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  1. Endovascular aneurysm repair: state-of-art imaging techniques for preoperative planning and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Truijers, M; Resch, T; Van Den Berg, J C; Blankensteijn, J D; Lönn, L

    2009-08-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) represents one of the greatest advances in vascular surgery over the past 50 years. In contrast to conventional aneurysm repair, EVAR requires accurate preoperative imaging and stringent postoperative surveillance. Duplex ultrasound (DUS), transesophageal echocardiography, intravascular ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), each provide useful information for patient selection, choice of endograft type and surveillance. Today most interventionists and surgeons will rely on CT or MR to assess aortic morphology, evaluate access artery patency and locate side branch orifices. However, recent developments in cross-sectional imaging, including advanced image postprocessing, multi-modality image fusion and new contrast agents have resulted in improved spatial resolution for preoperative planning. Advanced reconstruction algorithms, like dynamic CTA and MRA, provide valuable information on dynamic changes in aneurysm morphology that might have an important impact on endograft selection. During follow-up, imaging of the graft and aneurysm is of utmost importance to identify patients in need of secondary intervention. This has led to rigorous follow-up protocols including duplex ultrasound and regular CT examinations. The use of these intense follow-up protocols has recently been questioned because of high radiation dose and the frequent use of nephrotoxic contrast agents. New imaging modalities like contrast enhanced DUS, dynamic MR and dual-source CT could reduce radiation dose and obviate the need for nephrotoxic contrast. Up-to-date knowledge of non-invasive vascular imaging and image processing is crucial for EVAR planning and is essential for the development of follow-up programs involving reduced risk of harmful side effects.

  2. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  3. Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other parts of the body (the aorta). Aortic aneurysms can occur in the area below the stomach ( ... or in the chest (thoracic aneurysms). An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is usually located below the kidneys. In ...

  4. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, M G A; Lloyd, G M; Bown, M J; Fishwick, G; London, N J; Sayers, R D

    2007-01-01

    The operative mortality following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has not fallen significantly over the past two decades. Since its inception in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided an alternative to open AAA repair and perhaps an opportunity to improve operative mortality. Two recent large randomised trials have demonstrated the short and medium term benefit of EVAR over open AAA repair, although data on the long term efficacy of the technique are still lacking. This review aimed at providing an overview of EVAR and a discussion of the potential benefits and current limitations of the technique. PMID:17267674

  5. Techniques in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Phade, Sachin V.; Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVARs) has revolutionized the treatment of aortic aneurysms, with over half of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs performed endoluminally each year. Since the first endografts were placed two decades ago, many changes have been made in graft design, operative technique, and management of complications. This paper summarizes modern endovascular grafts, considerations in preoperative planning, and EVAR techniques. Specific areas that are addressed include endograft selection, arterial access, sheath delivery, aortic branch management, graft deployment, intravascular ultrasonography, pressure sensors, management of endoleaks and compressed limbs, and exit strategies. PMID:22121487

  6. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → ... You had a brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a weak area in the wall of a blood vessel that bulges or balloons out. Once it reaches a certain size, it ...

  7. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  8. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  9. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Kische, Stephan; Rehders, Tim C.; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Rauchhaus, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition with structural weakness of the aortic wall, which can progress to arterial dilatation and rupture. Today, both an increasing awareness of vascular disease and the access to tomographic imaging facilitate the diagnosis of TAA even in an asymptomatic stage. The risk of rupture for untreated aneurysms beyond a diameter of 5.6 cm ranges from 46% to 74% and the two-year mortality rate is greater than 70%, with most deaths resulting from rupture. Treatment options include surgical and non-surgical repair to prevent aneurysm enlargement and rupture. While most cases of ascending aortic involvement are subject to surgical repair (partially with valve-preserving techniques), aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta are amenable to emerging endovascular techniques as an alternative to classic open repair or to a hybrid approach (combining debranching surgery with stent grafting) in an attempt to improve outcomes. PMID:22419919

  10. Renal interventions during endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Renal insufficiency is a risk factor for mortality and morbidity during endovascular aneurysm repair. Multiple changes in practice have occurred to mitigate renal injury and renal dysfunction. Transrenal fixation does carry an increased risk of a decline in renal function in the medium term. Renal stenting for athero-occlusive disease during endovascular aneurysm repair needs careful consideration, as indications have changed and there are unexpected consequences with early vessel occlusion. The growing number of renal interventions during complex endovascular aneurysm repair with the advent of chimney snorkel/periscope techniques and the introduction of fenestrated grafts has shown the resilience of the intervention with relatively low renal issues (approximately 10%), but has also illustrated the need for additional device development.

  11. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutakis, Dean J; Zammert, Martin; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Belkin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is an important technique in the vascular surgeon's armamentarium, which has created a seismic shift in the management of aortic pathology over the past two decades. In comparison to traditional open repair, the endovascular approach is associated with significantly improved perioperative morbidity and mortality. The early survival benefit of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is sustained up to 3 years postoperatively, but longer-term life expectancy remains poor regardless of operative modality. Nonetheless, most abdominal aortic aneurysms are now repaired using endovascular stent grafts. The technology is not perfect as several postoperative complications, namely endoleak, stent-graft migration, and graft limb thrombosis, can develop and therefore lifelong imaging surveillance is required. In addition, a postoperative inflammatory response has been documented after endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms; the clinical significance of this finding has yet to be determined. Subsequently, the safety and applicability of endovascular stent grafts are likely to improve and expand with the introduction of newer-generation devices and with the simplification of fenestrated systems. PMID:27650343

  12. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Current and Future Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, R. J. Ivancev, K.

    2008-05-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has rapidly expanded since its introduction in the early 1990s. Early experiences were associated with high rates of complications including conversion to open repair. Perioperative morbidity and mortality results have improved but these concerns have been replaced by questions about long-term durability. Gradually, too, these problems have been addressed. Challenges of today include the ability to roll out the endovascular technique to patients with adverse aneurysm morphology. Fenestrated and branch stent-graft technology is in its infancy. Only now are we beginning to fully understand the advantages, limitations, and complications of such technology. This paper outlines some of the concepts and discusses the controversies and challenges facing clinicians involved in endovascular aneurysm surgery today and in the future.

  13. Juxtarenal aortic aneurysm: endoluminal transfemoral repair?

    PubMed

    Ferko, A; Krajina, A; Jon, B; Lesko, M; Voboril, Z; Zizka, J; Eliás, P

    1997-01-01

    Endoluminal transfemoral repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by a stent graft placement requires a segment of the nondilated infrarenal aorta of at least 15 mm long for safe stent graft attachment. The possibility of endoluminal treatment of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with partially covered spiral Z stent was assessed in experiment and in three clinical cases. In the experiment, the noncovered spiral Z stent was placed into the abdominal aorta, across the origins of renal arteries and mesenteric arteries, in six dogs. In the clinical cases, a partially covered stent graft was attached in 3 patients with the juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (of the group of 12 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm). The stent grafts were attached with proximal uncovered parts across the origins of the renal arteries. In experiment, the renal artery occlusions or stenoses were not observed 36 months after stent placement, and in clinic, 3 patients with the juxtarenal aortic aneurysm were successfully treated by stent graft placement. There were no signs of flow impairment into the renal arteries 14 months after stent graft implantation. This approach can possibly expand the indications for endoluminal grafting in the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms in patients who are at high risk for surgery.

  14. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in HIV Patients with Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm and Low CD4

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saritphat; Arworn, Supapong; Reanpang, Termpong

    2016-01-01

    We report two HIV infected patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm by using endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. A 59-year-old Thai man had a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and a 57-year-old man had a ruptured iliac artery aneurysm. Both patients had a CD4 level below 200 μ/L indicating a low immune status at admission. They were treated by EVAR. Neither patient had any complications in 3 months postoperatively. EVAR may have a role in HIV patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm together with very low immunity. PMID:27703834

  15. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  16. Endovascular Repair of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an assessment on endovascular repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). Clinical Need Aneurysm is the most common condition of the thoracic aorta requiring surgery. Aortic aneurysm is defined as a localized dilatation of the aorta. Most aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are asymptomatic and incidentally discovered. However, TAA tends to enlarge progressively and compress surrounding structures causing symptoms such as chest or back pain, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), dyspnea (shortness of breath), cough, stridor (a harsh, high-pitched breath sound), and hoarseness. Significant aortic regurgitation causes symptoms of congestive heart failure. Embolization of the thrombus to the distal arterial circulation may occur and cause related symptoms. The aneurysm may eventually rupture and create a life-threatening condition. The overall incidence rate of TAA is about 10 per 100,000 person-years. The descending aorta is involved in about 30% to 40% of these cases. The prognosis of large untreated TAAs is poor, with a 3-year survival rate as low as 25%. Intervention is strongly recommended for any symptomatic TAA or any TAA that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal aorta or is 6 cm or larger. Open surgical treatment of TAA involves left thoracotomy and aortic graft replacement. Surgical treatment has been found to improve survival when compared with medical therapy. However, despite dramatic advances in surgical techniques for performing such complex operations, operative mortality from centres of excellence are between 8% and 20% for elective cases, and up to 50% in patients requiring emergency operations. In addition, survivors of open surgical repair of TAAs may suffer from severe complications. Postoperative or postprocedural complications of descending TAA repair include paraplegia, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory failure, renal failure, and intestinal ischemia. The Technology Endovascular aortic aneurysm

  17. [Transient delayed paraplegia after repair of thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Martín Torrijos, M; Aguilar Lloret, C; Ariño Irujo, J J; Serrano Hernando, F J; López Timoneda, F

    2013-11-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysm requires multidisciplinary management due to its complexity both in surgical technique and anesthetic considerations. One of the most feared postoperative complication is spinal cord ischemia. It can be presented as different clinical patterns, and its recovery may be partial or complete. The postoperative management of spinal cord ischemia is mainly based on techniques to increase spinal cord perfusion, above all, hemodynamic stability and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. We present two cases of delayed paraplegia after an open repair of a thoracoabdominal aneurysm and a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm repair using an endovascular stent graft. They both had a complete neurological recovery after cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

  18. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  19. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Chaikof, Elliot L.; Lin, Peter H.; Brinkman, William T.; Dodson, Thomas F.; Weiss, Victor J.; Lumsden, Alan B.; Terramani, Thomas T.; Najibi, Sasan; Bush, Ruth L.; Salam, Atef A.; Smith, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    Objective The impact of co-morbid conditions on early and late clinical outcomes after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was assessed in concurrent cohorts of patients stratified with respect to risk for intervention. Summary Background Data As a minimally invasive strategy for the treatment of AAA, endovascular repair has been embraced with enthusiasm for all prospective patients who are suitable anatomical candidates because of the promise of achieving a durable result with a reduced risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Methods From April 1994 to March 2001, endovascular AAA repair was performed in 236 patients using commercially available systems. A subset of patients considered at increased risk for intervention (n = 123) were categorized, as such, based on a preexisting history of ischemic coronary artery disease, with documentation of myocardial infarction (60%) or congestive heart failure (35%), or due to the presence of chronic obstructive disease (21%), liver disease, or malignancy. Results Perioperative mortality (30-day) was 6.5% in the increased-risk patients as compared to 1.8% among those classified as low risk (P = NS). There was no difference between groups in age (74 ± 9 years vs. 72 ± 6 years; mean ± SD), surgical time (235 ± 95 minutes vs. 219 ± 84 minutes), blood loss (457 ± 432 mL vs. 351 ± 273 mL), postoperative hospital stay (4.8 ± 3.4 days vs. 4.0 ± 3.9 days), or days in the ICU (1.3 ± 1.8 days vs. 0.5 ± 1.6 days). Patients at increased risk of intervention had larger aneurysms than low-risk patients (59 ± 13 mm vs. 51 ± 14 mm;P < .05). Stent grafts were successfully implanted in 116 (95%) increased-risk versus 107 (95%) low-risk patients (P = NS). Conversion rates to open operative repair were similar in increased-risk and low-risk groups at 3% and 5%, respectively. The initial endoleak rate was 22% versus 20%, based on the first CT performed (either at discharge or 1 month;P = NS). To date

  20. Repair of multiple mycotic aortic aneurysms in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Esper, E; Krabill, K A; St Cyr, J A; Patton, C; Foker, J E

    1993-12-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic and common and internal iliac artery mycotic aneurysms resulted from an umbilical arterial catheter in a 3 1/2-week-old boy. He underwent staged repair including an 8-mm Gore-tax tube graft, primary repair of the common iliac artery aneurysm, and resection of the internal iliac aneurysm. His operative and postoperative course was uneventful. He was asymptomatic at 17 months' follow-up, with equal blood pressure in the upper and lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no stenoses or recurrent aneurysms at the anastomotic sites of the Gore-tex tube graft. Blood supply to his left leg came from collaterals, principally a large crossing vessel from the right iliac artery. This case represents the first successful aortic replacement in a 5 week old with extensive involvement of the thoracoabdominal aorta and its branch vessels. PMID:8301488

  1. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  2. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  3. Considerations for patients undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Lee, Jason T

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has taken over open surgery as the primary strategy for treatment of patients with abdominal and thoracic aneurysms. The minimally invasive nature of these techniques requires alterations in preoperative workup, intraoperative management, and familiarity with unique complications that can occur. Familiarity from the anesthetic standpoint of endovascular techniques, including treatment of patients with fenestrated, chimney, snorkel, and periscope grafts, is necessary for the contemporary cardiac anesthesiologist.

  4. Fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a less invasive option for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the predominant surgical therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Whereas anatomical limitations had become the major contraindication to endovascular treatment, fenestrated stent grafts were developed to overcome such obstacles. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair now provides an additional treatment option for patients felt to be unsuitable for an invasive open repair whose anatomy is not compatible with more traditional stent grafts. We review the evolution of fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and compare its safety and efficacy to other endovascular options.

  5. Unique Technique for Open Surgical Repair after Failed Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with Proximal Anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, Satoshi; Hirota, Jun; Mori, Kazuki; Shuto, Takashi; Okamoto, Keitaro; Sato, Aiko; Wada, Tomoyuki; Anai, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has revolutionized the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), with lower perioperative morbidity and mortality compared to conventional surgical repair. However, late secondary re-interventions after EVAR are still needed before aneurysm rupture in many cases. A patient with impending rupture of an AAA associated with a type I endoleak 7 years after EVAR who was successfully treated with a unique technique of fixation of the proximal aortic neck taking into account the structure of the stent graft is reported. This technique offers a safe solution to late open conversion after failed EVAR. PMID:27375808

  6. Unique Technique for Open Surgical Repair after Failed Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with Proximal Anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Jun; Mori, Kazuki; Shuto, Takashi; Okamoto, Keitaro; Sato, Aiko; Wada, Tomoyuki; Anai, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has revolutionized the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), with lower perioperative morbidity and mortality compared to conventional surgical repair. However, late secondary re-interventions after EVAR are still needed before aneurysm rupture in many cases. A patient with impending rupture of an AAA associated with a type I endoleak 7 years after EVAR who was successfully treated with a unique technique of fixation of the proximal aortic neck taking into account the structure of the stent graft is reported. This technique offers a safe solution to late open conversion after failed EVAR. PMID:27375808

  7. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the octogenarian.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, William T; Terramani, Thomas T; Najibi, Sasan; Weiss, Victor J; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Smith, Robert B; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze patient outcomes following endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EAR) among patients 80 years of age or older. In this study, reporting standards of the Ad Hoc Committee for Standardized Reporting Practices for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair of the Society of Vascular Surgery/American Association for Vascular Surgery (SVS/AAVS) were followed. Between August 8, 1996 and February 12, 2001 EAR was performed in 31 patients (29 male and 2 female) with an average age of 83 +/- 3 years and an average maximum aneurysm diameter of 59 +/- 7 mm. Overall technical success was 90% (28/31) with a single acute conversion and a 6% (2/32) incidence of major morbidity. There were no in-hospital deaths, but two patients (6%) died within 30 days of intervention. Four endoleaks, two type I and two type II, were observed within the first 30 days after endograft implantation and three new type II endoleaks were noted after implant periods that exceeded 1 month. Average follow-up was 16 months, with a single aneurysm-related death that occurred after late conversion to open repair, 2 years following initial endovascular treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed 3-, 12-, and 24-month estimated survivals of 93% (+/-5), 75% (+/-8), and 68% (+/-10), respectively. Clinical success rates were 90% (+/-5), 90% (+/-5), and 72% (+/-17) at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively. We conclude that, in the octogenarian with mild to moderate medical comorbidities, endovascular aneurysm repair provides an alternative to open AAA repair with low operative morbidity and good clinical success rates. Elevated SVS/AAVS medical comorbidity scores were not associated with increased operative mortality rates, but they did show a trend toward decreased mid-term survival. Careful consideration of life expectancy and the probability of rupture, as with traditional AAA repair, should dictate necessity for intervention. PMID:15175935

  8. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  9. [Late conversions following endoprosthetic repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, E L; Sadriev, O N

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a review of the literature concerning late open conversions after endoprosthetic repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms, followed by analyzing the data on frequency and terms of performing late conversions, indications, options of surgical technique, lethality, and remote results. PMID:27626267

  10. Management of a dislocated endovascular aneurysm repair in a challenging giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Geers, Joachim; Daenen, Geert; Stabel, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Introduction A case report of a contained rupture of an abdominal aneurysm, treated by endovascular technique (EVAR), but complicated by perioperative endoprosthesis limb dislocation. Case report An 81-year old male presented at the emergency department with a contained rupture of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and bilateral extensive iliac aneurysmatic disease. Open repair was no option, due to the pulmonary condition. The patient was prepped for an emergency EVAR. After placing a bifurcated endoprosthesis, angiography revealed a type IIIa endoleak, due to a dislocation between two left iliac extensions. We converted to a right-sided aorto-uni-iliac endoprosthesis with a femorofemoral bypass. A postoperative CT-scan showed a complete exclusion of the aneurysm, a patent aorto-uni-iliac endoprosthesis and a femorofemoral bypass without an endoleak. Discussion EVAR is feasible with a hostile neck AAA, even in a ruptured AAA. In large AAA, one should consider an overlap larger than suggested in the instructions for use. PMID:27385140

  11. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  12. Endovascular vs. Open Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Moris, Demetrios; Karaolanis, Georgios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are most often treated with open repair despite the fact that endovascular aneurysm repair is a less invasive and widely accepted method with clear benefits for elective aortic aneurysm patients. A debate exists regarding the definitive benefit in endovascular repair for patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aim of this literature review was to determine if any trends exist in favor of either open or endovascular repair. Material/Methods A literature search was performed using PUBMED, OVID, and Google Scholar databases. The search yielded 64 publications. Results Out of 64 publications, 25 were retrospective studies, 12 were population-based, 21 were prospective, 5 were the results of RCTs, and 1 was a case-series. Sixty-one studies reported on early mortality and provided data comparing endovascular repair (rEVAR) and open repair (rOR) for ruptured abdominal aneurysm groups. Twenty-nine of these studies reported that rEVAR has a lower early mortality rate. Late mortality after rEVAR compared to that of rOR was reported in 21 studies for a period of 3 to 60 months. Results of 61.9% of the studies found no difference in late mortality rates between these 2 groups. Thirty-nine publications reported on the incidence of complications. Approximately half of these publications support that the rEVAR group has a lower complication rate and the other half found no difference between the groups. Length of hospital stay has been reported to be shorter for rEVAR in most studies. Blood loss and need for transfusion of either red cells or fresh frozen plasma was consistently lower in the rEVAR group. Conclusions Differences between the included publications affect the outcomes. Randomized control trials have not been able to provide clear conclusions. rEVAR can now be considered a safe method of treating rAAA, and is at least equal to the well-established rOR method. PMID:27090791

  13. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  14. The outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in northern Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, M N; Yeoh, K C; Gooi, B H; Lim, S K

    2003-08-01

    A prospective study of all infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs both as electives and emergencies in Penang between January 1997 to December 2000 is presented. The objectives of the study were to determine the age, gender, racial distribution of the patients, the incidence, and risk factors and to summarize treatments undertaken and discuss the outcome. Among the races, the Malays were the most common presenting with infrarenal AAA. The mean age of patients operated was 68.5 years. Males were more commonly affected compared to females (12:1). Most infrarenal AAA repairs were performed as emergency operations, 33 cases (61.1%) compared to electives, 21 cases (38.9%). Total survival was 70.3% (elective 85.7%; emergency 57.6%). Mortality rate was 31.5% and the primary reason is the lack of operating time available for urgent operation and for treatment of concurrent disease states. Mycotic aneurysm with its triad of abdominal pain, fever and abdominal mass resulted in a significantly higher mortality (46.6%). Ninety six percent of the infrarenal AAA had transverse diameter greater than 6 cm. Morphologically 90.7% were fusiform AAA rather than saccular aneurysm (9.3%). Pulmonary complications (35.2%) were more common than cardiac complications (11.1%) possibly related to the urgent nature of the operation, smoking or history of pulmonary tuberculosis. Bleeding (14.8%) was the most common cause of mortality in ruptured mycotic infrarenal AAA.

  15. Custom Fenestration Templates for Endovascular Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leotta, Daniel F.; Starnes, Benjamin W.

    2015-01-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from CT images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a 3D printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient’s aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after removing the sleeve. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally-invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients. PMID:25864045

  16. Custom fenestration templates for endovascular repair of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Starnes, Benjamin W

    2015-06-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from computed tomography images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a three-dimensional printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient's aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after the sleeve is removed. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients. PMID:25864045

  17. Late iliac artery aneurysms and occlusive disease after aortic tube grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A 35-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, D; Hallett, J W; Ballard, D J; Naessens, J M; Cherry, K J; Gloviczki, P; Pairolero, P C

    1991-01-01

    Controversy continues over whether patients treated with straight Dacron aortic tube grafts for an abdominal aortic aneurysm remain at significant risk for subsequent development of iliac aneurysm or occlusive disease. To address this issue, the authors performed a population-based analysis of 432 patients who had an abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed between 1951 and 1984. Aneurysm repair was performed eventually in 206 patients (48%). To ascertain differences in late development of graft-related complications, iliac aneurysms, and arterial occlusions, the authors compared all tube-graft patients with similar numbers of bifurcated-graft patients matched for age and year of operation. In the tube-graft group, no subsequent clinically evident or autopsy-proven iliac aneurysms or iliac occlusive disease were noted. Over a mean follow-up of 6 years (range, 4 to 18 years), new aortic aneurysms occurred in the proximal aorta in both tube and bifurcated-graft patients (5.0% and 2.5%, respectively). In contrast the cumulative incidence of graft-related complications was higher with a bifurcated prosthesis (12.8%) compared with a straight graft (5.0%) (p = 0.15). These problems generally occurred 5 to 15 years postoperatively and emphasize the need for long-term graft surveillance. The authors conclude that straight tube-grafts for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms provide excellent late patency with minimal risk of subsequent iliac aneurysm development. PMID:1835832

  18. Surveillance Imaging Following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nirnimesh; Litt, Harold I.

    2015-01-01

    There is a significant risk of complication following endovascular abdominal repair (EVAR), including endoleak, graft translocation, thrombosis, and infection. Surveillance imaging is important for detecting EVAR complication. Surveillance modalities include conventional X-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and conventional angiography, with inherent advantages and drawbacks to each modality. The authors present common complications following EVAR, and recent advances in the key modalities for surveillance. PMID:26327742

  19. Redo-EVAR After Surgical Repair in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Bozok, Şahin; Ozan Karakişi, Sedat; Ergene, Şaban; Tufekçi, Nebiye; Ilhan, Gökhan; Karamustafa, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an adequate means for treating infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). However, secondary interventions are required in approximately 15% to 20% of patients. The aim of this paper was to report our knowledge with stent grafts in secondary interventions after EVAR in a 73-year-old patient. One of the exceptional complications of EVAR are endoleaks which may lead to expansion of aneurysm and rupture if not repaired. PMID:26702349

  20. The Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with the Chimney Technique for Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We collected our experience in the use of chimney technique with endovascular aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) for juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JAAs), and reviewed the outcomes. Methods: The patients who were treated with Ch-EVAR between January 2012 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) under general anesthesia. Femoral arterial access was obtained to place the main body of the endograft; brachial or axillary access was obtained to perform the placement of the chimney stent. Results: We treated 12 patients with 15 renal arteries using the Ch-EVAR procedure. Technical success was achieved in 11 of the 12 (91.6%) cases. Within the first 30 days of postoperative period, the target vessel patency rate was 93.3% (14 of 15 renal arteries). After a median follow-up period of 28 months, one patient required Ch-EVAR-related re-intervention due to a type Ia endoleak, and 13 of the 15 renal arteries were patent at the end of the follow-up period. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that Ch-EVAR can be completed with a high rate of success. Although early target vessel occlusion or early postoperative mortality might occur, Ch-EVAR could be an alternative treatment for JAA, especially in high risk patients. PMID:26961481

  1. Surgical Repair of an Asymptomatic Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jahangeer, Saleem; Anjum, Nadeem; O'Donnell, Aonghus; Doddakula, Kishore

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) is a rare finding, being mostly diagnosed on angiography or at autopsies. It is defined as being a dilation of the coronary artery that exceeds the diameter of the patient's largest coronary vessel by 1.5 to 2 times. Case Report We describe the operative correction of a giant right CAA measuring in excess of 10 cm. Conclusion Management of giant CAAs is not standardized and surgical strategy remains controversial. In our case, the patient has a successful surgical repair with no postoperative shunts on follow-up investigations. PMID:25360401

  2. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  3. Multiple endovascular aortic aneurysm repair graft failures and re-interventions over 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Belchos, Jessica; Wheatcroft, Mark; Moloney, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Re-intervention on abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular aortic aneurysm repair for complications such as endoleak, graft migration, and graft failure is relatively common. However, re-do endovascular aortic aneurysm repair can be complex, as the failed graft still resides within the vessel. In addition, some re-do endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs call for an advanced custom graft, which can further increase the complexity and technical skill required. We describe a case of a 15-year-old endovascular aortic aneurysm repair originally implanted in a 71-year-old man, followed by three separate complications requiring intervention. We describe important procedural decisions taken into consideration when presented with failure of an older graft. PMID:27489701

  4. Treatment of Hostile Proximal Necks During Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Tulio Pinho; Bernardes, Rodrigo de Castro; Procopio, Ricardo Jayme; Leite, Jose Oyama; Dardik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a therapy that continues to evolve rapidly as advances in technology are incorporated into new generations of devices and surgical practice. Although EVAR has emerged as a safe and effective treatment for patients with favorable anatomy, treatment of patients with unfavorable anatomy remains controversial and is still an off-label indication for endovascular treatment with some current stent-grafts. The proximal neck of the aneurysm remains the most hostile anatomic barrier to successful endovascular repair with long-term durability. Open surgery for unfavorable necks is still considered the gold standard treatment in contemporary practice, despite the increased mortality and morbidity attributed to suprarenal cross-clamping, particularly in high-risk patients. Evolving technology may overcome the obstacles preventing endovascular treatment of unfavorable proximal neck anatomy; current approaches include purely endovascular as well as hybrid approaches, and generally include strategies that either extend the length of the short neck, move the proximal neck more proximally, or keep the short neck intact. These approaches include the use of debranching techniques, banding, chimneys, fenestrated and branched devices, filling the sac with endobags, endoanchors, and other novel devices. These newer-generation devices appear to have promising short- and midterm results. However, lack of good evidence of efficacy with long-term results for these newer approaches still precludes wide dissemination of endovascular solutions for the hostile proximal neck. PMID:26798712

  5. Treatment of Hostile Proximal Necks During Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Tulio Pinho; Bernardes, Rodrigo de Castro; Procopio, Ricardo Jayme; Leite, Jose Oyama; Dardik, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a therapy that continues to evolve rapidly as advances in technology are incorporated into new generations of devices and surgical practice. Although EVAR has emerged as a safe and effective treatment for patients with favorable anatomy, treatment of patients with unfavorable anatomy remains controversial and is still an off-label indication for endovascular treatment with some current stent-grafts. The proximal neck of the aneurysm remains the most hostile anatomic barrier to successful endovascular repair with long-term durability. Open surgery for unfavorable necks is still considered the gold standard treatment in contemporary practice, despite the increased mortality and morbidity attributed to suprarenal cross-clamping, particularly in high-risk patients. Evolving technology may overcome the obstacles preventing endovascular treatment of unfavorable proximal neck anatomy; current approaches include purely endovascular as well as hybrid approaches, and generally include strategies that either extend the length of the short neck, move the proximal neck more proximally, or keep the short neck intact. These approaches include the use of debranching techniques, banding, chimneys, fenestrated and branched devices, filling the sac with endobags, endoanchors, and other novel devices. These newer-generation devices appear to have promising short- and midterm results. However, lack of good evidence of efficacy with long-term results for these newer approaches still precludes wide dissemination of endovascular solutions for the hostile proximal neck.

  6. Endovascular repair or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Badger, S A; Harkin, D W; Blair, P H; Ellis, P K; Kee, F; Forster, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) may improve outcomes for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The study aim was to compare the outcomes for eEVAR with conventional open surgical repair for the treatment of RAAA. Setting A systematic review of relevant publications was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing eEVAR with open surgical repair for RAAA were included. Participants 3 RCTs were included, with a total of 761 patients with RAAA. Interventions Meta-analysis was performed with fixed-effects models with ORs and 95% CIs for dichotomous data and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous data. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was short-term mortality. Secondary outcome measures included aneurysm-specific and general complication rates, quality of life and economic analysis. Results Overall risk of bias was low. There was no difference between the 2 interventions on 30-day (or in-hospital) mortality, OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.22; p=0.52). 30-day complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, composite cardiac complications, renal complications, severe bowel ischaemia, spinal cord ischaemia, reoperation, amputation and respiratory failure. Reporting was incomplete, and no robust conclusion was drawn. For complication outcomes that did include at least 2 studies in the meta-analysis, there was no clear evidence to support a difference between eEVAR and open repair. Longer term outcomes and cost per patient were evaluated in only a single study, thus precluding definite conclusions. Conclusions Outcomes between eEVAR and open repair, specifically 30-day mortality, are similar. However, further high-quality trials are required, as the paucity of data currently limits the conclusions. PMID:26873043

  7. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta.

  8. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  9. Endovascular management of bilateral superior intercostal artery aneurysms following late repair of coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Tapping, C R; Ettles, D F

    2011-08-01

    Endovascular management of massive bilateral superior intercostal artery aneurysms following late surgical repair of juxtaductal coarctation of the aorta is described in a 40-year-old male patient. Both aneurysms were successfully treated by coil embolisation without the need for further surgical intervention.

  10. Comparison of Costs of Endovascular Repair versus Open Surgical Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang Il; Min, Seung-Kee; Ahn, Sanghyun; Kim, Suh Min; Park, Daedo; Park, Taejin; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung; Ha, Jongwon; Kim, Sang Joon

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the hospital-related costs of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) treatment and cost structure between endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and open surgical repair (OSR) in Korean health care system. One hundred five primary elective AAA repairs (79 OSRs and 26 EVARs) performed in the Seoul National University Hospital from 2005 to 2009 were included. Patient characteristics were similar between two groups except for older age (P = 0.004) and more frequent history of malignancy (P = 0.031) in EVAR group. Thirty-day mortality rate was similar between two groups and there was no AAA-related mortality in both groups for 5 yr after repair. The total in-hospital costs for the index admission were significantly higher in EVAR patients (mean, KRW19,857,119) than OSR patients (mean KRW12,395,507) (P < 0.001). The reimbursement was also significantly higher in EVAR patients than OSR patients (mean, KRW14,071,081 vs KRW6,238,895, P < 0.001) while patients payments was comparable between two groups. EVAR patients showed higher follow-up cost up to 2 yr due to more frequent imaging studies and reinterventions for type II endoleaks (15.4%). In the perspective of cost-effectiveness, this study suggests that the determination of which method to be used in AAA treatment be more finely trimmed and be individualized. PMID:22468106

  11. Endovascular repair of a paraanastomotic aneurysm with inverted limb infrarenal bifurcated graft.

    PubMed

    Stringari, Carlo; Perkmann, Reinhold; Zaraca, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    A typical complication after conventional aortic prosthetic reconstruction is paraanastomotic aneurysm formation. Endovascular exclusion of paraanastomotic aneurysms has been shown to be a viable alternative to open surgical repair and to greatly reduce morbidity and mortality rates. We present a case report of asymptomatic proximal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm, measuring 4.5 cm in diameter, that was successfully treated by endovascular repair with a custom-made inverted limb infrarenal bifurcated graft.

  12. Endovascular management of a late saccular aortic aneurysm after end-to-end repair of coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kotoulas, Christophoros; Tzilalis, Vasileios; Spyridakis, Emmanouil; Mamareli, Ioannis

    2011-12-01

    Post-coarctation surgical repair aneurysm formation is observed rarely with end-to-end anastomosis technique. The redo surgery is associated with high mortality and morbidity rate. Although the minimal invasive method with stented grafts has been reported in only small number of patients, this could represent a valid alternative treatment. We present a case of successful endovascular treatment of a patient with a late post-coarctation repair saccular aneurysm.

  13. Late Sac Behavior after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Onohara, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimoe, Yasushi; Yamashita, Masafumi; Takahashi, Toshiki; Kishimoto, Jyunji; Mizuno, Akihiro; Kei, Junichi; Nakai, Mikizou; Sakaki, Masayuki; Suhara, Hitoshi; Kasashima, Fuminori; Endo, Masamitsu; Nishina, Takeshi; Furuyama, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masakazu; Iwata, Keiji; Marumoto, Akira; Urata, Yasuhisa; Sato, Katsutoshi; Ryugo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sac behavior after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is considered as a surrogate for the risk of late rupture. The purpose of the study is to assess the sac behavior of AAAs after EVAR. Methods and Results: Late sac enlargement (LSE) (≥5 mm) and late sac shrinkage (LSS) (≥5 mm) were analyzed in 589 consecutive patients who were registered at 14 national centers in Japan. The proportions of patients who had LSE at 1, 3 and 5 years were 2.6% ± 0.7%, 10.0% ± 1.6% and 19.0% ± 2.9%. The proportions of patients who had LSS at 1, 3 and 5 years were 50.1% ± 0.7%, 59.2% ± 2.3% and 61.7% ± 2.7%. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two variables as a risk factor for LSE; persistent endoleak (Odds ratio 9.56 (4.84–19.49), P <0.001) and low platelet count (Odds ratio 0.92 (0.86–0.99), P = 0.0224). The leading cause of endoleak in patients with LSE was type II. Conclusions: The incidence of LSE is not negligible over 5 year period. Patients with persistent endoleak and/or low platelet count should carefully be observed for LSE. Clinical Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR (UMIN000008345). PMID:27375803

  14. Preoperative Predictors of Long-Term Mortality after Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Saya; Kudo, Toshifumi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Akaza, Miho; Sasano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to clarify long-term mortality and its predictors in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and Methods: Patients with AAA who underwent elective EVAR at Tokyo Medical and Dental University hospital between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed. The patients’ data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: Sixty-four patients were identified for this study. In long-term follow-up, the survival rate was significantly lower in patients with high preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Patients with obstructive lung disease (FEV1/FVC <70%) or anemia tended to have a poorer prognosis but the association was not statistically significant. Age, concurrent hyperlipidemia, and blood pressure levels were not predictors of mortality rates. Discussion: High CRP level, COPD, and anemia reflect inflammation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of AAA. These inflammatory markers are predictors of long-term mortality after EVAR for AAA as well as for other diseases. Conclusions: A high preoperative CRP level was a predictor of increased long-term mortality in patients with AAA who underwent EVAR. No specific leading causes of death were identified for this increase in the mortality rate. PMID:27087872

  15. Hybrid repair of right aortic arch aneurysm with a Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koyu; Yoshitaka, Hidenori; Chikazawa, Genta; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Tamura, Kentaro

    2014-07-01

    We describe the case of a 74-year-old man who underwent a hybrid open and endovascular approach for repair of dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm of a right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum. Total debranching using a tailored quadrifurcated graft and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair for the transverse aortic lesion were performed. The procedures were successfully accomplished with complete exclusion of the aneurysm. This hybrid procedure for complex aortic arch disease may reduce perioperative complications compared to challenging conventional open approaches.

  16. Hybrid Decision Support System for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Follow-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Macía, Iván; Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; de Blas, Mariano

    An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm is an abnormal widening of the aortic vessel at abdominal level, and is usually diagnosed on the basis of radiological images. One of the techniques for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is Endovascular Repair. The long-term outcome of this surgery is usually difficult to predict in the absence of clearly visible signs, such as leaks, in the images. In this paper, we present a hybrid system that combines data extracted from radiological images and data extracted from the Electronic Patient Record in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm after the intervention. The results show that the system proposed by this approach yields valuable qualitative and quantitative information for follow-up of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm patients after Endovascular Repair.

  17. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) allows the exclusion of the dilated aneurismal segment of the aorta from the systematic circulation. The procedure requires, however, that the endograft extends to the healthy parts of the aorta above and below the aneurysm, yet the neck of a juxtarenal aortic aneurysm (JRA) is too short for a standard endovascular repair. Fenestrated endovascular aortic repair (f—EVAR) provides a solution to overcome this problem by enabling the continuation of blood flow to the renal and visceral arteries through holes or ‘fenestrations’ in the graft. These fenestrations are designed to match the ostial diameter of the renal and visceral arteries. There are three varieties fenestration, small, large, and scallop, and their location needs to be customized to fit the anatomy of the patient. If the device is not properly designed, if the alignment is inaccurate, or if the catheterization of the visceral arteries is not possible, the procedure may fail. In such cases, conversion to open surgery may become the only option as fenestrated endografts are not retrievable. It is recommended that a stent be placed within each small fenestration to the target artery to prevent shuttering of the artery or occlusion. Many authors have noted an increased risk of vessel occlusion in unstented fenestrations and scallops. Once placed in a patient, life-long follow-up at regular intervals is necessary to ensure the graft remains in its intended location, and that the components have adequate overlap. Should the need arise, routine follow-up allows the performance of timely and appropriate intervention through detection of events that could impact the long-term outcomes. Alternative Technology The technique of fenestrated endovascular grafting is still in evolution and few studies have been with published mid-term outcome data. As the technique become more common in vascular surgery practices, it will be important to

  18. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  19. A Case of Endovascular Treatment of Severe Graft Limb Kinking after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong-Beom; Park, Mi-Hwa; Jeong, Sang-Ho; Kwon, Sung Woo; Shin, Sung-Hee; Woo, Seong-Ill; Park, Sang-Don

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been recommended as an alternative to open aneurysm repair. The risk of severe perioperative complications is lower than that in open surgical repair; however, late complications are more likely. After EVAR, regular yearly surveillance by duplex ultrasonography or computed tomography is recommended. We report the case of a 67-year-old man with a severely kinked left iliac branch of the stent graft 10 years after EVAR. He had not undergone regular follow-up during the last 4 years. We realigned the endograft kink by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. PMID:27051658

  20. First long-term evidence supporting endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Muhs, Bart E; Dardik, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The traditional method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms with open surgical repair has been steadily replaced by endovascular repair, thought to be a more minimally invasive approach. It is not known, however, whether the endovascular approach is truly less invasive for operative physiology; in addition, this approach has a different spectrum of complications. As such, it is uncertain whether elective endovascular repair of nonruptured aortic aneurysms reduces long-term morbidity and mortality compared with traditional open approaches. In this article, the authors evaluate a recent publication investigating long-term outcomes of a prospective randomized multicenter trial evaluating patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms treated with either endovascular or open repair, and discuss the results in the context of current evidence. PMID:23570352

  1. The effect of anatomical factors on mortality rates after endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Derih, Ay; Burak, Erdolu; Gunduz, Yumun; Yumun, Aydin; Ahmet, Demir; Hakan, Ozkan; Osman, Tiryakioglu; Kamuran, Erkoc

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of anatomical characteristics on mortality rates after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods We investigated 56 EVAR procedures for infrarenal aortic aneurysms performed between January 2010 and December 2013, and the data were supplemented with a prospective review. The patients were divided into two groups according to the diameter of the aneurysm. Group I (n = 30): patients with aneurysm diameters less than 6 cm, group II (n = 26): patients with aneurysm diameters larger than 6 cm. The pre-operative anatomical data of the aneurysms were noted and the groups were compared with regard to postoperative results. Results There were no correlations between diameter of aneurysm (p > 0.05), aneurysm neck angle (p > 0.05) and mortality rate. The long-term mortality rate was found to be high in patients in whom an endoleak occurred. Conclusion We found that aneurysm diameter did not have an effect on postoperative mortality rates. An increased EuroSCORE value and the development of endoleaks had an effect on long-term mortality rates. PMID:26207946

  2. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm presenting as hoarseness: successful repair with an endovascular approach

    PubMed Central

    De Freitas, Simon; Connolly, Caoilfhionn; Neary, Colm; Sultan, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus is a rare finding, particularly in the adult population. These saccular aneurysms arise at the site of an incompletely obliterated ductus arteriosus along the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Left untreated, it is associated with a high risk of potentially life-threatening complications including rupture, infection and thromboembolism. As a result, surgical correction is recommended. Previously, options were limited to open repair but as endovascular experience grows, novel techniques afford safer and less invasive alternatives. In contrast, neonatal ductus arteriosus aneurysms may regress spontaneously and expectant treatment can be justified. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness secondary to a ductus arteriosus aneurysm; a diagnosis consistent with Ortner’s syndrome. The patient underwent an uncomplicated endovascular repair using the chimney-graft technique. PMID:27141045

  3. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  4. Novel repair of an external iliac vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, Arjun; Meissner, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Aneurysms involving the venous system are a rare entity. We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who presented to us with activity-limiting left gluteal pain and who on consequent workup was found to have a left external iliac vein aneurysm in a setting of iliocavomegaly. She underwent successful treatment of her aneurysm with a novel approach that involved staple plication and resection of the aneurysm over a balloon mandrel. We discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical technique adopted for the treatment of this uncommon condition. PMID:22704912

  5. Branched endograft repair of mycotic ascending aortic aneurysm using the snorkel technique.

    PubMed

    Quinney, Brenton Ellisor; Jordan, William

    2011-07-01

    Mycotic aneurysms are difficult clinical cases that can be approached by several methods. Debridement of infected tissue with in situ or extra-anatomic bypass is the traditional treatment. In poor operative candidates or reoperative cases, endovascular therapies can be an alternative. We present a 9-year-old with an ascending aortic mycotic aneurysm temporized with an endovascular repair as a bridge to definitive open surgery.

