, its rationale, and our pre and postoperative management.

  12. Increasing Acceptance of Behavioral Child Management Techniques: What Do Parents Say?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pemberton, Joy R.; Borrego, Joaquin

    2007-01-01

    Consumers' willingness to accept treatments is an important concern of clinicians and clinical researchers, particularly when treating children. However, few studies have directly asked parents to give reasons for accepting or refusing treatments. In the current study, 82 parents read descriptions of six behavioral child management techniques,…

  13. Mobility Based Key Management Technique for Multicast Security in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhanan, B.; Chitra, S.; Rajan, C.

    2015-01-01

    In MANET multicasting, forward and backward secrecy result in increased packet drop rate owing to mobility. Frequent rekeying causes large message overhead which increases energy consumption and end-to-end delay. Particularly, the prevailing group key management techniques cause frequent mobility and disconnections. So there is a need to design a multicast key management technique to overcome these problems. In this paper, we propose the mobility based key management technique for multicast security in MANET. Initially, the nodes are categorized according to their stability index which is estimated based on the link availability and mobility. A multicast tree is constructed such that for every weak node, there is a strong parent node. A session key-based encryption technique is utilized to transmit a multicast data. The rekeying process is performed periodically by the initiator node. The rekeying interval is fixed depending on the node category so that this technique greatly minimizes the rekeying overhead. By simulation results, we show that our proposed approach reduces the packet drop rate and improves the data confidentiality. PMID:25834838

  14. Mobility based key management technique for multicast security in mobile ad hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhanan, B; Chitra, S; Rajan, C

    2015-01-01

    In MANET multicasting, forward and backward secrecy result in increased packet drop rate owing to mobility. Frequent rekeying causes large message overhead which increases energy consumption and end-to-end delay. Particularly, the prevailing group key management techniques cause frequent mobility and disconnections. So there is a need to design a multicast key management technique to overcome these problems. In this paper, we propose the mobility based key management technique for multicast security in MANET. Initially, the nodes are categorized according to their stability index which is estimated based on the link availability and mobility. A multicast tree is constructed such that for every weak node, there is a strong parent node. A session key-based encryption technique is utilized to transmit a multicast data. The rekeying process is performed periodically by the initiator node. The rekeying interval is fixed depending on the node category so that this technique greatly minimizes the rekeying overhead. By simulation results, we show that our proposed approach reduces the packet drop rate and improves the data confidentiality.

  15. Investigation of energy management strategies for photovoltaic systems - An analysis technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cull, R. C.; Eltimsahy, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in formulating energy management strategies for stand-alone PV systems, developing an analytical tool that can be used to investigate these strategies, applying this tool to determine the proper control algorithms and control variables (controller inputs and outputs) for a range of applications, and quantifying the relative performance and economics when compared to systems that do not apply energy management. The analysis technique developed may be broadly applied to a variety of systems to determine the most appropriate energy management strategies, control variables and algorithms. The only inputs required are statistical distributions for stochastic energy inputs and outputs of the system and the system's device characteristics (efficiency and ratings). Although the formulation was originally driven by stand-alone PV system needs, the techniques are also applicable to hybrid and grid connected systems.

  16. Special article: general anesthetic gases and the global environment.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Yumiko

    2011-01-01

    General anesthetics are administered to approximately 50 million patients each year in the United States. Anesthetic vapors and gases are also widely used in dentists' offices, veterinary clinics, and laboratories for animal research. All the volatile anesthetics that are currently used are halogenated compounds destructive to the ozone layer. These halogenated anesthetics could have potential significant impact on global warming. The widely used anesthetic gas nitrous oxide is a known greenhouse gas as well as an important ozone-depleting gas. These anesthetic gases and vapors are primarily eliminated through exhalation without being metabolized in the body, and most anesthesia systems transfer these gases as waste directly and unchanged into the atmosphere. Little consideration has been given to the ecotoxicological properties of gaseous general anesthetics. Our estimation using the most recent consumption data indicates that the anesthetic use of nitrous oxide contributes 3.0% of the total emissions in the United States. Studies suggest that the influence of halogenated anesthetics on global warming will be of increasing relative importance given the decreasing level of chlorofluorocarbons globally. Despite these nonnegligible pollutant effects of the anesthetics, no data on the production or emission of these gases and vapors are publicly available. The primary goal of this article is to critically review the current data on the potential effects of general anesthetics on the global environment and to describe possible alternatives and new technologies that may prevent these gases from being discharged into the atmosphere.

  17. A comparison between audio and audiovisual distraction techniques in managing anxious pediatric dental patients.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, A R; Marwah, N; Raju, O S

    2007-01-01

    Pain is not the sole reason for fear of dentistry. Anxiety or the fear of unknown during dental treatment is a major factor and it has been the major concern for dentists for a long time. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the two distraction techniques, viz, audio distraction and audiovisual distraction, in management of anxious pediatric dental patients. Sixty children aged between 4-8 years were divided into three groups. Each child had four dental visits--screening visit, prophylaxis visit, cavity preparation and restoration visit, and extraction visit. Child's anxiety level in each visit was assessed using a combination of four measures: Venham's picture test, Venham's rating of clinical anxiety, pulse rate, and oxygen saturation. The values obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis. It was concluded that audiovisual distraction technique was more effective in managing anxious pediatric dental patient as compared to audio distraction technique.

  18. A Novel Surgical Pre-suturing Technique for the Management of Ankyloglossia.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Mayur; Pawar, Babita; Khairnar, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or "tongue-tie" is a congenital anomaly caused by tight lingual frenulum that abnormally connects the tongue base to the floor of the mouth. Ankyloglossia can results in difficulty during speech and deglutition. This case series presents a novel surgical technique in the management of ankyloglossia in using presuturing technique in which different sets of sutures are given on lingual frenum before severing it. This results in reduced opening of the wound, minimal bleeding, pain and discomfort. Two male patients with severe ankyloglossia had been managed with this technique and after 2 years of follow-up of these cases showed satisfactory protrusive and lateral movement of the tongue with minimal scarring and discomfort.

  19. A Novel Surgical Pre-suturing Technique for the Management of Ankyloglossia

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Mayur; Pawar, Babita; Khairnar, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Ankyloglossia or “tongue-tie” is a congenital anomaly caused by tight lingual frenulum that abnormally connects the tongue base to the floor of the mouth. Ankyloglossia can results in difficulty during speech and deglutition. This case series presents a novel surgical technique in the management of ankyloglossia in using presuturing technique in which different sets of sutures are given on lingual frenum before severing it. This results in reduced opening of the wound, minimal bleeding, pain and discomfort. Two male patients with severe ankyloglossia had been managed with this technique and after 2 years of follow-up of these cases showed satisfactory protrusive and lateral movement of the tongue with minimal scarring and discomfort. PMID:25598942

  20. Using mediation techniques to manage conflict and create healthy work environments.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Debra

    2004-01-01

    Healthcare organizations must find ways for managing conflict and developing effective working relationships to create healthy work environments. The effects of unresolved conflict on clinical outcomes, staff retention, and the financial health of the organization lead to many unnecessary costs that divert resources from clinical care. The complexity of delivering critical care services makes conflict resolution difficult. Developing collaborative working relationships helps to manage conflict in complex environments. Working relationships are based on the ability to deal with differences. Dealing with differences requires skill development and techniques for balancing interests and communicating effectively. Techniques used by mediators are effective for resolving disputes and developing working relationships. With practice, these techniques are easily transferable to the clinical setting. Listening for understanding, reframing, elevating the definition of the problem, and forming clear agreements can foster working relationships, decrease the level of conflict, and create healthy work environments that benefit patients and professionals.

  1. Perioperative pain management in hip arthroscopy; what options are there?

    PubMed Central

    Bech, N. H.; Hulst, A. H.; Spuijbroek, J. A.; van Leuken, L. L. A.; Haverkamp, D.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast growing orthopedic field of expertise. As in any field of surgery adequate postoperative pain management regimes are of utmost importance. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge on anesthetic options for perioperative pain management for hip arthroscopy. We searched the Pubmed/Medline and Embase database for literature and included 10 studies for our analysis. Because of the variety of pain scales and different ways of measured pain no meta-analysis could be performed and a descriptive review is performed. There are several types of pain regimens that can mostly be divided in two groups: local anesthetics and nerve blocks. Included studies show a rather large variation in reported visual analogue scale scores, post anesthesia care unit admission time and opioid usage. There are several anesthetic options available for hip arthroscopy. Different studies use different dosages, anesthetic regimens and different protocols; this partly explains the differences between studies with similar techniques. Peripheral nerve blocks seems promising but regarding current literature no clear recommendation can be made about what the best perioperative pain management option is, an overview of all reported techniques is given. PMID:27583156

  2. A Novel and Innovative Way of Nasogastric Tube Insertion in Anesthetized Intubated Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Kishore, Kamal; Sachan, Vertika; Chatterjee, Arnidam

    2017-01-01

    Nasogastric tube (NGT) placement in anesthetized and intubated is sometimes very challenging with more than 50% failure rate in the first attempt. We describe a newer innovative Sahu's three in one, technique with use of GlideScope and forward placement of intubated trachea by external laryngeal maneuver, these both techniques lead to separation of trachea from esophagus so that endoscopic jejunal feeding tube guide wire strengthen NGT can be guided and manipulated to esophagus under direct vision. After informed consent, we used Sahu's three in one combo technique to insert NGT in adult anesthetized and intubated patients of both the sexes with high success in the first attempt. We found this technique easy, helpful, less time consuming with high success rate. PMID:28298795

  3. Resistance Management Techniques of Milton H. Erickson, M.D.: An Application to Nonhypnotic Mental Health Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otani, Akira

    1989-01-01

    Delineates five selected hypnotically based techniques of client resistance management pioneered by Milton H. Erickson: acceptance; paradoxical encouragement; reframing; displacement; dissociation. Explains how techniques can be applied to nonhypnotic mental health counseling. Discusses relevant clinical, theoretical, and empirical issues related…

  4. Using economic valuation techniques to inform water resources management: a survey and critical appraisal of available techniques and an application.

    PubMed

    Birol, Ekin; Karousakis, Katia; Koundouri, Phoebe

    2006-07-15

    The need for economic analysis for the design and implementation of efficient water resources management policies is well documented in the economics literature. This need is also emphasised in the European Union's recent Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC), and is relevant to the objectives of Euro-limpacs, an EU funded project which inter alia, aims to provide a decision-support system for valuing the effects of future global change on Europe's freshwater ecosystems. The purpose of this paper is to define the role of economic valuation techniques in assisting in the design of efficient, equitable and sustainable policies for water resources management in the face of environmental problems such as pollution, intensive land use in agriculture and climate change. The paper begins with a discussion of the conceptual economic framework that can be used to inform water policy-making. An inventory of the available economic valuation methods is presented and the scope and suitability of each for studying various aspects of water resources are critically discussed. Recent studies that apply these methods to water resources are reviewed. Finally, an application of one of the economic valuation methods, namely the contingent valuation method, is presented using a case study of the Cheimaditida wetland in Greece.

  5. Unexpected Complete Heart Block and Anesthetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Arturo G

    2015-08-01

    A healthy, active duty military 25-year-old female with a history of congenital complete heart block presented for a routine septorhinoplasty. During the preoperative interview, she did not disclose her heart condition. A preordered electrocardiogram was not available. During induction of anesthesia, she became extremely bradycardic, approaching asystole, requiring resuscitation. This case highlights the potential anesthetic risks in individuals with a history of congenital heart rhythm disease.

  6. Intrinsic Organization of the Anesthetized Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhifeng; King, Jean; Zhang, Nanyin

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanism of unconsciousness has been a major unsolved question in neuroscience despite its vital role in brain states like coma and anesthesia. The existing literature suggests that neural connections, information integration and conscious states are closely related. Indeed, alterations in several important neural circuitries and networks during unconscious conditions have been reported. However, how the whole-brain network is topologically reorganized to support different patterns of information transfer at unconscious states remains unknown. Here we directly compared whole-brain neural networks in an awake and an anesthetized state in rodents. Consistent with our previous report, the awake rat brain was organized in a non-trivial manner and conserved fundamental topological properties as the human brain. Strikingly, these topological features were well maintained in the anesthetized brain. Meanwhile, local neural networks were reorganized with altered local network properties. The connectional strength between brain regions was also considerably different between the awake and anesthetized conditions. Interestingly, we found that long-distance connections were not preferentially reduced in the anesthetized condition, arguing against the hypothesis that loss of long-distance connections is characteristic to unconsciousness. These findings collectively show that the integrity of the whole-brain network can be conserved between widely dissimilar physiologic states while local neural networks can flexibly adapt to new conditions. They also illustrate that the governing principles of intrinsic brain organization might represent fundamental characteristics of the healthy brain. With the unique spatial and temporal scales of rsfMRI, this study has opened a new avenue for understanding the neural mechanism of (un)consciousness. PMID:22836253

  7. Heating pad burns in anesthetic skin.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, T R; Hammond, D C; Keip, D; Argenta, L C

    1985-07-01

    Patients requiring reconstruction by muscle or musculocutaneous flaps often have an associated area of skin anesthesia. This skin is susceptible to trauma because of its insensibility. This study reports 3 cases in which patients sustained deep partial-thickness burns of anesthetic skin following flap reconstruction. All burns healed by reepithelialization. Following flap reconstruction, patients should be warned regarding the use of heating pads. Burns of this type represent a preventable complication of flap reconstruction.

  8. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control.

  9. Subjective pain response to two anesthetic systems in dental surgery: traditional syringe vs. a computer controlled delivery system.

    PubMed

    Patini, R; Coviello, V; Raffaelli, L; Manicone, P F; Dehkhargani, S Z; Verdugo, F; Perfetti, G; D'Addona, A

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate human pain perception at different phases of dental surgery using a computer controlled device, the Single Tooth Anesthesia System (STA System), versus the traditional syringe technique. One hundred healthy patients participated in this single-blind split-mouth design study. Individuals provided pain ratings at needle insertion, delivery of anesthetic solution and tooth extraction via a numeric visual rating scale or NVRS. The anterior middle superior alveolar, or AMSA, injection was compared with traditional syringe injections in maxillary quadrants. NVRS scores for AMSA were significantly lower for the STA System when compared to traditional syringe technique at needle insertion, delivery of anesthetic solution (p less than 0.0001) and also during tooth extractions (p=0.0002). A higher percentage of patients (23 percent) required a second injection after the traditional syringe technique. Subjects reported having less clinical pain with AMSA injection at every step of the dental surgery. The STA System combines an anesthetic pathway and controlled flow rate resulting in virtually imperceptible needle insertion and injection, and a rapid onset of profound anesthesia. NVRS scoring system facilitated patient comprehension in assessing pain value and intensity experienced. The two anesthetic delivery techniques were therapeutically equivalent for maxillary injections but AMSA/computer controlled protocol significantly minimizes subjective pain perception at needle insertion, anesthetic delivery and during tooth extraction.

