Science.gov

Sample records for aneurysm infected

  1. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to Morganella morganii: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Young; Lee, Jong Seok; Choi, Han Sung; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ko, Young Gwan

    2011-02-01

    An infected aortic aneurysm, or mycotic aneurysm, is a rare arterial dilatation due to destruction of the infected vessel wall. Common pathogens resulting in an infected aortic aneurysm are Salmonella and Clostridium species, as well as Staphylococcus aureus; Morganella morganii, on the other hand, is very rare. An infected abdominal aortic aneurysm has tendencies to grow rapidly and to rupture. The mortality rate is high in patients undergoing emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by M. morganii. A high index of suspicion and imaging tests are necessary in order to diagnose an infected aortic aneurysm.

  2. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sumeet R; Gupta, Anju; Gupta, Vivek; Singhi, Pratibha D

    2016-08-01

    Neurological findings in HIV are common and include cognitive impairment, microcephaly, nonspecific white matter lesions and seizures. Cerebral vasculopathy and stroke are uncommon and may be due to primary HIV vasculopathy or opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis and cryptococcal meningitis. The authors describe a 7-y-old boy who presented with severe headache and was detected to have aneurysmal bleed due to intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27072660

  3. Infected Aneurysm after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection.

    PubMed

    Gen, Shiko; Usui, Ryuichi; Sasaki, Takaya; Nobe, Kanako; Takahashi, Aya; Okudaira, Keisuke; Ikeda, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man on hemodialysis was hospitalized for further investigation. Early gastric cancer was diagnosed by gastrointestinal endoscopy and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed. Fever and abdominal pain thereafter developed, and a severe inflammatory response was observed on a blood test. Contrast computed tomography (CT) showed ulcer-like projections and soft tissue surrounding the aorta, from the celiac to left renal artery. An infected aneurysm was diagnosed. Although infected aneurysms developing after laparoscopic cholecystectomy or biopsy of contiguous esophageal duplication cyst have been reported, those developing after ESD have not. When fever and abdominal pain develop after ESD, an infected aneurysm should be considered and contrast CT performed. PMID:27181541

  4. Infective endarteritis and false mycotic aneurysm complicating aortic coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Jaleleddine, Ziadi; Sana, Chatti; Faker, Ghedira; Adel, Khayati

    2012-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with coarctation of aorta developed infective endarteritis and mycotic aneurysm at the site distal to coarctation. The computed tomography angiogram was very helpful in the diagnosis. Medical management and early surgical intervention was curative. Infective endarteritis in coarctation may be underdiagnosed. PMID:23129914

  5. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Aneurysms Basic Facts & Information Fill a balloon too full ... of what can happen when you have an aneurysm. Medically, when an artery “balloons,” or widens, it ...

  6. Percutaneous Treatment of an Infected Aneurysmal Sac Secondary to Aortoesophageal Fistula with a History of Stent-Graft Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Numan, Furuzan Gulsen, Fatih; Cantasdemir, Murat; Solak, Serdar; Arbatli, Harun

    2012-06-15

    A 68-year-old man who was subjected to stent-grafting of a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) 4 months previously was admitted to our hospital with constitutional symptoms, including high fever, sweating, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and backache. An infected aneurysmal sac was suspected based on computed tomography (CT) findings, and an aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) was identified during esophagoscopy. CT-guided aspiration was performed using a 20-G Chiba needle, confirming the presence of infection. For treatment of the infected aneurysmal sac, CT-guided percutaneous catheter drainage in a prone position was performed under general anesthesia with left endobronchial intubation. Drainage catheter insertion was successfully performed using the Seldinger technique, which is not a standard treatment of an infected aneurysmal sac. Improvement in the patient's clinical condition was observed at follow-ups, and CT showed total regression of the collection in the aneurysmal sac.

  7. Symptomatic Peripheral Mycotic Aneurysms Due to Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    González, Isabel; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; San Román, Alberto; Olmos, Carmen; Sáez, Carmen; Revilla, Ana; Hernández, Miguel; Caniego, Jose Luis; Fernández, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral mycotic aneurysms (PMAs) are a relatively rare but serious complication of infective endocarditis (IE). We conducted the current study to describe and compare the current epidemiologic, microbiologic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic characteristics of patients with symptomatic PMAs (SPMAs). A descriptive, comparative, retrospective observational study was performed in 3 tertiary hospitals, which are reference centers for cardiac surgery. From 922 definite IE episodes collected from 1996 to 2011, 18 patients (1.9%) had SPMAs. Because all SPMAs developed in left-sided IE, we performed a comparative study between 719 episodes of left-sided IE without SPMAs and 18 episodes with SPMAs. We found a higher frequency of intravenous drug abuse, native valve IE, intracranial bleeding, septic emboli, multiple embolisms, and IE diagnostic delay >30 days in patients with SPMAs than in patients without SPMAs. The causal microorganisms were gram-positive cocci (n =10), gram-negative bacilli (n = 2), gram-positive bacilli (n = 3), Bartonella henselae (n = 1), Candida albicans (n = 1), and negative culture (n = 1). The median IE diagnosis delay was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 13–33 d) in the case of high-virulence microorganisms versus 45 days (IQR, 30–240 d) in the case of low- to medium-virulence microorganisms. Twelve SPMAs were intracranial and 6 were extracranial. In 10 cases (8 intracranial and 2 extracranial), SPMAs were the initial presentation of IE; the remaining cases developed symptoms during or after finishing parenteral antibiotic treatment. The initial diagnosis of intracranial SPMAs was made by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging in 6 unruptured aneurysms and by angiography in 6 ruptured aneurysms. The initial test in extracranial SPMAs was Doppler ultrasonography in limbs, CT in liver, and coronary angiography in heart. Four (3 intracranial, 1 extracranial) of 7 (6 intracranial, 1 extracranial

  8. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and spontaneous rupture: a potentially fatal quandary.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Audra; Dyamenahalli, Umesh; Greenberg, S Bruce; Drummond-Webb, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    We present the case of a 6-month-old previously healthy girl who presented with high fever, labored breathing, and an enlarged cardiac silhouette on her chest radiograph. Comprehensive evaluation discovered a ductus arteriosus aneurysm and pericardial effusion with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite pericardiocentesis and appropriate intravenous antibiotics, there was rapid enlargement of the aneurysm and accumulation of echogenic material within the ductus arteriosus aneurysm. Infected aneurysm rupture was identified during emergency surgery. This infant also had vocal cord paresis, a likely complication of the surgery. The clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient are discussed. Infection of a ductus arteriosus or an infected ductal arteriosus aneurysm is a rare and potentially fatal clinical entity. In the era of increasing community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus infections, this is a diagnosis that requires a high index of suspicion.

  9. Gonococcal aneurysm of the ascending aorta: case report and review of Neisseria gonorrhoeae endovascular infections.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, Samuel; Anstey, James Richards; Hites, Maya; Montesinos, Isabel; Roisin, Sandrine; Keyzer, Caroline; Jacobs, Frederique

    2014-02-01

    We present the case of a man with a bicuspid aortic valve who presented with persistent fever. Blood cultures yielded Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and the diagnosis of infected mycotic aneurysm was confirmed by detection of the bacterial genome in the aortic wall. The patient was cured with surgery and intravenous ceftriaxone.

  10. Infected false aneurysm caused by hematogenous dissemination of Staphylococcus aureus after the use of vaginal tampons.

    PubMed

    Sedivy, P; Sebesta, P; Trejbalová, E; Henysová, J

    2008-10-01

    The use of vaginal tampons during menstruation may be associated with the proliferation of bacteria on their uneven surface, unless the instructions for use provided by the manufacturer are followed. A healthy young woman presented with a false aneurysm of infectious origin, caused by Staphylococcus aureus, in connection with the use of vaginal tampons. The aneurysm manifested after the menstruation when tampons were used and during which the patient experienced an untreated feverish epizode. Vaginal colonies of Streptococcus and Staphylococcus are present in nearly 40% of healthy menstruating women. Staphylococcal septicemia with the subsequent appearance of an arterial infected false aneurysm in a formerly healthy woman has not yet been described in relation to the use of vaginal tampons.

  11. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up.

  12. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up. PMID:23380562

  13. Treatment of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Infected by Coxiella Burnetii Using a Cryopreserved Allograft.

    PubMed

    Jayet, Jérémie; Raux, Maxime; Allaire, Eric; Desgranges, Pascal; Cochennec, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by an intracellular bacillus named Coxiella burnetii (CB) and is a rare cause of vascular infections. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm infected by CB with bilateral paravertebral abscesses and contiguous spondylodiscitis treated by open repair using a cryopreserved allograft and long-term antibiotic therapy by oral doxycycline and oral hydroxychloroquine for a duration of 18 months. Twenty months after the operation, the patient had no infections signs and vascular complication. PMID:26968369

  14. Endovascular Stenting of Peripheral Infected Aneurysms: A Temporary Measure or a Definitive Solution in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Riga, Celia; Bicknell, Colin; Jindal, Ravul; Cheshire, Nicholas; Hamady, Mohamad

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of endovascular technology in the management of peripheral infected aneurysms in high-risk patients as a temporary measure or definitive solution. Five cases underwent successful endovascular stenting of infected aneurysms of the subclavian, femoral, and carotid arteries. All these patients were at high risk for open surgery. Covered stents were placed by percutaneous approach under local anesthesia in all patients. Postoperatively, antibiotics were continued for 3 months. A literature review using the Medline database was also undertaken, and all the relevant papers on endovascular management of peripheral infected aneurysms were taken into account. Stent deployment was successful in all patients. One patient died of mediastinal sepsis and another from type A aortic dissection 5 weeks later. Two patients required drainage of the infected hematoma. Three patients did well at a median follow-up of 1 year, with no evidence of sepsis. A review of the literature shows promising early and midterm results. Most early reports were of single cases, reflecting the low incidence of peripheral infected aneurysms. We conclude that further development of endoluminal techniques and long-term follow-up to establish the durability of stenting could potentially lead to a decrease in the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infected aneurysmal disease in this high-risk group of patients.

  15. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wilson W.L.; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R.; de Mol, Bas A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred after the aneurysm perforated. The patient showed no signs of heart failure and completed a 6-week regimen of antibiotic therapy before undergoing successful aortic and mitral valve replacement. In addition to the patient's case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27547149

  16. Infective Endocarditis of the Aortic Valve with Anterior Mitral Valve Leaflet Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Anton; Li, Wilson W L; van Paridon, Marieke; Bindraban, Navin R; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2016-08-01

    Mitral valve leaflet aneurysm is a rare and potentially devastating complication of aortic valve endocarditis. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had endocarditis of the native aortic valve and a concomitant aneurysm of the anterior mitral valve leaflet. Severe mitral regurgitation occurred after the aneurysm perforated. The patient showed no signs of heart failure and completed a 6-week regimen of antibiotic therapy before undergoing successful aortic and mitral valve replacement. In addition to the patient's case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27547149

  17. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  18. Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other parts of the body (the aorta). Aortic aneurysms can occur in the area below the stomach ( ... or in the chest (thoracic aneurysms). An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is usually located below the kidneys. In ...

  19. [Infective endocarditis due to Bartonella henselae following a rupture of a cerebral aneurysm].

    PubMed

    de La Blanchardière, A; Fournier, P-E; Haustraete, E; du Cheyron, D; Lepage, O; Verdon, R

    2009-06-01

    We report a case of severe aortic bicuspid valve endocarditis, revealed by global cardiac failure without fever, in a 38-year-old man who had developed cerebral mycotic aneurysms nine months earlier. PCR analysis of the excised aortic valve and serological tests (even 9 months earlier) were positive for Bartonella henselae. A combination of intravenous then oral doxycyclin at 200mg/day and intravenous gentamycin at 90mg/day was given for 6 and 2 weeks respectively. The evolution was favorable on follow-up, 12 months after completion of the therapy. Only 49 cases of B. henselae endocarditis have been reported to date, none with associated mycotic aneurysm but most often located on the bicuspid aortic valve, and usually with severe valvular damage due to late diagnosis. PMID:19097835

  20. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  1. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  2. Treatment and Prophylactic Strategy for Coxiella burnetii Infection of Aneurysms and Vascular Grafts: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Eldin, Carole; Mailhe, Morgane; Lions, Caroline; Carrieri, Patrizia; Safi, Hazem; Brouqui, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii vascular infections continue to be very severe diseases and no guidelines exist about their prevention. In terms of treatment, the benefit of the surgical removal of infected tissues has been suggested by 1 retrospective study.We present a case of a C burnetii abdominal aortic graft infection for which we observed a dramatic clinical and biological recovery after surgery. We thus performed a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of surgery on survival and serological outcome for patients with Q fever vascular infections diagnosed in our center.Between 1986 and February 2015, 100 patients were diagnosed with Q fever vascular infections. The incidence of these infections has significantly increased over the past 5 years, in comparison with the mean annual incidence over the preceding 22 years (8.83 cases per year versus 3.14 cases per year, P = 0.001). A two-and-a-half-year follow-up was available for 66 patients, of whom 18.2% died. We observed 6.5% of deaths in the group of patients who were operated upon at 2 and a half years, in comparison with 28.6% in the group which were not operated upon (P = 0.02). Surgery was the only factor that had a positive impact on survival at 2 and a half years using univariate analysis [hazard ratio: 0.17 [95% CI]: [0.039-0.79]; P = 0.024]. Surgery was also associated with a good serological outcome (74.1% vs 57.1% of patients, P = 0.03). In the group of patients with vascular graft infections (n = 47), surgery had a positive impact on serological outcome at 2 and a half years (85.7% vs 42.9%, P < 0.001) [hazard ratio: 0.40 [95% CI]: [0.17-098]; P = 0.046] and tended to be associated with lower although not statistically significant mortality (11.1% vs 27.6% of deaths, P = 0.19).Surgical treatment confers a benefit in terms of survival following C burnetii vascular infections. However, given the high mortality of these infections and their rising incidence, we propose a

  3. Idiopathic subvalvular aortic aneurysm masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Balaji; Ramanathan, Sundar; Subramaniam, Natarajan; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Subvalvular aneurysms are the least common type of left ventricular (LV) aneurysms and can be fatal. Subaortic LV aneurysms are much rarer than submitral LV aneurysms and mostly reported in infancy. They can be congenital or acquired secondary to infections, cardiac surgery or trauma. Here, we report a unique presentation of a large, idiopathic subaortic aneurysm in an adult masquerading as an acute coronary syndrome. Diagnosis was made with the help of a CT aortography. Aneurysm was surgically resected with good results. This case highlights the clinical presentation and management of subaortic aneurysms, an important differential for congenital aortic malformations. PMID:27591034

  4. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in HIV Patients with Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm and Low CD4

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saritphat; Arworn, Supapong; Reanpang, Termpong

    2016-01-01

    We report two HIV infected patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm by using endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. A 59-year-old Thai man had a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and a 57-year-old man had a ruptured iliac artery aneurysm. Both patients had a CD4 level below 200 μ/L indicating a low immune status at admission. They were treated by EVAR. Neither patient had any complications in 3 months postoperatively. EVAR may have a role in HIV patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm together with very low immunity. PMID:27703834

  5. Secondary Aortoesophageal Fistula Associated With Aneurysmal Graft Infection by Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Okwara, Chinemerem John; Petrasek, Jan; Gibson, Maeghan; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-04-01

    Aortoesophageal fistula is a rare and serious condition that carries a high mortality rate. We present a case of overt gastrointestinal bleeding from an aortoesophageal fistula in a patient with chronic infection of an endovascular prosthesis with Coxiella burnetii. PMID:27144194

  6. Secondary Aortoesophageal Fistula Associated With Aneurysmal Graft Infection by Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Petrasek, Jan; Gibson, Maeghan; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aortoesophageal fistula is a rare and serious condition that carries a high mortality rate. We present a case of overt gastrointestinal bleeding from an aortoesophageal fistula in a patient with chronic infection of an endovascular prosthesis with Coxiella burnetii. PMID:27144194

  7. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  8. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  10. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Aneurysm? An aneurysm (AN-u-rism) is a balloon-like bulge ... the weakened or injured walls can cause an aneurysm. An aneurysm can grow large and rupture (burst) ...

  11. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  12. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopinski, Piotr

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  13. A Rare Case of Streptococcus alactolyticus Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Emboli and Mycotic Left Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Patricia; Railsback, Jaclyn; Gleason, James Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    To date, S. alactolyticus endocarditis complicated by middle cerebral artery aneurysm has not been reported. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction presenting with confusion and a apical holosystolic murmur. Angiography of the brain identified new bilobed left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Serial blood cultures grew S. alactolyticus, and aortic and mitral valve vegetation were discovered on transesophageal echocardiography. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and microsurgical clipping of cerebral aneurysm. This case serves to highlight the pathogenicity of a sparsely described bacterium belonging to the heterogenous S. bovis complex. PMID:27525136

  14. A Rare Case of Streptococcus alactolyticus Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Emboli and Mycotic Left Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Railsback, Jaclyn

    2016-01-01

    To date, S. alactolyticus endocarditis complicated by middle cerebral artery aneurysm has not been reported. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction presenting with confusion and a apical holosystolic murmur. Angiography of the brain identified new bilobed left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Serial blood cultures grew S. alactolyticus, and aortic and mitral valve vegetation were discovered on transesophageal echocardiography. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and microsurgical clipping of cerebral aneurysm. This case serves to highlight the pathogenicity of a sparsely described bacterium belonging to the heterogenous S. bovis complex. PMID:27525136

  15. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  16. Enterococcal endocarditis complicated with ruptured infected-intracranial aneurysm: with pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic documentation in proof of the successful antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Urakami, Tosiharu; Hamada, Yohei; Magarihuchi, Hiroki; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Aoki, Yosuke

    2014-12-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with sudden onset of aphasia and apraxia. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the brain disclosed a left frontal hemorrhage. The concomitant low grade fever suggestive of infection was unresponsive to cefazolin 1 g q12h, and refractory to piperacillin (PIPC) 2 g q8h. Blood culture grew enterococci, establishing together with echocardiography the diagnosis of infective endocarditis. The angiography revealed cerebral hemorrhage to have resulted from the rupture of the infected intracranial aneurysm. The antimicrobial therapy was switched to ampicillin (ABPC) 2 g q4h plus gentamicin (GM) 60 mg q8h. The positive blood culture was subsequently identified Enterococcus faecium to which the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of PIPC, and ABPC was 16 mcg/mL, and 4 mcg/mL, respectively. The peak concentration of serum ABPC was 83.1, median 50.8, and trough 25.8 mcg/mL. Thus, the percent time > MIC for ABPC was 100%, and the time > minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) as well. On the other hand, time > MIC for PIPC, was found nearly 30% in retrospective analysis using population pharmacokinetics. The neurological deficit of the patient was completely restored to the normal status after 4-weeks' antimicrobial therapy with ABPC plus GM, then he underwent cardiac surgery for valvular replacement, where microbiological culture of the resected valve was negative. The constellation of the clinical, pharmacological and microbiological outcome in our case provides scientific evidence that the antibiotic therapy given to our case is the best available strategy as an antimicrobial treatment of severe enterococcal endocarditis complicated by disseminated lesion as infected intracranial aneurysm.

  17. Pathomechanisms and treatment of pediatric aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Krings, Timo; Geibprasert, Sasikhan; terBrugge, Karel G

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are rare diseases distinct from classical adult aneurysms and therefore require different treatment strategies. Apart from saccular aneurysms that are more commonly found in older children, three major pathomechanisms may be encountered: trauma, infection, and dissection. The posterior circulation and more distal locations are more commonly encountered in children compared to adults, and there is an overall male predominance. Clinical findings are not only confined to subarachnoid hemorrhage but may also comprise mass effects, headaches or neurological deficits. In traumatic aneurysms, the skull base and distal anterior communicating artery are commonly affected, and the hemorrhage occurs often delayed (2-4 weeks following the initial trauma). Infectious aneurysms are mostly bacterial in origin, and hemorrhage occurs early after a septic embolic shower. Dissecting aneurysms are the most often encountered aneurysm type in children and can lead to mass effect, hemorrhage, or ischemia depending on the fate of the intramural hematoma. Treatment strategies in pediatric aneurysms include endosaccular coil treatment only for the "classical berry-type" aneurysms; in the other instances, parent vessel occlusion, flow reversal, surgical options, or a combined treatment with bypass and parent vessel occlusion have to be contemplated.

  18. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  19. Brain abscess after endosaccular embolisation of a cerebral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangzhong; Zhan, Shengquan; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhaojie; Zhou, Dong; Zeng, Shaojian; Lin, Xiaofeng; Tang, Kai; Zhou, Dexiang; Shu, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular embolization has become an important treatment option for cerebral aneurysms, along with surgical clipping. But few literatures mentioned infectious complications after coiling of aneurysms. We present a patient with a brain abscess that developed after endosaccular embolization of a left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. The brain abscess was located adjacent to the aneurysm and discovered more than 2 months after embolization. We discuss the clinical implications of this rare complication and review the literature for infections related to the coils used for embolization of aneurysms.

  20. Early and late results of resection of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, K.; McPhail, N.; Hubbard, C.

    1977-01-01

    Resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is being performed with decreasing operative mortality and morbidity. Among 190 patients undergoing this procedure at the Ottawa Civic Hospital between 1970 and 1975, 53 (28%) had a ruptured aneurysm and 137 (72%), a nonruptured aneurysm. Mean age of the patients was 66.2 years. Concomitant disease was frequent, 73% of patients having two or more associated diseases; the average number of associated diseases per patient was 2.25. Operative mortality in the group with ruptured aneurysms was 51%, and in the group with nonruptured aneurysms, 4%. Postoperative morbidity was 85% among those with a ruptured aneurysm, 67% among those with imminent rupture before operation and 34% among the others with a nonruptured aneurysm. Graft complications occurred in 15% of those with a ruptured aneurysm and 9% of those with a nonruptured aneurysm. Among survivors of the operation 73% and 81% of those with a ruptured and a nonruptured aneurysm, respectively, are known to be alive. In both groups causes of late death included infection or thrombosis of the graft and mesenteric thrombosis, as well as causes unrelated to the operation. Surgical management of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is advocated in all but patients at poor risk for operation who have asymptomatic aneurysms less than 6 cm in diameter. PMID:872011

  1. Dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyong Shil; Choi, Min Kyung; Jeon, Yong Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with the tuberculous pleural effusion. An 82-year-old woman underwent emergency stent graft under a diagnosis of dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm. Preoperative computed tomography revealed right pleural effusion supposed to the hemothorax caused by the dissecting aneurysm. But, the effusion was sanguineous color fluid and it was determined to result from pulmonary tuberculosis. The medical team was exposed to the pulmonary tuberculosis; fortunately no one became infected. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of an infected aortic aneurysm and prepare for pathogen transmission. PMID:27499987

  2. Progressive intracranial fusiform aneurysms and T-cell immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Piantino, Juan A; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Pytel, Peter; Wagner-Weiner, Linda; Ansari, Sameer A

    2013-02-01

    In the pediatric population, intracranial fusiform aneurysms have been associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and rarely with opportunistic infections related to other immunodeficiencies. The HIV virus and other infectious organisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of these aneurysms. We present a child with T-cell immunodeficiency but no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or opportunistic intracranial infections that developed progressive bilateral fusiform intracranial aneurysms. Our findings suggest a role of immunodeficiency or inflammation in the formation of some intracranial aneurysms.

  3. How Is an Aneurysm Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Treated? Aortic aneurysms are treated with medicines and surgery. Small aneurysms ... doing your normal daily activities Treatment for an aortic aneurysm is based on its size. Your doctor may ...

  4. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. PMID:24238836

  5. A fibromatosis case mimicking abdominal aorta aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Arzu; Kahraman, Cemal; Tasdemir, Kutay; Mavili, Ertugrul

    2013-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare fibrosing reactive process that may be confused with mesenteric fibromatosis. Abdominal aorta aneurysm is rare too and mostly develops secondary to Behcet's disease, trauma, and infection or connective tissue diseases. Incidence of aneurysms occurring as a result of atherosclerotic changes increases in postmenopausal period. Diagnosis can be established with arteriography, tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging associated with clinical findings. Tumors and cysts should be considered in differential diagnosis. Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computerized tomography revealed an infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysm in a 41-year-old woman, but, on surgery, retroperitoneal fibrosis surrounding the aorta was detected. We present this interesting case because retroperitoneal fibrosis encircling the abdominal aorta can mimic abdominal aorta aneurysm radiologically.

  6. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. ... changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. ...

  7. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  8. Current technology for the treatment of infection following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) fixation by endovascular repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Capoccia, L; Mestres, G; Riambau, V

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, in parallel with the increase of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) procedures performances, a rise of late open surgical removal of EVAR implants has been observed, due to non-endovascularly correctable graft complications. Among them endograft infection is a rare but devastating occurrence, accounting for an incidence ranging from 0.2% to 0.7% in major series, and almost 1% of all causes of endograft explantations. However, a real estimation of the incidence of the problem respect to the number of EVAR implantations is difficult to obtain. Time to infection is usually defined as the period between EVAR and presentation of symptoms that leads to the infection diagnosis. It can be extremely variable, depending on bacterial virulence and host conditions. The diagnosis of an endograft infection is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies and microbial cultures whenever possible. If computed tomography (CT) scan is employed in almost 100% of infection diagnosis, a combination of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and CT scan is nowadays used with increasing frequency in order to rise the likelihood of detecting a graft infection, since even cultures of blood or samples collected from the infected field can sometimes be negative. Complete graft excision seems the best approach whenever a surgical reconstruction could be attempted. In situ reconstruction can be performed by the interposition of an autologous vein, a cryopreserved allograft or a rifampin-soaked Dacron graft. The so-called conventional treatment contemplates the re-establishment of vascularization through extranatomical routes, thus preserving the new graft material from possible contamination by the surgical field just cleaned. When severe comorbid conditions did not allow graft excision, a conservative treatment should be taken into account. It is mainly based on broad-spectrum or culture-specific antibiotic therapy combined, whenever

  9. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  10. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain aneurysms ... Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and arteriovenous ...

  11. [Approach to juxtarenal inflammatory aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Scuro, A; Barzaghi, M E; Griso, A; Ferrari Ruffino, S; Kontothanassis, D; Mirandola, M; Leonardi, G; D'Agata, M

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) in a late review of the literature is estimated about 2-15% overall aortic aneurysms. In our data this type of aneurysm is 3.6 overall aortic aneurysms treated. In the majority of the cases, IAAA is juxtarenal or infrarenal. Ethiopathogenesis of IAAA till today is not certain. Recent hypothesis on IAAA attribute the same ethiopathogenesis in both atherosclerotic and inflammatory aneurysm. The interaction of genetic, environmental and infective factors should be able to determine an autoimmune inflammatory reaction of variable severity. 80% of the patients suffering from IAAA present abdominal or lumbar pain, loss of weight and increase of the RC sedimentation velocity. The IAAA's natural history goes to rupture. Entrapment of nearstanding organs totally involved in the fibrotic process is the most frequent complication. Usually there is a compression of the ureter and the duodenum with consequenced hydroureteronephrosis and bowel obstruction. Preoperative diagnosis is possible; CT scan and MRI guarantee and accuracy about 90%. Intraoperatively the external wall of IAAA appears whitish and translucent and always there are tenacious adhesion given by the avventital wounds inflammation. Confirm is given by the histological examination of the aneurysmatic wall and peravventitial tissues. Our experience and a late review of the literature concorde that surgical indication for the treatment of IAAA is the same for the atherosclerotic one. This conviction is supported by the fact that the diagnostic methodical evolution and the improvement in mininvasive surgical technique lowered perioperating morbility and mortaliy. We prefer, according with many authors, retroperitoneal approach to juxtarenal IAAA, instead of standardized transperitoneal access with xifo-pubical or transversal under costal incision. This approach offers some advantages as easier exposition of aorta, whose postero-lateral wall is hardly ever

  12. Primary Aneurysm of the Medial Marginal Vein of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Casian, D.; Culiuc, V.

    2015-01-01

    The primary superficial venous aneurysms of the foot are very rare. A 34-year-old female patient developed a dorsal foot mass during the second trimester of pregnancy with no history of previous trauma, puncture, or infection. One year later, she was referred to the surgical department for excision of “foot hygroma.” Based on the clinical findings, the venous aneurysm was suspected and duplex ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of the aneurysm of the medial marginal vein of the foot. Excision of aneurysm with bipolar ligation of marginal vein was performed under local anesthesia. The postoperative evolution was uneventful. The authors hope that the presented case report will increase the awareness of general practitioners, dermatologists, and surgeons regarding the superficial venous aneurysms of lower limbs. PMID:26576318

  13. The False Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Baird, R. J.; Doran, M. L.

    1964-01-01

    The clinical course of 18 patients with 25 false aneurysms is reviewed. In recent years false aneurysm has been most commonly seen as a complication of arterioplastic procedures in which prosthetic arterial grafts were used. The use of indwelling needles or cannulae, particularly in patients with a wide arterial pulse pressure, can also lead to the formation of false aneurysms. In the groin, a false aneurysm is frequently mistaken for an abscess. Early diagnosis and operative repair are essential to reduce the incidence of further complications. PMID:14180533

  14. Cephalic vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Walid; Selmo, Francesca; Hindi, Mia; Haddad, Fadi; Khalil, Ismail

    2007-11-01

    Cephalic vein aneurysms are rare malformations that may develop in any part of the vascular system, and their history, presentation, and management vary depending on their site. The etiology of venous aneurysms remains unclear, although several theories have been elaborated. Venous aneurysms are unusual vascular malformations that occur equally between the sexes and are seen at any age; they can present as either a painful or a painless subcutaneous mass. No serious complications have been reported from upper extremity venous aneurysms. Surgical excision is the definitive management for most of these. The case reported here presented with a painless and mobile, soft, subcutaneous mass that caused only cosmetic concern.

  15. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  17. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → ... You had a brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a weak area in the wall of a blood vessel that bulges or balloons out. Once it reaches a certain size, it ...

  18. Aneurysm in the brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm may be found when an MRI or CT scan of the brain is done for another reason. A brain aneurysm ... and determine the cause of bleeding in the brain: Cerebral angiography or spiral CT scan angiography of the head to show the location ...

  19. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  20. [Splenic artery aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Colović, R; Davidović, L; Bilanović, D; Krivokapić, Z; Grubor, N; Cvetković, S; Radak, V; Marković, M

    2006-01-01

    Although the third most frequent aneurysm in the abdomen, after aneurysms of the aorta and iliac arteries, and most frequent aneurisms of visceral arteries, splenic artery aneurysms are rare, but not very rare. Thanks to the new imaging techniques, first of all ultrasonography, they have been discovered with increasing frequency. We present a series of 9 splenic artery aneurysms. Seven patients were female and two male of average age 49 years (ranging from 28 to 75 years). The majority of afected women were multiparae, with average 3 children (ranging from 1 to 6). One patient had a subacute rupture, and 2 had ruptures into the splenic vein causing portal hypertension. The spleen was enlarged in 7 out of 9 patients. The average size of aneurysms was 3,2 cm (ranging from 2 to 8 cm). The preoperative diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm was established in 6 patients while in 3 patients aneurism was accidentally found during other operations, during splenectomy in 2, and during the excision of a retroperitoneal tumour in 1 patient. Aneurysmectomy was carried out in 7 patients, while a ligation of the incoming and outcoming wessels was performed in 2 patients with arteriovenous fistula. Splenectomy was performed in 6 patients, while pancreatic tail resection, cholecystectomy and excision of the retroperitoneal tumor were performed in 3 patients. Additional resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm with reconstruction of aortoiliac segment was performed in 2 patients. There were no mortality and the postoperative recovery was uneventful in all patients. PMID:16989145

  1. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  2. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  3. Intrasplenic Arterial Aneurysms during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abu-khalaf, Mahmoud M. S.; Al-Ameer, Sokiyna M.; Smadi, Moath M.; Qatawneh, Ayman; Smara, Osama A.; Hadidy, Azmy T.

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms account for about 60% of all visceral aneurysms. Pregnancy is a risk factor for splenic artery aneurysms rupture with high maternal mortality and fetal loss. Intrasplenic arterial aneurysms are extremely rare and have not been reported to be associated with pregnancy. This report presents a 34-year-old woman during the second trimester, admitted with severe left upper quadrant and left shoulder pain. She had two uncomplicated intrasplenic aneurysms. Splenectomy was done. She delivered a full term healthy girl. This is the first report of acute abdomen during pregnancy caused by intrasplenic artery aneurysms with maternal and fetal survival. PMID:25810934

  4. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  5. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  6. Limitations of Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts for Active Mycotic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Shimono, Takatsugu; Yasuda, Fuyuhiko; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-06-15

    An 81-year-old woman with ruptured mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular placement of stent-grafts fabricated from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and Z-stents. Although exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved at the end of the procedure, a type I endoleak developed on the following day.Despite emergent surgical resection of the aneurysm and extra-anatomical reconstruction, the patient died 2 days later. Stent-graft repair may not be a suitable method for the treatment of ruptured mycotic aneurysm in the presence of active infection.

  7. Ruptured aortic aneurysm in a coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Debra, Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Kilgo, John; Ray, Scott; Miller, Karl V.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract – A radio-collared adult female coyote (Canis latrans) from South Carolina was found dead with no apparent signs of trauma or struggle. Necropsy revealed a ruptured aortic aneurysm within the thoracic cavity as well as severe heartworm infection, with paracites present in the caudal vena cava. Histologically, inflammatory cell infiltrates were frequent in the aneurysm and consisted of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Bacteria, fungi, and paracites were not found in the aneurysm. Death was due to exsanguinations. This represents a first report of an aneurysm in a coyote.

  8. A case of embolic stroke imitating atherothrombotic brain infarction before massive hemorrhage from an infectious aneurysm caused by Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Ryuichi; Shinoda, Jun; Irie, Seiichiro; Inoue, Koji; Sato, Teiko; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2012-11-01

    Early detection followed by treatment with antibiotics in conjunction with direct or endovascular surgery is integral in the management of patients with intracranial infectious aneurysms. These aneurysms often manifest as massive intracranial hemorrhages, which severely deteriorate the outcome. It is very important to detect infectious aneurysms before they rupture. Although usually associated with infective endocarditis, these aneurysms can occur in a variety of clinical settings. We present a case of α-Streptococcus-provoked infectious aneurysm in a patient without infective endocarditis, initially presenting as atherothrombotic-like brain infarction, before massive intracranial hemorrhage. The present case alerts clinicians to keep in mind possible development of infectious aneurysms, even in patients who appear to be suffering from atherothrombotic stoke, especially in patients presenting with signs of infection.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Mycotic Aneurysm: A Review of the Literature and Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zanaty, Mario; Starke, Robert M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Gonzalez, L. Fernando; Hasan, David; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The management of mycotic aneurysm has always been subject to controversy. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the intracranial infected aneurysm from pathogenesis till management while focusing mainly on the endovascular interventions. This novel solution seems to provide additional benefits and long-term favorable outcomes. PMID:24383049

  10. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  11. Endovascular Management of an Infected Superficial Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Damodharan, Karthik Beckett, David

    2013-10-15

    This article describes an endovascular technique of treating an infected pseudoaneurysm by direct thrombin injection via a catheter placed inside the aneurysm sac while maintaining temporary balloon occlusion of the neck of the false aneurysm.

  12. De Novo intracerebral aneurysm in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bakhaidar, Mohamad G; Ahamed, Naushad A; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Baeesa, Saleh S

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection associated aneurysmal vasculopathy is a rare complication of HIV infection affecting the pediatric and adult population. We present a case of a 7-year-old male child known to have a congenitally acquired HIV infection presenting with a ruptured left distal internal carotid artery fusiform aneurysm that was diagnosed on MRI scans 6 months prior to his presentation. He underwent craniotomy and successful aneurysm reconstruction. He had uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. This case is among the few reported pediatric cases of HIV-associated cerebral arteriopathy to undergo surgery. We also reviewed the relevant literature of this rare condition.

  13. Rasmussen's aneurysm: A forgotten scourge☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Colaco, Brendon; Colaco, Clinton; Hellman, Michael; Meena, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's aneurysm is an inflammatory pseudo-aneurysmal dilatation of a branch of pulmonary artery adjacent to a tuberculous cavity. Life threatening massive hemoptysis from the rupture of a Rasmussen's aneurysm is an uncommon yet life threatening complication of cavitary tuberculosis (TB). We present a case of a young woman who presented with low-grade fever and hemoptysis. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed biapical cavitary lesions and actively bleeding aneurysms involving pulmonary artery, which successfully underwent glue embolization. PMID:26744661

  14. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed? If you have an aortic aneurysm but no symptoms, your doctor may find it ... a routine physical exam. More often, doctors find aneurysms during tests done for other reasons, such as ...

  15. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  16. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  17. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  18. Endovascular aortic aneurysm operations.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Sasan; Terramani, Thomas T; Weiss, Victor J; Smith, Robert B; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Chaikof, Elliot L; Lumsden, Alan B

    2002-02-01

    Options for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms are in a state of evolutionary change. The development and continued refinement of the endoluminal approaches has decreased the need for open aortic aneurysm surgery. Endovascular stent graft technology is an area of active research in which both the delivery systems and the endografts are undergoing continued improvement so that patients with what was previously thought to be unfavorable anatomy may be treated by these means. The design and deployment techniques of the currently available endografts, as well as those in clinical trials, are presented. PMID:11822962

  19. Large Intracranial Aneurysm after Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kyeong-Wook; Cho, Chun-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for pituitary adenoma can lead to meningitis. Intracranial mycotic pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication in central nervous system infection. Large single pseudoaneurysm is more uncommon. Most mycotic aneurysms occur due to endocarditis. The present patient had no heart problem and was infected by CSF leakage after transsphenoidal surgery. We present a case of large ruptured mycotic pseudoaneurysm as a complication of cerebral infection after TSS for pituitary macroadenoma. PMID:24851153

  20. Complicated chronic pancreatitis causing mycotic aortic aneurysm: in situ replacement with a cryopreserved aortic allograft.

    PubMed

    Knosalla, C; Bauer, M; Weng, Y g; Weidemann, H; Hetzer, R

    2000-11-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysm, which resulted from infected pancreatic pseudocysts with retroperitoneal abscess, developed in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. The aorta was approached through median laparotomy. Necrotic material was debrided from the pancreatic pseudocysts, and the mycotic aneurysm was resected. The aorta was replaced in situ with a cryopreserved aortic allograft. This report discusses the rare complication of pancreatic pseudocysts, which affect the infrarenal abdominal aorta and cause a large mycotic aneurysm. This case suggests that the use of cryopreserved allografts is promising for in situ reconstruction, even in a grossly infected field.

  1. Surgical and Antimicrobial Management of a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Due to Q Fever: A Case Report and Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Robinson, William P; Schuksz, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, has been associated with vascular infection and aneurysm formation. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman from Iraq who presented with long-standing malaise as well as vague chest and shoulder discomfort and was found to have a saccular aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. Serology assays were positive for chronic C burnetii infection. She was treated with successful aneurysm resection and aortic replacement with a rifampin-impregnated Maquet Hemashield (TM) Dacron interposition graft interposition graft in addition to 18 months of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine. The patient is without evidence of recurrent infection on follow-up at 3 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case of aortic aneurysm secondary to Q fever reported in the United States. We review the diagnosis, surgical management, antibiotic therapy, and surveillance of a thoracic aortic aneurysm secondary to Q fever. PMID:27075992

  2. Idiopathic internal mammary artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Jens; Zimmermann, Hanna; Klose, Alexander; Luchting, Benjamin; Hinske, Christian; Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysms of the internal mammary artery are extremely rare, and their presentation and treatment are variable. Since these aneurysms often tend to rupture and cause haemothorax and life-threatening conditions, the knowledge of secure treatment options is indispensable. We here report the case of an idiopathic internal mammary aneurysm in a 46-year-old man. Open surgical resection of the aneurysm was performed in this case without any complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was in a good physical condition without any vascular or neurological abnormalities during follow-up. PMID:25452261

  3. Fever of unknown origin: Importance of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of a late infectious complication after aneurysm bypass.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Y; Pierret, C; Dusaud, M; Falzone, E; Tourtier, J P; de Kerangal, X

    2011-09-01

    Persistent blood flow in aneurysmal sac after bypass-exclusion is well documented in the literature. Aneurysm enlargement, local compressive symptoms and even sac rupture are commonly described complications. Late secondary infection of popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) following ligation and venous bypass is exceptional. We report the case of late PAA infection six years after bypass-exclusion in a 75 year-old man which was diagnosed by 18F-FDG PET/CT. The patient was successfully treated by aneurysm resection and antibiotics. The diagnosis of popliteal aneurysm infection is often clinical, echographic and sonographic, but computed tomography scan can be false negative in chronic low-grade infection. 18F-FDG PET/CT is able to accurately diagnose and localize infection with high sensibility and specificity.

  4. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Avinash; Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  5. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  6. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  11. Reconfigurable Polymer Networks for Improved Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninh, Chi Suze Q.

    Endovascular embolization of intracranial aneurysms is a minimally invasive treatment in which an implanted material forms a clot to isolate the weakened vessel. Current strategy suffers from long-term potential failure modes. These potential failure modes include (1) enzymatic degradation of the fibrin clot that leads to compaction of the embolic agent, (2) incomplete filling of the aneurysm sac by embolic agent, and (3) challenging geometry of wide neck aneurysms. In the case of wide neck aneurysms, usually an assisting metal stent is used to help open the artery. However, metal stents with much higher modulus in comparison to the soft blood vessel can cause biocompatibilities issues in the long term such as infection and scarring. Motivated to solve these challenges associated with endovascular embolization, strategies to synthesize and engineer reconfigurable and biodegradable polymers as alternative therapies are evaluated in this thesis. (1) Reconfiguration of fibrin gel's modulus was achieved through crosslinking with genipin released from a biodegradable polymer matrix. (2) Reconfigurability can also be achieved by transforming triblock co-polymer hydrogel into photoresponsive material through incorporation of melanin nanoparticles as efficient photosensitizers. (3) Finally, reconfigurability can be conferred on biodegradable polyester networks via Diels-Alder coupling of furan pendant groups and dimaleimide crosslinking agent. Taken all together, this thesis describes strategies to transform a broad class of polymer networks into reconfigurable materials for improved treatment of intracranial aneurysms as well as for other biomedical applications.

  12. Asymptomatic mycotic aneurysm of ascending aorta after heart transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Behzadnia, N; Ahmadi, Z H; Mandegar, M H; Salehi, F; Sharif-Kashani, B; Pourabdollah, M; Ansari-Aval, Z; Kianfar, A-A; Mirhosseini, S M; Eiji, M

    2015-01-01

    Mycotic pseudoaneurysm and aneurysm of the ascending aorta is a very rare and potentially fatal complication of heart transplantation. It usually presents with fever, chest pain, dyspnea, or constitutional symptoms. Most reports in the literature are about mycotic pseudoaneurysm, but mycotic aneurysm is rarer. Herein we report a 39-year-old man in who had an asymptomatic mycotic aneurysm of the ascending aorta developed late (1 year) after orthotopic heart transplantation. There was no history of previous mediastinitis or any other important infection. He underwent an uneventful replacement of the ascending aorta.