  6. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of Endoleaks following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.; Cil, B.; Munneke, G.; Tsetis, D.

    2013-02-15

    Major concerns after aortic aneurysm repair are caused by the presence of endoleaks, which are defined as persistent perigraft flow within the aortic aneurysm sac. Diagnosis of endoleaks can be performed with various imaging modalities, and indications for treatment are based on further subclassifications. Early detection and correct classification of endoleaks are crucial for planning patient management. The vast majority of endoleaks can be treated successfully by interventional means. Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of endoleaks are described in this article.

  7. Popliteal Artery Aneurysm Repair in the Endovascular Era

    PubMed Central

    Ronchey, Sonia; Pecoraro, Felice; Alberti, Vittorio; Serrao, Eugenia; Orrico, Matteo; Lachat, Mario; Mangialardi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare outcomes of popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) repair by endovascular treatment, great saphenous vein (GSV) bypass, and prosthetic bypass. Single center retrospective analysis of patients presenting PAA from 2000 to 2013. Patients were divided into endovascular treatment (group A); GSV bypass (group B); and prosthetic graft bypass (group C). Outcomes were technical success, perioperative mortality, and morbidity. Survival, primary and secondary patency, and freedom from reintervention rate were estimated. Differences in ankle-brachial index (ABI), in-hospital length of stay (InH-Los), red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and limb loss were reported. Mean follow-up was 49 (median: 35; 1–145; SD 42) months. Sixty-seven patients were included; 25 in group A, 28 in group B, and 14 in group C. PAA was symptomatic in 23 (34%) cases. Technical success was 100%. No perioperative death occurred. Three (4.5%) perioperative complications were reported with no significant difference between groups (P = 0.866). Five-years estimated survival was 78%. Estimated 5-years primary patency for groups A, B, and C was 71%, 81%, and 69%, respectively (P = 0.19). Estimated 5-years secondary patency for groups A, B, and C was 88%, 85%, and 84% (P = 0.85). Estimated 5-years freedom from reintervention for groups A, B, and C was 62%, 84%, and 70%, respectively (P = 0.16). A significant difference between preoperative ABI versus postoperative ABI was observed (P = 0.001). InH-LoS was significantly shorter in group A (P < 0.001). RBC transfusions were required significantly less in group A when compared to group C (P = 0.045). Overall limb salvage was achieved in all but 1 patient. PAA repair has good early and long-term outcomes with different treatment options. Endovascular treatment was not inferior to surgical repair with a reduced InH-LoS and RBC transfusion. It can be successfully employed even in nonelective setting. A randomized controlled

  8. Troubleshooting techniques for the Endurant™ device in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; Antoniou, George A; Trellopoulos, George; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Argyriou, Christos; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with the Endurant™ stent-graft system has been shown to be safe and effective in high-risk surgical patients with complex suprarenal and/or infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm anatomy. The wireformed M-shaped stent architecture and proximal springs with anchoring pins theoretically permit optimal sealing in shorter and more angulated proximal aneurysm necks even under off-label conditions. Nonetheless, extremely difficult anatomical situations and inherent graft system-related limitations must be anticipated. Herein, we describe our techniques to overcome the capture of the tip sleeve within the suprarenal bare-stent anchoring pins, other endograft segments, and native vessels. PMID:25182343

  9. Thrombotic Occlusion of Stent Graft Limbs due to Severe Angulation of Aortic Neck in Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsu; Kim, Myeong Gun; Oh, Pyung Chun; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kang, Jin Mo; Chung, Wook-Jin; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a safe alternative to open surgical repair for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, unfavorable aortic anatomy of the aneurysm has restricted the widespread use of EVAR. Anatomic limitation is most often related to characteristics of the proximal neck anatomy. In this report, we described a patient with a severely angulated proximal neck who underwent EVAR, but required repeat intervention because of thrombotic occlusion of stent graft limbs. PMID:27721866

  10. Thoracic aorta aneurysm open repair in heart transplant recipient; the anesthesiologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Fabrizio; Oriani, Alessandro; De Luca, Monica; Bignami, Elena; Sala, Alessandra; Chiesa, Roberto; Melissano, Germano; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Many years following transplantation, heart transplant recipients may require noncardiac major surgeries. Anesthesia in such patients may be challenging due to physiological and pharmacological problems regarding allograft denervation and difficult immunosuppressive management. Massive hemorrhage, hypoperfusion, renal, respiratory failure, and infections are some of the most frequent complications related to thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. Understanding how to optimize hemodynamic and infectious risks may have a substantial impact on the outcome. This case report aims at discussing risk stratification and anesthetic management of a 54-year-old heart transplant female recipient, affected by Marfan syndrome, undergoing thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. PMID:26750703

  11. [Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Khabazov, R I; Chupin, A V; Kolosov, R V; Deriabin, S V

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular repair of the abdominal aorta is a method of choice in pronounced concomitant pathology and high risk of open surgical treatment. The article deals with a clinical case report of successful surgical management of a patient with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm, transplanted kidney, chronic renal insufficiency, secondary diabetes mellitus, multifocal atherosclerosis with predominant involvement of coronary arteries and lower-limb arteries, in whom open surgical treatment was associated with high risk. Endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed with a good postoperative outcome. PMID:27626264

  12. Thoracic aorta aneurysm open repair in heart transplant recipient; the anesthesiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Fabrizio; Oriani, Alessandro; De Luca, Monica; Bignami, Elena; Sala, Alessandra; Chiesa, Roberto; Melissano, Germano; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Many years following transplantation, heart transplant recipients may require noncardiac major surgeries. Anesthesia in such patients may be challenging due to physiological and pharmacological problems regarding allograft denervation and difficult immunosuppressive management. Massive hemorrhage, hypoperfusion, renal, respiratory failure, and infections are some of the most frequent complications related to thoracic aorta aneurysm repair. Understanding how to optimize hemodynamic and infectious risks may have a substantial impact on the outcome. This case report aims at discussing risk stratification and anesthetic management of a 54-year-old heart transplant female recipient, affected by Marfan syndrome, undergoing thoracic aorta aneurysm repair.

  13. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  14. Combined transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass with right gastroepiploic artery and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Onur; Haberal, Ismail; Ozsoy, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) Symptoms: Palpable abdominal mass Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Coronary artery disease is common in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Here we report a case of the combination of surgical repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm and off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery. Case Report: A 74-year-old man who presented at our clinic with chest pain was diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. His medical history included right coronary artery stenting. Physical examination revealed a pulsatile abdominal mass on the left side and palpable peripheral pulses. Computed tomography scans showed an infrarenal abdominal aneurysm with a 61-mm enlargement. Coronary angiography revealed 80% stenosis in the stent within the right coronary artery and 20% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. The patient underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimal invasive coronary artery bypass grafting with right gastroepiploic artery were performed simultaneously in a single surgery. Conclusions: We report this case to emphasize the safety and effectiveness of transdiaphragmatic off-pump and minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery with abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This combined approach shortens hospital stay and decreases cost. PMID:23997852

  15. Conservatism and new technology: the impact on abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Bush, Ruth L; Najibi, Sasan; Lin, Peter H; Lumsden, Alan B; Dodson, Thomas F; Salam, Atef A; Smith, Robert B; Chaikof, Elliot L; Weiss, Victor L

    2002-01-01

    The last decade has represented a time of fundamental change in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Potentially, vascular surgeons will either acquire catheter-based skills or relinquish the care for many patients with infrarenal AAA. We investigated AAA referral patterns and method of AAA repair after the establishment of an endovascular AAA program at our institution. We conducted a retrospective review of elective AAA repairs after the initiation of an endovascular AAA program in April 1994. Six vascular surgeons performed all procedures with a clear distinction between the surgeons (n=3) who performed traditional AAA repair only and those (n=3) who managed AAAs by means of either endovascular or traditional treatment. From April 1994 through December 2000, 740 elective AAA repairs were performed. During this time the mean number of AAA repairs has been 106/year ranging from 75 to 155/year. More notable however is the steady increase in the percentage of endovascular AAA repairs from 6 per cent of all AAA repairs in 1994 to 61 per cent in 2000. During this time traditional surgeons have experienced a plateau in total AAA repairs performed per year with their number of open repairs decreasing by 36 per cent. At the same time endovascular surgeons have seen a progressive rise in total AAA cases including an increase of 200 per cent in open repairs and of 1367 per cent in endovascular repairs. Our vascular surgeons who repair AAA utilizing both endovascular and open techniques have experienced an increase in aneurysm referrals since the advent of an endovascular AAA program. Those who have not adopted endovascular skills have seen a decline in their aneurysm practice. The larger question about whether or not to embrace new technology before the availability of long-term follow-up remains unanswered. PMID:12467319

  16. Effect of age on survival between open repair and surveillance for small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giovanni; Lederle, Frank A; Ballard, David J; Hamilton, Cody; da Graca, Briget; Herrin, Jeph; Sass, Danielle M; Johnson, Gary R; Powell, Janet T

    2014-10-15

    Randomized controlled trials have shown no significant difference in survival between immediate open repair and surveillance with selective repair for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms of 4.0 to 5.5 cm in diameter. This lack of difference has been shown to hold true for all diameters in this range, in men and women, but the question of whether patients of different ages might obtain different benefits has remained unanswered. Using the pooled patient-level data for the 2,226 patients randomized to immediate open repair or surveillance in the United Kingdom Small Aneurysm Trial (UKSAT; September 1, 1991, to July 31, 1998; follow-up 2.6 to 6.9 years) or the Aneurysm Detection and Management (ADAM) trial (August 1, 1992, to July 31, 2000; follow-up 3.5 to 8.0 years), the adjusted effect of age on survival in the 2 treatment groups was estimated using a generalized propensity approach, accounting for a comprehensive array of clinical and nonclinical risk factors. No significant difference in survival between immediate open repair and surveillance was observed for patients of any age, overall (p = 0.606) or in men (p = 0.371) or women separately (p = 0.167). In conclusion, survival did not differ significantly between immediate open repair and surveillance for patients of any age, overall or in men or women. Combined with the previous evidence regarding diameter, and the lack of benefit of immediate endovascular in trials comparing it with surveillance repair for small abdominal aortic aneurysms, these results suggest that surveillance should be the first-line management strategy of choice for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms of 4.0 to 5.5 cm.

  17. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection Repair (EVAR) in Iran: Descriptive Midterm Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Marzban, Mehrab; Zafarghandi, Mohammadreza; Shirzad, Mahmood; Shirani, Shapour; Mahmoodian, Roshanak; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endovascular repair of aorta in comparison to open surgery has a low early operative mortality rate, but its long-term results are uncertain. Objectives: The current study describes for the first time our initial four-year experience of elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) at Tehran heart center, the first and a major referral heart center in Iran, as a pioneer of EVAR in Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients (46 men) who had the diagnosis of either an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n = 36), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 7), or thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) (n = 8) who had undergone EVAR by Medtronic stent grafts by our team between December 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed. Results: The rate of in-hospital aneurysm-related deaths in the group with AAA stood at 2.8% (one case), while there was no in-hospital mortality in the other groups. All patients were followed up for 13-18 months. The cumulative death rate in follow-up was nine cases from the total 51 cases (18%), out of which six cases were in the AAA group (four patients due to non-cardiac causes and two patients due to aneurysm-related causes), one case in the TAA group (following a severe hemoptysis), and two cases in the TAD group (following an expansion of dissection from re-entrance). The major event-free survival rate was 80.7% for endovascular repair of AAA, 85.7% for endovascular repair of TAA, and 65.6% for endovascular repair of TAD. Conclusion: The endovascular stent-graft repair of the abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection had high technical success rates in tandem with low-rate early mortality and morbidity, short hospital stay, and acceptable mid-term free symptom survival among Iranian patients. PMID:27110330

  18. Selective Spleen Embolization of Splenomegaly to Improve Thrombocytopenia Facilitating Open Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Staged Approach.

    PubMed

    Maras, Dimitrios; Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Dedes, Athansios; Tsanis, Antonios; Mazarakis, Ioannis; Gekas, Christos; Ioannou, Christos V

    2016-08-01

    We present an 82-year-old man with a history of hairy cell leukemia, having an 11-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm, who also had severe thrombocytopenia (about 20 000 platelets/μL) and splenomegaly at presentation. The patient had unfavorable anatomy for endovascular aneurysm repair, and therefore, an open procedure was planned. To reduce risk for perioperative bleeding and optimize patient preoperative status, a staged approach was employed. Initially, several sessions of embolization of 2 splenic artery branches were performed with the intent to decrease spleen size and to increase platelet count thus decreasing the perioperative bleeding risk. Then, after successfully increasing platelet count (280 000 PLT/μL), open repair of the aneurysm was conducted. This case demonstrates that selective splenic embolization in patients with hypersplenism and subsequent thrombocytopenia who are in need for major surgery may achieve a significant rise in platelet count and optimize patient's preoperative status in order to avoid bleeding complications. PMID:27581226

  19. Endovascular Repair of a Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm of the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Bhat, R.; Nagy, J.; Griffiths, G. D.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of a ruptured mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery, successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafting. A 64-year-old woman underwent diagnostic coronary angiography complicated by an infected hematoma of the left groin. Seven days later, she developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia and CT scan evidence of perivascular inflammation around the left common iliac artery. This was followed by rupture of a mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. The lesion was successfully treated with a stent-graft and prolonged antibiotic therapy, and the patient remains free of infection 10 months later. Accumulating evidence suggests that endovascular repair can be used safely for the repair of ruptured infected aneurysms.

  20. Patient Compliance with Surveillance Following Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Anthony D. Morbi, Abigail H. M. Nordon, Ian M.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeIntegral to maintaining good outcomes post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a robust surveillance protocol. A significant proportion of patients fail to comply with surveillance, exposing themselves to complications. We examine EVAR surveillance in Wessex (UK), exploring factors that may predict poor compliance.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 179 consecutive elective EVAR cases [2008–2013] was performed. 167 patients were male, with the age range of 50–95. Surveillance was conducted centrally (tertiary referral trauma centre) and at four spoke units. Surveillance compliance and predictors of non-compliance including age, gender, co-morbid status, residential location and socioeconomic status were analysed for univariate significance.ResultsFifty patients (27.9 %) were non-compliant with surveillance; 14 (8.1 %) had no imaging post-EVAR. At 1 year, 56.1 % (of 123 patients) were compliant. At years 2 and 3, 41.5 and 41.2 % (of 65 and 34 patients, respectively) were compliant. Four years post-EVAR, only one of eight attended surveillance (12.5 %). There were no statistically significant differences in age (p = 0.77), co-morbid status or gender (p = 0.64). Distance to central unit (p = 0.67) and surveillance site (p = 0.56) was non-significant. While there was a trend towards compliance in upper-middle-class socioeconomic groups (ABC1 vs. C1C2D), correlating with >50 % of non-compliant patients living within <10 mile radius of the central unit, overall predictive value was not significant (p = 0.82).ConclusionsCompliance with surveillance post-EVAR is poor. No independent predictor of non-compliance has been confirmed, but socioeconomic status appears to be relevant. There is a worrying drop-off in attendance beyond the first year. This study highlights a problem that needs to be addressed urgently, if we are to maintain good outcomes post-EVAR.

  1. Embolization with Histoacryl Glue of an Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm following Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Walid, Ayesha; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Ur Rehman, Zia

    2013-01-01

    We report a 62-year-old female who had surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm with a bifurcated graft 2 years ago. She presented with a distal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm which was successfully embolized with histoacryl glue. Only one such similar case has been reported in the literature so far (Yamagami et al. (2006)). PMID:23476883

  2. Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic and Renal Artery Aneurysms in Takayasu's Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Wetstein, Paul J; Clark, Margaret E; Cafasso, Danielle E; Golarz, Scott R; Ayubi, Farhan S; Kellicut, Dwight C

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a large vessel vasculitis that can be a challenging diagnosis to make and has a varied clinical presentation. Management largely depends on affected vessel disease severity and individual patient considerations. The diagnosis must be considered in a young patient with large vessel aneurysms. We present a case of a 30 year-old woman of Pacific Islander descent who presented to the Tripler Army medical Center Vascular Surgery Department in Honolulu, Hawai'i seeking repair of her abdominal aortic and renal artery aneurysms prior to conception. A 30 year-old Pacific Islander woman with a history of a saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm and renal artery aneurysms presented to our clinic seeking vascular surgery consultation prior to a planned pregnancy. She had a renal artery stent placed at an outside institution for hypertension. She met the diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis by Sharma's criteria. Physical exam was significant for a palpable, pulsatile, abdominal mass and CT angiography revealed a saccular irregular-appearing infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, extending to the aortic bifurcation, with a maximum diameter of 3.3 cm. A right renal artery aneurysm was also identified proximally, contiguous with the aorta, with a maximal transverse diameter of 1.7 cm. The patient underwent a supraceliac bypass to the right renal artery with a 7 mm Dacron graft, as well as excision of the right renal artery aneurysm. The abdominal aortic aneurysm was replaced using a Hemashield Dacron bifurcated 14 mm x 7 mm bypass graft. Intraoperative measurements of the renal artery aneurysm were 1.5 x 1.5 cm and the saccular appearing distal abdominal aortic aneurysm measured 3.6 x 3.3 cm. The patient was discharged from the hospital 7 days post-operatively. At 1-year follow up, CT scan of the abdominal aorta revealed the repair was without any evidence of aneurysm formation, anastomotic pseudoaneurysm formation, or areas of stenosis. She has remained

  3. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G.

    2016-01-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  4. Aortocaval Fistula Resulting From Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Dissecting Aneurysm Treated by Delayed Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiehao; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Jichun; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortocaval fistula (ACF) after rupture of an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the diagnosis is usually delayed, which increases the difficulties of treatment. We describe a case that successfully delayed use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for ACF resulting from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. We describe a special case of a 70-year-old male with an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm rupturing into inferior vena cava (IVC). On account of his atypical presentation, the diagnosis had been delayed for half a year. Due to severe metabolic sequelaes of the ACF and preexisting conditions, the traditional open repair was too risky. Minimally invasive EVAR was performed with a successful result. There were no endoleak or fistula at the follow-up of 9th month. EVAR is the most suitable method in patients with ACF from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. Further educational programs should be developed, which may give rise to earlier diagnosis and treatment with better outcomes. PMID:27149481

  5. Endovascular Abdominal Aneurysm Repair in Women: What are the Differences Between the Genders?

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Rui; Teixeira, Gabriela; Oliveira, Pedro; Loureiro, Luís; Pereira, Carlos; Almeida, Rui

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Abdominal aortic aneurysm has a lower incidence in the female population, but a higher complication rate. It was been hypothesized that some anatomical differences of abdominal aortic aneurysm in women could be responsible for that. We proposed to analyze our data to understand the differences in the clinical and anatomical characteristics and the outcomes of patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair, according to gender. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair between 2001-2013 was performed. Patients were divided according gender and evaluated regarding age, atherosclerotic risk factors, aneurysm anatomic features, endograft type, anesthesic risk classification, length of stay, reinterventions and mortality. Two statistical studies were performed, first comparing women and men (Group A) and a second one comparing women and men, adjusted by age (Group B). RESULTS: Of the 171 patients, only 5.8% (n=10) were females. Women were older (P<0.05) and the number of women with no atherosclerotic risk factor was significantly higher. The comparison adjusted by age revealed women with statistically less smoking history, less cerebrovascular disease and ischemic heart disease. Women had a trend to more complex anatomy, with more iliac intern artery aneurysms, larger aneurysm diameter and neck angulations statistically more elevated. No other variables were statistically different between age groups, neither reintervention nor mortality rates. CONCLUSION: Our study showed a clear difference in the clinical characteristics of women. The female population was statistically older, and when compared with men adjusted by age, had less atherosclerotic risk factors and less target organ disease. Women showed a more complex anatomy but with the same outcomes. PMID:27737406

  6. Endovascular Management of Delayed Complete Graft Thrombosis After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Thurley, Peter D.; Glasby, Michael J.; Pollock, John G.; Bungay, Peter; Nunzio, Mario De; El-Tahir, Amin M.; Quarmby, John W.

    2010-08-15

    Graft thrombosis rates after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms vary widely in published series. When thrombosis does occur, it usually involves a single limb and occurs within 3 months of stent-graft insertion. If the entire endoprosthesis is thrombosed, treatment may be challenging because femoro-femoral crossover graft insertion is not an option and a greater volume of thrombus is present, thus making thrombolysis more difficult. We present two cases of delayed thrombosis after EVAR involving the entire stent-graft. These were successfully treated by a combined surgical and endovascular technique, and patency has been maintained in both cases to date.

  7. Hybrid endografts combinations for the treatment 
of endoleak in endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; Trellopoulos, George; Antoniou, George A; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Nikolopoulos, Evagelos S; Iatrou, Christos; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid endografting in endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is defined as the process of placing a series of two or more different types of covered stents, usually to treat a complex abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) or a primary or secondary endoleak. We describe the treatment of a type III, a type Ib, and a type Ia endoleak in three patients respectively, using hybrid solutions, assembling components from different manufacturers. An update of the current clinical and experimental evidence on the application of anatomically compatible, hybrid endograft systems in conventional EVAR is also provided. PMID:23280081

  8. Surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with non-bleeding aortocaval fistula.

    PubMed

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka; Niino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aortocaval fistula (ACF) without bleeding because a clot was covering the fistula. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed as having a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and an aortocaval fistula, by enhanced computed tomography (CT). After the aneurysm had been opened, the fistula was detected, but there was no bleeding because it was covered with clot. After graft repair, bleeding from the fistula occurred when the clot was removed by suction. Direct closure of the fistula was achieved after bleeding was controlled by digital compression. PMID:23825505

  9. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-15

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  10. Repair of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Anastomosed to Donor Renal Artery in a Renal Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Hiroshi; Kin, Keiwa; Maeda, Shuusaku

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a successful repair of an internal iliac artery aneurysm in a renal transplant patient. At renal transplantation, the main renal artery and accessory renal artery had been anastomosed to the right internal iliac artery and right external iliac artery, respectively. The patient underwent resection and graft replacement of the iliac artery aneurysm with reattachment of the main renal artery to the right external iliac artery through a midline laparotomy with repeated topical cold perfusion for renal protection. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of renal function impairment was present at discharge. PMID:27738467

  11. Hybrid repair of penetrating aortic ulcer associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum with simultaneous repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bin; Cai, Hongbo; Jin, Hui

    2014-02-01

    We present the first case of a hybrid endovascular approach to a penetrating aortic ulcer on the left descending aorta with a right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from an aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum. The patient also had bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms. The three-step procedure consisted of a carotid-carotid bypass, followed by endovascular exclusion of the ulcer and the aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum, and then completion by covering the iliac aneurysms. The patient had no complications at 18 months after surgery. In such rare configurations, endovascular repair is a safe therapeutic option.

  12. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Aneurysms Basic Facts & Information Fill a balloon too full ... of what can happen when you have an aneurysm. Medically, when an artery “balloons,” or widens, it ...

  13. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Analysis of Aneurysm Volumetric Changes at Mid-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Pratali, Alessandro; Napoli, Vinicio; Vignali, Claudio; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the volumetric changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) in 24 months of follow-up. Methods. We evaluated the volume modifications in 63 consecutive patients after EVAR. All patients underwent strict duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography (CTA) follow-up; when complications were suspected, digital subtraction angiography was also performed. CTA datasets at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were post-processed through semiautomatic segmentation, to isolate the aneurysmal sac and calculate its volume. Maximum transverse diameters (Dmax) were also obtained in the true axial plane, Presence and type of endoleak (EL) were recorded. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the degree of volume change, correlation with diameter modifications, and significance of the volume increase with respect to ELs. Results. Mean reconstruction time was 7 min. Mean volume reduction rates were 6.5%, 8%, and 9.6% at 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up, respectively. Mean Dmax reduction rates were 4.2%, 6.7%, and 12%; correlation with volumes was poor (r = 0.73-0.81). ELs were found in 19 patients and were more frequent (p = 0.04) in patients with higher preprocedural Dmax, The accuracies of volume changes in predicting ELs ranged between 74.6% and 84.1% and were higher than those of Dmax modifications. The strongest independent predictor of EL was a volume change at 6 months {<=}0.3% (p = 0.005), although 6 of 19 (32%) patients with EL showed no significant AAA enlargement, whereas in 6 of 44 (14%) patients without EL the aneurysm enlarged. Conclusion. The lack of volume decrease in the aneurysm of at least 0.3% at 6 months follow-up indicates the need for closer surveillance, and has a higher predictive accuracy for an endoleak than Dmax.

  14. Predictors of Reintervention After Endovascular Repair of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Zayed, Hany A. Attia, Rizwan; Modarai, Bijan; Clough, Rachel E.; Bell, Rachel E.; Carrell, Tom; Sabharwal, Tarun; Reidy, John; Taylor, Peter R.

    2011-02-15

    The objective of this study was to identify factors predicting the need for reintervention after endovascular repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). We reviewed prospectively collected database records of all patients who underwent endovascular repair of IIAA between 1999 and 2008. Detailed assessment of the aneurysms was performed using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Follow-up protocol included CTA at 3 months. If this showed no complication, then annual duplex scan was arranged. Multivariate analysis and analysis of patient survival and freedom from reintervention were performed using Kaplan-Meier life tables. Forty IIAAs (median diameter 44 mm) in 38 patients were treated (all men; median age 75 years), and median follow-up was 27 months. Endovascular repair of IIAA was required in 14 of 40 aneurysms (35%). The rate of type I endoleak was significantly higher with proximal landing zone (PLZ) diameter >30 mm in the aorta or >24 mm in the common iliac artery or distal landing zone (DLZ) diameter >24 mm (P = 0.03, 0.03, and 0.0014, respectively). Reintervention rate (RR) increased significantly with increased diameter or decreased length of PLZ; increased DLZ diameter; and endovascular IIAA repair (P = 0.005, 0.005, 0.02, and 0.02 respectively); however, RR was not significantly affected by length of PLZ or DLZ. Freedom-from-reintervention was 97, 93, and 86% at 12, 24, and 108 months. There was no in-hospital or aneurysm-related mortality. Endovascular IIAA repair is a safe treatment option. Proper patient selection is essential to decrease the RR.

  15. Surveillance of patients after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with endovascular grafting or conventional treatment.

    PubMed

    Raithel, D

    1998-12-01

    At Nuremberg Southern Hospital we have been using endovascular therapy for aortic aneurysms for the past 3 years. Between August 1994 and August 1997, 193 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms were treated with endovascular stent grafts. Besides using commercially available modular systems of the Stentor type (MinTec/Vanguard*, Boston Scientific) we also participated in a multicenter study implanting EGS devices (EVT in 65 patients). Follow-up examinations must strive to detect thrombotic complications as well as endoleaks with high sensitivity and specificity. To avoid aneurysm rupture significant increase in aneurysm diameter must be detected in a timely fashion to select patients for additional corrective endovascular procedures or conversion to open surgical therapy. A close follow-up regimen therefore is absolutely mandatory for all patients undergoing endovascular aortic grafting, particularly when new prosthetic devices are being introduced. Prosthetic devices that have been adequately tested using controlled study designs and are commercially available may be followed-up using a standardized follow up scheme as delineated. Particularly during the first postoperative year color duplex with use of an intravenous ultrasound enhancing agent has been used successfully to detect even minor endoleaks originating from retrograde perfusion via aortic side branches (lumbar or inferior mesenteric artery). Only patients with documented endoleaks or suspected outflow obstruction requiring further intervention need to undergo diagnostic arteriography. After conventional aneurysm repair yearly duplex scans are usually sufficient to follow the normal patient. Patients who have undergone endovascular therapy, however need to be followed much closer using duplex as well as abdominal CT scans. This will logically result in significantly higher follow up costs. Periinterventional costs of endovascular aortic reconstruction currently exceed those of conventional aortic

  16. Experimental Study of a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Prior to and After Surgical Repair Hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlo, Anna-Elodie; Frankel, Steven; Chen, Jun; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2014-11-01

    Once a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm (TAA) is detected, the risk of rupture is estimated based on the TAA diameter compared to the normal aortic diameter and its expansion rate. However, there are no reliable predictors that can provide accurate prognosis, and each aneurysm may progress differently. This work aims to assess the hemodynamic characteristics and flow structures associated with TAAs. The flow in a patient specific thoracic aortic aneurysm is compared to the same patient after treatment, in order to quantify the differences in the hydrodynamic forces acting on the aneurysm. Flow visualization with dye and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are used to study flow features within both geometries. Local flow patterns are visualized to predict potential areas of recirculation and low shear stresses as they are associated with thrombogenicity. Understanding the differences in flow features between a thoracic aortic aneurysm and a normal aorta (or a TAA after surgical repair) may lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms that will enable clinicians to better estimate the risk of rupture.

  17. The role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging in the follow-up of patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Nadia; Parker, Pamela; Lakshminarayan, Raghuram

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Patients who undergo endovascular aneurysm repair are potentially at risk of developing problems related to the graft such as the development of endoleaks. Endoleaks can cause expansion of the aneurysmal sac, which can potentially lead to rupture. It is for this reason that lifelong surveillance of patients is required to assess the graft and the aneurysmal sac. This article discusses the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the follow-up of patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is rapidly becoming a powerful, accurate and cost-effective tool to complement computed tomography in the follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair patients. Real-time imaging of contrast filling into the arterial system means that contrast-enhanced ultrasound is an excellent problem-solving tool, particularly when assessing for the type and anatomy of endoleaks. In some instances, contrast-enhanced ultrasound can detect endoleaks when other modalities are equivocal.

  18. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II Secondary to Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hamilton; Tafazoli, Sharwin

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe pain and vasomotor and pseudomotor changes. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a recent advance in vascular surgery that has allowed repair of AAA while offering reduced intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay, reduced blood loss, fewer major complications, and more rapid recovery. Pseudoaneurysms are a rare complication of an EVAR procedure that may result in a wide range of complications. The present report examines CRPS type II as a novel consequence of pseudoaneurysm formation from brachial artery access in the EVAR procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CRPS type II presentation as sequelae of an EVAR procedure. PMID:25650247

  19. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-08-16

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  20. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  1. Molded Parallel Endografts for Branch Vessel Preservation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in Challenging Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Minion, David

    2012-06-01

    Parallel endografts (also known as snorkels or chimneys) are a proposed strategy for increasing the applicability of endovascular repair to aneurysms involving branch vessels. One major disadvantage of this strategy is the imperfect nature of seal inherent to having multiple side-by-side endografts. In this article, the use of odd-shaped parallel endografts to facilitate apposition and improve seal is proposed and a technique to mold a round stent graft into an "eye" shape using balloons is described.

  2. Numerical analysis of the hemodynamics of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repaired using the endovascular chimney technique.

    PubMed

    Ben Gur, Hila; Kosa, Gabor; Brand, Moshe

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of the hemodynamics in an abdominal aorta (AA) with an aneurysm repaired by a stent graft (SG) system using the chimney technique. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted in a model of an AA repaired with a chimney stent graft (CSG) inserted into a renal artery parallel to an aortic SG and a model of a healthy AA. Comparing the simulation results of these two cases suggests that the presence of the CSG in the AA causes changes in average wall shear stress (WSS), potentially damaging recirculation zones, and additional changes in flow patterns. PMID:26736427

  3. Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with chimney and snorkel grafts: indications, techniques and results.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh P; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Verhoeven, Eric L G; Adam, Donald J; Hardman, John A

    2013-12-01

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  4. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Katsargyris, Athanasios Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Adam, Donald J.; Hardman, John A.

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  5. Clinical outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated with hypertension: A 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi-Tao; Yuan, Qi-Dong; Cui, Ming-Zhe; Fang, Hong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) complicated with hypertension. Methods: Fifty-two patients with AAA complicated with hypertension treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into an observation group (34 cases) and a control group (18 cases). The control group was treated by incision of AAA and artificial blood vessel replacement, and the observation group was treated by EVAR. Results: All surgeries were performed successfully. However, compared with the control group, the observation group had significantly less surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion, as well as significantly higher total hospitalization expense (P<0.05). During the one-month follow-up, the observation group was significantly less prone to pulmonary infection, surgical site infection, lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis and lower extremity weakness than the control group (P<0.05). The observation group enjoyed significantly better quality of life than the control group did one and three months after surgery (P<0.05). Conclusion: Given sufficient funding, EVAR should be preferentially selected in the treatment of AAA complicated with hypertension due to minimal invasion, safety, stable postoperative vital signs and improved quality of life. PMID:27022336

  6. The "State of Art" of Organisational Blogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Gavin J.; Connolly, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the "state of art" of organisational blogging. It also aims to provide a critical review of the literature on organisational blogging and propose recommendations on how to advance the subject area in terms of academic research. Design/methodology/approach: A systematic literature review…

  7. Endovascular repair of mitroaortic intervalvular fibrosa aneurysm after bentall surgery.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Gerbay, Antoine; Campisi, Salvatore; Duprey, Ambroise; Heller, Fabien; Patoir, Arnaud; Albertini, Jean Noel; Fuzellier, Jean Francois; Isaaz, Karl; Favre, Jean Pierre

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of a successful transapical transcatheter treatment of a giant pseudoaneurysm originating from a rupture of the mitroaortic fibrosa that occurred 3 months after a Bentall procedure in a 81-year-old male patient. Because of the age of the patient and the location of the leak at the mitroaortic fibrosa, the risk of a conventional ascending aorta reoperation was considered too high, and a transcatheter approach was chosen. A transapical puncture was performed with a left minithoracotomy followed by a catheterization of the pseudoaneurysm neck and an 8-mm Amplatzer (St. Jude Medical, Saint Paul, MN, USA) device was delivered, resulting in a successful complete endovascular exclusion of the pseudo-aneurysmal sac. PMID:25639415

  8. [Successful endovascular repair of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with severe mural thrombus].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Akagi, Haruhiko; Irie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Sakai, Kei

    2014-11-01

    A 51-year-old man was transferred to our hospital on an emergency basis complaining of a sudden onset of severe left lumbar back pain. An emergency contrasted computed tomography showed a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm( rTAAA:Crawford classification type III). The ruptured site was near the aortic bifurcation, and the aneurysm had a relatively narrow segment with an extensive mural thrombus just below the renal arteries. Considering the high mortality of open surgery for the rTAAA and the poor general condition of the patient, we decided to perform endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a rescue procedure using the narrowed segment by the thrombus for a proximal landing zone. The abdominal part of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) was successfully excluded with a stent graft to obtain complete hemostasis. The postoperative course was uneventful except for the need for hemodialysis. Even though there is a risk of developing late type 1 endoleak, this procedure can be a feasible option as a rescue procedure or a bridge to radical open surgery for ruptured TAAA in a specially anatomical setting like this case. PMID:25391465

  9. Nitrogen-rich coatings for promoting healing around stent-grafts after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Lerouge, Sophie; Major, Annie; Girault-Lauriault, Pierre-Luc; Raymond, Marc-André; Laplante, Patrick; Soulez, Gilles; Mwale, Fackson; Wertheimer, Michael R; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2007-02-01

    Complications following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) are related to deficient healing around the stent-graft (SG). New generations of SG with surface properties that foster vascular repair could overcome this limitation. Our goal was to evaluate the potential of a new nitrogen-rich plasma-polymerised biomaterial, designated PPE:N, as an external coating for polyethylene terephtalate (PET)- or polytetrafluoro-ethylene (PTFE)-based SGs, to promote healing around the implant. Thin PPE:N coatings were deposited on PET and PTFE films. Then, adhesion, growth, migration and resistance to apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and fibroblasts, as well as myofibroblast differentiation, were assessed in vitro. In another experimental group, chondroitin sulphate (CS), a newly described mediator of vascular repair, was added to normal culture medium, to search for possible additional benefit. PPE:N-coatings, especially on PET, increased and accelerated cell adhesion and growth, compared with control PET and with standard polystyrene culture plates (PCP). PPE:N was also found to increase the resistance to apoptosis in VSMC, an important finding as aneurysms are characterised by VMSC depletion caused by a pro-apoptotic phenotype. Addition of CS in solution further increased migration and resistance to apoptosis. In conclusion, PPE:N-coating and/or CS could promote vascular repair around SGs following EVAR. PMID:17129601

  10. Deep gluteal grounding pad burn after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, Paolo; Venturini, Luigi; Cigna, Emanuele; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Biacchi, Daniele; di Marzo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Although skin burns at the site of grounding pad are a known risk of surgery, their exact incidence is unknown. We first report the case of a patient who presented a deep gluteal burn at the site of the grounding pad after an abdominal aortic aneurism repair, the etiology and the challenging treatment required to overcome this complication. PMID:26099000

  11. Aortic aneurysm repair. Reduced operative mortality associated with maintenance of optimal cardiac performance.

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, A D; Clowes, A W; Hechtman, H B; Mannick, J A

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances in the operative management of aortic aneurysms have resulted in a decreased rate of morbidity and mortality. In 1972, we hypothesized that a further reduction in operative mortality might be obtained with controlled perioperative fluid management based on data provided by the thermistor-tipped pulmonary artery balloon catheter. From 1972 to 1979 a flow directed pulmonary artery catheter was inserted in each of 110 consecutive patients prior to elective or urgent repair of nonruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysms. The slope of the left ventricular performance curve was determined preoperatively by incremental infusions of salt-poor albumin and Ringer's lactate solution. With each increase in the pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP), the cardiac index (CI) was measured. The PAWP was then maintained intra- and postoperatively at levels providing optimal left ventricular performance for the individual patient. There were no 30-day operative deaths among the patients in this series and only one in-hospital mortality (0.9%), four months following surgery. The five-year cumulative survival rate for patients in the present series was 84%, a rate which does not differ significantly from that expected for a normal age-corrected population. Since the patient population was unselected and there were no substantial alterations in operative technique during the present period, these improved results support the hypothesis that operative mortality attending the elective or urgent repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm can be minimized by maintenance of optimal cardiac performance with careful attention to fluid therapy during the perioperative period. PMID:7416834

  12. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Silverberg, Daniel Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  13. Diastolic Filling Reserve Preservation Using a Semispherical Dacron Patch for Repair of Anteroapical Left Ventricular Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Rebecca; Auf der Maur, Christoph; Toggweiler, Stefan; Brunner, Christian; Jamshidi, Peiman; Mueller, Xavier; Tavakoli, Reza

    2016-07-01

    In postinfarction left ventricular aneurysm, abnormal geometry and desynchronized wall motion may cause a highly inefficient pump function. The traditional endoventricular patch plasty according to the Dor technique might result in a truncated and restrictive left ventricular cavity in small adults. We report a modified technique of left ventricular anteroapical aneurysm repair by using a semispherical reshaping patch to restore the left ventricular geometry. PMID:27343541

  14. [Surgical techniques for thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair].