  10. Management strategy evaluation of pheromone-baited trapping techniques to improve management of invasive sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Heather; Jones, Michael L.; Irwin, Brian J.; Johnson, Nicholas; Wagner, Michael C.; Szymanski, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    We applied a management strategy evaluation (MSE) model to examine the potential cost-effectiveness of using pheromone-baited trapping along with conventional lampricide treatment to manage invasive sea lamprey. Four pheromone-baited trapping strategies were modeled: (1) stream activation wherein pheromone was applied to existing traps to achieve 10−12 mol/L in-stream concentration, (2) stream activation plus two additional traps downstream with pheromone applied at 2.5 mg/hr (reverse-intercept approach), (3) trap activation wherein pheromone was applied at 10 mg/hr to existing traps, and (4) trap activation and reverse-intercept approach. Each new strategy was applied, with remaining funds applied to conventional lampricide control. Simulating deployment of these hybrid strategies on fourteen Lake Michigan streams resulted in increases of 17 and 11% (strategies 1 and 2) and decreases of 4 and 7% (strategies 3 and 4) of the lakewide mean abundance of adult sea lamprey relative to status quo. MSE revealed performance targets for trap efficacy to guide additional research because results indicate that combining lampricides and high efficacy trapping technologies can reduce sea lamprey abundance on average without increasing control costs.

  11. A novel technique of otic barotrauma management using modified intravenous cannulae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Banks, Catherine; Choroomi, Sim; Kertesz, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    This article provides the first detailed description and systematic evaluation of the management of otic barotrauma using modified intravenous cannulae. A 24-gauge IC cannula was modified as a tool for tympanostomy tube placement and middle ear ventilation. The medical records of 271 ears of 156 adult patients (median age 49 years) who underwent this procedure were reviewed retrospectively. Hundred and ninty-one tubes were placed for otalgia because of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, 58 tubes were inserted for air travel prophylaxis and 22 tubes were placed for management of otic barotrauma post-flight. All the patients who had this procedure for prophylaxis experienced regular otic barotrauma symptoms during air travel prior to tube placement. All patients were reviewed 6 weeks (range 2-9 weeks) post-procedure. This technique of otic barotrauma management worked effectively in 99 % of treated patients. On follow-up, 88 % of tubes were found to be extruded and non-extruded tubes were removed in clinic without any anaesthesia. 99.6 % of tympanic membrane had healed completely and spontaneously without sequelae. Given the safety, effectiveness, low risk of complications associated with this novel tympanostomy technique, it provided a simple yet effective therapeutic option for the management of otic barotrauma. Finally, this technique can be easily applied in all health settings as it only requires medical supplies readily available in hospitals, therefore there is no additional cost.

  12. Evaluation of transpulmonary thermodilution as a method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Kim E; Kerr, Carolyn L; McDonell, Wayne N

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of a transpulmonary thermodilution (Trans) technique for the measurement of cardiac output, and to determine the agreement between Trans and conventional thermodilution (TD) in anesthetized cats. Using each technique, cardiac output was measured in 5 mature cats (weights 2.4 to 5.6 kg) anesthetized with isoflurane. To induce different levels of cardiac output in each cat, anesthesia was maintained at > 1.5x end-tidal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, and at 1.3x end-tidal isoflurane MAC with and without administration of dobutamine. At least 2 comparisons between TD and Trans values were made at each cardiac output rate. Thirty-two of the 42 recorded comparisons were analyzed. Linear regression analysis (TD vs Trans) yielded an r(2) value of 0.83. The mean bias (TD-Trans) was -3.7 mL/kg/min with limits of agreement of -35.9 to 28.5 mL/kg/min. The concordance coefficient was 0.91. The Trans method showed good relationship and good agreement with TD in anesthetized cats. The Trans method is a relatively noninvasive, practical, and safe method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

  13. Implementation of quality improvement techniques for management and technical processes in the ACRV project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiman, Laura B.

    1992-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a cooperative form of doing business that relies on the talents of everyone in an organization to continually improve quality and productivity, using teams and an assortment of statistical and measurement tools. The objective of the activities described in this paper was to implement effective improvement tools and techniques in order to build work processes which support good management and technical decisions and actions which are crucial to the success of the ACRV project. The objectives were met by applications in both the technical and management areas. The management applications involved initiating focused continuous improvement projects with widespread team membership. The technical applications involved applying proven statistical tools and techniques to the technical issues associated with the ACRV Project. Specific activities related to the objective included working with a support contractor team to improve support processes, examining processes involved in international activities, a series of tutorials presented to the New Initiatives Office and support contractors, a briefing to NIO managers, and work with the NIO Q+ Team. On the technical side, work included analyzing data from the large-scale W.A.T.E.R. test, landing mode trade analyses, and targeting probability calculations. The results of these efforts will help to develop a disciplined, ongoing process for producing fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide the ACRV organization .

  14. Advanced techniques in IR thermography as a tool for the pest management professional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jon L.

    2006-04-01

    Within the past five years, the Pest Management industry has become aware that IR thermography can aid in the detection of pest infestations and locate other conditions that are within the purview of the industry. This paper will review the applications that can be utilized by the pest management professional and discuss the advanced techniques that may be required in conjunction with thermal imaging to locate insect and other pest infestations, moisture within structures, the verification of data and the special challenges associated with the inspection process.

  15. Amyand's hernia in elderly patients: diagnostic, anesthetic, and perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiping; Tao, Zongyuan; Chen, Hao; Li, Qinyu; Chu, Peiguo G; Yen, Yun; Qiu, Weihua

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a vermiform appendix in an inguinal hernia sac is termed as Amyand's hernia. Although rare, mistakes in diagnosis and treatment can cause catastrophic results. Charts of patients with inguinal hernia were reviewed, and four cases of Amyand's hernia were confirmed. The clinical presentation, anesthetic, and perioperative management of Amyand's hernia were further analyzed. The mean age of patients was over 70 years, and all were males. None of the patients were diagnosed preoperatively. All the patients had little abdominal complaint only with a right inguinal mass and dragging sensation for several hours. Due to the short time after incarceration and significant cardiovascular and pulmonary comorbidities, manual reduction was attempted first in three patients. With complete preoperative evaluation and careful perioperative support, all patients underwent appendectomy and Bassini's hernia repair through a groin incision. Based on age-related organ failure and associated chronic medical illnesses of geriatric patients, the difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment are also summarized and analyzed.

  16. Developing nondestructive techniques for managing conflicts between fisheries and double-crested cormorant colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suzuki, Yasuko; Roby, Daniel D.; Lyons, Donald E.; Courtot, Karen; Collis, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) have been identified as the source of significant mortality to juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the Columbia River Basin. Management plans for reducing the size of a large colony on East Sand Island (OR, USA) in the Columbia River estuary are currently being developed. We evaluated habitat enhancement and social attraction as nondestructive techniques for managing cormorant nesting colonies during 2004–2007. We tested these techniques on unoccupied plots adjacent to the East Sand Island cormorant colony. Cormorants quickly colonized these plots and successfully raised young. Cormorants also were attracted to nest and raised young on similar plots at 2 islands approximately 25 km from East Sand Island; 1 island had a history of successful cormorant nesting whereas the other was a site where cormorants had previously nested unsuccessfully. On a third island with no history of cormorant nesting or nesting attempts, these techniques were unsuccessful at attracting cormorants to nest. Our results suggest that some important factors influencing attraction of nesting cormorants using these techniques include history of cormorant nesting, disturbance, and presence of breeding cormorants nearby. These techniques may be effective in redistributing nesting cormorants away from areas where fish stocks of conservation concern are susceptible to predation, especially if sites with a recent history of cormorant nesting are available within their foraging or dispersal range. Published 2015. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  17. Advances in Surgical Reconstructive Techniques in the Management of Penile, Urethral, and Scrotal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bickell, Michael; Beilan, Jonathan; Wallen, Jared; Wiegand, Lucas; Carrion, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews the most up-to-date surgical treatment options for the reconstructive management of patients with penile, urethral, and scrotal cancer. Each organ system is examined individually. Techniques and discussion for penile cancer reconstruction include Mohs surgery, glans resurfacing, partial and total glansectomy, and phalloplasty. Included in the penile cancer reconstruction section is the use of penile prosthesis in phalloplasty patients after penectomy, tissue engineering in phallic regeneration, and penile transplantation. Reconstruction following treatment of primary urethral carcinoma and current techniques for scrotal cancer reconstruction using split-thickness skin grafts and flaps are described.

  18. A modified technique for the laparoscopic management of large gastric bezoars

    PubMed Central

    Ulukent, Suat C.; Ozgun, Yigit M.; Sahbaz, Nuri A.

    2016-01-01

    Bezoar is an intraluminal mass formed by the accumulation of undigested material anywhere in the gastrointestinal system. Most of small bezoars are removed by gastrointestinal endoscopy, while the best approach for the larger ones is surgical removal. Currently, laparoscopic technique is successfully used in the treatment of bezoars, which are used to be managed by open surgery. In the laparoscopic treatment of bezoars, contamination of peritoneal cavity is a major problem. We describe a modified laparoscopic technique in which an endobag is placed in the stomach instead of the peritoneal cavity in order to avoid spillage of the bezoar during laparoscopic removal. PMID:27570860

  19. The diagnosis and management of pre-invasive breast disease: The role of new diagnostic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nerurkar, Ashutosh; Osin, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In recent years we have seen significantly increased use of minimally invasive diagnostic techniques in the management of breast disease. There is wide recognition of fine needle aspiration and core biopsy as the principal diagnostic methods. However, concerns exist regarding their reliability. This article provides a brief overview of the major diagnostic issues related to use of fine needle aspiration, core biopsy and ductal lavage. It summarizes areas of use for each technique, outlines the main diagnostic pitfalls and their causes, and provides a perspective on future developments in the field. PMID:14580247

  20. Inhaled nitric oxide induces cerebrovascular effects in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, W M; Kisch-Wedel, H; Kemming, G I; Meisner, F; Bruhn, S; Koehler, C; Flondor, M; Messmer, K; Zwissler, B

    2003-09-11

    Although inhaled nitric oxide (NO(i)) is considered to act selectively on pulmonary vessels, EEG abnormalities and even occasional neurotoxic effects of NO(i) have been proposed. Here, we investigated cerebrovascular effects of increasing concentrations of 5, 10 and 50 ppm NO(i) in seven anesthetized pigs. Cerebral hemodynamics were assessed non-invasively by use of near-infared spectroscopy and indicator dilution techniques. NO(i) increased cerebral blood volume significantly and reversibly. This effect was not attributable to changes of macrohemodynamic parameters or arterial blood gases. Simultaneously, cerebral transit time increased while cerebral blood flow remained unchanged. These data demonstrate a vasodilatory action of NO(i) in the cerebral vasculature, which may occur preferentially in the venous compartment.

  1. Management strategies for infected total hip arthroplasty. A critical appreciation of problems and techniques.

    PubMed

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Koutalos, Antonios; Komnos, George

    2014-10-02

    Infection is a devastating complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Risk factors have been recognised and prevention is possible. The nature of the disease is heterogeneous and for satisfactory management one has to weigh factors related to pathogen, host, local soft tissue, bone stock, surgeon experience and financial resources. Available data in the current literature is of poor quality and there is a lack of data comparing different techniques. Referral of patients to dedicated departments with the appropriate facilities may be more appropriate.

  2. Arrow shaft injury of the wrist and hand: case report, management, and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Launikitis, Robert A; Viegas, Steven F

    2009-01-01

    A case of accidental, self-inflicted injury to the hand from a hollow carbon shaft arrow which broke in its midshaft while attempting to shoot the arrow from a compound bow is presented. Basic knowledge of low velocity gunshot wounds and arrow injuries was applied in the treatment of this injury along with a unique management technique. The outcome, including hand function was good without any functional loss.

  3. Management of pulp canal obliteration using the Modified-Tip instrument technique

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Shoaib Haider

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of pulp canal obliteration following dental trauma has been reported to be approximately 4 – 24% and its management can be quite challenging for the practitioner. Locating the canal and negotiating it to full working length may lead to iatrogenic errors such as fractured instrument and perforation. This case report deals with such a case using the modified tip instrument technique to gain access and negotiate the canal to the apex followed by conventional root canal preparation and obturation. PMID:25780361

  4. Physical therapy modalities and rehabilitation techniques in the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Gulseren; Kenis, Ozge

    2014-03-01

    Neuropathic pain is an important problem because of its complex natural history, unclear etiology, and poor response to standard physical therapy agents. It causes severe disability unrelated to its etiology. The primary goals of the management of neuropathic pain are to detect the underlying cause, to define the differential diagnosis and eliminate risk factors, and to reduce the pain. The physician should also know the functional and psychologic conditions of the patient. Therefore, a multimodal management plan in neuropathic pain is essential. This review aimed to reflect a diverse point of view about various physical therapy modalities and rehabilitation techniques. Physical therapy modalities and rehabilitation techniques are important options and must be considered when pharmacotherapy alone is not sufficient. In addition, psychosocial support and cognitive behavioral therapy could also be taken into consideration. It has been suggested that the importance of pain rehabilitation techniques will increase in time and these will take a larger part in the management of neuropathic pain. However, it is now early to comment on these methods because of the lack of adequate publications.

  5. Task force: a management technique that produces quality decisions and employee commitment.

    PubMed

    Moore, C H; Kovach, K M

    1988-01-01

    A task force is a technique that can be used by the dietitian-manager to develop solutions for specific, identified problems. Because employees are directly involved in the decision-making process, better solutions--ones that are also more acceptable to the work group--result. To implement a task force, management must plan the strategy: Select a facilitator, explain the concept and problem to the work group, select task force participants, and make meeting arrangements. The task force meetings should be structured to maximize efficiency and productivity. The plan of action is developed by the task force members; all decisions are based upon input from the work group. Successful implementation of the solutions is the responsibility of the task force. Applications for task forces in both the clinical and food management areas are numerous and result in both tangible and intangible benefits.