  13. Modification of the trap door technique to treat venous aneurysms in arteriovenous fistulae.

    PubMed

    Kapoulas, Konstantinos C; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2012-01-01

    We present a modification of the "trap door" technique to treat true venous aneurysms which complicate vascular access arteriovenous fistula. The technique provides wide exposure of the aneurysm, facilitating aneurysmoraphy and permitting the exploitation of any adequate venous length for autologous reconstruction of the venous outflow. Furthermore, by precluding the proximity of the newly-reconstructed venous segments to the incised skin, their level of compromise from tissue scarring or infection is prevented. PMID:22020527

  14. Branched endograft repair of mycotic ascending aortic aneurysm using the snorkel technique.

    PubMed

    Quinney, Brenton Ellisor; Jordan, William

    2011-07-01

    Mycotic aneurysms are difficult clinical cases that can be approached by several methods. Debridement of infected tissue with in situ or extra-anatomic bypass is the traditional treatment. In poor operative candidates or reoperative cases, endovascular therapies can be an alternative. We present a 9-year-old with an ascending aortic mycotic aneurysm temporized with an endovascular repair as a bridge to definitive open surgery.

  15. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  16. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  17. Techniques in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Phade, Sachin V.; Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVARs) has revolutionized the treatment of aortic aneurysms, with over half of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs performed endoluminally each year. Since the first endografts were placed two decades ago, many changes have been made in graft design, operative technique, and management of complications. This paper summarizes modern endovascular grafts, considerations in preoperative planning, and EVAR techniques. Specific areas that are addressed include endograft selection, arterial access, sheath delivery, aortic branch management, graft deployment, intravascular ultrasonography, pressure sensors, management of endoleaks and compressed limbs, and exit strategies. PMID:22121487

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms. [Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Ling, D.; Heiken, J.P.; Glazer, H.S.; Sicard, G.A.; Totty, W.G.; Levitt, R.G.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 20 patients with radiologically or surgically proven abdominal aortic aneurysms using a Siemens Magnetom scanner with a 0.35-T superconductive magnet. Of nine patients who underwent surgical repair, MRI correctly demonstrated the origin of the aortic aneurysm in nine and accurately determined the status of the iliac arteries in eight. Of 11 patients who did not have surgical repair, MRI findings correlated well with other radiologic studies. MRI was found to be more reliable than sonography in determining the relation between the aneurysm and the renal arteries as well as the status of the iliac arteries. Despite these advantages, the authors still advocate sonography as the screening procedure of choice in patients with suspected abdominal aortic aneurysms because of its lower cost and ease of performance. MRI should be reserved for patients who have had unsuccessful or equivocal sonographic examinations.

  19. Idiopathic cystic artery aneurysm complicated with hemobilia.

    PubMed

    Anand, Utpal; Thakur, Sanjeev Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Jha, Achyutanand; Prakash, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Aneurysm of the cystic artery is not common, and it is a rare cause of hemobilia. Most of reported cases are pseudoaneurysms resulting from either an inflammatory process in the abdomen or abdominal trauma. We report a healthy individual who developed hemobilia associated with cystic artery aneurysm. The patient was managed with cholecystectomy and concomitant aneurysm repair. Visceral artery aneurysms are rare and can rupture with potentially grave outcome due to excessive bleeding. Angiographic embolization is a common method of treatment for visceral artery aneurysms. Open cholecystectomy and aneurysm repair was performed in our patient due to radiological evidence of associated cholecystitis.

  20. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  1. Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, P. D.; Lodge, Brian

    1960-01-01

    This paper records an incidence of 10·4% of aneurysm of the splenic artery in 250 consecutive routine post-mortem examinations. Medial degeneration seemed to be the commonest cause of such aneurysms and although a number were associated with other intraabdominal pathology, including portal hypertension, the association may be fortuitous and not causal. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:13688586

  2. Vernet's syndrome caused by large mycotic aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery after acute otitis media--case report.

    PubMed

    Amano, Mizuki; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Watanabe, Shunji; Ashizawa, Kei; Oguni, Eiichi; Saito, Atsushi; Nakai, Yasunobu; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Abe, Takashi; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Matsumura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    An 85-year-old man presented with a rare large aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) due to acute otitis media manifesting as Vernet's syndrome 2 weeks after the diagnosis of right acute otitis media. Angiography of the right extracranial ICA demonstrated an irregularly shaped large aneurysm with partial thrombosis. The aneurysm was treated by proximal ICA occlusion using endovascular coils. The ICA mycotic aneurysm was triggered by acute otitis media, and induced Vernet's syndrome as a result of direct compression to the jugular foramen. Extracranial ICA aneurysms due to focal infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lower cranial nerve palsy, although the incidence is thought to be very low.

  3. Flow Diverters for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Alderazi, Yazan J.; Kass-Hout, Tareq; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (pipeline embolization device, Silk flow diverter, and Surpass flow diverter) have been developed to treat intracranial aneurysms. These endovascular devices are placed within the parent artery rather than the aneurysm sac. They take advantage of altering hemodynamics at the aneurysm/parent vessel interface, resulting in gradual thrombosis of the aneurysm occurring over time. Subsequent inflammatory response, healing, and endothelial growth shrink the aneurysm and reconstruct the parent artery lumen while preserving perforators and side branches in most cases. Flow diverters have already allowed treatment of previously untreatable wide neck and giant aneurysms. There are risks with flow diverters including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, distant and delayed hemorrhages, and perforator occlusions. Comparative efficacy and safety against other therapies are being studied in ongoing trials. Antiplatelet therapy is mandatory with flow diverters, which has highlighted the need for better evidence for monitoring and tailoring antiplatelet therapy. In this paper we review the devices, their uses, associated complications, evidence base, and ongoing studies. PMID:24967131

  4. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  5. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm presenting as hoarseness: successful repair with an endovascular approach

    PubMed Central

    De Freitas, Simon; Connolly, Caoilfhionn; Neary, Colm; Sultan, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus is a rare finding, particularly in the adult population. These saccular aneurysms arise at the site of an incompletely obliterated ductus arteriosus along the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Left untreated, it is associated with a high risk of potentially life-threatening complications including rupture, infection and thromboembolism. As a result, surgical correction is recommended. Previously, options were limited to open repair but as endovascular experience grows, novel techniques afford safer and less invasive alternatives. In contrast, neonatal ductus arteriosus aneurysms may regress spontaneously and expectant treatment can be justified. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness secondary to a ductus arteriosus aneurysm; a diagnosis consistent with Ortner’s syndrome. The patient underwent an uncomplicated endovascular repair using the chimney-graft technique. PMID:27141045

  6. When Blood Vessels Bulge: All About Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vessels Bulge When Blood Vessels Bulge All About Aneurysms An aneurysm—a balloon-like bulge in an artery—can ... for years without causing any symptoms. But an aneurysm is a silent threat to your health. If ...

  7. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  8. Management of cholelithiasis in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed Central

    Ouriel, K; Ricotta, J J; Adams, J T; Deweese, J A

    1983-01-01

    Gallstones were detected in 42 of 865 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (4.9%). Eighteen patients underwent concomitant aneurysm resection and cholecystectomy. Eleven patients had aneurysmectomy without cholecystectomy. Thirteen patients underwent cholecystectomy alone. There were no significant increases in operative mortality, duration of operation, or length of hospital stay when cholecystectomy was added to aneurysm resection. However, there was one instance of prosthetic infection which occurred in a patient who did not have his graft retroperitonealized prior to cholecystectomy, and who also underwent gastrostomy and drainage of the liver bed. There have been no graft complications in the remaining 17 consecutive patients who had their graft retroperitonealized prior to cholecystectomy. Nine of 11 patients who underwent aneurysmectomy without cholecystectomy experienced an episode of acute cholecystitis during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years. Two of these episodes occurred in the immediate postoperative period and one patient died of biliary sepsis. On the basis of these findings, concomitant aneurysmectomy and cholecystectomy is advised in those patients with cholelithiasis undergoing aortic aneurysm resection providing no contraindications exist. PMID:6639176

  9. Medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, B Timothy; Terrin, Michael C; Dalman, Ronald L

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common condition that may be lethal when it is unrecognized. Current guidelines suggest repair as the aneurysm diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Most aortic aneurysms are detected incidentally when imaging is done for other purposes or through screening programs. Ninety percent of these aneurysms are below the threshold for intervention at the time of detection. A number of studies have sought to determine factors that lead to progression of aneurysmal disease that might be amenable to intervention during this period of observation. We review these studies and make recommendations for the medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms. On the basis of our current knowledge of the causes of aneurysm, a number of approaches have been proposed to prevent progression of aneurysmal disease. These include hemodynamic management, inhibition of inflammation, and protease inhibition. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines rules of evidence have helped to define strength of evidence to support these approaches. Level A evidence (from large randomized trials) is available to indicate that observation of small aneurysms in men is safe up to a size of 5.5 cm and that propranolol does not inhibit aneurysm expansion. Level B evidence (from small randomized trials) suggests that roxithromycin or doxycycline will decrease the rate of aneurysm expansion. A number of studies agree that tobacco use is associated with an increased rate of aneurysm expansion. Level B and C evidence is available to suggest that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) may inhibit aneurysm expansion. There are animal data but no human data demonstrating that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, will decrease the rate of AAA expansion. A pharmacological agent without important side effects that inhibited aneurysm expansion could change

  10. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  11. Endovascular Repair of a Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm of the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Bhat, R.; Nagy, J.; Griffiths, G. D.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of a ruptured mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery, successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafting. A 64-year-old woman underwent diagnostic coronary angiography complicated by an infected hematoma of the left groin. Seven days later, she developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia and CT scan evidence of perivascular inflammation around the left common iliac artery. This was followed by rupture of a mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. The lesion was successfully treated with a stent-graft and prolonged antibiotic therapy, and the patient remains free of infection 10 months later. Accumulating evidence suggests that endovascular repair can be used safely for the repair of ruptured infected aneurysms.

  12. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  13. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  14. Hepatic artery mycotic aneurysm of tubercular aetiology.

    PubMed

    Beeresha; Ghotekar, L H; Dutta, T K; Verma, S K; Elangovan, S

    2000-02-01

    Hepatic artery aneurysm caused by tuberculosis is extremely rare, the commonest being atherosclerosis and vasculitis. A 13 year boy admitted with suspected disseminated tuberculosis had a hepatic bruit. Patient died of aneurysmal rupture before antemortem etiological diagnosis could be established. Postmortem examination revealed widespread tubercular lesions in the chest and abdomen and hepatic artery aneurysm.

  15. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  16. Rebleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Starke, R M; Connolly, E S

    2011-09-01

    Rebleeding after initial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can have substantial impact on overall patient outcome. While older studies have suggested rebleeding occurs in about 4% of patients during the first day after initial aneurysmal bleed, these studies may have failed to capture very early rebleeds and, consequently, underestimated the impact of rebleeding. An electronic literature search was performed to identify English-language articles published or available for review from February 1975 through October 2010. A total of 43 articles (40 original research and 3 review articles) focused on rebleeding after initial aneurysmal SAH in humans were selected for review. Although most studies supported an incidence of rebleeding ≤4%, studies investigating ultra-early rebleeding reported bleeding within the first 24 h following aneurysmal SAH in as many as 9-17% of patients, with most cases occurring within 6 h of initial hemorrhage. Overall, studies investigating antifibrinolytic therapy to reduce rebleeding have failed to clearly demonstrate overall therapeutic benefit. Short-course antifibrinolytic therapy may have a role prior to initial aneurysm repair, although insufficient data are currently available. PMID:21761274

  17. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  18. Anomalous Right Subclavian Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Gordon C.; Codd, John E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past 2 years, 3 anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysms have been encountered at the St. Louis Heart Institute. The 1st patient, a 72-year-old woman, was found to have an asymptomatic 5-cm-diameter anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysm after surgery for suspected rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Resection was not attempted because of her poor cardiopulmonary and renal condition. One year later, the patient remains alive with marked cardiopulmonary limitations. The 2nd patient, a 77-year-old man, experienced dysphagia and severe weight loss because of a 14-cm-diameter aneurysm. Three days after undergoing surgical repair, he required reoperation for graft occlusion with right upper-extremity ischemia. Six months after hospital discharge, he died of pulmonary insufficiency and metastatic colon cancer. The 3rd patient, a 73-year-old woman, required emergency surgical intervention because of acute rupture and hypovolemic shock. Thirteen days later, she died of aspiration, asphyxia, and cardiac arrest. On the basis of our experience and a review of the literature, we conclude that symptomatic anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysms are rare, and that surgical intervention entails a relatively high morbidity and mortality rate. If long-term survival is anticipated, associated medical illnesses should be considered before surgery is undertaken. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:209-18) Images PMID:15227483

  19. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  20. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  1. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy.

  2. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  3. Infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Fonseca, Ana Catarina

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease of the endocardium of the heart and cardiac valves, caused by a variety of infectious agents, ranging from streptococci to rickettsia. The proportion of cases associated with rheumatic valvulopathy and dental surgery has decreased in recent years, while endocarditis associated with intravenous drug abuse, prosthetic valves, degenerative valve disease, implanted cardiac devices, and iatrogenic or nosocomial infections has emerged. Endocarditis causes constitutional, cardiac and multiorgan symptoms and signs. The central nervous system can be affected in the form of meningitis, cerebritis, encephalopathy, seizures, brain abscess, ischemic embolic stroke, mycotic aneurysm, and subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke in endocarditis is an ominous prognostic sign. Treatment of endocarditis includes prolonged appropriate antimicrobial therapy and in selected cases, cardiac surgery. In ischemic stroke associated with infective endocarditis there is no indication to start antithrombotic drugs. In previously anticoagulated patients with an ischemic stroke, oral anticoagulants should be replaced by unfractionated heparin, while in intracranial hemorrhage, all anticoagulation should be interrupted. The majority of unruptured mycotic aneurysms can be treated by antibiotics, but for ruptured aneurysms, endovascular or neurosurgical therapy is indicated.

  4. DOCK8 deficiency in a boy who presented with a giant aortic aneurysm between aortic root and iliac bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Patıroğlu, Türkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Doğan, Mehmet Sait; Üzüm, Kazım

    2016-06-01

    Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) deficiency is an autosomal recessive, inherited form of hyper-immunoglobulin E (hyper-IgE) syndrome, characterized by persistent cutaneous viral infections, elevated IgE, eosinophilia, and allergic manifestations. The case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with giant aortic aneurysm between the aortic root and iliac bifurcation is described in the present report. Aortic aneurysm of this size has not yet been reported. PMID:27372622

  5. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  7. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, M G A; Lloyd, G M; Bown, M J; Fishwick, G; London, N J; Sayers, R D

    2007-01-01

    The operative mortality following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has not fallen significantly over the past two decades. Since its inception in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided an alternative to open AAA repair and perhaps an opportunity to improve operative mortality. Two recent large randomised trials have demonstrated the short and medium term benefit of EVAR over open AAA repair, although data on the long term efficacy of the technique are still lacking. This review aimed at providing an overview of EVAR and a discussion of the potential benefits and current limitations of the technique. PMID:17267674

  8. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  9. Multiple coronary aneurysms in a young adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, Justin; Petersen, Timothy C.; Flemmer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection can cause multiple deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Emerging evidence has supported a direct association between HIV infection and accelerated atherosclerosis. The mechanism for atherosclerosis in HIV-positive patients is multifactorial, an interplay between conventional risk factors, HIV itself and highly active antiretroviral therapy. The case described is a 29-year-old man with HIV, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy and with few cardiovascular risk factors, who presented with chest pain and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization revealed multiple coronary artery aneurysms in the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery. Aneurysmal formation may develop from vasculitis, HIV itself, accelerated atherosclerosis, congenital formation or medications (e.g. protease inhibitors). The researchers provide a review of coronary artery disease, aneurysmal formation and vasculitic processes in the context of HIV. As this clinical entity becomes more apparent, alternative therapeutic options may need to be explored. PMID:27168940

  10. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Aimee E.; Cahill, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  11. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Aimee E.; Cahill, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography.

  12. Multiple coronary aneurysms in a young adult with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heizer, Justin; Petersen, Timothy C; Flemmer, Mark C

    2016-05-01

    HIV infection can cause multiple deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Emerging evidence has supported a direct association between HIV infection and accelerated atherosclerosis. The mechanism for atherosclerosis in HIV-positive patients is multifactorial, an interplay between conventional risk factors, HIV itself and highly active antiretroviral therapy. The case described is a 29-year-old man with HIV, non-adherent to antiretroviral therapy and with few cardiovascular risk factors, who presented with chest pain and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization revealed multiple coronary artery aneurysms in the left main coronary artery and the right coronary artery. Aneurysmal formation may develop from vasculitis, HIV itself, accelerated atherosclerosis, congenital formation or medications (e.g. protease inhibitors). The researchers provide a review of coronary artery disease, aneurysmal formation and vasculitic processes in the context of HIV. As this clinical entity becomes more apparent, alternative therapeutic options may need to be explored.

  13. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Moores, Aimee E; Cahill, Michael S; Villines, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  14. Polyarteritis nodosa-induced pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysmal rupture.

    PubMed

    Levin, Steven; Graber, John; Ehrenwald, Eduardo; Skeik, Nedaa

    2015-03-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a systemic, necrotizing vasculitis of small- and medium-sized arteries typically with multiorgan involvement. Most cases of PAN are idiopathic, although hepatitis B or C virus infections and hairy cell leukemia are important in the pathogenesis of some cases. PAN is characterized as segmental transmural inflammation of muscular arteries. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, a negative immunofluorescence test for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, and whenever possible, biopsy conformation. Angiographic images may reveal microaneurysms affecting the renal, hepatic, or mesenteric vasculature. Aneurysmal formation and rupture are important complications that can be fatal. Treatment may warrant immunosuppression with steroids and cyclophosphamide. If left untreated, PAN can be fatal. To our knowledge, we report the second documented case of PAN-induced ruptured inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm.

  15. Ten-Year Follow-Up of Endovascular Aneurysm Treatment with Talent Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael B. Scheschkowski, Tobias; Ring, Markus; Herber, Sascha; Oberholzer, Katja; Leicher-Dueber, Annegret; Neufang, Achim; Schmiedt, Walther; Dueber, Christoph

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results, complications, and secondary interventions during long-term follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to investigate the impact of endoleak sizes on aneurysm shrinkage. From 1997 to March 2007, 127 patients (12 female, 115 male; age, 73.0 {+-} 7.2 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with Talent stent-grafts. Follow-up included clinical visits, contrast-enhanced MDCT, and radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical outcome, secondary interventions, endoleak rate and management, and change in aneurysm size. There was no need for primary conversion surgery. Thirty-day mortality was 1.6% (two myocardial infarctions). Procedure-related morbidity was 2.4% (paraplegia, partial infarction of one kidney, and inguinal bleeding requiring surgery). Mean follow-up was 47.7 {+-} 34.2 months (range, 0-123 months). Thirty-nine patients died during follow-up; three of the deaths were related to aneurysm (aneurysm rupture due to endoleak, n = 1; secondary surgical reintervention n = 2). During follow-up, a total of 29 secondary procedures were performed in 19 patients, including 14 percutaneous procedures (10 patients) and 15 surgical procedures (12 patients), including 4 cases with late conversion to open aortic repair (stent-graft infection, n = 1; migration, endoleak, or endotension, n = 3). Overall mean survival was 84.5 {+-} 4.7 months. Mean survival and freedom from any event was 66.7 {+-} 4.5 months. MRI depicted significantly more endoleaks compared to MDCT (23.5% vs. 14.3%; P < 0.01). Patients in whom all aneurysm side branches were occluded prior to stent-grafting showed a significantly reduced incidence of large endoleaks. Endoleaks >10% of the aneurysm area were associated with reduced aneurysm shrinkage compared to no endoleaks or <10% endoleaks ({Delta} at 3 years, -1.8% vs. -12.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, endovascular

  16. Infection.

    PubMed

    Miclau, Theodore; Schmidt, Andrew H; Wenke, Joseph C; Webb, Lawrence X; Harro, Janette M; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-09-01

    Musculoskeletal infection is a clinical problem with significant direct healthcare costs. The prevalence of infection after closed, elective surgery is frequently estimated to be less than 2%, but in severe injuries, posttraumatic infection rates have been reported as 10% or greater. Although clinical infections are found outside the realm of medical devices, it is clear that the enormous increase of infections associated with the use of implants presents a major challenge worldwide. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections.

  17. Parent Artery Occlusion for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lishan; Peng, Qiang; Ha, Wenbo; Zhou, Dexiang; Xu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Summary Peripheral cerebral aneurysms are difficult to treat with preservation of the parent arteries. We report the clinical and angiographic outcome of 12 patients with cerebral aneurysms located peripherally. In the past five years, 12 patients, six females and six males, presented at our institution with intracranial aneurysms distal to the circle of Willis and were treated endovascularly. The age of our patients ranged from four to 58 years with a mean age of 37 years. Seven of the 12 patients had subarachnoid and/or intracerebral hemorrhage upon presentation. Two patients with P2 dissecting aneurysms presented with mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia, one patient with a large dissecting aneurysm complained of headaches and two patients with M3 dissecting aneurysms had mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia of the right arm. Locations of the aneurysms were as follows: posterior cerebral artery in seven patients, anterior inferior cerebellar artery in two, posterior inferior cerebellar artery in one, middle cerebral artery in two. Twelve patients with peripheral cerebral aneurysms underwent parent artery occlusion (PAO). PAO was performed with detachable coils. No patient developed neurologic deficits. Distally located cerebral aneurysms can be treated with parent artery occlusion when selective embolization of the aneurysmal sac with detachable platinum coils or surgical clipping cannot be achieved. PMID:20465914

  18. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  19. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  20. Mechanics of left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, S; Ghista, D N; Jayaraman, G

    1986-01-01

    When a coronary artery is significantly occluded, the left ventricular myocardial segment, which is perfused by that coronary artery, will become ischaemic and even irreversibly infarcted. An acute infarct has very low stiffness and if it involves the entire wall there is a risk of rupture; however, in the absence of such a critical situation, fibrous tissue is laid into the infarcted myocardial segment. Such an infarcted fibrotic myocardial segment will not be able to contract, and so generate tensile stress. The surrounding intact myocardium will contract and generate wall stress, thereby developing a high intra-chamber systolic pressure; the chronically infarcted and fibrotic segment will have to sustain this high chamber pressure. Its loss of contractility and the resulting reduced systolic stiffness relative to the intact segment, will cause it to deform into a bulge; this is an aneurysm. When a left ventricular chamber with an aneurysm contracts during the systolic phase, some blood also goes into the aneurysm, and this decreases the stroke volume; since the aneurysm wall is passive, stagnant blood flow prevails in the aneurysm itself, which in turn can give rise to the formation of a mural thrombus. These serious consequences provide a justification for the analysis of an infarcted left ventricular chamber, in order to predict the size of the aneurysmic bulge. Such an analysis is presented in this paper. To determine the left ventricular wall deformation, and the stress arising from infarction of a wall segment (which leads to a ventricular aneurysm) the left ventricle is modelled here as a pressurized ellipsoidal shell. Deformations of infarcted wall segments are computed for several damaged wall-thicknesses in left ventricles of different shapes. The analysis involves a derivation of equations for wall-stress equilibrium with the chamber pressure, and myocardial incompressibility before and after infarct formation. The equations are solved by the Newton

  1. Pregnancy-related rupture of arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J M; Van Hooydonk, J E; Boehm, F H

    1982-09-01

    Over 50 per cent of ruptured arterial aneurysms in women under the age of 40 are pregnancy-related. The hemodynamic and endocrine changes of pregnancy appear to be the cause of arterial alterations which may lead to new aneurysm formation and/or weakening of preexisting aneurysms. The most commonly reported arteries to have aneurysms rupture during pregnancy are the aorta, cerebral arteries, splenic artery, renal artery, coronary artery, and ovarian artery. In many instances, the rupture of an arterial aneurysm will initially simulate other less serious disease processes, thus delaying the correct diagnosis until a catastrophic event occurs. Early diagnosis and treatment of a ruptured arterial aneurysm are imperative in order to give optimal chances of survival to the mother and fetus.

  2. Kidney Salvage During Surgical Treatment of a Pararenal Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, George; Kakoulaki, Sofia; Hatzidakis, Adam; Ioannou, Christos V

    2015-12-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms although rare are accompanied by an extensive risk of morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is challenging, but it offers the only chance of survival. Extra-anatomic aortic reconstruction through uninfected tissues is feasible, providing a durable therapeutic option in the presence of severe infection. PMID:27011569

  3. Mycotic brain aneurysm and cerebral hemorrhagic stroke: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Lisboa, Lurdes; Sarmento, António; Almeida, Jorge; Mota, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Endocarditis due to Abiotrophia spp. is rare and often associated with negative blood cultures, infection relapse, and high rates of treatment failure and mortality (Lainscak et al., J Heart Valve Dis 14(1):33-36, 2005). The authors describe a case of an adolescent with cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to mycotic brain aneurysm rupture.

  4. Clipping techniques in cerebral aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Acciarri, Nicola; Toniato, Giovanni; Raabe, Andreas; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of cerebral aneurysm surgery owes a great tribute to the tenacity of pioneering neurosurgeons who designed and developed the clips used to close the aneurysms neck. However, until the beginning of the past century, surgery of complex and challenging aneurysms was impossible due to the lack of surgical microscope and commercially available sophisticated clips. The modern era of the spring clips began in the second half of last century. Until then, only malleable metal clips and other non-metallic materials were available for intracranial aneurysms. Indeed, the earliest clips were hazardous and difficult to handle. Several neurosurgeons put their effort in developing new clip models, based on their personal experience in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Finally, the introduction of the surgical microscope, together with the availability of more sophisticated clips, has allowed the treatment of complex and challenging aneurysms. However, today none of the new instruments or tools for surgical therapy of aneurysms could be used safely and effectively without keeping in mind the lessons on innovative surgical techniques provided by great neurovascular surgeons. Thanks to their legacy, we can now treat many types of aneurysms that had always been considered inoperable. In this article, we review the basic principles of surgical clipping and illustrate some more advanced techniques to be used for complex aneurysms. PMID:26657306

  5. Coronary steal due to ruptured right coronary aneurysm causing myocardial infarction in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazuhito; Yagi, Nobuhito; Wake, Minoru; Takahashi, Takanori; Nakazato, Jun; Miyagi, Tadayoshi; Shimotakahara, Junichi

    2014-08-01

    A 34-year-old female with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed an acute inferior myocardial infarction while hospitalized for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus sepsis. An emergent coronary angiography revealed an ectatic proximal left coronary artery and a huge aneurysm (37 mm × 32 mm) in the mid-portion of the right coronary artery, which had ruptured into the right atrium. A "steal phenomenon" due to significant left to right shunt resulting from the ruptured aneurysm was the cause of the myocardial infarction. Infection of the wall of the aneurysm might have contributed to the growth and the rupture in the presence of a pre-existing coronary aneurysm.

  6. Adolescent External Iliac Artery Trauma: Recurrent Aneurysmal Dilatation of an Iliofemoral Saphenous Vein Graft Treated by Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Lenton, James; Davies, John; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S.; McPherson, Simon

    2008-09-15

    An adolescent male sustained a severe penetrating injury to the external iliac artery. Emergency surgical revascularization was with a reversed long saphenous vein interposition graft. The primary graft and the subsequent revision graft both became aneurysmal. The second graft aneurysm was successfully excluded by endovascular stent-grafts with medium-term primary patency. A venous graft was used initially rather than a synthetic graft to reduce the risk of infection and the potential problems from future growth. Aneurysmal dilatation of venous grafts in children and adolescents is a rare but recognized complication. To the best of our knowledge, exclusion of these aneurysms with stent-grafts has not been previously reported in the adolescent population.

  7. Surgical Treatment of Aneurysmal Bone Cysts of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Addisu; McCarthy, Edward F.; Kebaish, Khaled M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to document the presentation, location, diagnostic modalities, preoperative embolization status, treatment, histology, complications, and recurrence rates for aneurysmal bone cysts of the mobile spine. Methods We reviewed our institution's database to identify patients diagnosed with aneurysmal bone cysts of the mobile spine (excluding the sacrum) from 1995 through 2006. Of those 17 patients, three were treated elsewhere and 14 underwent surgical treatment at our institution. Of those 14 patients, the nine (mean age at presentation, 17.2 years; range, 5‥32 years) with at least 2 years of follow-up (average, 49.6 months; range, 24‥88 months) formed our study group. For those nine patients, we tabulated the presentation, location, diagnostic modalities, preoperative embolization status, treatment, histology, complications, and recurrence rates. Results Pain was the presenting symptom in all nine patients. The lesion most commonly occurred in the cervical spine (five); two occurred in the lumbar spine, and two occurred in the thoracic spine. Patients underwent resection and combined anterior and posterior spinal arthrodesis (six) or resection and posterior spinal arthrodesis (three). There were four complications: one iliac crest donor site infection, one incidental durotomy, and two neurologic defcits. We noted two recurrences (both within 3 months). Conclusions Aneurysmal bone cysts of the spine can be successfully treated with surgical resection and instrumentation. PMID:23576920

  8. Thoracic aorta aneurysm open repair in heart transplant recipient; the anesthesiologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Fabrizio; Oriani, Alessandro; De Luca, Monica; Bignami, Elena; Sala, Alessandra; Chiesa, Roberto; Melissano, Germano; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Many years following transplantation, heart transplant recipients may require noncardiac major surgeries. Anesthesia in such patients may be challenging due to physiological and pharmacological problems regarding allograft denervation and difficult immunosuppressive management. Massive hemorrhage, hypoperfusion, renal, respiratory failure, and infections are some of the most frequent complications related to thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. Understanding how to optimize hemodynamic and infectious risks may have a substantial impact on the outcome. This case report aims at discussing risk stratification and anesthetic management of a 54-year-old heart transplant female recipient, affected by Marfan syndrome, undergoing thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. PMID:26750703

  9. [Mycotic aneurysm of the subrenal abdominal aorta: extra anatomical reconstruction in five patients].

    PubMed

    Denguir, R; Gharsallah, N; Khanfir, I; Ghedira, F; Kharroubi, M; Kalfat, T; Khayati, A; Abid, A

    2003-02-01

    Between 1988 and 2001, five patients with mycotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta underwent surgery. Extra-anatomical reconstruction with axillo-bifemoral bypass grafting was performed in all patients. The hospital mortality rate was 20%. During the follow-up period two patients presented thrombosis of the axillo-bifemoral bypass, descending aorto-bifemoral bypass was performed in one. Extra-anatomic revascularization is a satisfactory procedure in the treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. The results are acceptable and the prognosis is mainly related to the underlying pathology and the severity of the infection. PMID:12616221

  10. Thoracic aorta aneurysm open repair in heart transplant recipient; the anesthesiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Fabrizio; Oriani, Alessandro; De Luca, Monica; Bignami, Elena; Sala, Alessandra; Chiesa, Roberto; Melissano, Germano; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Many years following transplantation, heart transplant recipients may require noncardiac major surgeries. Anesthesia in such patients may be challenging due to physiological and pharmacological problems regarding allograft denervation and difficult immunosuppressive management. Massive hemorrhage, hypoperfusion, renal, respiratory failure, and infections are some of the most frequent complications related to thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. Understanding how to optimize hemodynamic and infectious risks may have a substantial impact on the outcome. This case report aims at discussing risk stratification and anesthetic management of a 54-year-old heart transplant female recipient, affected by Marfan syndrome, undergoing thoracic aorta aneurysm repair.

  11. Pulmonary artery aneurysm with patent arterial duct: resection of aneurysm and ductal division.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Endale; Teodori, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Congenital or acquired aneurysm of the pulmonary artery (PA) is rare. Although aneurysms are described following surgical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), occurrence of this lesion in association with PDA without previous surgery is extremely uncommon. An eight-year-old patient with PDA and aneurysm of the main PA is described in this report. Clinical diagnosis of PDA was made upon presentation. Diagnosis of PA aneurysm was suspected on chest x-ray and was confirmed on transthoracic echocardiography. Successful surgical resection of the aneurysm and division of the duct were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient did well on follow-up both from clinical and echocardiographic point of view.

  12. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  13. Coil embolization of multiple hepatic artery aneurysms in a patient with undiagnosed polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Stambo, Glenn W; Guiney, Michael J; Cannella, Xavier F; Germain, Bernard F

    2004-05-01

    Hepatic aneurysms are a rare sequela of vascular abnormalities in the liver, including trauma, infection, necrotizing vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), and iatrogenic and arterial mediolysis. Presentation with intra-abdominal hemorrhage is associated with a high mortality rate. We describe life-saving transcatheter coil embolization of multiple isolated ruptured hepatic pseudoaneurysms in a patient with no history or clinical findings of PAN. We present angiographic findings and intra-arterial transcatheter embolization techniques in the treatment of ruptured large hepatic artery aneurysms. Endovascular specialists should recognize that PAN could present with classic angiographic findings and, in some cases, as life-threatening ruptured isolated hepatic artery aneurysms as its first presentation.

  14. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jou, Liangder; Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  15. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  16. Hepatic artery aneurysm in corticosteroid-treated, adult Kawasaki's disease.

    PubMed

    Caputo, A E; Roberts, W N; Yee, Y S; Posner, M P

    1991-11-01

    We describe a single case of Kawasaki's disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) with the rare complication of a hepatic artery aneurysm which was surgically repaired. Unusual features include arterial aneurysmal formation in the hepatic arteries rather than in coronary arteries, the unusual morphology of the hepatic artery aneurysm, and the expansion of the aneurysm after corticosteroid therapy.

  17. Ruptured Isolated Spinal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez Romero, Diego; Batista, Andre Lima; Gentric, Jean Christoph; Raymond, Jean; Roy, Daniel; Weill, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolated spinal artery aneurysms are exceedingly rare vascular lesions thought to be related to dissection of the arterial wall. We describe two cases presenting with spinal subarachnoid haemorrhage that underwent conservative management. In the first patient the radiculomedullary branch involved was feeding the anterior spinal artery at the level of D3 and thus, neither endovascular nor surgical approach was employed. Control angiography was performed at seven days and at three months, demonstrating complete resolution of the lesion. In our second case, neither the anterior spinal artery or the artery of Adamkiewicz could be identified during angiography, thus endovascular management was deemed contraindicated. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a stable lesion in the second patient. No rebleeding or other complications were seen. In comparison to intracranial aneurysms, spinal artery aneurysms tend to display a fusiform appearance and lack a clear neck in relation to the likely dissecting nature of the lesions. Due to the small number of cases reported, the natural history of these lesions is not well known making it difficult to establish the optimal treatment approach. Various management strategies may be supported, including surgical and endovascular treatment, but It would seem that a wait and see approach is also viable, with control angiogram and treatment decisions based on the evolution of the lesion. PMID:25496690

  18. Preemptive Medicine for Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomohiro; NOZAKI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Most of cerebral aneurysms (CAs) are incidentally discovered without any neurological symptoms and the risk of rupture of CAs is relatively higher in Japanese population. The goal of treatments for patients with CAs is complete exclusion of the aneurysmal rupture risk for their lives. Since two currently available major treatments, microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, have inherent incompleteness to achieve cure of CAs with some considerable treatment risks, and there is no effective surgical or medical intervention to inhibit the formation of CAs in patients with ruptured and unruptured CAs, new treatment strategies with lower risk and higher efficacy should be developed to prevent the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs should be designed to prevent or delay the onset of symptoms from CAs found in an asymptomatic state or inhibit the de novo formation of CAs, but we have no definite methods to distinguish rupture-prone aneurysms from rupture-resistant ones. Recent advancements in the research of CAs have provided us with some clues, and one of the new treatment strategies for CAs will be developed based on the findings that several inflammatory pathways may be involved in the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs will be established with specific biomarkers and imaging modalities which can sensor the development of CAs. PMID:27053328

  19. Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Joo; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are rare and have distinct angiographic findings. The rarity, large size, complex anatomy and hemodynamic characteristics of giant serpentine aneurysms make treatment difficult. We report a case of a giant serpentine aneurysm of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) that presented as headache. Treatment involved a superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA bypass followed by aneurysm resection. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits, and early and late follow-up angiography disclosed successful removal of the aneurysm and a patent bypass graft. We conclude that STA-MCA bypass and aneurysm excision is a successful treatment method for a giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:20856671

  20. [A cylinder aneurysm of a penile prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Pannek, J; Bartel, P; Göcking, K

    2011-07-01

    Herniation of a penile prosthesis (cylinder aneurysm) is an extremely rare complication of penile prosthesis surgery. We report the first case of such an aneurysm in a patient with spinal cord injury. The treatment of choice is surgical revision with replacement of the faulty device. Filling of the implanted system with contrast media facilitates preoperative diagnostic workup. PMID:21567276

  1. Two cases of giant serpentine aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumabe, T; Kaneko, U; Ishibashi, T; Kaneko, K; Uchigasaki, S

    1990-06-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysm (GSA) is an entity defined on radiological and pathological grounds as a giant, partially thrombosed aneurysm containing tortuous vascular channels. We have had the opportunity to study two patients with GSAs, which has allowed for a complete comparative anatomical and radiological study. This report emphasizes the etiology of the GSAs. Twenty-two patients with GSAs have been reported in the literature, of which pathological studies were done in 10. In most of these, the aneurysm was found to be filled with an organized thrombus, but in our patients the aneurysm was filled with relatively new clot. The aneurysm enlarged and a change in the tortuous vascular channel was observed over a period of 1 year in the first patient, whereas a globoid aneurysm developed into a GSA in the brief period of just 2 weeks in the second patient. This rapid transformation of a globoid aneurysm into a GSA is of particular interest when the etiology of GSAs is considered. Our patients therefore shed some interesting light on the possible pathophysiology of GSAs. That is, the bloodstream may change dynamically in a giant aneurysm and may become a serpentine channel under conditions that lead to a "Coanda effect." PMID:2362659

  2. The Helsinki Rat Microsurgical Sidewall Aneurysm Model

    PubMed Central

    Marbacher, Serge; Marjamaa, Johan; Abdelhameed, Essam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Frösen, Juhana

    2014-01-01

    Experimental saccular aneurysm models are necessary for testing novel surgical and endovascular treatment options and devices before they are introduced into clinical practice. Furthermore, experimental models are needed to elucidate the complex aneurysm biology leading to rupture of saccular aneurysms. Several different kinds of experimental models for saccular aneurysms have been established in different species. Many of them, however, require special skills, expensive equipment, or special environments, which limits their widespread use. A simple, robust, and inexpensive experimental model is needed as a standardized tool that can be used in a standardized manner in various institutions. The microsurgical rat abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm model combines the possibility to study both novel endovascular treatment strategies and the molecular basis of aneurysm biology in a standardized and inexpensive manner. Standardized grafts by means of shape, size, and geometry are harvested from a donor rat's descending thoracic aorta and then transplanted to a syngenic recipient rat. The aneurysms are sutured end-to-side with continuous or interrupted 9-0 nylon sutures to the infrarenal abdominal aorta. We present step-by-step procedural instructions, information on necessary equipment, and discuss important anatomical and surgical details for successful microsurgical creation of an abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm in the rat. PMID:25350840

  3. Lessons from Animal Models of Arterial Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, S. David; Mintz, Yoav; Beeri, Ronen; Rubinstein, Chen; Gilon, Dan; Gavish, Leah; Berlatzky, Yacov; Appelbaum, Liat; Gavish, Lilach

    2013-01-01

    We review the results from the most common animal models of arterial aneurysm, including recent findings from our novel, laparoscopy-based pig model of abdominal aortic aneurysm, that contribute important insights into early pathogenesis. We emphasize the relevance of these findings for evaluation of treatment protocols and novel device prototypes for mechanism-based prevention of progression and rupture. PMID:26798701

  4. Pantopaque simulating thrombosed intracranial aneurysms on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lidov, M.W.; Silvers, A.R.; Mosesson, R.E.; Stollman, A.L.; Som, P.M.

    1996-03-01

    A patient is presented in whom iophendylate (Pantopaque) within the basal cisterns closely resembled the appearance on MRI of thrombosed aneurysms of the middle cerebral arteries. The sometimes subtle differences between the appearances on MRI of Pantopaque and aneurysmal clot are discussed to permit accurate diagnosis without resorting to more invasive diagnostic tests, such as cerebral angiography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  6. Anesthetic considerations in intracranial aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Steen, Stephen N; Johnson, Calvin; Lumb, Phillip D; Zelman, Vladimer; Mok, Martin S

    2002-03-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm generally has a poor outcome, though perioperative treatments have improved. At the present time, the important factors in the management of intracranial aneurysm surgery appear to be the maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure and the avoidance of hyperglycemia. Relevant features of the anesthetic management of this surgery are discussed.

  7. Simultaneous presentation of two cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Ezura, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kazuto; Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman experienced sudden onset of severe headache. Computed tomography showed subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hematoma in the right frontal lobe. Digital subtraction angiography revealed three aneurysms in the anterior communicating artery (AcomA), the right posterior communicating artery (PcomA), and the right middle cerebral artery. The AcomA aneurysm was treated with endovascular coiling. However, her oculomotor nerve palsy was aggravated after the procedure. Embolization of the right PcomA aneurysm was conducted immediately and her oculomotor nerve palsy recovered completely 3 months later. Simultaneous presentation of multiple aneurysms with separate symptoms is rare. We speculate that the progressive oculomotor nerve palsy was caused by tiny enlargement or morphological change of the aneurysm caused by elevated blood pressure and pulsatile effect after SAH.

  8. Aneurysms of the visceral and renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, Y. P.; Assadourian, R.; Taylor, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    Visceral aneurysms represent a rare clinical entity; however, 10-20% will rupture and this is accompanied by a significant mortality rate of 20-70%, depending on the location of the aneurysm. The incidence, pathogenesis and clinical aspects of splanchnic and renal artery aneurysms are reviewed from the available literature and the problems of diagnosis and treatment are discussed. Their incidence is increasing and controversy still exists regarding their treatment. The decision for intervention has to take into account the size and the natural history of the lesion, the risk of rupture, which is high during pregnancy, and the relative risk of surgical or radiological intervention. For most asymptomatic aneurysms, expectant treatment is acceptable. For large, symptomatic or aneurysms with a high risk of rupture, surgery is advisable. An alternative treatment is the use of endovascular techniques, ie embolisation, or graft stent insertion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8881722

  9. Cerebral aneurysms: Formation, progression and developmental chronology

    PubMed Central

    Etminan, Nima; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dreier, Rita; Bruckner, Peter; Torner, James C.; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel; Macdonald, R. Loch

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UAIs) in the general population is up to 3%. Existing epidemiological data suggests that only a small fraction of UIAs progress towards rupture over the lifetime of an individual, but the surrogates for subsequent rupture and the natural history of UIAs are discussed very controversially at present. In case of rupture of an UIA, the case-fatality is up to 50%, which therefore continues to stimulate interest in the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysm formation and progression. Actual data on the chronological development of cerebral aneurysm has been especially difficult to obtain and, until recently, the existing knowledge in this respect is mainly derived from animal or mathematical models or short-term observational studies. Here, we highlight the current data on cerebral aneurysm formation and progression as well as a novel approach to investigate the developmental chronology of cerebral aneurysms. PMID:24323717

  10. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  11. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  12. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  13. Successful coil embolization of a ruptured basilar artery aneurysm in a child with leukemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shihori; Maehara, Taketoshi; Mukawa, Maki; Aoyagi, Masaru; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Nemoto, Shigeru; Ono, Toshiaki; Ohno, Kikuo

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare in the pediatric population compared to adults. This has incited considerable discussion on how to treat children with this condition. Here, we report a child with a ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with coil embolization. A 12-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and accompanying abdominal candidiasis after chemotherapy suddenly complained of a severe headache and suffered consciousness disturbance moments later. Computed tomography scans and cerebral angiography demonstrated acute hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by saccular basilar artery aneurysm rupture. External ventricular drainage was performed immediately. Because the patient was in severe condition and did not show remarkable signs of central nervous system infection in cerebrospinal fluid studies, we applied endovascular treatment for the ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysm, which was successfully occluded with coils. The patient recovered without new neurological deficits after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Recent reports indicate that both endovascular and microsurgical techniques can be used to effectively treat ruptured cerebral aneurysms in pediatric patients. A minimally invasive endovascular treatment was effective in the present case, but long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm the efficiency of endovascular treatment for children with ruptured saccular basilar artery aneurysms.