    PubMed

    Imoto, K; Uchida, K

    2010-07-01

    We introduce our technique for the treatment of aneurysms arising in the descending thoracic aorta and the thoracoabdominal aorta. Thoracotomy is performed at a single site. The costal arch is transected to ensure an adequate field of vision. A lifting hook is used to open the proximal side of the aorta. The diaphragm is not totally transected to preserve respiratory function after surgery. In principle, partial extracorporeal circulation is performed using a percutaneous cardiopulmonary support system. The dose of heparin for systemic treatment is limited to 50 U/kg. The abdominal branches are perfused with the use of balloon catheters. Cardiac arrest is induced for about 10 seconds by intravenous administration of adenosine triphosphate to avoid aortic injury when the proximal aorta is clamped during partial extracorporeal circulation and to prevent massive bleeding when the elephant trunk is clamped. To prevent paraplegia, the Adamkiewics artery and 2 pairs of adjacent intercostal arteries identified by preoperative computed tomography are reconstructed, and cerebrospinal drainage and motor evoked potential monitoring are performed.

  15. Robot-assisted fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) using the Magellan system.

    PubMed

    Riga, Celia V; Bicknell, Colin D; Rolls, Alexander; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Hamady, Mohamad S

    2013-02-01

    A 67-year-old man underwent robot-assisted three-vessel fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) for a 7.3-cm juxtarenal aneurysm. The 6-F robotic catheter was manipulated from a remote workstation, away from the radiation source. Robotic cannulation of the left renal artery was achieved within 3 minutes. System setup time was 5 minutes. There were no postoperative complications. Computed tomography angiography performed at discharge and at 4-month follow-up confirmed target vessel patency with no evidence of an endoleak. Selective cannulation of target vessels during FEVAR using this novel technology is feasible. Endovascular robotics may have a role in simplifying complex endovascular tasks and potentially reducing radiation exposure to the operator.

  16. Amnesia following the rupture and repair of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed Central

    Volpe, B T; Hirst, W

    1983-01-01

    Clinical analysis and neuropsychological criteria derived from experimental studies of human amnesic syndromes, particularly the alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome, have been used to characterise an unusual form of amnesia that occurred in two patients after rupture of an anterior communication cerebral artery aneurysm. Intraoperative observation and multiple CT scans did not reveal focal brain damage. Arteriography showed that both patients had arterial vasospasm. The amnesia has persisted over three years since the surgery. Study of the characteristics of their amnesia showed several features in common with other amnesic syndromes, including severely depressed free recall, and less depressed recognition of visual and verbal material. Chronic amnesic syndromes with characteristics of classical amnesic syndromes occur infrequently after rupture and repair of intracranial aneurysms, and, if not caused by parenchymal haemorrhage, may follow pre-operative vasospasm. PMID:6886715

  17. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  18. Treatment of Type II Endoleaks After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Transcaval Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mansueto, Giancarlo Cenzi, Daniela; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Petrella, Enrico; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue and different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.

  19. Open and endovascular repair of hepatic artery aneurysm: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Derek P; Wang, Grace J; Woo, Edward Y; Fairman, Ronald M; Jackson, Benjamin M

    2011-02-01

    Hepatic artery aneurysms (HAAs) represent a complex and often lethal condition. An 80-year-old woman with polyarteritis nodosa and a right hepatic lobe HAA underwent endovascular repair with coils. Her case was complicated by intraoperative HAA rupture requiring exploratory laparotomy. In the second case, a 37-year-old man with a large HAA underwent open repair with a bifurcated graft that extended from the common hepatic artery to the left and right hepatic arteries. These two cases highlight the difficulty of managing HAAs, and provide insight into their treatment. Furthermore, our review of the literature highlights the data on the management of HAAs, including the natural history of this disease process, the indications for repair and the optimal treatment modality.

  20. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  1. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study*

    PubMed Central

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emílio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fábio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. PMID:27777476

  2. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  3. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    SciTech Connect

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul; Choong, Wen Ling; Ritchie, Moira Williams, Claire; Yadavali, Reddi; Lim, Shueh; Buchanan, Fraser; Bhat, Raj; Ramanathan, Krishnappan; Ingram, Susan Cormack, Laura; Moss, Jonathan G.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance.

  4. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) for Infra-renal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) under Local Anaesthesia - Initial Experience in Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Syed, A; Zainal, A A; Hanif, H; Naresh, G

    2012-12-01

    This is our initial report on the first 4 cases of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm undergoing Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) with local anaesthesia, controlled sedation and monitoring by an anaesthetist. All four patients were males with a mean age of 66.7 years. Only one required ICU stay of two days for cardiac monitoring due to bradycardia and transient hypotension post procedure. No mortality or major post operative morbidity was recorded and the mean hospital stay post procedure was 3.5 days (range 2-5 days).

  5. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) for infra-renal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm(AAA) under Local Anaesthesia - Initial Experience in Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Syed Alwi, S A K; Zainal Ariffin, A; Hanif, H; Naresh, G

    2012-10-01

    This is our initial report on the first 4 cases of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms undergoing Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR) with local anaesthesia, controlled sedation and monitoring by an anaesthetist. All 4 patients were males with a mean age of 66.7 years. Only one (1) required ICU stay of 2 days for cardiac monitoring due to bradycardia and transient hypotension post procedure. No mortality or major post operative morbidity was recorded and the mean hospital stay post procedure was 3.5 days (range 2-5 days).

  6. A Rare Complication of Spinal Cord Ischemia Following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair of an Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsubara, Yutaka; Inoue, Kentaro; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Matsuda, Daisuke; Tanaka, Shinichi; Okadome, Jun; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of a rare complication of spinal cord ischemia (SCI) following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Computed tomography showed stenosis and calcification of bilateral iliac arteries and a saccular aneurysm of the terminal aorta. Paraplegia occurred soon after balloon angioplasty of iliac arteries and EVAR. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage was not performed because the patient was on dual antiplatelet drugs. The patient was treated with intravenous methylpredonisolone and naloxone; however, this did not improve his paraplegia. SCI after EVAR is extremely rare and unpredictable complication, however, physicians should be aware of SCI after EVAR in patients with atherosclerosis. PMID:27738476

  7. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. PMID:26826712

  8. Technical tips for successful outcomes using adjunctive procedures during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Gupta, Naren

    2012-09-01

    The inability to obtain proximal or distal seal continues to remain one of the main challenges of endovascular aneurysm repair. This is particularly relevant when endografts are used in patients with unsuitable proximal or distal landing zones. A variety of techniques can be used to achieve a seal in these difficult situations. Two specific techniques that can help intraoperatively to resolve the lack of adequate graft to aortic wall opposition are discussed in this article. These include the use of Palmaz stents for proximal seal and hypogastric snorkel for distal seal with internal iliac flow preservation.

  9. Aneurysm of the interventricular membranous septum with thrombo-embolism--an indication for surgical repair?

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Salloum, J; Rancurel, G

    1993-12-01

    A 40-year-old woman with a significant neurological history presented with right hemiparesia, paraesthesia of the right upper member and of the hemiface. Computer tomography scanning revealed hypodensity along the right lateral ventricle which corresponded to the left hemiplegia which had developed when she was 20 years old. Arteriography of the four cervical axes was normal. Echocardiography visualized an aneurysm of the membraneous septum free of thrombosis without ventricular septal defect. The embolism was thought to be of cardiac origin and a decision was taken to correct it by surgery. Ten years after surgical repair no other neurological event has occurred. PMID:8131773

  10. Results of Open and Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair According to the E-PASS Score

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Fábio Hüsemann; Ferrarezi, Bárbara; de Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Molinari, Giovani José Dal Poggetto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm has become the standard of care due to a lower 30-day mortality, a lower morbidity, shorter hospital stay and a quicker recovery. The role of open repair (OR) and to whom this type of operation should be offered is subject to discussion. Objective: To present a single center experience on the repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, comparing the results of open and endovascular repairs. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional observational study including 286 patients submitted to OR and 91 patients submitted to EVAR. The mean follow-up for the OR group was 66 months and for the EVAR group was 39 months. Results: The overall mortality was 11.89% for OR and 7.69% for EVAR (P=0.263), EVAR presented a death relative risk of 0.647. It was also found a lower intraoperative bleeding for EVAR (OR=1417.48±1180.42 mL versus EVAR=597.80±488.81 mL, P<0.0002) and a shorter operative time for endovascular repair (OR=4.40±1.08 hours versus EVAR=3.58±1.26 hours, P<0.003). The postoperative complications presented no statistical difference between groups (OR=29.03% versus EVAR=25.27%, P=0.35). Conclusion: EVAR presents a better short term outcome than OR in all classes of physiologic risk. In order to train future vascular surgeons on OR, only young and healthy patients, who carry a very low risk of adverse events, should be selected, aiming at the long term durability of the procedure. PMID:27074271

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Endovascular versus Open Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Samuel T.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; O’Malley, A. James; Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Cotterill, Philip; Landon, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is increasingly used for emergent treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA). We sought to compare the perioperative and long-term mortality, procedure-related complications and rates of re-intervention of EVAR versus open aortic repair of rAAA in Medicare beneficiaries. Methods We examined perioperative and long-term mortality and complications after EVAR or open aortic repair performed for rAAA in all traditional Medicare beneficiaries discharged from a US hospital from 2001–2008. Patients were propensity score matched on baseline demographics, coexisting conditions, admission source, and hospital volume of rAAA repair and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of bias that might have resulted from unmeasured confounders Results Of 10,998 patients with repaired rAAA, 1126 underwent EVAR and 9872 underwent open repair. Propensity score matching yielded 1099 patient pairs. The average age was 78 years, and 72.4% were male. Perioperative mortality for EVAR and open repair were 33.8% and 47.7% respectively (p<0.001) and this difference persisted for more than four years. EVAR patients had higher rates of AAA-related reinterventions when compared with open repair patients (endovascular reintervention at 36 months 10.9% vs 1.5%, p<0.001), whereas open patients had more laparotomy related complications (incisional hernia repair at 36 months 1.8% vs. 6.2% p<0.001, all surgical complications at 36 months 4.4% vs. 9.1%, p<0.001). Use of EVAR for rAAA has increased from 6% of cases in 2001 to 31% of cases in 2008, while over the same time period overall 30-day mortality for admission for rAAA regardless of treatment has decreased from 55.8% to 50.9%. Conclusions EVAR for rAAA is associated with lower perioperative and long term mortality in Medicare beneficiaries. Increasing adoption of EVAR for rAAA is associated with an overall decrease in mortality of patients hospitalized

  12. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  13. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  14. Intermediate follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair: can we forgo CT scanning in certain patients?

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Jared; McNamara, Joanne; Matloubieh, Jubin; Hart, Joseph; Singh, Michael J; Davies, Mark G; Rhodes, Jeffrey M; Illig, Karl A

    2007-11-01

    Current recommendations for follow-up after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) include yearly computed tomographic (CT) scans after the first year. We hypothesize that this is unnecessary for patients who have aneurysm sacs that are stable or shrinking at 1 year and no evidence of endoleak. To explore this hypothesis, we reviewed the records of all patients undergoing EVAR at our institution who were implanted with grafts that are currently commercially available and had a minimum of 18 months' follow-up. Of 415 patients who underwent EVAR over an 8-year period, 93 met the entry criteria. At a mean follow-up of approximately 3 years, secondary interventions were required in 13%, 39%, and 25% of patients undergoing EVAR with Zenith, AneuRx, and Excluder devices, respectively, and secondary interventions after the first year were required in 3%, 22%, and 8% of such grafts, respectively. Seventy-one patients (76%) had aneurysm sacs that were stable or shrinking at 1 year and no endoleak. Only two of these patients subsequently required reintervention. Both patients had AneuRx grafts, and both problems could have easily been identified without CT scanning. Our data support the hypothesis that patients who meet these criteria at 1 year are unlikely to have problems that cannot be identified by ultrasound and/or clinical evaluation alone and, thus, that CT scans are not necessary after this point, especially in patients with Zenith or reengineered Excluder devices. PMID:17980790

  15. Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effectiveness of Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Nevala, Terhi; Biancari, Fausto; Manninen, Hannu; Aho, Pekka-Sakari; Matsi, Pekka; Maekinen, Kimmo; Roth, Wolf-Dieter; Yloenen, Kari; Lepaentalo, Mauri; Peraelae, Jukka

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in treating type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent EVAR with a Zenith stent-graft from January 2000 to December 2005. During a follow-up period of 4.5 {+-} 2.3 years, solely type II endoleak was detected in 47 patients (22%), and 14 of them underwent secondary interventions to correct this condition. Ten patients had transarterial embolization, and four patients had translumbar/transabdominal embolization. The embolization materials used were coils, thrombin, gelatin, Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer), and glue. Disappearance of the endoleak without enlargement of the aneurysm sac after the first secondary intervention was achieved in only five of these patients (5/13). One patient without surveillance imaging was excluded from analyses of clinical success. After additional interventions in four patients and the spontaneous disappearance of type II endoleak in two patients, overall clinical success was achieved in eight patients (8/12). One patient did not have surveillance imaging after the second secondary intervention. Clinical success after the first secondary intervention was achieved in two patients (2/9) in the transarterial embolization group and three patients (3/4) in the translumbar embolization group. The results of secondary interventions for type II endoleak are unsatisfactory. Although the small number of patients included in this study prevents reliable comparisons between groups, the results seem to favor direct translumbar embolization in comparison to transarterial embolization.

  16. Is Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Essential Prior to Endovascular Repair of Aortoiliac Aneurysms?

    SciTech Connect

    Bharwani, N. Raja, J.; Choke, E.; Belli, A. M.; Thompson, M. M.; Morgan, R. A.; Munneke, G.

    2008-05-15

    Patients who undergo endovascular repair of aorto-iliac aneurysms (EVAR) require internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization (IIAE) to prevent type II endoleaks after extending the endografts into the external iliac artery. However, IIAE may not be possible in some patients due to technical factors or adverse anatomy. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively whether patients with aorto-iliac aneurysms who fail IIAE have an increase in type II endoleak after EVAR compared with similar patients who undergo successful embolization. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 148 patients who underwent EVAR from December 1997 to June 2005. Sixty-one patients had aorto-iliac aneurysms which required IIAE before EVAR. Fifty patients had successful IIAE and 11 patients had unsuccessful IIAE prior to EVAR. The clinical and imaging follow-up was reviewed before and after EVAR. The endoleak rate of the embolized group was compared with that of the group in whom embolization failed. After a mean follow-up of 19.7 months in the study group and 25 months in the control group, there were no statistically significant differences in outcome measures between the two groups. Specifically, there were no type II endoleaks related to the IIA in patients where IIAE had failed. We conclude that failure to embolize the IIA prior to EVAR should not necessarily preclude patients from treatment. In patients where there is difficulty in achieving coil embolization, it is recommended that EVAR should proceed, as clinical sequelae are unlikely.

  17. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Katseni, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R.

  18. Transperitoneal repair of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and co-existent horseshoe kidney with division of the renal isthmus.

    PubMed

    Hajibandeh, Shahin; Hajibandeh, Shahab; Johnpulle, Michelle; Perricone, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The co-existence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and horseshoe kidney (HSK) is rare. We report a 67-year-old man with an expanding juxtarenal AAA associated with a HSK. The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck and contained a significant amount of mural thrombus. The isthmus of HSK closely lied over the aneurysm, making its exposure extremely difficult. The aneurysm was successfully repaired using transperitoneal approach with division of the renal isthmus and without any need for the renal artery reconstruction. Despite the potential complications, particularly renal insufficiency, associated with division of the renal isthmus and suprarenal cross-clamping of the abdominal aorta, in our case, post-operative period was uneventful and the patient's recovery was satisfactory. PMID:26511935

  19. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Complication of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mulcare, Robert J.; Royster, Thomas S.; Weiss, Harvey J.; Phillips, Louise L.

    1974-01-01

    A retrospective review was done of all patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) on whom coagulation studies were obtained. Those patients with laboratory documented disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were selected and their clinical records reviewed. This included 7 patients studied in the periods 1964–1965 and January 1971–July 1973. Of these 7 cases, 4 occurred in patients undergoing emergency operation for ruptured aneurysm and 3 were in elective cases. All 7 patients exhibited clinical evidence of abnormal bleeding, while 6 of the 7 progressed rapidly to renal shutdown. The seventh patient recovered spontaneously. Of the 6 patients with full blown clinical and laboratory evidence of DIC, 2 recovered. Both cases received heparin therapy and multiple hemodialyses. A third patient was started on heparin but died at 36 hours in heart failure. All 3 patients receiving heparin showed clinical cessation of abnormal bleeding and disappearance of soluble fibrin monomer complexes within 24 hours of starting therapy. The study suggests a higher incidence of DIC than has previously been appreciated in both the emergency and elective repair of AAA. The prompt recognition and treatment of this complication may reverse the abnormal intravascular clotting, minimize its more serious results and avoid futile and dangerous operative intervention. ImagesFig. 3. PMID:4851404

  20. Rehospitalization to Primary Versus Different Facilities Following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Richard S.; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara; Kind, Amy J.H.; Engelbert, Travis L.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.; Matsumura, Jon S.; Kent, K. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing readmissions represents a unique opportunity to improve care and reduce health care costs and is the focus of major payers. A large number of surgical patients are readmitted to hospitals other than where the primary surgery was performed, resulting in clinical decisions that do not incorporate the primary surgeon and potentially alter outcomes. This study characterizes readmission to primary versus different hospitals after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and examines the implications with regard to mortality and cost. Methods Patients who underwent open or endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA were identified from the CMS Chronic Conditions Warehouse (CCW), a random 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2005-2009. Outcomes for patients who underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days of initial discharge were compared based on readmission location (primary vs. different hospital). Results 885 patients underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days. 626 (70.7%) returned to the primary facility, and 259 (29.3%) returned to a different facility. Greater distance from patient residence to the primary hospital was the strongest predictor of readmission to a different facility. Patients living 50-100 miles from the primary hospital were more likely to be readmitted to a different hospital compared to patients living <10 miles away (OR = 8.50, P <.001). Patients with diagnoses directly related to the surgery (e.g. wound infection) were more likely to be readmitted to the primary hospital whereas medical diagnoses (e.g. pneumonia and congestive heart failure) were more likely to be treated at a different hospital. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality between patients readmitted to a different or the primary hospital. Median total 30-day payments were significantly lower at different versus primary hospitals ($11,978, primary vs. $11,168, different, P = .04). Conclusion Readmission

  1. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were successfully repaired by means of a surgical bypass technique in which a Dacron graft was placed between the carotid and brachial arteries. We also discuss our strategy for determining the optimal surgical approach in these patients. PMID:27777529

  2. Single-stage surgical repair in a complex case of aberrant right subclavian artery aneurysm and common carotid trunk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant right subclavian artery with coexisting common carotid trunk is an extremely rare congenital anomaly affecting <0.1% of the population. We report the case of a 77-year-old Caucasian man presenting with dysphagia and dyspnea secondary to an aberrant right subclavian artery aneurysm and describe our technique for open surgical repair. PMID:23618166

  3. Secondary aortoesophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair: literature review and new insights regarding the hypothesized mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Er-Ping; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Shui-Bo; Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endovascular aortic repair was first performed nearly two decades ago and has become a well-established alternative therapy for many thoracoabdominal aortic diseases. Early survival results with the endovascular aortic repair were impressive, but it also brought many complications. Aortoesophageal fistula is little-known and may be underestimated because it is an unusual complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Objective: To provide a review of the general features of aortoesophageal fistula as a little-known complication after thoracic endovascular aortic repair and to present a new insight regarding the hypothesized mechanisms of this complication based on clinical experience. Methods: The new insights regarding the hypothesized mechanisms built on the literature review and clinical experience. Literature Review from PubMed and Web of Knowledge for relevant studies with English paper. Searches were performed without year, and used the combinations of the following key words: “thoracic aortic aneurysm”, “endovascular”, “aortoesophageal fistula”, “complication”. Results: The authors’ hypothesized mechanisms of aortoesophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair include the relatively thin vessel wall on thoracic aortic aneurysm hard to prevent the relatively rigid stent graft projecting the aortic and direct erosion into the esophagus. Conclusion: Selecting flexibility and appropriate size stent graft, avoiding the thin aortic wall, and identifying the risk factors may reduce the morbidity of complications with aortoesophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair. PMID:25419355

  4. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K.; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Results from a Series of Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Speziale, Francesco; Montelione, Nunzio; Pranteda, Chiara; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Mansour, Wassim; Sbarigia, Enrico; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To compare durability and survival after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and open repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in young patients. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was conducted between 2005 and 2014 on all consecutive patients of 60 years of age or younger. Measures considered for analysis were reintervention related to AAA, laparotomy and access vessel injury during EVAR, and all-cause mortality during hospitalization and follow-up. Results. Seventy out of 119 patients were treated by OR (58.8%) and 49 (41.2%) by EVAR, 9 in off-label fashion (18.3%). Technical success was achieved in all cases. No AAA-related death was recorded. Overall in-hospital mortality was zero and the reintervention rate was 2.5% (3/119: 1/70 OR, 2/49 EVAR, p = 0.36). There is no death at 30-day or 1-year follow-up. Thirty-day reintervention rate was 1.6% (2/119; 0/70 OR, 2/49 EVAR, p = 0.16), while the 1-year rate was 2.5% (3/119; 1/70 OR, 2/49 EVAR, p = 0.36). At the mean follow-up of 56.8 ± 42.7 months, mortality and reintervention rates were 5.8% (7/119; 3/70 OR, 4/49 EVAR, p = 0.38) and 10% (12/119; 8/70 OR, 4/49 EVAR, p = 0.39), respectively. The overall reintervention rate, mortality, and freedom from adverse events did not differ between the two groups. No differences in outcome were recorded between patients treated by EVAR in on-label versus off-label fashion. Conclusion. Our (albeit limited) experience suggests that, in an unselected young patient population undergoing elective AAA repair, OR or EVAR can be performed safely with similar immediate and long term outcomes. PMID:27777952

  6. Open conversion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with the Ovation Prime™ endograft.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; Charalampidis, Dimitrios; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Antoniou, George A; Trellopoulos, George; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2014-02-01

    Advances in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endograft device technology have contributed to improved outcomes and durability of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), even in complex infrarenal aortic anatomies. However, stent graft failure secondary to endoleaks, migration, endotension and sac enlargement are persistent problems that can result in aneurysm rupture following EVAR.A symptomatic infrarenal AAA (4mm proximal neck) was treated initially with an Ovation Prime™ device (TriVascular, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA) in an off-label fashion, leading to type Ia endoleak moderately reduced by additional proximal neck ballooning. A failed Chimney technique to the single patent, but severely stenosed, right renal artery preceded the use of this device. A large type Ia endoleak was evident at 6-month follow-up, but following a failed supplementary endovascular intervention with coils to seal the endoleak, the patient presented with hemorrhagic shock from AAA rupture, requiring urgent open conversion. Intraoperatively it was impossible to explant this new type of endograft. Circumferential tying of the infrarenal aorta with a Teflon band was unable to stop the bleeding. However, after dividing the body of the stent-graft below the two proximal polymer rings, the endoleak was successfully treated by suturing the graft with the proximal aortic neck. The procedure was completed with extension of the stump to the common femoral arteries using a bifurcated Dacron prosthesis.The body of an Ovation Prime™ endograft may be impossible to explant in open conversion conditions. Large prospective studies with longer follow-up are required to adequately reflect the behavior of this particular device. PMID:24619891

  7. Patient-specific simulation of endovascular repair surgery with tortuous aneurysms requiring flexible stent-grafts.

    PubMed

    Perrin, David; Badel, Pierre; Orgeas, Laurent; Geindreau, Christian; du Roscoat, Sabine Rolland; Albertini, Jean-Noël; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The rate of post-operative complications is the main drawback of endovascular repair, a technique used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms. Complex anatomies, featuring short aortic necks and high vessel tortuosity for instance, have been proved likely prone to these complications. In this context, practitioners could benefit, at the preoperative planning stage, from a tool able to predict the post-operative position of the stent-graft, to validate their stent-graft sizing and anticipate potential complications. In consequence, the aim of this work is to prove the ability of a numerical simulation methodology to reproduce accurately the shapes of stent-grafts, with a challenging design, deployed inside tortuous aortic aneurysms. Stent-graft module samples were scanned by X-ray microtomography and subjected to mechanical tests to generate finite-element models. Two EVAR clinical cases were numerically reproduced by simulating stent-graft models deployment inside the tortuous arterial model generated from patient pre-operative scan. In the same manner, an in vitro stent-graft deployment in a rigid polymer phantom, generated by extracting the arterial geometry from the preoperative scan of a patient, was simulated to assess the influence of biomechanical environment unknowns in the in vivo case. Results were validated by comparing stent positions on simulations and post-operative scans. In all cases, simulation predicted stents deployed locations and shapes with an accuracy of a few millimetres. The good results obtained in the in vitro case validated the ability of the methodology to simulate stent-graft deployment in very tortuous arteries and led to think proper modelling of biomechanical environment could reduce the few local discrepancies found in the in vivo case. In conclusion, this study proved that our methodology can achieve accurate simulation of stent-graft deployed shape even in tortuous patient specific aortic aneurysms and may be potentially helpful to

  8. Clinical outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms that underwent endovascular repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) in patients at a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data on 16 patients with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and nine patients with consecutive rAAA treated with EVAR from January 2010 to December 2014 in a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The preoperative characteristics of the two groups are listed. Thirty-six percent (9/25) of the patients were referred from other hospitals that did not offer surgical services. The percentage of patients with rAAA that were transferred from other hospitals was 55.5% (5/9). The stay durations in the intensive care unit for elective EVAR cases were shorter than those for emergent EVAR (1.75±1 d elective vs. 10±13.37 d emergent; P<0.019). The hospitalization days (11.06±4.07 d elective vs. 21.89±18.36 d emergent; P<0.031), operative time (183.63±57.24 min elective vs. 227.11±59.92 min emergent; P<0.009), and blood loss volumes (115.63±80.41 mL elective vs. 422.22±276.26 mL emergent; P<0.005) are shown; statistics for use of Perclose ProGlide® (7 cases elective vs. 0 case emergent; P<0.024) are compared. The overall 30-d mortality rate was 11.11% (1/9). Conclusions The results confirm that EVAR surgery can be safely performed in a district general hospital with an integrated health care system. Using Perclose ProGlide® for selected cases may reduce blood loss and operative time. PMID:27499945

  9. Patient-specific simulation of endovascular repair surgery with tortuous aneurysms requiring flexible stent-grafts.

    PubMed

    Perrin, David; Badel, Pierre; Orgeas, Laurent; Geindreau, Christian; du Roscoat, Sabine Rolland; Albertini, Jean-Noël; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The rate of post-operative complications is the main drawback of endovascular repair, a technique used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms. Complex anatomies, featuring short aortic necks and high vessel tortuosity for instance, have been proved likely prone to these complications. In this context, practitioners could benefit, at the preoperative planning stage, from a tool able to predict the post-operative position of the stent-graft, to validate their stent-graft sizing and anticipate potential complications. In consequence, the aim of this work is to prove the ability of a numerical simulation methodology to reproduce accurately the shapes of stent-grafts, with a challenging design, deployed inside tortuous aortic aneurysms. Stent-graft module samples were scanned by X-ray microtomography and subjected to mechanical tests to generate finite-element models. Two EVAR clinical cases were numerically reproduced by simulating stent-graft models deployment inside the tortuous arterial model generated from patient pre-operative scan. In the same manner, an in vitro stent-graft deployment in a rigid polymer phantom, generated by extracting the arterial geometry from the preoperative scan of a patient, was simulated to assess the influence of biomechanical environment unknowns in the in vivo case. Results were validated by comparing stent positions on simulations and post-operative scans. In all cases, simulation predicted stents deployed locations and shapes with an accuracy of a few millimetres. The good results obtained in the in vitro case validated the ability of the methodology to simulate stent-graft deployment in very tortuous arteries and led to think proper modelling of biomechanical environment could reduce the few local discrepancies found in the in vivo case. In conclusion, this study proved that our methodology can achieve accurate simulation of stent-graft deployed shape even in tortuous patient specific aortic aneurysms and may be potentially helpful to

  10. Embolisation of a Proximal Type I Endoleak Post-Nellix Aortic Aneurysm Repair Complicated by Reflux of Onyx into the Nellix Endograft Limb

    SciTech Connect

    Ameli-Renani, S. Das, R. Weller, A. Chung, R. Morgan, R. A.

    2015-06-15

    We report the first case of intervention for a proximal type 1 endoleak following Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing repair of an aortic aneurysm. This was complicated by migration of Onyx into one of the Nellix graft limbs causing significant stenosis. Subsequent placement of a covered stent to affix the Onyx between the stent and the wall of the Nellix endograft successfully restored stent patency.

  11. Migration of the Zenith Flex Device during Endovascular Aortic Repair of an Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysm with a Severely Angulated Neck

    PubMed Central

    Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Murakami, Kenji; Sakurai, Yuka; Fujiwara, Keishi; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A woman in her 80s with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm was scheduled for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck (SAN), and the Zenith Flex device was selected. Completion angiography showed migration of the main body resulting in right renal artery stenosis. A Palmaz genesis was placed across the renal orifice. The patient had no renal dysfunction and was discharged 7 days after EVAR. If Zenith Flex devices are used for a SAN, it is necessary to consider not only the position of the renal artery but also the appropriate position of the stent-graft.

  12. Early Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uzung; Marinelli, Laura; Ali, Sayed; Huberfeld, Seymour; Barrera, Rafael; Chang, John B

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug that has been commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. Especially, its main metabolically active metabolite desethylamiodarone can adversely affect many organs. A very well-known severe complication of amiodarone therapy is the amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. This article presents the case study of an 82-year-old male patient with acute amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair for rapidly increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During the postoperative period the patient developed rapid atrial fibrillation and amiodarone therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the patient went into acute respiratory failure and was requiring high supplemental oxygen support and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. During the hospital course the patient required mechanical ventilator support. With discontinuation of amiodarone, supportive therapy and steroid treatment patient symptoms significantly improved. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients on the medication with progressive or acute respiratory symptoms. Early discontinuation of amiodarone and aggressive corticosteroid therapy should be considered as a viable treatment strategy. PMID:27574388

  13. Percutaneous Treatment of Sac Rupture in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico; Nicotera, Paolo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselective glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.

  14. The Effect of Steroid Therapy on Postoperative Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Atsushi; Omoto, Tadashi; Iizuka, Hirofumi; Kawaura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Unexpected systemic inflammatory response with high fever and increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) occurred frequently after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). This excessive inflammatory response affects the postoperative course. We evaluated the effects of steroid on the postoperative inflammatory response after EVAR. Methods: Steroid therapy, intravenous infusion of methylprednisolone 1000 mg just after the anesthesia induction, was started since December 2012. After induction of the steroid therapy, 25 patients underwent EVAR with steroid therapy (Group S). These patients were compared with the 65 patients who underwent EVAR without steroid therapy (Group C) in white blood cell count (WBC), CRP and maximum body temperature (BT) on postoperative day 1–5. Results: There was no significant difference in age, female gender, operation time, maximum aneurysm diameter between the two groups. There was no postoperative infective complication in the both groups. WBC did not differ between the two groups; however, CRP was significantly suppressed in Group S than in Group C on POD 1, 3 and 5. Also BT was significantly lower in Group S than Group C on POD 1, 2 and 3. Conclusions: Steroid pretreatment before implantation of the stent graft reduces the early postoperative inflammatory response after EVAR, without increasing postoperative infection. (This is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2015; 24: 861–865.)

  15. Retrograde amnesia in patients with rupture and surgical repair of anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Margaret G; Lafleche, Ginette M C

    2004-03-01

    The retrograde amnesia of patients with memory loss related to rupture and surgical repair of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms is compared with the retrograde amnesia of temporal amnesic patients and nonamnesic control participants. Two tests which focus on popular culture but which differ according to extent of news exposure and the cognitive processes necessary for task performance were used to measure retrograde memory. ACoA patients demonstrated more significant retrograde memory problems than did nonamnesic controls; however, the severity and pattern of their memory loss was less severe than that seen in association with temporal amnesia. Different factors influenced the remote memory loss of respective groups: ACoA patients' problems were related to impaired lexical retrieval whereas temporal amnesic patients had problems secondary to both retrieval and storage deficits. PMID:15012842

  16. Successful Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Woman with Severe von Willebrand (Type 3) Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Victoria; Marriott, Kevin; Stanbridge, Rex; Shlebak, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    von Willebrand disease type 3 (VWD3) is a rare but the most severe form of von Willebrand disease; it is due to almost complete lack of von Willebrand factor activity (VWF:RCo). It is inherited as autosomal recessive trait; whilst heterozygote carriers have mild, or no symptoms, patients with VWD3 show severe bleeding symptoms. In the laboratory, this is characterised by undetectable VWF:Ag, VWF:RCo, and reduced levels of factor VIII < 0.02 IU/dL. The bleeding is managed with von Willebrand/FVIII factor concentrate replacement therapy. In this rare but challenging case we report on the successful excision and repair of an ascending aortic aneurysm following adequate VWF/FVIII factor concentrate replacement using Haemate-P. PMID:25960895

  17. Feasibility of Three-Dimensional MR Angiography Image Fusion Guidance for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Tacher, Vania; Desgranges, Pascal; You, Ketsakin; Ridouani, Fourat; Marzelle, Jean; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography image fusion (IF) with live fluoroscopy guidance was used while performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) in five patients with a history of chronic renal disease or severe contrast allergy. Intraprocedural technical success was 100%. Median procedure time was 120 minutes (range, 60-180 min), fluoroscopy time was 40 minutes (range, 17-65 min), dose-area product was 245,867 mGy × cm(2) (range, 68,435-690,053 mGy × cm(2)), and iodinated contrast volume injected was 15 mL (range, 0-40 mL). Technical success was achieved in four of five patients (80%); one case was complicated by a type 1 endoleak on follow-up MR angiography, which was successfully treated. EVAR with MR angiography IF guidance was technically feasible and safe in five patients and reduced or eliminated the use of iodinated contrast media. PMID:26830935

  18. Surgical repair of an aberrant splenic artery aneurysm: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; LaMuraglia, Glenn; Nigri, Giuseppe; Vietri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    Aneurysms of the splenic artery are the most common splanchnic aneurysms. Aneurysms of a splenic artery with an anomalous origin from the superior mesenteric artery are however rare, with eight previously reported cases. Their indications for treatment are superposable to those of aneurysms affecting an orthotopic artery. Methods of treatment of this condition include endovascular, minimally invasive techniques and surgical resection. We report one more case of aneurysm of an aberrant splenic artery, treated with surgical resection, and preservation of the spleen.

  19. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Using a Reverse Chimney Technique in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome and Contained Ruptured Chronic Type B Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Kalender, Guenay; Heuschmid, Martin; Syha, Roland; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Brechtel, Klaus

    2011-10-15

    We report endovascular thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) with reverse chimney technique in a patient with contained ruptured type B dissection. EVAR seems feasible as a bailout option in Marfan patients with acute life-threatening disease.

  20. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Gonçalves, F; Baderkhan, H; Verhagen, H J M; Wanhainen, A; Björck, M; Stolker, R J; Hoeks, S E; Mani, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6–18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results Some 597 EVARs (71·1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47·6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5–9 mm) in 142 (23·8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10 mm) in 171 patients (28·6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84·3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78·7 to 89·8), 88·1 (80·6 to 95·5) and 94·4 (90·1 to 98·7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3·11; P < 0·001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2·10; P = 0·022), early postoperative complications (HR 3·34; P < 0·001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1·02; P = 0·001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance. PMID:24752772

  1. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  2. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Katseni, Konstantina; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R. PMID:26798637

  3. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Katseni, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R. PMID:26798637

  4. Early Experiences with the Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Sung, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report our early experiences with the endovascular repair of ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (rDTAAs), which are a rare and life-threatening condition. Methods Among 42 patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between October 2010 and September 2015, five patients (11.9%) suffered an rDTAA. Results The mean age was 72.4±5.1 years, and all patients were male. Hemoptysis and hemothorax were present in three (60%) and two (40%) patients, respectively. Hypovolemic shock was noted in three patients who underwent emergency operations. A hybrid operation was performed in three patients. The mean operative time was 269.8±72.3 minutes. The mean total length of aortic coverage was 186.0±49.2 mm. No 30-day mortality occurred. Stroke, delirium, and atrial fibrillation were observed in one patient each. Paraplegia did not occur. Endoleak was found in two patients (40%), one of whom underwent an early and successful reintervention. During the mean follow-up period of 16.8±14.8 months, two patients died; one cause of death was a persistent type 1 endoleak and the other cause was unknown. Conclusion TEVAR for rDTAA was associated with favorable early mortality and morbidity outcomes. However, early reintervention should be considered if persistent endoleak occurs. PMID:27064672

  5. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Young Patient with Descending Aortic Injury;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    No, Hironari; Nishida, Satoru; Takagi, Takeshi; Mohri, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy was referred to our emergency room due to a penetrating injury of the back. Computed tomography( CT) demonstrated a descending aortic injury at the Th9/10 level, bilateral hemothorax, and spinal cord injury. Although surgical treatment was indicated, multiple organ injury complicated open surgical repair, which required cardiopulmonary bypass with full heparinization. Therefore, the patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A 23×33-mm Excluder aortic extension cuff was chosen for the small, 15-mm diameter aorta. The aortic extension was delivered and deployed in the descending aorta. Postoperative CT demonstrated neither endoleak nor collapse of the stent-graft. TEVAR for traumatic aortic aneurysm appears to be safe and effective, and an aortic extension for an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be utilized as an alternative device if the patient is young and the aorta is small. PMID:27476569

  6. Risk Factor Analysis for Buttock Claudication after Internal Iliac Artery Embolization with Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Ryeon; Park, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involving the common iliac artery requires extension of the stent-graft limb into the external iliac artery. For this procedure, internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization is performed to prevent type II endoleak. In this study, we investigated the frequency and risk factor of buttock claudication (BC) in patients having interventional embolization of the IIA. Materials and Methods: From January 2010 to December 2013, a total of 110 patients with AAA were treated with EVAR in our institution. This study included 27 patients (24.5%) who had undergone unilateral IIA coil embolization with EVAR. We examined hospital charts retrospectively and interviewed by telephone for the occurrence of BC. Results: Mean age of total patients was 71.9±7.0 years and 88.9% were males. During a mean follow-up of 8.65±9.04 months, the incidence of BC was 40.7% (11 of 27 patients). In 8 patients with claudication, the symptoms had resolved within 1 month of IIA embolization, but the symptoms persisted for more than 6 months in the remaining 3 patients. In univariate and multivariate analysis, risk factors such as age, sex, comorbidity, patency of collateral arteries, and anatomical characteristics of AAA were not significantly related with BC. Conclusion: In this study, BC was a frequent complication of IIA embolization during EVAR and there was no associated risk factor. Certain principles such as checking preoperative angiogram, proximal and unilateral IIA embolization may have contributed to reducing the incidence of BC. PMID:27386451

  7. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  8. Large Diameter Limbs for Dilated Common Iliac Arteries in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair. Is It Safe?