  6. Uncertainty Management for Diagnostics and Prognostics of Batteries using Bayesian Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Goebel, kai

    2007-01-01

    Uncertainty management has always been the key hurdle faced by diagnostics and prognostics algorithms. A Bayesian treatment of this problem provides an elegant and theoretically sound approach to the modern Condition- Based Maintenance (CBM)/Prognostic Health Management (PHM) paradigm. The application of the Bayesian techniques to regression and classification in the form of Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), and to state estimation as in Particle Filters (PF), provides a powerful tool to integrate the diagnosis and prognosis of battery health. The RVM, which is a Bayesian treatment of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), is used for model identification, while the PF framework uses the learnt model, statistical estimates of noise and anticipated operational conditions to provide estimates of remaining useful life (RUL) in the form of a probability density function (PDF). This type of prognostics generates a significant value addition to the management of any operation involving electrical systems.

  7. The Differential Effects of Anesthetics on Bacterial Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Matthew; Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Schaefers, Matthew; Babazada, Hasan; Liu, Renyu; Yuki, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Volatile anesthetics have been in clinical use for a long period of time and are considered to be promiscuous by presumably interacting with several ion channels in the central nervous system to produce anesthesia. Because ion channels and their existing evolutionary analogues, ion transporters, are very important in various organisms, it is possible that volatile anesthetics may affect some bacteria. In this study, we hypothesized that volatile anesthetics could affect bacterial behaviors. We evaluated the impact of anesthetics on bacterial growth, motility (swimming and gliding) and biofilm formation of four common bacterial pathogens in vitro. We found that commonly used volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane affected bacterial motility and biofilm formation without any effect on growth of the common bacterial pathogens studied here. Using available Escherichia coli gene deletion mutants of ion transporters and in silico molecular docking, we suggested that these altered behaviors might be at least partly via the interaction of volatile anesthetics with ion transporters. PMID:28099463

  8. Anesthetic diffusion through lipid membranes depends on the protonation rate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Sierra-Valdez, F J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2014-12-18

    Hundreds of substances possess anesthetic action. However, despite decades of research and tests, a golden rule is required to reconcile the diverse hypothesis behind anesthesia. What makes an anesthetic to be local or general in the first place? The specific targets on proteins, the solubility in lipids, the diffusivity, potency, action time? Here we show that there could be a new player equally or even more important to disentangle the riddle: the protonation rate. Indeed, such rate modulates the diffusion speed of anesthetics into lipid membranes; low protonation rates enhance the diffusion for local anesthetics while high ones reduce it. We show also that there is a pH and membrane phase dependence on the local anesthetic diffusion across multiple lipid bilayers. Based on our findings we incorporate a new clue that may advance our understanding of the anesthetic phenomenon.

  9. Innovative techniques for estimating illegal activities in a human-wildlife-management conflict.

    PubMed

    Cross, Paul; St John, Freya A V; Khan, Saira; Petroczi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Effective management of biological resources is contingent upon stakeholder compliance with rules. With respect to disease management, partial compliance can undermine attempts to control diseases within human and wildlife populations. Estimating non-compliance is notoriously problematic as rule-breakers may be disinclined to admit to transgressions. However, reliable estimates of rule-breaking are critical to policy design. The European badger (Meles meles) is considered an important vector in the transmission and maintenance of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle herds. Land managers in high bTB prevalence areas of the UK can cull badgers under license. However, badgers are also known to be killed illegally. The extent of illegal badger killing is currently unknown. Herein we report on the application of three innovative techniques (Randomized Response Technique (RRT); projective questioning (PQ); brief implicit association test (BIAT)) for investigating illegal badger killing by livestock farmers across Wales. RRT estimated that 10.4% of farmers killed badgers in the 12 months preceding the study. Projective questioning responses and implicit associations relate to farmers' badger killing behavior reported via RRT. Studies evaluating the efficacy of mammal vector culling and vaccination programs should incorporate estimates of non-compliance. Mitigating the conflict concerning badgers as a vector of bTB requires cross-disciplinary scientific research, departure from deep-rooted positions, and the political will to implement evidence-based management.

  10. A Novel Technique for the Management of Blandin-Nuhn Mucocele: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, Ramesh; Mohammed, Faraz; Thapasum Fairozekhan, Arishiya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucocele, a common benign cystic lesion of minor salivary gland and associated ducts develops following extravasation or retention of mucous material in the subepithelial tissue. Occurrence of mucocele of tongue is considered less frequent when compared to a higher incidence of mucocele in the lower lip of young patients. Different modalities of treatment, such as conventional surgical excision followed by newer techniques like cryosurgery, electrocautery have been proposed to completely remove the lesion and reduce the chances of recurrence. Herewith, we report a novel treatment technique using alginate impression material to aid in complete excision of mucocele of glands of Blandin-Nuhn. How to cite this article: Kumaresan R, Karthikeyan P, Mohammed F, Fairozekhan TA. A Novel Technique for the Management of Blandin-Nuhn Mucocele: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):201-204. PMID:25206223

  11. Remote sensing techniques for conservation and management of natural vegetation ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Verdesio, J. J.; Dossantos, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of using remote sensing techniques, in the visible and near-infrared ranges, for mapping, inventory, conservation and management of natural ecosystems is discussed. Some examples realized in Brazil or other countries are given to evaluate the products from orbital platform (MSS and RBV imagery of LANDSAT) and aerial level (photography) for ecosystems study. The maximum quantitative and qualitative information which can be obtained from each sensor, at different level, are discussed. Based on the developed experiments it is concluded that the remote sensing technique is a useful tool in mapping vegetation units, estimating biomass, forecasting and evaluation of fire damage, disease detection, deforestation mapping and change detection in land-use. In addition, remote sensing techniques can be used in controling implantation and planning natural/artificial regeneration.

  12. Interventional pain management for spinal disorders: a review of injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Wewalka, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Chronic spinal pain has a high prevalence and a severe economic, societal and health impact. In the last decades the practice and research of interventional techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of spinal pain has increased sharply. The level of evidence of the most common techniques is well documented. With image-guided precise diagnostic blocks it is possible to identify the source of chronic spinal pain in well over 60% of the cases. Nonsurgical specialties such as PM&R increasingly resort to the possibilities of interventional pain management for musculoskeletal disorders. For many forms of spinal pain there is at least fair evidence for long-term pain relief after a guided therapeutic injection often reducing the intake of analgesic medication or the need for surgery. This review focuses on the evidence, the application spectrum and special considerations of injection techniques for the treatment of spinal disorders.

  13. A pilot study of the impact of stress management techniques on the classroom behavior of elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Petosa, R; Oldfield, D

    1985-02-01

    Intervention studies have demonstrated the benefit of stress management techniques on health-related variables among school-age children. It was hypothesized that teaching elementary school children stress management skills would promote appropriate classroom study behavior by enhancing student ability to attend to teacher assigned tasks. This pilot study supports the contention that stress management skills can increase classroom "on-task" behavior.

  14. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  15. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  16. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  17. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-01-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups. PMID:22899087

  18. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-09-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups.

  19. Anesthetic considerations in Sheldon-Hall syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Thomas Anthony; Kasser, James R; Holzman, Robert S

    2014-05-01

    Arthrogryposis is characterized by multiple, nonprogressive joint contractures which may be caused by maternal disorders such as oligohydramnios as well as fetal akinesia resulting from primary disorders of muscle, connective tissue, or neurologic tissue. Its prevalence is about 1 : 3000. Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is a heterogenous group of genetic disorders with a characteristic flexion of the joints of the hands and feet divided into different types with additional features. Sheldon-Hall Syndrome (SHS), also known as distal arthrogryposis type 2A (DA2A), has some nonorthopedic features of specific importance to anesthetic care.

  20. Membrane interactivity of charged local anesthetic derivative and stereoselectivity in membrane interaction of local anesthetic enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki

    2008-01-01

    With respect to the membrane lipid theory as a molecular mechanism for local anesthetics, two critical subjects, the negligible effects of charged drugs when applied extracellularly and the stereoselective effects of enantiomers, were verified by paying particular attention to membrane components, phospholipids with the anionic property, and cholesterol with several chiral carbons. The membrane interactivities of structurally-different anesthetics were determined by their induced fluidity changes of liposomal membranes. Lidocaine (3.0 μmol/mL) fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes, but not its quaternary derivative QX-314 (3.0 μmol/mL). Similarly to the mother molecule lidocaine, however, QX-314 fluidized phosphatidylserine-containing nerve cell model membranes and acidic phospholipids-constituting membranes depending on the acidity of membrane lipids. Positively charged local anesthetics are able to act on lipid bilayers by ion-pairing with anionic (acidic) phospholipids. Bupivacaine (0.75 mol/mL) and ropivacaine (0.75 and 1.0 μmol/mL) fluidized nerve cell model membranes with the potency being S(−)-enantiomer < racemate < R(+)-enantiomer (P < 0.01, vs antipode and racemate) and cardiac cell model membranes with the potency being S(−)-ropivacaine < S(−)-bupivacaine < R(+)-bupivacaine (P < 0.01). However, their membrane effects were not different when removing cholesterol from the model membranes. Stereoselectivity is producible by cholesterol which increases the chirality of lipid bilayers and enables to discriminate anesthetic enantiomers. The membrane lipid interaction should be reevaluated as the mode of action of local anesthetics. PMID:22915858

  1. Membrane interactivity of charged local anesthetic derivative and stereoselectivity in membrane interaction of local anesthetic enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki

    2008-01-01

    With respect to the membrane lipid theory as a molecular mechanism for local anesthetics, two critical subjects, the negligible effects of charged drugs when applied extracellularly and the stereoselective effects of enantiomers, were verified by paying particular attention to membrane components, phospholipids with the anionic property, and cholesterol with several chiral carbons. The membrane interactivities of structurally-different anesthetics were determined by their induced fluidity changes of liposomal membranes. Lidocaine (3.0 μmol/mL) fluidized phosphatidylcholine membranes, but not its quaternary derivative QX-314 (3.0 μmol/mL). Similarly to the mother molecule lidocaine, however, QX-314 fluidized phosphatidylserine-containing nerve cell model membranes and acidic phospholipids-constituting membranes depending on the acidity of membrane lipids. Positively charged local anesthetics are able to act on lipid bilayers by ion-pairing with anionic (acidic) phospholipids. Bupivacaine (0.75 mol/mL) and ropivacaine (0.75 and 1.0 μmol/mL) fluidized nerve cell model membranes with the potency being S(-)-enantiomer < racemate < R(+)-enantiomer (P < 0.01, vs antipode and racemate) and cardiac cell model membranes with the potency being S(-)-ropivacaine < S(-)-bupivacaine < R(+)-bupivacaine (P < 0.01). However, their membrane effects were not different when removing cholesterol from the model membranes. Stereoselectivity is producible by cholesterol which increases the chirality of lipid bilayers and enables to discriminate anesthetic enantiomers. The membrane lipid interaction should be reevaluated as the mode of action of local anesthetics.

  2. Anesthetic considerations in a parturient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Z; Qasem, F; Katsiris, S

    2017-02-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by varying degrees of autonomic dysfunction and sensory loss, including nociceptive hyposensitivity. It is this autonomic dysfunction that makes both general and neuraxial anesthesia challenging. Testing the block during neuraxial anesthesia may be difficult and the patient may be prone to hypotension and bradycardia. This case report describes the anesthetic management of a parturient with congenital insensitivity to pain presenting for cesarean delivery.

  3. Comparative Analysis between Podography and Radiography in the Management of Idiopathic Clubfeet by Ponseti Technique

    PubMed Central

    Badhwar, Sumit; Dube, Abhay S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic clubfoot is one of the most common and oldest congenital foot anomalies. There are controversies regarding its optimum management protocol and methodologies to be employed for its functional outcome evaluation. This paper attempts to propose a simple, reasonable and easily reproducible technique of podography for clinical and functional evaluation of clubfoot treated by the popular Ponseti technique. Aim To compare the Foot Bimalleolar (FBM) angle method (podography) and radiography with respect to management of idiopathic clubfoot by Ponseti’s Technique and its functional evaluation. Materials and Methods Sixty feet of 48 patients with idiopathic clubfoot deformity were assessed in terms of FBM by podography (foot print on paper and FBM angle drawing) and radiologically; before starting treatment, after 6 weeks and at 6 monthly intervals with a maximum follow up period of 4.8 years (Range 1.2 to 4.8 years). Mean age at start of treatment was 1.5 years (2 months to 2.5 years). Functional evaluation was done by Magone’s scoring system. Results After treatment, 92 percent patients had good correction (FBM greater than 70 degrees) which correlated well with post treatment Magone’s score of greater than 80 (good to excellent) in nearly 85 percent of cases. Radiologically, talocalcaneal angles in both the views improved in only 60 percent of cases. Conclusion Radiological criteria show inconsistent correlation with functional outcome for feet treated by Ponseti’s Technique. Podography (FBM angle analysis) is a very simple, objective, cost effective, radiation free, easily reproducible and highly reliable clinical criterion for the assessment of deformity correction in club foot by Ponseti’s Technique with an excellent correlation with functional outcome.