  14. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  15. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system. PMID:18774684

  16. Physical Factors Effecting Cerebral Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivan, Chander; Fiorella, David J.; Woo, Henry H.; Lieber, Baruch B.

    2013-01-01

    Many factors that are either blood-, wall-, or hemodynamics-borne have been associated with the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The distribution of cerebral aneurysms around the bifurcations of the circle of Willis has provided the impetus for numerous studies trying to link hemodynamic factors (flow impingement, pressure, and/or wall shear stress) to aneurysm pathophysiology. The focus of this review is to provide a broad overview of such hemodynamic associations as well as the subsumed aspects of vascular anatomy and wall structure. Hemodynamic factors seem to be correlated to the distribution of aneurysms on the intracranial arterial tree and complex, slow flow patterns seem to be associated with aneurysm growth and rupture. However, both the prevalence of aneurysms in the general population and the incidence of ruptures in the aneurysm population are extremely low. This suggests that hemodynamic factors and purely mechanical explanations by themselves may serve as necessary, but never as necessary and sufficient conditions of this disease’s causation. The ultimate cause is not yet known, but it is likely an additive or multiplicative effect of a handful of biochemical and biomechanical factors. PMID:23549899

  17. Physical factors effecting cerebral aneurysm pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sadasivan, Chander; Fiorella, David J; Woo, Henry H; Lieber, Baruch B

    2013-07-01

    Many factors that are either blood-, wall-, or hemodynamics-borne have been associated with the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The distribution of cerebral aneurysms around the bifurcations of the circle of Willis has provided the impetus for numerous studies trying to link hemodynamic factors (flow impingement, pressure, and/or wall shear stress) to aneurysm pathophysiology. The focus of this review is to provide a broad overview of such hemodynamic associations as well as the subsumed aspects of vascular anatomy and wall structure. Hemodynamic factors seem to be correlated to the distribution of aneurysms on the intracranial arterial tree and complex, slow flow patterns seem to be associated with aneurysm growth and rupture. However, both the prevalence of aneurysms in the general population and the incidence of ruptures in the aneurysm population are extremely low. This suggests that hemodynamic factors and purely mechanical explanations by themselves may serve as necessary, but never as necessary and sufficient conditions of this disease's causation. The ultimate cause is not yet known, but it is likely an additive or multiplicative effect of a handful of biochemical and biomechanical factors.

  18. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  19. Growth of basilar artery aneurysm after ventriculo-peritoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Soo; Oh, Chang-Wan; Han, Dae Hee

    2002-11-01

    We report upon two cases of obstructive hydrocephalus produced by giant basilar artery aneurysms. They initially presented with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, and were managed by a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt with good symptomatic improvement. With time, however, both showed a gradual deterioration of clinical symptoms due to increased aneurysm size. One, with a basilar tip aneurysm was treated by direct neck-clipping of the aneurysm, and was able to return to work. In the other patient, with a basilar trunk aneurysm, endovascular occlusion of one vertebral artery was attempted in an effort to decrease the aneurysm size, but the aneurysm enlarged precipitating brain stem failure. In conclusion, these cases reveal the risk of the VP shunt, which may induce aneurysmal growth, leading to clinical devastation, and emphasize the importance of definitive treatment for giant cerebral aneurysms whenever possible.

  20. Intracranial blister aneurysms: clip reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo; McCracken, D Jay

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial blister aneurysms are difficult to treat cerebrovascular lesions that typically affect the anterior circulation. These rare aneurysms can lead to acute rupture which usually cannot be treated via endovascular methods, but still require urgent surgical intervention. Surgical options are limited given their unique pathology and often require a combination of wrapping and clip reconstruction. In this video we present two patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured blister aneurysms. We demonstrate several surgical techniques for repairing the vascular defect with and without intraoperative rupture. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/nz-JM45uKQU.

  1. Anterior ethmoidal artery aneurysm and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    da Costa, L B; Valiante, T; Terbrugge, K; Tymianski, M

    2006-09-01

    The association between the formation of intracranial aneurysms and situations of increased blood flow in certain areas of the brain is well accepted today. It has been seen in association with arteriovenous malformations of the brain, carotid occlusion, and Moyamoya disease. The occurrence of aneurysms in small arteries of the skull base, with the exception of the intracavernous carotid artery, however, is rare. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior ethmoidal artery aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case of documented intracranial bleeding from such a lesion.

  2. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  3. Clinical outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated with hypertension: A 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi-Tao; Yuan, Qi-Dong; Cui, Ming-Zhe; Fang, Hong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) complicated with hypertension. Methods: Fifty-two patients with AAA complicated with hypertension treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into an observation group (34 cases) and a control group (18 cases). The control group was treated by incision of AAA and artificial blood vessel replacement, and the observation group was treated by EVAR. Results: All surgeries were performed successfully. However, compared with the control group, the observation group had significantly less surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion, as well as significantly higher total hospitalization expense (P<0.05). During the one-month follow-up, the observation group was significantly less prone to pulmonary infection, surgical site infection, lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis and lower extremity weakness than the control group (P<0.05). The observation group enjoyed significantly better quality of life than the control group did one and three months after surgery (P<0.05). Conclusion: Given sufficient funding, EVAR should be preferentially selected in the treatment of AAA complicated with hypertension due to minimal invasion, safety, stable postoperative vital signs and improved quality of life. PMID:27022336

  4. Ruptured cerebral aneurysm from choriocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Jizong

    2013-09-01

    Gestational trophoblastic diseases include hydatidiform moles, invasive moles, choriocarcinoma, placental-site trophoblastic tumours and miscellaneous trophoblastic lesions. Choriocarcinoma is a rare disease that arises from the trophoblastic epithelium of the placenta at the beginning of pregnancy. Among the confirmed cases, 45% occur after molar pregnancy, 25% after normal pregnancy, 25% after an abortion and 5% after ectopic pregnancy. This tumour is usually diagnosed based on its histopathologic appearance and a high level of serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG). Choriocarcinoma exhibits a good response to chemotherapy and radiation. However, it is also known for its tendency to spread rapidly to multiple organs, including the lungs, liver and brain. As one of the worst prognostic factors, brain metastasis complicates 3-28% of gestational choriocarcinoma cases. Increased β-HCG levels and a low serum cerebrospinal fluid β-HCG level can be strongly suggestive of intracranial choriocarcinoma, even in the absence of histopathologically proven disease. Reviewing the literature, there were 23 cases of intracerebral haemorrhage from an oncotic aneurysm as an initial presentation of choriocarcinoma. We report a further case of intracerebral haematoma secondary to oncotic aneurysm as the first presentation of metastatic choriocarcinoma with normal serum β-HCG.

  5. Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Behcet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hak; Lee, Si-Un; Huh, Choonwoong; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-01-01

    A man visited the emergency room with a headache. Brain computed tomography showed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multiple aneurysms. After aneurysm clipping surgery, the patient was discharged. After 5 days, he was admitted to the hospital with skin ulceration and was diagnosed with Behcet syndrome. An angiogram taken 7 weeks after aneurysmal SAH showed intracranial vasospasm. Because inflammation in Behcet syndrome may aggravate intracranial vasospasm, intracranial vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH in Behcet syndrome should be monitored for longer compared to general aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27114963

  6. Endovascular Repair of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    undergoing endovascular repair is aortic rupture, and the most common causes of late death are cardiac events and aortoesophageal or aortobronchial fistula. Technical Success Rate Technical success rates reported by case series are 55% to 100% (100% and 94.4% in 2 studies with all elective cases, 89% in a study with 5% emergent cases, and 55% in a study with 42% emergent cases). Surgical Reintervention In the comparative study, 3 (7.1%) patients in the ESG group and 14 (26.5%) patients in the surgery group required surgical reintervention. In the ESG group, the reasons for surgical intervention were postoperative bleeding at the access site, paraplegia, and type 1 endoleak. In the surgical group, the reasons for surgery were duodenal perforation, persistent thoracic duct leakage, false aneurysm, and 11 cases of postoperative bleeding. Pooled data from case series show that 9 (2.6%) patients required surgical intervention. The reasons for surgical intervention were endoleak (3 cases), aneurysm enlargement and suspected infection (1 case), aortic dissection (1 case), pseudoaneurysm of common femoral artery (1 case), evacuation of hematoma (1 case), graft migration (1 case), and injury to the access site (1 case). Endovascular Revision In the comparative study, 3 (7.1%) patients required endovascular revision due to persistent endoleak. Pooled data from case series show that 19 (5.3%) patients required endovascular revision due to persistent endoleak. Graft Migration Two case series reported graft migration. In one study, 3 proximal and 4 component migrations were noted at 2-year follow-up (total of 5%). Another study reported 1 (3.7%) case of graft migration. Overall, the incidence of graft migration was 2.6%. Aortic Rupture In the comparative study, aortic rupture due to bare stent occurred in 1 case (2%). The pooled incidence of aortic rupture or dissection reported by case series was 1.4%. Postprocedural Complications In the comparative study, there were no statistically

  7. Microsurgical technique of symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Fu; Hsu, Sanford P C; Chen, Min-Hsiung; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2015-07-01

    Symptomatic intracavernous aneurysm is rare. Cranial nerves in the cavernous sinus are subjected to the mass effect of an expanding aneurysm. Microsurgical clipping is the treatment of choice to relieve compressive cranial neuropathy. In this video, the authors present a case of intracavernous aneurysm causing diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness. The patient was operated on via a pretemporal transclinoid-transcavernous approach. The aneurysm was completely obliterated through direct clipping. There were no new-onset neurologic deficits and complications after the operation. Complete recovery of the diplopia, ptosis, and facial numbness was observed at the 6-month postoperative follow up. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4w5QUoNIAQM. PMID:26132609

  8. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  9. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Kische, Stephan; Rehders, Tim C.; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Rauchhaus, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition with structural weakness of the aortic wall, which can progress to arterial dilatation and rupture. Today, both an increasing awareness of vascular disease and the access to tomographic imaging facilitate the diagnosis of TAA even in an asymptomatic stage. The risk of rupture for untreated aneurysms beyond a diameter of 5.6 cm ranges from 46% to 74% and the two-year mortality rate is greater than 70%, with most deaths resulting from rupture. Treatment options include surgical and non-surgical repair to prevent aneurysm enlargement and rupture. While most cases of ascending aortic involvement are subject to surgical repair (partially with valve-preserving techniques), aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta are amenable to emerging endovascular techniques as an alternative to classic open repair or to a hybrid approach (combining debranching surgery with stent grafting) in an attempt to improve outcomes. PMID:22419919

  10. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  11. Case Report: A Troublesome Ophthalmic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Meling, T. R.; Sorteberg, W.; Bakke, S. J.; Jacobsen, E. A.; Lane, P.; Vajkoczy, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective and Importance When treating large unruptured ophthalmic artery (OA) aneurysms causing progressive blindness, surgical clipping is still the preferred method because aneurysm sac decompression may relieve optic nerve compression. However, endovascular treatment of OA aneurysms has made important progress with the introduction of stents. Although this development is welcomed, it also makes the choice of treatment strategy less straightforward than in the past, with the potential of missteps. Clinical Presentation A 56-year-old woman presented with a long history of progressive unilateral visual loss and magnetic resonance imaging showing a 20-mm left-sided OA aneurysm. Intervention Because of her long history of very poor visual acuity, we considered her left eye to be irredeemable and opted for endovascular therapy. The OA aneurysms was treated with stent and coils but continued to grow, threatening the contralateral eye. Because she failed internal carotid artery (ICA) balloon test occlusion, we performed a high-flow extracranial-intracranial bypass with proximal ICA occlusion in the neck. However, aneurysm growth continued due to persistent circulation through reversed blood flow in distal ICA down to the OA and the cavernous portion of the ICA. Due to progressive loss of her right eye vision, we surgically occluded the ICA proximal to the posterior communicating artery and excised the coiled, now giant, OA aneurysm. This improved her right eye vision, but her left eye was permanently blind. Conclusion This case report illustrates complications of the endovascular and surgical treatment of a large unruptured OA aneurysm. PMID:25485220

  12. Multiple tuberculous aneurysms of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Pierret, Charles; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Grand, Bertrand; Boddaert, Guillaume; Laurian, Claude; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    Tuberculous aneurysms of the aorta are quite rare, but are exceptional when found in multiple locations. We report the case of multiple tuberculous aortic aneurysms of the thoracic and abdominal aorta in a 19-year-old female discovered when she consulted for thrombocytopenic purpura. The treatment for both locations included prolonged antituberculous therapy and surgical resection with cryopreserved aortic allograft patch for the reconstruction.

  13. Aneurysmal portosystemic venous shunt: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bodner, G; Glück, A; Springer, P; König, P; Perkmann, R

    1999-10-01

    A case of an aneurysmal portosystemic venous shunt detected by colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) is presented. A young female patient complained of postprandial fatigue and had paroxysmal tachycardia. A direct vascular communication between right portal vein and right hepatic vein was found at CDUS and confirmed by direct portal angiogram. Using detachable coils a complete occlusion of the intrahepatic shunt was obtained. Reports from the literature regarding portovenous aneurysms are reviewed.

  14. Direct clipping of large basilar trunk aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshikazu; Nakagawa, Daichi; Kawai, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    A large basilar trunk aneurysm was incidentally found in a 77-year-old woman in examination for headache. Though it was asymptomatic, high signal intensity was noticed in the brainstem around the aneurysm on FLAIR image of MRI. As she was otherwise healthy, surgical clipping was performed through anterior temporal approach. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/0soWM8meCW8 . PMID:25554839

  15. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G.; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  16. Juxtarenal aortic aneurysm: endoluminal transfemoral repair?

    PubMed

    Ferko, A; Krajina, A; Jon, B; Lesko, M; Voboril, Z; Zizka, J; Eliás, P

    1997-01-01

    Endoluminal transfemoral repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by a stent graft placement requires a segment of the nondilated infrarenal aorta of at least 15 mm long for safe stent graft attachment. The possibility of endoluminal treatment of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with partially covered spiral Z stent was assessed in experiment and in three clinical cases. In the experiment, the noncovered spiral Z stent was placed into the abdominal aorta, across the origins of renal arteries and mesenteric arteries, in six dogs. In the clinical cases, a partially covered stent graft was attached in 3 patients with the juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (of the group of 12 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm). The stent grafts were attached with proximal uncovered parts across the origins of the renal arteries. In experiment, the renal artery occlusions or stenoses were not observed 36 months after stent placement, and in clinic, 3 patients with the juxtarenal aortic aneurysm were successfully treated by stent graft placement. There were no signs of flow impairment into the renal arteries 14 months after stent graft implantation. This approach can possibly expand the indications for endoluminal grafting in the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms in patients who are at high risk for surgery.

  17. Biology of intracranial aneurysms: role of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Ali, Muhammad S; Jabbour, Pascal M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Koch, Walter J; Dumont, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) linger as a potentially devastating clinical problem. Despite intense investigation, our understanding of the mechanisms leading to aneurysm development, progression and rupture remain incompletely defined. An accumulating body of evidence implicates inflammation as a critical contributor to aneurysm pathogenesis. Intracranial aneurysm formation and progression appear to result from endothelial dysfunction, a mounting inflammatory response, and vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation producing a pro-inflammatory phenotype. A later final common pathway appears to involve apoptosis of cellular constituents of the vessel wall. These changes result in degradation of the integrity of the vascular wall leading to aneurysmal dilation, progression and eventual rupture in certain aneurysms. Various aspects of the inflammatory response have been investigated as contributors to IA pathogenesis including leukocytes, complement, immunoglobulins, cytokines, and other humoral mediators. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of IA compared with control arteries has prominently featured differential expression of genes involved with immune response/inflammation. Preliminary data suggest that therapies targeting the inflammatory response may have efficacy in the future treatment of IA. Further investigation, however, is necessary to elucidate the precise role of inflammation in IA pathogenesis, which can be exploited to improve the prognosis of patients harboring IA. PMID:22781330

  18. Bronchial Artery Aneurysm Embolization with NBCA

    SciTech Connect

    Aburano, Hiroyuki Kawamori, Yasuhiro; Horiti, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Kiyohide; Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-12-15

    We present a case of asymptomatic bronchial artery aneurysm that formed a fistula with part of the pulmonary artery (there was no definite fistula with the pulmonary vein). We were able to catheterize the feeding vessel but could not reach the aneurysm. We therefore injected a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA; Histoacryl, B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) and iodized oil (Lipiodol; Guerbet, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) from the feeding vessel. The fistula, aneurysm, and feeding vessel were almost totally occluded. After embolization, the patient coughed a little; there were no other definite side effects or complications. One and 3 months later, on chest CT, the aneurysm was almost completely occupied with hyperattenuating NBCA-Lipiodol embolization. NBCA is a liquid embolization material whose time to coagulation after injection can be controlled by diluting it with Lipiodol. It is therefore possible to embolize an aneurysm, feeding vessels, and efferent vessels (in our case, it was a fistula) by using an NBCA-Lipiodol mixture of an appropriate concentration, regardless of whether the catheter can reach the aneurysm or not.

  19. False-negative indocyanine green videoangiography among complex unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms: the importance of further aneurysm inspection.

    PubMed

    Kulwin, Charles; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-10-01

    Successful surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms requires complete occlusion of the aneurysm lumen while maintaining patency of the adjacent branching and perforating arteries. Intraoperative flow assessment allows aneurysm clip repositioning in the event these requirements are not met, avoiding the risk of postoperative rehemorrhage or infarction. A number of modalities have been proposed for primarily intraoperative qualitative blood flow assessment, including microdoppler ultrasonography, intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and more recently noninvasive fluorescent angiography including indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent imaging. Puncture of the aneurysm dome to exclude aneurysm sac filling may also assess the efficacy of clip placement. Although a high concordance between ICG and DSA has been reported, there remains an important subset of aneurysms for which negative ICG study may erroneously suggest aneurysm occlusion. A high-risk situation for such a false-negative study is an atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm in which vessel wall plaque interferes with the ICG signal. Furthermore, a decreased flow within the aneurysm may not allow enough emission light for detection under the current technology. In this report, we describe our experience with cases of MCA aneurysms with false-negative ICG-VA studies requiring clip adjustment for optimal surgical treatment and discuss two illustrative cases of MCA aneurysms with intraoperative fluorescence studies that were falsely negative, requiring puncture of the aneurysm to correctly identify incomplete aneurysm occlusion. PMID:24552255

  20. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  2. The experimental study on aneurysm with PIV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueshe, Wang; Xiaoqi, Ma; Di, Li

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral aneurysm, a local enlargement of an artery caused by weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery, has the high death rate and disability rate, and is a threat to public health. The forming mechanism of aneurysm is complex, which motivated many researchers to conduct studies in this field. The results indicated that increasing heart frequency can aggravate the oscillation of wall shear stress, and push The growth points of aneurysm along the aneurysm wall, thereby significantly affecting bthe growth and rupture mechanism of aneurysm. In addition, it is found that the curvature of the vessel is the key to induce the secondary vortex in the aneurysm; the secondary vortex increases the magnitude of WSS near the dome of aneurysm, which can cause the rupture of aneurysm dome. there is a linear relationship between the velocity of blood flow and the square root of hear frequency.

  3. Giant serpentine aneurysm of the distal anterior cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Senbokuya, Nobuo; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Horikoshi, Toru

    2012-11-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man with a giant serpentine aneurysm arising from the distal anterior cerebral artery. This aneurysm grew from a fusiform aneurysm to a huge aneurysm within 5 months before manifesting as a mass lesion. The aneurysm was largely filled with thrombus, and 4 distal branches arose from the aneurysm dome. Selective balloon test occlusion of the distal anterior cerebral artery using an intravascular technique was performed to confirm the tolerance of the brain tissue. The balloon test occlusion elicited adequate leptomeningeal collateral circulation and no neurologic symptoms; thus, the aneurysm was treated with trapping and resection. The patient had no ischemic complications after the surgery and returned to his job 1 month later. No ischemia developed in the 2 years after surgery. Selective balloon test occlusion of the distal cerebral artery using an intravascular technique can be a very useful tool in planning the therapeutic strategy for a complicated distal cerebral aneurysm.

  4. Aneurysm of the internal carotid artery after minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Laissaoui, Younès; Noureddine El Alami, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of posttraumatic aneurysm of the internal carotid artery. The aneurysm was surgically removed, followed by a simple postoperative course. Such lesions should be highly suspected in cases of penetration into the retroangulomandibular neck region.

  5. Traumatic aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery from fist injury.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, A; Tognetti, F; Lanzino, G

    1990-01-01

    A case of traumatic aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery (STA) from fist injury during a basketball game is described. The published cases of STA aneurysms secondary to sport trauma and their diagnosis and treatment are reviewed.

  6. Bilingual aphasia due to spontaneous acute subdural haematoma from a ruptured intracranial infectious aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Vajramani, Girish V; Akrawi, Hawar; McCarthy, Rosaleen A; Gray, William P

    2008-09-01

    We report a case of spontaneous subdural haematoma due to ruptured intracranial infectious aneurysm, presenting with bilingual aphasia and illustrating differential language recovery. A 62-year-old right-handed bilingual gentleman, with a diagnosis of infective endocarditis, developed headache and became expressively aphasic in the English language. Three days later he was receptively and expressively aphasic in both English and Arabic. Cranial MRI scans showed a left-sided acute subdural haematoma with mass effect and midline shift. Contrast CT brain scans showed an enhancing speck adjacent to the clot and cerebral angiogram confirmed a distal middle cerebral artery aneurysm. He underwent image-guided craniotomy, evacuation of the subdural haematoma and excision of the aneurysm. Histopathological examination was consistent with an infectious intracranial aneurysm. Postoperatively his aphasia did not improve immediately. He had widened pulse pressure due to severe aortic regurgitation, confirmed on echocardiography. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair, following which his aphasia recovered gradually. Initially the recovery of his language was limited to Arabic. About a week later he recovered his English language as well. At 3-year follow-up he is doing well and has no neurological deficits. His aphasia has recovered completely. The present case is unique because of (a) presence of pure subdural haematoma, and (b) the differential susceptibility and recovery of native (L1) and acquired language (L2) in presence of a common pathology. The neurology of language in a bilingual is analysed and possible mechanisms discussed.

  7. Nocardia abscessus-related intracranial aneurysm of the internal carotid artery with associated brain abscess: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Farran, Yvette; Antony, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia infections primarily begin in the lungs and spread hematogenously to other sites in the body. Thus, a Nocardia brain abscess is not a completely uncommon occurrence. However, a Nocardia brain abscess complicated by a middle cerebral artery and infectious intracranial aneurysm is a very rare clinical entity. We present a case of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with an associated Nocardia brain abscess that required surgical intervention and resection. The patient was an immunocompetent 60-year-old male who presented with a chief complaint of headache and was found to have an infected intracranial aneurysm and cerebral abscess. He underwent drainage of the abscess with subsequent resection of the infected aneurysm. Cultures from both the blood vessel and brain tissue grew Nocardia abscessus. He was successfully treated with 6 weeks of ceftriaxone and high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Infectious intracranial aneurysms of the brain caused by Nocardia are rare occurrences, and only a single previous case has been described in the literature. The outcomes of this condition can be catastrophic if it is not treated with a combination of surgery and intravenous antibiotics. The guidelines for the management of this infection are not well defined at this time. PMID:26724261

  8. Nocardia abscessus-related intracranial aneurysm of the internal carotid artery with associated brain abscess: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Farran, Yvette; Antony, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia infections primarily begin in the lungs and spread hematogenously to other sites in the body. Thus, a Nocardia brain abscess is not a completely uncommon occurrence. However, a Nocardia brain abscess complicated by a middle cerebral artery and infectious intracranial aneurysm is a very rare clinical entity. We present a case of an infectious intracranial aneurysm with an associated Nocardia brain abscess that required surgical intervention and resection. The patient was an immunocompetent 60-year-old male who presented with a chief complaint of headache and was found to have an infected intracranial aneurysm and cerebral abscess. He underwent drainage of the abscess with subsequent resection of the infected aneurysm. Cultures from both the blood vessel and brain tissue grew Nocardia abscessus. He was successfully treated with 6 weeks of ceftriaxone and high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Infectious intracranial aneurysms of the brain caused by Nocardia are rare occurrences, and only a single previous case has been described in the literature. The outcomes of this condition can be catastrophic if it is not treated with a combination of surgery and intravenous antibiotics. The guidelines for the management of this infection are not well defined at this time.

  9. Management of Splenic Artery Aneurysms and False Aneurysms with Endovascular Treatment in 12 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, R.; Garcier, J.M.; Abergel, A.; Mofid, R.; Garcia, V.; Chahid, T.; Ravel, A.; Pezet, D.; Boyer, L.

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the endovascular treatment of splenic artery aneurysms and false aneurysms. Methods: Twelve patients (mean age 59 years, range 47-75 years) with splenic artery aneurysm (n = 10) or false aneurysm (n = 2) were treated. The lesion was asymptomatic in 11 patients; hemobilia was observed in one patient. The lesion was juxta-ostial in one case, located on the intermediate segment of the splenic artery in four, near the splenic hilus in six,and affected the whole length of the artery in one patient. In 10 cases, the maximum lesion diameter was greater than 2 cm; in one case 30% growth of an aneurysm 18 mm in diameter had occurred in 6 months;in the last case, two distal aneurysms were associated (17 and 18 mm in diameter). In one case, stent-grafting was attempted; one detachable balloon occlusion was performed; the 10 other patients were treated with coils. Results: Endovascular treatment was possible in 11 patients (92%) (one failure: stenting attempt). In four cases among 11, the initial treatment was not successful (residual perfusion of aneurysm); surgical treatment was carried out in one case, and a second embolization in two. Thus in nine cases (75%) endovascular treatment was successful: complete and persistent exclusion of the aneurysm but with spleen perfusion persisting at the end of follow-upon CT scans (mean 13 months). An early and transient elevation of pancreatic enzymes was observed in four cases. Conclusion: Ultrasound and CT have made the diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm or false aneurysm more frequent. Endovascular treatment, the morbidity of which is low, is effective and spares the spleen.

  10. Traumatic aneurysms of the intracranial and cervical vessels: A review.

    PubMed

    Bhaisora, Kamlesh S; Behari, Sanjay; Godbole, Chaitanya; Phadke, Rajendra V

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysms (TICA) are rare in occurrence, constituting less than 1% of the total cases of intracranial aneurysms. Cervical posttraumatic aneurysms arising from major blood vessels supplying the brain are also extremely rare. Their variable locations, morphological variations and the presence of concomitant head injury makes their diagnosis and treatment a challenge. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, classification and management issues related to TICA as well as traumatic neck aneurysms and review the pertinent literature.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF AORTIC ANEURYSMS

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O’Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2-4MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45-0.7N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the

  12. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25355741

  13. Rupture of giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm following flow diversion: mechanical stretch as a potential mechanism for early aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin; Humphries, William Edward; Doss, Vinodh T; Hoit, Daniel; Elijovich, Lucas; Arthur, Adam S

    2015-11-01

    A patient with a giant symptomatic vertebrobasilar aneurysm was treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy for obstructive hydrocephalus followed by treatment of the aneurysm by flow diversion using a Pipeline Embolization Device. After an uneventful procedure and initial periprocedural period, the patient experienced an unexpected fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 week later. Autopsy demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysm rupture (linear whole wall rupture). The patent Pipeline Embolization Device was in its intended location, as was the persistent coil occlusion of the distal left vertebral artery. The aneurysm appeared to rupture in a linear manner and contained a thick large expansile clot that seemed to disrupt or rupture the thin aneurysm wall directly opposite the basilar artery/Pipeline Embolization Device. We feel the pattern of aneurysm rupture in our patient supports the idea that the combination of flow diversion and the resulting growing intra-aneurysmal thrombus can create a mechanical force with the potential to cause aneurysm rupture. PMID:25361560

  14. [Giant intracranial aneurysm in three years old boy: case report].

    PubMed

    de Tella, Osvaldo Inácio; Crosera, João Francisco; Herculano, Marco Antonio; de Paiva Neto, Manoel Antonio

    2006-06-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are rare in the pediatric age group and differ from adults' aneurysms in size, localization and incidence. We report a 3-year-old boy with giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms who presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was submitted to surgical treatment and the postoperative period was uneventful.

  15. Massive superior mesenteric venous aneurysm with portal venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Starikov, Anna; Bartolotta, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Portal venous aneurysm is a rare and sometimes dangerous vascular pathology, which can result in thrombosis or rupture. We present the computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and sonographic imaging of a 27-year-old man with superior mesenteric venous aneurysm and subsequent thrombosis following acute pancreatitis. This multimodality imaging approach can prove useful in the evaluation of these rare aneurysms.

  16. The Management of Intracranial Aneurysms During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Barbarite, Eric; Hussain, Shahrose; Dellarole, Anna; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Peterson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic changes during pregnancy may favor the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Despite this risk, guidelines for managing intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy have not been clearly defined. The objective of this review is to describe the treatment options for pregnant women with intracranial aneurysms, and to report the maternal and fetal outcomes associated with different treatment strategies. A search of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database for the period January 1991 through June 2015. Aneurysm characteristics and management, pregnancy management, and maternal and fetal outcomes were evaluated. The most recent search was performed in June 2015. In total, 50 aneurysms (44 patients) were evaluated. Rupture was confirmed upon imaging in 36 aneurysms (72%), and most aneurysms ruptured during the third trimester (77.8%). Coil embolization was associated with a lower complication rate than clipping in patients with ruptured aneurysms (9.5% vs 23.1%). For patients with unruptured aneurysms, surgical management was associated with 31.9% fewer complications compared to no treatment. Most patients underwent Cesarean delivery (84%), and a combined neurosurgical-obstetrical procedure was used for 8 patients with ruptured aneurysms near term. Adverse outcomes were reported in 11.9% of children. Treatment of intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy is safe and effective. Furthermore, we suggest that coil embolization be considered a first line treatment over clipping for surgical management of the pregnant population. Going forward, we encourage the establishment of formal guidelines for managing intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy. PMID:27400091

  17. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  20. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  1. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  2. Pulmonary mycotic pseudo-aneurysm with a prior history of ventricular septal defect. Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Walasangikar, Vishal; Kumar Dey, Amit; Sharma, Rajaram; Murumkar, Vivek; Gadewar, Rohit; Hira, Priya; Mittal, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    In general aneurysms of the pulmonary arteries are less frequent than intracranial, aortic or other vascular locations. Infectious causes include bacteria such as Staphylococcus sp and Streptococcus sp, mycobacteria, Treponema pallidium (syphilis) and rarely fungi. We report a 7 year old female with two right-sided parahilar pseudo-aneurysm of fungal origin with a prior history of ventricular septal defect. Pulmonary mycotic pseudo-aneurysms are very rare and require a high suspicion to diagnose. If a patient is still symptomatic for fever and cough for a long time, and consolidation on x-ray is not improving on antibiotics, contrast-enhanced computed tomography is indicated. It can be suspected that the "friable mass attached to ventricular septal defect patch" was a source of fungeal emboli to pulmonary arteries thus giving weight to the infective endocarditis etiology. A prior history of ventricular septal defect repair could favour fungal endocarditis. PMID:27238181

  3. Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Zubillaga, A.F.; Guglielmi, G.; Vinuela, F.; Duckwiler, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was applied to determine the aneurysm neck sizes on the diagnostic angiograms. The cases were divided into two groups according to neck size, 4 mm being the discriminative value for small and wide necks. The posttreatment angiogram of each case was analyzed to evaluate the degree of occlusion achieved by the technique. Necks were successfully measured in 95% of the aneurysms. Complete aneurysm thrombosis was observed in 85% of the small-necked aneurysms and in 15% of the wide-necked aneurysms. Accurate angiographic measurements of neck diameter can be obtained in most aneurysms. The size of an aneurysm neck correlates well with the results of the endovascular treatment. Small-necked aneurysms can be satisfactorily occluded with this technique. In wide-necked aneurysms this technique should be reserved for lesions having a high surgical risk. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the gastrointestinal tract. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Diseases of the aorta. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  5. The Asymmetric Vascular Stent: Efficacy in a rabbit aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Paciorek, Ann M; Dohatcu, Andreea; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Bednarek, Daniel R; Kolega, John; Levy, Elad I; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Rudin, Stephen; Mocco, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Development of hemodynamic modifying devices to treat intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is an active area of research. The asymmetric vascular stent (AVS), a stent containing a low porosity patch, is such device. We evaluate AVS efficacy in an in vivo IA model. Methods We created twenty-four elastase rabbit model aneurysms: thirteen treated with the AVS, five treated with standard coronary stents, and six untreated controls. Four weeks following treatment, aneurysms underwent follow-up angiography, cone-beam micro-CT, histologic evaluation, and selective electron microscopy scanning. Results Four rabbits died early in the study: three during AVS treatment and one control (secondary to intra-procedural vessel injury and an unrelated tumor, respectively). AVS-treated aneurysms exhibited very weak or no aneurysm flow immediately after treatment and no flow in all aneurysms at follow-up. Stent-treated aneurysms showed flow both after treatment (5/5) and at follow-up (3/5). All control aneurysms remained patent during the study. Micro-CT scans showed: 9/9 of scanned AVS aneurysms were occluded, (6/9) AVSs were ideally placed and (3/9) the low porosity region partially covered the aneurysm neck; stent-treated aneurysms were 1/5 occluded, 2/5 patent, and 2/5 partially-patent. Histology results demonstrated: for AVS-treated aneurysms, advanced thrombus organization in the (9/9); for stent-treated aneurysms (1/4) no thrombus, (2/4) partially-thrombosed and (1/4) fully-thrombosed; for control aneurysms (4/4) no thrombus. Conclusion The use of AVSs shows promise as a viable new therapeutic in intracranial aneurysm treatment. These data encourage further investigation and provide substantial support to the AVS concept. PMID:19131663

  6. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  7. Abdominal aneurysm and horseshoe kidney: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Bietz, D S; Merendino, K A

    1975-01-01

    Two patients with aortic abdominal aneurysms in association with horseshoe kidney are presented, making a total of 34 cases recorded in the literature. In 29 patients, the aneurysm was resected and five patients were non-resectable. Because of the abnormalities in vascular supply to the abnormal kidney, it is important to diagnose the combination of aneurysm and horseshoe kidney preoperatively. An error in diagnosis should be unusual if an intravenous pyelogram is routinely obtained on all patients. This study may reveal abnormalities which will allow the diagnosis of horseshoe kidney to be made or suspected. If the intravenous pyelogram is abnormal, it should be followed by an aortogram. This may substantiate the diagnosis of aneurysm and horseshoe kidney and provide the necessary detailed information regarding the pattern of blood supply and its relationship to functioning tissue. The amount and disposition of functioning renal parenchyma may be further amplified by renal scan. If this sequence is followed, the unanticipated combination of abdominal aneurysm and horseshoe kidney should be rare. PMID:1130850

  8. Radiological features of azygous vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Moore, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Mediastinal masses are most commonly associated with malignancy. Azygous vein aneurysm is a very rare differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass. We report here three cases of azygous vein aneurysm including children and adult patients. In the pediatric patient it was further complicated by thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism. We describe the radiological features on CXR, MRI, CT, PET-CT, US and angiogram and their differential diagnosis. Imaging findings of continuity with azygous vein, layering of contrast medium on enhanced CT and dynamic MRA showing filling of the mass at the same time as the azygous vein without prior enhancement will be strongly suggestive of azygous vein aneurysm with transtracheal ultrasound being the definitive test in these patients. It is important to keep a vascular origin mass in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal masses. Also, in young healthy patients with pulmonary embolism, a vascular etiology such as azygous vein aneurysm should be carefully evaluated. This article will help the clinicians to learn about the imaging features of azygous vein aneurysm on different imaging modalities.

  9. Aneurysm strength can decrease under calcification.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y; Aboudi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of vessels in the vascular system that are prone to rupture. Prediction of the aneurysm rupture is a challenging and unsolved problem. Various factors can lead to the aneurysm rupture and, in the present study, we examine the effect of calcification on the aneurysm strength by using micromechanical modeling. The calcified tissue is considered as a composite material in which hard calcium particles are embedded in a hyperelastic soft matrix. Three experimentally calibrated constitutive models incorporating a failure description are used for the matrix representation. Two constitutive models describe the aneurysmal arterial wall and the third one - the intraluminal thrombus. The stiffness and strength of the calcified tissue are simulated in uniaxial tension under the varying amount of calcification, i.e. the relative volume of the hard inclusion within the periodic unit cell. In addition, the triaxiality of the stress state, which can be a trigger for the cavitation instability, is tracked. Results of the micromechanical simulation show an increase of the stiffness and a possible decrease of the strength of the calcified tissue as compared to the non-calcified one. The obtained results suggest that calcification (i.e. the presence of hard particles) can significantly affect the stiffness and strength of soft tissue. The development of refined experimental techniques that will allow for the accurate quantitative assessment of calcification is desirable. PMID:26717251

  10. Current strategies for the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R A; Fink, M E

    1987-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm represents a major health issue. Although most people who experience an aneurysmal SAH survive to be admitted to a hospital, less than one third of these patients ever return to their premorbid status. Clearly, morbidity of this magnitude demands reevaluation of the clinical approach to this problem. This article reviews the natural history of aneurysmal SAH, and examines the current therapeutic strategies that have been suggested to improve the outcome. Careful evaluation of the existing data suggests that early aneurysm surgery and aggressive postoperative volume expansion therapy constitute the best presently available approach to patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. PMID:3297009

  11. Radiological features of uncommon aneurysms of the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Kalisz, Kevin; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Although aortic aneurysms are the most common type encountered clinically, they do not span the entire spectrum of possible aneurysms of the cardiovascular system. As cross sectional imaging techniques with cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging continue to improve and becomes more commonplace, once rare cardiovascular aneurysms are being encountered at higher rates. In this review, a series of uncommon, yet clinically important, cardiovascular aneurysms will be presented with review of epidemiology, clinical presentation and complications, imaging features and relevant differential diagnoses, and aneurysm management. PMID:27247710

  12. Comprehensive Overview of Contemporary Management Strategies for Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Amitoz; Nimjee, Shahid M; Agrawal, Abhishek; Zhang, Jonathan; Diaz, Orlando; Zomorodi, Ali R; Smith, Tony; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric; Klucznik, Richard P; Ferrell, Andrew; Golshani, Kiarash; Stieg, Philip E; Britz, Gavin W

    2015-10-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains an important health issue in the United States. Despite recent improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral aneurysms, the mortality rate following aneurysm rupture. In those patients who survive, up to 50% are left severely disabled. The goal of preventing the hemorrhage or re-hemorrhage can only be achieved by successfully excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. This article is a comprehensive review by contemporary vascular neurosurgeons and interventional neuroradiolgists on the modern management of cerebral aneurysms.

  13. Swine hybrid aneurysm model for endovascular surgery training.

    PubMed

    Namba, K; Mashio, K; Kawamura, Y; Higaki, A; Nemoto, S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  14. Swine Hybrid Aneurysm Model for Endovascular Surgery Training

    PubMed Central

    Namba, K.; Mashio, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Higaki, A.; Nemoto, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  15. A Case of Glucocorticoid Remediable Aldosteronism and Thoracoabdominal Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Shahrrava, Anahita; Moinuddin, Sunnan; Boddu, Prajwal; Shah, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is rare familial form of primary aldosteronism characterized by a normalization of hypertension with the administration of glucocorticoids. We present a case of GRA and thoracoabdominal aneurysm complicated by multiple aortic dissections requiring complex surgical and endovascular repairs. Registry studies have shown a high rate of intracranial aneurysms in GRA patients with high case fatality rates. The association of thoracoabdominal aneurysms with GRA has not been described, thus far, in literature. Studies have shown that high tissue aldosterone levels concomitant with salt intake have a significant role in the pathogenesis of aneurysms and this may explain the formation of aneurysms in the intracranial vasculature and aorta. The association of GRA with thoracic aortic aneurysms needs to be further studied to develop screening recommendations for early identification and optimal treatment. Also, the early use of mineralocorticoid antagonists may have a significant preventive and attenuating effect in aneurysm formation, an association which needs to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27366333

  16. Endoport-Assisted Microsurgical Treatment of a Ruptured Periventricular Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Caruso, James; Buell, Thomas; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Importance. Ruptured periventricular aneurysms in patients with moyamoya disease represent challenging pathologies. The most common methods of treatment include endovascular embolization and microsurgical clipping. However, rare cases arise in which the location and anatomy of the aneurysm make these treatment modalities particularly challenging. Clinical Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old female with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm located in the wall of the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. Distal endovascular access was not possible, and embolization risked the sacrifice of arteries supplying critical brain parenchyma. Using the BrainPath endoport system, the aneurysm was able to be accessed. Since the fusiform architecture of the aneurysm prevented clip placement, the aneurysm was ligated with electrocautery. Conclusion. We demonstrate the feasibility of endoport-assisted approach for minimally invasive access and treatment of uncommon, distally located aneurysms. PMID:27195160

  17. Endoport-Assisted Microsurgical Treatment of a Ruptured Periventricular Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Caruso, James; Starke, Robert M; Ding, Dale; Buell, Thomas; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Importance. Ruptured periventricular aneurysms in patients with moyamoya disease represent challenging pathologies. The most common methods of treatment include endovascular embolization and microsurgical clipping. However, rare cases arise in which the location and anatomy of the aneurysm make these treatment modalities particularly challenging. Clinical Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old female with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm located in the wall of the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. Distal endovascular access was not possible, and embolization risked the sacrifice of arteries supplying critical brain parenchyma. Using the BrainPath endoport system, the aneurysm was able to be accessed. Since the fusiform architecture of the aneurysm prevented clip placement, the aneurysm was ligated with electrocautery. Conclusion. We demonstrate the feasibility of endoport-assisted approach for minimally invasive access and treatment of uncommon, distally located aneurysms. PMID:27195160

  18. Resolution of third nerve palsy despite persistent aneurysmal mass effect after flow diversion embolization of posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Binyamin, Tamar R; Dahlin, Brian C; Waldau, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCOM) aneurysms may cause third nerve palsies. The optimal treatment with clipping versus coiling remains controversial. Here we report on two cases of resolution of third nerve palsy after flow diversion embolization of large and giant PCOM aneurysms without adjuvant coil placement. The resolution of third nerve palsy was not preceded by significant shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac on MRI. However, one patient showed resolution of T2-weighted signal abnormalities in the midbrain and mesial temporal lobe despite a similar size of the aneurysm. Therefore, flow diversion embolization of a PCOM aneurysm may resolve oculomotor nerve palsies through decreasing arterial pulsations against the nerve or midbrain. PMID:27183957

  19. Uterine cirsoid aneurysm: MRI and MRA

    SciTech Connect

    Joja, Ikuo; Asakawa, Mari; Motoyama, Kazumi

    1996-03-01

    Uterine cirsoid aneurysm is uncommon. It is important to make a diagnosis of this disease preoperatively, because repeated curettages may induce life-threatening massive genital bleeding. We present a case of a 51-year-old woman with uterine cirsoid aneurysm in whom MRI and MRA were very useful for the preoperative diagnosis. The radiologic appearances on ultrasonography, CT, conventional SE MRI, MRA, dynamic MRI, and pelvic angiography are presented. Conventional SE T1-weighted and T2-weighted images demonstrated multiple flow voids in the uterus and bilateral adnexal regions. MRA demonstrated a cluster of distinct, tortuous, and coiled vascular channels in the pelvis. MRA could obtain images almost equal to angiography and was considered to be an excellent noninvasive imaging technique for the diagnosis of uterine cirsoid aneurysm. 28 refs., 7 figs

  20. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention.