    SciTech Connect

    Malagari, Katerina Brountzos, Elias; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Papathanasiou, Matilda; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Mastorakou, Renata; Kelekis, Dimitris

    2004-09-15

    In this prospective study we examined whether dilated common iliac arteries (CIAs) can provide a safe distal seal in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the use of bifurcated stent grafts with large diameter limbs. Sixteen patients with 26 dilated CIAs with a diameter of {>=}6 mm who were offered EVAR using stent grafts with large diameter limbs were included in the study (Group A). Forty-two patients who also underwent EVAR without iliac dilatation, matched for age, sex and surgical risk were used for comparison (controls-Group B). In group A mean CIA diameter was 18.2 mm (16-28) and mean abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameter was 6.87 {+-} 1.05 cm; mean age was 77.2 {+-} 4.8 yrs (67-81). Mean follow-up was 33.6 months (2.8 yrs). CIA diameter changes and development of endoleaks were assessed by CT angiography (CTA). Overall iliac dilatation was present in 16/58 of our patients (27.6%). In 10 patients dilatation was bilateral (17.3%). Partial or complete flow to the internal iliac artery (IIA) territories was preserved in all patients post-EVAR. On follow-up, stable caliber of the dilated CIAs was observed in 21 patients (84%), enlargement of 1mm in 3 (16%), and failure of the distal attachment in 1 (6.2%). Compared to the control group there was no statistical significance in the incidence of complications. Dilated common iliac arteries provide a safe distal seal in patients who have undergone EVAR, thus obviating the need for additional endovascular procedures and sparing flow in the IIA vascular bed.

  9. Endovascular Repair of a Type III Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Occlusion of Visceral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris; Tsigris, Chris; Michail, Othon; Marinos, George; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-07-15

    The successful endovascular repair of a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) with the use of a tube endograft is reported. A 56-year-old male with a 6.4-cm type III TAAA, a 4.2-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chronic renal insufficiency presented with flank pain, nausea, acute anuria, and serum creatinine of 6.1 mg/dl. Acute occlusion of the left solitary renal artery was diagnosed and emergent recanalization with percutaneus transluminal angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully, with reversal of the serum creatinine level at 1.6 mg/dl. Further imaging studies for TAAA management revealed ostial occlusion of both the celiac artery (CA) and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) but a hypertrophic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) providing retrograde flow to the aforementioned vessels. This rare anatomic serendipity allowed us to repair the TAAA simply by using a two-component tube endograft without fenestrations (Zenith; William Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) that covered the entire length of the aneurysm, including the CA and SMA origins, since a natural arterial bypass from the IMA to the CA and SMA already existed, affording protection from gastrointestinal ischemic complications. The patient had a fast and uneventful recovery and is currently doing well 6 months after the procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of successful endovascular repair of a TAAA involving visceral arteries with the simple use of a tube endograft.

  10. Endovascular Repair of a Kommerell’s Diverticulum and Aneurysmal Right-sided Aortic Arch: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kannno, Megumu; Ishikawa, Kazunori; Takano, Takashi; Ono, Takano; Morishima, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery is an uncommon anomaly. We describe a case of Kommerell’s diverticulum involving the distal portion of a right-sided aortic arch and the origin of an aberrant left subclavian artery in a 74-year-old man with hoarseness. The patient underwent successful endovascular repair of the aneurysm with use of a Gore TAG thoracic endoprosthesis and coil embolization of the left subclavian artery. Postoperative computed tomography showed complete exclusion of the lesion, without endoleaks. Endovascular repair is feasible and can be effective in such cases. PMID:23555359

  11. Surgical repair of an aberrant splenic artery aneurysm: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; LaMuraglia, Glenn; Nigri, Giuseppe; Vietri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    Aneurysms of the splenic artery are the most common splanchnic aneurysms. Aneurysms of a splenic artery with an anomalous origin from the superior mesenteric artery are however rare, with eight previously reported cases. Their indications for treatment are superposable to those of aneurysms affecting an orthotopic artery. Methods of treatment of this condition include endovascular, minimally invasive techniques and surgical resection. We report one more case of aneurysm of an aberrant splenic artery, treated with surgical resection, and preservation of the spleen. PMID:17349366

  12. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  13. Temporary extra-anatomic brain perfusion followed by total rerouting of the supra-aortic vessels for hybrid repair of a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Frederic; Canaud, Ludovic; Hireche, Kheira; Berthet, Jean-Philippe; Marty-Ane, Charles; Alric, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Hybrid repair of ruptured aortic arch repair has been proposed as a valuable approach. However, the presence of an anterior mediastinal hematoma must be carefully detected because of the inherent risk of rupture at sternotomy. We report the case of a patient presenting a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm with anterior rupture who underwent hybrid repair using a temporary extra-anatomic brain perfusion followed by total rerouting of the supra-aortic trunks. We propose this adjunctive technique as a means of allowing a safe endovascular exclusion of aortic arch lesions and avoiding the risk of acute and total aortic rupture in case of anterior rupture of aortic arch aneurysms.

  14. Endovascular stent-graft repair of spontaneous aorto-caval fistula secondary to a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: An emergency management of hostile anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyuan; Wang, Haofu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although endovascular aneurysm repair of aorto-caval fistula offers a safe and efficient approach compared to traditional open repair, endovascular techniques for the treatment of aorto-caval fistula with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in emergency circumstance are not well established. This study aims to evaluate the effect of endovascular repair of aorto-caval fistula of a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and hostile anatomy. Methods: we report a case of an aorto-caval fistula endovascular repaired in a 78-year-old male using a hybrid stent-graft technique. Results: The patient had an uneventful recovery and CTA follow up showed no sign of ACF or any endoleak. Conclusion: This case highlights ACF might be managed by composite endograft implantation with careful and solid sealing of anchoring zones on the two sides. PMID:27489717

  15. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  16. Surgical repair of true left ventricular aneurysm in an infant: a rare complication after unsuccessful perventricular VSD closure.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Saygi, Murat; Yildiz, Okan; Erek, Ersin; Guzeltas, Alper

    2014-10-01

    A 2.5-month-old female patient presented for closure of a ventricular septal defect (VSD). Transthoracic echocardiography showed a large muscular ventricular septal defect. After perventricular closure of the defect was performed with an Amplatzer muscular VSD occluder, peroperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed that the device had been implanted in the wrong area of the ventricular septum. The device was retrieved and a large mid-muscular defect with extension to the outlet septum was closed with a patch of Dacron which was secured with 5-0 sutures. A perforation in the ventricular septum due to attempted perventricular device delivery was seen, and it was repaired primarily. In the eighth month of follow-up, transthoracic echocardiography revealed an aneurysm in the posterior wall of the left ventricle. The patient's electrocardiogram showed pathological Q waves and ST-segment elevation in leads DII, DIII, and aVF consistent with subacute inferior myocardial infarction. At subsequent surgery, this was found to be a true aneurysm, located in area of distribution of the obtuse marginal branch of the left circumflex coronary artery in the posterior wall of the left ventricle. The aneurysm was closed off using a Dacron patch, and the sac was resected. Development of a true aneurysm is a rare but important complication of attempted perventricular VSD closure.

  17. Long-term results of open repair of popliteal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wagenhäuser, M.U.; Herma, K.B.; Sagban, T.A.; Dueppers, P.; Schelzig, H.; Duran, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Popliteal artery aneurysms (PAA) are rare. Different surgical techniques for open surgical repair are possible. This study presents a single centre experience using open surgical repair with a medial approach (MA) and outlines differences between symptomatic (SLS) and asymptomatic (ALS) legs. Methods Data collection was performed retrospectively. The investigation period was from 1 January 1996 to 1 January 2013. Patients presented in the Outpatient Department and received a questionnaire concerning their quality of life. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Mann–Whitney test and Cochran–Armitage test for trend was used for data analysis. Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate limb salvage rates. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results We analyzed 16 ALS and 26 SLS with an average age of 63.5 ± 10 years. Preoperative ankle-brachial index (ABI) was 1.0 ± 0.2 for ALS (on control examination: 1.12 ± 0.24) and 0.08 ± 0.18 for SLS (on control examination 0.94 ± 0.14) (p < 0.05). Limb salvage rate was 100% for ALS and 86.7% for SLS (overall 93.3%). Primary patency rate for SLS was 85%, for ALS rate of 100%, respectively (overall 92.5%). ALS reached an average of 13.1 ± 2.7 points (SLS 11.4 ± 2.8) on a numeric point scale. Conclusion Open surgery is therapy and prevention of acute ischaemia all in one, especially for asymptomatic patients and delivers good long-term results. Endovascular therapies offer an alternative but long-term results are pending. Open surgery should still be considered as a gold standard therapy. PMID:25905015

  18. An apical left ventricular aneurysm rupture presenting as left breast mass 11 years after surgical repair.

    PubMed

    Fok, M; Bashir, M; Hammoud, I; Harrington, D; Kuduvalli, M; Field, M; Oo, A

    2014-10-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm is a rare entity and, consequently, there is limited knowledge of the condition's natural history. The most frequent mode of presentation for LV pseudoaneurysm is heart failure with chest pain. However, the variable presentation of this condition requires a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who had suffered an acute myocardial infarction 23 years previously, which resulted in a calcified LV apical aneurysm. Three weeks prior to being referred to our hospital, she was noted by her general practitioner to have a left-sided breast mass although mammography was negative. One week later, she attended the accident and emergency department; she was haemodynamically unstable but was resuscitated successfully. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a large haematoma located in the left chest wall communicating with the left ventricle. She underwent emergency cardiac surgical repair. On arrival at the intensive care unit following surgery, her haemodynamic status was unstable, and she deteriorated rapidly and died. With this report, we aim to raise the level of awareness for an apical LV pulsatile mass that could anatomically expand and present as a breast mass or tumour. An early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention is essential in order to achieve better outcomes and avoid detrimental complications. PMID:25245713

  19. Antiplatelet treatment and prothrombotic diathesis following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Trellopoulos, G; Georgiadis, G S; Nikolopoulos, E S; Kapoulas, K C; Georgakarakos, E I; Lazarides, M K

    2014-10-01

    Prothrombotic diathesis expressed by elevated levels of coagulation-specific biomarkers has been reported in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and after AAA endovascular repair (EVAR). This study investigates the effect of antiplatelet agents (APLs) on the prothrombotic diathesis in the post-EVAR period. Forty elective EVAR patients had thrombin-antithrombin complex, d-dimer, fibrinopeptide A, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein measured before, at 24 hours, 1 month, and 6 months after EVAR. Patients receiving APLs postoperatively were compared with those not receiving APLs. All biomarkers were above the normal limits preoperatively and increased significantly 24 hours postoperatively followed by a drop at 1 and 6 months. No statistically significant changes were noted among patients receiving APLs in comparison with those not receiving APLs. The preoperative and postoperative prothrombotic diathesis of AAA following EVAR was confirmed in line with other reports. There was however no significant alteration of the examined biomarkers in patients receiving APLs. PMID:24101707

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis indicates underreporting of renal dysfunction following endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Karthikesalingam, Alan; Bahia, Sandeep S; Patel, Shaneel R; Azhar, Bilal; Jackson, Dan; Cresswell, Lynne; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Holt, Peter J E; Thompson, Matt M

    2015-02-01

    Deterioration in renal function has been described after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVRs). The etiology is multifactorial and represents an important therapeutic target. A need exists to quantitatively summarize incidence and severity of renal dysfunction after EVR to allow better-informed attempts to preserve renal function and improve life expectancy. Here a systematic search was performed using Medline and Embase for renal function after EVR applying PRISMA statements. Univariate and multivariate random-effects meta-analyses were performed to estimate pooled postoperative changes in serum creatinine and creatinine clearance at four time points after EVR. Clinically relevant deterioration in renal function was also estimated at 1 year or more after EVR. Pooled probability of clinically relevant deterioration in renal function at 1 year or more was 18% (95% confidence interval of 14-23%, I2 of 82.5%). Serum creatinine increased after EVR by 0.05 mg/dl at 30 days/1 month, 0.09 mg/dl at 1 month to 1 year, and 0.11 mg/dl at 1 year or more (all significant). Creatinine clearance decreased after EVR by 5.65 ml/min at 1 month-1 year and by 6.58 ml/min at 1 year or more (both significant). Thus, renal dysfunction after EVR is common and merits attention.

  1. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery. PMID:23852404

  2. Repair of a large main pulmonary artery aneurysm in a 71-year-old Jehovah's Witness patient.

    PubMed

    Henn, Lucas W; Esmailian, Fardad

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm is a rarely reported and poorly studied entity; most mentions in the literature are in case series and case reports. Cardiac surgery in Jehovah's Witness patients is occurring more frequently because of improved techniques of blood conservation. We report the repair of a large pulmonary artery aneurysm in a 71-year-old woman who was a Jehovah's Witness. Using total cardiopulmonary bypass, we replaced the main pulmonary artery and both branches with Gelweave tube-grafts, because the fragility of a homograft presented possible bleeding problems. The patient recovered rapidly, and her symptoms were greatly improved. We think that a patient's status as a Jehovah's Witness need not preclude potentially life-saving cardiac operations. PMID:23914038

  3. Repair of a Large Main Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm in a 71-Year-Old Jehovah's Witness Patient

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Lucas W.; Esmailian, Fardad

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm is a rarely reported and poorly studied entity; most mentions in the literature are in case series and case reports. Cardiac surgery in Jehovah's Witness patients is occurring more frequently because of improved techniques of blood conservation. We report the repair of a large pulmonary artery aneurysm in a 71-year-old woman who was a Jehovah's Witness. Using total cardiopulmonary bypass, we replaced the main pulmonary artery and both branches with Gelweave tube-grafts, because the fragility of a homograft presented possible bleeding problems. The patient recovered rapidly, and her symptoms were greatly improved. We think that a patient's status as a Jehovah's Witness need not preclude potentially life-saving cardiac operations. PMID:23914038

  4. Experience With Fenestrated Endovascular Repair of Juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongzhou; Li, Yue; Peng, Ran; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Tao; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To present the early and mid-term results of fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) using the Zenith fenestrated device for juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (JAAAs) at our center in China. Design: Retrospective study. The study included 15 male patients with JAAAs, who underwent FEVAR using the Zenith fenestrated device at our center between February 2011 and June 2015. All custom-made Zenith fenestrated devices were designed according to computed tomography angiography (CTA) images obtained preoperatively. The patients with renal insufficiency underwent duplex ultrasonography, while the patients with normal renal function underwent 3 CT data acquisitions including nonenhanced CT, arterial phase, and venous phase. These examinations and blood examinations were completed at 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge, and annually thereafter. The mean age of the patients was 73.13 ± 9.06 years (range, 57–86 years), and the median follow-up period was 30 months (8–52 months). Small fenestrations were used in 27 renal arteries, scallops were used in 7 superior mesenteric arteries (SMAs) and 2 renal arteries, and large fenestrations were used in 2 SMAs. Conversion to an open procedure was not required in any of the patients, and the technical success rate was 100%. The mean length of hospital stay was 11.33 ± 2.02 days (7–15 days). No patient died within the 1st 30 days after the operation. One patient had a type Ia endoleak, which disappeared at 6 months after the operation, 1 patient had a type Ib endoleak, which was detected at 17 months after the operation, and 2 patients had type II endoleaks. One patient died at 17 months and another patient died at 30 months after the operation. Therefore, the all-cause mortality rate was 13.33% (2/15). The target vessel patency rate was 100% without occlusion. The early and mid-term results of FEVAR using the Zenith fenestrated device were good, demonstrating that this procedure is effective for

  5. Single-Stage Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm through a Median Sternotomy in a Patient with Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta and Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Hironobu; Mukai, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudocoarctation of the aorta is a rare anomaly and considered a benign condition. Pseudocoarctation of the aorta has been associated with aneurysm formation in the thoracic aorta, which may cause sudden rupture or dissection. Thus, the presence of an aneurysm in combination with pseudocoarctation of the aorta is thought to be an indication for surgery. We present a case of pseudocoarctation of the aorta associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and severe aortic valve stenosis with a bicuspid aortic valve. In our case, single-stage repair was performed through a median sternotomy using our “pleural-window approach.” PMID:26131037

  6. Repair of left subclavian artery and aberrant right subclavian artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nair, Kannan R; Vasu, Harilal; Jacob, Aju; Velayudhan, Bashi V

    2010-12-01

    Left subclavian artery aneurysm with an aneurysm of the aberrant right subclavian artery is a rare condition with a reported incidence of 0.13% to 1%. We report the successful surgical correction of both conditions in a 34-year-old man.

  7. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures. The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562). Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  8. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures.The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562).Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  9. Endovascular repair of a ruptured subclavian artery aneurysm in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome using a sandwich technique.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Codreanu, Maria; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Safi, Hazim; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2014-10-01

    We present the case of a type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patient with a ruptured right subclavian artery aneurysm and associated arteriovenous fistula who underwent successful endovascular repair requiring simultaneous stent graft repair of the innominate artery using a sandwich technique. A 17-year-old man with known type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome developed right neck and shoulder swelling. CTA study demonstrated a 17 × 13-cm ruptured subclavian artery aneurysm with an associated internal jugular vein arteriovenous fistula. In the hybrid suite, a 7 mm × 15-cm stent graft (Viabahn, WL Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) was advanced from the right brachial approach into the innominate artery. A separate wire was placed into the right carotid artery via the right femoral approach (7 Fr), and a 7 mm × 10-cm stent graft (Viabahn) was advanced into the innominate artery. An additional 8 mm × 10-cm stent graft (Viabahn) was placed from the right brachial approach to obtain a distal-landing zone in the axillary artery. Complex vascular anatomy, in which graft seal creation may be challenging, does not exclude endovascular approaches as the sandwich technique can be utilized as a suitable alternative to open repair.

  10. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  11. The financial implications of endovascular aneurysm repair in the cost containment era

    PubMed Central

    Stone, David H.; Horvath, Alexander J.; Goodney, Philip P.; Rzucidlo, Eva M.; Nolan, Brian W.; Walsh, Daniel B.; Zwolak, Robert M.; Powell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with significant direct device costs. Such costs place EVAR at odds with efforts to constrain healthcare expenditures. This study examines the procedure-associated costs and operating margins associated with EVAR at a tertiary care academic medical center. Methods All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (n = 127). Among this cohort, 49 patients met standard commercial instruction for use guidelines, were treated using a single manufacturer device, and billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) 238. Of these 49 patients, net technical operating margins (technical revenue minus technical cost) were calculated in conjunction with the hospital finance department. EVAR implant costs were determined for each procedure. DRG 238-associated costs and length of stay were benchmarked against other academic medical centers using University Health System Consortium 2012 data. Results Among the studied EVAR cohort (age 75, 82% male, mean length of stay, 1.7 days), mean technical costs totaled $31,672. Graft implants accounted for 52% of the allocated technical costs. Institutional overhead was 17% ($5495) of total technical costs. Net mean total technical EVAR-associated operating margins were —$4015 per procedure. Our institutional costs and length of stay, when benchmarked against comparable centers, remained in the lowest quartile nationally using University Health System Consortium costs for DRG 238. Stent graft price did not correlate with total EVAR. market share. Conclusions EVAR is currently associated with significant negative operating margins among Medicare beneficiaries. Currently, device costs account for over 50% of EVAR-associated technical costs and did not impact EVAR market share, reflecting an unawareness of cost differential among surgeons. These data indicate that EVAR must undergo dramatic care delivery redesign for this practice to remain sustainable

  12. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR.

  13. Visceral and Renal Artery Complications of Suprarenal Fixation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Dawson, Joseph; Loftus, Ian M.; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2007-07-15

    Background. The effect of suprarenal fixation of endovascular grafts on renal and visceral artery function remains undefined. This study aimed to determine renal and visceral artery complications following suprarenal fixation during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR). Methods. Prospectively collected data from 112 patients who received suprarenal fixation (group SF) and 36 patients who received infrarenal fixation (group IF) in a single institution from December 1997 to April 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Median follow-up was 26 months (range 0.1-101 months). Results. Stent struts extended to or above the level of 106 (94.6%) right renal arteries, 104 (92.9%) left renal arteries, 49 (43.8%) superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), and 7 (6.3%) celiac arteries in group SF. This group had 2 (1.8%) unintentional main renal artery occlusions, of which 1 was successfully treated at the first procedure with a renal stent. There was 1 (0.9%) SMA occlusion which resulted in bowel infarction and death. Group IF had no renal or visceral artery complications. There were no late-onset occlusions or infarcts. There was no significant difference in median serum creatinine between groups SF and IF at 1 month (p = 0.18) and 6 months to 12 months (p 0.22) follow-up. The change in serum creatinine over time was also not significantly different within each group (SF, p = 0.09; IF, p 0.38). Conclusions. In this study, suprarenal fixation was associated with a very small incidence of immediate renal and visceral artery occlusion. There did not appear to be any medium-term sequelae of suprarenal fixation.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of the cross-limb stent graft configuration for endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Shek, Tina L T; Tse, Leonard W; Nabovati, Aydin; Amon, Cristina H

    2012-12-01

    The technique of crossing the limbs of bifurcated modular stent grafts for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is often employed in the face of splayed aortic bifurcations to facilitate cannulation and prevent device kinking. However, little has been reported about the implications of cross-limb EVAR, especially in comparison to conventional EVAR. Previous computational fluid dynamics studies of conventional EVAR grafts have mostly utilized simplified planar stent graft geometries. We herein examined the differences between conventional and cross-limb EVAR by comparing their hemodynamic flow fields (i.e., in the "direct" and "cross" configurations, respectively). We also added a "planar" configuration, which is commonly found in the literature, to identify how well this configuration compares to out-of-plane stent graft configurations from a hemodynamic perspective. A representative patient's cross-limb stent graft geometry was segmented using computed tomography imaging in Mimics software. The cross-limb graft geometry was used to build its direct and planar counterparts in SolidWorks. Physiologic velocity and mass flow boundary conditions and blood properties were implemented for steady-state and pulsatile transient simulations in ANSYS CFX. Displacement forces, wall shear stress (WSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were all comparable between the direct and cross configurations, whereas the planar geometry yielded very different predictions of hemodynamics compared to the out-of-plane stent graft configurations, particularly for displacement forces. This single-patient study suggests that the short-term hemodynamics involved in crossing the limbs is as safe as conventional EVAR. Higher helicity and improved WSS distribution of the cross-limb configuration suggest improved flow-related thrombosis resistance in the short term. However, there may be long-term fatigue implications to stent graft use in the cross configuration when compared to the direct

  15. Local brain hypothermia for neuroprotection in stroke treatment and aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kenneth R; Zuccarello, Mario

    2005-04-01

    Hypothermia is well known to provide neuroprotection following various brain insults in experimental animals. Two recently completed clinical trials of whole body hypothermia in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients' demonstrated significantly improved survival rates and neurologic outcomes. These results provide new excitement and encouragement for clinical application of hypothermia in cerebrovascular disease. However, the intensive care challenges and adverse events (e.g. prolonged times to target temperatures, shivering and sedation, pneumonia) during the management of hypothermia, dampen enthusiasm for widespread application especially in elderly stroke patients. In this manuscript, we review recent hypothermia trials for stroke. We describe an alternate approach, i.e. local brain cooling, and discuss this new technique with reference to the extensive literature on the marked efficacy of hypothermia. We describe a new technology, the ChillerPad(TM) and ChillerStrip(TM) Systems developed by Seacoast Technologies, Inc. (Portsmouth, NH, USA). The latter device has received FDA approval and will be employed in a trial of local hypothermia for cerebral aneurysm repair. We present our experimental findings that profound local hypothermia does not damage cortical neurons. We also report that local hypothermia protects the blood-brain barrier and markedly reduces vasogenic edema development in an experimental intracerebral hemorrhage model. Lastly, we review potential mechanisms through which hypothermia provides blood-brain barrier protection and reduces edema formation. Clearly, hypothermia has a bright future for cerebrovascular disease treatment if brain cooling can be delivered in a manner that does not compromise the patient or the neurosurgical and intensive care settings. Local brain cooling may be just that new treatment approach.

  16. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR. PMID:27617255

  17. A Case of Intestinal Necrosis after Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery-Preserving Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masataka; Imai, Akito; Watanabe, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man underwent endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and both internal iliac arteries (IIAs) were preserved. Postoperatively, loss of appetite developed. On the fifth day, computerized tomography (CT) showed inferior mesenteric artery thrombus formation, necrosis of the descending colon and rectum, and generalized peritonitis. The endovascular devices had not migrated. A colonic resection was performed. Histological analysis confirmed intestinal necrosis associated with mesenteric thrombus. The colon can become necrotic even if both IIAs are patent. Ischemic changes in the colon should be detected if it occurs and subsequent laparotomy should be done if it is necessary.

  18. Embolization for type 2 endoleak with sac expansion after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: safety and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kenji; Yamagami, Takuji; Urashima, Masaki; Tomiyoshi, Hideki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and outcome of embolization as treatment for persistent type 2 endoleak (T2EL) occurring after abdominal aortic stent graft implantation. This retrospective study included seven consecutive patients (one female, six males, mean age 72 years, range 66-88 years) with T2EL between January 2011 and September 2012. In all, T2EL was associated with an increase more than 5 mm in the aneurysm. The endoleak cavity or feeding artery was embolized with coils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. Clinical success was defined as regression or stabilization of the aneurysm sac irrespective of residual endoleaks on follow-up CT studies. At the time of T2EL intervention, mean aneurysm sac diameter was 63 mm (range 52-72 mm), and mean increase size of aneurysm sac diameter was 7 mm (range 5-13). Mean follow-up period was 6.0 ± 6.2 months (range 3-18 months). Our technical success rate was 100 %. Clinical success was obtained in 5 (71.4 %) of the seven patients. One patient was embolized three times due to sac expansion. T2EL was treated by transarterial embolization in eight procedures, and one procedure was performed by direct puncture embolization. There were no major complications; two procedures elicited minor complications: transient back pain and muscle weakness of the left lower leg. We suggest embolization was safe and effective treatment, a less invasive treatment option comparison to open repair, as one choice to address T2EL. PMID:27006871

  19. Left ventricular aneurysm repair with use of a bovine pericardial patch.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthew J; Preventza, Ourania; Cooley, Denton A; de la Cruz, Kim I; Coselli, Joseph S

    2014-08-01

    Left ventricular aneurysm, which can impair systolic function, has a reported incidence of 10% to 35% in patients after myocardial infarction. In a 58-year-old woman who had a history of myocardial infarction, we excised a large left ventricular aneurysm and restored left ventricular geometry with use of a bovine pericardial patch. The aneurysm's characteristics and the patient's preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.25 had indicated surgical intervention. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and her left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.50 to 0.55 on the 4th postoperative day. This case illustrates the value of surgical treatment for patients who have a debilitating left ventricular aneurysm.

  20. Endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and a left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Klonaris, Chris; Avgerinos, Efthimios D; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-01

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  1. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  2. Quantified Aortic Luminal Irregularity as a Predictor of Complications and Prognosis After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Akihiro; Kato, Masaaki; Motoki, Manabu; Sugai, Hiroko; Okubo, Nobukazu

    2016-03-01

    Atheromatous degeneration of the aorta is considered to be a risk factor for postoperative embolic complications after endovascular treatment, and is associated with a high incidence of vascular events in the long term. We devised a method to quantify the shagginess of the aorta using contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. This study examined the method's validity and prognostic usefulness in patients undergoing elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). We retrospectively investigated 427 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2007 and 2013. Preoperative contrast-enhanced CT images with a slice thickness of 1 mm were analyzed using a workstation, and the degree of aortic luminal irregularity from the level of the left subclavian artery ostium to that of the celiac artery ostium was quantified by computing a shagginess score. We compared the computed scores with subjective visual assessments of aortic shagginess. Subsequently, we evaluated the relationship between the computed scores and postoperative prognosis. The shagginess scores were significantly correlated with the visual assessments of the aortic lumen, which were performed by 5 experienced vascular surgeons (rho ranged from 0.564-0.654, all P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the shagginess score was independently associated with the development of renal impairment within a month after EVAR (odds ratio, 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.83-4.22, P < 0.001). The shagginess score was significantly higher in patients who suffered postoperative intestinal and peripheral ischemic complications, as compared with those who did not (P < 0.001). The mean postoperative follow-up period was 1207 ± 641 days. Cox proportional hazards regression showed that the shagginess score was a significant independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.72, P = 0.007, and HR, 1

  3. Renal dysfunction and the associated decrease in survival after elective endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Zarkowsky, Devin S.; Hicks, Caitlin W.; Bostock, Ian C.; Stone, David H.; Eslami, Mohammad; Goodney, Philip P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The reported frequency of renal dysfunction after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) varies widely in current surgical literature. Published research establishes pre-existing end-stage renal disease as a poor prognostic indicator. We intend to quantify the mortality effect associated with renal morbidity developed postoperatively and to identify modifiable risk factors. Methods All elective EVAR patients with preoperative and postoperative renal function data captured by the Vascular Quality Initiative between January 2003 and December 2014 were examined. The primary study end point was long-term mortality. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative parameters were analyzed to estimate mortality stratified by renal outcome and to describe independent risk factors associated with post-EVAR renal dysfunction. Results This study included 14,475 elective EVAR patients, of whom 96.8% developed no post-EVAR renal dysfunction, 2.9% developed acute kidney injury, and 0.4% developed a new hemodialysis requirement. Estimated 5-year survival was significantly different between groups, 77.5% vs 53.5%, respectively, for the no dysfunction and acute kidney injury groups, whereas the new hemodialysis group demonstrated 22.8% 3-year estimated survival (P < .05). New-onset postoperative congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR], 3.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-10.38), return to the operating room (OR, 3.26; 95% CI, 1.49-7.13), and postoperative vasopressor requirement (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.40-5.12) predicted post-EVAR renal dysfunction, whereas a preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was protective (OR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.21-0.53). Volume of contrast material administered during elective EVAR varies 10-fold among surgeons in the Vascular Quality Initiative database, but the average volume administered to patients is statistically similar, regardless of preoperative eGFR. Multivariable logistic regression

  4. Quantified Aortic Luminal Irregularity as a Predictor of Complications and Prognosis After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Akihiro; Kato, Masaaki; Motoki, Manabu; Sugai, Hiroko; Okubo, Nobukazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atheromatous degeneration of the aorta is considered to be a risk factor for postoperative embolic complications after endovascular treatment, and is associated with a high incidence of vascular events in the long term. We devised a method to quantify the shagginess of the aorta using contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. This study examined the method's validity and prognostic usefulness in patients undergoing elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). We retrospectively investigated 427 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2007 and 2013. Preoperative contrast-enhanced CT images with a slice thickness of 1 mm were analyzed using a workstation, and the degree of aortic luminal irregularity from the level of the left subclavian artery ostium to that of the celiac artery ostium was quantified by computing a shagginess score. We compared the computed scores with subjective visual assessments of aortic shagginess. Subsequently, we evaluated the relationship between the computed scores and postoperative prognosis. The shagginess scores were significantly correlated with the visual assessments of the aortic lumen, which were performed by 5 experienced vascular surgeons (rho ranged from 0.564–0.654, all P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the shagginess score was independently associated with the development of renal impairment within a month after EVAR (odds ratio, 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.83–4.22, P < 0.001). The shagginess score was significantly higher in patients who suffered postoperative intestinal and peripheral ischemic complications, as compared with those who did not (P < 0.001). The mean postoperative follow-up period was 1207 ± 641 days. Cox proportional hazards regression showed that the shagginess score was a significant independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09–1.72, P = 0

  5. [Endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aorta in patients with infrarenal aneurysm and unfavourable anatomy of its proximal neck].

    PubMed

    Poliakov, R S; Abugov, S A; Puretskiĭ, M V; Saakian, Iu M; Charchian, É R; Poliakov, K V; Boltenkov, A V; Mardanian, G V; Karapetian, A Kh

    2015-01-01

    Analysed herein are immediate and remote results of endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aorta in patients with unfavourable anatomy of its proximal neck. Group I (Study Group) was composed of 31 patients with unfavourable anatomy of the proximal neck, the control group (Group II) comprised a total of 52 patients with no unfavourable anatomical factors. The criteria of assessment were as follows: technical success, adequate position of the endograft, frequency of the development of various endoleaks, duration of the operation and hospital stay, lethality in the remote period, and necessity of secondary interventions. Technical success of endoprosthetic repair was achieved in 100% of patients in the both groups. An adequate position by the proximal end of the coated portion of the endograft was observed in 27 (87.1%) patients of Group I and in 51 (98.1%) patients of the control group (p=0.08). Secondary postdilatation of the endograft's body in the proximal neck was statistically more often performed in the study group of patients. The duration of the operation and hospital stay in the compared groups had no statistically significant differences. In the remote period, patients with unfavourable morphology of the proximal neck were found to develop type I-A endoleaks into the cavity of the aneurysm. By other evaluated criteria such as the total survival rate, secondary interventions, graft migration, type I-B, II and V endoleaks no statistically significant differences were revealed. It was concluded that endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aorta in patients with unfavourable anatomy of the proximal neck of the aneurysm is associated with admissible immediate, short- and long-term outcomes. Longer follow up is required in order to more adequately asses the reliability of the obtained findings. PMID:26673297

  6. An analysis of the influence of intra-operative blood salvage and autologous transfusion on reducing the need for allogeneic transfusion in elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Janko; Nikolic, Dragan; Milosevic, Djordje; Popovic, Vladan; Markovic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Background An intra-operative cell salvage machine, commonly known as a “cell saver”, aspirates, washes, and filters patient’s blood during an operation so that the blood can be returned to the patient’s circulation instead of being discarded. This procedure could significantly reduce the risks related to the use of allogeneic blood and blood products in surgery. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of intra-operative cell salvage on reducing the need for allogeneic blood in patients with asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm undergoing elective repair of the aneurysm. Material and methods We retrospectively collected data from the clinical records of patients who underwent elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Two groups were formed: the “cell saver” group, in which intra-operative cell salvage was used, and the control group, in which a cell saver was not used. Results Thirty patients underwent abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with the use of a cell saver, while 32 underwent the same operation without cell salvage. We found a significant association between use of the cell saver and a reduced need for allogeneic blood in these patients. Operations performed with the use of a cell saver lasted, on average, less time than those performed without it. The difference between pre-operative and post-operative haemoglobin levels was significantly greater in the group of patients who underwent repair with the use of a cell saver than in the control group. Conclusion The use of a cell saver in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair significantly reduces the need for intra-operative use of allogeneic blood. PMID:23114525

  7. Hybrid Endovascular Repair for an Arch Aneurysm Combined with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Higashiue, Shinichi; Kuroyanagi, Satoshi; Furuya, Onichi; Naito, Shiho; Kojima, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a hybrid endovascular approach to a 9.3-cm saccular aneurysm of the left sided aortic arch combined with an aberrant right subclavian artery. The two-step procedure consisted of a bilateral carotid-subclavian bypass, followed by an ascending aorta-bicarotid bypass and completed by an endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm by covering the whole aortic arch and its branches. The patient had no postoperative complications and was discharged 10 postoperative day. Hybrid procedures may be useful in complex aortic arch pathologies and may reduce postoperative complications in comparison with conventional open surgery. PMID:25848437

  8. Fenestrated Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Hemodynamic Analysis of the Effect of Fenestrated Stents on the Renal Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Thanapong

    2010-01-01

    Objective We wanted to investigate the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated stents on the renal arteries with using a fluid structure interaction method. Materials and Methods Two representative patients who each had abdominal aortic aneurysm that was treated with fenestrated stent grafts were selected for the study. 3D realistic aorta models for the main artery branches and aneurysm were generated based on the multislice CT scans from two patients with different aortic geometries. The simulated fenestrated stents were designed and modelled based on the 3D intraluminal appearance, and these were placed inside the renal artery with an intra-aortic protrusion of 5.0-7.0 mm to reflect the actual patients' treatment. The stent wire thickness was simulated with a diameter of 0.4 mm and hemodynamic analysis was performed at different cardiac cycles. Results Our results showed that the effect of the fenestrated stent wires on the renal blood flow was minimal because the flow velocity was not significantly affected when compared to that calculated at pre-stent graft implantation, and this was despite the presence of recirculation patterns at the proximal part of the renal arteries. The wall pressure was found to be significantly decreased after fenestration, yet no significant change of the wall shear stress was noticed at post-fenestration, although the wall shear stress was shown to decrease slightly at the proximal aneurysm necks. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates that the hemodynamic effect of fenestrated renal stents on the renal arteries is insignificant. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different lengths of stent protrusion with variable stent thicknesses on the renal blood flow, and this is valuable for understanding the long-term outcomes of fenestrated repair. PMID:20046500

  9. Using machine learning methods for predicting inhospital mortality in patients undergoing open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Torra, Ana; Ruiz-Fernandez, Daniel; Marin-Alonso, Oscar; Soriano-Payá, Antonio; Camacho-Mackenzie, Jaime; Carreño-Jaimes, Marisol

    2016-08-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is an abnormal dilatation of the aortic vessel at abdominal level. This disease presents high rate of mortality and complications causing a decrease in the quality of life and increasing the cost of treatment. To estimate the mortality risk of patients undergoing surgery is complex due to the variables associated. The use of clinical decision support systems based on machine learning could help medical staff to improve the results of surgery and get a better understanding of the disease. In this work, the authors present a predictive system of inhospital mortality in patients who were undergoing to open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Different methods as multilayer perceptron, radial basis function and Bayesian networks are used. Results are measured in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the classifiers, achieving an accuracy higher than 95%. The developing of a system based on the algorithms tested can be useful for medical staff in order to make a better planning of care and reducing undesirable surgery results and the cost of the post-surgical treatments. PMID:27395372

  10. Can surgeons assess CT suitability for endovascular repair (EVAR) in ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm? Implications for a ruptured EVAR trial.