  4. Balloon-Occlusion Technique for Managing Portal Vein Hemorrhage in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Seal, John B.; Bohorquez, Humberto; Battula, Naren; DeGregorio, Lucia; Bugeaud, Emily; Bruce, David S.; Carmody, Ian C.; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is relatively common among candidates for liver transplantation and can present significant intraoperative challenges. Depending on the extent of PVT, thromboendovenectomy (TEV), portal bypass, or systemic inflow may be required to restore portal inflow. While TEV is the most commonly used approach to restore anatomic portal inflow, portal vein injury and life-threatening hemorrhage are risks with this technique. Case Report: We present a salvage technique for managing portal vein injury during TEV using intraluminal balloon occlusion of the portal vein during portal vein repair and reconstruction. This alternative mode of bleeding control optimizes exposure to the retropancreatic space and avoids direct application of vascular clamps that can cause further injury to the vessel and surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Careful preoperative planning and anticipation of potential problems are essential for safe and effective management of complex PVT intraoperatively. The balloon-occlusion technique can facilitate safe and efficient repair of a portal vein injury during TEV for liver transplantation. PMID:28331452

  5. The state of the art in clinical knowledge management: An inventory of tools and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.; Wright, Adam; Simonaitis, Linas; Carpenter, James D.; Allen, George O.; Doebbeling, Bradley N.; Sirajuddin, Anwar Mohammad; Ash, Joan S.; Middleton, Blackford

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To explore the need for, and use of, high-quality, collaborative, clinical knowledge management (CKM) tools and techniques to manage clinical decision support content. Methods In order to better understand the current state of the art in CKM, we developed a survey of potential CKM tools and techniques. We conducted an exploratory study by querying a convenience sample of respondents about their use of specific practices in CKM. Results The following tools and techniques should be priorities in organizations interested in developing successful computer-based provider order entry (CPOE) and clinical decision support (CDS) implementations: 1) A multidisciplinary team responsible for creating and maintaining the clinical content; 2) An external organizational repository of clinical content with web-based viewer that allows anyone in the organization to review it; 3) An online, collaborative, interactive, internet-based tool to facilitate content development; 4) An enterprise-wide tool to maintain the controlled clinical terminology concepts. Even organizations that have been successfully using Computer-based Provider Order Entry with advanced Clinical Decision Support features for well over 15 years are not using all of the CKM tools or practices that we identified. Conclusions If we are to further stimulate progress in the area of clinical decision support, we must continue to develop and refine our understanding and use of advanced CKM capabilities. PMID:19828364

  6. Comparison based on environmental effects of nitrogen management techniques in a manure digestate case study.

    PubMed

    Paccanelli, Nicola; Teli, Aronne; Scaglione, Davide; Insabato, Gabriele; Casula, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Due to climate issues and favourable energy market, biogas is spreading as a manure management technique. Digestate is rich in nutrient and has to be handled in order to respect the 'nitrate directive' that limits nitrogen field application in areas defined as vulnerable. In this study, we compared different nitrogen management scenarios: a non-treatment option, a biological short-cut nitrification, a complete autotrophic process (anammox) and ammonia stripping from membrane filtration concentrate. The environmental effect comparison was obtained with 'Cross media effects analysis' and life cycle assessment (LCA). The results were different in some aspects, especially the impacts on eutrophication. According to cross media, the best process is DENO 2, while LCA shows similar impacts for all techniques and the best solution would be the no-treatment option. The main reason to adopt a digestate treatment technique is the lack of area for a correct disposal. If LCA eutrophication results are multiplied with the hectares necessary for each technology, a result similar to that of cross media is obtained.

  7. Management of Congenital Talipes Equino Varus (CTEV) by Ponseti Casting Technique in Neonates: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Saif Ullah, Md; Shahjahan, Md; Abu Sayed, Sk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of Ponseti technique in the management of congenital Talipes Equino Varus (CTEV) in neonatal age group. Methods: It is a prospective observational study, conducted during the period of July 2010 to December 2011 at the Department of Pediatric Surgery in a tertiary hospital. All the neonates with CTEV were treated with Ponseti casting technique. Neonates with other congenital deformities, arthrogryposis and myelomeningocele were excluded. Results: Total 58 CTEV feet of 38 neonates were treated. Twenty six were males and 12 were females. Thirty seven (63.8%) feet were of rigid variety and 21(36.2 %) feet were of non-rigid variety. Twenty patients had bilateral and 18 had unilateral involvement. Mean pre-treatment Pirani score of study group was 5.57. Mean number of plaster casts required per CTEV was 3.75 (range: 2-6). Thirty five rigid and 15 non-rigid (total 86.2%) feet required percutaneous tenotomy. Out of 58 feet 56 (96.6%) were managed successfully. Three (5.2%) patients developed complications like skin excoriation and blister formation. Mean post-treatment Pirani score of the study group was: 0.36 ± 0.43. Conclusion: The Ponseti technique is an excellent, simple, effective, minimally invasive, and inexpensive procedure for the treatment CTEV deformity. Ideally it can be performed as a day case procedure without general anesthesia even in neonatal period. PMID:26023437

  8. Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J.

    1980-04-01

    In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques.

  9. Stress Management Apps With Regard to Emotion-Focused Coping and Behavior Change Techniques: A Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Alexandra; Bleser, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic stress has been shown to be associated with disease. This link is not only direct but also indirect through harmful health behavior such as smoking or changing eating habits. The recent mHealth trend offers a new and promising approach to support the adoption and maintenance of appropriate stress management techniques. However, only few studies have dealt with the inclusion of evidence-based content within stress management apps for mobile phones. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate stress management apps on the basis of a new taxonomy of effective emotion-focused stress management techniques and an established taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Methods Two trained and independent raters evaluated 62 free apps found in Google Play with regard to 26 behavior change and 15 emotion-focused stress management techniques in October 2015. Results The apps included an average of 4.3 behavior change techniques (SD 4.2) and 2.8 emotion-focused stress management techniques (SD 2.6). The behavior change technique score and stress management technique score were highly correlated (r=.82, P=.01). Conclusions The broad variation of different stress management strategies found in this sample of apps goes in line with those found in conventional stress management interventions and self-help literature. Moreover, this study provided a first step toward more detailed and standardized taxonomies, which can be used to investigate evidence-based content in stress management interventions and enable greater comparability between different intervention types. PMID:28232299

  10. Anesthesia in a child with Kinsbourne syndrome: Does anesthesia technique matters?

    PubMed Central

    Nisa, N; Talawar, P; Vasudevan, B

    2016-01-01

    Kinsbourne syndrome is a rare neurological paraneoplastic syndrome associated with neuroblastic tumors. There are very few literatures on its anesthetic management and interaction with anesthetic agents. The epileptogenic potential of certain anesthetic agents such as ketamine, etomidate, and meperidine might trigger opsoclonus and myoclonus and have an impact on the long-term neurological outcome. The objective of this case report is to discuss the safety of anesthetic agents and their relationship in a patient with Kinsbourne syndrome. We discuss our experience in the anesthetic management of a child with Kinsbourne syndrome with ganglioneuroblastoma in the thoracic paravertebral space. PMID:27833499

  11. Anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) injection.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shelly; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, blinded study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of the anterior middle superior alveolar (AMSA) injection using the computer-assisted Wand Plus injection system versus a conventional syringe. The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered in a blind manner 2 AMSA injections utilizing the computer-assisted injection system and a conventional syringe to 40 subjects during 2 separate appointments. A pulp tester was used to test for anesthesia, in 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes, of the central and lateral incisors, canine, and first and second premolars. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive no responses (80 readings) with the pulp tester were obtained. For all teeth, except the central incisor, the use of the computer-assisted injection system was significantly (P < .05) more likely to result in pulpal anesthesia than the use of the conventional syringe technique. For the computer-assisted injection system, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 35 to 58%, and for the conventional syringe, successful pulpal anesthesia ranged from 20 to 42%. For both techniques, the onset of pulpal anesthesia was slow, and duration of pulpal anesthesia declined steadily over 60 minutes. We conclude that although the AMSA injection using the computer-assisted injection system was more successful than the conventional syringe technique, the rather modest to low success rates, slow onset, and declining duration of pulpal anesthesia over 60 minutes would not ensure predictable pulpal anesthesia from the second premolar to the central incisor. PMID:15497297

  12. Anesthesia methods used by anesthetic specialists for circumcision cases

    PubMed Central

    Altaş, Cafer; Küçükosman, Gamze; Yurtlu, Bülent S.; Okyay, Rahşan D.; Aydın, Bengü G.; Pişkin, Özcan; Çimencan, Murat; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Hancı, Volkan; Özkoçak-Turan, Işıl

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the anesthesiologist’s choice for anesthesia techniques and drugs in circumcision and determine the preoperative examination, intraoperative monitoring techniques, postoperative analgesia methods, and common complications among anesthesiologists working in Turkey. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Zonguldak, Turkey, between May and July 2012. Survey data were obtained via survey forms through electronic data over the web. The questionnaire consists of 20 questions. These questions included demographic data, methods of anesthesia for circumcision, postoperative analgesia methods, and monitoring methods. Results: The data were obtained from 206 anesthesiologists who agreed to participate in the survey. Circumcision was performed most frequently in the age group of 3-6 years old. It was found that 47% of routine preoperative laboratory tests were coagulation parameters and complete blood count tests. The most common method of anesthesia was laryngeal mask. The frequency of administration of regional anesthesia was 37.4%, and caudal block was more preferable. Bupivacaine as a local anesthetic in regional anesthesia and midazolam and ketamine were the most preferred agents in sedoanalgesia. During regional anesthesia, ultrasound was most often used by anesthesiologists (31.6%). Conclusion: Ambulatory anesthesia protocols, which are also needed in circumcision, can be improved with international recommendation, and these protocols could be conformed as sociocultural structure in societies. This study should be regarded as a preliminary study to attract attention on anesthesia techniques in circumcision. PMID:28042634

  13. A review of the surgical management of breast cancer: plastic reconstructive techniques and timing implications.

    PubMed

    Rosson, Gedge D; Magarakis, Michael; Shridharani, Sachin M; Stapleton, Sahael M; Jacobs, Lisa K; Manahan, Michele A; Flores, Jaime I

    2010-07-01

    The oncologic management of breast cancer has evolved over the past several decades from radical mastectomy to modern-day preservation of chest and breast structures. The increased rate of mastectomies over recent years made breast reconstruction an integral part of the breast cancer management. Plastic surgery now offers patients a wide variety of reconstruction options from primary closure of the skin flaps to performance of microvascular and autologous tissue transplantation. Well-coordinated partnerships between surgical oncologists, plastic surgeons, and patients address concerns of tumor control, cosmesis, and patients' wishes. The gamut of breast reconstruction options is reviewed, particularly noting state-of-the-art techniques, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various timing modalities.

  14. Power Management Based Current Control Technique for Photovoltaic-Battery Assisted Wind-Hydro Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhakar, J.; Ragavan, K.

    2013-07-01

    This article proposes new power management based current control strategy for integrated wind-solar-hydro system equipped with battery storage mechanism. In this control technique, an indirect estimation of load current is done, through energy balance model, DC-link voltage control and droop control. This system features simpler energy management strategy and necessitates few power electronic converters, thereby minimizing the cost of the system. The generation-demand (G-D) management diagram is formulated based on the stochastic weather conditions and demand, which would likely moderate the gap between both. The features of management strategy deploying energy balance model include (1) regulating DC-link voltage within specified tolerances, (2) isolated operation without relying on external electric power transmission network, (3) indirect current control of hydro turbine driven induction generator and (4) seamless transition between grid-connected and off-grid operation modes. Furthermore, structuring of the hybrid system with appropriate selection of control variables enables power sharing among each energy conversion systems and battery storage mechanism. By addressing these intricacies, it is viable to regulate the frequency and voltage of the remote network at load end. The performance of the proposed composite scheme is demonstrated through time-domain simulation in MATLAB/Simulink environment.

  15. Scientific or rule-of-thumb techniques of ground-water management--Which will prevail?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuinness, Charles Lee

    1969-01-01

    Emphasis in ground-water development, once directed largely to quantitatively minor (but sociologically vital) service of human and stock needs, is shifting: aquifers are treated as possible regulating reservoirs managed conjunctively with surface water. Too, emphasis on reducing stream pollution is stimulating interest in aquifers as possible waste-storage media. Such management of aquifers requires vast amounts of data plus a much better understanding of aquifer-system behavior than now exists. Implicit in this deficiency of knowledge is a need for much new research, lest aquifers be managed according to ineffective rule-of-thumb standards, or even abandoned as unmanageable. The geohydrologist's task is to define both internal and boundary characteristics of aquifer systems. Stratigraphy is a primary determinant of these characteristics, but stratigraphically minor features may make aquifers transcend stratigraphic boundaries. For example, a structurally insignificant fracture may carry more water than a major fault; a minor stratigraphic discontinuity may be a major hydrologic boundary. Hence, there is a need for ways of defining aquifer boundaries and quantifying aquifer and confining-bed characteristics that are very different from ordinary stratigraphic techniques. Among critical needs are techniques for measuring crossbed permeability; for extrapolating and interpolating point data on direction and magnitude of permeability in defining aquifer geometry; and for accurately measuring geochemical properties of water and aquifer material, and interpreting those measurements in terms of source of water, rate of movement, and waste-sorbing capacities of aquifers and of confining beds--in general, techniques adequate for predicting aquifer response to imposed forces whether static, hydraulic, thermal, or chemical. Only when such predictions can be made routinely can aquifer characteristics be inserted into a master model that incorporates both the hydrologic and

  16. Ureteroscopy for management of stone disease: an up to date on surgical technique and disposable devices.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Fabio C; Marchini, Giovanni S; Pedro, Renato N; Monga, Manoj

    2016-12-01

    The surgical management of urinary stone disease developed substantially over the past decades and advanced minimally invasive techniques have been successfully introduced into clinical practice. Retrograde ureteroscopy and ureterorrenoscopy have become the first-line option for treatment of ureteral and renal stones worldwide with high success rates allied with a low morbidity profile. In this review, we will discuss some key points in ureteroscopy for stone disease, such as the access to upper urinary tract, including balloon and catheter dilation; how to choose and use some disposable devices (hydrophilic versus PTFE guide wires, ureteral catheters, and laser fiber setting); and lastly present and compare different techniques for kidney or ureteral stone treatment (dusting versus basketing).

  17. Interventional Radiology in the Management of Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysms: A Review of Techniques and Embolic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Hosur Ananthashayana; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Garg, Pramod; Srivastava, Deep Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Visceral artery pseudoaneurysms occur mostly as a result of inflammation and trauma. Owing to high risk of rupture, they require early treatment to prevent lethal complications. Knowledge of the various approaches of embolization of pseudoaneurysms and different embolic materials used in the management of visceral artery pseudoaneurysms is essential for successful and safe embolization. We review and illustrate the endovascular, percutaneous and endoscopic ultrasound techniques used in the treatment of visceral artery pseudoaneurysm and briefly discuss the embolic materials and their benefits and risks. PMID:27134524

  18. Incorporating Piaget's theories into behavior management techniques for the child dental patient.

    PubMed

    Delitala, G

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews psychologist Jean Piaget's contributions to knowledge of cognitive development in children, relating it to behavior management techniques. Piaget theorized that children's knowledge about reality is realized by touching and observing; he termed this constructivism. He recognized that there are stages of development in knowledge acquisition. Practitioners should try to stimulate these needs to develop a positive dental experience. Another Piaget model is egocentrism, wherein a child views the world subjectively. The dentist should let the child patient know what's going on and have an active part in treatment.