  1. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Current and Future Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, R. J. Ivancev, K.

    2008-05-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has rapidly expanded since its introduction in the early 1990s. Early experiences were associated with high rates of complications including conversion to open repair. Perioperative morbidity and mortality results have improved but these concerns have been replaced by questions about long-term durability. Gradually, too, these problems have been addressed. Challenges of today include the ability to roll out the endovascular technique to patients with adverse aneurysm morphology. Fenestrated and branch stent-graft technology is in its infancy. Only now are we beginning to fully understand the advantages, limitations, and complications of such technology. This paper outlines some of the concepts and discusses the controversies and challenges facing clinicians involved in endovascular aneurysm surgery today and in the future.

  2. Renal interventions during endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Renal insufficiency is a risk factor for mortality and morbidity during endovascular aneurysm repair. Multiple changes in practice have occurred to mitigate renal injury and renal dysfunction. Transrenal fixation does carry an increased risk of a decline in renal function in the medium term. Renal stenting for athero-occlusive disease during endovascular aneurysm repair needs careful consideration, as indications have changed and there are unexpected consequences with early vessel occlusion. The growing number of renal interventions during complex endovascular aneurysm repair with the advent of chimney snorkel/periscope techniques and the introduction of fenestrated grafts has shown the resilience of the intervention with relatively low renal issues (approximately 10%), but has also illustrated the need for additional device development.

  3. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  4. Emergency endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Dixon, Hannah; Saratzis, Nikolaos

    2010-12-01

    Popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA), despite being rare, is the most common peripheral aneurysm. It can present as acute thrombosis and occlusion of the aneurysmal segment, and distal embolization, causing either chronic or acute limb ischemia. It has traditionally been treated with open surgical reconstruction. Endovascular repair of PAAs has recently been applied electively with a favourable early and mid-term outcome; however there is a lack of reports on the endovascular treatment of PAAs presenting with acute complications. This report describes the treatment of a thrombosed PAA in a 58 year old male using an endovascular stent-graft and also provides a systematic review of the literature on the emergency endovascular treatment of PAAs.

  5. Embolomycotic Aneurysm of External Iliac Artery

    PubMed Central

    Terán, Nemesio A.; Gonzalez, Nerio M.; García, Luis; Gonzalez, Freddy E.; Rivera, Humberto E.

    1989-01-01

    We report a case of embolomycotic aneurysm of the right iliac artery secondary to bacterial endocarditis. The patient, a 33-year-old woman, presented with unilateral hydronephrosis and lower extremity edema caused by aneurysmal compression of the ipsilateral ureter and the external iliac vein. She was treated with ligation and an extraperitoneal left-external-iliac-artery to right-femoral-artery bypass using a knitted Dacron prosthesis. Since her surgery, our patient has been well except for persistence of moderate leg edema. To the best of our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st case of embolomycotic external-iliac-artery aneurysm secondary to bacterial endocarditis and resulting in hydronephrosis and venous insufficiency. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1989;16:51-55) Images PMID:15227238

  6. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Agustin, Jose Alberto; de Diego, Jose Juan Gomez; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Rodrigo, Jose Luis; Almeria, Carlos; Mahia, Patricia; Luaces, Maria; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Macaya, Carlos; de Isla, Leopoldo Perez

    2015-07-26

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur, including heart failure, thromboembolism, or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-year-old male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded, and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm, causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. PMID:26225205

  7. Transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ramesh; Trehan, Vijay; Rangasetty, Uma Mahesh C; Mukhopadhyay, Saibal; Thakur, Ashish K; Kalra, G S

    2004-02-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of ruptured sinus of valsalva aneurysm was attempted in eight patients between January 1995 and March 2003 as an alternative strategy to surgery as this technique at present is an accepted therapeutic modality for various intracardiac defects. The age range was 14-35 years, all were male, seven in symptomatic class III and one in class IV on medical treatment. Two-dimensional and color Doppler echocardiography revealed rupture of an aneurysm of right coronary sinus into right ventricle in five and noncoronary sinus into right atrium in three and none had associated ventricular septal defect. The echo estimated size of the defect was 7-12 mm. On cardiac catheterization left ventricular end-diastolic pressure ranged from 20 to 40 mmHg and the calculated Qp/Qs ratio was 2-3.5. In all patients the defect was crossed retrogradely from the aortic side and over an arterio-venous wire loop after balloon sizing, devices were successfully deployed by antegrade venous approach (Rashkind umbrella device in two and Amplatzer occluders in six, which included Amplatzer duct occluder in five and Amplatzer septal occluder in one). One patient who had residual shunt developed hemolysis on the next day and was taken up for reintervention. That patient continued to have intermittent hemolysis and was sent for surgical repair. On follow-up (2-96 months), there was no device embolization, infective endocarditis, and aortic regurgitation. One patient died of progressive congestive heart failure while other six are asymptomatic. These data highlight that transcatheter closure is feasible and effective, especially safe with the available Amplatzer devices. Definitely, it has the advantage of obviating open heart surgery but complete occlusion is mandatory to prevent hemolysis and infective endocarditis. PMID:15009772

  8. Factors Influencing the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Rebecca L; Podraza, Katherine M; Luthra, Nijee; Origitano, Thomas C; Schneck, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Deciding how to manage an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can be difficult for patients and physicians due to controversies about management. The decision as to when and how to intervene may be variable depending on physicians' interpretation of available data regarding natural history and morbidity and mortality of interventions. Another significant factor in the decision process is the patients' conception of the risks of rupture and interventions and the psychological burden of harboring an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Objective  To describe which factors are being considered when patients and their physicians decide how to manage unruptured intracranial aneurysms.  Materials & methods  In a retrospective chart review study, we identified patients seen for evaluation of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Data was collected regarding patient and aneurysm characteristics. The physician note pertaining to the management decision was reviewed for documented reasons for intervention. Results  Of 88 patients included, 36 (41%) decided to undergo open or endovascular surgery for at least one unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms were present in 14 (16%) patients. Younger patients and current smokers were more likely to undergo surgery, but gender and race did not affect management. Aneurysm size and location strongly influenced management. The most common documented reasons underlying the decision of whether to intervene were the risk of rupture, aneurysm size, and risks of the procedure. For 23 aneurysms (21%), there were no factors documented for the management decision.  Conclusion  The risk of rupture of unruptured intracranial aneurysms may be underestimated by currently available natural history data. Major factors weighed by physicians in management decisions include aneurysm size and location, the patient's age, and medical comorbidities along with the risk of procedural complications. Additional data is needed to define

  9. Arterial fenestrations and their association with cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mira A; Caplan, Justin M; Yang, Wuyang; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy

    2014-12-01

    Fenestrations of intracranial arteries and associated aneurysms are rare. The significance of these fenestrations in relation to aneurysms remains unclear. We present four patients with fenestration-associated aneurysms and a comprehensive review of associations with aneurysms and other vascular lesions. A PubMed search of the literature was conducted from 1970-2012 reporting cases of intracranial aneurysms associated with arterial fenestration or duplications. Data were collected on patient presentation, sex, age, aneurysm and fenestration location, aneurysm treatment, and presence of other vascular lesions. We performed a retrospective review of four patients with intracranial fenestrations associated with aneurysms at our institution from 2012-2013. There were 59 cases of fenestrations and associated aneurysms in the literature. Aneurysms were reported as either arising from (n=50) or adjacent to but distinct from (n=13) fenestrations. The most common single fenestration location was at the basilar artery (n=23, 36.5%); however the majority of fenestrations were in the carotid circulation (n=34, 54.0%). The majority of patients with aneurysms and fenestrations at all locations except those at the anterior communicating artery (70.5%) presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with aneurysms arising from a fenestration or adjacent to a fenestration presented with an additional intracranial vascular lesion in 38% and 31% of cases, respectively. The majority of all aneurysms were treated with microsurgical clipping. Aneurysms associated with cerebral arterial fenestrations are most commonly discovered after subarachnoid hemorrhage and are most often located in the carotid circulation. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for an associated vascular lesion if an intracranial fenestration is discovered.

  10. Age at intracranial aneurysm rupture among generations

    PubMed Central

    Woo, D; Hornung, R; Sauerbeck, L; Brown, R; Meissner, I; Huston, J; Foroud, T; Broderick, J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported intracranial aneurysm (IA) occurring at young ages in subsequent generations. These studies did not correct for duration of follow-up. Second-generation members who would have their ruptured IA late in life may not be detected due to shorter follow-up time than the first generation. We examined families in which ruptured IA occurred in two consecutive generations for the hypothesis that the second generation (F1) was more likely to have a rupture at a younger age than the older generation (F0). Methods: The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) Study is a multicenter, international study recruiting families of ruptured and unruptured IA. All available family members are interviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to examine differences by generation. Results: Although we found that the F1 generation was more likely to have an aneurysm rupture at a younger age than the F0 generation, we found that this was largely because of a lack of follow-up time in the F1 generation. The F1 generation had 50% the rupture rate of the prior generation. When analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves, we found a tendency to have a slightly later rupture rate in the F1 generation once time to follow-up was included in the analysis model. Conclusions: Families of ruptured intracranial aneurysm (IA) do not appear to demonstrate “anticipation.” Our finding suggests that genetic epidemiology of ruptured IA should examine all types of variations such as single base-pair changes, deletions, insertions, and other variations that do not demonstrate anticipation. GLOSSARY FIA = familial intracranial aneurysm; IA = intracranial aneurysm; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:19237697

  11. Aneurysm flow characteristics in realistic carotid artery aneurysm models induced by proximal virtual stenotic plaques: a computational hemodynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Peloc, Nora L.; Chien, Aichi; Goldberg, Ezequiel; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysms may rarely coexist with a proximal artery stenosis. In that small percent of patients, such coexistence poses a challenge for interventional neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons to make the best treatment decision. According to previous studies, the incidence of cerebral aneurysms in patients with internal carotid artery stenosis is no greater than five percent, where the aneurysm is usually incidentally detected, being about two percent for aneurysms and stenoses in the same cerebral circulation. Those cases pose a difficult management decision for the physician. Case reports showed patients who died due to aneurysm rupture months after endarterectomy but before aneurysm clipping, while others did not show any change in the aneurysm after plaque removal, having optimum outcome after aneurysm coiling. The aim of this study is to investigate the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic changes before and after treatment of stenotic plaque. Virtually created moderate stenoses in vascular models of internal carotid artery aneurysm patients were considered in a number of cases reconstructed from three dimensional rotational angiography images. The strategy to create those plaques was based on parameters analyzed in a previous work where idealized models were considered, including relative distance and stenosis grade. Ipsilateral and contralateral plaques were modeled. Wall shear stress and velocity pattern were computed from finite element pulsatile blood flow simulations. The results may suggest that wall shear stress changes depend on relative angular position between the aneurysm and the plaque.

  12. Superior mesenteric vein aneurysm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuan; Vu, Jonathan-Hien; Matteo, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    A 46-year-old female was found to have a saccular superior mesenteric vein (SMV) aneurysm on computed tomography (CT) scan during workup for abdominal pain. It measured 3.5 cm in diameter. The SMV aneurysm was successfully resected, and the SMV was repaired with femoral vein patch angioplasty. She was placed on coumadin for 3 months. At follow-up, the vein patch repair was patent and the patient was doing well with complete resolution of her abdominal pain. PMID:22156158

  13. Embolisation of recently ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J V; Molyneux, A J; Brennan, R P; Renowden, S A

    1995-01-01

    Patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of aneurysms unsuitable for craniotomy and clipping have been treated by coil embolisation within three weeks. Sixty nine of 75 consecutive patients were successfully treated. Procedure related complications occurred in 10 patients, resulting in permanent neurological deficits in three and one death (4.8%). The Glasgow outcome scores at six weeks were 53 grade 1, seven grade 2, four grade 3, and five grade 5. These results are comparable with surgical series despite a high proportion of aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation. Images PMID:7500100

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of ductus arteriosus aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, S; Hutchinson, D P; Sampson, A J

    2015-11-01

    The ductus arteriosus holds major functional importance within the fetal circulation, and anomalies within the ductus arteriosus may interfere with the integrity of the fetal circulation. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm, previously considered a rare lesion, is now a well-reported finding in infancy with some reports describing this finding in the prenatal period. Postnatally, most ductus arteriosus aneurysms resolve spontaneously; however, a small group of infants show complications such as connective-tissue disorders, thrombo-embolism, compression of surrounding thoracic structures and life-threatening spontaneous rupture requiring surgical correction. As such, postnatal assessment in this group is recommended. PMID:27433265

  15. [A case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Tamaki, M; Yamamoto, N; Takeda, A; Kuriyama, M; Kawada, Y; Mizoguchi, Y; Kasahara, M

    1991-01-01

    Venous aneurysm is a rare entity and the disease occurring in the retroperitoneal space has been reported in only 4 cases. Therefore, the fifth case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm on the literature was described. A 59-year-old male was referred to our clinic because of painless large mass in the left abdomen. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic mass at the perinephric space. The resected cyst contained yellow-grayish fluid. The cyst wall was microscopically formed of 4 layers; blood and cholesterin, hyaline, muscle and collagen from the inner to outer side. He is well without any trouble after the operation.

  16. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  17. Mycotic aneurysm caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei in a previously healthy returning traveller

    PubMed Central

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Vammen, Sten; Fuursted, Kurt; Hjort, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a common cause of serious, difficult to treat infections in South-East Asia and Northern Australia, but is a rare imported pathogen in the USA and Europe. We report a case of a patient with a mycotic aneurysm caused by B. pseudomallei in a previously healthy returning traveller. The patient presented with 4 weeks of abdominal pain and intermittent fever after a brief vacation in Thailand. The aneurysm was excised and replaced by an autologous deep vein graft, and the patient was treated for 6 months with antibiotics adjusted according to postoperative renal impairment. Twenty-four months after surgery the patient is well and without relapse. PMID:25246454

  18. Computational analysis of anterior communicating artery aneurysm shear stress before and after aneurysm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2011-12-01

    It is widely accepted that complexity in the flow pattern at the anterior communicating artery (AComA) is associated with the high rate of aneurysm formation at that location observed in large studies. The purpose of this work is to study associations between hemodynamic patterns, and AComA aneurysm initiation by comparing hemodynamics in the aneurysm and the normal model where the aneurysm was computationally removed. Vascular models of both right and left circulation were independently reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography images using deformable models after image registration of both images, and fused using a surface merging algorithm. The geometric models were then used to generate high-quality volumetric finite element grids of tetrahedra with an advancing front technique. For each patient, the second anatomical model was created by digitally removing the aneurysm. It was iteratively achieved by applying a Laplacian smoothing filter and remeshing the surface. Finite element blood flow numerical simulations were performed for both the pathological and normal models under the same personalized pulsatile flow conditions imposed at the inlets of both models. The Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated by using a finite-element formulation. It was observed that aneurysms initiated in regions of high and moderate WSS in the counterpart normal models. Adjacent or close to those regions, low WSS portions of the arterial wall were not affected by the disease. These results are in line with previous observations at other vascular locations.

  19. Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing for the Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Brownrigg, Jack R. W.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Holt, Peter J. E.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Morgan, Robert A.; Loftus, Ian M.; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and report preliminary results of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair with endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), a novel therapeutic alternative whose feasibility has not been established in rAAAs due to the unknown effects of the rupture site on the ability to achieve sealing. Case Report: Between December 2013 and April 2014, 5 patients (median age 71 years, range 57–90; 3 men) with rAAAs were treated with the Nellix EVAS system at a single institution. Median aneurysm diameter was 70 mm (range 67–91). Aneurysm morphology in 4 of the 5 patients was noncompliant with instructions for use (IFU) for both EVAS and standard stent-grafts; the remaining patient was outside the IFU for standard stent-grafts but treated with EVAS under standard IFU for the Nellix system. Median Hardman index was 2 (range 0–3). Two patients died of multiorgan failure after re-laparotomy and intraoperative cardiac arrest, respectively. Among survivors, all devices were patent with no signs of endoleak or failed aneurysm sac sealing at 6 months (median follow-up 9.2 months). Conclusion: EVAS for the management of infrarenal rAAAs appears feasible. The use of EVAS in emergency repairs may broaden the selection criteria of the current endovascular strategy to include patients with more complex aneurysm morphology. PMID:25904491

  20. True mycotic aneurysm in a patient with gonadotropinoma after trans-sphenoidal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Radotra, Bishan Das; Salunke, Praveen; Parthan, Girish; Dutta, Pinaki; Vyas, Sameer; Mukherjee, Kanchan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged antibiotic use, and intrathecal injections are known risk factors for the development of invasive aspergillosis. Central nervous system (CNS) aspergillosis can manifest in many forms, including mycotic aneurysm formation. The majority of the mycotic aneurysms presents with subarachnoid hemorrhage after rupture and are associated with high mortality. Only 3 cases of true mycotic aneurysms have been reported following trans-sphenoidal surgery. Case Description: A 38-year-old man was admitted with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma for which he underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery. Three weeks later, he presented with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and meningitis. He was treated with intrathecal and intravenous antibiotics, stress dose of glucocorticoids, and lumbar drain. The defect in the sphenoid bone was closed endoscopically. After 3 weeks of therapy, he suddenly became unresponsive, and computed tomography of the head showed subarachnoid hemorrhage. He succumbed to illness on the next day, and a limited autopsy of the brain was performed. The autopsy revealed extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage and aneurysmal dilatation, thrombosis of the basilar artery (BA), multiple hemorrhagic infarcts in the midbrain, and pons. Histopathology of the BA revealed the loss of internal elastic lamina and septate hyphae with an acute angle branching on Grocott's methenamine silver stain, conforming to the morphology of Aspergillus. Conclusion: The possibility of intracranial fungal infection should be strongly considered in any patient receiving intrathecal antibiotics who fails to improve in 1–2 weeks, and frequent CSF culture for fungi should be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Since CSF culture has poor sensitivity in the diagnosis of fungal infections of CNS; empirical institution of antifungal therapy may be considered in this scenario. PMID:26759738

  1. Resolution of a fungal mycotic aneurysm after a contaminated steroid injection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the past ten years there have been three separate outbreaks of fungal contaminated steroid injections from compounding pharmacies. The 2012 outbreak of central nervous system fungal infections associated with contaminated methylprednisolone produced by a United States compounding pharmacy has led to 750 infections (151 with meningitis and paraspinal infections and 325 cases with paraspinal infections without meningitis) and 64 deaths as of October 23, 2013. Exserohilum rostratum has been the predominant pathogen identified by culture, polymerase chain reaction or antibody tests. According to previous reports, cerebral involvement with phaeohyphomycosis has a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Case presentation We report a 41 year-old Caucasian woman who received a lumbar methylprednisolone injection from a contaminated lot in August 2012. She was diagnosed with fungal meningitis by cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and positive (1, 3) beta-D-glucan after cultures and polymerase chain reaction were negative. Two weeks after onset of therapy, she developed a 4.1 mm superior cerebellar artery mycotic aneurysm associated with new stroke symptoms, which resolved with thirty-two weeks of antifungal treatment. Conclusions This is the rare case report of successful medical management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm with stroke symptoms related to a presumed phaeohyphomycosis in an immunocompetent individual. Further studies are needed to determine the utility of cerebrospinal fluid (1, 3) beta-D-glucan in diagnosing and monitoring patients with meningitis thought to be related to fungal infection. PMID:24885172

  2. Flow diversion for complex intracranial aneurysms in young children.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ramon; Brown, Benjamin L; Beier, Alexandra; Ranalli, Nathan; Aldana, Philipp; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are exceedingly rare and account for less than 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Open surgery to treat such aneurysms has been shown to be more durable than endovascular techniques, and durability of treatment is particularly important in the pediatric population. Over the past 2 decades, however, a marked shift in aneurysm treatment from open surgery toward endovascular procedures has occurred for adults. The authors describe their early experience in treating 3 unruptured pediatric brain aneurysms using the Pipeline embolization device (PED). The first patient, a girl with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism Type II who was harboring multiple intracranial aneurysms, underwent two flow diversion procedures for a vertebrobasilar aneurysm and a supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. The second patient underwent PED placement on a previously coiled but enlarging posterior communicating artery aneurysm. All procedures were uneventful, with no postsurgical complications, and led to complete angiographic obliteration of the aneurysms. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first series of flow diversion procedures in children reported in the medical literature. While flow diversion is a new and relatively untested technology in children, outcomes in adults have been promising. For challenging lesions in the pediatric population, flow diversion may have a valuable role as a well-tolerated, safe treatment with durable results. Many issues remain to be addressed, such as the durability of flow diverters over a very long follow-up and vessel response to growth in the presence of an endoluminal device.

  3. Flow diversion for complex intracranial aneurysms in young children.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Ramon; Brown, Benjamin L; Beier, Alexandra; Ranalli, Nathan; Aldana, Philipp; Hanel, Ricardo A

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are exceedingly rare and account for less than 5% of all intracranial aneurysms. Open surgery to treat such aneurysms has been shown to be more durable than endovascular techniques, and durability of treatment is particularly important in the pediatric population. Over the past 2 decades, however, a marked shift in aneurysm treatment from open surgery toward endovascular procedures has occurred for adults. The authors describe their early experience in treating 3 unruptured pediatric brain aneurysms using the Pipeline embolization device (PED). The first patient, a girl with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism Type II who was harboring multiple intracranial aneurysms, underwent two flow diversion procedures for a vertebrobasilar aneurysm and a supraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm. The second patient underwent PED placement on a previously coiled but enlarging posterior communicating artery aneurysm. All procedures were uneventful, with no postsurgical complications, and led to complete angiographic obliteration of the aneurysms. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first series of flow diversion procedures in children reported in the medical literature. While flow diversion is a new and relatively untested technology in children, outcomes in adults have been promising. For challenging lesions in the pediatric population, flow diversion may have a valuable role as a well-tolerated, safe treatment with durable results. Many issues remain to be addressed, such as the durability of flow diverters over a very long follow-up and vessel response to growth in the presence of an endoluminal device. PMID:25555114

  4. Clinical Analysis of Giant Intracranial Aneurysms with Endovascular Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical analysis of nine patients with giant aneurysms managed with endovascular embolization. Methods From March 2000 to September 2009, nine cases of giant intracranial aneurysms were treated (five unruptured and four ruptured). The nine patients included two males and seven females who were 47 to 72 years old (mean, 59.2 years old). The types of giant intracranial aneurysms were eight internal carotid artery aneurysms and one vertebral artery aneurysm. Treatment for each aneurysm was chosen based on anatomic relationships, aneurysmal factors, and the patients' clinical state. Three patients underwent endovascular coiling with stent and six initially underwent endovascular coiling alone. Medical records, operation records, postoperative angiographies, and follow-up angiographies were reviewed retrospectively. Results Eight out of nine patients showed good clinical outcomes. (six were excellent and two were good) after a mean follow-up period of 27.9 months. Six (67%) of the nine patients had a near-complete occlusions on the post-operative angiogram (mean, 13.5 months after the procedure). Occlusion rates of 90% or higher were obtained for eight (89%) of all the patients. One patient died due to multiple organ failure. Stents were ultimately required at some point for managing four aneurysms. Two patients needed additional procedures because of aneurysm regrowth. Conclusion Endovascular treatment could be an alternative option for managing giant aneurysms adjuvant to surgical intervention. PMID:23210026

  5. Prediction of outcomes in young adults with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Ahn, Sung-Yong; Moon, Hong-Joo; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Chung, Heung-Seob; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kwon, Taek-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is rare in young adults and little is known about aneurysms in this subgroup. The effect of clinical and prognostic factors on the outcome based on the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores and the predictors of unfavorable outcomes were analyzed in young adults with aneurysmal SAH. A retrospective review of the clinical parameters, including age, sex, hypertension, smoking status, hyperlipidemia, location of the cerebral aneurysm, size of the aneurysm, multiplicity, perioperative complication such as hydrocephalus, vasospasm, and hematoma, and Hunt and Hess and Fisher grading on presentation, was conducted in 108 young adults (mean age 34.8 years) managed at our institute. The outcome was classified based on GOS grading into unfavorable (GOS scores 1-3) or favorable (GOS scores 4 or 5). The overall mortality rate was 3.7% (4/108 patients). Univariate regression analysis for the outcomes at discharge found that age at the time of presentation, male sex, size of aneurysm, multiple aneurysms, hyperlipidemia, and poor Hunt and Hess and Fischer grades were associated with unfavorable outcome. Multivariate regression analysis found independent effects of sex, multiple aneurysms, size of aneurysm, and Hunt and Hess grade on the outcome at discharge. Size of aneurysm, presence of multiple aneurysms, Hunt and Hess grade, and hypertension were the predictors of outcome at mean 2-year follow up based on multivariate exact regression analysis. The multimodal approach with aggressive medical management, early intervention, and surgical treatment might contribute to favorable long-term outcomes in patients with poor expected outcomes.

  6. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  7. Combined Endovascular and Microsurgical Management of Complex Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Mukerji, Nitin; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are associated with a 50% mortality rate after rupture and patients can suffer significant morbidity during subsequent treatment. Neurosurgical management of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has evolved over the years. The historical practice of using microsurgical clipping to treat aneurysms has benefited in the last two decades from tremendous improvement in endovascular technology. Microsurgery and endovascular therapies are often viewed as competing treatments but it is important to recognize their individual limitations. Some aneurysms are considered complex, due to several factors such as aneurysm anatomy and a patient’s clinical condition. A complex aneurysm often cannot be completely excluded with a single approach and its successful treatment requires a combination of microsurgical and endovascular techniques. Planning such an approach relies on understanding aneurysm anatomy and thus should routinely include 3D angiographic imaging. In patients with ruptured aneurysms, endovascular coiling is a well-tolerated early treatment and residual aneurysms can be treated with intervals of definitive clipping. Microsurgical clipping also can be used to reconstruct the neck of a complex aneurysm, allowing successful placement of coils across a narrow neck. Endovascular techniques are assisted by balloons, which can be used in coiling and testing parent vessel occlusion before sacrifice. In some cases microsurgical bypasses can provide alternate flow for planned vessel sacrifice. We present current paradigms for combining endovascular and microsurgical approaches to treat complex aneurysms and share our experience in 67 such cases. A dual microsurgical–endovascular approach addresses the challenge of intracranial aneurysms. This combination can be performed safely and produces excellent rates of aneurysm obliteration. Hybrid angiographic operating-room suites can foster seamless and efficient complementary application of these two

  8. Basic flow structure in saccular aneurysms: a flow visualization study.

    PubMed

    Steiger, H J; Poll, A; Liepsch, D; Reulen, H J

    1987-01-01

    Basic flow patterns were investigated in a set of glass aneurysm models by means of flow visualization methods. Dye injection and streaming double refraction were used to visualize flow. The circulation inside lateral aneurysms arising at a 90 degree angle from a straight parent conduit could not be visualized by the dye-injection technique but could be demonstrated by streaming double refraction. The inflow was seen to arise from the downstream lip of the orifice and to project to the dome of the aneurysm. Backflow to the parent conduit took place along the walls of the aneurysm. In aneurysms located at bifurcations, flow characteristics depended on the geometry of the bifurcation and the flow ratio between the branches. Relatively little intra-aneurysmal flow was demonstrated in side branch-related aneurysms arising distal to an asymmetric 90 degrees bifurcation of the type encountered at the junction of the internal carotid and posterior communicating arteries. Stagnation of flow at the neck and little intra-aneurysmal circulation were found with terminal aneurysms of the basilar bifurcation type if the outflow through the branches was symmetric. With asymmetric outflow, however, or if the axis of the aneurysm did not coincide with that of the afferent vessel, an active rotation developed in these aneurysms. The size of the aneurysm had no influence on the basic pattern of intra-aneurysmal circulation. The use of pulsatile perfusion did not significantly alter the basic flow patterns observed with steady flow. Locally disturbed laminar flow was observed in certain models at physiological Reynold's numbers, but there were no signs of fully developed turbulence.

  9. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  10. Pleural Empyema and Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Su, Ta-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ko, Po-Jen; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Shen, Te-Chun; Chou, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pleural empyema (PE) may evolve into necrosis, fistula in the thorax, and sepsis; thus, it is also associated with high mortality. We investigated and analyzed the risk of aortic aneurysm (AA) in a cohort study of patients with PE. A total of 34,250 patients diagnosed with PE were identified as the PE cohort, and 137,000 patients without PE were selected randomly as the control group and matched by sex, age, and index year of PE diagnosis. Patients ages 20 years and younger with a history of AA were excluded. The risk of AA was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Excess risk of AA development was 1.69-fold higher in PE patients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.39–2.05) compared with non-PE patients. The patients with PE exhibited a greater adjusted risk of AA (aHR = 2.01; CI = 1.44–2.81) even if they did not have any of the 9 comorbidities included in our analysis (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, cardiac artery disease, stroke, bacterial endocarditis, and rheumatic endocarditis). Compared with the patients without any of the 9 comorbidities or PE, the patients with only PE had a greater risk of developing AA (aHR = 2.00; CI = 1.43–2.79). The PE cohort had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of AA than the non-PE cohort did during 12 years of follow-up. In a large-scale cohort, patients with PE are linked with an increased risk of AA. PMID:26632741

  11. Mechanical properties of the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    MacSweeney, S T; Young, G; Greenhalgh, R M; Powell, J T

    1992-12-01

    The mechanical properties of the abdominal aorta were investigated non-invasively in 30 patients with aortic aneurysm and 11 with peripheral arterial disease. The distensibility of the aorta was measured using M-mode ultrasonography, permitting non-invasive assessment of the pressure--strain elastic modulus or aortic stiffness, Ep. The median Ep value increased from 4.0 N/cm2 in control subjects in their third decade of life (n = 10) to 10.4 N/cm2 in middle age (n = 11) to 14.0 N/cm2 in the elderly (n = 13). In the presence of a normal diameter, peripheral arterial disease with aortic atherosclerosis had little effect on aortic stiffness, median Ep being 16.0 N/cm2. Aneurysmal dilatation was associated with a significant increase in aortic stiffness, median Ep being 31.3 N/cm2 (P < 0.001). For aortas of normal diameter, Ep was at all ages dependent on mean arterial pressure. In patients with aortic aneurysms there was no clear relationship between Ep and mean arterial pressure or aortic diameter. Of the patients studied, 15 underwent aortic reconstruction; increasing aortic stiffness (log Ep) was associated with a decreased medial elastin content of the aortic biopsy (r = -0.63, P < 0.02). This study demonstrates the marked stiffness or inelasticity of dilated or aneurysmal vessels, part of which is attributable to the loss of elastin.

  12. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutakis, Dean J; Zammert, Martin; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Belkin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is an important technique in the vascular surgeon's armamentarium, which has created a seismic shift in the management of aortic pathology over the past two decades. In comparison to traditional open repair, the endovascular approach is associated with significantly improved perioperative morbidity and mortality. The early survival benefit of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is sustained up to 3 years postoperatively, but longer-term life expectancy remains poor regardless of operative modality. Nonetheless, most abdominal aortic aneurysms are now repaired using endovascular stent grafts. The technology is not perfect as several postoperative complications, namely endoleak, stent-graft migration, and graft limb thrombosis, can develop and therefore lifelong imaging surveillance is required. In addition, a postoperative inflammatory response has been documented after endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms; the clinical significance of this finding has yet to be determined. Subsequently, the safety and applicability of endovascular stent grafts are likely to improve and expand with the introduction of newer-generation devices and with the simplification of fenestrated systems. PMID:27650343

  13. Portal vein aneurysm: What to know.

    PubMed

    Laurenzi, Andrea; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Lionetti, Raffaella; Meniconi, Roberto Luca; Colasanti, Marco; Vennarecci, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysm is an unusual vascular dilatation of the portal vein, which was first described by Barzilai and Kleckner in 1956 and since then less than 200 cases have been reported. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the international literature to better clarify various aspects of this rare nosological entity and provide clear evidence-based summary, when available, of the clinical and surgical management. A systematic literature search of the Pubmed database was performed for all articles related to portal vein aneurysm. All articles published from 1956 to 2014 were examined for a total of 96 reports, including 190 patients. Portal vein aneurysm is defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 1.9 cm in cirrhotic patients and 1.5 cm in normal livers. It can be congenital or acquired and portal hypertension represents the main cause of the acquired version. Surgical indication is considered in case of rupture, thrombosis or symptomatic aneurysms. Aneurysmectomy and aneurysmorrhaphy are considered in patients with normal liver, while shunt procedures or liver transplantation are the treatment of choice in case of portal hypertension. Being such a rare vascular entity its management should be reserved to high-volume tertiary hepato-biliary centres. PMID:26188840

  14. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the fifth metacarpal.

    PubMed

    Ozyurek, Selahattin; Rodop, Osman; Kose, Ozkan; Cilli, Feridun; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2009-08-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare, rapidly growing, and destructive benign bone tumor that even more rarely involves the bones of the hand. Various treatment options for aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported in the literature, but controversy exists regarding optimal treatment. Due to its rarity in the hand, no evidence-based treatment regimen has been established. A 21-year-old man presented with a history of pain and local swelling over his fifth metacarpal of 5 months' duration. Physical and radiographic examination of the hand was consistent with aneurysmal bone cyst. After biopsy, pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst. En-block resection of the tumor and autologous bicortical strut graft fixation with Kirschner wires was performed. The hand was immobilized in a short arm cast for 3 weeks after the patient received 3 weeks of physiotherapy. Kirschner wires were removed 6 weeks postoperatively. Excellent clinical and functional results were obtained with no recurrence after 3 years of follow-up with en-block resection and reconstruction with iliac crest graft. Radiographic examination demonstrated the osseous integration of the graft with no signs of recurrence. Although treatment should be planned individually according to lesion site and size and to patient age, we suggest en-block resection to prevent recurrence and secondary surgical interventions particularly in cases with no articular involvement.

  15. Endovascular treatment of coarctation and related aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, E L; Krajcer, Z

    2014-06-11

    Today,surgical repair has almost doubled the 30year survival rate in patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and 72% to 98% of patients now reach adulthood. Possible late complications include malignant hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, aortic valve dysfunction, recurrent CoA, and aneurysm formation with risk of rupture. Treating postoperative CoA-related aneurysms with observation alone is associated with a mortality rate of 36%, compared with 9% for surgical repair. Even in the best surgeons' hands, aortic surgery has associated complications, and the complexity of reoperative surgery makes the risks substantially greater. For patients with CoA-related aneurysm, endovascular treatment constitutes a good alternative to reoperative surgery because it poses a lower risk of morbidity and mortality. Implanting an endograft has been shown to be successful in treating CoA and related aneurysms, producing excellent intermediate outcomes and minimal morbidity and mortality. Despite evidence that using covered stents improves outcomes, the superiority of any particular stent type has yet to be established. With a variety of endografts available, the decision of which stent to use depends on anatomy, availability, and operator preference.

  16. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  17. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  18. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Moll, Frans L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  19. [A case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, A; Nishimura, K; Matsumiya, K; Oka, T; Takaha, M; Arima, R; Kurata, A

    1992-09-01

    A case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm is reported. A 73-year-old woman was referred to us with the chief complaint of left abdominal mass. A giant abdominal mass was palpable and diagnostic imaging examination including ultrasound tomography, excretory pyelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a giant cystic mass encircled by calcification in the left retroperitoneal space. Operation for this cystic mass was performed under the preoperative diagnosis of a giant left renal cyst. During operation the mass was located between the left kidney and the left adrenal gland. Because it was difficult to separate the mass from the left kidney the mass was removed with the left kidney. The extirpated tumor measured 15.5 x 15.0 x 9.5 cm and contained old blood clots and red-yellow colored fluid. A histological examination revealed that the tumor wall was composed of smooth muscle and elastic fibers. Therefore, pathological diagnosis was retroperitoneal venous aneurysm. Retroperitoneal venous aneurysm is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the 8th case of retroperitoneal venous aneurysm reported in Japan.

  20. Bilateral nonfistulous congenital coronary arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C S; Weaver, W F; Zeman, E D; Forker, A D

    1975-02-01

    A 15 year old boy collapsed and died after participating in a basketball game. Autopsy revealed bilateral congenital coronary arterial aneurysms. The diagnosis was made post mortem but, retrospectively, might have been suspected during life, even before angiography. The clues to the correct diagnosis were chest pain, a systolic and diastolic murmur and a mass on the right heart border in the chest roentgenogram.

  1. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  2. Endovascular Treatment of ACom Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Finitsis, S.; Anxionnat, R.; Lebedinsky, A.; Albuquerque, P.C.; Clayton, M.F.; Picard, L.; Bracard, S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The immediate and long-term outcomes, complications, recurrences and the need for retreatment were analyzed in a series of 280 consecutive patients with anterior communicating artery aneurysms treated with the endovascular technique. From October 1992 to October 2001 280 patients with 282 anterior communicating artery aneurysms were addressed to our center. For the analysis, the population was divided into two major groups: group 1, comprising 239 (85%) patients with ruptured aneurysms and group 2 comprising of 42 (15%) patients with unruptured aneurysms. In group 1, 185 (77.4%) patients had a good initial pre-treatment Hunt and Hess grade of I-III. Aneurysm size was divided into three categories according to the larger diameter: less than 4 mm, between 4 and 10 mm and larger than 10 mm. The sizes of aneurysms in groups 1 and 2 were identical but a less favorable neck to depth ratio of 0.5 was more frequent in group 2. Endovascular treatment was finally performed in 234 patients in group 1 and 34 patients in group 2. Complete obliteration was more frequently obtained in group 2 unlike a residual neck or opacification of the sac that were more frequently seen in group 1. No peri-treatment complications were recorded in group 2. In group 1 the peri-treatment mortality and overall peri-treatment morbidity were 5.1% and 8.1% respectively. Eight patients (3.4%) in group 1 presented early post treatment rebleeding with a mortality of 88%. The mean time to follow-up was 3.09 years. In group 1, 51 (21.7%) recurrences occurred of which 14 were minor and 37 major. In group 2, eight (23.5%) recurrences occurred, five minor and three major. Two patients (0.8%) presented late rebleeding in group 1. Twenty-seven second endovascular retreatments were performed, 24 (10.2%) in group 1 and three (8.8%) in group 2, seven third endovascular retreatments and two surgical clippings in group 1 only. There was no additional morbidity related to retreatments. Endovascular treatment

  3. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  4. Endoscope-Assisted Microneurosurgery for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Galzio, Renato J.; Di Cola, Francesco; Raysi Dehcordi, Soheila; Ricci, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The endovascular techniques has widely changed the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. However surgery still represent the best therapeutic option in case of broad-based and complex lesions. The combined use of endoscopic and microsurgical techniques (EAM) may improve surgical results. Objective: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the advantages and limits of EAM for intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Between January 2002 and December 2012, 173 patients, harboring 206 aneurysms were surgically treated in our department with the EAM technique. One hundred and fifty-seven aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 49 were in the posterior circulation. Standard tailored approaches, based on skull base surgery principles, were chosen. The use of the endoscope included three steps: initial inspection, true operative time, and final inspection. For each procedure, an intraoperative video and an evaluation schedule were prepared, to report surgeons’ opinions about the technique itself. In the first cases, we always used the endoscope during surgical procedures in order to get an adequate surgical training. Afterwards we became aware in selecting cases in which to apply the endoscopy, as we started to become familiar with its advantages and limits. Results: After clipping, all patients were undergone postoperative cerebral angiography. No surgical mortality related to EAM were observed. Complications directly related to endoscopic procedures were rare. Conclusion: Our retrospective study suggests that endoscopic efficacy for aneurysms is only scarcely influenced by the preoperative clinical condition (Hunt–Hess grade), surgical timing, presence of blood in the cisterns (Fisher grade) and/or hydrocephalus. However the most important factors contributing to the efficacy of EAM are determined by the anatomical locations and sizes of the lesions. Furthermore, the advantages are especially evident using dedicated scopes and holders, after an

  5. Flow dynamics in a lethal anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kerber, C W; Imbesi, S G; Knox, K

    1999-01-01

    We describe and analyze the flow dynamics in replicas of a human anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The replicas were placed in a circuit of pulsating non-Newtonian fluid, and flows were adjusted to replicate human physiologic parameters. Individual slipstreams were opacified with isobaric dyes, and images were recorded on film and by CT/MR angiography. When flow in the afferent (internal carotid) and efferent (anterior and middle cerebral) arteries was bilaterally equal, slipstreams rarely entered the aneurysm. When flow in either the afferent or efferent vessels was not symmetrical, however, slipstreams entered the aneurysm neck, impinged upon the aneurysm dome, and swirled within the aneurysm. Unequal flow in carotid or cerebral systems may be necessary to direct pathologic, fluid slipstreams into an aneurysm. PMID:10588134

  6. Assessment of coronary artery aneurysms with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Kosar, E; Chandraratna, P A

    1997-05-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are rare and may be difficult to detect clinically. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography provides numerous imaging planes that may improve the assessment of coronary aneurysms and act as an adjunct to standard angiography. Five patients with angiographically detected coronary aneurysms were studied with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography and Doppler flow imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography was successful in identifying the size and characteristics of the coronary aneurysms. Doppler ultrasound identified markedly increased flow velocity in a patient with a coronary arteriovenous fistula and decreased coronary flow velocity in two patients with aneurysmal coronary arteries and intracoronary thrombus. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography is a useful, noninvasive method of assessing coronary artery aneurysms and may act as an adjunct to angiography in identifying fistula anastomosis.

  7. A Case of Cerebral Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Fabry's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Youn Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrage (SAH) with Fabry's disease. A 42-year-old woman presented with aneurysmal SAH originated from a saccular aneurysm of the right posterior communicating artery. The patient was treated by an endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm. Postoperatively the patient recovered favorably without any neurological deficit. During her admission, the patient had a sign of proteinuria in urine analysis. The pathologic findings of kidney needle biopsy implied nephrosialidosis (mucolipidosis of lysosomal stroage disease), which is consistent with a Fabry's disease. It is uncommon that Fabry's disease is presented with aneurysmal SAH, especially in middle-aged patients, but could be a clinical concern. Further investigations are needed to reveal risk factors, vascular anatomy, and causative mechanisms of Fabry's disease with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:23634271

  8. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. We also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing. PMID:25044644

  9. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  10. Dissecting aneurysm of the anterior temporal artery: case report.