    PubMed

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; kappa = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  11. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  12. High-intensity interval exercise training before abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (HIT-AAA): protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Tew, Garry A; Weston, Matthew; Kothmann, Elke; Batterham, Alan M; Gray, Joanne; Kerr, Karen; Martin, Denis; Nawaz, Shah; Yates, David; Danjoux, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), open surgical or endovascular aneurysm repair procedures are often used to minimise the risk of aneurysm-related rupture and death; however, aneurysm repair itself carries a high risk. Low cardiopulmonary fitness is associated with an increased risk of early post-operative complications and death following elective AAA repair. Therefore, fitness should be enhanced before aneurysm repair. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is a potent, time-efficient strategy for enhancing cardiopulmonary fitness. Here, we describe a feasibility study for a definitive trial of a pre-operative HIT intervention to improve post-operative outcomes in patients undergoing elective AAA repair. Methods and analysis A minimum of 50 patients awaiting elective repair of a 5.5–7.0 cm infrarenal AAA will be allocated by minimisation to HIT or usual care control in a 1:1 ratio. The patients allocated to HIT will complete three hospital-based exercise sessions per week, for 4 weeks. Each session will include 2 or 4 min of high-intensity stationary cycling followed by the same duration of easy cycling or passive recovery, repeated until a total of 16 min of high-intensity exercise is accumulated. Outcomes to be assessed before randomisation and 24–48 h before aneurysm repair include cardiopulmonary fitness, maximum AAA diameter and health-related quality of life. In the post-operative period, we will record destination (ward or critical care unit), organ-specific morbidity, mortality and the durations of critical care and hospital stay. Twelve weeks after the discharge, participants will be interviewed to reassess quality of life and determine post-discharge healthcare utilisation. The costs associated with the exercise intervention and healthcare utilisation will be calculated. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was secured through Sunderland Research Ethics Committee. The findings of the trial

  13. The Burden of Hard Atherosclerotic Plaques Does Not Promote Endoleak Development After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Risk Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Johannes Glodny, Bernhard

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To objectify the influence of the atherosclerotic burden in the proximal landing zone on the development of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) or thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) using objective aortic calcium scoring (ACS). Materials and Methods: This retrospective observation study included 267 patients who received an aortic endograft between 1997 and 2010 and for whom preoperative computed tomography (CT) was available to perform ACS using the CT-based V600 method. The mean follow-up period was 2 {+-} 2.3 years. Results: Type I endoleaks persisted in 45 patients (16.9%), type II in 34 (12.7%), type III in 8 (3%), and type IV or V in 3 patients, respectively (1.1% each). ACS in patients with type I endoleaks was not increased: 0.029 {+-} 0.061 ml compared with 0.075 {+-} 0.1349 ml in the rest of the patients, (p > 0.05; Whitney-Mann U-Test). There were significantly better results for the indication 'traumatic aortic rupture' than for the other indications (p < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, age was an independent risk factor for the development of type I endoleaks in the thoracic aorta (Wald 9.5; p = 0.002), whereas ACS score was an independent protective factor (Wald 6.9; p = 0.009). In the abdominal aorta, neither age nor ACS influenced the development of endoleaks. Conclusion: Contrary to previous assumptions, TEVAR and EVAR can be carried out without increasing the risk of an endoleak of any type, even if there is a high atherosclerotic 'hard-plaque' burden of the aorta. The results are significantly better for traumatic aortic.

  14. Systemic upregulation of leukocyte integrins in response to lower body ischemia-reperfusion during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Madeleine Valdes; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Connall, Timothy; Morrison, Debra; Kim, Choong; Kaupke, Charles J.; Wilson, Samuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion in myocardial infarction and stroke are associated with upregulation of leukocyte adhesion molecules, which contributes to tissue injury by facilitating leukocyte adhesion and infiltration in the affected tissues. Surgical repair of the abdominal aortic aneurysm involves clamping and declamping of the aorta, which necessarily results in ischemia and reperfusion of the lower half of the body. Given the large volume of the affected tissues and unimpeded venous return during reperfusion, we hypothesized that the procedure may result in upregulation of leukocyte integrins in the systemic circulation. To test this hypothesis, we studied neutrophil and monocyte surface densities of CD11b and CD18 in patients undergoing elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Serial blood samples were collected from the radial artery and femoral vein during the operation and leukocyte CD11b and CD18 surface densities were quantified by flow cytometry. Following reperfusion, CD11b expression in neutrophils and monocytes increased significantly in femoral venous and arterial blood. The mean time to peak expression of CD11 b in neutrophils and monocytes during reperfusion was 34.4 and 31.4 minutes in venous and 38.5 and 36.4 minutes in arterial blood, respectively. Similar rises in CD18 expression on neutrophils and monocytes were observed in venous and arterial blood. The mean time to peak expression of CD18 in neutrophils and monocytes during reperfusion was 34.0 and 40.0 minutes in venous and 47.5 and 50.0 minutes in arterial blood, respectively. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:15712780

  15. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Prakash Hughes, John Patel, Ashish S. Donati, Tommaso Sallam, Morad Patel, Sanjay D. Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  16. A Case of Successful Coil Embolization for a Late-Onset Type Ia Endoleak after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with the Chimney Technique

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JRAAs) are challenging to treat by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures. The chimney technique with EVAR (Ch-EVAR) is one of the feasible and less invasive treatments for JRAAs. However, the main concern of Ch-EVAR is the potential risk of “gutters,” which can lead to type Ia endoleak (EL). Most type Ia ELs after Ch-EVAR procedures occurred intraoperatively, and these ELs could be treated using an endovascular technique. However, late-onset type Ia ELs could be extremely rare, which might have a fear of conservative treatment. Type Ia ELs are associated with an increased risk of aneurysm rupture; therefore reintervention is recommended as soon as possible, and we should be aware of the occurrence of type Ia ELs after the Ch-EVAR procedure. PMID:27699077

  17. A Case of Successful Coil Embolization for a Late-Onset Type Ia Endoleak after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with the Chimney Technique

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JRAAs) are challenging to treat by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures. The chimney technique with EVAR (Ch-EVAR) is one of the feasible and less invasive treatments for JRAAs. However, the main concern of Ch-EVAR is the potential risk of “gutters,” which can lead to type Ia endoleak (EL). Most type Ia ELs after Ch-EVAR procedures occurred intraoperatively, and these ELs could be treated using an endovascular technique. However, late-onset type Ia ELs could be extremely rare, which might have a fear of conservative treatment. Type Ia ELs are associated with an increased risk of aneurysm rupture; therefore reintervention is recommended as soon as possible, and we should be aware of the occurrence of type Ia ELs after the Ch-EVAR procedure.

  18. Comparative effect of propofol versus sevoflurane on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury after elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, AS; Mahmoud, KM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal injury is a common cause of morbidity and mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Propofol has been reported to protect several organs from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced injury. We performed a randomized clinical trial to compare propofol and sevoflurane for their effects on renal I/R injury in patients undergoing elective AAA repair. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients scheduled for elective AAA repair were randomized to receive propofol anesthesia in group I or sevoflurane anesthesia in group II. Urinary specific kidney proteins (N-acetyl-beta-glucosamidase, alpha-1-microglobulin, glutathione transferase [GST]-pi, GST-alpha) were measured within 5 min of starting anesthesia as a base line (T0), at the end of surgery (T1), 8 h after surgery (T2), 16 h after surgery (T3), and 24 h postoperatively (T4). Serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 1-β) were measured at the same time points. In addition, serum creatinine and cystatin C were measured before starting surgery as a baseline and at days 1, 3, and 6 after surgery. Results: Postoperative urinary concentrations of all measured kidney specific proteins and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly lower in the propofol group. In addition, the serum creatinine and cystatin C were significantly lower in the propofol group compared with the sevoflurane group. Conclusion: Propofol significantly reduced renal injury after elective open AAA repair and this could have clinical implications in situations of expected renal I/R injury. PMID:27375385

  19. Duplex Ultrasound versus Computed Tomography for the Postoperative Follow-Up of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair. Where Do We Stand Now?

    PubMed Central

    Karanikola, Evridiki; Dalainas, Ilias; Karaolanis, Georgios; Zografos, Georgios; Filis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has rapidly developed to be the preferred method for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with suitable anatomy. EVAR offers the advantage of lower perioperative mortality and morbidity but carries the cost of device-related complications such as endoleak, graft migration, graft thrombosis, and structural graft failure. These complications mandate a lifelong surveillance of EVAR patients and their endografts. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the safety of color-duplex ultrasound (CDU) as compared with computed tomography (CT), based on the current literature, for post-EVAR surveillance. The post-EVAR follow-up modalities, CDU versus CT, are evaluated questioning three parameters: (1) accuracy of aneurysm size, (2) detection and classification of endoleaks, and (3) detection of stent-graft deformation. Studies comparing CDU with CT scan for investigation of post-EVAR complications have produced mixed results. Further and long-term research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of CDU versus CT, before CDU can be recommended as the primary imaging modality for EVAR surveillance, in place of CT for stable aneurysms. PMID:25317026

  20. Prediction of in-hospital mortality after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using an artificial neural network

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Eric S.; Hocking, Kyle M.; Brophy, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) carries a high mortality rate, even with prompt transfer to a medical center. An artificial neural network (ANN) is a computational model which improves predictive ability via pattern recognition, while continually adapting to new input data. The goal of this study was to effectively use ANN modeling to provide vascular surgeons a discriminant adjunct to assess the likelihood of in-hospital mortality on a pending rAAA admission using easily obtainable patient information from the field. Methods One-hundred and twenty-five of 332 total patients from a single-institution from 1998–2013 who had attempted rAAA repair were reviewed for preoperative factors associated with in-hospital mortality. One-hundred and eight patients received an open operation, and 17 patients received endovascular repair. Five variables were found significant upon multivariate analysis (P < .05), and four of these five: preoperative shock, loss of consciousness, cardiac arrest and age were modeled via multiple logistic regression and an ANN. These predictive models were compared against the Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS). All models were assessed by generation of receiver operating characteristic curves and Actual vs. Predicted outcomes plots, with area under the curve (AUC) and Pearson r2 value as the primary measures of discriminant ability. Results Of the 125 patients, 53 (42%) did not survive to discharge. Five preoperative factors were significant (P < .05) independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis: advanced age, renal disease, loss of consciousness, cardiac arrest and shock, though renal disease was excluded from the models. The sequential accumulation of zero to four of these risk factors progressively increased overall mortality rate, from 11% to 16% to 44% to 76% to 89% (Age ≥ 70 considered a risk factor). Algorithms derived from multiple logistic regression, ANN and GAS models generated AUC values of

  1. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters <18 mm and 30 (26%) patients had one or more CIA diameters >18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% {+-} 3% and 84% {+-} 9% for the <18-mm and {>=}18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  2. Noninvasive vascular ultrasound elastography applied to the characterization of experimental aneurysms and follow-up after endovascular repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromageau, Jérémie; Lerouge, Sophie; Listz Maurice, Roch; Soulez, Gilles; Cloutier, Guy

    2008-11-01

    Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to noninvasively characterize abdominal aneurysms with ultrasound (US) elastography before and after endovascular treatment. Twenty three dogs having bilateral aneurysms surgically created on iliac arteries with venous patches were investigated. In a first set of experiments, the feasibility of elastography to differentiate vascular wall elastic properties between the aneurismal neck (healthy region) and the venous patch (pathological region) was evaluated on six dogs. Lower strain values were found in venous patches (p < 0.001). In a second set of experiments, 17 dogs having endovascular repair (EVAR) by stent graft (SG) insertion were examined three months after SG implantation. Angiography, color Doppler US, examination of macroscopic sections and US elastography were used. The value of elastography was validated with the following end points by considering a solid thrombus of a healed aneurysm as a structure with small deformations and a soft thrombus associated with endoleaks as a more deformable tissue: (1) the correlation between the size of healed organized thrombi estimated by elastography and by macroscopic examinations; (2) the correlation between the strain amplitude measured within vessel wall elastograms and the leak size; and (3) agreement on the presence and size of endoleaks as determined by elastography and by combined reference imaging modalities (angiography + Doppler US). Mean surfaces of solid thrombi estimated with elastography were found correlated with those measured on macroscopic sections (r = 0.88, p < 0.001). Quantitative strain values measured within the vessel wall were poorly linked with the leak size (r = 0.12, p = 0.5). However, the qualitative evaluation of leak size in the aneurismal sac was very good, with a Kappa agreement coefficient of 0.79 between elastography and combined reference imaging modalities. In summary, complementing B-scan and color Doppler, noninvasive US

  3. Image Guidance for Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Comparison of Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional Angiography and Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe; Desgranges, Pascal; Deux, Jean-Francois; Grünhagen, Thijs; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of image fusion (IF) of preprocedural arterial-phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for roadmapping in endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms, and to compare this approach versus current roadmapping methods (ie, two-dimensional [2D] and three-dimensional [3D] angiography). Materials and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients with complex aortic aneurysms treated with endovascular techniques were retrospectively reviewed; these included aneurysms of digestive and/or renal arteries and pararenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. All interventions were performed with the same angiographic system. According to the availability of different roadmapping software, patients were successively placed into three intraprocedural image guidance groups: (i) 2D angiography (n = 9), (ii) 3D rotational angiography (n = 14), and (iii) IF (n = 14). X-ray exposure (dose–area product [DAP]), injected contrast medium volume, and procedure time were recorded. Results Patient characteristics were similar among groups, with no statistically significant differences (P ≥ .05). There was no statistical difference in endograft deployment success between groups (2D angiography, eight of nine patients [89%]; 3D angiography and IF, 14 of 14 patients each [100%]). The IF group showed significant reduction (P < .0001) in injected contrast medium volume versus other groups (2D, 235 mL ± 145; 3D, 225 mL ± 119; IF, 65 mL ± 28). Mean DAP values showed no significant difference between groups (2D, 1,188 Gy · cm2 ± 1,067; 3D, 984 Gy · cm2 ± 581; IF, 655 Gy · cm2 ± 457; P = .18); nor did procedure times (2D, 233 min ± 123; 3D, 181 min ± 53; IF, 189 min ± 60; P = .59). Conclusions The use of IF-based roadmapping is a feasible technique for endovascular complex aneurysm repair associated with significant reduction of injected contrast agent volume and similar x-ray exposure and procedure time. PMID:24035418

  4. Unusual Open Surgical Repair of a Type IB Endoleak and a Giant Symptomatic Aortic Aneurysm following Stent Grafting for Type B Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Mihály, Zsuzsanna; Csobay-Novák, Csaba; Entz, László; Szeberin, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of type IB endoleak after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for post-dissection aortic aneurysm usually includes attempts of endovascular interventions using coils or plugs to occlude the false lumen or placement of a distal fenestrated endograft. Open conversion usually requires deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest with the associated increased mortality and complications. We present a case of a young patient with a 90 mm descending thoracic aneurysm caused by a chronic type B aortic dissection. A type II endoleak after TEVAR was successfully treated with left subclavian artery transposition. The patient had a rapidly increasing aortic aneurysm with a persistent type IB endoleak in spite of placement of an Amplatzer plug into the false lumen of the dissection. He developed progressive acute compression of the main stem bronchi by the aneurysm sac and his dyspnea worsened by an acute pulmonary embolism treated with anticoagulation. Adequate oxygenation could only be achieved with mechanical ventilation using a double-lumen endobronchial tube. A left thoracotomy was performed and the type IB endoleak was treated with bending of the distal aorta around the stent graft with a Dacron graft sleeve. Aortic clamping and circulatory support devices were avoided. The sac of the aneurysm was opened, a giant hematoma was evacuated, and aneurysmorrhaphy was performed to cover the stent graft. There was no residual endoleak and the bronchi were decompressed. The patient recovered after prolonged hospitalization and he was discharged home in good condition 24 days after admission. He returned to his normal activities and is asymptomatic 5 months later. Computed tomographic angiography showed decreased aneurysm sac, no evidence of endoleak, no residual pulmonary embolus, and no bronchial compression. PMID:26520424

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patient with a renal allograft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Ryuk, Jong-Pil; Choi, Hyang Hee; Kwon, Sang-Hwy; Huh, Seung

    2009-02-01

    Renal transplant recipients requiring aortic reconstruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pose a unique clinical problem. The concern during surgery is causing ischemic injury to the renal allograft. A variety of strategies for protection of the renal allograft during AAA intervention have been described including a temporary shunt, cold renal perfusion, extracorporeal bypass, general hypothermia, and endovascular stent-grafting. In addition, some investigators have reported no remarkable complications of the renal allograft without any specific measures. We treated a case of AAA in a patient with a renal allograft using a temporary aortofemoral shunt with good result. Since this technique is safe and effective, it should be considered in similar patients with AAA and previously placed renal allografts.

  6. Combined general–epidural anesthesia with continuous postoperative epidural analgesia preserves sigmoid colon perfusion in elective infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Panaretou, Venetiana; Siafaka, Ioanna; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Manouras, Andreas; Seretis, Charalampos; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Sigala, Fragiska; Zografos, George; Filis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Background: In elective open infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair the use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia may preserve splanchnic perfusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of epidural anesthesia on gut perfusion with gastrointestinal tonometry in patients undergoing aortic reconstructive surgery. Methods: Thirty patients, scheduled to undergo an elective infrarenal abdominal aortic reconstructive procedure were randomized in two groups: the epidural anesthesia group (Group A, n=16) and the control group (Group B, n=14). After induction of anesthesia, a transanally inserted sigmoid tonometer was placed for the measurement of sigmoid and gastric intramucosal CO2 levels and the calculation of regional–arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2). Additional measurements included mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and arterial lactate levels. Results: There were no significant intra- and inter-group differences for MAP, CO, SVR, and arterial lactate levels. Sigmoid pH and PCO2 increased in both the groups, but this increase was significantly higher in Group B, 20 min after aortic clamping and 10 min after aortic declamping. Conclusions: Patients receiving epidural anesthesia during abdominal aortic reconstruction appear to have less severe disturbances of sigmoid perfusion compared with patients not receiving epidural anesthesia. Further studies are needed to verify these results. PMID:23493852

  7. Treating patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm with endovascular repair and the crossover chimney technique in the internal iliac artery to protect the unilateral internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guang-Rui; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Huang, Lian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the treatment methods for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) that required occlusion of the openings of the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs) in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Four patients with AAA were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and the crossover chimney technique in the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs). We inserted and released the abdominal aortic stent as usual and implanted the bypass stent graft simultaneously. The intraoperative immediate angiography showed complete isolation of the AAA and patency of the bypass. One month after surgery, it showed contrast engorgement in the bypass stent in three patients. The IIA on the bypass side and its branches had good developing. Another case in which we utilized a COOK stent, occlusion started at the opening of the bypass stent, with no occurrence of other complications. For patients in whom AAAs involve bilateral iliac arteries and the openings of the bilateral IIAs need to be occluded, EVAR and a crossover chimney technique can protect the unilateral IIA. PMID:26885136

  8. Endovascular repair of ruptured aneurysm arising from fenestration of the horizontal segment of the anterior cerebral artery: case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Ezura, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kazuto; Chonan, Masashi; Mino, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with an aneurysm arising from a fenestration of horizontal portion (A(1)) of the anterior cerebral artery manifesting as subarachnoid hemorrhage. Coil embolization was conducted and the aneurysm was occluded easily. Most reported cases of these types of aneurysms underwent direct surgery. Aneurysm arising from the A(1) fenestration is rare, but the present case shows that coil embolization can be an effective treatment modality. Three-dimensional rotational angiography and aneurysmography were helpful to characterize this complicated vascular structure.

  9. Endovascular aneurysm repair with the Ovation TriVascular Stent Graft System utilizing a predominantly percutaneous approach under local anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kontopodis, N; Kehagias, E; Papaioannou, A; Kafetzakis, A; Papadopoulos, G; Pantidis, D; Tsetis, D

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience with the Ovation Abdominal Stent Graft System (TriVascular Inc., Santa Rosa, CA) during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and compare results according to the type of anaesthesia. Methods: We conducted a single-centre retrospective study including patients who underwent EVAR using the Ovation endograft between May 2011 and July 2014. Outcome was evaluated regarding pre-, peri- and immediate postoperative and follow-up measures. Overall results are reported, while additional analysis was performed to compare the outcome between groups of patients undertaking either local or regional/general anaesthesia (LA vs RGA). Results: 66 patients were included. Median follow-up was 13 months (range, 1–39 months). Median age was 72 years and median abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter was 58 mm (range, 54–100 mm). Technical success was 63 (95%), while there were 2 (3%) conversions to open surgery. A total percutaneous approach was used in 50/66 (76%) cases. Overall, 9/66 (14%) subjects suffered from any kind of morbidity. Median hospitalization was 3 days (range, 1–16 days). Immediate and midterm mortality rate was 0%. No endoleak Type I, III, IV or stent migration was observed. There were 8 (13%) Type II endoleaks. Overall, additional endovascular procedures were required in 6 (9%), while surgery was performed in 4 (6%) patients. 44 (67%) patients underwent LA and 22 (23%) RGA. Differences between groups were significant for procedural time (85 vs 107 min; p < 0.001), percutaneous access (91% vs 45%; p < 0.001) and systematic complications (2.3% vs 14%; p = 0.05). Conclusion: EVAR with the use of the Ovation endograft shows promising short-term and midterm results regarding safety and effectiveness. Completion of the procedures under LA using a total percutaneous approach seems advantageous and may be used in routine practice. Advances in knowledge: The Ovation Abdominal Stent Graft System is an ultra-low profile

  10. Role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the follow-up of endo-vascular aortic aneurysm repair: an effective and safe surveillance method.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Mariarosaria Fabrizia; Citone, Michele; Rossini, Michele; Speziale, Francesco; David, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of Aortic Aneurysm disease is a growing procedure due to increase of life expectancy in Western Countries and relative incidence. In the past ten years we observed a progressive growth of endovascular over open surgery procedures with a related decline in rupture related deaths. Endo Vascular Aortic Repair [EVAR] is a well known technique of treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, that has changed the surgical approach to abdominal aortic aneurysms, as it is performed with low perioperative morbility and mortality rate and shorter hospital stay. However although EVAR offers immediate advantages over open surgical repair, it carries the need of close lifelong surveillance due to specific possible complications including rupture, endoleaks, graft migration and enlargement of aneurysm sac size. Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography [CTA] is actually considered the standard reference in EVAR followup. However CTA carries high costs, radiation exposure and potential renal impairment. In the last five years several studies have been published on the role of Contrast Enhanced UltraSound [CEUS] in EVAR follow-up asserting high accuracy of this evaluation technique with absence of renal impairment, without radiation risk and at low costs. Especially since introduction of second generation Contrast Agents this evaluation technique is gaining popularity in EVAR follow-up surveillance. The diffusion of CEUS investigations by using new generation of contrast medium with appropriate software represents without any doubt an important step in the EVAR surveillance and could open up new strategies in the evaluation of endovascular aortic procedures gaining a fundamental role in EVAR follow-up.

  11. Frequency of concomitant ischemic heart disease and risk factor analysis for an early postoperative myocardial infarction after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Rim; Heo, Seon-Hee; Woo, Shin-Young; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Dong Ik; Yang, Jeonghoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to see the frequency of concomitant ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Korean patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and to determine risk factors for an early postoperative acute myocardial infarction (PAMI) after elective open or endovascular AAA repair. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of patients who underwent elective AAA repair over the past 11 years. Patients were classified into 3 groups: control group; group I, medical IHD treatment; group II, invasive IHD treatment. Rates of PAMI and mortality at 30 days were compiled and compared between groups according to the type of AAA repair. Results Six hundred two elective repairs of infrarenal or juxtarenal AAAs were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified into control group (n = 398, 66.1%), group I (n = 73, 12.1%) and group II (n = 131, 21.8%). PAMI developed more frequently after open surgical repair (OSR) than after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (5.4% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.012). In OSR patients (n = 373), PAMI developed 2.1% in control group, 18.0% in group I and 7.1% in group II (P < 0.001). In EVAR group (n = 229), PAMI developed 0.6% in control group, 4.3% in group I and 2.2% in group II (P = 0.211). On the multivariable analysis of risk factors of PAMI, PAMI developed more frequently in patients with positive functional stress test. Conclusion The prevalence of concomitant IHD was 34% in Korean AAA patients. The risk of PAMI was significantly higher after OSR compared to EVAR and in patients with IHD compared to control group. Though we found some risk factors for PAMI, these were not applied to postoperative mortality rate. PMID:26942161

  12. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Albrecht, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Kruschewski, Martin

    2009-09-15

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks {>=}20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  13. The False Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Baird, R. J.; Doran, M. L.

    1964-01-01

    The clinical course of 18 patients with 25 false aneurysms is reviewed. In recent years false aneurysm has been most commonly seen as a complication of arterioplastic procedures in which prosthetic arterial grafts were used. The use of indwelling needles or cannulae, particularly in patients with a wide arterial pulse pressure, can also lead to the formation of false aneurysms. In the groin, a false aneurysm is frequently mistaken for an abscess. Early diagnosis and operative repair are essential to reduce the incidence of further complications. PMID:14180533

  14. Combined Endovascular Repair of a Celiac Trunk Aneurysm Using Celiac-Splenic Stent Graft and Hepatic Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Bracchi, Elena; Ferrario, Massimo

    2010-04-15

    Celiac trunk aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic lesions. However, treatment is generally warranted to avoid catastrophic rupture. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who sought care for a celiac trunk aneurysm close to the hepatosplenic bifurcation managed endovascularly by using a combined treatment of celiac-splenic stent-graft implantation and hepatic artery embolization.

  15. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up.

  16. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up. PMID:23380562

  17. A Retrospective Analysis of Comparison of General Versus Regional Anaesthesia for Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yağan, Özgür; Özyılmaz, Kadir; Taş, Nilay; Hancı, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to compare general anaesthesia (GA) versus regional anaesthesia (RA) for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods We analysed the files of 89 patients between August 2010–August 2012 who underwent elective EVAR retrospectively. Results We performed RA for 32 patients (36%) and GA for 57 patients (64%). The operations were completed successfully in both groups and did not require conventional surgery. The mean age of the patients was 71.5±7 (range 50–88 years). RA was preferred more than GA in the presence of advanced-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease statistically (p=0.032). The usage of vasodilator drug and atropine was found to be higher in the GA group than the RA group in the intraoperative period (p=0.001 and p=0.01, respectively). The intensive care unit (ICU) was necessary for 5 patients in the RA group (16%) and 13 patients for the GA group (23%) postoperatively (p=0.301). The median ICU stay in the RA group was 2 hours and 4.4 hours in the GA group (p=0.114). The median hospital stay was 2.63±1.91 days in the RA group and 2.04±1.16 days in the GA group, with no statistically significant difference between groups (p=0.120). There was no mortality of patients in either group for the peroperative period and the 30-day follow-up period. Conclusion Our present study suggests that patient characteristics are more important than the anaesthetic method on the outcomes of EVAR. PMID:27366462

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Augmenting the Preclose Technique with a Collagen-Based Closure Device for Percutaneous Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rafiuddin; Juszczak, Maciej T.; Bratby, Mark J.; Sideso, Ediri; Anthony, Susan; Tapping, Charles R.; Handa, Ashok; Darby, Christopher R.; Perkins, Jeremy; Uberoi, Raman

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo report our experience of selectively augmenting the preclose technique for percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (p-EVAR) with an Angio-Seal device as a haemostatic adjunct in cases of significant bleeding after tensioning the sutures of the suture-mediated closure devices.Materials and MethodsProspectively collected data for p-EVAR patients at our institute were analysed. Outcomes included technical success and access site complications. A logistic regression model was used to analyse the effects of sheath size, CFA features and stent graft type on primary failure of the preclose technique necessitating augmentation and also on the development of complications.Resultsp-EVAR was attempted via 122 CFA access sites with a median sheath size of 18-French (range 12- to 28-French). Primary success of the preclose technique was 75.4 % (92/122). Angio-Seal augmentation was utilised as an adjunct to the preclose technique in 20.5 % (25/122). The overall p-EVAR success rate was 95.1 % (116/122). There was a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.0093) between depth of CFA and primary failure of preclose technique. CFA diameter, calcification, type of stent graft and sheath size did not have significant effects on primary preclose technique failure. Overall 4.9 % (6/122) required surgical conversion but otherwise there were no major complications.ConclusionAugmentation with an Angio-Seal device is a safe and effective adjunct to increase the success rate of the preclose technique in p-EVAR.

  19. Buttock Claudication and Erectile Dysfunction After Internal Iliac Artery Embolization in Patients Prior to Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, H. S. Bown, M. J.; Lambert, K. V.; Fishwick, N. G.; McCarthy, M. J.; London, N. J. M.; Sayers, R. D.

    2008-07-15

    Coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (IIA) is used to extend the application of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in cases of challenging iliac anatomy. Pelvic ischemia is a complication of the technique, but reports vary as to the rate and severity. This study reports our experience with IIA embolization and compares the results to those of other published series. The vascular unit database of the Leicester Royal Infirmary was used to identify patients who had undergone IIA coil embolization prior to EVAR. Data were collected from hospital case notes and by telephone interviews. Thirty-eight patients were identified; 29 of these were contactable by telephone. A literature search was performed for other studies of IIA embolization and the results were pooled. In this series buttock claudication occurred in 55% (16 of 29 patients) overall: in 52% of unilateral embolizations (11 of 21) and 63% of bilateral embolizations (5 of 8). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 46% (6 of 13 patients) overall: in 38% of unilateral embolizations (3 of 8) and 60% of bilateral embolizations (3 of 5). The literature review identified 18 relevant studies. The results were pooled with our results, to give 634 patients in total. Buttock claudication occurred in 28% overall (178 of 634 patients): in 31% of unilateral embolizations (99 of 322) and 35% of bilateral embolizations (34 of 98) (p = 0.46, Fisher's exact test). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 17% overall (27 of 159 patients): in 17% of unilateral embolizations (16 of 97) and 24% of bilateral embolizations (9 of 38) (p = 0.33). We conclude that buttock claudication and erectile dysfunction are frequent complications of IIA embolization and patients should be counseled accordingly.

  20. “Open” repair of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (experience of 51 cases)

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Piero Paolo; Walas, Ryszard; Cebotaru, Theodor; Popa, Calin; Vintila, Bogdan; Steiu, Flaviu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of toracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) represents a difficult problem for the vascular surgeon and may become a formidable challenge in an emergency procedure. In patient with hemodynamic instability, protective measures as cerebral spinal fluid drainage and bio-pump against spinal cord, visceral and renal ischemia, may be ineffective or impracticable. Material and methods We report our experience of 51 emergency-operated patients with TAAA out of 660 treated between 1994 and 2014; 48 patients (94%) were hemodynamically unstable, 3 (6%) were hemodynamically stable. The TAAA patients were evaluated, according to Crawford classification, as: 18 type I, 13 type II, 15 type III, 5 type IV. Results Overall mortality was 23 cases out of 51 (43.1%); 8 deaths occurred during the surgical procedure and 14 in the postoperative period. Early deaths, subdivided by Crawford TAAA classification, were: type I 9/18 (50%), type II 9/13 (69.2%), type III 7/15 (46.6%), type IV 3/5 (60%). Paraplegia-paraparesis developed in 6 cases out of 43 (16.2%), excluding 8 deaths during the operative procedure. Acute renal failure was observed in 8 out of 43 patients (18.6%). Dialysis was found to be a risk factor for hospital mortality (p = 0.03). Pulmonary insufficiency was diagnosed in 15 patients out of 43 (34.8%), and 5 patients (15.5%) needed tracheostomy, out of whom 3 died (p = 0.04%). Postoperative bleeding was present in 8 cases out of 43 (18.6%). Inferior laryngeal nerve palsy was present in 6 cases out of 43 (13.5%). The follow-up period comprised 1-3-5-10 years postoperative follow-up. The actuarial survival rate of patients discharged from hospital was respectively 75%, 63%, 48%, 35%. Conclusions In the literature there are very few studies published on emergency treatment for TAAA. Having usually low numbers of patients in the groups wider experiences are still needed to give more light on the pathophysiology and surgical treatment of this type

  1. Advances in modulation spectroscopy: State-of-art photoreflectance metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtagh, M. E.; Ward, S.; Nee, D.; Kelly, P. V.

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, technological advances of modulation spectroscopy are presented, exploiting the sensitivity, room-temperature resolution, as well as the rapid and non-contact (non-destructive) nature of laser-induced photoreflectance (PR). A novel method of asynchronous (switching) modulation is presented to overcome laser-induced non-PR background effects, which limit or even obscure the complex (phase) PR response. The solid-state, acousto-optic based method may even be employed for non-uniform samples, and moreover, exhibits evidence for improved signal-to-noise level. Also presented is a novel optical design in order to achieve multiple, independent and simultaneous spectral acquisition, including auto-calibration. Results are demonstrated for heavily doped n-type and p-type GaAs substrates, and also technologically important HBT device structures, with further applications also emphasised for HEMTs, LEDs, etc. The results demonstrate the importance and role of PR as a successful commercial metrology tool for existing state-of-art, as well as next generation semiconductor characterisation and statistical-process-control (SPC) equipment.

  2. Idiopathic cystic artery aneurysm complicated with hemobilia.

    PubMed

    Anand, Utpal; Thakur, Sanjeev Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Jha, Achyutanand; Prakash, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Aneurysm of the cystic artery is not common, and it is a rare cause of hemobilia. Most of reported cases are pseudoaneurysms resulting from either an inflammatory process in the abdomen or abdominal trauma. We report a healthy individual who developed hemobilia associated with cystic artery aneurysm. The patient was managed with cholecystectomy and concomitant aneurysm repair. Visceral artery aneurysms are rare and can rupture with potentially grave outcome due to excessive bleeding. Angiographic embolization is a common method of treatment for visceral artery aneurysms. Open cholecystectomy and aneurysm repair was performed in our patient due to radiological evidence of associated cholecystitis.

  3. Technical advances with newer aortic endografts provide additional support to withhold the early endovascular repair of small abdominal aortic aneurysms until it is really needed.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Georgiadis, George S; Nikolopoulos, Evagelos; Trellopoulos, George; Kapoulas, Konstantinos; Lazarides, Miltos

    2012-07-01

    The idea of early endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of "small" abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has gained attention over "watchful waiting," mostly due to the concern for losing the anatomic suitability for endovascular repair over time. Generally, small AAAs have longer, smaller, less angulated necks, and less tortuous iliac arteries than larger ones. Though the borderline anatomic characteristics were assumed to be contraindications for older generation endografts, the modifications of modern devices seem promising to overcome those limitations, in order to treat the small AAAs when reaching the 5.5 cm threshold. Moreover, early endovascular intervention has been proven neither cost effective nor beneficial for the patients' quality of life. This article evaluates the technical progress that could overcome the difficulties of those small AAAs that present technically demanding anatomies, thus advocating endovascular intervention when they reach the diameter threshold. PMID:22589239

  4. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  5. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  6. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E; Chaer, Rabih A; Avgerinos, Efthymios D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  7. Six years' experience with prostaglandin I2 infusion in elective open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a parallel group observational study in a tertiary referral vascular center.

    PubMed

    Beirne, Chris; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif

    2008-11-01

    The prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)) analogue iloprost, a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet activation, has traditionally been utilized in pulmonary hypertension and off-label use for revascularization of chronic critical lower limb ischemia. This study was designed to assess the effect of 72 hr iloprost infusion on systemic ischemia post-open elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (EAAA) surgery. Between January 2000 and 2007, 104 patients undergoing open EAAA were identified: 36 had juxtarenal, 15 had suprarenal, and 53 had infrarenal aneurysms, with a mean maximal diameter of 6.9 cm. The male-to-female ratio was 2.5:1, with a mean age of 71.9 years. No statistically significant difference was seen between the study groups with regard to age, sex, risk factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, or diameter of aneurysm repaired. All emergency, urgent, and endovascular procedures for aneurysms were excluded. Fifty-seven patients received iloprost infusion for 72 hr in the immediate postoperative period compared with 47 patients who did not. Patients were monitored for signs of pulmonary, renal, cardiac, systemic ischemia, and postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity. Statistically significantly increased ventilation rates (p=0.0048), pulmonary complication rates (p=0.0019), and myocardial ischemia (p=0.0446) were noted in those patients not receiving iloprost. These patients also had significantly higher renal indices including estimate glomerular filtration rate changes (p=0.041) and postoperative urea level rises (p=0.0286). Peripheral limb trashing was noted in five patients (11.6%) in the non-iloprost group compared with no patients who received iloprost. Increased rates of transfusion requirements and bowel complications were noted in those who did not receive iloprost, with their ICU stay greater than twice that of iloprost patients. All-cause morbidity affected 67% of patients not receiving iloprost compared to 40% who did

  8. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  9. Hepatic artery aneurysm in corticosteroid-treated, adult Kawasaki's disease.

    PubMed

    Caputo, A E; Roberts, W N; Yee, Y S; Posner, M P

    1991-11-01

    We describe a single case of Kawasaki's disease (mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome) with the rare complication of a hepatic artery aneurysm which was surgically repaired. Unusual features include arterial aneurysmal formation in the hepatic arteries rather than in coronary arteries, the unusual morphology of the hepatic artery aneurysm, and the expansion of the aneurysm after corticosteroid therapy.

  10. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  12. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... will open the stent using a spring-like mechanism and attach it to the walls of the ... including in the lungs, urinary tract, and belly Heart attack or stroke Reactions to medicines Risks for this ...

  13. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  14. Two Cases of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Right Aortic Arch: Comparison of Two Operative Strategies for Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Onohara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Harada, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshikazu; Saiki, Munehiro

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid TEVAR was performed in 2 patients with right aortic arch accompanied by Kommerell’s diverticulum and aortic aneurysm. In patient 1, total debranch + TEVAR was performed with 1-stage median sternotomy. In patient 2, total arch replacement and insertion of a peripheral elephant trunk were performed first, followed by TEVAR. No endoleaks or aortic events were observed in either case during the observation period, and both patients had good postoperative clinical courses. We report our experience with two such cases that were treated with two different methods of hybrid TEVAR, and discuss the merits and demerits of each treatment method. PMID:25298843

  15. Can Early Computed Tomography Angiography after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Predict the Need for Reintervention in Patients with Type II Endoleak?

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O.; Schnapauff, D.; Herzog, L.; Löwenthal, D.; Bulla, K.; Bulla, B.; Halloul, Z.; Meyer, F.; Pech, M.; Gebauer, B.; Ricke, J.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to identify parameters on CT angiography (CTA) of type II endoleaks following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which can be used to predict the subsequent need for reinterventions.MethodsWe retrospectively identified 62 patients with type II endoleak who underwent early CTA in mean 3.7 ± 1.9 days after EVAR. On the basis of follow-up examinations (mean follow-up period 911 days; range, 373–1,987 days), patients were stratified into two groups: those who did (n = 18) and those who did not (n = 44) require reintervention. CTA characteristics, such as AAA, endoleak, as well as nidus dimensions, patency of the inferior mesenteric artery, number of aortic branch vessels, and the pattern of endoleak appearance, were recorded and correlated with the clinical outcome.ResultsUnivariate and receiver operating characteristic curve regression analyses revealed significant differences between the two groups for the endoleak volume (surveillance group: 1391.6 ± 1427.9 mm{sup 3}; reintervention group: 3227.7 ± 2693.8 mm{sup 3}; cutoff value of 2,386 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.002), the endoleak diameter (13.6 ± 4.3 mm compared with 25.9 ± 9.6 mm; cutoff value of 19 mm; p < 0.0001), the number of aortic branch vessels (2.9 ± 1.2 compared with 4.2 ± 1.4 vessels; p = 0.001), as well as a “complex type” endoleak pattern (13.6 %, n = 6 compared with 44.4 %, n = 8; p = 0.02).ConclusionsEarly CTA can predict the future need for reintervention in patients with type II endoleak. Therefore, treatment decision should be based not only on aneurysm enlargement alone but also on other imaging characteristics.

  16. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  17. Enhanced Recovery after Elective Open Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Complementary Overview through a Pooled Analysis of Proportions from Case Series Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel, Sanderland J. T.; El Dib, Regina; do Nascimento, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs in elective open surgical repair (OSR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Background Open surgical repair of AAA is associated with high morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and high costs. ERAS programs contribute to the optimization of treatment by reducing hospital stay and improving clinical outcomes. Methods A review of PubMed, EMBASE and LILACS databases was conducted. As only one randomized controlled trial was found, a pooled analysis of proportions from case series was conducted, considering it a complementary overview of the topic. Inclusion criteria were case series with more than five cases reported, adult patients who underwent an elective OSR of AAA and use of an ERAS program. ERAS was compared to conventional perioperative care. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI) are shown for each outcome. The overlap of the CI suggests similar effect of the interventions studied. Results Thirteen case series studies with ERAS involving 1,250 patients were compared to six case series with conventional care with a total of 1,429 patients. The pooled, respective proportions for ERAS and conventional care were: mortality, 1.51% [95% CI: 0.0091, 0.0226] and 3.0% [95% CI 0.0183, 0.0445]; and incidence of complications, 3.82% [95% CI 0.0259, 0.0528] and 4.0% [95% CI 0.03, 0.05]. Conclusion This review shows that ERAS and conventional care therapies have similar mortality and complication rates in OSR of AAA. PMID:24887022

  18. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a-the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  19. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms. [Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Ling, D.; Heiken, J.P.; Glazer, H.S.; Sicard, G.A.; Totty, W.G.; Levitt, R.G.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 20 patients with radiologically or surgically proven abdominal aortic aneurysms using a Siemens Magnetom scanner with a 0.35-T superconductive magnet. Of nine patients who underwent surgical repair, MRI correctly demonstrated the origin of the aortic aneurysm in nine and accurately determined the status of the iliac arteries in eight. Of 11 patients who did not have surgical repair, MRI findings correlated well with other radiologic studies. MRI was found to be more reliable than sonography in determining the relation between the aneurysm and the renal arteries as well as the status of the iliac arteries. Despite these advantages, the authors still advocate sonography as the screening procedure of choice in patients with suspected abdominal aortic aneurysms because of its lower cost and ease of performance. MRI should be reserved for patients who have had unsuccessful or equivocal sonographic examinations.