  19. The Application of Biomedical Engineering Techniques to the Diagnosis and Management of Tropical Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Faisal, Tarig; Neuman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews a number of biomedical engineering approaches to help aid in the detection and treatment of tropical diseases such as dengue, malaria, cholera, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, ebola, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and American trypanosomiasis (Chagas). Many different forms of non-invasive approaches such as ultrasound, echocardiography and electrocardiography, bioelectrical impedance, optical detection, simplified and rapid serological tests such as lab-on-chip and micro-/nano-fluidic platforms and medical support systems such as artificial intelligence clinical support systems are discussed. The paper also reviewed the novel clinical diagnosis and management systems using artificial intelligence and bioelectrical impedance techniques for dengue clinical applications. PMID:25806872

  20. Chiropractic management of shoulder pain and dysfunction of myofascial origin using ischemic compression techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hains, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder pain and dysfunction is a chief complaint commonly presenting to a chiropractor's office. The purpose of this article is to review the most common etiologies of shoulder pain, focusing on those conditions of a myofascial origin. In addition to a review of the literature, the author draws upon his own clinical experience to describe a method to diagnose and manage, patients with shoulder pain of myofascial origin using ischemic compression techniques. This hands-on therapeutic approach conveys several benefits including: positive therapeutic outcomes; a favorable safety profile and; it is minimally strenuous on the doctor and well tolerated by the patient. ImagesFigure 7

  1. The application of biomedical engineering techniques to the diagnosis and management of tropical diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fatimah; Thio, Tzer Hwai Gilbert; Faisal, Tarig; Neuman, Michael

    2015-03-23

    This paper reviews a number of biomedical engineering approaches to help aid in the detection and treatment of tropical diseases such as dengue, malaria, cholera, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, ebola, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and American trypanosomiasis (Chagas). Many different forms of non-invasive approaches such as ultrasound, echocardiography and electrocardiography, bioelectrical impedance, optical detection, simplified and rapid serological tests such as lab-on-chip and micro-/nano-fluidic platforms and medical support systems such as artificial intelligence clinical support systems are discussed. The paper also reviewed the novel clinical diagnosis and management systems using artificial intelligence and bioelectrical impedance techniques for dengue clinical applications.

  2. The management of femoral bone stock in THA revision: indications and techniques.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Luca; Galante, Claudio; Zagra, Luigi

    2014-10-02

    Following the increasing number of total hip arthroplasties, the amount of hip revision procedures continue to rise. Careful patient selection and bone loss evaluation is crucial for a correct management of femoral revision procedures. The key point in femoral revision is to obtain a reliable primary stability of the stem, with the least invasive implant as possible, to preserve and if possible to restore the bone stock. In this article we present the indications and the techniques for the femoral revisions most commonly used in Europe, referring to the evidence in the literature and our personal experiences.

  3. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANORECTAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active Ingredients § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  4. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  5. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  6. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  7. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  8. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  9. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  10. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  11. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  12. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  13. Effect of Local and General Anesthetics on Interfacial Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Water undergoes structural change as it interfaces with hydrophilic surfaces, including the many hydrophilic surfaces within the cell. This interfacial water has become known as “Exclusion Zone (EZ) water” or “fourth-phase water” [1]. Methods We tested the hypothesis that anesthetics diminish the amount of EZ water, and that this change may correlate with functional changes in anesthesia. By using the local anesthetics Lidocaine and Bupivacaine as well as a general inhalational anesthetic, Isoflurane, we tracked the EZ size as these anesthetics were introduced. Results All three anesthetics diminished EZ size in a concentration-dependent manner at concentrations of 0.18 mM and greater for Bupivacaine, 0.85 mM and greater for Lidocaine, and 0.2% for Isoflurane. At extremely low (micromolar) concentrations, however, all three anesthetics increased EZ size. Conclusions The sharp increase of EZ size associated with micromolar anesthetic concentrations follows a similar pattern to induction of general anesthesia, from the excitation stage (Stage II) to the depression and overdose stages of surgical anesthesia (Stages III and IV). The results are consistent with the hypothesis that anesthetics may act on water, a fundamental organizational component common to all cells. PMID:27054588

  14. The sterile-male-release technique in Great Lakes sea lamprey management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twohey, Michael B.; Heinrich, John W.; Seelye, James G.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Kaye, Cheryl A.; Scholefield, Ron J.; McDonald, Rodney B.; Christie, Gavin C.

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of a sterile-male-release technique from 1991 through 1999 and evaluation of its effectiveness in the Great Lakes sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) management program is reviewed. Male sea lampreys were injected with the chemosterilant bisazir (P,P-bis(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic amide) using a robotic device. Quality assurance testing indicated the device delivered a consistent and effective dose of bisazir. Viability of embryos in an untreated control group was 64% compared to 1% in a treatment group. A task force developed nine hypotheses to guide implementation and evaluation of the technique. An annual average of 26,000 male sea lampreys was harvested from as many as 17 Great Lakes tributaries for use in the technique. An annual average of 16,100 sterilized males was released into 33 tributaries of Lake Superior to achieve a theoretical 59% reduction in larval production during 1991 to 1996. The average number of sterile males released in the St. Marys River increased from 4,000 during 1991 to 1996 to 20,100 during 1997 to 1999. The theoretical reduc-stertion in reproduction when combined with trapping was 57% during 1991 to 1996 and 86% during 1997 to 1999. Evaluation studies demonstrated that sterilized males were competitive and reduced production of larvae in streams. Field studies and simulation models suggest reductions in reproduction will result in fewer recruits, but there is risk of periodic high recruitment events independent of sterile-male release. Strategies to reduce reproduction will be most reliable when low densities of reproducing females are achieved. Expansion of the technique is limited by access to additional males for sterilization. Sterile-male release and other alternative controls are important in delivering integrated pest management and in reducing reliance on pesticides.

  15. A refined electrofishing technique for collecting Silver Carp: Implications for management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouska, Wesley W.; Glover, David C.; Bouska, Kristen; Garvey, James E.

    2017-01-01

    Detecting nuisance species at low abundance or in newly established areas is critical to developing pest management strategies. Due to their sensitivity to disturbance and erratic jumping behavior, Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix can be difficult to collect with traditional sampling methods. We compared catch per unit effort (CPUE) of all species from a Long Term Resource Monitoring (LTRM) electrofishing protocol to an experimental electrofishing technique designed to minimize Silver Carp evasion through tactical boat maneuvering and selective application of power. Differences in CPUE between electrofishing methods were detected for 2 of 41 species collected across 2 years of sampling at 20 sites along the Illinois River. The mean catch rate of Silver Carp using the experimental technique was 2.2 times the mean catch rate of the LTRM electrofishing technique; the increased capture efficiency at low relative abundance emphasizes the utility of this method for early detection. The experimental electrofishing also collected slightly larger Silver Carp (mean: 510.7 mm TL versus 495.2 mm TL), and nearly four times as many Silver Carp independently jumped into the boat during experimental transects. Novel sampling approaches, such as the experimental electrofishing technique used in this study, should be considered to increase probability of detection for aquatic nuisance species.

  16. PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY COMPARING TWO ANESTHETIC METHODS FOR SHOULDER SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Prata Nascimento, Luis Gustavo; Bueno, Rogerio Serpone; Oliveira Almeida, Luiz Henrique; Strose, Eric; de Mello, Sérgio Cabral; Saletti, Deise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of suprascapular nerve block in combination with infusion of anesthetic into the subacromial space, compared with interscalene block. Methods: Forty-five patients with small or medium-sized isolated supraspinatus tendon lesions who underwent arthroscopic repair were prospectively and comparatively evaluated through random assignation to three groups of 15, each with a different combination of anesthetic methods. The efficacy of postoperative analgesia was measured using the visual analogue scale for pain and the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and opioid drug consumption. Inhalation anesthetic consumption during surgery was also compared between the groups. Results: The statistical analysis did not find any statistically significant differences among the groups regarding anesthetic consumption during surgery or postoperative analgesic efficacy during the first 48 hours. Conclusion: Suprascapular nerve block with infusion of anesthetic into the subacromial space is an excellent alternative to interscalene block, particularly in hospitals in which an electrical nerve stimulating device is unavailable. PMID:27022569

  17. Anesthetic Considerations for Common Procedures in Geriatric Patients: Hip Fracture, Emergency General Surgery, and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    PubMed

    Lester, Laeben

    2015-09-01

    The elderly population is growing. Geriatric patients undergo a large proportion of surgical procedures and have increased complications, morbidity, and mortality, which may be associated with increased intensive care unit time, length of stay, hospital readmission, and cost. Identification of optimal anesthetic care for these patients, leading to decreased complications and contributing to best possible outcomes, will have great value. This article reviews the anesthetic considerations for intraoperative care of geriatric patients and focus on 3 procedures (hip fractures, emergency abdominal surgery, and transcatheter aortic valve replacement). An approach to evaluation and management of the elderly surgical patient is described.

  18. Effective behaviour change techniques in the prevention and management of childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Chater, A; Lorencatto, F

    2013-10-01

    Rates of childhood obesity are increasing, and it is essential to identify the active components of interventions aiming to prevent and manage obesity in children. A systematic review of behaviour change interventions was conducted to find evidence of behaviour change techniques (BCTs) that are most effective in changing physical activity and/or eating behaviour for the prevention or management of childhood obesity. An electronic search was conducted for randomised controlled trials published between January 1990 and December 2009. Of 4309 titles and abstracts screened, full texts of 135 articles were assessed, of which 17 published articles were included in this review. Intervention descriptions were coded according to the behaviour-specific CALO-RE taxonomy of BCTs. BCTs were identified and compared across obesity management (n=9) vs prevention (n=8) trials. To assess the effectiveness of individual BCTs, trials were further divided into those that were effective (defined as either a group reduction of at least 0.13 body mass index (BMI) units or a significant difference in BMI between intervention and control groups at follow-up) vs non-effective (reported no significant differences between groups). We reliably identified BCTs utilised in effective and non-effective prevention and management trials. To illustrate the relative effectiveness of each BCT, effectiveness ratios were calculated as the ratio of the number of times each BCT was a component of an intervention in an effective trial divided by the number of times they were a component of all trials. Results indicated six BCTs that may be effective components of future management interventions (provide information on the consequences of behaviour to the individual, environmental restructuring, prompt practice, prompt identification as role model/position advocate, stress management/emotional control training and general communication skills training), and one that may be effective in prevention

  19. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Veerappa, Muralimanohar; Jawali, Vivek; Pandya, Nischal; Krishnamoorthy, Jayaprakash; Muniraju, Geetha; George, Antony; Baishya, Jitumoni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. Aim: This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. Results: We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females) coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day ‘0’ was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to ‘lift’ up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access) for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any anesthesiologist wishing

  20. Reliability and Efficacy of Water Use Estimation Techniques and their Impact on Water Management and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Deeds, N.; Kelley, V.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating how much water is being used by various water users is key to effective management and optimal utilization of groundwater resources. This is especially true for aquifers like the Ogallala that are severely stressed and display depleting trends over the last many years. The High Plains Underground Water Conservation District (HPWD) is the largest and oldest of the Texas water conservation districts, and oversees approximately 1.7 million irrigated acres. Water users within the 16 counties that comprise the HPWD draw from the Ogallala extensively. The HPWD has recently proposed flow-meters as well as various 'alternative methods' for water users to report water usage. Alternative methods include using a) site specific energy conversion factors to convert total amount of energy used (for pumping stations) to water pumped, b) reporting nozzle package (on center pivot irrigation systems) specifications and hours of usage, and c) reporting concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). The focus of this project was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness for each of these water use estimation techniques for regulatory purposes. Reliability and effectiveness of direct flow-metering devices was also addressed. Findings indicate that due to site-specific variability and hydrogeologic heterogeneity, alternative methods for estimating water use can have significant uncertainties associated with water use estimates. The impact of these uncertainties on overall water usage, conservation, and management was also evaluated. The findings were communicated to the Stakeholder Advisory Group and the Water Conservation District with guidelines and recommendations on how best to implement the various techniques.

  1. Etomidate: a new intravenous anesthetic induction agent.

    PubMed

    Giese, J L; Stanley, T H

    1983-01-01

    Currently available anesthetic induction agents provide adequate hypnosis but are not ideal, particularly in the high risk patient (ASA class III-V), because most cause myocardial and/or respiratory depression and some have other important side effects. Etomidate was recently marketed as an intravenous anesthetic induction agent. It is a non-barbiturate hypnotic without analgesic properties that has less cardiovascular and respiratory depressant actions than sodium thiopental, even in patients with minimal cardiovascular reserve. Laboratory studies indicate that etomidate is approximately 25 times more potent and has a therapeutic index six times greater than sodium thiopental. In contrast to most other induction agents, etomidate does not cause histamine release. Furthermore, tolerance does not occur with repeated administration. Etomidate's rapid distribution half life (t 1/2 alpha = 2.81 +/- 1.64 min), short elimination half life 1/2 beta = 3.88 +/- 1.11 hr) and rapid clearance (954 +/- 178 ml/min) explain its rapid onset and short duration of action. The compound produces electroencephalographic changes and effects on cerebral blood flow, metabolism and intracranial pressure that are similar to sodium thiopental, suggesting that it may have a place in neurosurgery and as a "brain protective" agent in patients at risk of a brain hypoxic insult. Etomidate did not affect hepatorenal and hematologic function after repeated injections in animal toxicology studies, but few investigations addressing its effects on hepatic, renal, and neuromuscular function in man have been accomplished. The most noticeable side effects of etomidate include myoclonia, pain on injection and postoperative nausea and vomiting.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A clinical comparison of pain perception and extent of area anesthetized by Wand® and a traditional syringe

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Meet; Shivaswamy, Sumanth; Jain, Sanjay; Tambwekar, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the contemporary dental practice, alleviation of pain is the most important factor to ameliorate patient's condition and to gain one's confidence towards the skills of the operator. Such confidence aids to the ultimate success of the treatment procedures. Aims and Objectives: This study compares the pain response of a group of 10 subjects to the Wand® with the response to traditional syringe injections and also compares the extent of the area anesthetized. Materials and Methods: 10 subjects were selected for the study and 20 injections were given contralaterally to them, 10 with Wand®, and rest with the traditional aspirating syringe. Each subject received 2 injections on the palate, Left side with Wand® (test) and Right side with Traditional syringe (control). All injections were given by the same investigator without the use of topical anesthetic spray/gel. Pain perception levels were recorded with a visual analogue scale. Also the extent of area anesthetized with a single palatal injection was assessed by probing. Results: The results showed injections with the syringe were more painful than injections with the Wand® in 2 of 10 subjects. Also the extent of the area anesthetized by both the techniques was similar except in 2 patients. Conclusion: The Wand® results in less painful injections; however, mean ratings of pain for both the groups, were mostly below the annoying level of pain. Also, the areas covered by the anesthetic effect of both the injections were comparatively similar. PMID:23055586

  3. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  4. Software Health Management: A Short Review of Challenges and Existing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pipatsrisawat, Knot; Darwiche, Adnan; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Schumann, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Modern spacecraft (as well as most other complex mechanisms like aircraft, automobiles, and chemical plants) rely more and more on software, to a point where software failures have caused severe accidents and loss of missions. Software failures during a manned mission can cause loss of life, so there are severe requirements to make the software as safe and reliable as possible. Typically, verification and validation (V&V) has the task of making sure that all software errors are found before the software is deployed and that it always conforms to the requirements. Experience, however, shows that this gold standard of error-free software cannot be reached in practice. Even if the software alone is free of glitches, its interoperation with the hardware (e.g., with sensors or actuators) can cause problems. Unexpected operational conditions or changes in the environment may ultimately cause a software system to fail. Is there a way to surmount this problem? In most modern aircraft and many automobiles, hardware such as central electrical, mechanical, and hydraulic components are monitored by IVHM (Integrated Vehicle Health Management) systems. These systems can recognize, isolate, and identify faults and failures, both those that already occurred as well as imminent ones. With the help of diagnostics and prognostics, appropriate mitigation strategies can be selected (replacement or repair, switch to redundant systems, etc.). In this short paper, we discuss some challenges and promising techniques for software health management (SWHM). In particular, we identify unique challenges for preventing software failure in systems which involve both software and hardware components. We then present our classifications of techniques related to SWHM. These classifications are performed based on dimensions of interest to both developers and users of the techniques, and hopefully provide a map for dealing with software faults and failures.