    PubMed

    Umeoka, Katsuya; Shirokane, Kazutaka; Mizunari, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Teramoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented a rare dissecting aneurysm of the anterior temporal artery (ATA) manifesting as headache. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mixed-density mass in the horizontal segment of the middle cerebral artery. Emergent angiography demonstrated aneurysmal dilatation and a thrombosed mass in the sylvian fissure. Infectious aneurysm was excluded. She underwent emergent surgery to reduce the risk of repeated infarction and hemorrhage. The distal side of the ATA manifested occlusive changes suggestive of arterial dissection. The proximal side of the ATA was ligated and the lesion was excised. Histological examination confirmed that the aneurysmal dilatation was attributable to arterial dissection due to disruption of the internal elastic lamina. Distal dissecting aneurysms may occur in the absence of infectious disease. We recommend that ruptured distal dissecting aneurysms be treated surgically in the acute stage immediately after detection.

  11. Aneurysm resection and vascular reconstruction for true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Xi; Han, Li-Na; Liang, Fa-Qi; Chu, Fu-Tao; Jia, Xin

    2015-06-01

    The aneurysms at the initial segment of splenic artery are rare. This paper aimed to investigate the methods to treat the true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery by aneurysmectomy plus vascular reconstruction. Retrospectively reviewed were 11 cases of true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery who were treated in our hospital from January 2000 to June 2013. All cases were diagnosed by color ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT) and angiography. Upon resection of the aneurysm, the auto-vein transplantation was performed in situ between the hepatic artery and the distal part of the splenic artery in 1 case; the artificial vessel bypass was done between the infra-renal aorta and distal portion of the splenic artery in 7 cases; the splenectomy was done in 2 cases; the splenectomy in combination with ligation of multiple small aneurysms were performed in 1 case. All cases were cured and discharged from the hospital 10-14 days after operation. A 1-14 year follow-up showed that 9 cases survived, and 2 cases died, including 1 case who died of acute myocardial infarction 2 years after aorta-splenic artery bypass operation and 1 case who died of acute cerebral hemorrhage 5 years after aneurysm resection and the splenectomy. Among 6 cases receiving aorta-splenic artery bypass, 1 gradually developed stenosis at anatomosed site, which eventually progressed to complete occlusion 2 years to 6 years after operation, without suffering from splenic infarction because the spleen was supplied by the short gastric vessel and its collaterals. The other 5 cases receiving aorta-splenic artery bypass and 1 case undergoing autologous vascular transplantation did not develop stricture or pseudoaneurysm at the stoma. Our study showed that the aneurysmectomy plus vascular reconstruction is a better treatment for aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Extracranial Internal Carotid Aneurysms Using Endografts

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Rostagno, Roman D.; Zander, Tobias; Llorens, Rafael; Schonholz, Claudio; Maynar, Manuel

    2008-03-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid artery (EICA) are infrequent. They are difficult to treat with conventional surgery because of their distal extension into the skull base. We report three cases of EICA aneurysms in two symptomatic patients successfully treated with polytetrafluoroethylene self-expanding endografts using an endovascular approach. The aneurysms were located distal to the carotid bifurcation and extended to the subpetrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  13. Coil embolization of ruptured frontopolar artery aneurysm: case report.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Cicuendez, Marta; Paredes, Igor; Alen, Jose F; Navia, Pedro; Lagares, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysms are infrequent. The most common location is at the bifurcation of the pericallosal and callosomarginal arteries. Cerebral artery anomalies can sometimes, at least partially, explain aneurysm formation in less common locations in relation to hemodynamic stress caused on the vascular wall. We report a very rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured frontopolar artery aneurysm as a part of an anomalous anterior cerebral artery complex that was, for the first time, treated with endovascular coiling.

  14. A Case of Giant Right Atrial Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Ravindra S; Tiwari, Ashish; Suresh, P V; Raj, Vimal; Kaushik, Pradeepkumar

    2016-07-01

    Giant right atrial aneurysm is a rare entity in infants and children. It needs to be distinguished from an atrial diverticulum, which can have similar presentation. Generally, an incidental finding in children, it can present with varied symptoms. We report a case of a giant right atrial aneurysm in an asymptomatic child with a large clot in the dilated right atrium, who underwent successful resection of the atrial aneurysm. PMID:26884450

  15. Incidental Superior Hypophygeal Artery Aneurysm Embedded within Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Kim, Min-Su; Jung, Young-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Intra-cranial aneurysm can be incidental findings in patients with pituitary adenomas, and are usually located outside the pituitary region. However, the coexistence of intrasellar (not intracranial) aneurysms with pituitary adenomas is extremely rare. We report a patient with an incidental superior hypophygeal aneurysm embedded within a non-functional pituitary adenoma which was treated by transsphenoidal surgery after endovascular coil embolization. PMID:24278658

  16. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  17. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  18. Novel repair of an external iliac vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, Arjun; Meissner, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Aneurysms involving the venous system are a rare entity. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to us with activity-limiting left gluteal pain and who on consequent workup was found to have a left external iliac vein aneurysm in a setting of iliocavomegaly. She underwent successful treatment of her aneurysm with a novel approach that involved staple plication and resection of the aneurysm over a balloon mandrel. We discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical technique adopted for the treatment of this uncommon condition. PMID:22704912

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: how can we improve their treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, T K

    1980-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are present in a least 2% of the elderly population of the Western world and their number is increasing. Without treatment 30% of patients with asymptomatic aneurysms live for 5 years, although the risk of rupture becomes greater as the size of the aneurysm increases. Of those with untreated symptomatic aneurysms 80% are dead within a year. Elective repair of aneurysms has a low mortality, and 50% of the patients live for at least 5 years. Symptomatic aneurysms all cause pain and may produce other symptoms from pressure on adjacent structures, distal embolism, acute thrombosis or rupture. In 88% of cases an aneurysm can be diagnosed by physical examination alone; confirmatory tests include soft-tissue roentgenography of the abdomen, ultrasonography, computer-assisted tomography and aortography. Repair is indicated for symptomatic or ruptured aortic aneurysms and for asymptomatic aneurysms over 5 cm in diameter. Early diagnosis and referral for repair is essential for optimum treatment of this common condition. PMID:7004617

  20. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography in cerebral aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, R.; Pietila, T.; Al, H; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Outcome of surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms may be severely compromised by local cerebral ischaemia or infarction resulting from the inadvertent occlusion of an adjacent vessel by the aneurysm clip, or by incomplete aneurysm closure. It is therefore mandatory to optimise clip placement in situ to reduce the complication rate. The present study was performed to investigate the reliability of intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) in cerebral aneurysm surgery, and to assess the impact of this method on the surgical procedure itself.
METHODS—Seventy five patients (19 men, 56 women, mean age 54.8 years, range 22-84 years) with 90 saccular cerebral aneurysms were evaluated. Blood flow velocities in the aneurysmal sac and in the adjacent vessels were determined by MDU before and after aneurysm clipping. The findings of MDU were analysed and compared with those of visual inspection of the surgical site and of postoperative angiography. Analysis was also made of the cases in which the clip was repositioned due to MDU findings.
RESULTS—A relevant stenosis of an adjacent vessel induced by clip positioning that had escaped detection by visual inspection was identified by Doppler ultrasonography in 17 out of 90 (18.9%) aneurysms. In addition, Doppler ultrasound demonstrated a primarily unoccluded aneurysm in 11 out of 90 (12.2%) patients. The aneurysm clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU findings in 26 out of 90 (28.8%) cases. In middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, the MDU results were relevant to the surgical procedure in 17out of 44 (38.6%) cases. Whereas with aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery significant findings occurred in only five of 32cases (15.6%; p<0.05). The clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU results in 18 out of 50 (36%) aneurysms in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) grade I-V compared with only eight out of 40 (20%) aneurysms in patients without SAH (p<0.05).

  1. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  2. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T

    2016-07-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  3. Stent Application for the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and striking development in both the techniques and devices make it possible to treat most of cerebral aneurysms endovascularly. Stent has become one of the most important tools in treating difficult aneurysms not feasible for simple coiling. The physical features, the dimensions, and the functional characteristics of the stents show considerable differences. There are also several strategies and tips to treat difficult aneurysms by using stent and coiling. Nevertheless, they require much experience in clinical practice as well as knowledge of the stents to treat cerebral aneurysms safely and effectively. In this report, a brief review of properties of the currently available stents and strategies of their application is presented. PMID:22125751

  4. Thrombosis modeling in intracranial aneurysms: a lattice Boltzmann numerical algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouared, R.; Chopard, B.; Stahl, B.; Rüfenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.; Courbebaisse, G.

    2008-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann numerical method is applied to model blood flow (plasma and platelets) and clotting in intracranial aneurysms at a mesoscopic level. The dynamics of blood clotting (thrombosis) is governed by mechanical variations of shear stress near wall that influence platelets-wall interactions. Thrombosis starts and grows below a shear rate threshold, and stops above it. Within this assumption, it is possible to account qualitatively well for partial, full or no occlusion of the aneurysm, and to explain why spontaneous thrombosis is more likely to occur in giant aneurysms than in small or medium sized aneurysms.

  5. Intracranial Aneurysms: Wall Motion Analysis for Prediction of Rupture.

    PubMed

    Vanrossomme, A E; Eker, O F; Thiran, J-P; Courbebaisse, G P; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, K

    2015-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are a common pathologic condition with a potential severe complication: rupture. Effective treatment options exist, neurosurgical clipping and endovascular techniques, but guidelines for treatment are unclear and focus mainly on patient age, aneurysm size, and localization. New criteria to define the risk of rupture are needed to refine these guidelines. One potential candidate is aneurysm wall motion, known to be associated with rupture but difficult to detect and quantify. We review what is known about the association between aneurysm wall motion and rupture, which structural changes may explain wall motion patterns, and available imaging techniques able to analyze wall motion. PMID:25929878

  6. External jugular vein aneurysm: a source of thrombotic complications.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, C V; Kostas, T; Tsetis, D; Georgakarakos, E; Gionis, M; Katsamouris, A N

    2010-06-01

    Superficial venous aneurysms are rare and usually are uneventful. We present a case in which a 40-year old female presenting with a thrombosed external jugular vein aneurysm which previously caused an undetected pulmonary embolism. The aneurysm was excised and the external jugular vein was ligated under local anesthesia and anticoagulation was initiated. In conclusion aneurysms of the superficial venous system should be considered as a possible source of pulmonary emboli. These sites can safely be excised and ligated under local anesthesia offering long term protection from its possible complications. PMID:20502418

  7. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-02-29

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes.

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Descending Aortic Aneurysms: Parity, Disparity, and Switch

    PubMed Central

    Theruvath, Tom P.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ikonomidis, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Central to the pathologic changes in developing aortic aneurysms are alterations in the abundance and activity of proteases, of which the most important for aneurysm production comprise the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. In this review, literature demonstrating the role of MMPs in the development of aortic aneurysms is presented, with emphasis on the parity and disparity between the thoracic and abdominal aorta. Furthermore, the role of embryologic cellular origins and evidence of phenotypic switch will be addressed in terms of how this process alters MMP production during aneurysm development. PMID:21958052

  9. Polyarteritis with symptomatic intracerebral aneurysms at initial presentation.

    PubMed

    Munn, E J; Alloway, J A; Diffin, D C; Arroyo, R A

    1998-10-01

    Polyarteritis rarely involves the cerebral vasculature, and has not been reported to have an initial presentation with intracerebral aneurysms. We describe the first case of polyarteritis presenting with symptomatic intracerebral aneurysms. A literature review from 1966 to 1997 identified 5 additional cases with evidence of intracerebral aneurysms and polyarteritis. The cases reviewed all had evidence of longstanding systemic symptoms suggestive of polyarteritis prior to diagnosis. Polyarteritis with intracerebral aneurysms is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and therefore must be recognized and treated early.

  10. Outcome After Surgical Treatment of Paraclinoid Carotid Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualin, Alberto; Meneghelli, Pietro; Cozzi, Francesco; Chioffi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Surgery on paraclinoid carotid aneurysms is technically demanding and entails considerable risks, especially to visual function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and visual outcome after surgery in 66 patients with paraclinoid carotid aneurysms (30 ruptured and 36 unruptured) treated between 1990 and 2014. Thirty-six aneurysms were of standard size, and 30 were large (16-20 mm) or giant (>20 mm); the Barami classification was used in every case. During surgery, multiple clips were needed in 25 % of patients with standard, and in 80 % of patients with large-giant aneurysms; temporary carotid occlusion was performed on 11 % of patients with standard and 63 % with large-giant aneurysms. Postoperatively, a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was repaired surgically in two patients. At the 3-month follow-up, the modified Rankin Score (mRS) was favorable (0-2) in 63 % of patients with ruptured and in 97 % with unruptured aneurysms; four patients presenting with large hematomas died. Postoperative visual impairment (worsening or newly developing deficit) was noted in 25 % of cases with standard and 14 % of cases with large-giant ruptured aneurysms, and, respectively, in 10 % with standard and 31 % with large-giant unruptured aneurysms. It has been concluded that surgery remains a reasonable choice in the management of patients with paraclinoid carotid aneurysms. PMID:27637626

  11. Ruptured Gastric Aneurysm in α-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Spanuchart, Ittikorn; Scott Gallacher, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present a unique vascular complication of α-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) in a patient with an acute onset of epigastric pain and hemodynamic instability. Abdominal computed tomography angiography detected hemoperitoneum and hematoma within the gastrohepatic ligament with active extravasation. Abdominal angiography revealed left gastric aneurysms. An association between AATD and vascular aneurysms has been suggested to be secondary to unopposed proteolytic activity against arterial structural proteins. The aneurysm formation in aortic, superior mesenteric, inferior mesenteric, and splenic arteries has been reported. We report the first case with ruptured gastric artery aneurysm as a complication of AATD. PMID:27622197

  12. Aneurysm of the pulmonary vein: an unusual cause of stroke.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Alexander; Jebran, Ahmad Fawad; Schmidt, Karsten; Hinterthaner, Marc; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Bähr, Mathias; Schöndube, Friedrich A; Danner, Bernhard C

    2014-11-01

    This clinical report deals with a giant true pulmonary venous aneurysm, which was partially thrombosed. The overall incidence of pulmonary venous aneurysms is unknown, and they are reported only occasionally. We present the case of a previously healthy man with acute onset of ischemic cerebral stroke. The cause was a thrombus in a huge aneurysm of the left superior pulmonary vein. The patient subsequently underwent uncomplicated therapy for stroke, including thrombolysis followed by excision of the giant pulmonary venous aneurysm. As curative therapy we recommend complete resection of this rare entity.

  13. [Giant aneurysm of the inter-atrial septum].

    PubMed

    Akoudad, H; Cherti, M; Chaouki, S; Ztot, S; Haddour, L; el Mrabet, I; el Khadiri, A; Benmimoun, E G; Arharbi, A

    1999-01-01

    We report the case of a large atrial septal aneurysm and a review of the literature. Atrial septal aneurysm is found in 1-8% of normal subjects. Its prevalence is higher among patients with ischemic stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography is an optimal tool for the diagnosis of atrial septal aneurysm. The clinical course may be complicated by arterial embolism, but mechanical complications may also occur, as in this case. Due to the lack of general agreement, treatment options should be discussed on an individual basis for patients with atrial septal aneurysm. PMID:10093663

  14. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  15. Influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xiang; Lai, Ling-Feng; Zheng, Kuang; Li, Guo-Xiong; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Liang-Ping; Duan, Chuan-Zhi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze influencing factors associated with immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment (EVT), providing theoretical evidence and guidance for clinical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Totally 529 patients met the inclusive criteria, consisting of 338 males and 191 females. Gender; age; history of hypertension, diabetes, and smoking; intracranial atherosclerosis; rupture status, size and location, features of aneurysmal neck, shapes; vasospasm; treatment modality; and degree of aneurysm occlusion were all carefully and completely recorded. All data were investigated in univariate and multivariate logistic regression model to determine whether they were correlated with the degree of aneurysm occlusion. According to aneurysm size, aneurysms were classified as micro-miniature, miniature, and large aneurysms. There were 451 narrow-neck aneurysms and 78 wide-neck aneurysms. Totally 417 were regular and 112 were irregular. And 125 were un-ruptured aneurysms; 404 were ruptured aneurysms. The modalities of treatment were as follows: embolization with coil (n = 415), stent-assisted coil embolization (n = 89), and balloon-assisted coil embolization (n = 25). Univariate analysis showed that aneurysm size, feature of aneurysm neck, shape, and rupture status might affect the immediate occlusion after EVT. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that ruptured aneurysm, tiny aneurysm, and wide-neck aneurysm were independent influencing factors of complete occlusion of intracranial aneurysm. Aneurysm rupture status, size, feature of aneurysmal neck, and shape might be the independent influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysm patients after EVT. Un-ruptured, micro-miniature, narrow-neck, and regular-shaped aneurysms were more probable to be occluded completely. PMID:26100332

  16. [Peroperative risks in cerebral aneurysm surgery].

    PubMed

    Mustaki, J P; Bissonnette, B; Archer, D; Boulard, G; Ravussin, P

    1996-01-01

    The perioperative complications associated with cerebral aneurysm surgery require a specific anaesthetic management. Four major perioperative accidents are discussed in this review. The anaesthetic and surgical management in case of rebleeding subsequent to the re-rupture of the aneurysm is mainly prophylactic. It includes haemodynamic stability assurance, maintenance of mean arterial pressure (MAP) between 80-90 mmHg during stimulation of the patient such as endotracheal intubation, application of the skull-pin head-holder, incision, and craniotomy. The aneurysmal transmural pressure should be adequately maintained by avoiding an aggressive decrease of intracranial pressure. Once the skull is open, the brain must be kept slack in order to decrease pressure under the retractors and avoid the risks of stretching and tearing of the adjacent vessels. If, despite these precautions, the aneurysm ruptures again. MAP should be decreased to 60 mmHg and the brain rendered more slack, in order to allow direct clipping of the aneurysm, or temporary clipping of the adjacent vessels. The optimal agents in this situation are isoflurane (which decreases CMRO2), intravenous anaesthetic agents (inspite their negative inotropic effect, they may potentially protect the brain) and sodium nitroprusside. Vasospasm occurs usually between the 3rd and the 7th day after subarachnoid haemorrhage. It may be seen peroperatively. The optimal treatment, as well as prophylaxis, is moderate controlled hypertension (MAP > 100 mmHg), associated with hypervolaemia and haemodilution, the so-called triple H therapy, with strict control of the filling pressures. Other beneficial therapies are calcium antagonists (nimodipine and nicardipine), the removal of the blood accumulated around the brain and in the cisternae, and possibly local administration of papaverine. Abrupt MAP increases are controlled in order to maintain adequate aneurysmal transmural pressure. Beta-blockers, local anaesthetics

  17. Late iliac artery aneurysms and occlusive disease after aortic tube grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A 35-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, D; Hallett, J W; Ballard, D J; Naessens, J M; Cherry, K J; Gloviczki, P; Pairolero, P C

    1991-01-01

    Controversy continues over whether patients treated with straight Dacron aortic tube grafts for an abdominal aortic aneurysm remain at significant risk for subsequent development of iliac aneurysm or occlusive disease. To address this issue, the authors performed a population-based analysis of 432 patients who had an abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed between 1951 and 1984. Aneurysm repair was performed eventually in 206 patients (48%). To ascertain differences in late development of graft-related complications, iliac aneurysms, and arterial occlusions, the authors compared all tube-graft patients with similar numbers of bifurcated-graft patients matched for age and year of operation. In the tube-graft group, no subsequent clinically evident or autopsy-proven iliac aneurysms or iliac occlusive disease were noted. Over a mean follow-up of 6 years (range, 4 to 18 years), new aortic aneurysms occurred in the proximal aorta in both tube and bifurcated-graft patients (5.0% and 2.5%, respectively). In contrast the cumulative incidence of graft-related complications was higher with a bifurcated prosthesis (12.8%) compared with a straight graft (5.0%) (p = 0.15). These problems generally occurred 5 to 15 years postoperatively and emphasize the need for long-term graft surveillance. The authors conclude that straight tube-grafts for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms provide excellent late patency with minimal risk of subsequent iliac aneurysm development. PMID:1835832

  18. Fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a less invasive option for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the predominant surgical therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Whereas anatomical limitations had become the major contraindication to endovascular treatment, fenestrated stent grafts were developed to overcome such obstacles. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair now provides an additional treatment option for patients felt to be unsuitable for an invasive open repair whose anatomy is not compatible with more traditional stent grafts. We review the evolution of fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and compare its safety and efficacy to other endovascular options.

  19. Aortic Endograft Infection by Pasteurella multocida: A Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Keyashian, Brian; Amene, Juliet; Malinowski, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Infection of an aortic endograft is a rare complication following endovascular aneurysm repair. These patients have been treated with explantation of the graft to obtain source control followed by an extra-anatomic bypass to restore circulation. The present case study describes an interesting case of Pasteurella infection involving an aortic endograft managed nonoperatively by percutaneous drainage and graft preservation. PMID:27581225

  20. Management of a dislocated endovascular aneurysm repair in a challenging giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Geers, Joachim; Daenen, Geert; Stabel, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Introduction A case report of a contained rupture of an abdominal aneurysm, treated by endovascular technique (EVAR), but complicated by perioperative endoprosthesis limb dislocation. Case report An 81-year old male presented at the emergency department with a contained rupture of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and bilateral extensive iliac aneurysmatic disease. Open repair was no option, due to the pulmonary condition. The patient was prepped for an emergency EVAR. After placing a bifurcated endoprosthesis, angiography revealed a type IIIa endoleak, due to a dislocation between two left iliac extensions. We converted to a right-sided aorto-uni-iliac endoprosthesis with a femorofemoral bypass. A postoperative CT-scan showed a complete exclusion of the aneurysm, a patent aorto-uni-iliac endoprosthesis and a femorofemoral bypass without an endoleak. Discussion EVAR is feasible with a hostile neck AAA, even in a ruptured AAA. In large AAA, one should consider an overlap larger than suggested in the instructions for use. PMID:27385140

  1. Proximal clamping levels in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Büket, S; Atay, Y; Islamoğlu, F; Yağdi, T; Posacioğlu, H; Alat, I; Cikirikçioğlu, M; Yüksel, M; Durmaz, I

    1999-01-01

    In the surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm, the single proximal cross-clamp can be placed at 3 alternative aortic levels: infrarenal, hiatal, and thoracic. We performed this retrospective study to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 main aortic clamping locations. Eighty patients presented at our institution with abdominal aortic aneurysms from March 1993 through May 1998. Fifty of these patients had intact aneurysms and underwent elective surgery, and 30 had ruptured aneurysms that necessitated emergency surgery. Proximal aortic clamping was applied at the infrarenal level in 24 patients (22 from the intact aneurysm group, 2 from the ruptured group), at the hiatal level in 34 patients (22 intact, 12 ruptured), and at the thoracic level (descending aorta) via a limited left lateral thoracotomy in 22 patients (6 intact, 16 ruptured). Early mortality rates (within 30 days) were 4% (2 of 50 patients) among patients with intact aneurysms and 40% (12 of 30 patients) among those with ruptured aneurysms. In the 2 patients from the intact aneurysm group, proximal aortic clamps were applied at the hiatal level. In the ruptured aneurysm group, proximal aortic clamps were placed at the thoracic level in 10 patients, the infrarenal level in 1, and the hiatal level in 1. According to our study, the clinical status of the patient and the degree of operative urgency--as determined by the extent of the aneurysm--generally dictate the proximal clamp location. Patients who present with aneurysmal rupture or hypovolemic shock benefit from thoracic clamping, because it restores the blood pressure and allows time to replace the volume deficit. Infrarenal placement is advantageous in patients with intact aneurysms if there is sufficient space for the clamp between the renal arteries and the aortic aneurysm. In patients with juxtarenal aneurysms, hiatal clamping enables safe and easy anastomosis to the healthy aorta. Clamping at this level also helps prevent

  2. Small Intracranial Aneurysm Treatment Using Target ® Ultrasoft ™ Coils

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gaurav; Miller, Timothy; Iyohe, Moronke; Shivashankar, Ravi; Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The introduction of small, soft, complex-shaped microcoils has helped facilitate the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms (IAs) over the last several years. Here, we evaluate the initial safety and efficacy of treating small IAs using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils. Materials and methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database at a single, high volume, teaching hospital was performed from September 2011 to May 2015. IAs smaller than or equal to 5.0 mm in maximal dimension treated with only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils were included. Results A total of 50 patients with 50 intracranial aneurysms were included. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from index aneurysm rupture was the indication for treatment in 23 of 50 (46%) cases, and prior subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from another aneurysm was the indication for treatment in eight of 50 (16%) cases. The complete aneurysm occlusion rate was 70% (35/50), the minimal residual aneurysm rate was 14% (7/50), and residual aneurysm rate was 16% (8/50). One intraoperative aneurysm rupture occurred. Three patients died during hospitalization from clinical sequelae of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Follow-up at a mean of 13.6 months demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion in 75% (30/40) of cases, near complete occlusion in 15% (6/40) of cases, and residual aneurysm in 10% (4/40) of cases, all four of which were retreated. Conclusion Our initial results using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils for the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms demonstrate initial excellent safety and efficacy profiles. PMID:27403224

  3. Rapid virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-03-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient.

  4. Rapid Virtual Stenting for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Chen, Danyang; Chen, Zihe; Wang, Xiangyu; Paliwal, Nikhil; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui; Corso, Jason J.; Xu, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms is the most severe form of stroke with high rates of mortality and disability. One of its primary treatments is to use stent or Flow Diverter to divert the blood flow away from the IA in a minimal invasive manner. To optimize such treatments, it is desirable to provide an automatic tool for virtual stenting before its actual implantation. In this paper, we propose a novel method, called ball-sweeping, for rapid virtual stenting. Our method sweeps a maximum inscribed sphere through the aneurysmal region of the vessel and directly generates a stent surface touching the vessel wall without needing to iteratively grow a deformable stent surface. Our resulting stent mesh has guaranteed smoothness and variable pore density to achieve an enhanced occlusion performance. Comparing to existing methods, our technique is computationally much more efficient. PMID:27346910

  5. [Giant vertebro-basilar aneurysm. Frontal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rosa, A; Mizon, J P; Sevestre, H

    1991-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with an apparent frontal syndrome. He also had bilateral trigeminal neuralgia, a pyramidal syndrome of all 4 limbs, balance disturbances, a horizontal nystagmus when looking to the left and a right velopalatine paralysis. CT scan with contrast showed a hyperdense rounded lesion in the left cerebello-pontine angle. Cerebral angiography showed this to be a large aneurysm of the end of the vertebral arteries. The patient died suddenly. Autopsy confirmed the site and presence of the aneurysm. Balance disturbances, the pyramidal syndrome and velopalatine paralysis could all be explained by brain stem compression and the bilateral nature of the trigeminal neuralgia by compression of the trigemino-thalamic tract. The apparent frontal syndrome, the authors suggest could have resulted from subacute raised intracranial pressure.

  6. Surgical Procedures for Renal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshinori; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the strategy and surgical procedures for treating a renal artery aneurysm (RAA). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the surgical strategy for 21 cases with RAA between 2001 and 2010 at this institution. Treatment was indicated for patients with an RAA larger than 2 cm and/or symptoms. Surgical treatment was the initial strategy, and coil embolization was indicated in the case of narrow-necked, saccular, extraparenchymal aneurysms. Results: Fifteen patients in 21 cases received an aneurysmectomy and renal artery reconstruction with an in-situ repair. One patient underwent an unplanned nephrectomy, and coil embolization was performed in 5 patients. Conclusion: In-situ repair was safe and minimally invasive. RAA, even in the second bifurcation, could be exposed by a subcostal incision, and the transperitoneal approach permitted the safe treatment of an RAA with acceptable results, in our simple preservation of renal function. PMID:23555504

  7. Cardiovocal Syndrome Secondary to an Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Chen, Mei-Chien; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    We reported that a 68-year-old man presented to the ENT outpatient department complaining of hoarseness for more than 10 months. Clinical exam identified left vocal palsy in the paramedian position and atrophic vocal folds were noted. Chest radiography revealed a large bulging contour overlying aorta and left hilar shadow. Aortic aneurysm was proved by CT scanning. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography for further evaluation showed a broad-based aortic aneurysm at proximal descending aorta, projecting anterolaterally. Cardiovocal syndrome was proved. The syndrome is a rare clinical presentation. While a patient with unilateral vocal palsy is encountered, one might keep in mind the possibility of cardiovocal syndrome especially in an adult who had a cardiovascular disease. PMID:27088024

  8. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  9. Management of Giant Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sami; Otan, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To provide an overview of the medical literature on giant splenic artery aneurysm (SAA). The PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched using keywords to identify articles related to SAA. Keywords used were splenic artery aneurysm, giant splenic artery aneuryms, huge splenic artery aneurysm, splenic artery aneurysm rupture, and visceral artery aneurysm. SAAs with a diameter ≥5 cm are considered as giant and included in this study. The language of the publication was not a limitation criterion, and publications dated before January 15, 2015 were considered. The literature review included 69 papers (62 fulltext, 6 abstract, 1 nonavailable) on giant SAA. A sum of 78 patients (50 males, 28 females) involved in the study with an age range of 27–87 years (mean ± SD: 55.8 ± 14.0 years). Age range for male was 30–87 (mean ± SD: 57.5 ± 12.0 years) and for female was 27–84 (mean ± SD: 52.7 ± 16.6 years). Most frequent predisposing factors were acute or chronic pancreatitis, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cirrhosis. Aneurysm dimensions were obtained for 77 patients with a range of 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 97.1 ± 46.0 mm). Aneurysm dimension range for females was 50–210 mm (mean ± SD: 97.5 ± 40.2 mm) and for males was 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 96.9 ± 48.9 mm). Intraperitoneal/retroperitoneal rupture was present in 15, among which with a lesion dimension range of 50–180 mm (mean ± SD; 100 ± 49.3 mm) which was range of 50–300 mm (mean ± SD: 96.3 ± 45.2 mm) in cases without rupture. Mortality for rupture patients was 33.3%. Other frequent complications were gastrosplenic fistula (n = 3), colosplenic fistula (n = 1), pancreatic fistula (n = 1), splenic arteriovenous fistula (n = 3), and portosplenic fistula (n = 1). Eight of the patients died in early postoperative period while 67 survived. Survival status of the

  10. Cardiovocal Syndrome Secondary to an Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Chen, Mei-Chien; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    We reported that a 68-year-old man presented to the ENT outpatient department complaining of hoarseness for more than 10 months. Clinical exam identified left vocal palsy in the paramedian position and atrophic vocal folds were noted. Chest radiography revealed a large bulging contour overlying aorta and left hilar shadow. Aortic aneurysm was proved by CT scanning. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography for further evaluation showed a broad-based aortic aneurysm at proximal descending aorta, projecting anterolaterally. Cardiovocal syndrome was proved. The syndrome is a rare clinical presentation. While a patient with unilateral vocal palsy is encountered, one might keep in mind the possibility of cardiovocal syndrome especially in an adult who had a cardiovascular disease. PMID:27088024

  11. First genetic analysis of aneurysm genes in familial and sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    van de Luijtgaarden, Koen M; Heijsman, Daphne; Maugeri, Alessandra; Weiss, Marjan M; Verhagen, Hence J M; IJpma, Arne; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle

    2015-08-01

    Genetic causes for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have not been identified and the role of genes associated with familial thoracic aneurysms in AAA has not been explored. We analyzed nine genes associated with familial thoracic aortic aneurysms, the vascular Ehlers-Danlos gene COL3A1 and the MTHFR p.Ala222Val variant in 155 AAA patients. The thoracic aneurysm genes selected for this study were the transforming growth factor-beta pathway genes EFEMP2, FBN1, SMAD3, TGBF2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and the smooth muscle cells genes ACTA2, MYH11 and MYLK. Sanger sequencing of all coding exons and exon-intron boundaries of these genes was performed. Patients with at least one first-degree relative with an aortic aneurysm were classified as familial AAA (n = 99), the others as sporadic AAA. We found 47 different rare heterozygous variants in eight genes: two pathogenic, one likely pathogenic, twenty-one variants of unknown significance (VUS) and twenty-three unlikely pathogenic variants. In familial AAA we found one pathogenic and segregating variant (COL3A1 p.Arg491X), one likely pathogenic and segregating (MYH11 p.Arg254Cys), and fifteen VUS. In sporadic patients we found one pathogenic (TGFBR2 p.Ile525Phefs*18) and seven VUS. Thirteen patients had two or more variants. These results show a previously unknown association and overlapping genetic defects between AAA and familial thoracic aneurysms, indicating that genetic testing may help to identify the cause of familial and sporadic AAA. In this view, genetic testing of these genes specifically or in a genome-wide approach may help to identify the cause of familial and sporadic AAA. PMID:26017485

  12. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver NɛκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NɛκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  13. Ultrasound of Primary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Keeney, Gary L.; Rock, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are rare, benign, expansile lesions of bone often found in the metaphyses of long bones in pediatric and young adult population. Multiple fluid levels are typically seen on imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). We describe a case of a primary ABC in the fibula of a 34-year-old man diagnosed on ultrasound with a mobile fluid level demonstrated sonographically. PMID:24587935

  14. Aneurysmal cyst of the petrosal bone.

    PubMed Central

    Lackmann, G M; Töllner, U

    1993-01-01

    An aneurysmal cyst of the petrosal bone presenting as hearing loss and recurrent bacterial meningitis is reported. None of the clinical or radiographic signs described previously were present. Because other diagnostic methods are not reliable, it is recommended that coronal thin section computed tomography be performed in every case of suspected malformation of the skull base and in the diagnosis of recurrent bacterial meningitis. PMID:8215531

  15. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier–Stokes solver NεκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NεκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in

  16. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the ethmoid bone

    PubMed Central

    Janjua, Noor; Cresswell, Manuela; Sharma, Rishi; Maheshwar, Arcot

    2014-01-01

    A 90-year-old woman presented with headache and diplopia, and a mass in the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses was found on CT scan. The patient underwent examination under anaesthesia showing a mass arising from the ethmoid, apparently from the nasal septum. Biopsies taken showed an aneurysmal bone cyst. The patient opted against surgery and has been managed conservatively. A second CT scan 4 years later showed significant increase in size. PMID:24706701

  17. Systemic lupus erythematosus with hepatic aneurysm, valsalva sinus aneurysm and associated polyangiitis: aneurysmal wall remodeling with dense fibrosis and calcification mediated by residual smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K

    2004-01-01

    Isolated case reports have demonstrated the combination of hepatic aneurysm and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The author experienced a rare autopsy case of a 36-year old Japanese male with SLE, a hepatic aneurysm, a Valsalva sinus aneurysm and associated polyangiitis. In the histopathological and ultrastructural examinations of the postmortem organs, most of the angiitis lesions were in the scar phase associated with the histopathological features of collagenous fibrosis with the diminution of the smooth muscle cells and elastic fibre layers. Massive calcification was seen on the wall and obliterative changes in the lumen with calcified thrombi. In the dense collagenous stroma of the aneurysmal wall, residual atrophic smooth muscle cells with immunohistochemical (HHF35+, alpha-smooth-muscle actin+, vimentin+ and desmin almost-) and ultrastructural features (spindle-shaped cells with a few rER and rich intracytoplasmic filaments with peripheral dense patches) were assumed to be involved in the histogenesis of the aneurysmal wall. Massive calcification and degeneration or dynamic remodeling of the extracellular matrices in the aneurysmal wall might be mediated by the residual smooth muscle cells. It was suspected that the generalized polyangiitis as a complication of SLE might have involved the intrahepatic arteries and Valsalva sinus wall and subsequently generated the aneurysm.

  18. Hemodynamic Influences on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease: Application of Biomechanics to Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M.; Dalman, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    “Atherosclerotic” abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur with the greatest frequency in the distal aorta. The unique hemodynamic environment of this area predisposes it to site-specific degenerative changes. In this review, we summarize the differential hemodynamic influences present along the length of the abdominal aorta, and demonstrate how alterations in aortic flow and wall shear stress modify AAA progression in experimental models. Improved understanding of aortic hemodynamic risk profiles provides an opportunity to modify patient activity patterns to minimize risk of aneurysmal degeneration. PMID:20347049

  19. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm: an uncommon presentation].

    PubMed

    Taborda, Lúcia; Pereira, Laurinda; Amona, Eurides; Pinto, Erique Guedes; Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Most abdominal aortic aneurysms are asymptomatic, being accidentally found on physical examination or in routinely performed imaging studies. They only require surveillance (which is variable according to the aneurism size) and medical therapy in order to achieve risk factor reduction. However, in certain situations, according to the risk of aneurism rupture, elective surgery or endovascular procedure may be necessary. About 80% of the cases of aneurism rupture occur into the retroperitoneal space, with a high mortality rate. There are uncommon presentations of aneurism rupture as the aorto-caval fistula, which also require fast diagnosis and intervention. The authors present the case of a 71-year-old man, with the previous diagnosis of hypertension, acute myocardial infarction 2 months earlier (undergone primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) and tabagism, who was admitted at the emergency department with intense 24-hour-evolution epigastric pain. On physical examination, the Blood Pressure values measured at the lower limbs were about half the ones measured at the upper limbs and there was an abdominal pulsatile mass, with a high-intensity murmur. As the authors suspected aortic dissection, aneurysm, coarctation or thrombosis, it was done a Computed Tomography scanning with intravenous contrast, which revealed a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm with a mural thrombus. The doppler ultrasound confirmed the presence of a high debit aorto-caval fistula. The patient was immediately transferred to the Vascular Surgery. However he died 2 hours later, during surgery. PMID:22525642

  20. Aneurysm of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Gordini, Veliano; Collice, Massimo; Fedriga, Emanuele; Moreo, Antonella; Morello, Marco; Porrini, Annamaria; Donatelli, Francesco

    1991-01-01

    A 53-year-old man was admitted for treatment of an aberrant right subclavian artery aneurysm that had been diagnosed 5 years earlier and had recently begun to enlarge. The aneurysm, which involved the right subclavian artery from its origin, measured 47 mm in diameter and about 10 cm in length. Because of the lesion's size and friability, a 2-stage operation was performed. In the 1st stage, the right subclavian and right vertebral arteries were revascularized with double bypass grafts via a right cervical approach. In the 2nd stage, the patient was repositioned and a left thoracotomy incision was made. With the aid of left-heart bypass, the aorta was cross-clamped proximal and distal to the lesion, and the aneurysmal orifice was closed with a Dacron patch. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 17th postoperative day and remains asymptomatic 24 months later. We recommend the 2-stage technique for similar cases because it prevents limb ischemia and reduces the risk of hemorrhagic and embolic complications. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:76-9) Images PMID:15227513

  1. [Syphilitic aortic aneurysm. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, A; Ibn Elhadj, Z; Essmat, W; Léfi, A; Kammoun, I; Zouaoui, W; Marrakchi, S; Chine, S; Gargouri, S; Keskes, H; Kachboura, S

    2006-05-01

    The incidence of tertiary syphilis has declined in recent years owing to the early recognition of the disease and use of antibiotics. As a result, syphilitic aortic aneurysms are rarely encountered nowadays. We report the case of a 65 years old man, who was admitted to our hospital in June 2004 for dyspnea, cough and chest discomfort. On physical examination, blood pressure was 130/80 mmHg with no significant laterality, pulse rate was 70 per minute and there was a decrease of breath sounds over the right lung. Laboratory findings revealed a slight elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serological studies for syphilis showed a positive venereal disease laboratory test (VDRL) at 1/32 and a positive Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test (TPHA) at 1/2560. The chest radiography showed a right para cardiac opacity measuring 16 x 12 cm. Fiber optic bronchoscopy showed an extrinsic compression of the right upper lobar bronchus. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and 16 multidetector-row spiral computed aortography showed a huge partially thrombosed saccular aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 132 mm in diameter. The circulating lumen measured 53 mm in its largest diameter. This aneurysm involved the innominate artery. There was no other arterial involvement. The patient was given a three week course of intravenous penicillin followed by a successful surgical procedure in September 2004 with ascending aortic replacement and innominate artery reimplantation. This case illustrates well a formerly common, but now extremely rare disease.

  2. Prevention of ischemic complications during aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Andreas; Seidel, Kathleen

    2016-03-01

    Ischemic complications during aneurysm surgery are a frequent cause of postoperative infarctions and new neurological deficits. In this article, we discuss imaging and neurophysiological tools that may help the surgeon to detect intraoperative ischemia. The strength of intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the full view of the arterial and venous vessel. DSA is the gold standard in complex and giant aneurysms, but due to certain disadvantages, it cannot be considered standard of care. Microvascular Doppler sonography is probably the fastest diagnostic tool and can quickly aid diagnosis of large vessel occlusions. Intraoperative indocyanine green videoangiography is the best tool to assess flow in perforating and larger arteries, as well as occlusion of the aneurysm sac. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring with somatosensory and motor evoked potentials indirectly measures blood flow by recording neuronal function. It covers all causes of intraoperative ischemia, provided that ischemia occurs in the brain areas under surveillance. However, every method has advantages and disadvantages. No single method is superior to the others in every aspect. Therefore, it is very important for the neurosurgeon to know the strengths and weaknesses of each tool in order to have them available, to know how to use them for each individual situation, and to be ready to apply them within the time window for reversible cerebral ischemia.

  3. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-04-04

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

  4. Endovascular exclusion of a large external iliac vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Mina; Hernandez, Diego

    2013-07-01

    Iliac vein aneurysms are uncommon, and there is no consensus on optimal treatment. We present a case of venous exclusion using an endovascular approach. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a large external iliac vein aneurysm treated endovascularly. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach with satisfactory 1-year follow-up.

  5. Diversity in the Strength and Structure of Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Anne M.; Duan, Xinjie; Aziz, Khaled M.; Hill, Michael R.; Watkins, Simon C.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are pathological enlargements of brain arteries that are believed to arise from progressive wall degeneration and remodeling. Earlier work using classical histological approaches identified variability in cerebral aneurysm mural content, ranging from layered walls with intact endothelium and aligned smooth muscle cells, to thin, hypocellular walls. Here, we take advantage of recent advances in multiphoton microscopy, to provide novel results for collagen fiber architecture in 15 human aneurysm domes without staining or fixation as well as in 12 control cerebral arteries. For all aneurysm samples, the elastic lamina was absent and the abluminal collagen fibers had similar diameters to control arteries. In contrast, the collagen fibers on the luminal side showed great variability in both diameter and architecture ranging from dense fiber layers to sparse fiber constructs suggestive of ineffective remodeling efforts. The mechanical integrity of eight aneurysm samples was assessed using uniaxial experiments, revealing two sub-classes (i) vulnerable unruptured aneurysms (low failure stress and failure pressure), and (ii) strong unruptured aneurysms (high failure stress and failure pressure). These results suggest a need to refine the end-point of risk assessment studies that currently do not distinguish risk levels among unruptured aneurysms. We propose that a measure of wall integrity that identifies this vulnerable wall subpopulation will be useful for interpreting future biological and structural data. PMID:25632891

  6. Extracranial arterial aneurysms: a cause of crescendo transient ischaemic attacks.

    PubMed

    Paterson, H M; Holdsworth, R J

    2000-12-01

    Crescendo transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) should be regarded as a medical emergency. Patients require hospitalisation with urgent assessment and symptom control with anticoagulant therapy. We report on three patients, all of whom had atherosclerotic aneurysmal disease of the extracranial arterial circulation who presented with crescendo TIAs. The possibility of extracranial aneurysmal disease should always be considered and excluded.