  1. Validation of long-term survival prediction for scheduled abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with an independent calculator using only pre-operative variables.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, J B; Danjoux, G; Kerr, K; Snowden, C; Swart, M

    2015-06-01

    We observed survival after scheduled repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in 1096 patients for a median (IQR [range]) of 3.0 (1.5-5.8 [0-15]) years: 943 patients had complete data, 250 of whom died. We compared discrimination and calibration of an external model with the Kaplan-Meier model generated from the study data. Integrated Brier misclassification scores for both models at 1-5 postoperative years were 0.04, 0.08, 0.11, 0.13 and 0.16, respectively. Harrel's concordance index at 1-5 postoperative years was 0.73, 0.71, 0.68, 0.67 and 0.66, respectively. Groups with median 5-year predicted mortality of 40% (n = 251), 18% (n = 414) and 8% (n = 164) had lower observed mortality than 114 patients with 70% predicted mortality, hazard ratio (95% CI): 0.58 (0.37-0.76), p = 0.0031; 0.30 (0.19-0.48), p = 1.7 × 10(-12) and 0.19 (0.13-0.27), p = 1.3 × 10(-10) , respectively, test for trend p = 5.6 × 10(-15) . Survival predicted by the external calculator was similar to the Kaplan-Meier estimate.

  2. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard. METHODS: For this prospective study we enrolled 163 patients (123 men; mean age, 65.7 years) referred for CTA for EVAR follow-up. CTA, DTA and CEUS were performed at 1 and 12 mo in all patients, with a maximum time interval of 2 d. RESULTS: Among 163 patients 33 presented complications at CTA. DTA and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 32/33 (96.96%) patients and for the absence of complications in 127/130 (97.69%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of DTA were 97%, 98%, 91%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. CEUS and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 19/33 (57.57%) patients and for the absence of complications in 129/130 (99.23%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 58%, 99%, 95%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combining DTA and CEUS together in detecting EVAR complications were 77%, 98% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Combining DTA and CEUS in EVAR follow-up has the potential to limit the use of CTA only in doubtful cases. PMID:27247719

  3. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  4. Medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, B Timothy; Terrin, Michael C; Dalman, Ronald L

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common condition that may be lethal when it is unrecognized. Current guidelines suggest repair as the aneurysm diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Most aortic aneurysms are detected incidentally when imaging is done for other purposes or through screening programs. Ninety percent of these aneurysms are below the threshold for intervention at the time of detection. A number of studies have sought to determine factors that lead to progression of aneurysmal disease that might be amenable to intervention during this period of observation. We review these studies and make recommendations for the medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms. On the basis of our current knowledge of the causes of aneurysm, a number of approaches have been proposed to prevent progression of aneurysmal disease. These include hemodynamic management, inhibition of inflammation, and protease inhibition. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines rules of evidence have helped to define strength of evidence to support these approaches. Level A evidence (from large randomized trials) is available to indicate that observation of small aneurysms in men is safe up to a size of 5.5 cm and that propranolol does not inhibit aneurysm expansion. Level B evidence (from small randomized trials) suggests that roxithromycin or doxycycline will decrease the rate of aneurysm expansion. A number of studies agree that tobacco use is associated with an increased rate of aneurysm expansion. Level B and C evidence is available to suggest that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) may inhibit aneurysm expansion. There are animal data but no human data demonstrating that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, will decrease the rate of AAA expansion. A pharmacological agent without important side effects that inhibited aneurysm expansion could change

  5. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  6. Automatic pose initialization for accurate 2D/3D registration applied to abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Shun; Lucas, Joseph; Liao, Rui

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) stenting can be greatly facilitated by overlaying the preoperative 3-D model of the abdominal aorta onto the intra-operative 2-D X-ray images. Accurate 2-D/3-D registration in 3-D space makes the 2-D/3-D overlay robust to the change of C-Arm angulations. By far, the 2-D/3-D registration methods based on simulated X-ray projection images using multiple image planes have been shown to be able to provide satisfactory 3-D registration accuracy. However, one drawback of the intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration methods is that the similarity measure is usually highly non-convex and hence the optimizer can easily be trapped into local minima. User interaction therefore is often needed in the initialization of the position of the 3-D model in order to get a successful 2-D/3-D registration. In this paper, a novel 3-D pose initialization technique is proposed, as an extension of our previously proposed bi-plane 2-D/3-D registration method for AAA intervention [4]. The proposed method detects vessel bifurcation points and spine centerline in both 2-D and 3-D images, and utilizes landmark information to bring the 3-D volume into a 15mm capture range. The proposed landmark detection method was validated on real dataset, and is shown to be able to provide a good initialization for 2-D/3-D registration in [4], thus making the workflow fully automatic.

  7. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopinski, Piotr

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  8. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm From Late Type II Endoleak Treated by Transarterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gunasekaran, Senthil; Funaki, Brian Lorenz, Jonathan

    2013-02-15

    Endoleak is the most common complication after endovascular aneurysm repair. The most common type of endoleak, a type II endoleak, typically follows a benign course and is only treated when associated with increasing aneurysm size. In this case report, we describe a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm due to a late, type II endoleak occurring 10 years after endovascular aneurysm repair that was successfully treated by transarterial embolization.

  9. Primary calibration of measurement microphones in the world: state of art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of state of art of measurement microphones primary calibration in the world with emphasis on Brazil practices. Initially, pressure field calibration is summarized being discussed mainly the couplers used to create pressure field conditions. After that, free-field calibration is presented being commented especially the anechoic chambers used to create free-field conditions. Concluding, it is showed diffuse-field calibration that is being investigated. It is presented, in particular, the reverberant chambers used to create diffuse-field conditions.

  10. Current technology for the treatment of infection following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) fixation by endovascular repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Capoccia, L; Mestres, G; Riambau, V

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, in parallel with the increase of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) procedures performances, a rise of late open surgical removal of EVAR implants has been observed, due to non-endovascularly correctable graft complications. Among them endograft infection is a rare but devastating occurrence, accounting for an incidence ranging from 0.2% to 0.7% in major series, and almost 1% of all causes of endograft explantations. However, a real estimation of the incidence of the problem respect to the number of EVAR implantations is difficult to obtain. Time to infection is usually defined as the period between EVAR and presentation of symptoms that leads to the infection diagnosis. It can be extremely variable, depending on bacterial virulence and host conditions. The diagnosis of an endograft infection is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies and microbial cultures whenever possible. If computed tomography (CT) scan is employed in almost 100% of infection diagnosis, a combination of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and CT scan is nowadays used with increasing frequency in order to rise the likelihood of detecting a graft infection, since even cultures of blood or samples collected from the infected field can sometimes be negative. Complete graft excision seems the best approach whenever a surgical reconstruction could be attempted. In situ reconstruction can be performed by the interposition of an autologous vein, a cryopreserved allograft or a rifampin-soaked Dacron graft. The so-called conventional treatment contemplates the re-establishment of vascularization through extranatomical routes, thus preserving the new graft material from possible contamination by the surgical field just cleaned. When severe comorbid conditions did not allow graft excision, a conservative treatment should be taken into account. It is mainly based on broad-spectrum or culture-specific antibiotic therapy combined, whenever

  11. CT Study of the Relationship Between the Common Iliac Artery and Vein and Their Juxtaposition: Implications for Conduit Construction Prior to Endosvascular Stent-Graft Repair of Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Lenton, James; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kent, Patrick; Nicholson, Tony

    2008-11-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the anatomical relationship and juxtaposition between the common iliac artery and vein in a population of patients with aortic aneurysmal disease and a population clinically and radiologically free of atheroma. It was a retrospective study of 100 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomographic assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysm prior to endovascular or open surgical repair and 100 patients undergoing computed tomographic assessment for other pathologies who did not have clinical or imaging signs of aorto-iliac atheroma. In both groups the anatomical relationship between the right and left iliac artery and vein was studied, and the thickness of the fat plane separating the artery from the vein measured. The right iliac vein was posterolateral to the artery at the level of the common iliac artery bifurcation in 95% of patients in both groups. At the same level the left iliac vein was posterior in 23% (p {<=} 0.001). Eighty-three percent of patients in the aneurysm group had a fat plane between the right artery and vein that measured 0 mm (no visible fat plane = 52%) to 1 mm (= 31%). Ninety-eight percent of patients in the aneurysm group had a measurable fat plane between the left iliac artery and vein of up to 5 mm (p = 0.001). Six percent of the control group demonstrated no visible fat plane between the right iliac artery and vein (p {<=} 0.001), while the fat plane measured more than 1 mm (1-5 mm) on the left in 100%. We conclude that in patients where conduit construction is required for aortic stent-graft access, the anatomical configuration and intimate relationship of the iliac arteries and veins should be assessed and taken into account at CT scan evaluation. The distal right common iliac artery should not be used, as venous damage can be predicted from the anatomical and intimate relationship of the iliac artery and vein at this level in patients with atheroma and the difficulties this relationship

  12. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  13. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  14. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Aneurysm? An aneurysm (AN-u-rism) is a balloon-like bulge ... the weakened or injured walls can cause an aneurysm. An aneurysm can grow large and rupture (burst) ...

  15. A Staged Hybrid Procedure to Manage Complex Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Aortic Arch Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hernández Carbonell, Teresa; Haulon, Stephan; Prat, Alain; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Tyrrell, Mark R; Sobocinski, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    We report the management of a patient who had an open-surgical repair following traumatic avulsion of the supra-aortic trunks (SAT) 30 years prior to presentation with a large arch aneurysm and poor cerebral collaterals. "Simple" thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) was not an option because it would have excluded the collateral circulation to the carotid and vertebral arteries. We devised a two-stage hybrid procedure to repair this challenging aneurysm.

  16. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  17. Endoluminal embolization of bilateral atherosclerotic common iliac aneurysms with fibrin tissue glue (Beriplast)

    SciTech Connect

    Beese, Richard C.; Tomlinson, Mark A.; Buckenham, Timothy M.

    2000-05-15

    The standard surgical approach to nonleaking iliac aneurysms found at repair of a leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm is to minimize the operative risk by repairing the abdominal aorta only. This means that the bypassed iliac aneurysms may have to be repaired later. As this population of patients are usually elderly with coexisting medical problems, interventional radiology is being used to embolize these aneurysms, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality associated with further general anesthesia and surgery. Various materials and stents have been reported to be effective in the treatment of iliac aneurysms. We report the successful use of endoluminal fibrin tissue glue (Beriplast) to treat two large iliac aneurysms in a patient who had had a previous abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. We discuss the technique involved and the reasons why we used tissue glue in this patient.

  18. The gamma-ray blazar quest: new optical spectra, state of art and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Álvarez Crespo, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Landoni, M.; Masetti, N.; Ricci, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; La Franca, F.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2016-10-01

    We recently developed a procedure to recognize γ-ray blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty regions of the unidentified/unassociated γ-ray sources (UGSs). Such procedure was based on the discovery that Fermi blazars show peculiar infrared colors. However, to confirm the real nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic data are necessary. Thus, we performed an extensive archival search for spectra available in the literature in parallel with an optical spectroscopic campaign aimed to reveal and confirm the nature of the selected γ-ray blazar candidates. Here, we first search for optical spectra of a selected sample of γ-ray blazar candidates that can be potential counterparts of UGSs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR12). This search enables us to update the archival search carried out to date. We also describe the state-of-art and the future perspectives of our campaign to discover previously unknown γ-ray blazars.

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brinssen M, Verhoeven EL, Cuypers PW, et al: DREAM Study Group. Long-term outcome of open or ... is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation ...

  20. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:783-787. Hammond CJ, Nicholson AA. ... of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New York, NY: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 85. Sternbergh WC. Technique: ...

  1. A Case of Glucocorticoid Remediable Aldosteronism and Thoracoabdominal Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Shahrrava, Anahita; Moinuddin, Sunnan; Boddu, Prajwal; Shah, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is rare familial form of primary aldosteronism characterized by a normalization of hypertension with the administration of glucocorticoids. We present a case of GRA and thoracoabdominal aneurysm complicated by multiple aortic dissections requiring complex surgical and endovascular repairs. Registry studies have shown a high rate of intracranial aneurysms in GRA patients with high case fatality rates. The association of thoracoabdominal aneurysms with GRA has not been described, thus far, in literature. Studies have shown that high tissue aldosterone levels concomitant with salt intake have a significant role in the pathogenesis of aneurysms and this may explain the formation of aneurysms in the intracranial vasculature and aorta. The association of GRA with thoracic aortic aneurysms needs to be further studied to develop screening recommendations for early identification and optimal treatment. Also, the early use of mineralocorticoid antagonists may have a significant preventive and attenuating effect in aneurysm formation, an association which needs to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27366333

  2. Intracranial blister aneurysms: clip reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo; McCracken, D Jay

    2015-07-01

    Intracranial blister aneurysms are difficult to treat cerebrovascular lesions that typically affect the anterior circulation. These rare aneurysms can lead to acute rupture which usually cannot be treated via endovascular methods, but still require urgent surgical intervention. Surgical options are limited given their unique pathology and often require a combination of wrapping and clip reconstruction. In this video we present two patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured blister aneurysms. We demonstrate several surgical techniques for repairing the vascular defect with and without intraoperative rupture. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/nz-JM45uKQU.

  3. The use of a new hybrid stentgraft for the repair of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms with the frozen elephant trunk method – first Polish experiences

    PubMed Central

    Krasoń, Marcin; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Przybylski, Roman; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Borowicz, Marcin; Niklewski, Tomasz; Głowacki, Jan; Wolny, Tomasz; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Walas, Ryszard; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    The frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique is a modification of the traditional elephant trunk method, which was introduced by Borst in 1983 in order to treat extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms. The crux of the new method is the different type of aortic prosthesis, consisting of a Dacron part (with or without branches leading to the arterial vessels which exit the aortic arch) and a port for extracorporeal circulation with a self-expanding nitinol stentgraft. This combination enables a complete one-stage treatment of the pathologies within the arch and the proximal segment of the descending aorta; moreover, it facilitates the performance of a two-stage hybrid treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms involving a significant part of the descending aorta. This article presents the cases of four patients with extensive aortic disease, who were implanted with Thoraflex prostheses (Vascutek, Scotland). PMID:26335241

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: how can we improve their treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, T K

    1980-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are present in a least 2% of the elderly population of the Western world and their number is increasing. Without treatment 30% of patients with asymptomatic aneurysms live for 5 years, although the risk of rupture becomes greater as the size of the aneurysm increases. Of those with untreated symptomatic aneurysms 80% are dead within a year. Elective repair of aneurysms has a low mortality, and 50% of the patients live for at least 5 years. Symptomatic aneurysms all cause pain and may produce other symptoms from pressure on adjacent structures, distal embolism, acute thrombosis or rupture. In 88% of cases an aneurysm can be diagnosed by physical examination alone; confirmatory tests include soft-tissue roentgenography of the abdomen, ultrasonography, computer-assisted tomography and aortography. Repair is indicated for symptomatic or ruptured aortic aneurysms and for asymptomatic aneurysms over 5 cm in diameter. Early diagnosis and referral for repair is essential for optimum treatment of this common condition. PMID:7004617

  5. Small pipes: preliminary experience with 3-mm or smaller pipeline flow-diverting stents for aneurysm repair prior to regulatory approval.

    PubMed

    Martin, A R; Cruz, J P; O'Kelly, C; Kelly, M; Spears, J; Marotta, T R

    2015-03-01

    Flow diversion has become an established treatment option for challenging intracranial aneurysms. The use of small devices of ≤3-mm diameter remains unapproved by major regulatory bodies. A retrospective review of patients treated with Pipeline Embolization Devices of ≤3-mm diameter at 3 Canadian institutions was conducted. Clinical and radiologic follow-up data were collected and reported. Twelve cases were treated with ≥1 Pipeline Embolization Device of ≤3-mm diameter, including 2 with adjunctive coiling, with a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 4-42 months). One patient experienced a posttreatment minor complication (8%) due to an embolic infarct. No posttreatment hemorrhage or delayed complications such as in-stent stenosis/thrombosis were observed. Radiologic occlusion was seen in 9/12 cases (75%) and near-occlusion in 2/12 cases (17%). Intracranial aneurysm treatment with small-diameter flow-diverting stents provided safe and effective aneurysm closure in this small selected sample. These devices should be further studied and considered for regulatory approval. PMID:25395659

  6. Radiological Changes in Infantile Dissecting Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly

    PubMed Central

    Yatomi, Kenji; Oishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Suga, Yasuo; Nonaka, Senshu; Yoshida, Kensaku; Arai, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intracranial aneurysms are extremely rare in infants, and to our knowledge only seven infants treated for ruptured spontaneous dissecting aneurysms have been reported. Good outcomes have been achieved with endovascular treatment of infantile aneurysm. We the endovascular treatment of a one-month-old girl for ruptured dissecting aneurysm located in the anterior communicating artery, and the unique radiological changes that were observed during the perioperative and follow-up periods. These changes suggest that blood coagulation and fibrinolytic response play a part in the repair and healing processes of dissecting aneurysms. Careful neuroradiological surveys are needed for pediatric dissecting aneurysms treated endovascularly. PMID:25496693

  7. Eye Tracking and Head Movement Detection: A State-of-Art Survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Eye-gaze detection and tracking have been an active research field in the past years as it adds convenience to a variety of applications. It is considered a significant untraditional method of human computer interaction. Head movement detection has also received researchers' attention and interest as it has been found to be a simple and effective interaction method. Both technologies are considered the easiest alternative interface methods. They serve a wide range of severely disabled people who are left with minimal motor abilities. For both eye tracking and head movement detection, several different approaches have been proposed and used to implement different algorithms for these technologies. Despite the amount of research done on both technologies, researchers are still trying to find robust methods to use effectively in various applications. This paper presents a state-of-art survey for eye tracking and head movement detection methods proposed in the literature. Examples of different fields of applications for both technologies, such as human-computer interaction, driving assistance systems, and assistive technologies are also investigated. PMID:27170851

  8. State-of-Art Empirical Modeling of Ring Current Plasma Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, C.; Ma, Q.; Wang, C. P.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere plays a key role in plasma dynamics by changing magnetic field configurations and generating the ring current. In this study, we present our preliminary results of empirically constructing 2D equatorial ring current pressure and pressure anisotropy spatial distributions controlled by Dst based on measurements from two particle instruments (HOPE and RBSPICE) onboard Van Allen Probes. We first obtain the equatorial plasma perpendicular and parallel pressures for different species including H+, He+, O+ and e- from 20 eV to ~1 MeV, and investigate their relative contributions to the total plasma pressure and pressure anisotropy. We then establish empirical equatorial pressure models within ~ 6 RE using a state-of-art machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression Machine (SVRM). The pressure models predict equatorial perpendicular and parallel plasma thermal pressures (for each species and for total pressures) and pressure anisotropy at any given r, MLT, Bz/Br (equivalent Z distance), and Dst within applicable ranges. We are currently validating our model predictions and investigating how the ring current pressure distributions and the associated pressure gradients vary with Dst index.

  9. Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine in Italy: state-of-art, organizational aspects and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Chiesa, V; Odone, A

    2015-08-31

    Neisseria meningitidis causes severe invasive meningococcal diseases (IMDs) in humans including meningitis and septicemia, responsible for serious clinical conditions and leading to life-long disabilities and death. Serogroup B dominates IMDs burden in Italy, accounting for over 60% of total cases. On January 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) licensed the first serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine in Europe. A number of European countries and Regions have introduced the new MenB vaccine in their immunization schedule, including Italy. In this paper we present the state of art, related critical issues and future perspectives of MenB vaccine introduction in Italy, in the context of the most recent available epidemiological data. In particular, we systematically assess the ongoing processes in the 8 Italian regions and one autonomous province that have already introduced MenB vaccine. With the new 2014-2018 National Vaccine Prevention Plan including active MenB vaccine offer about to be adopted, it is of fundamental importance to gather further evidence on MenB vaccine clinical effectiveness, duration of protection and cost-effectiveness. Italian regions are called to organize and manage MenB immunization programs. Careful consideration will need to be devoted on timing, doses, and co-administration with other vaccines but also to economic assessments and strengthened communication to the general public. Our data will help to plan, implement and evaluate MenB immunization programmes in other Italian and international settings.

  10. Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine in Italy: state-of-art, organizational aspects and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Chiesa, V; Odone, A

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes severe invasive meningococcal diseases (IMDs) in humans including meningitis and septicemia, responsible for serious clinical conditions and leading to life-long disabilities and death. Serogroup B dominates IMDs burden in Italy, accounting for over 60% of total cases. On January 2013 the European Medicine Agency (EMA) licensed the first serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine in Europe. A number of European countries and Regions have introduced the new MenB vaccine in their immunization schedule, including Italy. In this paper we present the state of art, related critical issues and future perspectives of MenB vaccine introduction in Italy, in the context of the most recent available epidemiological data. In particular, we systematically assess the ongoing processes in the 8 Italian regions and one autonomous province that have already introduced MenB vaccine. With the new 2014-2018 National Vaccine Prevention Plan including active MenB vaccine offer about to be adopted, it is of fundamental importance to gather further evidence on MenB vaccine clinical effectiveness, duration of protection and cost-effectiveness. Italian regions are called to organize and manage MenB immunization programs. Careful consideration will need to be devoted on timing, doses, and co-administration with other vaccines but also to economic assessments and strengthened communication to the general public. Our data will help to plan, implement and evaluate MenB immunization programmes in other Italian and international settings. PMID:26788733

  11. [INVITED] An overview of the state of art in laser welding simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, M.; Fabbro, R.

    2016-04-01

    The work presented in this paper deals with the laser welding simulation. Due to the rise of laser processing in industry, its simulation takes also more and more place. Nevertheless, the physical phenomena occurring are quite complex and, above all, very coupled. Thus, a state of art is necessary to summarize phenomena that have to be considered. Indeed, the electro-magnetic wave interacts with the material surface, heating the piece until the fusion and the vaporization. The vaporization induces a recoil pressure and deforms the liquid/vapor interface creating a vapor capillary. The heat diffused in the material produces thermal dilatation leading to mechanical stress and strain. As a complete simulation is too large to be computed with one model, the literature is composed by two kinds of models, the thermo-mechanical simulations and the multi-physical simulations. The first aims to find the mechanical stress and strain due to the welding. The model is usually simplified in order to reduce the simulation size. The second, compute the more accurately the thermal and the velocity fields. In that case authors usually search also the size of the weld bead and want to be totally self consistent. In this review, the major part of equations and assumptions needed to simulate laser welding are shown. Their effects on simulation results are illustrated for each simulation type. The paper aims to give sufficient knowledge and tools to allow a simulation of laser welding.

  12. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    , resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the mortality rate can be 40% to 50%, with severe morbidity of 10% to 20%. The reported overall risk of rupture is 1.9% per year and is higher for women, cigarette smokers, and cocaine users, and in aneurysms that are symptomatic, greater than 10 mm in diameter, or located in the posterior circulation. If left untreated, there is a considerable risk of repeat hemorrhage in a ruptured aneurysm that results in increased mortality. In Ontario, intracranial aneurysms occur in about 1% to 4% of the population, and the annual incidence of SAH is about 10 cases per 100,000 people. In 2004-2005, about 660 intracranial aneurysm repairs were performed in Ontario. Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms Treatment of an unruptured aneurysm attempts to prevent the aneurysm from rupturing. The treatment of a ruptured intracranial aneurysm aims to prevent further hemorrhage. There are 3 approaches to treating an intracranial aneurysm. Small, asymptomatic aneurysms less than 10 mm in diameter may be monitored without any intervention other than treatment for underlying risk factors such as hypertension. Open surgical clipping, involves craniotomy, brain retraction, and placement of a silver clip across the neck of the aneurysm while a patient is under general anesthesia. This procedure is associated with surgical risks and neurological deficits. Endovascular coil embolization, introduced in the 1990s, is the health technology under review. Literature Review Methods The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched the International Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) Database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant systematic reviews. OVID Medline, Medline In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, and Embase were searched for English-language journal articles that reported primary data on the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of treatments for intracranial aneurysms, obtained in a clinical setting or analyses of primary

  13. Rebleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Starke, R M; Connolly, E S

    2011-09-01

    Rebleeding after initial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can have substantial impact on overall patient outcome. While older studies have suggested rebleeding occurs in about 4% of patients during the first day after initial aneurysmal bleed, these studies may have failed to capture very early rebleeds and, consequently, underestimated the impact of rebleeding. An electronic literature search was performed to identify English-language articles published or available for review from February 1975 through October 2010. A total of 43 articles (40 original research and 3 review articles) focused on rebleeding after initial aneurysmal SAH in humans were selected for review. Although most studies supported an incidence of rebleeding ≤4%, studies investigating ultra-early rebleeding reported bleeding within the first 24 h following aneurysmal SAH in as many as 9-17% of patients, with most cases occurring within 6 h of initial hemorrhage. Overall, studies investigating antifibrinolytic therapy to reduce rebleeding have failed to clearly demonstrate overall therapeutic benefit. Short-course antifibrinolytic therapy may have a role prior to initial aneurysm repair, although insufficient data are currently available. PMID:21761274

  14. Anomalous Right Subclavian Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Gordon C.; Codd, John E.

    1991-01-01

    During the past 2 years, 3 anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysms have been encountered at the St. Louis Heart Institute. The 1st patient, a 72-year-old woman, was found to have an asymptomatic 5-cm-diameter anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysm after surgery for suspected rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Resection was not attempted because of her poor cardiopulmonary and renal condition. One year later, the patient remains alive with marked cardiopulmonary limitations. The 2nd patient, a 77-year-old man, experienced dysphagia and severe weight loss because of a 14-cm-diameter aneurysm. Three days after undergoing surgical repair, he required reoperation for graft occlusion with right upper-extremity ischemia. Six months after hospital discharge, he died of pulmonary insufficiency and metastatic colon cancer. The 3rd patient, a 73-year-old woman, required emergency surgical intervention because of acute rupture and hypovolemic shock. Thirteen days later, she died of aspiration, asphyxia, and cardiac arrest. On the basis of our experience and a review of the literature, we conclude that symptomatic anomalous right subclavian artery aneurysms are rare, and that surgical intervention entails a relatively high morbidity and mortality rate. If long-term survival is anticipated, associated medical illnesses should be considered before surgery is undertaken. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:209-18) Images PMID:15227483

  15. Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Mimicking as Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor II Mutation.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Rana O; Dhillon, Baltej Singh; Sandhu, Harleen K; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We report successful endovascular repair of a left vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with transforming growth factor beta receptor II mutation. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left subclavian artery aneurysm on computed tomography angiography. The patient consented to publication of this report.

  16. Rare Case of Vaginal Delivery in Giant Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Luneva, Ekaterina; Samokhvalova, Maria; Pakhomov, Artem; Mitrofanova, Lubov; Malev, Eduard; Uspenskiy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent successful vaginal delivery despite previously unsuspected 8-cm ascending and 6-cm descending aortic aneurysms. These were repaired immediately after delivery. PMID:27069941

  17. Recurrent aortic aneurysms in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Adams, Corey; Zhen-Yu Tong, Michael; Lawlor, D Kirk; DeRose, Guy; Forbes, Thomas L

    2010-01-01

    The following is a case of a 22-year-old male with recurrent thoracic aneurysms with several constitutional symptoms, including gastrointestinal discomfort, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, and a 2-week history of severe lower back pain. The patient underwent an initial thoracoabdominal repair of a visceral aneurysm followed by endovascular repair of a recurrent thoracic pseudoaneurysm. The etiology of the visceral aneurysm was initially hypothesized to be mycotic; however, further information revealed signs and symptoms consistent with the diagnostic criteria for Behçet disease (BD). We suggest that BD be considered in younger patients who present with an aortic aneurysm. Although open repair is the traditional approach for arterial lesions in BD, the role for endovascular intervention should be considered as it represents a surgical repair with a significant reduction in morbidity. PMID:20822728

  18. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  19. Superior mesenteric vein aneurysm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuan; Vu, Jonathan-Hien; Matteo, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    A 46-year-old female was found to have a saccular superior mesenteric vein (SMV) aneurysm on computed tomography (CT) scan during workup for abdominal pain. It measured 3.5 cm in diameter. The SMV aneurysm was successfully resected, and the SMV was repaired with femoral vein patch angioplasty. She was placed on coumadin for 3 months. At follow-up, the vein patch repair was patent and the patient was doing well with complete resolution of her abdominal pain. PMID:22156158

  20. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  1. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  2. Surgical approach to right colon cancer: From open technique to robot. State of art

    PubMed Central

    Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Cirillo, Pia; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work is a topic highlight on the surgical treatment of the right colon pathologies, focusing on the literature state of art and comparing the open surgery to the different laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Different laparoscopic procedures have been described for the treatment of right colon tumors: Totally laparoscopic right colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, robotic right colectomy. Two main characteristics of these techniques are the different type of anastomosis: Intracorporeal (for totally laparoscopic right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy and robotic technique) or extracorporeal (for laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy and open right colectomy) and the different incision (suprapubic, median or transverse on the right side of abdomen). The different laparoscopic techniques meet the same oncological criteria of radicalism as the open surgery for the right colon. The totally laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis and even more the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, remain a technical challenge due to the complexity of procedures (especially for the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy) and the particular right colon vascular anatomy but they seem to have some theoretical advantages compared to the other laparoscopic and open procedures. Data reported in literature while confirming the advantages of laparoscopic approach, do not allow to solve controversies about which is the best laparoscopic technique (Intracorporeal vs Extracorporeal Anastomosis) to treat the right colon cancer. However, the laparoscopic techniques with intracorporeal anastomosis for the right colon seem to show some theoretical advantages (functional, technical

  3. Surgical approach to right colon cancer: From open technique to robot. State of art

    PubMed Central

    Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Cirillo, Pia; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work is a topic highlight on the surgical treatment of the right colon pathologies, focusing on the literature state of art and comparing the open surgery to the different laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Different laparoscopic procedures have been described for the treatment of right colon tumors: Totally laparoscopic right colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, robotic right colectomy. Two main characteristics of these techniques are the different type of anastomosis: Intracorporeal (for totally laparoscopic right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy and robotic technique) or extracorporeal (for laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy and open right colectomy) and the different incision (suprapubic, median or transverse on the right side of abdomen). The different laparoscopic techniques meet the same oncological criteria of radicalism as the open surgery for the right colon. The totally laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis and even more the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, remain a technical challenge due to the complexity of procedures (especially for the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy) and the particular right colon vascular anatomy but they seem to have some theoretical advantages compared to the other laparoscopic and open procedures. Data reported in literature while confirming the advantages of laparoscopic approach, do not allow to solve controversies about which is the best laparoscopic technique (Intracorporeal vs Extracorporeal Anastomosis) to treat the right colon cancer. However, the laparoscopic techniques with intracorporeal anastomosis for the right colon seem to show some theoretical advantages (functional, technical

  4. Surgical approach to right colon cancer: From open technique to robot. State of art.

    PubMed

    Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Cirillo, Pia; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-08-27

    This work is a topic highlight on the surgical treatment of the right colon pathologies, focusing on the literature state of art and comparing the open surgery to the different laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Different laparoscopic procedures have been described for the treatment of right colon tumors: Totally laparoscopic right colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, robotic right colectomy. Two main characteristics of these techniques are the different type of anastomosis: Intracorporeal (for totally laparoscopic right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy and robotic technique) or extracorporeal (for laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy and open right colectomy) and the different incision (suprapubic, median or transverse on the right side of abdomen). The different laparoscopic techniques meet the same oncological criteria of radicalism as the open surgery for the right colon. The totally laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis and even more the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, remain a technical challenge due to the complexity of procedures (especially for the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy) and the particular right colon vascular anatomy but they seem to have some theoretical advantages compared to the other laparoscopic and open procedures. Data reported in literature while confirming the advantages of laparoscopic approach, do not allow to solve controversies about which is the best laparoscopic technique (Intracorporeal vs Extracorporeal Anastomosis) to treat the right colon cancer. However, the laparoscopic techniques with intracorporeal anastomosis for the right colon seem to show some theoretical advantages (functional, technical

  5. Surgical approach to right colon cancer: From open technique to robot. State of art.

    PubMed

    Fabozzi, Massimiliano; Cirillo, Pia; Corcione, Francesco

    2016-08-27

    This work is a topic highlight on the surgical treatment of the right colon pathologies, focusing on the literature state of art and comparing the open surgery to the different laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Different laparoscopic procedures have been described for the treatment of right colon tumors: Totally laparoscopic right colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, robotic right colectomy. Two main characteristics of these techniques are the different type of anastomosis: Intracorporeal (for totally laparoscopic right colectomy, single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, laparoscopic assisted right colectomy and robotic technique) or extracorporeal (for laparoscopic assisted right colectomy, laparoscopic facilitated right colectomy, hand-assisted right colectomy and open right colectomy) and the different incision (suprapubic, median or transverse on the right side of abdomen). The different laparoscopic techniques meet the same oncological criteria of radicalism as the open surgery for the right colon. The totally laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis and even more the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy, remain a technical challenge due to the complexity of procedures (especially for the single incision laparoscopic surgery colectomy) and the particular right colon vascular anatomy but they seem to have some theoretical advantages compared to the other laparoscopic and open procedures. Data reported in literature while confirming the advantages of laparoscopic approach, do not allow to solve controversies about which is the best laparoscopic technique (Intracorporeal vs Extracorporeal Anastomosis) to treat the right colon cancer. However, the laparoscopic techniques with intracorporeal anastomosis for the right colon seem to show some theoretical advantages (functional, technical

  6. An Aortoenteric Fistula Arising after Endovascular Management of a Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Complicated with a Psoas Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gülcü, Aytaç; Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Uğurlu, Şevket Baran; Göktay, Ahmet Yiğit

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysms account for 1–3% of all aortic aneurysms. The management of this disease is controversial. Since open surgical repair is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, endovascular aneurysm repair is an alternative treatment method with promising early and midterm outcomes, although its long-term durability is unknown. Secondary aortoenteric fistulas may occur iatrogenically after either aortic reconstructive surgery or endovascular repair. As the number of aneurysms managed with endovascular aneurysm repair has substantially increased, cases of aortoenteric fistulas referred for endovascular repair are augmented. We report the case of an aortoduodenal fistula manifested with duodenal perforation after staged endovascular and surgical treatment of a mycotic aortic aneurysm. PMID:27365559

  7. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  8. The – Not So – Solid 5.5 cm Threshold for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Facts, Misinterpretations, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Pantidis, Dimitrios; Dedes, Athansios; Daskalakis, Nikolaos; Ioannou, Christos V.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent a focal dilation of the aorta exceeding 1.5 times its normal diameter. It is reported that 4–8% of men and 0.5–1% of women above 50 years of age bear an AAA. Rupture represents the most disastrous complication of aneurysmal disease that is accompanied by an overall mortality of 80%. Autopsy data have shown that nearly 13% of AAAs with a maximum diameter ≤5 cm were ruptured and 60% of the AAAs >5 cm in diameter never ruptured. It is therefore obvious that the “maximum diameter criterion,” as a single parameter that fits all patients, is obsolete. Investigators have begun a search for more reliable rupture risk markers for AAA expansion, such as the level and change of peak wall stress or AAA geometry. Furthermore, it is becoming more and more evident that intraluminal thrombus (ILT), which is present in 75% of all AAAs, affects AAA features and promotes their expansion. Though these hemodynamic properties of AAAs are significant and seem to better describe rupture risk, they are in need of specialized equipment and software and demand time for processing making them difficult in use and unattractive to clinicians in everyday practice. In the search for the addition of other risk factors or user-friendly tools, which may predict AAA expansion and rupture, the use of the asymmetrical ILT deposition index seems appealing since it has been reported to identify AAAs that may have an increased or decreased growth rate. PMID:26835458

  9. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  10. How Is an Aneurysm Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Treated? Aortic aneurysms are treated with medicines and surgery. Small aneurysms ... doing your normal daily activities Treatment for an aortic aneurysm is based on its size. Your doctor may ...

  11. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction Caused by Isolated Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Lin, Chun Huie; Reardon, Michael J; Ramlawi, Basel

    2016-08-01

    Isolated sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare occurrence, with an incidence of <1.5% among congenital heart disease repairs in the world. We recount the case of a 64-year-old man who presented with right-sided heart failure symptoms caused by a severely dilated right coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that substantially obstructed the right ventricular outflow tract. Successful surgical repair involved right ventricular outflow tract resection and subcoronary patch repair. PMID:27547152

  12. Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing for the Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Brownrigg, Jack R. W.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Holt, Peter J. E.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Morgan, Robert A.; Loftus, Ian M.; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and report preliminary results of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) repair with endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), a novel therapeutic alternative whose feasibility has not been established in rAAAs due to the unknown effects of the rupture site on the ability to achieve sealing. Case Report: Between December 2013 and April 2014, 5 patients (median age 71 years, range 57–90; 3 men) with rAAAs were treated with the Nellix EVAS system at a single institution. Median aneurysm diameter was 70 mm (range 67–91). Aneurysm morphology in 4 of the 5 patients was noncompliant with instructions for use (IFU) for both EVAS and standard stent-grafts; the remaining patient was outside the IFU for standard stent-grafts but treated with EVAS under standard IFU for the Nellix system. Median Hardman index was 2 (range 0–3). Two patients died of multiorgan failure after re-laparotomy and intraoperative cardiac arrest, respectively. Among survivors, all devices were patent with no signs of endoleak or failed aneurysm sac sealing at 6 months (median follow-up 9.2 months). Conclusion: EVAS for the management of infrarenal rAAAs appears feasible. The use of EVAS in emergency repairs may broaden the selection criteria of the current endovascular strategy to include patients with more complex aneurysm morphology. PMID:25904491

  13. Comparison of Superb Micro-Vascular Ultrasound Imaging (SMI) and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Detection of Endoleaks After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Marcin; Tomczak, Jolanta; Snoch-Ziółkiewicz, Magdalena; Dzieciuchowicz, Łukasz; Strauss, Ewa; Oszkinis, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Unusual clinical course Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Angio CT Specialty: Surgery Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: High-resolution contrast-enhanced ultrasound is one of methods used in the detection and characterization of endoleaks, which is a frequent complication after EVAR. A new technology provided by Toshiba’s AplioTM 500 ultrasound system, called Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging (SMI), is dedicated specifically to imaging very low flow states and appears to be a promising new method for detection of endoleaks. Case Report: After endovascular treatment, a 68-year-old patient who had stent-graft implantation underwent clinical examinations, including contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI), and computed tomographic angiography (CTA), revealing additional information about abnormal blood flow localized in the periphery of the sack of the left common iliac artery aneurysm. By using CEUS and SMI, the endoleak was clearly visible. Conclusions: This case report illustrates the potential clinical value of this advanced Doppler technology (SMI) and how it could influence clinical management. PMID:26806053

  14. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G.; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  15. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. PMID:24238836

  16. Outcome After Surgical Treatment of Paraclinoid Carotid Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualin, Alberto; Meneghelli, Pietro; Cozzi, Francesco; Chioffi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Surgery on paraclinoid carotid aneurysms is technically demanding and entails considerable risks, especially to visual function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and visual outcome after surgery in 66 patients with paraclinoid carotid aneurysms (30 ruptured and 36 unruptured) treated between 1990 and 2014. Thirty-six aneurysms were of standard size, and 30 were large (16-20 mm) or giant (>20 mm); the Barami classification was used in every case. During surgery, multiple clips were needed in 25 % of patients with standard, and in 80 % of patients with large-giant aneurysms; temporary carotid occlusion was performed on 11 % of patients with standard and 63 % with large-giant aneurysms. Postoperatively, a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was repaired surgically in two patients. At the 3-month follow-up, the modified Rankin Score (mRS) was favorable (0-2) in 63 % of patients with ruptured and in 97 % with unruptured aneurysms; four patients presenting with large hematomas died. Postoperative visual impairment (worsening or newly developing deficit) was noted in 25 % of cases with standard and 14 % of cases with large-giant ruptured aneurysms, and, respectively, in 10 % with standard and 31 % with large-giant unruptured aneurysms. It has been concluded that surgery remains a reasonable choice in the management of patients with paraclinoid carotid aneurysms. PMID:27637626

  17. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  18. Human cardiomyocyte generation from pluripotent stem cells: A state-of-art.