  5. [Anesthetic and physiologic implications of neurophysiologic monitoring with evoked potentials during spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Valverde Junguito, J L; Aldana Díaz, E M; Pérez Lorensu, P J; González Miranda, F

    2007-04-01

    Neurophysiologic monitoring with somatosensory and motor evoked potentials in spinal surgery is now widely applied in order to reduce the risk of neural injury and facilitate intraoperative decision making. Most anesthetics affect such monitoring by altering both somatosensory and motor evoked responses and these effects may place constraints on the choice of anesthetic. Intraoperative management includes maintaining stable physiologic conditions, which involves adjusting hemodynamic parameters, maintaining normal blood flow to promote proper oxygen exchange, ensuring proper ventilation, and avoiding variations in temperature. Close collaboration between the anesthetist, the surgeon, and the neurophysiologist will ensure the success of intraoperative monitoring and make it possible to avoid neural injury by making timely changes in the surgical approach.

  6. Modeling anesthetic developmental neurotoxicity using human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiaowen; Twaroski, Danielle; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting pre-clinical evidence in rodents and non-human primates has demonstrated that prolonged exposure of developing animals to general anesthetics can induce widespread neuronal cell death followed by long-term memory and learning disabilities. In vitro experimental evidence from cultured neonatal animal neurons confirmed the in vivo findings. However, there is no direct clinical evidence of the detrimental effects of anesthetics in human fetuses, infants, or children. Development of an in vitro neurogenesis system using human stem cells has opened up avenues of research for advancing our understanding of human brain development and the issues relevant to anesthetic-induced developmental toxicity in human neuronal lineages. Recent studies from our group, as well as other groups, showed that isoflurane influences human neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis, while ketamine induces neuroapoptosis. Application of this high throughput in vitro stem cell neurogenesis approach is a major stride toward assuring the safety of anesthetic agents in young children. This in vitro human model allows us to (1) screen the toxic effects of various anesthetics under controlled conditions during intense neuronal growth, (2) find the trigger for the anesthetic-induced catastrophic chain of toxic events, and (3) develop prevention strategies to avoid this toxic effect. In this paper, we reviewed the current findings in anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity studies, specifically focusing on the in vitro human stem cell model. PMID:23859832

  7. Pain fiber anesthetic reduces brainstem Fos after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Badral, B; Davies, A J; Kim, Y H; Ahn, J S; Hong, S D; Chung, G; Kim, J S; Oh, S B

    2013-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that pain-sensing neurons in the trigeminal system can be selectively anesthetized by co-application of QX-314 with the TRPV1 receptor agonist, capsaicin (QX cocktail). Here we examined whether this new anesthetic strategy can block the neuronal changes in the brainstem following molar tooth extraction in the rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received infiltration injection of anesthetic 10 min prior to lower molar tooth extraction. Neuronal activation was determined by immunohistochemistry for the proto-oncogene protein c-Fos in transverse sections of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). After tooth extraction, c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) detected in the dorsomedial region of bilateral Sp5C was highest at 2 hrs (p < .01 vs. naïve ipsilateral) and declined to pre-injury levels by 8 hrs. Pre-administration of the QX cocktail significantly reduced to sham levels Fos-LI examined 2 hrs after tooth extraction; reduced Fos-LI was also observed with the conventional local anesthetic lidocaine. Pulpal anesthesia by infiltration injection was confirmed by inhibition of the jaw-opening reflex in response to electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Our results suggest that the QX cocktail anesthetic is effective in reducing neuronal activation following tooth extraction. Thus, a selective pain fiber 'nociceptive anesthetic' strategy may provide an effective local anesthetic option for dental patients in the clinic.

  8. Review: effects of anesthetics on brain circuit formation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Meredith; Ryu, Yun Kyoung; Smith, Sarah C; Patel, Piyush; Mintz, Cyrus D

    2014-10-01

    The results of several retrospective clinical studies suggest that exposure to anesthetic agents early in life is correlated with subsequent learning and behavioral disorders. Although ongoing prospective clinical trials may help to clarify this association, they remain confounded by numerous factors. Thus, some of the most compelling data supporting the hypothesis that a relatively short anesthetic exposure can lead to a long-lasting change in brain function are derived from animal models. The mechanism by which such changes could occur remains incompletely understood. Early studies identified anesthetic-induced neuronal apoptosis as a possible mechanism of injury, and more recent work suggests that anesthetics may interfere with several critical processes in brain development. The function of the mature brain requires the presence of circuits, established during development, which perform the computations underlying learning and cognition. In this review, we examine the mechanisms by which anesthetics could disrupt brain circuit formation, including effects on neuronal survival and neurogenesis, neurite growth and guidance, formation of synapses, and function of supporting cells. There is evidence that anesthetics can disrupt aspects of all of these processes, and further research is required to elucidate which are most relevant to pediatric anesthetic neurotoxicity.

  9. Considerations for the Use of Anesthetics in Neurotoxicity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Karmarkar, Sumedha W; Bottum, Kathleen M; Tischkau, Shelley A

    2010-01-01

    Anesthetics are widely used in experiments investigating neurotoxicity and neuroprotection; however, these agents are known to interfere with the outcome of these experiments. The purpose of this overview is to review these effects and suggest methods for minimizing unintended consequences on experimental outcomes. Information on the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of isoflurane, dexmedetomidine, propofol, ketamine, barbiturates, halothane, xenon, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide is summarized. The pertinent cell signaling pathways of these agents are discussed. Methods of humane animal euthanasia without anesthetics are considered. Most anesthetics alter the processes of neuronal survival and death. When designing survival surgeries, sham controls subjected to anesthesia but not the surgical intervention should be compared with controls subjected to neither anesthesia nor surgery. Additional controls could include using an anesthetic with a different mechanism of action from the primary anesthetic used. Because the effects of anesthetics lessen with time after surgery, survival surgeries should include later time points until at least 7 d after the procedure. Humane methods of animal euthanasia that do not require anesthetics exist and should be used whenever appropriate. PMID:20819374

  10. Evaluating the Effect of Three Water Management Techniques on Tomato Crop

    PubMed Central

    Elnesr, Mohammad Nabil; Alazba, Abdurrahman Ali; Zein El-Abedein, Assem Ibrahim; El-Adl, Mahmoud Maher

    2015-01-01

    The effects of three water management techniques were evaluated on subsurface drip irrigated tomatoes. The three techniques were the intermittent flow (3 pulses), the dual-lateral drip system (two lateral lines per row, at 15 and 25cm below soil surface), and the physical barrier (buried at 30 cm below soil surface). Field experiments were established for two successive seasons. Water movement in soil was monitored using continuously logging capacitance probes up to 60 cm depth. The results showed that the dual lateral technique positively increased the yield up to 50%, water use efficiency up to 54%, while the intermittent application improved some of the quality measures (fruit size, TSS, and Vitamin C), not the quantity of the yield that decreased in one season, and not affected in the other. The physical barrier has no significant effect on any of the important growth measures. The soil water patterns showed that the dual lateral method lead to uniform wetting pattern with depth up to 45 cm, the physical barrier appeared to increase lateral and upward water movement, while the intermittent application kept the wetting pattern at higher moisture level for longer time. The cost analysis showed also that the economic treatments were the dual lateral followed by the intermittent technique, while the physical barrier is not economical. The study recommends researching the effect of the dual lateral method on the root growth and performance. The intermittent application may be recommended to improve tomato quality but not quantity. The physical barrier is not recommended unless in high permeable soils. PMID:26057380

  11. Evaluating the Effect of Three Water Management Techniques on Tomato Crop.

    PubMed

    Elnesr, Mohammad Nabil; Alazba, Abdurrahman Ali; Zein El-Abedein, Assem Ibrahim; El-Adl, Mahmoud Maher

    2015-01-01

    The effects of three water management techniques were evaluated on subsurface drip irrigated tomatoes. The three techniques were the intermittent flow (3 pulses), the dual-lateral drip system (two lateral lines per row, at 15 and 25 cm below soil surface), and the physical barrier (buried at 30 cm below soil surface). Field experiments were established for two successive seasons. Water movement in soil was monitored using continuously logging capacitance probes up to 60 cm depth. The results showed that the dual lateral technique positively increased the yield up to 50%, water use efficiency up to 54%, while the intermittent application improved some of the quality measures (fruit size, TSS, and Vitamin C), not the quantity of the yield that decreased in one season, and not affected in the other. The physical barrier has no significant effect on any of the important growth measures. The soil water patterns showed that the dual lateral method lead to uniform wetting pattern with depth up to 45 cm, the physical barrier appeared to increase lateral and upward water movement, while the intermittent application kept the wetting pattern at higher moisture level for longer time. The cost analysis showed also that the economic treatments were the dual lateral followed by the intermittent technique, while the physical barrier is not economical. The study recommends researching the effect of the dual lateral method on the root growth and performance. The intermittent application may be recommended to improve tomato quality but not quantity. The physical barrier is not recommended unless in high permeable soils.

  12. Double blind randomised controlled trial of two different breathing techniques in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Slader, C A; Reddel, H K; Spencer, L M; Belousova, E G; Armour, C L; Bosnic‐Anticevich, S Z; Thien, F C K; Jenkins, C R

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that breathing techniques reduce short acting β2 agonist use and improve quality of life (QoL) in asthma. The primary aim of this double blind study was to compare the effects of breathing exercises focusing on shallow nasal breathing with those of non‐specific upper body exercises on asthma symptoms, QoL, other measures of disease control, and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) dose. This study also assessed the effect of peak flow monitoring on outcomes in patients using breathing techniques. Methods After a 2 week run in period, 57 subjects were randomised to one of two breathing techniques learned from instructional videos. During the following 30 weeks subjects practised their exercises twice daily and as needed for relief of symptoms. After week 16, two successive ICS downtitration steps were attempted. The primary outcome variables were QoL score and daily symptom score at week 12. Results Overall there were no clinically important differences between the groups in primary or secondary outcomes at weeks 12 or 28. The QoL score remained unchanged (0.7 at baseline v 0.5 at week 28, p = 0.11 both groups combined), as did lung function and airway responsiveness. However, across both groups, reliever use decreased by 86% (p<0.0001) and ICS dose was reduced by 50% (p<0.0001; p>0.10 between groups). Peak flow monitoring did not have a detrimental effect on asthma outcomes. Conclusion Breathing techniques may be useful in the management of patients with mild asthma symptoms who use a reliever frequently, but there is no evidence to favour shallow nasal breathing over non‐specific upper body exercises. PMID:16517572

  13. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  14. Western pond turtle: Biology, sampling techniques, inventory and monitoring, conservation, and management: Northwest Fauna No. 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R.B.; Welsh, Hartwell H.; Germano, David J.; Ashton, Donald T.

    2012-01-01

    One of only two native, freshwater turtle species in the western United States, western pond turtles are declining in portions of their original range. Declines are mostly due to habitat loss, introduction of non-native species, pollution, and lack of connectivity among populations. USGS zoologist R. Bruce Bury and colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service, California State University, and other agencies compiled and edited a new review and field manual of this charismatic species. Objectives were to determine its current distribution and abundance, summarize and evaluate population features, review techniques to detect population and habitat changes, and improve monitoring for long-term trends. Methods described in the manual should improve consistency, efficiency, and accuracy of survey data, resulting in improved management and conservation efforts.

  15. Project planning and management techniques of the fast-paced TMX-Upgrade construction

    SciTech Connect

    Seberger, C.D.; Chargin, A.K.

    1981-10-26

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-Upgrade) construction will be completed in 18 months at a total cost of $14.5 million. This paper describes the project planning and the management techniques used to complete the TMX-Upgrade within its allocated cost and schedule. In the planning stages of a project, before approval of the proposal, we define major project objectives, create a work breakdown structure (WBS), detail a technical description for each level of the WBS, and provide detailed bottoms-up cost estimates and summary schedules. In the operating phase, which continues throughout the project, we establish budget and schedule baselines. The reporting phase includes The Department of Energy (DOE) reviews of project status at monthly, quarterly, and semiannual intervals. These reports include cost, schedule, manpower, major procurement, and technical status information.