  7. Harvey W. Cushing and cerebrovascular surgery: Part I, Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spencer, Dennis D

    2004-09-01

    The development of surgical techniques for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms has paralleled the evolution of the specialty of neurological surgery. During the Cushing era, intracranial aneurysms were considered inoperable and only ligation of the carotid artery was performed. Cushing understood the limitations of this approach and advised the need for a more thorough understanding of aneurysm pathology before further consideration could be given to the surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Despite his focus on brain tumors, Cushing's contributions to the discipline of neurovascular surgery are of great importance. With the assistance of Sir Charles Symonds, Cushing described the syndrome of subarachnoid hemorrhage. He considered inserting muscle strips into cerebral aneurysms to promote aneurysm sac thrombosis and designed the "silver clip," which was modified by McKenzie and later used by Dandy to clip the first intracranial aneurysm. Cushing was the first surgeon to wrap aneurysms in muscle fragments to prevent recurrent hemorrhage. He established the foundation on which pioneers such as Norman Dott and Walter Dandy launched the modern era of neurovascular surgery.

  8. Headache attributed to unruptured saccular aneurysm, mimicking hemicrania continua.

    PubMed

    Vikelis, Michail; Xifaras, Michail; Magoufis, Georgios; Gekas, Georgios; Mitsikostas, Dimos Dimitrios

    2005-06-01

    Unruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms most often remain asymptomatic, but they may cause headache or other symptoms or signs. We describe herewith a case of headache attributed to an unruptured internal carotid artery aneurysm, clearly mimicking the phenotype of hemicrania continua. Potential pathophysiological explanations and recommendations for recognition of similar cases are discussed.

  9. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  10. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  11. Ruptured renal artery aneurysm: coil packing with GDCs.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Misako; Nakata, Manabu; Kawai, Akira; Suzuki, Kazumi; Morita, Tatsuo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-06-01

    Renal artery aneurysm (RAA) is a relatively uncommon occurrence, but it can be life-threatening when rupture (although rare) occurs. We present the successful endovascular treatment of a ruptured RAA, which was achieved by packing the aneurysm using Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils.

  12. Embolization of Large Aneurysms with Long Wire Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Dussaussois, Luc; Ait Said, Kamel; Abada, Hicham T.; Dereume, Jean P.; Struyven, Julien

    2002-01-15

    The authors report the experience of using long coils of 2 m length in the management of large aneurysms. Knowledge of the characteristics of these coils is of value for correct placement. These coils are safe and cost-effective for excluding large aneurysms.

  13. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay.

  14. Diversity in the Strength and Structure of Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Anne M; Duan, Xinjie; Aziz, Khaled M; Hill, Michael R; Watkins, Simon C; Cebral, Juan R

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are pathological enlargements of brain arteries that are believed to arise from progressive wall degeneration and remodeling. Earlier work using classical histological approaches identified variability in cerebral aneurysm mural content, ranging from layered walls with intact endothelium and aligned smooth muscle cells, to thin, hypocellular walls. Here, we take advantage of recent advances in multiphoton microscopy, to provide novel results for collagen fiber architecture in 15 human aneurysm domes without staining or fixation as well as in 12 control cerebral arteries. For all aneurysm samples, the elastic lamina was absent and the abluminal collagen fibers had similar diameters to control arteries. In contrast, the collagen fibers on the luminal side showed great variability in both diameter and architecture ranging from dense fiber layers to sparse fiber constructs suggestive of ineffective remodeling efforts. The mechanical integrity of eight aneurysm samples was assessed using uniaxial experiments, revealing two sub-classes (i) vulnerable unruptured aneurysms (low failure stress and failure pressure), and (ii) strong unruptured aneurysms (high failure stress and failure pressure). These results suggest a need to refine the end-point of risk assessment studies that currently do not distinguish risk levels among unruptured aneurysms. We propose that a measure of wall integrity that identifies this vulnerable wall subpopulation will be useful for interpreting future biological and structural data. PMID:25632891

  15. Mechanisms of Healing in Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Kallmes, David F; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recanalization of intracranial aneurysms following endovascular coiling remains a frustratingly common occurrence. An understanding of the molecular and histopathological mechanisms of aneurysm healing following coil embolization is essential to improving aneurysm occlusion rates. Histolopathologic studies in coiled human and experimental aneurysms suggest that during the first month post-coiling, thrombus formation and active inflammation occur within the aneurysm dome. Several months following embolization, the aneurysm is excluded from the parent vessel by formation of a neointimal layer, which is often thin and discontinuous, across the aneurysm neck. Numerous coil modifications and systemic therapies have been tested in animals and humans in an attempt to improve the aneurysm healing process; these modifications have met with variable levels of success. In this review, we summarize the histopathologic and molecular biology of aneurysm healing and discuss how these findings have been applied in an attempt to improve angiographic outcomes in patients harboring intracranial aneurysm. PMID:25430855

  16. Impact of Stent Design on Intra-Aneurysmal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, M.; Hirabayashi, M.; Wetzel, S.; Lylyk, P.; Wata, H.; Tsutsumi, S.; Rüfenacht, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Summary In addition to providing a skeleton for vessel reconstruction, stent implantation as used for cerebral aneurysm treatment can induce flow redirection, thus reducing vortical flow velocities within the aneurysm cavity. Further, stent characteristics such as strut size, porosity and cell shape influence the changes in intra-aneurysmal flow by analog simulations. The purpose of this computer simulation study was to visualize the flow pattern over the entire neck area of a side wall aneurysm while changing the stent parameters. A 3-D computer model aneurysm was constructed to have a parent artery of 5 mm diameter and an aneurysm of 10 mm diameter. The distance between the midline of main artery and center point of the aneurysm was 6.8 mm, providing a neck length of 5 mm, a width of 3.6 mm, and a neck area of 14 mm 2. The simulations were carried out with a Finite Element Method based flow simulation package. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation was solved for a steady flow with a mean speed of 290 mm/s, steady viscosity of 3.83 cp, and density of 1.0 g/cm3. Two parallel stent struts (dimensions: 100 µm m 100 µm m 2.0 mm) were introduced into the plane of the aneurysm neck. The fraction of the aneurysm neck cross-section occupied by the stent was 2.83% in all cases. The velocity distribution through the neck of the aneurysm was calculated for three different choices of separation between the struts for each of two orientations of the struts (parallel and perpendicular) relative to the vessel axis. The flow pattern in the aneurysm was composed of an inflow zone at the distal neck and of an outflow zone at the proximal neck. The placement of stent struts at the aneurysm neck resulted in a decrease in the mean speed in the aneurysm. The degree of reduction and the distribution of flow through the neck did depend on the orientation of the stent struts. The struts, when placed parallel or perpendicular to the parent vessel axis affected the mean speed through

  17. [Perioperative management of a ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Peña, J J; Marqués, J I; Mateo, E; Llagunes, J; Aguar, F; de Andrés, J

    2008-03-01

    Congenital sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are extremely rare in Spain. The lesion consists of a defect that allows the aortic media to separate from the annulus fibrosus of the aortic valve, causing it to dilate with arterial pressure. The natural course of the aneurysm involves the risk of complication due to bacterial endocarditis, with conduction blocks or myocardial ischemia. Rupture of the aneurysm, usually into a right chamber, causes a left-right shunt that leads to heart failure and death if untreated. We present the case of a previously asymptomatic 60-year-old woman who presented with a clinical picture that led to a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, and in whom there occurred a coincident rupture of a congenital sinus of Valsalva aneurysm. We describe the anesthetic procedure and emphasize the importance of intraoperative echocardiography throughout the resection of the aneurysm.

  18. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2014-01-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision.

  19. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sandip; Diwaker, Preeti; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma.

  20. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Sandip; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma. PMID:27504302

  1. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sandip; Diwaker, Preeti; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma. PMID:27504302

  2. Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms Associated with Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeho; Kim, Chong-gue

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disorder involving multiple organs. Its cause is still unknown, but vasculitis is the major pathologic characteristic. The common vascular lesions associated with Behçet's disease are aneurysm formation, arterial or venous occlusive diseases, and varices. Arterial aneurysms mostly occur in large arteries. Intracranial aneurysms hardly occur with Behçet's disease. We would like to present a 41-year-old female patient with Behçet's disease who showed symptoms of severe headache due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms. We also present a literature review of intracranial arterial aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. PMID:27114964

  3. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm. Endovascular treatment with fenestrated endoprothesis].

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Román; Cesareo, Vicente; García-Mónaco, Ricardo; Peralta, Oscar; Domenech, Alberto; Bracco, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is consider an alternative to open surgery for high risk patients. Its goal is to exclude the aneurysm from the circulation by using an endoprothesis introduced from a femoral approach. Patients must be strictly selected to avoid possible complications. The most frequent limitation is related to anatomic contraindications such as visceral arteries involved in the aneurysm. Fenestrated endograft have been recently developed to allow endovascular treatment when anatomic features contraindicate classic endovascular procedures. Fenestrated endograft have holes that match with the origin of the visceral arteries maintaining its potency. In this paper we report the endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by using a fenestrated endoprothesis in a patient whose left renal artery is originated from the aneurysm.

  4. Wrapping of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a viable alternative.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; Lovett, V F

    1986-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm wrapping is an excellent procedure to use for poor-risk patients, calcified aneurysms, aneurysms extending above the renal arteries, and prophylaxis for small aneurysms. The procedure has a low operative mortality rate and a low long-term graft-related complication rate. It appears that aortic wrapping can be performed with a similar mortality and long-term survival rate as standard resection and grafting procedures, in spite of its application in generally poorer-risk patients. However, we do not believe that this procedure will replace aortic resection and grafting for most lumbar aortic aneurysms, but it should be considered for use in selected instances and should be in the armamentarium of all vascular surgeons.

  5. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic artery aneurysm associated with polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Parent, Brodie A; Cho, Sung W; Buck, David G; Nalesnik, Michael A; Gamblin, T Clark

    2010-12-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a vasculitis, which often involves small and medium sized visceral arteries. This condition may result in multifocal aneurismal formation and end-organ damage. Uncommonly, PAN may present with rupture of hepatic artery aneurysms. Here, we report a rare case of a ruptured intrahepatic aneurysm associated with PAN. A 79-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain had CT scan of the abdomen, which revealed hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Visceral angiogram confirmed pseudo-aneurysm of a right hepatic arterial branch, and this was managed with endovascular coil embolization. The diagnosis of PAN was made and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. We also performed a literature review to define this condition's demographics, clinical presentations, and appropriate management. The review revealed 17 published cases of ruptured PAN-related intrahepatic aneurysms. We conclude that unexplained findings of visceral arterial aneurysms should prompt investigations for vasculitis as the etiology.

  6. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-07-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision.

  7. Biology of Saccular Cerebral Aneurysms: A Review of Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Vernard S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Atwal, Gursant; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Spetzler, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biology of intracranial aneurysms is a clinical quandary. How these aneurysms form, progress, and rupture is poorly understood. Evidence indicates that well-established risk factors play a critical role, along with immunologic factors, in their development and clinical outcomes. Much of the expanding knowledge of the inception, progression, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms implicates inflammation as a critical mediator of aneurysm pathogenesis. Thus, therapeutic targets exploiting this arm of aneurysm pathogenesis have been implemented, often with promising outcomes. PMID:27504449

  8. Surgical repair of an aberrant splenic artery aneurysm: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; LaMuraglia, Glenn; Nigri, Giuseppe; Vietri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    Aneurysms of the splenic artery are the most common splanchnic aneurysms. Aneurysms of a splenic artery with an anomalous origin from the superior mesenteric artery are however rare, with eight previously reported cases. Their indications for treatment are superposable to those of aneurysms affecting an orthotopic artery. Methods of treatment of this condition include endovascular, minimally invasive techniques and surgical resection. We report one more case of aneurysm of an aberrant splenic artery, treated with surgical resection, and preservation of the spleen.

  9. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  10. Enlarged Parent Artery Lumen at Aneurysmal-Neck Segment in Wide-Necked Distal Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Won; Woo, Jung Min; Lim, Ok Kyun; Jo, Ye-eun; Kim, Jae Kyun; Kim, Eun Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hypothesizing that the parent artery (PA) diameter of the aneurysm-neck segment is larger than those of normal segments, especially in wide-necked aneurysm cases, we conducted 3D angiographic analyses in wide-necked aneurysm cases focusing on the luminal morphologic change of the PA. Materials and Methods Under the approval of local IRB, we enrolled 26 patients with distal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, which were treated with stent assisted coiling. The PA diameters along the centerline were measured at 6 points with built-in software by two observers. Those 6 points were P1 and P2 proximally, P3 and P4 at the aneurysm ostium margins, and P5 and P6 distally. We performed an ANOVA test and a Bonferroni method for post hoc analyses. Linear regression analysis was performed to find any morphologic influencing factors. Results There were 20 distal ICA aneurysms out of 26 consecutive cases after exclusion. The differences in diameter at each point were statistically significant (p<0.0001). On post hoc analyses, the difference between P4 and P5 was significant both in maximum and mean PA diameters (p<0.0001 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analyses failed to reveal any morphological influencing factor. Conclusion PAs harboring a wide-necked aneurysm requiring stent assistance for coiling showed significant enlargement of the lumen, especially at the distal transition segment of the aneurysm ostium and the PA. PMID:26389011

  11. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months.

  12. Prevalence of cerebral aneurysm in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Oshino, Satoru; Nishino, Akio; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Arita, Hideyuki; Tateishi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Shimokawa, Toshio; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Saitoh, Youichi

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of cerebral aneurysm was retrospectively investigated in 208 patients with acromegaly relative to the rate of cerebral aneurysm in a group of control subjects. Neuroradiological examinations of the cerebral vascular system were conducted in 208 acromegaly patients (101 men; mean age, 48.8 years). The prevalence of cerebral aneurysm in the acromegaly patients was compared to that in a control group consisting of 7,390 subjects who underwent "brain checkup" between 2006 and 2008 (mean age, 51.6 years). In the acromegaly group, cerebral aneurysm was detected in 4.3 % of patients. By sex, the prevalence was 6.9 % in males, a significantly proportion than that in the control group with an odds ratio of 4.40. The prevalence in females did not differ between the two groups. In the acromegaly group, the rate of hypertension was significantly higher in the patients with aneurysm compared to those without aneurysm. Multiple logistic regression identified acromegaly as a significant factor related to the prevalence of cerebral aneurysm in all male subjects; other factors, such as age, hypertension and smoking, were not found to be significant. A significantly higher prevalence of cerebral aneurysm was detected in male patients with acromegaly. This finding indicates that excess growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor 1 affects the cerebral vascular wall, resulting in aneurysm formation. In addition to known systematic complications in the cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and other systems, the risk of cerebral aneurysm should be considered in the management of acromegaly.

  13. Aneurysm Study of Pipeline in an Observational Registry (ASPIRe)

    PubMed Central

    Kallmes, David F.; Brinjikji, Waleed; Boccardi, Edoardo; Ciceri, Elisa; Diaz, Orlando; Tawk, Rabih; Woo, Henry; Jabbour, Pascal; Albuquerque, Felipe; Chapot, Rene; Bonafe, Alain; Dashti, Shervin R.; Almandoz, Josser E. Delgado; Given, Curtis; Kelly, Michael E.; Cross, DeWitte T.; Duckwiler, Gary; Razack, Nasser; Powers, Ciaran J.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lopes, Demetrius; Harrigan, Mark R.; Huddle, Daniel; Turner, Raymond; Zaidat, Osama O.; Defreyne, Luc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Cekirge, Saruhan; Fiorella, David; Hanel, Ricardo A.; Lylyk, Pedro; McDougall, Cameron; Siddiqui, Adnan; Szikora, Istvan; Levy, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Few prospective studies exist evaluating the safety and efficacy of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. The Aneurysm Study of Pipeline In an observational Registry (ASPIRe) study prospectively analyzed rates of complete aneurysm occlusion and neurologic adverse events following PED treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods We performed a multicenter study prospectively evaluating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with PED. Primary outcomes included (1) spontaneous rupture of the Pipeline-treated aneurysm; (2) spontaneous nonaneurysmal intracranial hemorrhage (ICH); (3) acute ischemic stroke; (4) parent artery stenosis, and (5) permanent cranial neuropathy. Secondary endpoints were (1) treatment success and (2) morbidity and mortality at the 6-month follow-up. Vascular imaging was evaluated at an independent core laboratory. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients with 207 treated aneurysms were included in this registry. The mean aneurysm size was 14.5 ± 6.9 mm, and the median imaging follow-up was 7.8 months. Twenty-four aneurysms (11.6%) were small, 162 (78.3%) were large and 21 (10.1%) were giant. The median clinical follow-up time was 6.2 months. The neurological morbidity rate was 6.8% (13/191), and the neurological mortality rate was 1.6% (3/191). The combined neurological morbidity/mortality rate was 6.8% (13/191). The most common adverse events were ischemic stroke (4.7%, 9/191) and spontaneous ICH (3.7%, 7/191). The complete occlusion rate at the last follow-up was 74.8% (77/103). Conclusions Our prospective postmarket study confirms that PED treatment of aneurysms in a heterogeneous patient population is safe with low rates of neurological morbidity and mortality. Patients with angiographic follow-up had complete occlusion rates of 75% at 8 months. PMID:27610126

  14. Aneurysmal Lesions of Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Contain Clonally Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Song; White, John V.; Lin, Wan Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Solomides, Charalambos; Evans, Kyle; Ntaoula, Nectaria; Nwaneshiudu, Ifeyinwa; Gaughan, John; Monos, Dimitri S.; Oleszak, Emilia L.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with often life-threatening consequences. This vascular disorder is responsible for 1–2% of all deaths in men aged 65 years or older. Autoimmunity may be responsible for the pathogenesis of AAA. Although it is well documented that infiltrating T cells are essentially always present in AAA lesions, little is known about their role in the initiation and/or progression of the disease. To determine whether T cells infiltrating AAA lesions contain clonally expanded populations of T cells, we amplified β-chain TCR transcripts by the nonpalindromic adaptor–PCR/Vβ-specific PCR and/or Vβ-specific PCR, followed by cloning and sequencing. We report in this article that aortic abdominal aneurysmal lesions from 8 of 10 patients with AAA contained oligoclonal populations of T cells. Multiple identical copies of β-chain TCR transcripts were identified in these patients. These clonal expansions are statistically significant. These results demonstrate that αβ TCR+ T lymphocytes infiltrating aneurysmal lesions of patients with AAA have undergone proliferation and clonal expansion in vivo at the site of the aneurysmal lesion, in response to unidentified self- or nonself Ags. This evidence supports the hypothesis that AAA is a specific Ag–driven T cell disease. PMID:24752442

  15. Persistent Aneurysm Growth Following Pipeline Embolization Device Assisted Coiling of a Fusiform Vertebral Artery Aneurysm: A Word of Caution!

    PubMed Central

    Kerolus, Mena; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2015-01-01

    The complex morphology of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms makes them one of the most challenging lesions treated by neurointerventionists. Different management strategies in the past included parent vessel occlusion with or without extra-intracranial bypass surgery and endovascular reconstruction by conventional stents. Use of flow diversion has emerged as a promising alternative option with various studies documenting its efficacy and safety. However, there are various caveats associated with use of flow diversion in patients with fusiform vertibrobasilar aneurysms especially in patients presenting with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report a rare case of persistent aneurysmal growth after coiling and placement of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) for SAH from a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm. As consequences of aneurysm rupture can be devastating especially in patients with a prior SAH, the clinical relevance of recognizing and understanding such patterns of failure cannot be overemphasized as highlighted in the present case. PMID:25763295

  16. Chronic cerebral paragonimiasis combined with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Juk-Dong; Suh, Bumn-Suk; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Song, Chang-June; Shin, Dae-Whan; Lee, Young-Ha

    2003-11-01

    A 67-year-old Korean woman attended our hospital complaining of a severe headache. A brain computed tomography scan showed conglomerated, high-density, calcified nodules in the left temporo-occipito-parietal area and high-density subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cisterns. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows multiple conglomerated iso- or low-signal intensity round nodules with peripheral rim enhancement. She underwent craniotomies to clip the aneurysm and remove the calcified masses. Paragonimus westermani eggs were identified in the calcified necrotic lesions. Results of parasitic examinations on the sputum and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for P. westermani were all negative. The patient presented with headache and dizziness that had occurred for more than 30 years. She had not eaten freshwater crayfish or crabs. However, she had sometimes prepared raw crabs for several decades. Overall, this case was diagnosed as chronic cerebral paragonimiasis, in which she may have been infected through the contamination of utensils during the preparation of the second intermediate hosts, combined with a cerebral hemorrhage.

  17. A study of the hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.

    2006-03-01

    In this study, the effects of unequal physiologic flow conditions in the internal carotid arteries on the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms were investigated. Patient-specific vascular computational fluid dynamics models of five cerebral aneurysms were constructed from bilateral 3D rotational angiography images. The aneurysmal hemodynamics was analyzed under a range of physiologic flow conditions including the effects of unequal mean flows and phase shifts between the flow waveforms of the left and right internal carotid arteries. A total of five simulations were performed for each patient, and unsteady wall shear stress (WSS) maps were created for each flow condition. Time dependent curves of average WSS magnitude over selected regions on the aneurysms were constructed and used to analyze the influence of the inflow conditions. It was found that mean flow imbalances in the feeding vessels tend to shift the regions of elevated WSS (flow impingement region) towards the dominating inflow jet and to change the magnitude of the WSS peaks. However, the overall qualitative appearance of the WSS distribution and velocity simulations is not substantially affected. In contrast, phase differences tend to increase the temporal complexity of the hemodynamic patterns and to destabilize the intra-aneurysmal flow pattern. However, these effects are less important when the A1 confluence is less symmetric, i.e. dominated by one of the A1 segments. Conditions affecting the flow characteristics in the parent arteries of cerebral aneurysms with more than one avenue of inflow should be incorporated into flow models.

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neuroinflammation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Manoranjan, Branavan; Turner, Ryan C.; McConnell, Evan; Vates, George Edward; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simard, J. Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating outcomes including vasospasm, cognitive decline, and even death. Currently, treatment options are limited for this potentially life threatening injury. Recent evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in injury expansion and brain damage. Red blood cell breakdown products can lead to the release of inflammatory cytokines that trigger vasospasm and tissue injury. Preclinical models have been used successfully to improve understanding about neuroinflammation following aneurysmal rupture. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of how neuroinflammation relates to secondary outcomes such as vasospasm after aneurysmal rupture and to critically discuss pharmaceutical agents that warrant further investigation for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. We provide a concise overview of the neuroinflammatory pathways that are upregulated following aneurysmal rupture and how these pathways correlate to long-term outcomes. Treatment of aneurysm rupture is limited and few pharmaceutical drugs are available. Through improved understanding of biochemical mechanisms of injury, novel treatment solutions are being developed that target neuroinflammation. In the final sections of this review, we highlight a few of these novel treatment approaches and emphasize why targeting neuroinflammation following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may improve patient care. We encourage ongoing research into the pathophysiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in regards to neuroinflammatory cascades and the translation to randomized clinical trials. PMID:27049383

  19. Uninfected anastomotic false aneurysms following arterial reconstruction with prosthetic grafts.

    PubMed

    Read, R C; Thompson, B W

    1975-01-01

    Thirteen men, aged 49 to 76 years, average 60, were treated at the Little Rock, Arkansas Veterans Administration Hospital between January 1, 1969 and January 1, 1974 for 1-3 false aneurysms, a total of 18, following prosthetic arterial grafting. Most (ten patients, 15 aneurysms) had aorto-femoral bifurcation grafts for Leriche syndrome. Dacron prostheses were employed in ten, Teflon in three. The interval between the initial operation and the appearance of the aneurysms averaged six years. The end-to-side femoral anastomosis broke down in all ten patients with Leriche syndrome. Six of the eight unilateral aneurysms were on the right side, two had bilateral aneurysms and one patient had three. Five patients died some months or years after repair from vascular accidents. Three other patients required amputations sometime later because their grafts clotted. Silk sutures were employed in only two patients. Plastic sutures in the others were found to have pulled out of the recipient vessels. The aneurysms were all uninfected and were repaired by local stitching in four and the addition of further plastic grafting in nine. We conclude that false aneurysms occur with plastic sutures and they relate primarily to disruption of the end-to-side femoral artery attachment from the stresses of movement at the hip joint.

  20. Diverticula of Kommerell and Aberrant Subclavian Arteries Complicated by Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R. G. Whigham, C. J.; Trinh, C.

    2005-06-15

    This is a retrospective evaluation of the incidence of aberrant subclavian arteries (ASAs) and diverticula of Kommerell, as well as the occurrence and significance of associated aneurysms. Thoracic aortograms obtained during a 12.5-year period were reviewed, seeking the presence of aberrant right and left subclavian arteries (ARSAs/ALSAs), diverticula of Kommerell, and the incidence of associated aortic aneurysms. Several cases were evaluated with computed tomography concomitantly. Results were correlated with a literature review. Twenty-two ASAs were identified. Nineteen were on the right (ARSAs) and three were on the left (ALSAs). A diverticulum of Kommerell (DOK) was also present on the right in seven and on the left in three. Five of these patients had complicating aneurysms. Four of these were associated with ARSAs and their diverticula. Two were atherosclerotic; one was a limited dissection and one of uncertain etiology was ruptured. One additional aneurysm (atherosclerotic) involved an ALSA/DOK. The patient with the ruptured aneurysm died in surgery; three were managed conservatively because of concomitant disease; and one is being followed because of the small size (2.5 cm) of the aneurysm. ARSAs are relatively uncommon and ALSAs are rare. Both ARSA and ALSA are frequently associated with a DOK. Aneurysms rarely involve ASAs (with or without a DOK), but they are associated with a high mortality rate if they are not discovered before rupture. Early diagnosis plus surgical and/or endovascular management can be lifesaving.

  1. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel; Varble, Nicole; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are potentially devastating pathological dilations of arterial walls that affect 2-5% of the population. In our previous CFD study of 119 IAs, we found that ruptured aneurysms were correlated with complex flow pattern and statistically predictable by low wall shear stress and high oscillatory shear index. To understand flow mechanisms that drive the pathophysiology of aneurysm wall leading to either stabilization or growth and rupture, we aim at exploring vortex dynamics of aneurysmal flow and provide insight into the correlation between the previous predictive morphological parameters and wall hemodynamic metrics. We adopt the Q-criterion definition of coherent structures (CS) and analyze the CS dynamics in aneurysmal flows for both ruptured and unruptured IA cases. For the first time, we draw relevant biological conclusions concerning aneurysm flow mechanisms and pathophysiological outcome. In pulsatile simulations, the coherent structures are analyzed in these 119 patient-specific geometries obtained using 3D angiograms. The images were reconstructed and CFD were performed. Upon conclusion of this work, better understanding of flow patterns of unstable aneurysms may lead to improved clinical outcome.

  2. Endovascular treatment of infectious intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bradley A; Puri, Ajit S

    2013-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysms (IIA) are rare but a considerable source of morbidity and mortality as a result of rupture. Most patients with these lesions have considerable medical comorbidities, making endovascular approaches a crucial modality in their treatment armamentarium. Contributing our own case, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature to illustrate overall results and outcomes for patients with IIA treated with endovascular approaches. Incorporating our own case, we found 65 patients harboring 72 IIA across 31 reports. Fifty-one were treated via parent artery occlusion (71%), 17 via direct aneurysm embolization (24%), two via stent-coiling (3%), and two with stent monotherapy (3%). Twenty-nine IIAs were treated with n-butylcyanoacrylate (NBCA) (40%), 25 with coils (35%), seven with Onyx or ethylene vinyl alcohol (10%), five with detachable balloons (7%), four with stents (6%), and one with autologous clot (1%). One case of incomplete aneurysm occlusion and two cases of recanalization were reported. Six symptomatic periprocedural ischemic events were reported (9%), with only three resulting in permanent sequelae (5%). No infectious complications were reported. Incorporating the natural history of the disease, 28 patients were neurologically intact (43%), while seven had died at the time of follow-up (11%). Endovascular treatment of ruptured, symptomatic, or enlarging IIA is an excellent treatment modality with high occlusion rates and low procedure-related complication rates. Distal IIA are more often treated with parent artery occlusion, in our hands, preferentially with Onyx, while proximal lesions may be treated with direct stent-coiling or even flow-diverting stent monotherapy.

  3. Beware of the aneurysm in stealth mode!

    PubMed

    Swarnkar, Amar; Ramaswamy, Raghu; Padalino, David J; Deshaies, Eric M

    2015-02-01

    Endovascular treatment is one of the treatment options considered for acute stroke in many primary stroke centers. Outcome from such treatment can be very successful and gratifying if the intervention is timely and patient selection is appropriate. There are however certain pitfalls that need to be kept in mind which, if the interventionalist is not careful, can adversely affect the outcome. We describe such a case where the patient presented with acute stroke due to basilar artery thrombosis but also had an aneurysm in the affected vessel. We also make certain recommendations to reduce the chances of complications arising during treatment of patients with such a condition.

  4. Surrogate Markers of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The natural course of many abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is to gradually expand and eventually rupture and monitoring the disease progression is essential to their management. In this publication, we review surrogate markers of AAA progression. AAA diameter remains the most widely used and important marker of AAA growth. Standardized reporting of reproducible methods of measuring AAA diameter is essential. Newer imaging assessments, such as volume measurements, biomechanical analyses, and functional and molecular imaging, as well as circulating biomarkers, have potential to add important information about AAA progression. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:26715680

  5. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  6. [Pulmonary artery aneurysm. A case report].

    PubMed

    Palma Nieto, J C; Sciaccaluga Morelli, C; Antón Martínez, J; Ramos del Amo, V M

    1999-02-01

    The pulmonary artery aneurysm is a rare clinical entity that presents a low incidence and prevalence, of difficult diagnosis to be presented with poorly specific symptoms or also without symptoms, being detected in radiological studies as a widening or mediastinal mass. It can be uni or bilateral and presenting itself isolated or in the context of other sicknesses. The diagnosis of certainty is based in the realization of Echo-Doppler and other studies as a tomography or a magnetic resonance, the therapeutic option being so difficult, and according to cases, by an expectant or aggressive attitude. PMID:10073101

  7. Aneurysm, arachnoiditis and intrathecal Au (gold)

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, D.M.; Kim, T.H.; Levitt, S.H. )

    1990-05-01

    This report is a 20-year follow-up of 14 patients treated with external beam craniospinal irradiation and intrathecal gold (10-45 mCi) for medulloblastoma. Six of the patients died within 2 years of treatment from persistent disease. No patients are alive without complications. Six of eight surviving patients developed arachnoiditis and cauda equina syndrome within 5 to 10 years of treatment. Seven of eight survivors developed aneurysms and/or cerebrovascular accidents 9 to 20 years after treatment. Four of the cerebrovascular events were fatal. Intrathecal gold pools in the basal cisterns and cauda equina delivering an extremely inhomogeneous dose throughout the neuroaxis. Its use is discouraged.

  8. The Effect of Steroid Therapy on Postoperative Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Atsushi; Omoto, Tadashi; Iizuka, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Unexpected systemic inflammatory response with high fever and increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) occurred frequently after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). This excessive inflammatory response affects the postoperative course. We evaluated the effects of steroid on the postoperative inflammatory response after EVAR. Methods: Steroid therapy, intravenous infusion of methylprednisolone 1000 mg just after the anesthesia induction, was started since December 2012. After induction of the steroid therapy, 25 patients underwent EVAR with steroid therapy (Group S). These patients were compared with the 65 patients who underwent EVAR without steroid therapy (Group C) in white blood cell count (WBC), CRP and maximum body temperature (BT) on postoperative day 1–5. Results: There was no significant difference in age, female gender, operation time, maximum aneurysm diameter between the two groups. There was no postoperative infective complication in the both groups. WBC did not differ between the two groups; however, CRP was significantly suppressed in Group S than in Group C on POD 1, 3 and 5. Also BT was significantly lower in Group S than Group C on POD 1, 2 and 3. Conclusions: Steroid pretreatment before implantation of the stent graft reduces the early postoperative inflammatory response after EVAR, without increasing postoperative infection. (This is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2015; 24: 861–865.)

  9. Interleukin-6 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Huang, Ching-Shan; Tseng, Wan-Min; Lin, Ching-Po

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, was found to surge in the cerebral spinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized that the plasma level of IL-6 could be an independent biomarker in predicting clinical outcome of patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Methods We prospectively included 53 consecutive patients treated with platinum coil embolization of the ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Plasma IL-6 levels were measured in the blood samples at the orifices of the aneurysms and from peripheral veins. The outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale one month after SAH. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between the plasma IL-6 levels and the neurological outcome. Results Significant risk factors for the poor outcome were old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on day 0, high Fisher grades, and high aneurysmal and venous IL-6 levels in univariate analyses. Aneurysmal IL-6 levels showed modest to moderate correlations with GCS on day 0, vasospasm grade and Fisher grade. A strong correlation was found between the aneurysmal and the corresponding venous IL-6 levels (ρ = 0.721; P<0.001). In the multiple logistic regression models, the poor 30-day mRS was significantly associated with high aneurysmal IL-6 level (OR, 17.97; 95% CI, 1.51–214.33; P = 0.022) and marginally associated with high venous IL-6 level (OR, 12.71; 95% CI, 0.90–180.35; P = 0.022) after adjusting for dichotomized age, GCS on day 0, and vasospasm and Fisher grades. Conclusions The plasma level of IL-6 is an independent prognostic biomarker that could be used to aid in the identification of patients at high-risk of poor neurological outcome after rupture of the intracranial aneurysm. PMID:26176774

  10. Aneurysm shape reconstruction from biplane angiograms in the ISUIA collection.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Madhavan L; Sharda, Gaurav V; Huston, John; Mocco, J; Capuano, Ana W; Torner, James C; Saha, Punam K; Meissner, Irene; Brown, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    The International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) is an epidemiologic international study of the natural history of unruptured intracranial aneurysms that enrolled 4,060 subjects. A conventional biplane cerebral angiogram available for central review was required for enrollment resulting in a large database. Data on aneurysms that ruptured during follow-up of the 1,692 untreated subjects provides an opportunity to investigate the anatomic features that may be predictive of future rupture. The objective of the study is to develop and test a method for three-dimensional (3D) shape reconstruction of aneurysms using biplane angiographic data in the ISUIA for retrospective morphometric assessment. Beginning with the two boundaries of the biplane views, curve morphing techniques were employed to estimate a number of intermediate boundaries around the aneurysm sac resulting in the creation of a 3D sac surface. The method was tested using simulated biplane "angiograms" of pre-reconstructed 3D models of patient-specific aneurysms. An algorithm to perform the image analysis was developed, and the morphometric indices of 150 intracranial aneurysms in the ISUIA database were estimated. Simultaneously, experienced neuroradiologists made manual measurements of key dimensions in the sac from the biplane angiograms for all cases. 3D reconstructions using our proposed method matched well with the original pre-reconstructed 3D geometries and were consistent with manual measurements of the neuroradiologists for the ISUIA aneurysms. A method for reconstructing the 3D geometry of the intracranial aneurysm sac from biplane angiograms in the ISUIA database with reasonable fidelity has been developed.

  11. Evaluation the Aortic Aneurysm Remodeling After a Successful Stentgraft Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Nowicka, Monika; Kowalczyk, Agnieszka; Rusak, Grażyna; Ratajczak, Przemysław; Sobociński, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Routine imaging follow-up after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is mainly aimed at detection of endoleaks. The aim of the study was to assess changes in the size of the abdominal aortic aneurysm sack using CT angiography (CTA) after successful treatment using endovascular stent graft implantation. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis of CTA results included 102 patients aged 54–88, who had no postoperative complications. Patients underwent CTA before EVAR and after the treatment (mean time between studies, 7.6 months). The largest cross-sectional area of the aneurysm sac was measured using a curved multiplanar reconstruction. A change of the aneurysm cross-sectional over 10% was considered significant. Results The average cross-sectional area decreased after EVAR by 3% and this change was not statistically significant. Regression of the cross-sectional area was observed in 18.6% of patients, progression was in 23.5%, and no change was seen in 57.8%. Cross-sectional areas before and after EVAR were significantly correlated (r=0.75, p<0.0001). There was no correlation between the cross-sectional area change after EVAR and patients’ age or the time between the treatment and the follow-up CTA. Cross-sectional area before the treatment predicted changes in the aneurysm size after EVAR (p=0.0045). Conclusions Remodeling of abdominal aortic aneurysms after EVAR is not uniform. The change of aneurysm size depends on the initial aneurysm size but not on the time from EVAR. The size of the aneurysm after EVAR should not be considered as a measure of the treatment efficacy. PMID:27800038

  12. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Maitland, D.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether or not a successful aneurysm treatment procedure can subject a parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. Prior to treatment, the aneurysm at systole is filled with a periodic train of vortex tubes, which form at the aneurysm neck and advect upwards into the dome. Following the treatment procedure however, the motion of the vortex train is inhibited by the aneurysm filling material, which confines the vortex tubes to the region beneath the aneurysm neck. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the treated aneurysm neck and the close proximity of a vortex tube to the parent artery wall increase the maximum wall shear stresses to values approximately equal to 50 Pa at systole. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stresses indicates that there is a 1.4 × 9 10−7 m2 area on the parent artery exposed to wall shear stresses greater than 37.9 Pa, a value shown by Fry [Circ. Res. 22(2):165–197, 1968] to cause severe damage to the endothelial cells that line the artery wall. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully isolates the aneurysm from the circulation and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the artery wall. PMID:18629647

  13. Internal Carotid Artery Reconstruction Using Multiple Fenestrated Clips for Complete Occlusion of Large Paraclinoid Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Kook

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although surgical techniques for clipping paraclinoid aneurysms have evolved significantly in recent times, direct microsurgical clipping of large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms remains a formidable surgical challenge. We review here our surgical experiences in direct surgical clipping of large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms, especially in dealing with anterior clinoidectomy, distal dural ring resection, optic canal unroofing, clipping techniques, and surgical complications. Methods Between September 2001 and February 2012, we directly obliterated ten large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms. In all cases, tailored orbito-zygomatic craniotomies with extradural and/or intradural clinoidectomy were performed. The efficacy of surgical clipping was evaluated with postoperative digital subtraction angiography and computed tomographic angiography. Results Of the ten cases reported, five each were of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Five aneurysms occurred in the carotid cave, two in the superior hypophyseal artery, two in the intracavernous, and one in the posterior wall. The mean diameter of the aneurysms sac was 18.8 mm in the greatest dimension. All large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms were obliterated with direct neck clipping without bypass. With the exception of the one intracavenous aneurysm, all large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms were occluded completely. Conclusion The key features of successful surgical clipping of large and giant paraclinoid aneurysms include enhancing exposure of proximal neck of aneurysms, establishing proximal control, and completely obliterating aneurysms with minimal manipulation of the optic nerve. Our results suggest that internal carotid artery reconstruction using multiple fenestrated clips without bypass may potentially achieve complete occlusion of large paraclinoid aneurysms. PMID:24527189

  14. Blood flow characteristics in a terminal basilar tip aneurysm prior to its fatal rupture

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, D.M.; Putman, C.M.; Scrivano, E.; Lylyk, P.; Cebral, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The development and validation of methods to stratify the risk of rupture of cerebral aneurysms is highly desired since current treatment risks can exceed the natural risk of rupture. Because unruptured aneurysms are typically treated before they rupture, it is very difficult to connect the proposed risk indices to the rupture of an individual aneurysm. The purpose of this case study was to analyze the hemodynamic environment of a saccular aneurysm of the terminal morphology sub-type that was imaged just prior to its rupture and to test whether the hemodynamic characteristics would designate this particular aneurysm as at high risk. Methods A patient-specific computational fluid dynamics model was constructed from 3D rotational angiography images acquired just hours before the aneurysm ruptured. A pulsatile flow calculation was performed and hemodynamic characteristics previously connected to rupture were analyzed. Results It was found that the aneurysm had a concentrated inflow stream, small impingement region, complex intra-aneurysmal flow structure, asymmetric flow split from the parent vessel to the aneurysm and daughter branches, and high levels of aneurysmal wall shear stress near the impaction zone. Conclusions The hemodynamics characteristics observed in this aneurysm right before its rupture are consistent with previous studies correlating aneurysm rupture and hemodynamic patterns in saccular and terminal aneurysms. This study supports the notion that hemodynamic information may be used to help stratify the rupture risk of cerebral aneurysms. PMID:20150312

  15. Computational Hemodynamic Analysis for the Diagnosis of Atherosclerotic Changes in Intracranial Aneurysms: A Proof-of-Concept Study Using 3 Cases Harboring Atherosclerotic and Nonatherosclerotic Aneurysms Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Hidenori; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Endo, Toshiki; Funamoto, Kenichi; Ohta, Makoto; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    This was a proof-of-concept computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study designed to identify atherosclerotic changes in intracranial aneurysms. We selected 3 patients with multiple unruptured aneurysms including at least one with atherosclerotic changes and investigated whether an image-based CFD study could provide useful information for discriminating the atherosclerotic aneurysms. Patient-specific geometries were constructed from three-dimensional data obtained using rotational angiography. Transient simulations were conducted under patient-specific inlet flow rates measured by phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry. In the postanalyses, we calculated time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and relative residence time (RRT). The volume of blood flow entering aneurysms through the neck and the mean velocity of blood flow inside aneurysms were examined. We applied the age-of-fluid method to quantitatively assess the residence of blood inside aneurysms. Atherosclerotic changes coincided with regions exposed to disturbed blood flow, as indicated by low WSS and long RRT. Blood entered aneurysms in phase with inlet flow rates. The mean velocities of blood inside atherosclerotic aneurysms were lower than those inside nonatherosclerotic aneurysms. Blood in atherosclerotic aneurysms was older than that in nonatherosclerotic aneurysms, especially near the wall. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that CFD analysis provided detailed information on the exchange and residence of blood that is useful for the diagnosis of atherosclerotic changes in intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27703491

  16. [Transient delayed paraplegia after repair of thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Martín Torrijos, M; Aguilar Lloret, C; Ariño Irujo, J J; Serrano Hernando, F J; López Timoneda, F

    2013-11-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysm requires multidisciplinary management due to its complexity both in surgical technique and anesthetic considerations. One of the most feared postoperative complication is spinal cord ischemia. It can be presented as different clinical patterns, and its recovery may be partial or complete. The postoperative management of spinal cord ischemia is mainly based on techniques to increase spinal cord perfusion, above all, hemodynamic stability and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. We present two cases of delayed paraplegia after an open repair of a thoracoabdominal aneurysm and a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair using an endovascular stent graft. They both had a complete neurological recovery after cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

  17. Multilocular True Ulnar Artery Aneurysm in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Mark W; Sanders, Christopher; Lago, Mary; Hilaire, Hugo St

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar artery aneurysms are an exceedingly rare entity in the pediatric population and have no consistent etiologic mechanism. We present the case of a 15-year-old male with a multilocular ulnar artery aneurysm in the setting of no antecedent history of trauma, no identifiable connective tissue disorders, and no other apparent etiological factors. Furthermore, the patient's arterial palmar arch system was absent. The aneurysm was resected, and arterial reconstruction was successfully performed via open surgical approach with cephalic vein interposition graft. We believe this treatment modality should be considered as the primary approach in all of these pediatric cases in consideration of the possible pitfalls of less comprehensive measures. PMID:27104094

  18. Ruptured ileocolic artery aneurysm: an unusual cause of hemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zakaur R; Yousif, Omer F; Halliday, Mark W; Hubaishah, Nasser A; Adam, Khalid A

    2012-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysm of a branch of ileocolic artery is a rare finding and is an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis, and surgical or endovascular intervention are necessary to avoid devastating consequences and high mortality rates following an emergency operation after rupture. Resection is a good choice for surgical intervention for some aneurysms that are not suitable for endovascular repair. This report describes the case of a middle-aged man with a ruptured superior mesenteric artery branch aneurysm and his subsequent surgical management. PMID:23006464

  19. Ruptured Ileocolic Artery Aneurysm: An Unusual Cause of Hemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Zakaur R.; Yousif, Omer F.; Halliday, Mark W.; Hubaishah, Nasser A.; Adam, Khalid A.