    PubMed

    Talkhabi, Mahmood; Aghdami, Nasser; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-01-15

    The human heart is considered a non-regenerative organ. Worldwide, cardiovascular diseases continue to be the leading cause of death. Despite advances in cardiac treatment, myocardial repair remains severely limited by the lack of an appropriate source of viable cardiomyocytes (CMs) to replace damaged tissue. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can efficiently be differentiated into functional CMs necessary for cell replacement therapy and other potential applications. The number of protocols that derive CMs from hPSCs has increased exponentially over the past decade following observation of the first human beating CMs. A number of highly efficient, chemical based protocols have been developed to generate human CMs (hCMs) in small-scale and large-scale suspension systems. To reduce the heterogeneity of hPSC-derived CMs, the differentiation protocols were modulated to exclusively generate atrial-, ventricular-, and nodal-like CM subtypes. Recently, remarkable advances have been achieved in hCM generation including chemical-based cardiac differentiation, cardiac subtype specification, large-scale suspension culture differentiation, and development of chemically defined culture conditions. These hCMs could be useful particularly in the context of in vitro disease modeling, pharmaceutical screening and in cellular replacement therapies once the safety issues are overcome. Herein we review recent progress in the in vitro generation of CMs and cardiac subtypes from hPSCs and discuss their potential applications and current limitations. PMID:26682938

  19. Human cardiomyocyte generation from pluripotent stem cells: A state-of-art.

    PubMed

    Talkhabi, Mahmood; Aghdami, Nasser; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-01-15

    The human heart is considered a non-regenerative organ. Worldwide, cardiovascular diseases continue to be the leading cause of death. Despite advances in cardiac treatment, myocardial repair remains severely limited by the lack of an appropriate source of viable cardiomyocytes (CMs) to replace damaged tissue. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can efficiently be differentiated into functional CMs necessary for cell replacement therapy and other potential applications. The number of protocols that derive CMs from hPSCs has increased exponentially over the past decade following observation of the first human beating CMs. A number of highly efficient, chemical based protocols have been developed to generate human CMs (hCMs) in small-scale and large-scale suspension systems. To reduce the heterogeneity of hPSC-derived CMs, the differentiation protocols were modulated to exclusively generate atrial-, ventricular-, and nodal-like CM subtypes. Recently, remarkable advances have been achieved in hCM generation including chemical-based cardiac differentiation, cardiac subtype specification, large-scale suspension culture differentiation, and development of chemically defined culture conditions. These hCMs could be useful particularly in the context of in vitro disease modeling, pharmaceutical screening and in cellular replacement therapies once the safety issues are overcome. Herein we review recent progress in the in vitro generation of CMs and cardiac subtypes from hPSCs and discuss their potential applications and current limitations.

  20. [False aneurysm on dacron prosthesis, 20 years after aortofemoral bypass].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bertagni, A; Nasti, A G; Montesano, G

    2001-10-01

    A 85-year-old male developed a false, non septic, non anastomotic aneurysm, 20 years after right aorto-femoral Dacron grafting for claudication. On account of the proximity to the femoral anastomosis, and the association with a profunda femoris stenosis, a conventional surgical repair was preferred to an endovascular treatment. The patient underwent a successful aneurysm resection followed by PTFE interposition between the primary graft and the profunda femoris artery, with uneventful recovery.

  1. [False aneurysm on dacron prosthesis, 20 years after aortofemoral bypass].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bertagni, A; Nasti, A G; Montesano, G

    2001-10-01

    A 85-year-old male developed a false, non septic, non anastomotic aneurysm, 20 years after right aorto-femoral Dacron grafting for claudication. On account of the proximity to the femoral anastomosis, and the association with a profunda femoris stenosis, a conventional surgical repair was preferred to an endovascular treatment. The patient underwent a successful aneurysm resection followed by PTFE interposition between the primary graft and the profunda femoris artery, with uneventful recovery. PMID:11692765

  2. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. ... changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. ...

  3. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  4. Aneurysm sac shrinkage after endovascular treatment of the aorta: beyond sac pressure and endoleaks.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Georgiadis, George S; Ioannou, Christos V; Kapoulas, Konstantinos C; Trellopoulos, George; Lazarides, Miltos

    2012-06-01

    The isolation of the aneurysm sac from systemic pressure and its consequent shrinkage are considered criteria of success after endovascular repair (EVAR). However, the process of shrinkage does not solely depend on the intrasac pressure, the predictive role of which remains ambiguous. This brief review summarizes the additional pathophysiological mechanisms that regulate the biomechanical properties of the aneurysm wall and may interfere with the process of aneurysm sac shrinkage. PMID:22402935

  5. [Peripheral arterial pseudo-aneurysm in Behçet's disease: Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Abissegue, Y; Ouldsalek, E; Lyazidi, Y; El Ochi, M R; El Fatemi, B; Chtata, H T; Bensaid, Y; Taberkant, M

    2016-05-01

    Behçet's disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiopathogenesis. Arterial events such as pseudo-aneurysms are rare and may be the mode of occurrence of the disease. These pseudo-aneurysms tend, regardless of size, to progress rapidly to life-threatening rupture. We report two cases of arterial pseudo-aneurysms that ruptured. Treatment consisted of surgical repair in one case and arterial ligation in the other; the postoperative course was uneventful in both cases.

  6. Ruptured ileocolic artery aneurysm: an unusual cause of hemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zakaur R; Yousif, Omer F; Halliday, Mark W; Hubaishah, Nasser A; Adam, Khalid A

    2012-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysm of a branch of ileocolic artery is a rare finding and is an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis, and surgical or endovascular intervention are necessary to avoid devastating consequences and high mortality rates following an emergency operation after rupture. Resection is a good choice for surgical intervention for some aneurysms that are not suitable for endovascular repair. This report describes the case of a middle-aged man with a ruptured superior mesenteric artery branch aneurysm and his subsequent surgical management. PMID:23006464

  7. Ruptured Ileocolic Artery Aneurysm: An Unusual Cause of Hemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Zakaur R.; Yousif, Omer F.; Halliday, Mark W.; Hubaishah, Nasser A.; Adam, Khalid A.

    2012-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysm of a branch of ileocolic artery is a rare finding and is an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis, and surgical or endovascular intervention are necessary to avoid devastating consequences and high mortality rates following an emergency operation after rupture. Resection is a good choice for surgical intervention for some aneurysms that are not suitable for endovascular repair. This report describes the case of a middle-aged man with a ruptured superior mesenteric artery branch aneurysm and his subsequent surgical management. PMID:23006464

  8. Uninfected anastomotic false aneurysms following arterial reconstruction with prosthetic grafts.

    PubMed

    Read, R C; Thompson, B W

    1975-01-01

    Thirteen men, aged 49 to 76 years, average 60, were treated at the Little Rock, Arkansas Veterans Administration Hospital between January 1, 1969 and January 1, 1974 for 1-3 false aneurysms, a total of 18, following prosthetic arterial grafting. Most (ten patients, 15 aneurysms) had aorto-femoral bifurcation grafts for Leriche syndrome. Dacron prostheses were employed in ten, Teflon in three. The interval between the initial operation and the appearance of the aneurysms averaged six years. The end-to-side femoral anastomosis broke down in all ten patients with Leriche syndrome. Six of the eight unilateral aneurysms were on the right side, two had bilateral aneurysms and one patient had three. Five patients died some months or years after repair from vascular accidents. Three other patients required amputations sometime later because their grafts clotted. Silk sutures were employed in only two patients. Plastic sutures in the others were found to have pulled out of the recipient vessels. The aneurysms were all uninfected and were repaired by local stitching in four and the addition of further plastic grafting in nine. We conclude that false aneurysms occur with plastic sutures and they relate primarily to disruption of the end-to-side femoral artery attachment from the stresses of movement at the hip joint.

  9. Emergency endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Dixon, Hannah; Saratzis, Nikolaos

    2010-12-01

    Popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA), despite being rare, is the most common peripheral aneurysm. It can present as acute thrombosis and occlusion of the aneurysmal segment, and distal embolization, causing either chronic or acute limb ischemia. It has traditionally been treated with open surgical reconstruction. Endovascular repair of PAAs has recently been applied electively with a favourable early and mid-term outcome; however there is a lack of reports on the endovascular treatment of PAAs presenting with acute complications. This report describes the treatment of a thrombosed PAA in a 58 year old male using an endovascular stent-graft and also provides a systematic review of the literature on the emergency endovascular treatment of PAAs.

  10. Surgical options for the management of visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Van Petersen, A; Meerwaldt, R; Geelkerken, R; Zeebregts, C

    2011-06-01

    Visceral artery aneurysm (VAA) is a rare entity but increased use of abdominal imaging has led to an increased prevalence. Rupture is related to a high mortality rate. Open repair, endovascular treatment and laparoscopic techniques have been described as treatment options. In this systematic review we describe the surgical options for treating VAA. A literature search identified articles focussing on the key issues of visceral artery aneurysms and surgical options using the Pubmed and Cochrane databases. Case reports dominate the literature about VAA. Twenty-seven small case series and ten review articles have been published in the last 20 years concerning the surgical options for VAA. The evidence does not exceed level 3. Surgical treatment is dictated by both patient and aneurysm characteristics. Whether VAA should be treated largely depends upon age, gender, presence of hypertension (e.g. in renal aneurysm), aneurysm size and presentation. Aneurysm size and characteristics, anatomical location and presence of collateral circulation dictate the surgical option to be chosen. The mortality and morbidity rates after elective open repair are low. Literature about surgical options for treating VAA remains scarce. Only a few clinical trials have shown the possibilities and results of open surgical repair. In general, there is no consensus on the surgical treatment of VAA and the highest level of evidence is based upon expert opinions. PMID:21577188

  11. Surgical options for the management of visceral artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Van Petersen, A; Meerwaldt, R; Geelkerken, R; Zeebregts, C

    2011-06-01

    Visceral artery aneurysm (VAA) is a rare entity but increased use of abdominal imaging has led to an increased prevalence. Rupture is related to a high mortality rate. Open repair, endovascular treatment and laparoscopic techniques have been described as treatment options. In this systematic review we describe the surgical options for treating VAA. A literature search identified articles focussing on the key issues of visceral artery aneurysms and surgical options using the Pubmed and Cochrane databases. Case reports dominate the literature about VAA. Twenty-seven small case series and ten review articles have been published in the last 20 years concerning the surgical options for VAA. The evidence does not exceed level 3. Surgical treatment is dictated by both patient and aneurysm characteristics. Whether VAA should be treated largely depends upon age, gender, presence of hypertension (e.g. in renal aneurysm), aneurysm size and presentation. Aneurysm size and characteristics, anatomical location and presence of collateral circulation dictate the surgical option to be chosen. The mortality and morbidity rates after elective open repair are low. Literature about surgical options for treating VAA remains scarce. Only a few clinical trials have shown the possibilities and results of open surgical repair. In general, there is no consensus on the surgical treatment of VAA and the highest level of evidence is based upon expert opinions.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: relation to end-tidal CO2 tension.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, H; Nielsen, H B; Secher, N H

    2016-08-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We intend to adjust ventilation according end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) and here evaluated to what extent that strategy maintains frontal lobe oxygenation (ScO2) as determined by near infrared spectroscopy. For 44 patients [5 women, aged 70 (48-83) years] ScO2, mean arterial pressure (MAP), EtCO2, and ventilation were obtained retrospectively from the anesthetic charts. By clamping the aorta, ScO2 and EtCO2 were kept stable by reducing ventilation (median, -0.8 l min(-1); interquartile range, -1.1 to -0.4; P < 0.001). During reperfusion of the aorta a reduction in MAP by 8 mmHg (-15 to -1; P < 0.001) did not prevent an increase in ScO2 by 2 % (-1 to 4; P < 0.001) as EtCO2 increased 0.5 kPa (0.1-1.0; P < 0.001) despite an increase in ventilation by 1.8 l min(-1) (0.9-2.7; P < 0.001). Changes in ScO2 related to those in EtCO2 (r = 0.41; P = 0.0001) and cerebral deoxygenation (-15 %) was noted in three patients while cerebral hyperoxygenation (+15 %) manifests in one patient. Thus changes in ScO2 were kept within acceptable limits (±15 %) in 91 % of the patients. For the majority of the patients undergoing AAA repair ScO2 was kept within reasonable limits by reducing ventilation by approximately 1 l min(-1) upon clamping of the aorta and increasing ventilation by approximately 2 l min(-1) when the lower body is reperfused. PMID:26141676

  13. Osteopontin and Osteoprotegerin as Potential Biomarkers in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm before and after Treatment.

    PubMed

    Filis, Konstantinos; Martinakis, Vasilios; Galyfos, George; Sigala, Fragiska; Theodorou, Dimitris; Andreadou, Ioanna; Zografos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Although osteopontin (OPN) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), no association of these two biomarkers with AAA surgical or endovascular treatment has been reported. Material and Methods. Seventy-four AAA patients were prospectively selected for open or endovascular repair. All aneurysms were classified (Types A-E) according to aneurysmal extent in CT imaging (EUROSTAR criteria). All patients had preoperative serum OPN and OPG values measurements and 1 week after the procedure. Preoperative and postoperative values were compared with a control group of twenty patients (inguinal hernia repair). Results. Preoperative OPN values in patients with any type of aneurysm were higher than in the control group, while OPG values showed no difference. Postoperative OPN values in AAA patients were higher than in the control group. OPN values increased after open surgery and after EVAR. OPG values increased after open surgery but not after EVAR. There was no difference in OPN/OPG values between EVAR and open surgery postoperatively. Conclusions. OPN values are associated with aneurysm presence but not with aneurysm extent. OPG values are not associated either with aneurysm presence or with aneurysm extent. OPN values increase after AAA repair, independently of the type of repair.

  14. Osteopontin and Osteoprotegerin as Potential Biomarkers in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm before and after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martinakis, Vasilios; Sigala, Fragiska; Theodorou, Dimitris; Andreadou, Ioanna; Zografos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Although osteopontin (OPN) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), no association of these two biomarkers with AAA surgical or endovascular treatment has been reported. Material and Methods. Seventy-four AAA patients were prospectively selected for open or endovascular repair. All aneurysms were classified (Types A–E) according to aneurysmal extent in CT imaging (EUROSTAR criteria). All patients had preoperative serum OPN and OPG values measurements and 1 week after the procedure. Preoperative and postoperative values were compared with a control group of twenty patients (inguinal hernia repair). Results. Preoperative OPN values in patients with any type of aneurysm were higher than in the control group, while OPG values showed no difference. Postoperative OPN values in AAA patients were higher than in the control group. OPN values increased after open surgery and after EVAR. OPG values increased after open surgery but not after EVAR. There was no difference in OPN/OPG values between EVAR and open surgery postoperatively. Conclusions. OPN values are associated with aneurysm presence but not with aneurysm extent. OPG values are not associated either with aneurysm presence or with aneurysm extent. OPN values increase after AAA repair, independently of the type of repair. PMID:27379275

  15. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  16. [Approach to juxtarenal inflammatory aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Scuro, A; Barzaghi, M E; Griso, A; Ferrari Ruffino, S; Kontothanassis, D; Mirandola, M; Leonardi, G; D'Agata, M

    2004-01-01

    involved in inflammatory process, little duodenum's and left renal veins manipulation and low incidence of paralytic ileum and respiratory disease. Endovascular surgery hasn't in this moment any role in juxtarenal IAAA treatment because this type of aneurysm has inadequate proximal neck. In the future, probably, endovascular repair will be possible using a new type of endograft with renal legs. Often surgical treatment is inadequate to control retroperitorenal fibrosis and so surgeon has to use perioperating pharmacolocical therapy.

  17. Lecithin-based nanostructured gels for skin delivery: an update on state of art and recent applications.

    PubMed

    Elnaggar, Yosra S R; El-Refaie, Wessam M; El-Massik, Magda A; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2014-04-28

    Conventional carriers for skin delivery encounter obstacles of drug leakage, scanty permeation and low entrapment efficiency. Phospholipid nanogels have recently been recognized as prominent delivery systems to circumvent such obstacles and impart easier application. The current review provides an overview on different types of lecithin nanostructured gels, with particular emphasis on liposomal versus microemulsion gelled systems. Liposomal gels investigated encompassed classic liposomal hydrogel, modified liposomal gels (e.g. Transferosomal, Ethosomal, Pro-liposomal and Phytosomal gels), Microgel in liposomes (M-i-L) and Vesicular phospholipid gel (VPG). Microemulsion gelled systems encompassed Lecithin microemulsion-based organogels (LMBGs), Pluronic lecithin organogels (PLOs) and Lecithin-stabilized microemulsion-based hydrogels. All systems were reviewed regarding matrix composition, state of art, characterization and updated applications. Different classes of lecithin nanogels exhibited crucial impact on transdermal delivery regarding drug permeation, drug loading and stability aspects. Future perspectives of this theme issue are discussed based on current laboratory studies. PMID:24531009

  18. Endovascular treatment of coarctation and related aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, E L; Krajcer, Z

    2014-06-11

    Today,surgical repair has almost doubled the 30year survival rate in patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and 72% to 98% of patients now reach adulthood. Possible late complications include malignant hypertension, left ventricular dysfunction, aortic valve dysfunction, recurrent CoA, and aneurysm formation with risk of rupture. Treating postoperative CoA-related aneurysms with observation alone is associated with a mortality rate of 36%, compared with 9% for surgical repair. Even in the best surgeons' hands, aortic surgery has associated complications, and the complexity of reoperative surgery makes the risks substantially greater. For patients with CoA-related aneurysm, endovascular treatment constitutes a good alternative to reoperative surgery because it poses a lower risk of morbidity and mortality. Implanting an endograft has been shown to be successful in treating CoA and related aneurysms, producing excellent intermediate outcomes and minimal morbidity and mortality. Despite evidence that using covered stents improves outcomes, the superiority of any particular stent type has yet to be established. With a variety of endografts available, the decision of which stent to use depends on anatomy, availability, and operator preference.

  19. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  20. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Moll, Frans L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  1. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain aneurysms ... Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and arteriovenous ...

  2. Screening for aortic aneurysm after treatment of coarctation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, James L; Gray, Robert G; LuAnn Minich, L; Wilkinson, Stephen E; Heywood, Mason; Edwards, Reggie; Weng, Hsin Ti; Su, Jason T

    2014-01-01

    Isolated coarctation of the aorta (CoA) occurs in 6-8 % of patients with congenital heart disease. After successful relief of obstruction, patients remain at risk for aortic aneurysm formation at the site of the repair. We sought to determine the diagnostic utility of echocardiography compared with advanced arch imaging (AAI) in diagnosing aortic aneurysms in pediatric patients after CoA repair. The Congenital Heart Databases from 1996 and 2009 were reviewed. All patients treated for CoA who had AAI defined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), or catheterization were identified. Data collected included the following: type, timing, and number of interventions, presence and time to aneurysm diagnosis, and mortality. Patients were subdivided into surgical and catheterization groups for analysis. Seven hundred and fifty-nine patients underwent treatment for CoA during the study period. Three hundred and ninety-nine patients had at least one AAI. Aneurysms were diagnosed by AAI in 28 of 399 patients at a mean of 10 ± 8.4 years after treatment. Echocardiography reports were available for 380 of 399 patients with AAI. The sensitivity of echocardiography for detecting aneurysms was 24 %. The prevalence of aneurysms was significantly greater in the catheterization group (p < 0.05) compared with the surgery group. Aneurysm was also diagnosed earlier in the catheterization group compared with the surgery group (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed a significantly increased risk of aneurysm diagnosis in patients in the catheterization subgroup and in patients requiring more than three procedures. Aortic aneurysms continue to be an important complication after CoA repair. Although serial echocardiograms are the test of choice for following-up most congenital cardiac lesions in pediatrics, our data show that echocardiography is inadequate for the detection of aneurysms after CoA repair. Because the time to aneurysm diagnosis was

  3. Surgical Procedures for Renal Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshinori; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the strategy and surgical procedures for treating a renal artery aneurysm (RAA). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the surgical strategy for 21 cases with RAA between 2001 and 2010 at this institution. Treatment was indicated for patients with an RAA larger than 2 cm and/or symptoms. Surgical treatment was the initial strategy, and coil embolization was indicated in the case of narrow-necked, saccular, extraparenchymal aneurysms. Results: Fifteen patients in 21 cases received an aneurysmectomy and renal artery reconstruction with an in-situ repair. One patient underwent an unplanned nephrectomy, and coil embolization was performed in 5 patients. Conclusion: In-situ repair was safe and minimally invasive. RAA, even in the second bifurcation, could be exposed by a subcostal incision, and the transperitoneal approach permitted the safe treatment of an RAA with acceptable results, in our simple preservation of renal function. PMID:23555504

  4. Epithelioid Angiosarcoma With Metastatic Disease After Endovascular Therapy of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, Joerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Brechtel, Klaus; Kalender, Guenay; Heller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D.; Lescan, Mario

    2012-02-15

    Malignancies of the aortic wall represent a rare condition, and only a few reports have covered cases of sarcomas arising at the site of a prosthesis made of Dacron. A coincidence with endovascular repair has only been reported in one case to date. We report a patient with epithelioid angiosarcoma and metastatic disease, which was found in an aneurysmal sac after endovascular aortic repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. Therapeutic Benefit of Bone Marrow–Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Transplantation after Experimental Aneurysm Embolization with Coil in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianyun; Huang, Jun; Chen, Xi; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Zhu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysm embolization with coil is now widely used clinically. However, the recurrence of aneurysms after embolization has always plagued neurosurgeons because the endothelial layer of the aneurysm neck loses its integrity after being embolized by coil. Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPCs) could be incorporated into injured endothelium and differentiate into mature endothelial cells during vascular repairing processes. The aim of our study is to explore the effects of BM-EPCs on aneurysm repairing and remodeling in a rat embolization model of abdominal aortic aneurysm. BM-EPC proliferation, migration and tube formation were not affected by super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO) labeling compared to the controls (p>0.05). The number of SPIO-labeled cells greatly increased in EPC transplanted rats compared to that of phosphate buffered saline treated rats. SPIO-labeled EPC (SPIO-EPC) are mainly located in the aneurysm neck and surrounded by fibrous tissue. A histology study showed that the aneurysm orifice was closed with neointima and the aneurysm was filled with newly formed fibrous tissue. The SPIO-EPC accumulated in the aneurysm neck, which accelerated focal fibrous tissue remodeling, suggesting that BM-EPCs play a crucial role in repairing and remodeling the aneurysm neck orifice. PMID:24587209

  6. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    PubMed

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage.

  7. Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm Associated with a Fistula Draining into the Superior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Giant coronary artery aneurysm associated with a coronary–cameral fistula is an uncommon condition. Such aneurysms are usually associated with other cardiac diseases, such as coronary atherosclerosis, and therefore might augment myocardial ischemia in adults. The main indications for surgical intervention are severe coexisting coronary artery disease, evidence of embolization, and aneurysmal enlargement or rupture. We describe a large right coronary artery aneurysm and a coronary–cameral fistula that drained into the superior vena cava. The surgical repair was successful. PMID:27547153

  8. Limitations of Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts for Active Mycotic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Shimono, Takatsugu; Yasuda, Fuyuhiko; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-06-15

    An 81-year-old woman with ruptured mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular placement of stent-grafts fabricated from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and Z-stents. Although exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved at the end of the procedure, a type I endoleak developed on the following day.Despite emergent surgical resection of the aneurysm and extra-anatomical reconstruction, the patient died 2 days later. Stent-graft repair may not be a suitable method for the treatment of ruptured mycotic aneurysm in the presence of active infection.

  9. Current Trends in the Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Harris, K.A.; Ameli, F. Michael; Louis, E.L. St.

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm has undergone dramatic changes over the last three decades. More sophisticated diagnostic techniques have allowed early elective repair to be carried out. Improvement has resulted in both morbidity and mortality rates. Investigations such as ultrasound, computerized tomographic scanning and arteriography allow easy confirmation of the diagnosis of aortic aneurysms and permit a better assessment of the extent prior to surgical intervention. Improvement in the pre-operative management, particularly in relation to cardiac, renal, and pulmonary disease, has led to greatly improved results. The most important change in surgical technique has been repair of the aneurysm rather than resection. Combined with better post-operative intensive care units, this development has contributed to the improved morbidity and mortality rates. Although the complication rate of elective repair is low, the major cause of death remains myocardial infarction. As a result of all these improvements, indication for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has been extended to patients over the age of 80. Following surgical repair, most patients can be expected to return to normal lifestyles and lifespans. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21263973

  10. Collective experience with hybrid procedures for suprarenal and thoracoabdominal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    van de Mortel, Rob H W; Vahl, Anco C; Balm, Ron; Buth, Jaap; Hamming, Jaap F; Schurink, Geert W H; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2008-01-01

    Not every patient is fit for open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair, nor is every TAAA or juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm suitable for branched or fenestrated endovascular exclusion. The hybrid procedure consists of debranching of the renal and visceral arteries followed by endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm and might be an alternative in these patients. Between May 2004 and March 2006, 16 patients were treated with a hybrid procedure. The indications were recurrent suprarenal or thoracoabdominal aneurysms after previous abdominal and/or thoracic aortic surgery (n = 8), type I to III TAAAs (n = 3), proximal type I endoleak after endovascular repair (n = 2), penetrating ulcer of the juxtarenal aorta (n = 1), visceral patch aneurysm after type IV open repair (n = 1), and primary suprarenal aneurysm (n = 1). Eight (50%) of 16 patients were judged to be unfit for open TAAA repair. The hospital mortality rate was 31% (5 of 16). Four of five deceased patients were unfit for thoracophrenic laparotomy. Two patients died from cardiac complications and three from visceral ischemia. No spinal cord ischemia was detected, and temporary renal failure occurred in four patients (25%). The mean follow-up was 13 months (range 6-28 months). During follow-up, no additional grafts occluded and no patients died. Hybrid procedures are technically feasible but have substantial mortality (31%), especially in patients unfit for open repair (80%). They might be indicated when urgent TAAA surgery is required or when vascular anatomy is unfavorable for fenestrated endografts in patients with extensive previous open aortic surgery. PMID:18674462

  11. Colorectal cancer associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of EVAR followed by colectomy.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria A; Pizzardi, Giulia; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The association of colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is infrequent but poses special problems of priority of treatment under elective circumstances. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcome of 16 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) followed by colectomy. Operative mortality was nil. Operative morbidity included two transient rise of serum creatinine level and one extraperitoneal anastomotic leakage which evolved favourably with conservative treatment. EVAR allowed a very short delay of treatment of colorectal cancer after aneurysm repair, minimizing operative complications.

  12. Colorectal cancer associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of EVAR followed by colectomy.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria A; Pizzardi, Giulia; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The association of colorectal cancer and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is infrequent but poses special problems of priority of treatment under elective circumstances. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the outcome of 16 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) followed by colectomy. Operative mortality was nil. Operative morbidity included two transient rise of serum creatinine level and one extraperitoneal anastomotic leakage which evolved favourably with conservative treatment. EVAR allowed a very short delay of treatment of colorectal cancer after aneurysm repair, minimizing operative complications. PMID:23151840

  13. Fenestrated and Chimney Technique for Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysm: A Systematic Review and Pooled Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Hu, Zhongzhou; Bai, Chujie; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Tao; Ge, Yangyang; Luan, Shaoliang; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JAA) account for approximately 15% of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) and chimney endovascular aneurysm repair (CH-EVAR) are both effective methods to treat JAAs, but the comparative effectiveness of these treatment modalities is unclear. We searched the PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases to identify English language articles published between January 2005 and September 2013 on management of JAA with fenestrated and chimney techniques to conduct a systematic review to compare outcomes of patients with juxtarenal aortic aneurysm (JAA) treated with the two techniques. We compared nine F-EVAR cohort studies including 542 JAA patients and 8 CH-EVAR cohorts with 158 JAA patients regarding techniques success rates, 30-day mortality, late mortality, endoleak events and secondary intervention rates. The results of this systematic review indicate that both fenestrated and chimney techniques are attractive options for JAAs treatment with encouraging early and mid-term outcomes. PMID:26869488

  14. Staged Management of a Ruptured Internal Mammary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Young; Kim, Gun Jik; Oh, Tak Hyuk; Lee, Young Ok; Lee, Sang Cjeol; Cho, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The rupture of an internal mammary artery (IMA) aneurysm in a patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis (NF-1) is a rare but life-threatening complication requiring emergency management. A 50-year-old man with NF-1 was transferred to the emergency department of Kyungpook National University Hospital, where an IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were diagnosed and drained. The IMA aneurysmal rupture and hemothorax were successfully repaired by staged management combining endovascular treatment and subsequent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The patient required cardiopulmonary cerebral resuscitation, the staged management of coil embolization, and a subsequent VATS procedure. This staged approach may be an effective therapeutic strategy in cases of IMA aneurysmal rupture. PMID:27066438

  15. Surgical approach for the treatment of aortoesophageal fistula combined with dual aortic aneurysms: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aortoesophageal fistula is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. The disease is with high mortality due to aneurysm rupture, and thus successfully managed cases are rarely reported. Here, we report a case of aortoesophageal fistula caused by a huge descending aneurysm and another smaller aneurysm found in the aortic arch. Such case was relatively rare in the cardiovascular field. Due to the limited experience, it was difficult to determine the proper therapeutic strategy. For this case, for the dual aneurysm, we surgically inserted an aortic endovascular stent-graft to exclusive the aneurysm and simultaneously repair the other aortic arch aneurysm. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged after 1 month antibiotics therapy for the palliative treatment of the esophageal fistula. She survived for 8 months at home before dying of massive hematemesis. Here, we present the operative method and our therapeutic experience for this extremely rare case. PMID:24180498

  16. Cephalic vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Walid; Selmo, Francesca; Hindi, Mia; Haddad, Fadi; Khalil, Ismail

    2007-11-01

    Cephalic vein aneurysms are rare malformations that may develop in any part of the vascular system, and their history, presentation, and management vary depending on their site. The etiology of venous aneurysms remains unclear, although several theories have been elaborated. Venous aneurysms are unusual vascular malformations that occur equally between the sexes and are seen at any age; they can present as either a painful or a painless subcutaneous mass. No serious complications have been reported from upper extremity venous aneurysms. Surgical excision is the definitive management for most of these. The case reported here presented with a painless and mobile, soft, subcutaneous mass that caused only cosmetic concern.

  17. Institutional Impact of EVAR's Incorporation in the Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: a 12 Years' Experience Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Rui; Antunes, Inês Lopes; Oliveira, Pedro; Pereira, Carlos; de Almeida, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced as a less aggressive treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for patients ineligible for open repair (OR). Objective To analyze EVAR's incorporation impact in the treatment of infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysms in our institution. Methods A retrospective study of the patients with diagnostic of infra-renal AAA treated between December 2001 and December 2013 was performed. The choice between EVAR and OR was based on surgeon's experience, considering patient clinical risk and aneurysm's anatomical features. Patients treated by EVAR and by OR were analyzed. In each group, patient's and aneurysm's characteristics, surgical and anesthesia times, cost, transfusion rate, intraoperative complications, hospital stay, mortality and re-intervention rates and survival curves were evaluated. Results The mean age, all forms of heart disease and chronic renal failure were more common in EVAR group. Blood transfusion, surgical and anesthesia times and mean hospital stay were higher for OR. Intraoperative complications rate was higher for endovascular aneurysm repair, overall during hospitalization complication rate was higher for open repair. The average cost in endovascular aneurysm repair was 1448.3€ higher. Re-interventions rates within 30 days and late re-intervention were 4.1% and 11.7% for endovascular aneurysm repair versus 13.7% and 10.6% for open repair. Conclusions Two different groups were treated by two different techniques. The individualized treatment choice allows to achieve a mortality of 2.7%. Age ≥80 years influences survival curve in OR group and ASA ≥IV in EVAR group. We believe EVAR's incorporation improved the results of OR itself. Patients with more comorbidities were treated by endovascular aneurysm repair, decreasing those excluded from treatment. Late reinterventions were similar for both techniques. PMID:27556307

  18. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  19. Surgical treatment of innominate artery and aortic aneurysm: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Erdinc; Harling, Leanne; Ashrafian, Hutan; Anagnostakou, Vania; Tassopoulos, Dimitris; Charitos, Christos; Kokotsakis, John; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Innominate artery (IA) aneurysms represent 3% of all arterial aneurysms. Due to the risk of thromboembolic complications and spontaneous rupture, surgical repair is usually recommended on an early elective basis. We present the case of 81-year-old Caucasian male presenting with atypical anterior chest pain secondary to a large innominate artery aneurysm who underwent successful open surgical repair at our institution. In our experience, open correction via median sternotomy with extension into the right neck provides excellent exposure and facilitates rapid reconstruction with good short and long-term outcomes. Minimally invasive and endovascular approaches provide emerging alternatives to open IA aneurysm repair, however further research is required to better define optimal patient selection criteria and determine the long-term outcomes of these novel therapies. PMID:23725538

  20. Management of Aortic Aneurysms: Is Surgery of Historic Interest Only?

    PubMed

    Bacharach, J Michael; Wood, Emily A; Slovut, David P

    2015-11-01

    Since its advent in 1991, endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has become a mainstay of treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Studies such as the comparison of endovascular aneurysm repair with open repair in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR 1) trial, have demonstrated the effectiveness of EVAR in reducing perioperative mortality. Technological improvements in graft design and delivery account for an increasing utilization of endovascular repair. Newer branch and fenestrated graft designs have allowed for treatment of patients with complex aortic anatomy that previously could not be treated with EVAR. Endovascular repair, while dominant, is unlikely to eliminate the need for open repair or to relegate open surgery for AAA to historical interest only. The unprecedented adoption of EVAR has led to complications and modes of failure that were not seen with open repair. The rate of failure is markedly increased when endografts are used outside of the instructions for use (IFU). The long-term durability of fenestrated and investigational branch devices remains to be established. The demand for an endovascular approach by patients and the willingness of physicians to place endografts outside the anatomic IFU criteria may have resulted in the pendulum swinging too far away from open surgical management. The consequence of reduced open aortic surgeries is a concern for both patient care as well as training for vascular surgery fellows. Vascular surgery training programs will require innovative changes in training to assure that vascular surgery trainees will have the requisite skill and experience required to competently perform open surgical repair on what will undoubtedly be some of the most complex aortic pathology. PMID:26395644

  1. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month. PMID:26980403

  2. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month.

  3. Aneurysm in the brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm may be found when an MRI or CT scan of the brain is done for another reason. A brain aneurysm ... and determine the cause of bleeding in the brain: Cerebral angiography or spiral CT scan angiography of the head to show the location ...

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... there are changes in your surgical incision, such as: The edges are pulling apart. You have green or yellow drainage. You have more redness, pain, warmth, or swelling. Your bandage is soaked with blood or clear fluid.

  5. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  6. Endovascular treatment of aortic aneurysms: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Jonathan L; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2009-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) continue to be a leading cause of death, with increasing incidence and prevalence. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) now represents the most common method of AAA repair in the United States. Ongoing improvements in endovascular stent-graft technology have occurred since the first published report of EVAR in 1991. These improvements have led to multiple US Food and Drug Administration-approved devices, streamlined operative techniques, and extended applicability of EVAR. Despite these facts, basic anatomic considerations still eliminate many patients from being offered EVAR. Distinct advantages of EVAR over open repair have been demonstrated, including a less invasive operative exposure, decreased transfusion requirements, shortened intensive care unit and hospital stay, and decreased perioperative mortality. It is our opinion that in 2009, anatomically suitable patients should be offered EVAR as first-line therapy, except for the less common scenario of the young and fit patient, for which open repair should be strongly considered. Use of EVAR for ruptured AAAs also has shown promise, yielding survival results commensurate with the best single-center results with open repair for rupture. However, questions remain regarding the long-term efficacy of EVAR in preventing aneurysm-related death for all patients treated with this technique. As device improvements and technical advances continue, it is reasonable to expect that long-term results will improve as well. Furthermore, the advent of fenestrated and multi-branch endograft technology is expanding indications, and will continue to enlarge the percentage of patients who will be considered acceptable candidates for EVAR. Lastly, randomized clinical trials are under way to determine whether the generally accepted threshold of 5.5 cm for elective open AAA repair should be decreased in patients who are candidates for EVAR. Until further data emerge, standard guidelines for elective

  7. [Splenic artery aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Colović, R; Davidović, L; Bilanović, D; Krivokapić, Z; Grubor, N; Cvetković, S; Radak, V; Marković, M

    2006-01-01

    Although the third most frequent aneurysm in the abdomen, after aneurysms of the aorta and iliac arteries, and most frequent aneurisms of visceral arteries, splenic artery aneurysms are rare, but not very rare. Thanks to the new imaging techniques, first of all ultrasonography, they have been discovered with increasing frequency. We present a series of 9 splenic artery aneurysms. Seven patients were female and two male of average age 49 years (ranging from 28 to 75 years). The majority of afected women were multiparae, with average 3 children (ranging from 1 to 6). One patient had a subacute rupture, and 2 had ruptures into the splenic vein causing portal hypertension. The spleen was enlarged in 7 out of 9 patients. The average size of aneurysms was 3,2 cm (ranging from 2 to 8 cm). The preoperative diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm was established in 6 patients while in 3 patients aneurism was accidentally found during other operations, during splenectomy in 2, and during the excision of a retroperitoneal tumour in 1 patient. Aneurysmectomy was carried out in 7 patients, while a ligation of the incoming and outcoming wessels was performed in 2 patients with arteriovenous fistula. Splenectomy was performed in 6 patients, while pancreatic tail resection, cholecystectomy and excision of the retroperitoneal tumor were performed in 3 patients. Additional resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm with reconstruction of aortoiliac segment was performed in 2 patients. There were no mortality and the postoperative recovery was uneventful in all patients. PMID:16989145

  8. Microballoon Occlusion Test to Predict Colonic Ischemia After Transcatheter Embolization of a Ruptured Aneurysm of the Middle Colic Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Inokuchi, Hiroyuki; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nishie, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ishigami, Kousei; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Daisuke; Honda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Morita, Masaru; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-15

    A 76-year-old woman presented with sudden massive melena, and superior mesenteric arteriography showed an aneurysm in the middle colic artery (MCA). Because she had a history of right hemicolectomy and ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, embolization of the MCA aneurysm was considered to pose a risk comparable to that of colonic ischemia. A microballoon occlusion test during occlusion of the MCA confirmed retrograde visualization of the IMA branches through the collateral arteries by way of the left internal iliac artery, and embolization was successfully performed using microcoils. No colonic ischemia or aneurysm rupture occurred after embolization.