  16. Interaction of Local Anesthetics with Biomembranes Consisting of Phospholipids and Cholesterol: Mechanistic and Clinical Implications for Anesthetic and Cardiotoxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite a long history in medical and dental application, the molecular mechanism and precise site of action are still arguable for local anesthetics. Their effects are considered to be induced by acting on functional proteins, on membrane lipids, or on both. Local anesthetics primarily interact with sodium channels embedded in cell membranes to reduce the excitability of nerve cells and cardiomyocytes or produce a malfunction of the cardiovascular system. However, the membrane protein-interacting theory cannot explain all of the pharmacological and toxicological features of local anesthetics. The administered drug molecules must diffuse through the lipid barriers of nerve sheaths and penetrate into or across the lipid bilayers of cell membranes to reach the acting site on transmembrane proteins. Amphiphilic local anesthetics interact hydrophobically and electrostatically with lipid bilayers and modify their physicochemical property, with the direct inhibition of membrane functions, and with the resultant alteration of the membrane lipid environments surrounding transmembrane proteins and the subsequent protein conformational change, leading to the inhibition of channel functions. We review recent studies on the interaction of local anesthetics with biomembranes consisting of phospholipids and cholesterol. Understanding the membrane interactivity of local anesthetics would provide novel insights into their anesthetic and cardiotoxic effects. PMID:24174934

  17. Assessment of frequent cutting as a plant-community management technique in power-line corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luken, James O.; Hinton, Andrew C.; Baker, Douglas G.

    1991-05-01

    Repeated cutting of vegetation at or near ground level in power-line corridors is a common practice for inhibiting tree growth and regeneration. However, few data exist on long-term community responses. In this study, we sampled 20 northern Kentucky power-line corridors and compared their seedling and sapling communities to the edges and interiors of adjacent undisturbed forests. Mean seedling and sapling density in corridors was roughly twice that of adjacent undisturbed forest interiors, suggesting that repeated cutting is not a viable method of inhibiting tree regeneration. Corridor communities were dominated by Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) and Fraxinus americana (white ash), but ordinations indicated strong similaritties among communities in corridors and adjacent forests. Many of the tree species found in adjacent forests, with the exception of a few shade-tolerant species, had highest seedling and sapling densities in corridors. Stump or root sprouting by many species appears to regenerate forests quickly after cutting. However, disturbed soil and detritus accumulations caused by management crews and their equipment may also create a large variety of microsites for seedling establishment. Because repeated cutting selects for dominance by species with highest sprout growth rates, it should not be used as the sole management technique. It may instead be used to alter the vigor, stature, and stored reserves of trees so that herbicides or other methods of tree control can be used more efficiently.

  18. Application of capillary fluid management techniques to the design of a phase separating microgravity bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Barry W.; Neville, Gale E., Jr.; Sager, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Manned space missions require the development of compact, efficient, and reliable life support systems. A number of aqueous biological conversion processes are associated with bioregenerative life support systems. Vessels, or bioreactors, capable of supporting these processes in microgravity must be developed. An annular flow bioreactor has been conceived. It has the potential to incorporate containment, phase separation, gas exchange, and illumination into a single vessel. The bioreactor utilizes capillary fluid management techniques and is configured as a cylindrical tube in which a two-phase liquid-gas flow is maintained. Vanes placed around the inner perimeter enhance capillary forces and cause the liquid phase to attach and flow along the interior surface of the tube. No physical barrier is required to complete phase separation. It is shown analytically that liquid film thickness is limited only by vane geometry and that an annular flow bioreactor capable of managing 284 liters would occupy 0.7 cubic m, less than half the volume of a Spacelab experiment rack.

  19. Bicondylar tibial plateau fractures managed with the Sheffield Hybrid Fixator. Biomechanical study and operative technique.

    PubMed

    Ali, A M; Yang, L; Hashmi, M; Saleh, M

    2001-12-01

    The two main challenges in the management of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures are: Firstly, the compromised skin and soft tissue envelope which invite a high rate of complications following attempted open reduction and dual plating. Secondly, poor bone quality and comminuted fracture patterns, which create difficulty in achieving stable fixation. Although dual plating is considered to be the best mechanical method of stabilizing these complex fractures, there remains concern regarding the high rate of complications associated with extensive soft tissue dissection, required for the insertion of these plates in an already compromised knee. The Sheffield Hybrid fixator (SHF) technique offers a solution to the two main problems of these difficult fractures by minimizing soft tissue dissection, since bone fragments are reduced and fixed percutaneously, and providing superior cancellous bone purchase with beam loading stabilization for comminuted fractures. Our biomechanical testing showed the SHF with four tensioned wires to be as strong as dual plating and able to provide adequate mechanical stability in the fixation of bicondylar tibial plateau fractures. This was confirmed clinically by a prospective review of the use of the SHF at our centre, for managing complex and high-energy tibial plateau fractures with a good final outcome and no cases of deep infection or septic arthritis.

  20. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  1. Catheter fixation and ligation: a simple technique for ventriculostomy management following endovascular stenting.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Justin M; Vasan, Rohit; van Loveren, Harry R; Youssef, A Samy; Agazzi, Siviero

    2013-05-01

    The object of this study was to describe a unique method of managing ventriculostomy catheters in patients on antithrombotic therapy following endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The authors retrospectively reviewed 3 cases in which a unique method of ventriculostomy management was used to successfully avoid catheter-related hemorrhage while the patient was on dual antiplatelet therapy. In this setting, ventriculostomy catheters are left in place and fixed to the calvarium with titanium straps effectively ligating them. The catheter is divided and the distal end is removed. The proximal end can be directly connected to a distal shunt system during this stage or at a later date if necessary. The method described in this report provided a variety of management options for patients requiring external ventricular drainage for subarachnoid hemorrhage. No patient suffered catheter-related hemorrhage. This preliminary report demonstrates a safe and effective method for discontinuing external ventricular drainage and/or placing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt in the setting of active coagulopathy or antithrombotic therapy. The technique avoids both the risk of hemorrhage related to catheter removal and reinsertion and the thromboembolic risks associated with the reversal of antithrombotic therapy. Some aneurysm centers have avoided the use of stent-assisted coiling in cases of ruptured aneurysms to circumvent ventriculostomy-related complications; however, the method described herein should allow continued use of this important treatment option in ruptured aneurysm cases. Further investigation in a larger cohort with long-term follow-up is necessary to define the associated risks of infection using this method.

  2. The sterile-male-release technique in Great Lakes sea lamprey management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Twohey, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    The parasitic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) has been a serious pest since its introduction into the Great Lakes, where it contributed to severe imbalances in the fish communities by selectively removing large predators (Smith 1968; Christie 1974; Schneider et al.1996). Since the 1950s, restoration and maintenance of predator-prey balance has depended on the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC) sea lamprey management program. Initially, management relied primarily on stream treatments with a selective lampricide to kill larvae, on barriers to migration, and on trapping to remove potential spawners (Smith and Tibbles 1980). By the late 1970s, however, it was clear that the future of sea lamprey management lay in development of a larger array of control strategies, including more alternatives to lampricide applications (Sawyer 1980). Since then the only new alternative to chemical control to reach operational status is the release of sterilized male sea lampreys. Research on the concept began at the USGS, Hammond Bay Biological Station in Millersburg, MI (HBBS) during the 1970s (Hanson and Manion 1980). Development and evaluation continued through the 1980s, leading to the release of sterilized males in Great Lakes tributaries since 1991 (Twohey et al. 2003a). The objectives of this paper are 1) to review the implementation and evaluations of sterile-male-release technique (SMRT) as it is being applied against sea lampreys in the Great Lakes, 2) to review our current understanding of its efficacy, and 3) to identify additional research areas and topics that would increase either the efficacy of SMRT or expand its geographic potential for application.

  3. The Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility: Techniques of Neutralization, Stakeholder Management and Political CSR.

    PubMed

    Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna; Collin, Jeff; Holden, Chris; Lee, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Since scholarly interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has primarily focused on the synergies between social and economic performance, our understanding of how (and the conditions under which) companies use CSR to produce policy outcomes that work against public welfare has remained comparatively under-developed. In particular, little is known about how corporate decision-makers privately reconcile the conflicts between public and private interests, even though this is likely to be relevant to understanding the limitations of CSR as a means of aligning business activity with the broader public interest. This study addresses this issue using internal tobacco industry documents to explore British-American Tobacco's (BAT) thinking on CSR and its effects on the company's CSR Programme. The article presents a three-stage model of CSR development, based on Sykes and Matza's theory of techniques of neutralization, which links together: how BAT managers made sense of the company's declining political authority in the mid-1990s; how they subsequently justified the use of CSR as a tool of stakeholder management aimed at diffusing the political impact of public health advocates by breaking up political constituencies working towards evidence-based tobacco regulation; and how CSR works ideologically to shape stakeholders' perceptions of the relative merits of competing approaches to tobacco control. Our analysis has three implications for research and practice. First, it underlines the importance of approaching corporate managers' public comments on CSR critically and situating them in their economic, political and historical contexts. Second, it illustrates the importance of focusing on the political aims and effects of CSR. Third, by showing how CSR practices are used to stymie evidence-based government regulation, the article underlines the importance of highlighting and developing matrices to assess the negative social impacts of CSR.

  4. Update for nurse anesthetists. Anesthetic implications for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maracic, Lindy; Van Nostrand, Joanne; Beach, Dania

    2007-06-01

    Cancer is one of the most prevalent disease processes affecting people of all ages. Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease. Cancer survival is dependent on treatment options that may include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Chemotherapy, or systemic cancer therapy, is designed to promote cell death during different phases of cell growth and division. Unfortunately, chemotherapeutic agents cannot differentiate between malignant and normal cells. Therefore, the toxic effects of chemotherapy are also seen in healthy organs and tissues. In addition, chemotherapeutic agents can interact with other medications. The effects of chemotherapy may be acute and self-limiting or chronic and present long after treatment has been completed. Patients who have had chemotherapy often undergo surgery that may or may not be related to their cancer. Chemotherapy administration can have a profound influence on anesthetic management. Safe administration of anesthesia includes knowledge of chemotherapeutic agents and their toxic effects. This course discusses the anatomic and physiologic effects of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and how they specifically affect patients receiving anesthesia.

  5. Managing complex processing of medical image sequences by program supervision techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crubezy, Monica; Aubry, Florent; Moisan, Sabine; Chameroy, Virginie; Thonnat, Monique; Di Paola, Robert

    1997-05-01

    Our objective is to offer clinicians wider access to evolving medical image processing (MIP) techniques, crucial to improve assessment and quantification of physiological processes, but difficult to handle for non-specialists in MIP. Based on artificial intelligence techniques, our approach consists in the development of a knowledge-based program supervision system, automating the management of MIP libraries. It comprises a library of programs, a knowledge base capturing the expertise about programs and data and a supervision engine. It selects, organizes and executes the appropriate MIP programs given a goal to achieve and a data set, with dynamic feedback based on the results obtained. It also advises users in the development of new procedures chaining MIP programs.. We have experimented the approach for an application of factor analysis of medical image sequences as a means of predicting the response of osteosarcoma to chemotherapy, with both MRI and NM dynamic image sequences. As a result our program supervision system frees clinical end-users from performing tasks outside their competence, permitting them to concentrate on clinical issues. Therefore our approach enables a better exploitation of possibilities offered by MIP and higher quality results, both in terms of robustness and reliability.

  6. Effective management of medical information through a novel blind watermarking technique.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudeb; Kundu, Malay Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Medical Data Management (MDM) domain consists of various issues of medical information like authentication, security, privacy, retrieval and storage etc. Medical Image Watermarking (MIW) techniques have recently emerged as a leading technology to solve the problems associated with MDM. This paper proposes a blind, Contourlet Transform (CNT) based MIW scheme, robust to high JPEG and JPEG2000 compression and simultaneously capable of addressing a range of MDM issues like medical information security, content authentication, safe archiving and controlled access retrieval etc. It also provides a way for effective data communication along with automated medical personnel teaching. The original medical image is first decomposed by CNT. The Low pass subband is used to embed the watermark in such a way that enables the proposed method to extract the embedded watermark in a blind manner. Inverse CNT is then applied to get the watermarked image. Extensive experiments were carried out and the performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated through both subjective and quantitative measures. The experimental results and comparisons, confirm the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed technique in the MDM paradigm.

  7. Evolution of transversus abdominis plane infiltration techniques for postsurgical analgesia following abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeffrey; Ayad, Sabry; Gonzales, Jeffrey J; Mehta, Jaideep; Boublik, Jan; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) infiltration is a regional anesthesia technique that has been demonstrated to be effective for management of postsurgical pain after abdominal surgery. There are several different clinical variations in the approaches used for achieving analgesia via TAP infiltration, and methods for identification of the TAP have evolved considerably since the landmark-guided technique was first described in 2001. There are many factors that impact the analgesic outcomes following TAP infiltration, and the various nuances of this technique have led to debate regarding procedural classification of TAP infiltration. Based on our current understanding of fascial and neuronal anatomy of the anterior abdominal wall, as well as available evidence from studies assessing local anesthetic spread and cutaneous sensory block following TAP infiltration, it is clear that TAP infiltration techniques are appropriately classified as field blocks. While the objective of peripheral nerve block and TAP infiltration are similar in that both approaches block sensory response in order to achieve analgesia, the technical components of the two procedures are different. Unlike peripheral nerve block, which involves identification or stimulation of a specific nerve or nerve plexus, followed by administration of a local anesthetic in close proximity, TAP infiltration involves administration and spread of local anesthetic within an anatomical plane of the surgical site. PMID:26677342

  8. The impact of different management techniques on carbon balance of a pine stand after windthrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemblinska, Klaudia; Urbaniak, Marek; Merbold, Lutz; Chojnicki, Bogdan H.; Olejnik, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    Forest ecosystems cover approximately 1/3 of the global land area (and 29.8% in Poland). Since forests are constantly exposed to various types of disturbances - both natural and anthropogenic such as fires, wind, insects outbreaks or clear cuts - it is important to investigate the impact of such damages on the carbon dynamics. This becomes even more important due to the fact that future climate change will most likely result in a higher frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events. Even though wind damages cause large disturbances to forests only few places in the world exist where continuous measurements of carbon exchange (CO2) in windthrown sites are carried out. Besides the opportunity to assess the carbon dynamics following wind disturbance, there is an additional possibility of evaluating differences in post windthrow forest management practices. To fill this knowledge gap we set up two measuring stations in north-western Poland in the 500ha area of pine forest damaged by tornado in July 2012, to assess the impact of such disturbance on CO2 and H2O exchange by use of Eddy Covariance (EC) technique (Tlen I and Tlen II). Both sites are characterized by similar climatic as well as soil conditions and are located 3km from each other. While at the site Tlen I all biomass (coarse and fine woody debris were collected together with stumps) was removed and ploughed thereafter, at Tlen II only trunks and main branches were taken out from the site without ploughing. Total harvested biomass per hectare, as derived from local forest inventory, were almost 18 % higher at Tlen I than Tlen II site (where uprooted stumps were left to decompose). First analysis of the eddy covariance data shows that both sites are significant carbon sources. Emissions of carbon dioxide from the non-ploughed site (Tlen II) are higher than from the ploughed site (Tlen I). Both sites released more than 8.1 t of CO2 per ha during a three month time period (mid July to mid August 2014) after

  9. Top-down mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Mashour, George A.

    2014-01-01

    The question of how structurally and pharmacologically diverse general anesthetics disrupt consciousness has persisted since the nineteenth century. There has traditionally been a significant focus on “bottom-up” mechanisms of anesthetic action, in terms of sensory processing, arousal systems, and structural scales. However, recent evidence suggests that the neural mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness may involve a “top-down” process, which parallels current perspectives on the neurobiology of conscious experience itself. This article considers various arguments for top-down mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, with a focus on sensory processing and sleep-wake networks. Furthermore, recent theoretical work is discussed to highlight the possibility that top-down explanations may be causally sufficient, even assuming critical bottom-up events. PMID:25002838

  10. [Introduces a novel scavenger for waste anesthetic gas].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-dong; Liang, Jin-bing; Song, Jin-hua

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a novel scavenger for waste anesthetic gas which makes use of negative pressure in operating room. This setting can scavenge the exhaust gas absolutely without affection the normal work of anaesthesia.