    2012-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysm of a branch of ileocolic artery is a rare finding and is an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis, and surgical or endovascular intervention are necessary to avoid devastating consequences and high mortality rates following an emergency operation after rupture. Resection is a good choice for surgical intervention for some aneurysms that are not suitable for endovascular repair. This report describes the case of a middle-aged man with a ruptured superior mesenteric artery branch aneurysm and his subsequent surgical management. PMID:23006464

  20. Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Thrombosis in Giant Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopard, B.; Ouared, R.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.

    We propose a numerical model of blood flow and blood clotting whose purpose is to describe thrombus formation in cerebral aneurysms. We identify possible mechanisms that can cause occurence of spontaneous thrombosis in unruptured giant intracranial aneurysms. Our main claim is that, under normal conditions, there is a low shear rate threshold below which thrombosis starts and growths. This assumption is supported by several evidences from literature. The proposed mechanisms are incorporated into a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for blood flow and platelets adhesion and aggregation. Numerical simulations show that the low shear rate threshold assumption together with aneurysm geometry account well for the observations.

  1. Endovascular coil embolization of unruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy; Hakma, Zakaria; Veznedaroglu, Erol

    2014-07-01

    The patient is a 60-year-old woman who presented to her primary care physician with new onset of headache. She was neurologically intact without cranial nerve deficit. An outpatient CT angiogram (CTA) revealed no subarachnoid hemorrhage, but showed a right-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm measuring 11 mm by 10 mm. Digitally subtracted cerebral angiography confirmed these measurements and showed that the aneurysm was amenable to endovascular coil embolization. The patient underwent aneurysm coiling without complication and was discharged to home on postoperative Day 1. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/MjOc3Zpv2K8 . PMID:24983726

  2. Endovascular Treatment of a Renal Artery Branch Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Malacrida, G.; Dalainas, Ilias Medda, Massimo; Nano, Giovanni; Inglese, Luigi

    2007-02-15

    A 58-year-old woman was admitted to our institution because of a left renal artery branch saccular aneurysm with a 2 cm diameter. Due to a hostile abdomen and the infrarenal location, an endovascular approach was chosen. A Jostent Peripheral Stent-Graft was placed under angiographic control, excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. No peri- or postprocedural complications were observed. At 6 months follow-up, the endograft is patent, excluding the aneurysm. Endovascular treatment may represent an alternative to surgery, especially in the distal infraparenchymal location.

  3. Pericardial fat flap for mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Kawatani, Yohei; Ito, Yujiro; Hori, Takaki

    2016-07-01

    Standard treatment for mycotic aneurysm of thoracic aorta is complete debridement with replacement of the aneurysm with a homograft or Dacron graft. However, contamination from surrounding tissues may occur after the graft replacement. Transposition of the viable, well-vascularized tissues should be used to fill surrounding dead space and isolate the graft to prevent reinfection. Although the omentum is regarded as the best tissue, it is not always available for use. We describe here a new alternative technique for such situations, that is, the use of a pericardial fat flap for patients with a mycotic descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. PMID:27059067

  4. Multilocular True Ulnar Artery Aneurysm in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Mark W; Sanders, Christopher; Lago, Mary; Hilaire, Hugo St

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar artery aneurysms are an exceedingly rare entity in the pediatric population and have no consistent etiologic mechanism. We present the case of a 15-year-old male with a multilocular ulnar artery aneurysm in the setting of no antecedent history of trauma, no identifiable connective tissue disorders, and no other apparent etiological factors. Furthermore, the patient's arterial palmar arch system was absent. The aneurysm was resected, and arterial reconstruction was successfully performed via open surgical approach with cephalic vein interposition graft. We believe this treatment modality should be considered as the primary approach in all of these pediatric cases in consideration of the possible pitfalls of less comprehensive measures.

  5. Musical hallucinations associated with seizures originating from an intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D L; Tatini, U; Zimmerman, R S; Bortz, J J; Sirven, J I

    2001-04-01

    Hallucinations are defined as sensory phenomena in the absence of external sensory stimuli. Auditory hallucinations have been shown to arise from many different intracranial lesions, but seizures manifesting as musical hallucinations triggered by unruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare. We present a case of persistent, episodic musical hallucinations associated with seizures that led to the discovery of 2 small intracranial aneurysms. Typical electroencephalographic findings for seizure activity were observed but resolved after surgical clipping of the aneurysms. Concomitantly, the patient's hallucinations resolved. The literature on musical hallucinations is reviewed. PMID:11322359

  6. Retroesophageal subclavian artery aneurysm arising from Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Sala, F; Bouillane, P J; Francisci, M P; Diaz, F; Lena, P; Kreitmann, P; Batt, M

    2001-11-01

    This report describes a novel technique used for management of retroesophageal subclavian artery aneurysm arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. The procedure consists of endoaortic exclusion of the aneurysmal neck, using a prosthetic patch after sternotomy during circulatory arrest, and antegrade cold blood cerebroplegia. The advantages of this technique are avoidance of hemorrhagic complications during clamping of the aneurysmal neck, limiting of the extent of dissection of the aortic arch, and elimination of the risk of inadvertent left recurrent nerve paralysis. Antegrade cold blood cerebroplegia provides good cerebral protection and decreases the duration and consequences of extracorporeal circulation.

  7. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting with necrotising appendicitis and hepatic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Ozçay, Necdet; Arda, Kemal; Sugüneş, Tonguç; Ozdemirel, Deniz; Aydoğ, Gülden; Atalay, Fuat; Akoğlu, Musa

    2003-03-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a necrotizing vasculitis which affects small and medium-sized arteries. The clinical features of the disease vary according to the site and extent of involvement. Aneurysmal dilatation and thrombosis in the arteries of the liver and gastrointestinal tract have been reported in polyarteritis nodosa. However, rupture of the hepatic aneurysm and necrotizing appendicitis due to polyarteritis nodosa are uncommon; indeed a case in which these have occurred together has not been reported to date. In this case report, a patient with necrotizing appendicitis and hepatic aneurysm rupture due to underlying poliarteritis nodasa is presented. Extensive intraabdominal hematoma and appendicitis were treated surgically and complete recovery was achieved.

  8. Percutaneous Endoluminal Bypass of Iliac Aneurysms with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebben, Alexander; Tettoni, Serena; Muratore, Pierluigi; Rossato, Dennis; Savio, Daniele; Rabbia, Claudio

    1998-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous treatment of iliac aneurysms, a covered stent was inserted in nine men suffering from common iliac artery aneurysms (six cases), external iliac aneurysms (one case), or pseudoaneurysms (two cases). Placement of the stent was successful in all patients. In one patient, an endoprosthesis thrombosed after 15 days, but was successfully treated by thrombolysis and additional stent placement. At the follow-up examinations (mean period 22 months) all stent-grafts had remained patent. No late leakage or stenosis was observed.

  9. Aneurysmal Neck Clipping as the Primary Treatment Option for Both Ruptured and Unruptured Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jai Ho; Park, Jung Eon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Bum Su

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms are less amenable to coil embolization, an increasing number of studies support favorable endovascular treatment for them. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of two different treatments (surgery versus coiling) and evaluate the benefits of surgical clipping for MCA aneurysms. Methods Here we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 178 ruptured and unruptured MCA aneurysms treated in patients between September 2008 and April 2012. Parameters assessing treatment outcomes include degree of aneurysm occlusion, presence of regrowth, clinical status, and complications. Results Among 178 MCA aneurysms, 153 were treated surgically. After a mean follow-up of 12 months, the surgery group showed a clinically significant complete occlusion rate (98%) compared with the coiling group (56%) (p<0.001). Follow-up radiologic evaluation showed a higher regrowth rate (four of 16 cases) in the coiling group than in the surgery group (one of 49 cases) (p=0.003). There was no statistically significant difference in favorable clinical outcome rate between the two groups. The procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality rates were 2% (three of 153 cases) in the surgery group and 0% (0 of 25 cases) in the coiling group. Conclusion Compared to endovascular treatment, surgical neck clipping for both ruptured and unruptured MCA aneurysms results in a significantly higher complete obliteration rate and less regrowth. Therefore, even in this endovascular era, we still recommend surgical clipping as the primary treatment option for MCA aneurysms rather than coil embolization. PMID:27226859

  10. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy.

  11. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  12. Bilateral Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Giant coronary aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral coronary aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral coronary aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant coronary aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Multiple HIV-related Aneurysms Using Multilayer Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Euringer, Wulf; Suedkamp, Michael; Rylski, Bartosz; Blanke, Philipp

    2012-08-15

    Complex peripheral aneurysm anatomy with major artery branches in the immediate vicinity and mycotic aneurysm often impede endovascular management using covered stent grafts. The Cardiatis Multilayer Stent (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) is a recently approved innovative stent system for peripheral aneurysm management. Its multilayer design aims at decreasing mean velocity and vorticity within the aneurysm sac to cause thrombus formation while maintaining patency of branching vessels due to laminar flow. We present a case of bilateral subclavian artery aneurysms and perivisceral aortic aneurysms in an AIDS patient successfully treated with the Cardiatis Multilayer Stent at 18 months' follow-up.

  14. Radiological Changes in Infantile Dissecting Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly

    PubMed Central

    Yatomi, Kenji; Oishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Suga, Yasuo; Nonaka, Senshu; Yoshida, Kensaku; Arai, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intracranial aneurysms are extremely rare in infants, and to our knowledge only seven infants treated for ruptured spontaneous dissecting aneurysms have been reported. Good outcomes have been achieved with endovascular treatment of infantile aneurysm. We the endovascular treatment of a one-month-old girl for ruptured dissecting aneurysm located in the anterior communicating artery, and the unique radiological changes that were observed during the perioperative and follow-up periods. These changes suggest that blood coagulation and fibrinolytic response play a part in the repair and healing processes of dissecting aneurysms. Careful neuroradiological surveys are needed for pediatric dissecting aneurysms treated endovascularly. PMID:25496693

  15. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysm caused by polyarteritis nodosa. Case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun C; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Iihara, Koji; Sakai, Hideki; Higashi, Toshio; Kogure, Shuji; Taniguchi, Ayumi; Ueda, Hatsue I; Nagata, Izumi

    2002-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare systemic necrotizing arteritis that involves small- and medium-sized arteries in various organs. Although aneurysm formation in visceral arteries is a typical finding in PAN, intracranial aneurysms are much less common, and only a few cases of aneurysm rupture associated with this disease have been documented. In this paper, the authors report on a ruptured PAN aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery; the lesion was trapped and resected. On histological examination, extensive fibrinoid necrosis and an inflammatory infiltration of leukocytes were seen in the aneurysm wall. To the authors' knowledge this is the first report of subarachnoid hemorrhage from a histologically confirmed PAN aneurysm.

  16. Staged Management of a Ruptured Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Oh, Tak Hyuk; Lee, Young Ok; Lee, Sang Cjeol; Cho, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of an internal mammary artery (IMA) aneurysm in a patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1) is a rare but life-threatening complication requiring emergency management. A 50-year-old man with NF-1 was transferred to the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital, where an IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were diagnosed and drained. The IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were successfully repaired by staged management combining endovascular treatment and subsequent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The patient required cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation, the staged management of coil embolization, and a subsequent VATS procedure. This staged approach may be an effective therapeutic strategy in cases of IMA aneurysmal rupture. PMID:27066438

  17. Dynamic effects on the formation and rupture of aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ren, J S

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic analysis of an axially stretched arterial wall with collagen fibers distributed in two preferred directions under a suddenly applied constant internal pressure along with the possibility of the formation and rupture of aneurysm are examined within the framework of nonlinear dynamics. A two layer tube model with the fiber-reinforced composite-based incompressible anisotropic hyper-elastic material is employed to model the mechanical behavior of the arterial wall. The maximum amplitudes and the phase diagrams are given by numerical computation of the differential relation. It is shown that the arterial wall undergoes nonlinear periodic oscillation and no aneurysms are formed under the normal condition. However, an aneurysm may be formed under such abnormal conditions as the stiffness of the fibers is deduced or the direction of the fibers is oriented towards the axial direction. Furthermore, the possibility for the rupture of aneurysm is discussed with the distribution of stresses. PMID:21141675

  18. A Massive Intratumoral Aneurysmal Vessel in a Retroperitoneal Lipoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae

    2015-12-01

    Lipoblastoma is a benign tumor and usually does not require radical operation for complete excision. We describe here a case of a retroperitoneal lipoblastoma with a massive intratumoral aneurysmal vessel.

  19. Suggested Connections between Risk Factors of Intracranial Aneurysms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Raschi, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review studies of aneurysm risk factors and the suggested hypotheses that connect the different risk factors and the underlying mechanisms governing the aneurysm natural history. The result of this work suggests that at the center of aneurysm evolution there is a cycle of wall degeneration and weakening in response to changing hemodynamic loading and biomechanic stress. This progressive wall degradation drives the geometrical evolution of the aneurysm until it stabilizes or ruptures. Risk factors such as location, genetics, smoking, co-morbidities, and hypertension seem to affect different components of this cycle. However, details of these interactions or their relative importance are still not clearly understood. PMID:23242844

  20. Calcaneal chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alex; Barreto, Bruno; Soares Barreto, Lara Grimaldi; Athanazio, Daniel A; Athanazio, Paulo R F

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of destructive chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst involving the left calcaneus. Because of the extensive destruction of the calcaneus, total calcanectomy was the treatment of choice.

  1. Coarctation of the aorta and post-stenotic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, I M; Pollock, J C

    1990-01-01

    Despite earlier angiography, post-stenotic aneurysm of the aorta was an unexpected finding at operation in two patients with coarctation. One aneurysm was found in an intercostal artery in a 19 year old man and the other was a false aneurysm just distal to the coarctation site in a 7 year old boy. These aneurysms are fragile, apt to rupture, and difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Though local factors such as jet streams and bacterial endocarditis may influence their formation there must be an underlying generalised weakness in the arterial wall. A coarctation should not be regarded as an isolated arterial abnormality because it may be a feature of a more generalised disease. Because of the risk of rupture, which may not be prevented by antihypertensive treatment, operation should not be delayed in any age group. PMID:2245114

  2. Calcaneal chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alex; Barreto, Bruno; Soares Barreto, Lara Grimaldi; Athanazio, Daniel A; Athanazio, Paulo R F

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of destructive chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst involving the left calcaneus. Because of the extensive destruction of the calcaneus, total calcanectomy was the treatment of choice. PMID:20350821

  3. Rare Case of Vaginal Delivery in Giant Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Luneva, Ekaterina; Samokhvalova, Maria; Pakhomov, Artem; Mitrofanova, Lubov; Malev, Eduard; Uspenskiy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent successful vaginal delivery despite previously unsuspected 8-cm ascending and 6-cm descending aortic aneurysms. These were repaired immediately after delivery. PMID:27069941

  4. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with

  5. Recurrent aortic aneurysms in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Adams, Corey; Zhen-Yu Tong, Michael; Lawlor, D Kirk; DeRose, Guy; Forbes, Thomas L

    2010-01-01

    The following is a case of a 22-year-old male with recurrent thoracic aneurysms with several constitutional symptoms, including gastrointestinal discomfort, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, and a 2-week history of severe lower back pain. The patient underwent an initial thoracoabdominal repair of a visceral aneurysm followed by endovascular repair of a recurrent thoracic pseudoaneurysm. The etiology of the visceral aneurysm was initially hypothesized to be mycotic; however, further information revealed signs and symptoms consistent with the diagnostic criteria for Behçet disease (BD). We suggest that BD be considered in younger patients who present with an aortic aneurysm. Although open repair is the traditional approach for arterial lesions in BD, the role for endovascular intervention should be considered as it represents a surgical repair with a significant reduction in morbidity. PMID:20822728

  6. Repair of multiple mycotic aortic aneurysms in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Esper, E; Krabill, K A; St Cyr, J A; Patton, C; Foker, J E

    1993-12-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic and common and internal iliac artery mycotic aneurysms resulted from an umbilical arterial catheter in a 3 1/2-week-old boy. He underwent staged repair including an 8-mm Gore-tax tube graft, primary repair of the common iliac artery aneurysm, and resection of the internal iliac aneurysm. His operative and postoperative course was uneventful. He was asymptomatic at 17 months' follow-up, with equal blood pressure in the upper and lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no stenoses or recurrent aneurysms at the anastomotic sites of the Gore-tex tube graft. Blood supply to his left leg came from collaterals, principally a large crossing vessel from the right iliac artery. This case represents the first successful aortic replacement in a 5 week old with extensive involvement of the thoracoabdominal aorta and its branch vessels. PMID:8301488

  7. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  8. Endocarditis-Induced Mycotic Brain Aneurysm following Right MCA Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Brandon; Desai, Bobby; Falgiani, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of cerebrovascular accident is extremely common in emergency medicine; however, CVA resulting from hemorrhage following mycotic brain aneurysm following embolic stroke is extremely uncommon. This case reports such an event. PMID:23326719

  9. Screening for aortic aneurysm after treatment of coarctation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, James L; Gray, Robert G; LuAnn Minich, L; Wilkinson, Stephen E; Heywood, Mason; Edwards, Reggie; Weng, Hsin Ti; Su, Jason T

    2014-01-01

    Isolated coarctation of the aorta (CoA) occurs in 6-8 % of patients with congenital heart disease. After successful relief of obstruction, patients remain at risk for aortic aneurysm formation at the site of the repair. We sought to determine the diagnostic utility of echocardiography compared with advanced arch imaging (AAI) in diagnosing aortic aneurysms in pediatric patients after CoA repair. The Congenital Heart Databases from 1996 and 2009 were reviewed. All patients treated for CoA who had AAI defined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), or catheterization were identified. Data collected included the following: type, timing, and number of interventions, presence and time to aneurysm diagnosis, and mortality. Patients were subdivided into surgical and catheterization groups for analysis. Seven hundred and fifty-nine patients underwent treatment for CoA during the study period. Three hundred and ninety-nine patients had at least one AAI. Aneurysms were diagnosed by AAI in 28 of 399 patients at a mean of 10 ± 8.4 years after treatment. Echocardiography reports were available for 380 of 399 patients with AAI. The sensitivity of echocardiography for detecting aneurysms was 24 %. The prevalence of aneurysms was significantly greater in the catheterization group (p < 0.05) compared with the surgery group. Aneurysm was also diagnosed earlier in the catheterization group compared with the surgery group (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed a significantly increased risk of aneurysm diagnosis in patients in the catheterization subgroup and in patients requiring more than three procedures. Aortic aneurysms continue to be an important complication after CoA repair. Although serial echocardiograms are the test of choice for following-up most congenital cardiac lesions in pediatrics, our data show that echocardiography is inadequate for the detection of aneurysms after CoA repair. Because the time to aneurysm diagnosis was

  10. Chronic Q Fever in Alberta: A Case of Coxiella burnetii Mycotic Aneurysm and Concomitant Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Stokes, William; Janvier, Jack; Vaughan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Q fever is a potentially life-threatening infection from the intracellular, Gram-negative Coxiella burnetii. It presents most commonly as endocarditis or vascular infection in people with underlying cardiac or vascular disease. We discuss a case of a 67-year-old male with Coxiella burnetii vascular infection of a perirenal abdominal aortic graft. The patient had a history of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair 5 years earlier. He presented with a 12 × 6 × 8 cm perirenal pseudoaneurysm and concomitant L1, L2, and L3 vertebral body discitis. He underwent an open repair which revealed a grossly infected graft perioperatively. Q fever serology revealed phase I serological IgG titer of 1 : 2048 and phase II 1 : 1024 consistent with chronic Q fever. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on infected vascular tissue was positive for C. burnetii. The patient was started on doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine with good clinical response and decreasing serological titers. Recognizing chronic Q fever is a difficult task as symptoms are nonspecific, exposure risk is difficult to ascertain, and diagnosis is hidden from conventional microbiological investigations. Its recognition, however, is critical as C. burnetii is inherently resistant to standard empiric therapies used in cardiovascular infections. PMID:27366178

  11. Chronic Q Fever in Alberta: A Case of Coxiella burnetii Mycotic Aneurysm and Concomitant Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Janvier, Jack; Vaughan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Q fever is a potentially life-threatening infection from the intracellular, Gram-negative Coxiella burnetii. It presents most commonly as endocarditis or vascular infection in people with underlying cardiac or vascular disease. We discuss a case of a 67-year-old male with Coxiella burnetii vascular infection of a perirenal abdominal aortic graft. The patient had a history of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair 5 years earlier. He presented with a 12 × 6 × 8 cm perirenal pseudoaneurysm and concomitant L1, L2, and L3 vertebral body discitis. He underwent an open repair which revealed a grossly infected graft perioperatively. Q fever serology revealed phase I serological IgG titer of 1 : 2048 and phase II 1 : 1024 consistent with chronic Q fever. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on infected vascular tissue was positive for C. burnetii. The patient was started on doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine with good clinical response and decreasing serological titers. Recognizing chronic Q fever is a difficult task as symptoms are nonspecific, exposure risk is difficult to ascertain, and diagnosis is hidden from conventional microbiological investigations. Its recognition, however, is critical as C. burnetii is inherently resistant to standard empiric therapies used in cardiovascular infections. PMID:27366178

  12. Deviation from optimal vascular caliber control at middle cerebral artery bifurcations harboring aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Merih I; Lauric, Alexandra; Wu, Chengyuan; Hippelheuser, James; Malek, Adel M

    2014-10-17

    Cerebral aneurysms form preferentially at arterial bifurcations. The vascular optimality principle (VOP) decrees that minimal energy loss across bifurcations requires optimal caliber control between radii of parent (r₀) and daughter branches (r1 and r2): r₀(n)=r₁(n)+r₂(n), with n approximating three. VOP entails constant wall shear stress (WSS), an endothelial phenotype regulator. We sought to determine if caliber control is maintained in aneurysmal intracranial bifurcations. Three-dimensional rotational angiographic volumes of 159 middle cerebral artery (MCA) bifurcations (62 aneurysmal) were processed using 3D gradient edge-detection filtering, enabling threshold-insensitive radius measurement. Radius ratio (RR)=r₀(3)/(r₁(3)+r₂(3)) and estimated junction exponent (n) were compared between aneurysmal and non-aneurysmal bifurcations using Student t-test and Wilcoxon rank-sum analysis. The results show that non-aneurysmal bifurcations display optimal caliber control with mean RR of 1.05 and median n of 2.84. In contrast, aneurysmal bifurcations had significantly lower RR (0.76, p<.0001) and higher n (4.28, p<.0001). Unexpectedly, 37% of aneurysmal bifurcations revealed a daughter branch larger than its parent vessel, an absolute violation of optimality, not witnessed in non-aneurysmal bifurcations. The aneurysms originated more often off the smaller daughter (52%) vs. larger daughter branch (16%). Aneurysm size was not statistically correlated to RR or n. Aneurysmal males showed higher deviation from VOP. Non-aneurysmal MCA bifurcations contralateral to aneurysmal ones showed optimal caliber control. Aneurysmal bifurcations, in contrast to non-aneurysmal counterparts, disobey the VOP and may exhibit dysregulation in WSS-mediated caliber control. The mechanism of this focal divergence from optimality may underlie aneurysm pathogenesis and requires further study.

  13. Utility of Balloon-Assisted Guglielmi Detachable Coiling in the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, S.; Cellerini, M.; Villa, G.; Nistri, M.; Pandolfo, C.; Ammannati, F.; Mennonna, P.; Giordano, GP.

    2002-01-01

    Summary Balloon-assisted Guglielmi detachable coiling (BAGDC) is a new technical option developed to allow endovascular treatment of wide-necked aneurysms. Aim of the following work is to report a single center experience of BADGC of aneurysms with assessment of its efficacy and safety. BAGDC of wide-necked aneurysms (SNR close to 1) was retrospectively evaluated in 37 patients (28 females, nine males, mean age: 56.6 yrs, range: 27-81 yrs) who underwent the procedure between january 1999 and january 2002 for a total of 45 procedures on 41 aneurysms. Twenty-nine patients presented with SAH from an acutely ruptured aneurysm. In two patients BAGDC failed whereas 35 patients successfully underwent BADGC (39 aneurysms). Twenty-nine patients (31 aneurysms) were available for angiographic follow-up (mean: 10 mo, range: 3-24 mo). At the last angiographic follow-up 29/33 aneurysms (87%) resulted stable and occluded (22 aneurysms with dense and seven with loose packing of the sac and the neck), two aneurysms showed regrowth, one aneurysm showed a neck remnant and another one a sac and neck remnant. Complications directly related to the procedure occurred in five patients (three perforations, one thromboembolism, one femoral AV) with a mortality and morbility rate of 2.7 and 5.4 respectively. BAGDC is a promising adjunct to treatment of wide-necked aneurysms broadening the spectrum of indications for endovascular treament of challenging aneurysms. PMID:20594481

  14. The energy loss may predict rupture risks of anterior communicating aneurysms: a preliminary result.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Qian, Yi; Lee, Chong-Joon; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Ling, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms are well documented to have a higher rupture risk compared with aneurysms at other locations. However, the risk predicting factors for these aneurysms still remain unclear due to the complex arteries geometries and flow patterns involved. The authors introduce a comprehensive method to quantitatively illustrate the development of ACoA aneurysms using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. Seven ACoA aneurysms, which included 2 ruptured and 5 unruptured aneurysms, were employed. Patient-specific whole anterior circulation geometries were segmented to simulate the real circumstances in vivo. The energy losses (EL) and flow architectures of these 7 aneurysms were evaluated using an algorithm modality. Overall, the 2 ruptured aneurysms, along with 1 unruptured aneurysm that was defined as highly likely to rupture due to ACoA location and a bleb sitting at the top of the dome, had a significantly larger EL and more complex and unstable flow architecture than the others. Two aneurysms had a negative value of EL indicating that the geometries with aneurysms of the anterior communicating complex (ACC) had a smaller loss of energy than the geometries without aneurysms. Despite a small sample size resulting in a low statistical significance, EL may serve as a development predictor of ACoA aneurysms. PMID:26064320

  15. Junctional Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms: The Schrödinger's Cat of Vascular Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Andrew P.; Loveren, Harry R. van; Youssef, A. Samy; Agazzi, Siviero

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Despite advances in neuroimaging, it is not always definitive whether a paraclinoid aneurysm is intradural or entirely extradural. We illustrate the potential use of surgical exploration in these aneurysms that we refer to as “junctional” aneurysms. Methods Retrospective review of eight patients with unruptured aneurysms who underwent a planned surgical exploration of a junctional aneurysm. Results Of the eight patients, three underwent exploration of the aneurysm during surgery for a different aneurysm. All three of these were found to be extradural. Five patients underwent a craniotomy for the exclusive purpose of clarifying the location of the aneurysm. Two of these cases were found to be intradural and were clipped. Two cases were found to be extradural. In one patient, the initially extradural aneurysm was converted into an intradural aneurysm during removal of the anterior clinoid process, necessitating surgical clipping. One transient third nerve palsy was observed. Discussion Until further progress in neuroimaging allows clinicians to determine unequivocally the exact anatomical location of a paraclinoid aneurysm, we advocate the use of the term junctional aneurysm to reflect the clinical uncertainty inherent in management decisions made regarding these aneurysms. We have illustrated a strategy of surgical exploration in select patients. PMID:25844299

  16. Junctional Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms: The Schrödinger's Cat of Vascular Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Andrew P; Loveren, Harry R van; Youssef, A Samy; Agazzi, Siviero

    2015-03-01

    Objectives Despite advances in neuroimaging, it is not always definitive whether a paraclinoid aneurysm is intradural or entirely extradural. We illustrate the potential use of surgical exploration in these aneurysms that we refer to as "junctional" aneurysms. Methods Retrospective review of eight patients with unruptured aneurysms who underwent a planned surgical exploration of a junctional aneurysm. Results Of the eight patients, three underwent exploration of the aneurysm during surgery for a different aneurysm. All three of these were found to be extradural. Five patients underwent a craniotomy for the exclusive purpose of clarifying the location of the aneurysm. Two of these cases were found to be intradural and were clipped. Two cases were found to be extradural. In one patient, the initially extradural aneurysm was converted into an intradural aneurysm during removal of the anterior clinoid process, necessitating surgical clipping. One transient third nerve palsy was observed. Discussion Until further progress in neuroimaging allows clinicians to determine unequivocally the exact anatomical location of a paraclinoid aneurysm, we advocate the use of the term junctional aneurysm to reflect the clinical uncertainty inherent in management decisions made regarding these aneurysms. We have illustrated a strategy of surgical exploration in select patients.

  17. The 'Sphere': A Dedicated Bifurcation Aneurysm Flow-Diverter Device.

    PubMed

    Peach, Thomas; Cornhill, J Frederick; Nguyen, Anh; Riina, Howard; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2014-01-01

    We present flow-based results from the early stage design cycle, based on computational modeling, of a prototype flow-diverter device, known as the 'Sphere', intended to treat bifurcation aneurysms of the cerebral vasculature. The device is available in a range of diameters and geometries and is constructed from a single loop of NITINOL(®) wire. The 'Sphere' reduces aneurysm inflow by means of a high-density, patterned, elliptical surface that partially occludes the aneurysm neck. The device is secured in the healthy parent vessel by two armatures in the shape of open loops, resulting in negligible disruption of parent or daughter vessel flow. The device is virtually deployed in six anatomically accurate bifurcation aneurysms: three located at the Basilar tip and three located at the terminus bifurcation of the Internal Carotid artery (at the meeting of the middle cerebral and anterior cerebral arteries). Both steady state and transient flow simulations reveal that the device presents with a range of aneurysm inflow reductions, with mean flow reductions falling in the range of 30.6-71.8% across the different geometries. A significant difference is noted between steady state and transient simulations in one geometry, where a zone of flow recirculation is not captured in the steady state simulation. Across all six aneurysms, the device reduces the WSS magnitude within the aneurysm sac, resulting in a hemodynamic environment closer to that of a healthy vessel. We conclude from extensive CFD analysis that the 'Sphere' device offers very significant levels of flow reduction in a number of anatomically accurate aneurysm sizes and locations, with many advantages compared to current clinical cylindrical flow-diverter designs. Analysis of the device's mechanical properties and deployability will follow in future publications.

  18. [False aneurysm on dacron prosthesis, 20 years after aortofemoral bypass].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bertagni, A; Nasti, A G; Montesano, G

    2001-10-01

    A 85-year-old male developed a false, non septic, non anastomotic aneurysm, 20 years after right aorto-femoral Dacron grafting for claudication. On account of the proximity to the femoral anastomosis, and the association with a profunda femoris stenosis, a conventional surgical repair was preferred to an endovascular treatment. The patient underwent a successful aneurysm resection followed by PTFE interposition between the primary graft and the profunda femoris artery, with uneventful recovery.

  19. Intracranial saccular aneurysm in a child with only persistent headache.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Olcay; Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Dilber, Cengiz; Çinar, Celal

    2015-06-01

    Headache is one of the common symptoms of intracranial aneursym. A 5-year-old child lately presented to our pediatric emergency department with persistent headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 7×8 mm rounded lesion with slowly heterogeneous low signal in T2 sequence consistent with a partial occluded aneurysm, in the right medial frontal lobe that close to anterior cerebral artery. Intracranial aneurysms are rare in children and they are noncommon without complications as our case.

  20. Morphology Parameters for Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sujan; Tremmel, Markus; Mocco, J; Kim, Minsuok; Yamamoto, Junichi; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Meng, Hui

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to identify image-based morphological parameters that correlate with human intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture. METHODS For 45 patients with terminal or sidewall saccular IAs (25 unruptured, 20 ruptured), three-dimensional geometries were evaluated for a range of morphological parameters. In addition to five previously studied parameters (aspect ratio, aneurysm size, ellipticity index, nonsphericity index, and undulation index), we defined three novel parameters incorporating the parent vessel geometry (vessel angle, aneurysm [inclination] angle, and [aneurysm-to-vessel] size ratio) and explored their correlation with aneurysm rupture. Parameters were analyzed with a two-tailed independent Student's t test for significance; significant parameters (P < 0.05) were further examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Additionally, receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed on each parameter. RESULTS Statistically significant differences were found between mean values in ruptured and unruptured groups for size ratio, undulation index, nonsphericity index, ellipticity index, aneurysm angle, and aspect ratio. Logistic regression analysis further revealed that size ratio (odds ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.03−1.92) and undulation index (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08−2.11) had the strongest independent correlation with ruptured IA. From the receiver operating characteristic analysis, size ratio and aneurysm angle had the highest area under the curve values of 0.83 and 0.85, respectively. CONCLUSION Size ratio and aneurysm angle are promising new morphological metrics for IA rupture risk assessment. Because these parameters account for vessel geometry, they may bridge the gap between morphological studies and more qualitative location-based studies. PMID:18797347

  1. Considerations for patients undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Lee, Jason T

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has taken over open surgery as the primary strategy for treatment of patients with abdominal and thoracic aneurysms. The minimally invasive nature of these techniques requires alterations in preoperative workup, intraoperative management, and familiarity with unique complications that can occur. Familiarity from the anesthetic standpoint of endovascular techniques, including treatment of patients with fenestrated, chimney, snorkel, and periscope grafts, is necessary for the contemporary cardiac anesthesiologist.

  2. Computational study of anterior communicating artery hemodynamics before aneurysm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2012-03-01

    It is widely accepted that complexity in the flow pattern at the anterior communicating artery (AComA) is associated with the high rate of aneurysm formation in that location observed in large studies. A previous computational hemodynamic study showed a possible association between high maximum intraaneurysmal wall shear stress (WSS) at the systolic peak with rupture in a cohort of AComA aneurysms. In another study it was observed a connection between location of aneurysm blebs and regions of high WSS in models where blebs were virtually removed. However, others reported associations between low WSS and either rupture or blister formation. The purpose of this work is to study associations between hemodynamic patterns and AComA aneurysm initiation by comparing hemodynamics in the aneurysm and the normal model where the aneurysm was computationally removed. Vascular models of both right and left circulation were independently reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography images using deformable models, and fused using a surface merging algorithm. The geometric models were then used to generate high-quality volumetric finite element grids of tetrahedra with an advancing front technique. For each patient, the second anatomical model was created by digitally removing the aneurysm. It was iteratively achieved by applying a Laplacian smoothing filter and remeshing the surface. Finite element blood flow numerical simulations were performed. It was observed that aneurysms initiated in regions of high and moderate WSS in the counterpart normal models. Adjacent or close to those regions, low WSS portions of the arterial wall were not affected by the disease.

  3. [False aneurysm on dacron prosthesis, 20 years after aortofemoral bypass].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bertagni, A; Nasti, A G; Montesano, G

    2001-10-01

    A 85-year-old male developed a false, non septic, non anastomotic aneurysm, 20 years after right aorto-femoral Dacron grafting for claudication. On account of the proximity to the femoral anastomosis, and the association with a profunda femoris stenosis, a conventional surgical repair was preferred to an endovascular treatment. The patient underwent a successful aneurysm resection followed by PTFE interposition between the primary graft and the profunda femoris artery, with uneventful recovery. PMID:11692765

  4. The Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with the Chimney Technique for Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We collected our experience in the use of chimney technique with endovascular aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) for juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JAAs), and reviewed the outcomes. Methods: The patients who were treated with Ch-EVAR between January 2012 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) under general anesthesia. Femoral arterial access was obtained to place the main body of the endograft; brachial or axillary access was obtained to perform the placement of the chimney stent. Results: We treated 12 patients with 15 renal arteries using the Ch-EVAR procedure. Technical success was achieved in 11 of the 12 (91.6%) cases. Within the first 30 days of postoperative period, the target vessel patency rate was 93.3% (14 of 15 renal arteries). After a median follow-up period of 28 months, one patient required Ch-EVAR-related re-intervention due to a type Ia endoleak, and 13 of the 15 renal arteries were patent at the end of the follow-up period. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that Ch-EVAR can be completed with a high rate of success. Although early target vessel occlusion or early postoperative mortality might occur, Ch-EVAR could be an alternative treatment for JAA, especially in high risk patients. PMID:26961481

  5. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-08-04

    We report that the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. Lastly, we also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.

  6. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; et al

    2014-08-04

    We report that the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several suchmore » devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. Lastly, we also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.« less

  7. Computational Hemodynamics Framework for the Analysis of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Chien, Aichi; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Putman, Christopher; Cebral, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms is important for clinicians because the natural rupture risk can be exceeded by the small but significant risk carried by current treatments. To this end numerous investigators have used image-based computational fluid dynamics models to extract patient-specific hemodynamics information, but there is no consensus on which variables or hemodynamic characteristics are the most important. This paper describes a computational framework to study and characterize the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms in order to relate it to clinical events such as growth or rupture. In particular, a number of hemodynamic quantities are proposed to describe the most salient features of these hemodynamic environments. Application to a patient population indicates that ruptured aneurysms tend to have concentrated inflows, concentrated wall shear stress distributions, high maximal wall shear stress and smaller viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, these statistical associations are largely unaffected by the choice of physiologic flow conditions. This confirms the notion that hemodynamic information derived from image-based computational models can be used to assess aneurysm rupture risk, to test hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for aneurysm formation, progression and rupture, and to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:21643491

  8. Chondroblastoma of the patella with aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Yan, Mengning; Yue, Bing; Zeng, Yiming; Wang, You

    2014-01-01

    Chondroblastoma of the patella is rare. Aneurysmal bone cysts, which develop from a prior lesion such as a chondroblastoma, are seldom seen in the patella. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with 2 years of right knee pain without calor, erythema, pain on palpation, or abnormal range of motion. Radiological studies suggested aneurysmal bone cyst. The lesion was excised with curettage and the residual cavity filled with autogenous bone graft. Histopathology revealed chondroblastoma associated with a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst. In the follow-up period, the patient demonstrated normal joint activities with no pain. Normal configuration of the patella and bone union were shown on plain radiographs. The authors present a review of the literature of all cases of patellar chondroblastoma with aneurysmal bone cyst. This case is the 14th report of aneurysmal bone cyst arising in a chondroblastoma of the patella. According to the literature, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the study of these lesions. The pathologic diagnosis is based on the presence of chondroblastoma and aneurysmal bone cyst. Treatment of this lesion includes patellectomy, curettage alone, and curettage with bone grafting. Despite the risk of recurrence of this lesion in the patella, the authors first recommend curettage followed by filling the cavity with bone graft. To protect the anterior tension of the patella intraoperatively, the bone window should be made at the medial edge of the patella to perform the curettage and bone grafting.

  9. Optical coherence tomography: a new method to assess aneurysm healing

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, William E.; Chow, Michael M.; Prayson, Richard A.; Shure, Mark A.; Jeon, Sung W.; Huang, David; Zeynalov, Emil; Woo, Henry H.; Rasmussen, Peter A.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Masaryk, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Object Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage affects approximately 10/100,000 people per year. Endovascular coil embolization is used increasingly to treat cerebral aneurysms and its safety and durability is rapidly developing. The long-term durability of coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms remains in question; patients treated using this modality require multiple follow-up angiography studies and occasional repeated treatments. Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality that uses backscattered light to produce high-resolution tomography of optically accessible biological tissues such as the eye, luminal surface of blood vessels, and gastrointestinal tract. Vascular OCT probes in the form of imaging microwires are presently available—although not Food and Drug Administration–approved—and may be adapted for use in the cerebral circulation. In this study the authors describe the initial use of OCT to make visible the neck of aneurysms created in a canine model and treated with coil embolization. Optical coherence tomography images demonstrate changes that correlate with the histological findings of healing at the aneurysm neck and thus may be capable of demonstrating human cerebral aneurysm healing. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography may obviate the need for subsequent follow-up angiography studies as well as aid in the understanding of endovascular tissue healing. Data in this study demonstrate that further investigation of in vivo imaging with such probes is warranted. PMID:15739565

  10. The effect of flow recirculation on abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taib, Ishkrizat; Amirnordin, Shahrin Hisham; Madon, Rais Hanizam; Mustafa, Norrizal; Osman, Kahar

    2012-06-01

    The presences of flow recirculation at the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) region yield the unpredictable failure of aneurismal wall. The failure of the aneurismal wall is closely related to the hemodynamic factor. Hemodynamic factor such as pressure and velocity distribution play a significance role of aneurysm growth and rupture. By using the computational approach, the influence of hemodynamic factor is investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method on the virtual AAA model. The virtual 3D AAAs model was reconstructed from Spiral Computed Tomography scan (CT-scan). The blood flow is assumed as being transient, laminar and Newtonian within a rigid section of the vessel. The blood flow also driven by an imposed of pressure gradient in the form of physiological waveform. The pulsating blood flow is also considered in this simulation. The results on pressure distribution and velocity profile are analyzed to interpret the behaviour of flow recirculation. The results show the forming of vortices is seen at the aneurysm bulge. This vortices is form at the aneurysm region then destroyed rapidly by flow recirculation. Flow recirculation is point out much higher at distal end of aneurysm closed to iliac bifurcation. This phenomenon is managed to increase the possibility of aneurysm growth and rupture.