  11. Anesthetic considerations for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Andrew D; Sobey, Jenna H; Stickles, Eric T

    2017-02-17

    Electroconvulsive therapy is being used more frequently in the treatment of many chronic and acute psychiatric illnesses in children. The most common psychiatric indications for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy are refractory depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, catatonia, and autism. In addition, a relatively new indication is the treatment of pediatric refractory status epilepticus. The anesthesiologist may be called upon to assist in the care of this challenging and vulnerable patient population. Unique factors for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy include the potential need for preoperative anxiolytic and inhalational induction of anesthesia, which must be weighed against the detrimental effects of anesthetic agents on the evoked seizure quality required for a successful treatment. Dexmedetomidine is likely the most appropriate preoperative anxiolytic as oral benzodiazepines are relatively contraindicated. Methohexital, though becoming less available at many institutions, remains the gold standard for induction of anesthesia for pediatric electroconvulsive therapy though ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane are becoming increasingly viable options. Proper planning and communication between the multidisciplinary teams involved in the care of children presenting for electroconvulsive therapy treatments is vital to mitigating risks and achieving the greatest therapeutic benefit.

  12. Ice Reduces Needle-Stick Pain Associated With Local Anesthetic Injection

    PubMed Central

    Mahshidfar, Babak; Cheraghi Shevi, Salimeh; Abbasi, Mohsen; Kasnavieh, Mohammad Hosseini; Rezai, Mahdi; Zavereh, Mina; Mosaddegh, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Local anesthetic injections are widely used in the emergency department for different purposes. Pain management for such injections is of great importance to both patients and the healthcare system. Objectives Our study aimed to determine the effectiveness and safety of cryotherapy in patients receiving local anesthetic injections. Methods Subjects who presented with superficial lacerations were randomly assigned to 2 groups, the first group received ice packing prior to injection and the second did not. The pain severity, length and depth of the laceration, and the other necessary information before and after the pain-reducing intervention were measured, documented, and compared at the end of the study. Pain scores were measured using a numerical rating scale before and after the procedure, and the differences were compared using a t-test. Results Ninety subjects were enrolled in the study, 45 in each group. There were no statistical differences between the 2 groups in terms of baseline preoperative and operative characteristics (P > 0.05). The pain scores in the cryotherapy group were significantly lower before and after the procedure (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups for wound infection (P = 0.783). Conclusions Cooling the injection site prior to local anesthetic injection is an effective and inexpensive method to reduce the pain and discomfort caused by the injection. PMID:27847696

  13. Anesthetic considerations for patients with postpolio syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Donna

    2011-10-01

    Postpolio syndrome is a disorder related to the recurrence of neuromuscular symptoms in survivors of paralytic poliomyelitis. A comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary for the anesthesia provider to develop a safe anesthetic plan. This case report discusses the anesthetic challenges and considerations in patients with postpolio syndrome, focusing on the importance of careful pharmacologic dosing of opioids, and neuromuscular agents as well as perioperative and postoperative issues related to aspiration risks, cold intolerance, and positioning.

  14. Effects of anesthetic compounds on responses of earthworms to electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Podolak-Machowska, Agnieszka; Kostecka, Joanna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Santocki, Michal; Bigaj, Janusz; Plytycz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Earthworms play an important role in biomedical research, and some surgical procedures require anesthesia. Anesthetic treatments used so far usually induce convulsive body movements connected with extrusion of coelomocyte-containing coelomic fluid that may affect experimental results. Extensive movements connected with the expulsion of coelomic fluid are exploited by immunologists as a method of harvesting immunocompetent coelomocytes from worms subjected to mild electrostimulation (4.5V). The aim of the investigations was to find anesthetic drugs without unintentional coelomocyte depletion. Experiments were performed on adult specimens of Dendrobaena veneta, the coelomocytes of which consist of amoebocytes and riboflavin-storing eleocytes. Earthworm mobility was filmed and extrusion of coelomocytes was quantified by detection of eleocyte-derived riboflavin in immersion fluid. Treatments included earthworms (1) immersed either in physiological saline (controls) or in a solution of one of the tested anesthetic drugs; (2) electrostimulated immediately after anesthesia, and (3) electrostimulated a second time after a 1-hour recovery period. The well-established fish and amphibian anesthetic agent MS-222 induced coelomocyte expulsion. In contrast, solutions of the mammalian local anesthetic drug, prilocaine hydrochloride (0.25-0.5%, 5-10 min) caused temporal earthworm immobilization followed by recovery, thus showing utility as an efficient earthworm anesthetic.

  15. Anesthetics Target Interfacial Transmembrane Sites in Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chiara, David C.; Miller, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics are a heterogeneous group of small amphiphilic ligands that interact weakly at multiple allosteric sites on many pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs), resulting in either inhibition, potentiation of channel activity, or both. Allosteric principles imply that modulator sites must change configuration and ligand affinity during receptor state transitions. Thus, general anesthetics and related compounds are useful both as state-dependent probes of receptor structure and as potentially selective modulators of pLGIC functions. This review focuses on general anesthetic sites in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which were among the first anesthetic-sensitive pLGIC experimental models studied, with particular focus on sites formed by transmembrane domain elements. Structural models place many of these sites at interfaces between two or more pLGIC transmembrane helices both within subunits and between adjacent subunits, and between transmembrane helices and either lipids (the lipid-protein interface) or water (i.e. the ion channel). A single general anesthetic may bind at multiple allosteric sites in pLGICs, producing a net effect of either inhibition (e.g. blocking the ion channel) or enhanced channel gating (e.g. inter-subunit sites). Other general anesthetic sites identified by photolabeling or crystallography are tentatively linked to functional effects, including intra-subunit helix bundle sites and the lipid-protein interface. PMID:25316107

  16. Effect of local anesthetics on serotonin1A receptor function.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhagyashree D; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    The fundamental mechanism behind the action of local anesthetics is still not clearly understood. Phenylethanol (PEtOH) is a constituent of essential oils with a pleasant odor and can act as a local anesthetic. In this work, we have explored the effect of PEtOH on the function of the hippocampal serotonin1A receptor, a representative neurotransmitter receptor belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Our results show that PEtOH induces reduction in ligand binding to the serotonin1A receptor due to lowering of binding affinity, along with a concomitant decrease in the degree of G-protein coupling. Analysis of membrane order using the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe DPH revealed decrease in membrane order with increasing PEtOH concentration, as evident from reduction in rotational correlation time of the probe. Analysis of results obtained shows that the action of local anesthetics could be attributed to the combined effects of specific interaction of the receptor with anesthetics and alteration of membrane properties (such as membrane order). These results assume relevance in the perspective of anesthetic action and could be helpful to achieve a better understanding of the possible role of anesthetics in the function of membrane receptors.

  17. Comparative efficacy of 16 anesthetic chemicals on rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, P.A.; Marking, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Presently there are no legally registered fish anesthetics that allow for the release of fish or use of the fish for food soon after they have been anesthetized. MS-222 (tricaine), the only anesthetic registered for use on fish in the United States, cannot be used within 21 d of harvesting the fish for food. As the start in a search for an anesthetic that can be used with little or no withdrawal period, we tested the efficacy of 16 chemicals as anesthetics on rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri. Efficacy was defined by the fish (1) becoming handleable (quiet enough to be manipulated and handled readily) in 3 min or less, (2) recovering in 10 min or less, and (3) showing no mortality after 15 min in the anesthetic solution. Four chemicals--MS-222, quinaldine sulfate, benzocaine, and 2-phenoxyethanol--met these criteria for efficacy. Chemicals that yielded excessive induction or recovery times or caused excessive mortality were methylpentynol, chlorobutanol, etomidate, metomidate, Piscaine, propanidid, carbon dioxide, nicotine, salt, Halothane, Metofane, and Biotal. Because carbon dioxide leaves no residues and requires no withdrawal period, it may be an acceptable alternative for fishery workers who can tolerate somewhat shallower anesthesia and longer induction and recovery times.

  18. Comparison of pneumotachography and anemometery for flow measurement during mechanical ventilation with volatile anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R; Herrmann, Jacob; McNeil, John S; Kaczka, David W

    2016-11-14

    Volatile anesthetics alter the physical properties of inhaled gases, such as density and viscosity. We hypothesized that the use of these agents during mechanical ventilation would yield systematic biases in estimates of flow ([Formula: see text]) and tidal volume (V T) for two commonly used flowmeters: the pneumotachograph (PNT), which measures a differential pressure across a calibrated resistive element, and the hot-wire anemometer (HWA), which operates based on convective heat transfer from a current-carrying wire to a flowing gas. We measured [Formula: see text] during ventilation of a spring-loaded mechanical test lung, using both the PNT and HWA placed in series at the airway opening. Delivered V T was estimated from the numerically-integrated [Formula: see text]. Measurements were acquired under baseline conditions with room air, and during ventilation with increasing concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane. We also evaluated a simple compensation technique for HWA flow, which accounted for changes in gas mixture density. We found that discrepancies in estimated V T between the PNT and HWA occurred during ventilation with isoflurane (6.3 ± 3.0%), sevoflurane (10.0 ± 7.3%), and desflurane (25.8 ± 17.2%) compared to baseline conditions. The magnitude of these discrepancies increased with anesthetic concentration. A simple compensation factor based on density reduced observed differences between the flowmeters, regardless of the anesthetic or concentration. These data indicate that the choice and concentration of anesthetic agents are primary factors for differences in estimated V T between the PNT and HWA. Such discrepancies may be compensated by accounting for alterations in gas density.

  19. Use of anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictors for dentistry in patients with cardiopathies. Review of the literature published in the last decade

    PubMed Central

    Serrera Figallo, María A.; Velázquez Cayón, Rocío T.; Corcuera Flores, Jose R.; Machuca Portillo, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The use of local anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictor agents in dentistry is thoroughly justified and is widely extended, but we cannot ignore the fact that anesthetic infiltration poses risk of complications throughout the dental treatment period. The objective of the present review is to document the reported effects the use of the local anesthetics most widely employed in dentistry, with or without association to vasoconstrictor agents may have in patients with any sort of cardiopathy. Study Design: We have searched for randomized clinical trials on the assessment of the cardiovascular effects of local anesthetics used in dentistry, without limits as regards age or sex, conducted in patients with any type of cardiopathy which were published during the last decade and were index-linked in Cochrane, Embase and Medline. Results: We have found six randomized clinical trials index-linked in Medline and Cochrane in the past ten years. These trials compare different types of anesthetics: lidocaine 2%, mepivacaine 2%, prilocaine 2% , associated or not to different vasoconstrictor concentrations such as adrenaline or felypressin. The cardiopathies affecting the patients included in the different trials range from hypertension, ischemic heart disease, arrythmias, chronic coronary disease to heart transplantation. Conclusions: The use of anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictor agents is justified in the case of patients with cardiopathies (once we get over the period in which any type of dental manipulation is contraindicated) and in controlled hypertensive patients. In any case, we must be very careful with the choice and execution of the anesthetic technique, being it possible to use a dose between 1.8 and 3.6 ml, on a general basis. Further studies are necessary to establish the effects of these drugs on severe hypertensive patients or in patients with other more advanced cardiopathies. Key words:Vasoconstrictor agents, epinephrine/adverse effects

  20. Assessment of alternative management techniques of tank bottom petroleum sludge in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Futaisi, Ahmed; Jamrah, Ahmad; Yaghi, Basma; Taha, Ramzi

    2007-03-22

    This paper investigated several options for environmentally acceptable management techniques of tank bottom oily sludge. In particular, we tested the applicability of managing the sludge by three options: (1) as a fuel supplement; (2) in solidification; (3) as a road material. Environmental testing included determination of heavy metals concentration; toxic organics concentration and radiological properties. The assessment of tank bottom sludge as a fuel supplement included various properties such as proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and energy content. Solidified sludge mixtures and road application sludge mixtures were subjected to leaching using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Tank bottom sludge was characterized as having higher concentrations of lead, zinc, and mercury, but lower concentrations of nickel, copper and chromium in comparison with values reported in the literature. Natural occurring radioactive minerals (NORM) activity values obtained on different sludge samples were very low or negligible compared to a NORM standard value of 100Bq/g. The fuel assessment results indicate that the heating values, the carbon content and the ash content of the sludge samples are comparable with bituminous coal, sewage sludge, meat and bone meal and petroleum coke/coal mixture, but lower than those in car tyres and petroleum coke. The nitrogen content is lower than those fuels mentioned above, while the sulfur content seems comparable with bituminous coal, petroleum coke and a petroleum coke/coal mixture. The apparent lack of leachability of metals from solidification and road material sludge applications suggests that toxic metals and organics introduced to these applications are not readily attacked by weak acid solutions and would not be expected to migrate or dissolved into the water. Thus, in-terms of trace metals and organics, the suggested sludge applications would not be considered hazardous as defined by the TCLP leaching procedure.