  11. Treatment of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms with Pipeline embolization device

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osama; Storey, Christopher; Kalakoti, Piyush; Deep Thakur, Jai; Zhang, Shihao; Nanda, Anil; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Object Treatment of complex intracranial aneurysms with Pipeline embolization device (PED) (ev3/Covidien Vascular Therapies) has gained recent popularity. One application of PEDs that is not well described in the literature is the utility and long-term safety in treatment of vertebrobasilar fusiform (VBF) aneurysms. Despite the advancements in endovascular therapy, VBF aneurysms continue to challenging pathology. The authors provide long-term follow-up of VBF aneurysms treated with PEDs. Methods We retrospectively reviewed four patients that were treated at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport with PEDs for VBFs from 2012 to 2014. Each patient was discussed in a multidisciplinary setting between neurosurgeons and neurointerventionalists. Each patient underwent platelet function tests to ensure responsiveness to anti-platelet agents and was treated by one neurointerventionalist (HC). All patients were placed on aspirin and Plavix and were confirmed for therapeutic response prior to discharge. Results Follow-up ranged from 12 to 25 months, with a mean of 14.25 months. Two cases presented with a recurrence after the initial treatment, both of which required subsequent treatment. Of the four patients treated, one patient developed hemiparesis and three died. Conclusion Despite reports describing successful treatment of VBF aneurysms with PEDs, delayed complications after obliteration and remodeling can occur. We describe our institutional experience of VBFs treated with PEDs. Treatment of holobasilar fusiform aneurysms may carry a worse prognosis after treatment. Further long-term follow-up will provide a better understanding of this pathology. PMID:26089246

  12. [Endosaccular embolization of an intrasellar aneurysm with hypopituitarism: case report].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Tone, Osamu; Tomita, Hiroki; Tamaki, Masashi; Akimoto, Hideaki; Shigeta, Keigo; Sampetrean, Oltea; Kanno, Kazuo; Matsushita, Mika

    2008-04-01

    An 81-year-old male presented with weight loss and hyponatremia. A baseline endocrinological examination revealed anterior pituitary dysfunction. A computed tomography and MRI revealed a large, unruptured intrasellar aneurysm protruding from the right internal carotid artery and pushing the pituitary stalk leftward. The patient developed polyuria and polydipsia from 10 days after commencing corticosteroid supplementation and was diagnosed with partial central diabetes insipidus (DI). Balloon assisted endosaccular embolization was performed about one month after the posterior pituitary dysfunction was identified. The unruptured aneurysm was successfully embolized with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) without narrowing of the parent vessel. DI resolved completely and the posterior pituitary dysfunction improved soon after endosaccular embolization. The remission of DI after coil embolization suggested that the DI might have been induced by the progressive mass effect of the aneurysm rather than by the steroid. An endocrinological evaluation and cerebral angiography confirmed partial recovery of anterior pituitary dysfunction and almost complete obliteration of the aneurysm, respectively at 1 year after the operation. We report a case of hypopituitarism secondary to the large intrasellar aneurysm. This aneurysm was embolized with GDCs, resulting in partial recovery of anterior pituitary dysfunction and complete recovery of posterior pituitary dysfunction.

  13. Partially Polyurethane-Covered Stent for Cerebral Aneurysm Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Hussain S.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Rudin, Stephen; Baier, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Partially polyurethane-covered stent (PPCS) is proposed for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. The PPCSs were observed to substantially modify the flow entering the aneurysm in a patient-specific aneurysm phantom (PSAP). These stents can act as flow modulators and the polyurethane (PU) membrane can provide a smooth scaffold for restoring the structural integrity of the diseased vessel. Partial coating of the stent aids in sealing only the entrance to the aneurysm while keeping the perforators around the aneurysm open and patent. Biocompatibility of the PU membrane was monitored using contact angle measurements to show that critical surface tension (CST) values remained in the thromboresistant range of 20–30 mN/m. Stent flexibility, stiffness, and pressure–diameter relationship showed no significant change after asymmetric PU film application. No delamination of the PU membrane from the stent was observed within the working strains of the stent. The flow modulating capability of the PPCS was monitored by intentionally orienting the stent to cover either the proximal or the distal regions along the neck of the PSAP. Time density curves (TDCs) compared the relative metrics of input rate, washout rate, residence time, and influx in the aneurysm before and after the stent placement. PMID:18837459

  14. [Endovascular treatment for cervical carotid artery aneurysm: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yasuhiko; Sugiu, Kenji; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Tokunaga, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuya; Date, Isao

    2013-06-01

    We report here a case of cervical carotid artery aneurysm. This 37-year-old male suffered from acute neck swelling when he was taking lunch after physical work. Ultrasonography demonstrated a cervical pseudoaneurysm and a jet flow, which was blowing into the dome from the carotid artery. Angiogram revealed an aneurysm with a diameter of 3 cm at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. Coil embolization using double-catheter technique was performed and complete occlusion of the aneurysm was obtained without any complications. The patient returned to his normal life. Cervical carotid artery aneurysms are rare and they induce pain by swelling in the neck, hoarseness, swallowing disturbance, hemorrhage, and cerebral ischemia due to embolism. In case of a cervical carotid artery aneurysm, safe and effective treatments are required and endovascular treatment should be considered. Although stent-assisted coil embolization or covered-stent placement were reported as an effective treatment for cervical aneurysms, coil embolization without using a stent was performed in this particular patient who is a young, blue-collar worker because the avoidance of long-term anti-platelet therapy was desirable. Preoperative evaluation is important to select adequate treatment. PMID:23732763

  15. Chondroblastoma of the patella with aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Yan, Mengning; Yue, Bing; Zeng, Yiming; Wang, You

    2014-01-01

    Chondroblastoma of the patella is rare. Aneurysmal bone cysts, which develop from a prior lesion such as a chondroblastoma, are seldom seen in the patella. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with 2 years of right knee pain without calor, erythema, pain on palpation, or abnormal range of motion. Radiological studies suggested aneurysmal bone cyst. The lesion was excised with curettage and the residual cavity filled with autogenous bone graft. Histopathology revealed chondroblastoma associated with a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst. In the follow-up period, the patient demonstrated normal joint activities with no pain. Normal configuration of the patella and bone union were shown on plain radiographs. The authors present a review of the literature of all cases of patellar chondroblastoma with aneurysmal bone cyst. This case is the 14th report of aneurysmal bone cyst arising in a chondroblastoma of the patella. According to the literature, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the study of these lesions. The pathologic diagnosis is based on the presence of chondroblastoma and aneurysmal bone cyst. Treatment of this lesion includes patellectomy, curettage alone, and curettage with bone grafting. Despite the risk of recurrence of this lesion in the patella, the authors first recommend curettage followed by filling the cavity with bone graft. To protect the anterior tension of the patella intraoperatively, the bone window should be made at the medial edge of the patella to perform the curettage and bone grafting. PMID:24683664

  16. Surgical options for the management of visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Van Petersen, A; Meerwaldt, R; Geelkerken, R; Zeebregts, C

    2011-06-01

    Visceral artery aneurysm (VAA) is a rare entity but increased use of abdominal imaging has led to an increased prevalence. Rupture is related to a high mortality rate. Open repair, endovascular treatment and laparoscopic techniques have been described as treatment options. In this systematic review we describe the surgical options for treating VAA. A literature search identified articles focussing on the key issues of visceral artery aneurysms and surgical options using the Pubmed and Cochrane databases. Case reports dominate the literature about VAA. Twenty-seven small case series and ten review articles have been published in the last 20 years concerning the surgical options for VAA. The evidence does not exceed level 3. Surgical treatment is dictated by both patient and aneurysm characteristics. Whether VAA should be treated largely depends upon age, gender, presence of hypertension (e.g. in renal aneurysm), aneurysm size and presentation. Aneurysm size and characteristics, anatomical location and presence of collateral circulation dictate the surgical option to be chosen. The mortality and morbidity rates after elective open repair are low. Literature about surgical options for treating VAA remains scarce. Only a few clinical trials have shown the possibilities and results of open surgical repair. In general, there is no consensus on the surgical treatment of VAA and the highest level of evidence is based upon expert opinions. PMID:21577188

  17. Surgical options for the management of visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Van Petersen, A; Meerwaldt, R; Geelkerken, R; Zeebregts, C

    2011-06-01

    Visceral artery aneurysm (VAA) is a rare entity but increased use of abdominal imaging has led to an increased prevalence. Rupture is related to a high mortality rate. Open repair, endovascular treatment and laparoscopic techniques have been described as treatment options. In this systematic review we describe the surgical options for treating VAA. A literature search identified articles focussing on the key issues of visceral artery aneurysms and surgical options using the Pubmed and Cochrane databases. Case reports dominate the literature about VAA. Twenty-seven small case series and ten review articles have been published in the last 20 years concerning the surgical options for VAA. The evidence does not exceed level 3. Surgical treatment is dictated by both patient and aneurysm characteristics. Whether VAA should be treated largely depends upon age, gender, presence of hypertension (e.g. in renal aneurysm), aneurysm size and presentation. Aneurysm size and characteristics, anatomical location and presence of collateral circulation dictate the surgical option to be chosen. The mortality and morbidity rates after elective open repair are low. Literature about surgical options for treating VAA remains scarce. Only a few clinical trials have shown the possibilities and results of open surgical repair. In general, there is no consensus on the surgical treatment of VAA and the highest level of evidence is based upon expert opinions.

  18. Traumatic Intracranial Aneurysm Formation following Closed Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Miley, Jefferson T; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2008-01-01

    Background: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare conditions that can be a result of non-penetrating head trauma. We report the occurrence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods: All diagnostic cerebral angiograms performed in patients with traumatic brain injury at a level I trauma center from January 2006 to July 2007 were reviewed. Results: Diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed in 74 patients with the diagnosis of closed head injury. A total of 4 traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms were found in 4 patients, two in the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery, one in the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and one in the paraophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery. Two patients were treated with coil embolization. One patient had follow up imaging on which there was no change in the size and morphology of the aneurysm. Conclusion: Intracranial aneurysms can develop in patients with closed head injury presumably related to shear or rotational injury. It is unclear whether these aneurysms should be classified as traumatic intracranial aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms, but the pathological findings frequently reveal disruption of the three vascular layers fulfilling the definition of pseudoaneurysm. For these reason we favor the name of post-traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms. PMID:22518228

  19. Anesthetic management during surgery for left ventricular aneurysm and false aneurysm occurring in stage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Hun; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) and false aneurysm are complications of acute myocardial infarction, trauma, and cardiac surgery. Left ventricular false aneurysm (LVFA) is a particularly catastrophic complication owing to its high propensity for rupture. Surgical resection should be considered for LVFA occurring within three months after myocardial infarction or development of congestive heart failure. In this report, we describe a case of acute heart failure with LVA and LVFA occurring in stage as a complication of myocardial infarction in a 55-year-old man. The patient was also at risk of brain ischemia due to abnormal vessel status and a previous cerebrovascular accident with left-sided weakness. Successful perioperative anesthetic management was achieved by focusing on maintaining marginal upper normal blood pressure to ensure cerebral perfusion and to reduce the risk of false aneurysm rupture. PMID:27703635

  20. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Marcelo; Zeidan, Fernanda; Lobato, Armando C.

    2013-01-01

    There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research. PMID:23401778

  1. Endovascular treatment of asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms: anatomic and technical factors related to ischemic events and coil stabilization.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Akio; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Sakai, Hideki; Iihara, Koji; Nagata, Izumi

    2004-09-01

    The present study assessed the safety and efficacy of embolization using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) in 100 asymptomatic cerebral aneurysms classified as sidewall (70) or terminal (30) aneurysms according to the parent artery (68 small aneurysms with a small neck, 21 small aneurysms with a wide neck, and 11 large aneurysms). A balloon-assisted technique was used in 49 aneurysms. Immediate angiography revealed that 71 aneurysms were completely obliterated. Transient deficits occurred in 19 patients, permanent deficits in four patients, and one patient died. Most complications occurred during or immediately after treatment and resolved within a few minutes to a few weeks. None of the surviving patients manifested significant morbidity at 1-year follow up. Follow-up angiographic study was performed in 79 aneurysms. Rates of recanalization and progressive thrombosis (total occlusion of the residual aneurysm at follow up) were 11% and 38%, respectively, in sidewall aneurysms, and 26% and 0%, respectively, in terminal aneurysms. Treatment with GDCs was effective for patients with small aneurysms with small necks, the morbidity was acceptable, and progressive thrombosis occurred during the follow-up period. GDC treatment achieved unsatisfactory results in patients with small terminal aneurysms with wide necks and in large aneurysms, because the obliteration rate was low, and the recanalization and complication rates were high. Multivariate analysis showed that complete occlusion was associated with small-necked aneurysms, and ischemic events tended to occur in terminal aneurysms and in aneurysms treated by the balloon-assisted technique.

  2. Ruptured giant mitral valve aneurysm: an unexpected finding in a diabetic patient with dyspnea and new-onset atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Trifunovic, Danijela; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Bozic, Vesna; Petrovic, Milan; Ostojic, Miodrag

    2014-07-01

    Mitral valve aneurysm (MVA) is a rare valve disease. The case is reported of pathologically proven MVA in a 61-year-old diabetic male with chronic alcoholic liver disease who presented with dyspnea and new-onset atrial fibrillation, without clinical elements of current or recent infection. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a 'cystic' formation of the anterior mitral leaflet (AML) with mild mitral regurgitation (MR) and aortic regurgitation (AR) hitting the AML. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) showed clearly that the formation on the AML was a valve aneurysm, and depicted the site of aneurysm rupture with an additional jet of MR through the rupture. Following mitral valve replacement, pathology of the excised valve showed chronic bacterial endocarditis with calcified bacterial colonies, myxomatous changes with fibrinoid dissection of lamina fibrosa, and neovascularization of the leaflet. The mechanisms of MVA formation are discussed, together with its potential complications, diagnostic modalities and therapeutic strategies. The present case emphasizes that MVA is often a remnant of endocarditis, even when the latter is clinically silent and undiagnosed. The importance of chronic AR directed towards the AML as a predisposing condition for MVA formation is also underlined in this case. The superiority of TEE in providing a full exploration of the mitral valve morphology is verified. PMID:25803977

  3. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  4. Case Series of HIV Infection-Associated Arteriopathy: Diagnosis, Management, and Outcome Over a 5-Year period at Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Chiang Mai University.

    PubMed

    Orrapin, Saritphat; Reanpang, Termpong; Orrapin, Saranat; Arwon, Supapong; Kattipathanapong, Thanate; Lekwanavijit, Suree; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2015-09-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can present with 4 pathology types: drug-induced vasospasm (ergotism), arterial limb ischemia, critical limb ischemia, and aneurysm. Although these problems are common vascular problems, they result in increased morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients, especially aneurysm. Patients with these problems tend to be diagnosed with difficulty because of atypical symptoms and signs. Because of lack of data in treatment outcome literature, our report explores and provides information on HIV infection-related arteriopathy. There were 17 patients in our 5-year review. There was no death in patients except the aneurysm type. The survival of aneurysm patients was significantly lower than from other pathologies (P = .003). Our case series showed good short-term outcome, and patients were not at risk for less beneficial surgical procedures.

  5. Hemodynamic impact of cerebral aneurysm endovascular treatment devices: coils and flow diverters.

    PubMed

    Goubergrits, Leonid; Schaller, Jens; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Woelken, Thies; Ringelstein, Moritz; Spuler, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Coils and flow diverters or stents are devices successfully used to treat cerebral aneurysms. Treatment aims to reduce intra-aneurysmal flow, thereby separating the aneurysmal sac from the blood circulation. The focus and this manuscript combining literature review and our original research is an analysis of changes in aneurysmal hemodynamics caused by endovascular treatment devices. Knowledge of post-treatment hemodynamics is a path to successful long-term treatment. Summarizing findings on hemodynamic impact of treatment devices, we conclude: coiling and stenting do not affect post-treatment intra-aneurysmal pressure, but significantly alter aneurysmal hemodynamics through flow reduction and a change in flow structure. The impact of treatment devices on aneurysmal flow depends, however, on a set of parameters including device geometry, course of placement, parent vessel and aneurysm geometry.

  6. Dissecting Aneurysm of the Basilar Arterial Trunk Presenting with Pontine Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Y.-G.; Ryu, C.W.; Kim, J.S.; Cha, E.Y.; Pyun, H.W.; Kim, D.Y.; Choi, J.W.; suh, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Dissecting basilar aneurysms have rarely been reported but are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, controversy exists as to the proper management of such lesions because their natural course is not well understood. We describe a 50-year-old man with a dissecting aneurysm involving the lower basilar trunk who presented with pontine infarction corresponding to the aneurysmal sac location. We obliterated the dissecting basilar aneurysm by coil embolization of the aneurysmal sac as well as the diseased segment of the basilar trunk after confirmation of collateral filling of the basilar artery through the posterior communicating artery. The patient recovered without any procedural complication. Eight month follow-up revealed complete disappearance of the aneurysm without symptom recurrence together with preservation of collateral flow in the distal basilar artery. Obliteration of the parent artery as well as the aneurysmal sac with coils could be considered in a lower basilar aneurysm of a dissecting nature. PMID:20566107

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions HANAC syndrome hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps syndrome Enable Javascript to view ... All Close All Description Hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps (HANAC) syndrome is part of ...

  8. Modified Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization Technique to Treat an Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, M. M.; Northeast, A.; Lintott, P.; Liong, W.-C.; Warakaulle, D. R.

    2010-10-15

    Stent-assisted coil embolization is a well-described technique for the treatment of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. We describe a modification of this technique used successfully to occlude a wide-necked internal iliac artery aneurysm.

  9. Endovascular Embolization of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Ethylene-vinyl Alcohol (Onyx): A Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M.J.; Lehmann, E.D.; Bottomley, J.; Kessel, D.O.; Nicholson, A.A.; McPherson, S.J.; Morgan, R.A.; Belli, A.-M.

    2006-12-15

    We report the application of the liquid embolic agent ethylene-vinyl alcohol (Onyx; MicroTherapeutics, Irvine, CA, USA) in the management of visceral artery aneurysms. The technique and indications for using Onyx are discussed with emphasis on the management of wide-necked aneurysms and maintenance of patency of the parent vessel. None of the cases was considered suitable for stent-grafting or embolization with conventional agents. Two aneurysms of the renal artery bifurcation and one aneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery were treated. Following treatment there was complete exclusion of all aneurysms. There was no evidence of end-organ infarction. Follow-up with intervals up to 6 months has shown sustained aneurysm exclusion. Onyx is known to be effective in the management of intracranial aneurysms. Our experience demonstrates the efficacy and applicability of the use of Onyx in the treatment of complex visceral artery aneurysms.

  10. Giant serpentine aneurysm of vertebrobasilar artery mimicking dolichoectasia--an unusual complication of pediatric AIDS. Report of a case with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, A; Tagore, R; Siddappa, N B; Santosh, V; Yasha, T C; Ranga, U; Chandramouli, B A; Shankar, S K

    2008-01-01

    Central nervous system manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in children differ strikingly from adults. Developmental delay, subacute AIDS encephalitis and basal ganglia calcification are common in children, in contrast to opportunistic infections and dementia in adults. Intracranial aneurysms are being recognized with increasing frequency in pediatric AIDS. Fusiform dilatation of vessels of circle of Willis to form large aneurysms, termed cerebral aneurysmal childhood arteriopathy, is an exceedingly rare complication of pediatric AIDS. We report a case of massive fusiform dilatation of vertebrobasilar system mimicking congenital dolichoectasia with evidence suggesting direct causation by HIV-1 Clade C virus. In view of scant literature that exists on this unusual complication of pediatric AIDS, we present a detailed review of all previously recorded cases and review the etiopathogenesis. There are 20 reports (32 cases) on record till date that have mostly involved the anterior circulation, occurring between 4-15 years of age. Occurrence is associated with profound immunosuppression, and perinatally acquired HIV with latent interval of 5.5-11 years to onset of symptoms. Direct causation by HIV is favored as reports demonstrate presence of virus in affected vessels, association with high viral load and, more conclusively, arrest in progression or reversal with early initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The fusiform nature and location of these aneurysms makes any form of surgical intervention or embolization impossible. High degree of clinical suspicion and awareness of this entity is, therefore, important as this can place young patients at risk for major cerebrovascular accidents.

  11. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  12. Intracranial Infectious Aneurysm in Orbital Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Kim, Charles; Carrasco, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm and cavernous sinus thrombosis are rare complications of orbital cellulitis. We report the case of a 46-year-old male presenting with sinusitis and orbital cellulitis complicated by the development of an orbital mass. Following orbitotomy with debulking, the patient underwent bony orbital decompression for increasing proptosis postoperatively. While his exam stabilized, the patient developed complete ptosis and extraocular motor palsy in the contralateral eye after undergoing bilateral sinus debridement. Imaging was notable for the presence of a pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery, which was treated with a stent. This report demonstrates rare complications of orbital cellulitis. These patients should be monitored carefully with noninvasive imaging studies, such as cerebral angiography, for early detection of vascular abnormalities that can progress rapidly. PMID:25955309

  13. [Sacral metastasis simulating aneurysmal bone cyst].

    PubMed

    Sanromán-Álvarez, Pablo; Simal-Julián, Juan Antonio; Miranda-Lloret, Pablo; Pérez-Borredá, Pedro; Botella-Asunción, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Cystic spinal lesions with characteristic patterns, such as the presence of haematic fluid-fluid levels (H-FFL), have been associated with many tumoral lineages, more frequently with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) and exceptionally with metastasis. We present the case of a 60-year-old man with the finding of a sacral cystic bone lesion with H-FFL, with initial suspicion of ABC and confirmed diagnosis of metastasis. The case presented is, to our knowledge, the second case published of spinal cystic bone metastasis with H-FFL pattern with unknown primary tumour at the time of diagnosis and the only one that received resective surgical treatment, achieving pulmonary and metastatic disease control with good quality of life after 1 year of follow up.

  14. Pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Sato, K

    1997-11-01

    A three-year-old male Siberian Husky dog was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Osaka Prefecture University with a complaint of difficulty in expelling the stools. By rectal examination, a mass as big as a fist could be detected occupying the cavum pelvis. Radiographically the mass had a thin bony shell bulging from the pubic periosteum. In the shell, radiolucent trabeculation gave the area a "soap bubble" appearance. The cut surface of the removed mass showed a honeycomb-like pattern constituted of some small loculate bony cysts. These cysts were separated from each other by a fibrous or bony trabeculae with blood-filled vascular channels or sponge-like structures. From clinical and pathological findings, this mass was diagnosed as a pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst. After surgery, the patient completely recovered without tenesmus.

  15. Progressive Deconstruction of a Distal Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Using Competitive Flow Diversion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew K; Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Moftakhar, Roham

    2016-03-01

    Progressive deconstruction is an endovascular technique for aneurysm treatment that utilizes flow diverting stents to promote progressive thrombosis by diverting blood flow away from the aneurysm's parent vessel. While the aneurysm thromboses, collateral blood vessels develop over time to avoid infarction that can often accompany acute parent vessel occlusion. We report a 37-year-old woman with a left distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with this strategy. The concept and rationale of progressive deconstruction are discussed in detail.

  16. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm From Late Type II Endoleak Treated by Transarterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gunasekaran, Senthil; Funaki, Brian Lorenz, Jonathan

    2013-02-15

    Endoleak is the most common complication after endovascular aneurysm repair. The most common type of endoleak, a type II endoleak, typically follows a benign course and is only treated when associated with increasing aneurysm size. In this case report, we describe a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm due to a late, type II endoleak occurring 10 years after endovascular aneurysm repair that was successfully treated by transarterial embolization.

  17. Does electrothrombosis occur immediately after embolization of an aneurysm with Guglielmi detachable coils?

    PubMed

    Horowitz, M; Samson, D; Purdy, P

    1997-03-01

    Current options for treating cerebral aneurysms include surgical clipping and placement of Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). The latter system is reported to induce acute aneurysmal occlusion by a mechanism of electrothrombosis. We report our observations in the case of a ruptured aneurysm treated with GDCs and then surgically exposed 2 hours later. The lack of thrombus within the aneurysm and around the coils led us to question the mechanism of action of GDCs.

  18. Treatment of a pediatric recurrent fusiform middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm with a flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anthony M; Zipfel, Gregory; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2012-11-15

    Pediatric patients with aneurysm often have different localizations and morphologies from adults and recurrences are not uncommon after successful clip reconstruction/obliteration. Treatment of a recurrent pediatric aneurysm after clip ligation is a technical challenge. We present the case of an adolescent with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) fusiform aneurysm which recurred following clip reconstruction and bypass. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular flow diversion.

  19. Treatment of a pediatric recurrent fusiform middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm with a flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anthony M; Zipfel, Gregory; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric patients with aneurysm often have different localizations and morphologies from adults and recurrences are not uncommon after successful clip reconstruction/obliteration. Treatment of a recurrent pediatric aneurysm after clip ligation is a technical challenge. We present the case of an adolescent with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) fusiform aneurysm which recurred following clip reconstruction and bypass. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular flow diversion.

  20. Feasibility and methodology of optical coherence tomography imaging of human intracranial aneurysms: ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Barry; Sun, Cuiru; Khiel, Tim-Rasmus; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Standish, Beau A.; da Costa, Leodante; de Morais, Josaphat; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysm is a common cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. An aneurysm may undergo microscopic morphological changes or remodeling of the vessel wall prior to rupture, which could potentially be imaged. In this study we present methods of tissue sample preparation of intracranial aneurysms and correlation between optical coherence tomography imaging and routine histology. OCT has a potential future in the assessment of microscopic features of aneurysms, which may correlate to the risk of rupture.

  1. Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Embolization with Fibrin Sealant: A Simple and Effective Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Malagari, Katerina; Papathanasiou, Mathildi A.; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2003-02-15

    Endovascular treatment of internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms is an attractive alternative to surgical management, because the former is associated with less morbidity and mortality.Embolization with coils or exclusion of the IIA orifice with stent -grafts are the preferred techniques. Although uncommon, technical failures occur with reported aneurysm rupture. Two patients with IIA aneurysms are reported here, where we describe successful occlusion of their IIA aneurysms with the use of fibrin sealant, after initial failure of coil embolization.

  2. [A model of the arterial aneurysm of the brain for microneurosurgical training].

    PubMed

    Belykh, E G; Byval'tsev, V A; Nakadzhi, P; Lei, T; Oliviero, M M; Nikiforov, S B

    2014-01-01

    Clipping of arterial aneurysms of the brain is one of technically complex neurosurgical interventions. In the available literature, there is no information about simulation models of aneurysm clipping that have tactile properties similar to the real ones. The study presents a technical rationale for the development of a new model for the aneurysm on human placental vessels to train skills of isolating and clipping under ruptured and unruptured aneurysm conditions.

  3. Traumatic ulnar artery aneurysm secondary to basketball dunk: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kashi, Kambiz J; Leeman, Joshua; Rothkopf, Ian; Rothkopf, Douglas M

    2012-04-01

    Ulnar artery aneurysms are uncommon lesions. They are often caused by traumatic injury to the hand. Ulnar artery aneurysms have been reported in association with multiple sports-related activities, but never secondary to a basketball injury. The following is a case presentation of an ulnar artery aneurysm likely formed secondary to repetitive basketball slam dunking with accompanying review of diagnosis and surgical treatment of ulnar artery aneurysms.

  4. Pancreatic Arcade Artery Aneurysm—A Rare Complication after Replacement of Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsuru; Kawamoto, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm in the pancreatic arcade artery is an uncommon event, and is usually associated with the condition of median arcuate ligament syndrome. The stenosis at the base of the celiac axis has been presumed to be attributable to a relative increase in flow and pressure within the pancreatic arcade, resulting in subsequent development of the aneurysm. We, herein, present a rare case with rapid development of a pancreatic arcade artery aneurysm immediately after the replacement of a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-04-15

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising.

  7. [Mycotic aneurysms of the thoraco-abdominal part of the aorta].

    PubMed

    Ignashov, A M; Vasil'ev, S V; Usikov, V D; Gavrilenkov, V I; Semenov, D V; Bedrov, A Ia; Ivanov, A T; Kovalev, M G; Martynenko, G I; Petrova, E Iu; Peregoedov, E V; Kurkov, A A; Sidorov, A A

    2001-01-01

    Mycotoc aneurysms (MA)--a rare and extremely dangerous lesion of the aorta. CT, MRA and aortography were used to diagnose MA of the thoracoabdominal areas in 2 men of 64 and 67 years of age. The clinical picture included: fever with shivering with the temperature 38-39 degrees C and increasing pains in the inferiothoracic and lumbar areas of the spine. Hemoculture was positive in 1 patient only. The patients were operated on. Shunting of the aorta from the inferiothoracic to infrarenal segments was performed in one patient with the exclusion of the involved portion and resection of MA. Metalloosteosynthesis of the spine due to destruction of LI-LII and compression of the spine were performed in the second patient followed by analogous shunting of the aorta and visceral arteries with the resection of the aneurysm. To prevent infection of the prostheses the shunts were wrapped up with a piece of the greater omentum. One patient died two months later from recurrent sepsis. The other one is alive, within 28 months the shunts are patent, there are no signs of a reinfection. PMID:11837001

  8. Quantitative Characterization of the Hemodynamic Environment in Ruptured and Unruptured Brain Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Mut, Fernando; Weir, Jane; Putman, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Hemodynamics is thought to play an important role in the mechanisms of aneurysm pathogenesis, progression and rupture. The purpose of this study was to define quantitative measures related to qualitative flow characteristics previously analyzed and to investigate their relationship to aneurysm rupture. Methods The hemodynamic environments in 210 cerebral aneurysms were analyzed using image-based CFD under different flow conditions. Quantitative hemodynamic variables were defined and extracted from the simulation results. A statistical analysis of the relationship to the previous history of aneurysm rupture was performed, and the variability with flow conditions was assessed. Results Ruptured aneurysms were more likely to have larger inflow concentrations, larger maximum wall shear stress (WSS), larger shear concentrations and lower viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Areas under low WSS and measures of abnormally low shear force distributions of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms were not statistically different. Although the values of hemodynamic quantities changed with different flow conditions, the statistical differences or ratios between their mean values over the ruptured and unruptured groups were maintained, for both pulsatile and steady flows. Conclusions Concentrated inflow streams and WSS distributions with elevated levels of maximal WSS and low aneurysmal viscous dissipation are statistically associated with a clinical history of prior aneurysm rupture. In contrast, the area and total viscous shear force applied in the aneurysm region subjected to abnormally low WSS levels are not. This study highlights the potential for image-based CFD for investigating aneurysm evolution mechanisms and for clinical assessment of aneurysm risks. PMID:21127144

  9. Surgical Flow Alteration for the Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms That Are Unclippable, Untrappable, and Uncoilable

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Ho; Kwun, Byung Duk; Park, Wonhyoung; Park, Jung Cheol; Roh, Sung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The treatment of complex intracranial aneurysms remains challenging. One approach is the application of surgical flow alteration to treat aneurysms that are neither clippable, trappable, or coilable. The efficacy and limitations of surgical flow alteration have not yet been established. Methods Cases of complex aneurysms treated with surgical flow alteration (proximal occlusion with or without bypass, distal occlusion with or without bypass and bypass only) were included in this retrospective study. Results Among a total of 16 cases, there were 7 giant aneurysms (≥25 mm diameter) and 9 large aneurysms (>10 mm diameter); 15 of 16 aneurysms were unruptured. There were 8 aneurysms located in the anterior circulation, while the other 8 were in the posterior circulation. Aneurysms were treated with proximal occlusion in 10 cases and distal occlusion in 5 cases; in 1 case, the aneurysm occluded spontaneously after bypass without parent artery occlusion. All but 2 cases underwent prior or concurrent bypass surgery. Complete obliteration of the aneurysm at the latest imaging follow-up was shown in 12 of 16 cases (75.0%). Bypass patency was confirmed in 13 of 15 cases (86.7%). Surgery-related morbidity developed in 3 cases (18.8%, Glasgow outcome scale of 4) and all were perforator infarctions. There were no mortalities. Conclusion Surgical flow alteration resulted in a high rate of aneurysmal obliteration with acceptable morbidity. Although several limitations remained, it could represent an alternative method for treating complex aneurysms. PMID:26819686

  10. Rare complication of anterior communicating artery aneurysm coiling: Transient retrograde amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Jayaraman, Anand; Chandramouli, BA

    2015-01-01

    Amnesia is an unusual and rare complication following endovascular coiling of intracranial aneurysms. We present a case of anterior communicating artery (ACOM) aneurysm in which the patient developed retrograde amnesia following endovascular coiling of the aneurysm. On imaging there was infarct involving bilateral fornices. The patient showed significant clinical improvement on follow up. PMID:26246104

  11. Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Endovascularly Treated Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Pyysalo, L.M.; Keski-Nisula, L.H.; Niskakangas, T.T.; Kähärä, V.J.; Öhman, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Long-term follow-up studies after endovascular treatment for intracranial aneurysm are still rare and inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term clinical and angiographic outcome of patients with endovascularly treated aneurysms. The clinical outcome of all 185 patients with endovascularly treated aneurysms were analyzed and 77 out of 122 surviving patients were examined with MRI and MRA nine to 16 years (mean 11 years) after the initial endovascular treatment. Sixty-three patients were deceased at the time of follow-up. The cause of death was aneurysm-related in 34 (54ċ) patients. The annual rebleeding rate from the treated aneurysms was 1.3% in the ruptured group and 0.1% in the unruptured group. In long-term follow-up MRA 18 aneurysms (53%) were graded as complete, 11 aneurysms (32%) had neck remnants and five aneurysms (15%) were incompletely occluded in the ruptured group. The occlusion grade was lower in the unruptured group with 20 aneurysms (41%) graded as complete, 11 (22%) had neck remnants and 18 (37%) were incomplete. However, only three aneurysms were unstable during the follow-up period and needed retreatment. Endovascular treatment of unruptured aneurysms showed incomplete angiographic outcome in 37% of cases. However, the annual bleeding rate was as low as 0.1%. Endovascular treatment of ruptured aneurysms showed incomplete angiographic outcome in 15% of cases and the annual rebleeding rate was 1,3%. PMID:20977853

  12. Mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with an apical aneurysm caused by vasospastic angina.

    PubMed

    Kiyooka, Takahiko; Satoh, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-20

    Mid-ventricular obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (MVOHCM) is a rare form of cardiomyopathy, characterized by the presence of a pressure gradient between the left ventricular basal and apical chambers and is frequently associated with an apical aneurysm. However, the exact cause of this aneurysm remains unknown. We here describe a patient with MVOHCM in whom the apical aneurysm may be caused by vasospastic angina.

  13. Echocardiographic and Doppler characteristics of postoperative ductal aneurysm in a dog.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Julien; Nicolle, Audrey P; Chetboul, Valérie; Behr, Luc; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    A patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) was detected in a 10-month-old Pyrenean Shepherd. The PDA was occluded with hemostatic clips. One month after surgery, an aneurysmal dilatation of the ductus was diagnosed using Doppler echocardiography. The authors present the echo-Doppler findings and the follow-up of the ductus aneurysm. The pathogenesis and significance of such an aneurysm are discussed.

  14. Balloon-Assisted Coil Embolization for Large-Necked Renal Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Mounayer, Charbel; Aymard, Armand; Saint-Maurice, Jean-Pierre; Chapot, Rene; Merland, Jean-Jacques; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2000-03-15

    An aneurysm of the right renal artery was discovered in a patient suffering from cerebral arterial angiodysplasia and arterial hypertension. The aneurysm was large necked, which made selective endovascular treatment very difficult. To perform the embolization of the aneurysm, a balloon remodelling technique was used. This prevented migration of coils within the arterial lumen.

  15. [The role of intraoperative flowmetry in surgery of cerebral aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Shekhtman, O D; Éliava, Sh Sh; Shakhnovich, V A; Pilipenko, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the study was to assess the capabilities of intraoperative ultrasonic flowmetry in cerebral aneurysm surgery for prevention and immediate correction of cerebral ischemia. Ultrasonic flowmeter (Model HT313/323, "ransonic Systems Inc.", USA) was used during surgery in patients with complicated, large and giant aneurysms for evaluation of cerebral blood flow in main arteries (internal carotid, anterior and middle cerebral) and their branches (branches of M2-M3 and A2 segments). The series included 20 adult patients (13 male and 7 female) operated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgery Institute during 2008-2011 years. Mean age was 47.4 +/- 8.6 years. Giant aneurysms (> 2.5 cm) were present in 12 (60%) patients, large (1.5-2.5 cm)--in 5 (25%). Aneurysms of internal carotid artery were found in 8 cases. 1 female patient was operated on giant aneurysm of anterior cerebral--anterior communicating artery. In 4 (20%) cases significant alterations of blood flow were registered after clipping (> 25% according to initial), the changes were not visible. This allowed to correct the position of clips. In 2 surgeries ('low' paraclinoid aneurysms) the collateral flow was sufficient during temporary clipping, this allowed trapping of aneurysms with good neurological outcome. In 3 cases flowmeter was used to evaluate blood flow after extracranial-intracranial bypass. Ultrasonic flowmetry is a simple, reproducible and safe technique for intraoperative assessment of blood flow. Despite visual sufficiency of arteries flowmetry allows detection of surgically significant alterations of blood flow after clipping. PMID:22066255

  16. Endovascular treatment of unruptured posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Ge, Huijian; Jin, Hengwei; He, Hongwei; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Endovascular treatment of unruptured posterior circulation intracranial aneurysms (UPCIAs) is limited in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA). The aim of this study is to evaluate the periprocedural morbidity, mortality, and midterm clinical and angiographic follow-ups of endovascular treatment of UPCIAs. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all patients treated in a 2-year period (89 patients: 10–78 years of age, mean: 45.5 ± 14.3/92 UPCIAs). Fifty-eight aneurysms were found incidentally, 12 in association with mass effect symptoms and 22 with stroke. Results: A clinical improvement or stable outcome was achieved in 84 patients (94.4%). The two cases of permanent morbidity included a patient with paralysis and another patient with hemianopia. One patient died after treatment of a giant fusiform vertebrobasilar aneurysm. In one patient, the aneurysm ruptured during treatment, resulting in death. Another patient suffered a fatal aneurysm rupture 4 days after treatment. Giant size (P = 0.005) and mass effect presentation (P = 0.029) were independent predictors of unfavorable outcomes in UPCIAs. Angiographic follow-up was available in 76 of the 86 surviving patients (88.4%) with a mean of 6.8 months (range: 1–36 months). Recanalization in six patients (7.9%) at 3 months, 4 months, 4 months, 24 months, and 36 months required retreatment in three patients. In-stent stenosis of >50% was found in three patients. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy is an attractive option for UPCIAs with stable midterm outcome. However, the current endovascular option seems to have a limitation for the treatment of the aneurysm with giant size or mass effect presentation. PMID:27570378

  17. Hemodynamic Alterations after Stent Implantation in 15 Cases of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Tian, Zhongbin; Liu, Jian; Jing, Linkai; Paliwal, Nikhil; Wang, Shengzhang; Zhang, Ying; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui; Yang, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Stent-assisted coiling technology has been widely used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. In current study, we investigated the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic alterations after stent implantation and its association with aneurysm location. Methods We first retrospectively studied 15 aneurysm cases (8 internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery (ICA-OphA) aneurysms and 7 posterior communicating artery (PcoA) aneurysms) treated with Enterprise stents and coils. Then based on patient-specific geometries before and after stenting, we built virtual stenting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation models. Results Before and after stent deployment, the average Wall Shear Stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal sac at systolic peak changed from 7.04 Pa (4.14 Pa, 15.77 Pa) to 6.04 Pa (3.86 Pa, 11.13 Pa), P = 0.001; and the spatially averaged value of flow velocity in the perpendicular plane of aneurysm dropped from 0.5 m/s (0.28 m/s, 0.7 m/s) to 0.33 m/s (0.25 m/s, 0.49 m/s), P = 0.001, respectively. Post-stent implantation, WSS in ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms decreased by 14.4% (P = 0.012) and 16.6% (P = 0.018) respectively, and flow velocity also reduced by 10.3% (P = 0.029) and 10.5% (P = 0.013), respectively. Changes in WSS, flow velocity, and pressure were not significantly different between ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms (P > 0.05). Stent implantation did not significantly change the peak systolic pressure in both aneurysm types. Conclusion After stent implantation, intra-aneurysmal flow velocity and WSS decreased independent of aneurysm type (ICA-OphA and PcoA). Little change was observed on peak systolic pressure. PMID:26746828

  18. Coronary artery aneurysms and ectasia: role of coronary CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Zamudio, Mariana; Bacilio-Pérez, Ulises; Herrera-Zarza, Mary C; Meave-González, Aloha; Alexanderson-Rosas, Erick; Zambrana-Balta, Greby F; Kimura-Hayama, Eric T

    2009-11-01

    Coronary artery dilatations-aneurysms and ectasia-are an uncommon and frequently unrecognized incidental finding in patients with coronary artery disease. Aneurysms and ectasia are associated with a vast group of disorders, and the evaluation and characterization of coronary aneurysms and ectasia represent a great diagnostic task with clinical and therapeutic implications. The underlying etiology is variable and includes degenerative, congenital, inflammatory, infectious, toxic, and traumatic causes. Unlike aneurysms, ectasia is more frequently seen in association with atherosclerosis or as a compensatory mechanism in those cases in which a proximal stenosis is noted in the opposite coronary artery; ectasia is also seen in some coronary artery anomalies, such as anomalous origin from the pulmonary artery, or as a result of a high-flow state, as seen in coronary artery fistulas. The diagnostic approach depends on the clinical scenario, and nowadays, noninvasive evaluation with multidetector computed tomography is possible. Imaging assessment should include evaluation of (a) the distribution, (b) maximal diameter, (c) presence or absence of intraluminal thrombi, (d) number, (e) extension, and (f) associated complications such as myocardial infarction. This article presents an overview of the definition, classification, etiology, clinical manifestations, and potential complications of coronary artery aneurysms and ectasia.

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: recent experience with 210 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, R. J.; Gurry, J. F.; Kellam, J. F.; Wilson, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    In the 6 1/2 years ending June 1977, 210 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent operation at Toronto Western Hospital; 160 aneurysms (76%) were unruptured and 50 (24%) were ruptured. In the patients with unruptured aneurysms the mean age was 68 years; the oldest was 91, and 12 were more than 80 years of age. The overall hospital mortality was 5.6%. Death in hospital occurred in 1 (1.2%) of the 83 asymptomatic patients, 4 (7.4%) of the 54 symptomatic patients and 4 (17.0%) of the 23 patients for whom operation was considered urgent. In the patients with ruptured aneurysms the mean age was 71 years; the oldest was 90, and five were more than 80 years of age. The overall hospital mortality was 54%. The morbidity and mortality were analysed; in particular the reasons for the markedly variable hazard of operations for the three categories of unruptured aneurysm were sought. The surgical literature is confusing because of the interchanging use of the words unruptured, elective and symptomless. The current philosophy management and technique of operation in a large cardiovascular surgery service with many trainees are presented and a plea is made for a standardized and simplified operation, always performed with three assistants helping the operating surgeon. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:348287

  20. Operative treatment of aneurysms and Coanda effect: a working hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J L; Roberts, A

    1972-12-01

    The Coanda effect has been known to mechanical engineers for many decades. Consideration of this effect both by a neurosurgeon and a mechanical engineer revealed that it might be of importance during the operative treatment of intracranial aneurysms. If a jet effect were produced in the stream of blood after clipping an aneurysm, most of the flow of blood might be directed down only one limb of a bifurcation occurring in a vessel near to a clipped aneurysm. Blood might also be entrained from the other limb of the bifurcation. This boundary wall effect, which can occur without the rate of flow through the vessel being altered appreciably, could explain some of the unfortunate sequelae of aneurysm surgery which occur in the absence of any obvious cause such as postoperative thrombosis, etc. A possible mechanism for some of the complications after gradual occlusion of the common carotid artery in the neck is also proposed on this basis. Other details of how this data might be of clinical significance, together with suggestions for how to avoid fluidic effects during aneurysm surgery, are presented. PMID:4647852