  9. Covered stent in the superior gluteal artery in a hybrid approach to treat internal iliac artery aneurysm: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Noël-Lamy, Maxime; Teng Tan, Kong; Lindsay, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    This brief report describes a hybrid endovascular and open procedure to treat internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms and preserve pelvic blood flow. A covered stent was deployed before surgery in the superior gluteal artery, extending across the IIA aneurysm, with the proximal end in the common iliac artery lumen. During open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, the stent graft was anastomosed in an end-to-side manner to the surgical graft. Four aneurysms were treated in 3 patients. Technical success was achieved in all cases. There were no complications or repeat interventions. Stents were all patent at imaging follow-up (range, 6-25 mo). Patients were free from buttock claudication. PMID:26095271

  10. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options. PMID:27332680

  11. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  12. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  13. Intrasplenic Arterial Aneurysms during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abu-khalaf, Mahmoud M. S.; Al-Ameer, Sokiyna M.; Smadi, Moath M.; Qatawneh, Ayman; Smara, Osama A.; Hadidy, Azmy T.

    2015-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms account for about 60% of all visceral aneurysms. Pregnancy is a risk factor for splenic artery aneurysms rupture with high maternal mortality and fetal loss. Intrasplenic arterial aneurysms are extremely rare and have not been reported to be associated with pregnancy. This report presents a 34-year-old woman during the second trimester, admitted with severe left upper quadrant and left shoulder pain. She had two uncomplicated intrasplenic aneurysms. Splenectomy was done. She delivered a full term healthy girl. This is the first report of acute abdomen during pregnancy caused by intrasplenic artery aneurysms with maternal and fetal survival. PMID:25810934

  14. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  15. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  16. Novel Use of an Iliac Branch Device in the Treatment of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Shiraev, Timothy P; Dubenec, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Iliac branch devices (IBDs) are commonly used to treat iliac artery aneurysms and maintain patency of the internal iliac artery or its branches. This case report illustrates another possible application for an IBD. We present the case of a 77-year-old male who underwent repair of his infrarenal aneurysm with an IBD as a bifurcated aortic stent-graft in a small diameter aorta to maintain bilateral common iliac artery patency. PMID:27174353

  17. New Variable Porosity Flow Diverter (VPOD) Stent Design for Treatment of Cerebrovascular Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian; Baier, Robert; Rudin, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Using flow diverting Stents for intracranial aneurysm repair has been an area of recent active research. While current commercial flow diverting stents rely on a dense mesh of braided coils for flow diversion, our group has been developing a method to selectively occlude the aneurysm neck, without endangering nearby perforator vessels. In this paper, we present a new method of fabricating the low porosity patch, a key element of such asymmetric vascular stents (AVS). PMID:22254507

  18. Ruptured Juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Treated With a Fenestrated EVAR Graft Intended for a Different Patient.

    PubMed

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Elboushi, Amro; Lees, Tim; Williams, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains challenging. A 79-year-old male who had infrarenal endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) 13 years previously presented with leaking juxtarenal AAA. Emergency fenestrated EVAR (FEVAR) was performed utilizing a stent graft designed and built for a different patient. Despite the need to embolize the celiac artery prior to covering it with the stent graft in order to achieve adequate proximal seal, the patient had uneventful recovery. PMID:27334480

  19. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  20. The effect of aortic morphology on peri-operative mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether aneurysm shape and extent, which indicate whether a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is eligible for endovascular repair (EVAR), influence the outcome of both EVAR and open surgical repair. Methods and results The influence of six morphological parameters (maximum aortic diameter, aneurysm neck diameter, length and conicality, proximal neck angle, and maximum common iliac diameter) on mortality and reinterventions within 30 days was investigated in rAAA patients randomized before morphological assessment in the Immediate Management of the Patient with Rupture: Open Versus Endovascular strategies (IMPROVE) trial. Patients with a proven diagnosis of rAAA, who underwent repair and had their admission computerized tomography scan submitted to the core laboratory, were included. Among 458 patients (364 men, mean age 76 years), who had either EVAR (n = 177) or open repair (n = 281) started, there were 155 deaths and 88 re-interventions within 30 days of randomization analysed according to a pre-specified plan. The mean maximum aortic diameter was 8.6 cm. There were no substantial correlations between the six morphological variables. Aneurysm neck length was shorter in those undergoing open repair (vs. EVAR). Aneurysm neck length (mean 23.3, SD 16.1 mm) was inversely associated with mortality for open repair and overall: adjusted OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.57, 0.92) for each 16 mm (SD) increase in length. There were no convincing associations of morphological parameters with reinterventions. Conclusion Short aneurysm necks adversely influence mortality after open repair of rAAA and preclude conventional EVAR. This may help explain why observational studies, but not randomized trials, have shown an early survival benefit for EVAR. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25627357

  1. Huge aneurysm and coronary-cameral fistula from right coronary branch: First case.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere

    2016-02-01

    Coronary-cameral fistulas are rare cardiovascular anomalies. A giant coronary artery aneurysm associated with a coronary-cameral fistula is a very rare condition, with an estimated prevalence of 0.02%. We report the case of middle-aged woman who presented with a huge extracardiac aneurysmal mass and a coronary-cameral fistula from a right coronary artery branch. It was successfully repaired by ligation and excision plus marsupialization of the aneurysm. We believe this is the first such a case reported in literature.

  2. Surgical Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Congenital Solitary Pelvic Kidney and Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takaaki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Sano, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the rare case of a 54-year-old man with uncontrolled renovascular hypertension, who was found to have an abdominal aortic aneurysm with congenital solitary pelvic kidney and superior mesenteric artery stenosis. A single renal artery branched from aneurysmal aortic bifurcation, and both the renal artery and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) had severe stenosis at their origins. The aneurysm was repaired with a bifurcated Dacron graft, to which the renal artery was anastomosed. SMA bypass was created between the graft’s left limb and the SMA using another Dacron graft. The operation was successful, with improvement in renal functions and control of hypertension. PMID:27738466

  3. BILATERAL ANEURYSMS OF THE INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY—Successful Surgical Approach in One Stage

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Robert D.; Schmerl, E. F.; Rhee, James L.

    1959-01-01

    When intracranial aneurysm is suspected, carotid arteriogram should be done not only on the suspected side but always on both sides. Without surgical intervention the prognosis of bilateral aneurysms is notoriously poor. With the aid of hypothermic anesthesia it is now possible to operate on both sides in a single procedure. This was demonstrated in a case in which both carotid arteries were simultaneously occluded twice during the surgical repair of bilateral carotid aneurysms. Occlusion was done once for eight minutes and once for ten minutes, without clinical evidence of brain damage. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13671362

  4. Standard of Practice for the Interventional Management of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Uberoi, Raman; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Shrivastava, Vivek; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are uncommon, comprising less than 2% of all abdominal aneurysmal disease. Although they have a fairly innocuous natural history, when they have attained a large size they carry a significant risk of rupture. Rupture is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an early diagnosis and treatment are crucial. Over the last decade, interventional treatment options have become established alternatives to open surgical repair. These guidelines aim to review the pathogenesis, natural history, and presentation of isolated iliac artery aneurysms including a description of imaging and interventional treatment strategies.

  5. Rasmussen's aneurysm: A forgotten scourge☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Colaco, Brendon; Colaco, Clinton; Hellman, Michael; Meena, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's aneurysm is an inflammatory pseudo-aneurysmal dilatation of a branch of pulmonary artery adjacent to a tuberculous cavity. Life threatening massive hemoptysis from the rupture of a Rasmussen's aneurysm is an uncommon yet life threatening complication of cavitary tuberculosis (TB). We present a case of a young woman who presented with low-grade fever and hemoptysis. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed biapical cavitary lesions and actively bleeding aneurysms involving pulmonary artery, which successfully underwent glue embolization. PMID:26744661

  6. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L.; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2015-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, e.g., inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in AAA morbidity and mortality. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO) magnetic resonance imaging are two novel approaches to AAA imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (e.g., integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of AAA and show great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26763279

  7. Endovascular Versus Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Best Decision.

    PubMed

    Déglise, Sébastien; Delay, Charline; Saucy, François; Lejay, Anne; Dubuis, Céline; Briner, Lukas; Chakfé, Nabil; Corpataux, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Since the first implantation of an endograft in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) rapidly gained recognition. Historical trials showed lower early mortality rates but these results were not maintained beyond 4 years. Despite newer-generation devices, higher rates of reintervention are associated with EVAR during follow-up. Therefore, the best therapeutic decision relies on many parameters that the physician has to take in consideration. Patient's preferences and characteristics are important, especially age and life expectancy besides health status. Aneurysmal anatomical conditions remain probably the most predictive factor that should be carefully evaluated to offer the best treatment. Unfavorable anatomy has been observed to be associated with more complications especially endoleak, leading to more re-interventions and higher risk of late mortality. Nevertheless, technological advances have made surgeons move forward beyond the set barriers. Thus, more endografts are implanted outside the instructions for use despite excellent results after open repair especially in low-risk patients. When debating about AAA repair, some other crucial points should be analysed. It has been shown that strict surveillance is mandatory after EVAR to offer durable results and prevent late rupture. Such program is associated with additional costs and with increased risk of radiation. Moreover, a risk of loss of renal function exists when repetitive imaging and secondary procedures are required. The aim of this article is to review the data associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm and its treatment in order to establish selection criteria to decide between open or endovascular repair. PMID:26333665

  8. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed? If you have an aortic aneurysm but no symptoms, your doctor may find it ... a routine physical exam. More often, doctors find aneurysms during tests done for other reasons, such as ...

  9. Endovascular Tubular Stent-Graft Placement for Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mid-term outcomes of endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2010, 20 patients (7 women and 13 men; mean age 74 years) underwent endovascular repair of 22 isolated IAAs. Two patients underwent endovascular repair for bilateral aneurysms. Ten para-anastomotic aneurysms (45%) developed after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair with an aorto-iliac graft, and 12 were true aneurysms (55%). Eleven straight and 11 tapered stent-grafts were placed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was performed to detect complications and evaluate aneurysmal shrinkage at week 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and once every year thereafter. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed in seven patients with chronic kidney disease. Results: All procedures were successful, without serious complications, during the mean (range) follow-up period of 746 days (47-2651). Type II endoleak not requiring treatment was noted in one patient. The mean (SD) diameters of the true and para-anastomotic aneurysms significantly (p < 0.05) decreased from 42.0 (9.3) to 36.9 (13.6) mm and from 40.1 (13.0) to 33.6 (15.8) mm, respectively; the mean (SD) shrinkage rates were 15.1% (20.2%) and 18.9% (22.4%), respectively. The primary patency rate was 100%, and no secondary interventions were required. Four patients (21%) developed transient buttock claudication, and one patient (5%) developed colorectal ischaemia, which was treated conservatively. Conclusion: Endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for the repair of isolated IAAs is safe and efficacious. Tapered stent-grafts of various sizes are required for accurate placement.

  10. Endovascular repair of a Kommerell diverticulum anomaly.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peixian; Wang, Mo; Dong, Dianning; Kong, Xiangqian; Jin, Xing; Zhang, Shiyi

    2015-05-01

    A Kommerell diverticulum (KD) may predispose toward aortic aneurysm, dissection, or rupture, although they are primarily asymptomatic. We report a case of an aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a KD in a right-side aortic arch. The lesions were successfully treated by an endovascular approach involving Amplatzer vascular plug embolization of the aberrant left subclavian artery and endovascular repair of the KD.

  11. Direct aneurysm sac catheterization and embolization of an enlarging internal iliac aneurysm using cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Monish; Shah, Rohan; Resnick, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Since cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has been adapted for use with a C-arm system it has brought volumetric CT capabilities in the interventional suite. Although cone-beam CT image resolution is far inferior to that generated by traditional CT scanners, the system offers the ability to place an access needle into position under tomographic guidance and use the access to immediately begin a fluoroscopic procedure without moving the patient. We describe a case of a “jailed” enlarging internal iliac artery aneurysm secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, in which direct percutaneous puncture of the internal iliac artery aneurysm sac was performed under cone-beam CT guidance. PMID:25858522

  12. Left Ventricular Aneurysm with 1- to 2-mm-Thick Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Domingo; Del Río, Miguel; Gallo, Amelia; Frank, Luis; Tamashiro, Alberto; Schneider, Raúl

    1990-01-01

    From January 1983 to July 1985, 64 patients underwent left ventricular aneurysmectomy in our surgical unit. In 11 (17%) of these cases, the lesion was a variant of the true aneurysm that included an extremely thin (1- to 2-mm), well-defined area of myocardium. In 9 of the cases, the aneurysm was confirmed preoperatively by means of high-quality ventriculography (high resolution and many hues of gray). Surgical and pathologic criteria established the lesion's clinical significance. To the best of our knowledge, these aneurysms constitute a heretofore undescribed variant of the classic true left ventricular aneurysm, exhibiting certain gross characteristics of the false left ventricular aneurysm and sharing with false aneurysms their greater risk of rupture. While it is impossible to tell whether these aneurysms are progressing toward rupture, we believe that all such lesions should undergo urgent repair in the presence of cardiac symptoms. Following aneurysmectomy, ventriculoplasty or septoplasty using an elliptical woven Dacron patch helps to preserve the internal contour and surface anatomy of the ventricle. In our series, this procedure resulted in early and late postoperative mortality figures comparable to those associated with the surgical treatment of classic true left ventricular aneurysms. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:337-45) Images PMID:15227526

  13. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-02-15

    An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR.

  14. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  15. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  16. Ultrasound screening for clinically occult abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, M; Chan, A

    1988-01-01

    In a review of the records of 74 patients who had undergone repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm at a community hospital between 1977 and 1983 we found that the aneurysm had been undiagnosed before rupture in 35%; these patients had an operative death rate of 50%, whereas elective repair carried a death rate of 4%. The characteristic patient was an obese man over the age of 55 years with hypertension, coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease or peripheral vascular disease. Ultrasound examination was performed in 45 patients with these characteristics, and six aneurysms were diagnosed. Either surgery or computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. The rate of false-negative results was estimated by review of the charts of 100 men over the age of 55 years who had undergone abdominal ultrasonography for other indications: no undetected aneurysms were discovered over 3 years of follow-up. Routine screening in this high-risk group would improve the rate of diagnosis of this potentially fatal condition before rupture and offer the patient the lower mortality rate associated with elective surgery. PMID:3281738

  17. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  18. Endovascular aortic aneurysm operations.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Sasan; Terramani, Thomas T; Weiss, Victor J; Smith, Robert B; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Chaikof, Elliot L; Lumsden, Alan B

    2002-02-01

    Options for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms are in a state of evolutionary change. The development and continued refinement of the endoluminal approaches has decreased the need for open aortic aneurysm surgery. Endovascular stent graft technology is an area of active research in which both the delivery systems and the endografts are undergoing continued improvement so that patients with what was previously thought to be unfavorable anatomy may be treated by these means. The design and deployment techniques of the currently available endografts, as well as those in clinical trials, are presented. PMID:11822962

  19. Multimodality imaging and state-of-art GPU technology in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions on real time decision support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, S.; Sidiropoulos, K.; Glotsos, D.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Kalatzis, I.; Asvestas, P.; Cavouras, D.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to design a pattern recognition system for assisting the diagnosis of breast lesions, using image information from Ultrasound (US) and Digital Mammography (DM) imaging modalities. State-of-art computer technology was employed based on commercial Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards and parallel programming. An experienced radiologist outlined breast lesions on both US and DM images from 59 patients employing a custom designed computer software application. Textural features were extracted from each lesion and were used to design the pattern recognition system. Several classifiers were tested for highest performance in discriminating benign from malignant lesions. Classifiers were also combined into ensemble schemes for further improvement of the system's classification accuracy. Following the pattern recognition system optimization, the final system was designed employing the Probabilistic Neural Network classifier (PNN) on the GPU card (GeForce 580GTX) using CUDA programming framework and C++ programming language. The use of such state-of-art technology renders the system capable of redesigning itself on site once additional verified US and DM data are collected. Mixture of US and DM features optimized performance with over 90% accuracy in correctly classifying the lesions.

  20. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  1. Endovascular repair of a spontaneous ilio-iliac fistula presenting as pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Melas, N; Saratzis, A; Abbas, A; Sarris, K; Saratzis, N; Lazaridis, I; Kiskinis, D

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous rupture of a common iliac artery aneurysm into the common iliac vein is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 68 year old man admitted with acute cardiac failure and massive pulmonary embolism as a complication of a spontaneous ilio-iliac fistula, secondary to aneurysmal rupture. The aneurysm was successfully excluded using an aorto-uni-iliac stent graft. No complications were noted at 9 months follow-up. Arteriovenous fistulae should be considered in patients with aortic or iliac aneurysms who develop a pulmonary embolism or symptoms of venous congestion. Endovascular repair of these pathologies is a feasible therapeutic option; however long term results remain unknown.

  2. An unusual case of the right subclavian artery aneurysm resulting from long-term repetitive blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yukihiro; Ishida, Narihiro; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Takemura, Hirofumi

    2012-07-01

    This case report describes a right subclavian artery aneurysm secondary to long-term repetitive blunt trauma. A 62-year-old man with a right subclavian artery aneurysm had had a history of bird hunting using a shotgun that impacted substantially against his right clavicula and shoulder weekly for >20 years. The patient underwent open repair with partial sternotomy and distal balloon control. The aneurysmal sac was resected, and the right subclavian artery was reconstructed with a primary end-to-end anastomosis. Histopathologic examination of the resected aneurysmal wall revealed that all three layers of the arterial wall were comparatively intact, with fibrosis and lipid deposition in the intima and in various degrees of degeneration in the media, suggesting a true aneurysm.

  3. Combined suture and clipping for the reconstruction of a ruptured blister-like aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Archavlis, Eleftherios; Giese, Alf

    2016-10-01

    Blister-like aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA) present a severe therapeutical challenge. While several reconstructive techniques are in use in case of acute rupture sacrifice of the parent vessel may be required. We present a combined technique of micro-sutures and clip application to repair the parent vessel in an intraoperatively ruptured blister-like aneurysm. Following temporary trapping of an intraoperatively ruptured 7-mm blister-like aneurysm four 8-0 nylon sutures were applied to adapt the vessel walls and support the branches of subsequently applied mini-clips. The combination of micro-sutures and mini-clips might be a valuable alternative to direct clipping or suturing in some cases with intraoperative rupture of blister-like aneurysms. PMID:27514829

  4. Combined suture and clipping for the reconstruction of a ruptured blister-like aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Archavlis, Eleftherios; Giese, Alf

    2016-10-01

    Blister-like aneurysms of the internal carotid artery (ICA) present a severe therapeutical challenge. While several reconstructive techniques are in use in case of acute rupture sacrifice of the parent vessel may be required. We present a combined technique of micro-sutures and clip application to repair the parent vessel in an intraoperatively ruptured blister-like aneurysm. Following temporary trapping of an intraoperatively ruptured 7-mm blister-like aneurysm four 8-0 nylon sutures were applied to adapt the vessel walls and support the branches of subsequently applied mini-clips. The combination of micro-sutures and mini-clips might be a valuable alternative to direct clipping or suturing in some cases with intraoperative rupture of blister-like aneurysms.

  5. Idiopathic internal mammary artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Jens; Zimmermann, Hanna; Klose, Alexander; Luchting, Benjamin; Hinske, Christian; Sadeghi-Azandaryani, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysms of the internal mammary artery are extremely rare, and their presentation and treatment are variable. Since these aneurysms often tend to rupture and cause haemothorax and life-threatening conditions, the knowledge of secure treatment options is indispensable. We here report the case of an idiopathic internal mammary aneurysm in a 46-year-old man. Open surgical resection of the aneurysm was performed in this case without any complications. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was in a good physical condition without any vascular or neurological abnormalities during follow-up. PMID:25452261

  6. Contained Rupture of Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm in a 64-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Anjali; Lafaro, Rocco; Timmermans, Robert; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Cooper, Howard A.; Panza, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    We report a contained rupture of a right coronary sinus of Valsalva aneurysm, in which repair resulted in symptomatic improvement. Patients often present with symptoms secondary to rupture of the sinus of Valsalva aneurysm into one of the cardiac chambers, or secondary to the compression of adjacent structures. Whereas sinus of Valsalva aneurysms and their rupture are well reported in the literature, contained ruptures have been described only rarely. In those cases, symptoms often arose from compression of adjacent structures. Although transesophageal echocardiography is considered to be the diagnostic method of choice, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography can be equally helpful in establishing the diagnosis and delineating the lesion. Diagnosis and prompt repair in our 64-year-old patient resulted in the rapid resolution of his symptoms. PMID:27777531

  7. Far-lateral approach for surgical treatment of fusiform PICA aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Neil, Jayson A

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured fusiform posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) aneurysms can be technically challenging lesions. Surgeons must be ready to employ a variety of strategies in the successful treatment of these aneurysms. Strategies include complex clip techniques including clip-wrapping or trapping and revascularization. The case presented here is of a man with subarachnoid hemorrhage from a fusiform ruptured PICA aneurysm. The technique demonstrated is a far-lateral approach and a clip-wrap technique using muslin gauze. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively in preparation for possible occipital-PICA bypass if direct repair was not feasible. It is the authors' preference to perform direct vessel repair as a primary goal and use bypass techniques when this is not possible. Vessel patency was evaluated after clip-wrapping using intraoperative Doppler. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is used in such cases. The patient recovered well. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/iwLqufH47Ds .

  8. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm into the Left Atrium with Multiple Fistulous Communications: A Rare Cause of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Chandrashekhar, Rakshita; Pratt, Jerry W; Cole, Maria D; Kamath, Sreenivas; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured noncoronary sinus of valsalva aneurysm with fistulous connections to multiple cardiac chambers has not been reported previously. We report a 66-year-old man who presented with worsening cough and exertional dyspnea. Transesophageal echocardiogram confirmed a large aneurysm involving the noncoronary cusp of the aortic sinus with aneurysmal extension to the left atrium. There were also two fistulous communications with the left atrium and one small fistulous connection with the right atrium. Open-heart surgery with aortic root replacement and reimplantation of coronary arteries along with primary closure and repair of aorta to the left atrial fistula was performed. PMID:26819782

  9. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19–23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  10. Treatment of a Common Iliac Aneurysm by Endovascular Exclusion Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug and Femorofemoral Crossover Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, Nicholas J. Ling, Lynn; Cowling, Mark G.; Asquith, John R.; Hopkinson, Gregory B.

    2009-07-15

    We report our initial experience using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP2) in the treatment of a left common iliac aneurysm. Following investigation by computerized tomographic angiography and catheter angiography, a 79-year-old man was found to have a markedly tortuous iliac system, with a left common iliac artery aneurysm that measured 48 mm in maximal diameter. Due to the patient's age and comorbidities the surgical opinion was that conventional open repair was not suitable. However, due to the tortuous nature of the aneurysm and iliac vessels, standard endovascular repair, using either a bifurcated or an aorto-uni-iliac stent graft, was also not possible. A combined approach was used by embolizing the ipsilateral internal iliac artery using coils and excluding the aneurysm using two AVP2 occlusion devices, followed by femorofemoral crossover grafting. Total aneurysm occlusion was achieved using this method and this allowed the patient to have a much less invasive surgical procedure than with conventional open repair of common iliac aneurysms, thus avoiding potential comorbidity and mortality.

  11. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Avinash; Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  12. Intracranial aneurysm and sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Edriss, Hawa; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Sildenafil is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. To date, we found five reported cases of intracerebral bleeding and two reported cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sildenafil use. We report a 49-year-old hypertensive and diabetic patient who presented with acute pulmonary edema and loss of consciousness following ingestion of 100 mg of sildenafil prior to sexual intercourse. He was not previously aware of the presence of an aneurysm and had no family history of it. Computed tomography of his head revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of a saccular aneurysm with subsequent repeat hemorrhage within a few hours of presentation. A sudden increase in blood pressure led to pulmonary edema. Studies have shown that sildenafil acts on phosphodiesterase-1, -2 and -5 receptors and leads to a secondary increase in intracerebral circulation and vasodilatory effects, leading to sympathetic overactivity which increases the risk for intracranial bleeding. PMID:27034561

  13. [Hybrid treatment of a symptomatic aneurysm of a Kommerell's diverticulum].

    PubMed

    Cruz Ciria, S; Guillén Subirán, M E; Zaragozano Guillén, R; Hilario González, J

    2013-01-01

    Left aortic arch with aberrant right subclavian artery is the most common congenital vascular anomaly involving the aortic arch. In 60% of cases, the aberrant right subclavian artery arises from a dilated segment of the aortic arch called Kommerell's diverticulum. Aneurysm of the aberrant right subclavian artery is rare; this condition could remain clinically silent or it could originate nonspecific symptoms. Rupture of an aneurysm of the aberrant right subclavian artery is associated with high mortality. Although there are no exact criteria to indicate the treatment of this condition, repair of the aneurysm is recommended when symptoms occur or when it reaches a size of 30 mm to 50mm. The malformation can be suspected at plain-film X-ray examination, but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) are the imaging tests of choice for the diagnosis and for planning treatment. We present the case of a patient with an aberrant right subclavian artery with a small calcified aneurysm in a Kommerell's diverticulum that caused chest pain and dysphagia; the patient underwent a procedure combining endovascular and surgical treatment.

  14. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  19. Relative importance of aneurysm diameter and body size for predicting AAA rupture in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Lu, Bing; Fokkema, Margriet T.M.; Conrad, Mark; Patel, Virendra I.; Fillinger, Mark; Matyal, Robina; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Women have been shown to have up to a four-fold higher risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture at any given aneurysm diameter compared to men, leading to recommendations to offer repair to women at lower diameter thresholds. Although this higher risk of rupture may simply reflect greater relative aortic dilatation in women who have smaller aortas to begin with, this has never been quantified. Our objective was therefore to quantify the relationship between rupture and aneurysm diameter relative to body size and to determine whether a differential association between aneurysm diameter, body size, and rupture risk exists for men and women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all patients in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) database who underwent endovascular or open AAA repair. Using each patient’s height and weight, body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) were calculated. Next, indices of each measure of body size (height, weight, BMI, BSA) relative to aneurysm diameter were calculated for each patient. To generate these indices, we divided aneurysm diameter (in cm) by the measure of body size [e.g. aortic size index (ASI) = aneurysm diameter (cm) / BSA (m2)]. Along with other relevant clinical variables, we used these indices to construct different age-adjusted and multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models to determine predictors of ruptured repair vs. elective repair. Models for men and women were developed separately and different models were compared using the area under the curve (AUC). Results We identified 4045 patients who underwent AAA repair (78% male, 53% EVAR). Women had significantly smaller diameter aneurysms, lower BSA, and higher BSA indices than men (Table 1). For men, the variable that increased the odds of rupture the most was aneurysm diameter (AUC = 0.82). Men exhibited an increased rupture risk with increasing aneurysm diameter (<5.5cm: OR 1.0; 5.5–6.4cm: OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5–1

  20. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  1. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system. PMID:18774684

  2. Stent-Grafts for Unruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, John

    2006-06-15

    Aortic stent-grafts were introduced at the beginning of the 1990s as a less invasive method of dealing with aortic aneurysms in patients with poor cardiovascular reserve. The numbers of procedures performed worldwide has increased exponentially despite the current lack of any substantial evidence for long-term efficacy in comparison with the gold standard of open surgical grafting. This review summarizes the evolution of the abdominal aortic stent-graft, the techniques used for assessment and deployment, and the effect of the procedure on both the patient and the device. The recent publication of two national multicenter trials has confirmed that the endovascular technique confers a 2.5-fold reduction in 30-day mortality in comparison with open surgery. However, over 4 years of follow-up, there is a 3-fold increase in the risk of reintervention and the overall costs are 30% greater with endovascular repair. Although the improvement in aneurysm-related mortality persists in the mid-term, because of the initial reduction in perioperative mortality, the all-cause mortality rate at 4 years is actually no better than for open surgery. Longer-term data from the randomized trials are awaited as well as results from the latest trials utilizing state-of-the-art devices. Whilst the overall management of abdominal aortic aneurysms has undoubtedly benefited from the introduction of stent-grafts, open repair currently remains the gold standard treatment.

  3. Ten-Year Follow-Up of Endovascular Aneurysm Treatment with Talent Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael B. Scheschkowski, Tobias; Ring, Markus; Herber, Sascha; Oberholzer, Katja; Leicher-Dueber, Annegret; Neufang, Achim; Schmiedt, Walther; Dueber, Christoph

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results, complications, and secondary interventions during long-term follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to investigate the impact of endoleak sizes on aneurysm shrinkage. From 1997 to March 2007, 127 patients (12 female, 115 male; age, 73.0 {+-} 7.2 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with Talent stent-grafts. Follow-up included clinical visits, contrast-enhanced MDCT, and radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical outcome, secondary interventions, endoleak rate and management, and change in aneurysm size. There was no need for primary conversion surgery. Thirty-day mortality was 1.6% (two myocardial infarctions). Procedure-related morbidity was 2.4% (paraplegia, partial infarction of one kidney, and inguinal bleeding requiring surgery). Mean follow-up was 47.7 {+-} 34.2 months (range, 0-123 months). Thirty-nine patients died during follow-up; three of the deaths were related to aneurysm (aneurysm rupture due to endoleak, n = 1; secondary surgical reintervention n = 2). During follow-up, a total of 29 secondary procedures were performed in 19 patients, including 14 percutaneous procedures (10 patients) and 15 surgical procedures (12 patients), including 4 cases with late conversion to open aortic repair (stent-graft infection, n = 1; migration, endoleak, or endotension, n = 3). Overall mean survival was 84.5 {+-} 4.7 months. Mean survival and freedom from any event was 66.7 {+-} 4.5 months. MRI depicted significantly more endoleaks compared to MDCT (23.5% vs. 14.3%; P < 0.01). Patients in whom all aneurysm side branches were occluded prior to stent-grafting showed a significantly reduced incidence of large endoleaks. Endoleaks >10% of the aneurysm area were associated with reduced aneurysm shrinkage compared to no endoleaks or <10% endoleaks ({Delta} at 3 years, -1.8% vs. -12.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, endovascular

  4. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  5. Ruptured Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm after Bacille Calmette-Guerin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Floros, Nikolaos; Meletiadis, Konstantinos; Kusenack, Ulrich; Zirngibl, Hubert; Kamper, Lars; Haage, Patrick; Dreger, Nici Markus

    2015-10-01

    To report a case of a ruptured mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (MAA) after intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy because of bladder carcinoma. A 57-year-old male patient was admitted to our hospital for follow-up computed tomography 14 months after transurethral resection of a papillary carcinoma of the bladder and intravesical BCG therapy. The CT scan revealed a ruptured MAA aneurysm and the patient underwent an endovascular repair with an aorto-bi-iliac stent graft. A ruptured MAA is a rare but lethal complication after BCG instillation therapy. The standard therapy is the open reconstruction but according to the literature an endovascular therapy in combination with long-term antibiotics should be considered as a bridging or a definite solution.

  6. TEVAR: Endovascular Repair of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Nation, David A.; Wang, Grace J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has allowed a minimally invasive approach for management of an array of thoracic aortic pathologies. Initially developed specifically for exclusion of thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is now used as an alternative to open surgery for a variety of disease pathologies due to the lower morbidity of this approach. Advances in endograft technology continue to broaden the applications of this technique. PMID:26327745

  7. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  8. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  9. Endoanchor stenting for the repair of a Type I endoleak in the aortic arch following the endovascular repair of a Kommerrell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rohan S; Muetterties, Corbin; Moser, George William; Wheatley, Grayson H

    2016-08-01

    As more challenging aortic arch anatomy is being treated using aortic stent-grafts, there is an increased risk for proximal Type I endoleaks at the proximal seal zone or subsequent graft migration. We report a case of an endoanchor-assisted thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair of a patient with an aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) and aortic arch aneurysm who developed a proximal Type I endoleak in the aortic arch which was subsequently treated with endoanchors. PMID:27349832

  10. Clubfoot repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... release; Talipes equinovarus - repair; Tibialis anterior tendon transfer Images Clubfoot repair - series References Kelly DM. Congenital Anomalies ... provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  11. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  12. Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm Presenting as Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Raz, Guy M; Stamou, Sotiris C

    2014-06-01

    A 49-year-old woman with four months of increasing episodic palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath presented to an outside clinic where a new 4/6 systolic ejection murmur was identified. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large aortic root aneurysm. The patient underwent emergent repair of the dissected root aneurysm with a modified Bentall procedure utilizing a #19 St Jude Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. Postoperatively, she required a permanent pacemaker placement. Her echo showed ejection fraction improvement from a preoperative 25% to a postoperative 35%. She was discharged home on postoperative day 7. PMID:26798728

  13. Studying the interaction of stent-grafts and treated abdominal aortic aneurysms: time to move caudally!

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Raptis, Anastasios; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Bisdas, Theodosios; Beropoulis, Efthymios; Georgiadis, George S; Matsagkas, Miltiadis; Xenos, Michalis

    2015-06-01

    Since the advent of endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms (EVAR), clinical focus has been on preventing loss of sealing at the level of the infrarenal neck, which leads to type I endoleak and repressurization of the aneurysm sac. Enhanced mechanisms for central fixation and seal have consequently lowered the incidence of migration and endoleaks. However, endograft limb thrombosis and its causal mechanisms have not been addressed adequately in the literature. This article reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with limb thrombosis in order to facilitate better clinical judgment to prevent iliac adverse effects. PMID:25991770

  14. Snorkel/chimney and fenestrated endografts for complex abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ullery, B W; Lee, J T; Dalman, R L

    2015-10-01

    Complex endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) involves extension of the proximal aortic seal zone with preservation of branch vessel patency, thereby expanding the applicability of endografting from the infrarenal to the suprarenal aorta. Snorkel/chimney (Sn-EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (f-EVAR) serve as the two most commonly utilized advanced endovascular techniques to combat hostile proximal neck anatomy. The purpose of this article is to describe the principles and evolution of these advanced endovascular strategies, technical considerations, and results of sn- and f-EVAR in the management of challenging neck anatomy in abdominal aortic aneurysm disease.

  15. A Giant Renal Vein Aneurysm in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ketikoglou, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a 40-year-old female patient with liver cirrhosis and diffuse abdominal pain. The imaging studies revealed a huge renal vein aneurysm. The patient refused any interventional management, despite the risk of possible rupture, and after a week of mild pain therapy, she was discharged. She was followed up closely, and after one year, she remains asymptomatic. Conservative management of such patients has been described before with success. However, open repair or percutaneous thrombosis of the aneurysm remains the indicated therapy, when vein patency is an issue for organ viability. PMID:27698670

  16. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  17. The Upside-Down Gore Excluder Limb and Double-Barrel Sandwich Technique for Penetrating Aortic Ulcer and Iliac Aneurysm Exclusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Song, Incheol; Huh, Seung

    2016-03-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has become the first-line treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms and iliac artery aneurysms in recent years. However, the diameter of the infrarenal aorta is larger than that of the aortic bifurcation, especially with small aortic diameters, for which a reversed tapered device is necessary. We describe the off-label use of the upside-down Gore Excluder limb and double-barrel sandwich technique for the treatment of a penetrating abdominal aortic ulcer with a large common iliac artery aneurysm. These techniques offer an easy endovascular approach for excluding an aneurysm in selected patients. However, this technique is outside the standard instructions for use, therefore careful planning and long-term follow-up are mandatory. PMID:27051656

  18. The Upside-Down Gore Excluder Limb and Double-Barrel Sandwich Technique for Penetrating Aortic Ulcer and Iliac Aneurysm Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Song, Incheol; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has become the first-line treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms and iliac artery aneurysms in recent years. However, the diameter of the infrarenal aorta is larger than that of the aortic bifurcation, especially with small aortic diameters, for which a reversed tapered device is necessary. We describe the off-label use of the upside-down Gore Excluder limb and double-barrel sandwich technique for the treatment of a penetrating abdominal aortic ulcer with a large common iliac artery aneurysm. These techniques offer an easy endovascular approach for excluding an aneurysm in selected patients. However, this technique is outside the standard instructions for use, therefore careful planning and long-term follow-up are mandatory. PMID:27051656

  19. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  20. Aneurysm of the Splenic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, P. D.; Lodge, Brian

    1960-01-01

    This paper records an incidence of 10·4% of aneurysm of the splenic artery in 250 consecutive routine post-mortem examinations. Medial degeneration seemed to be the commonest cause of such aneurysms and although a number were associated with other intraabdominal pathology, including portal hypertension, the association may be fortuitous and not causal. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:13688586

  1. Flow Diverters for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Alderazi, Yazan J.; Kass-Hout, Tareq; Prestigiacomo, Charles J.; Gandhi, Chirag D.

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (pipeline embolization device, Silk flow diverter, and Surpass flow diverter) have been developed to treat intracranial aneurysms. These endovascular devices are placed within the parent artery rather than the aneurysm sac. They take advantage of altering hemodynamics at the aneurysm/parent vessel interface, resulting in gradual thrombosis of the aneurysm occurring over time. Subsequent inflammatory response, healing, and endothelial growth shrink the aneurysm and reconstruct the parent artery lumen while preserving perforators and side branches in most cases. Flow diverters have already allowed treatment of previously untreatable wide neck and giant aneurysms. There are risks with flow diverters including in-stent thrombosis, perianeurysmal edema, distant and delayed hemorrhages, and perforator occlusions. Comparative efficacy and safety against other therapies are being studied in ongoing trials. Antiplatelet therapy is mandatory with flow diverters, which has highlighted the need for better evidence for monitoring and tailoring antiplatelet therapy. In this paper we review the devices, their uses, associated complications, evidence base, and ongoing studies. PMID:24967131

  2. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  3. When Blood Vessels Bulge: All About Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vessels Bulge When Blood Vessels Bulge All About Aneurysms An aneurysm—a balloon-like bulge in an artery—can ... for years without causing any symptoms. But an aneurysm is a silent threat to your health. If ...

  4. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  5. Adult aortic coarctation discovered incidentally after the rupture of sinus of Valsalva aneurysm: combined surgical and interventional approach.

    PubMed

    Ouali, Sana; Kortas, Chokri; Brockmeier, Konrad; Boughzela, Essia

    2011-12-01

    Combination of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA), and a coexisting asymptomatic adult aortic isthmic coarctation is extremely rare. The timing and sequence of surgical and/or interventional repair of these two pathologies are controversial. We present a case of a 37-year-old male who was admitted to our department because of severe acute congestive heart failure and signs of ruptured aneurysm of the SV into the right ventricle. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed the communication between an important right coronary SVA and right ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic regurgitation, and revealed severe aortic coarctation. Because of the severe dilation of right sinus of Valsalva a surgical repair of the ruptured aneurysm was performed. Aortic coarctation was treated four weeks later by a percutaneous stent-graft implantation. This case report supports the concept that hybrid approach is feasible in patients with ruptured SVA and aortic coarctation in adulthood.

  6. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  7. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch: Treatment Options Available in the Endovascular EraBased on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process.

  8. To treat or not to treat basilic vein aneurysms? A clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Spataro, Catena; Donati, Marcello; Basile, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Superficial venous aneurysms are a very uncommon disease probably associated with thrombosis and recurrent pulmonary thromboembolisms. Surgical treatment is safe and is performed in symptomatic cases. Surgical repair of superficial venous aneurysms is a recommended treatment, and no postoperative complications usually occur. The aim of this study is to report our experience treating superficial venous aneurysms, because they can cause devastating consequences. Obviously, they should be surgically treated if they are symptomatic, but there exists the possibility of complications such as thromboembolic events; however, they are unpredictable. Thus, the only solution to remove the potential risk of developing pulmonary or other embolic events is prophylactic surgery and anticoagulant therapy, also in low-risk patients.

  9. Endocarditis with ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm caused by nonvaccine Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 21.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kamakshya P; Vanchiere, John A; Bocchini, Joseph A; Wu, Amy C; Jackson, Robert D; Kiel, Ernest A; Mello, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare, catastrophic complication of endocarditis. We report an unusual case of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm associated with endocarditis that was caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 21. The patient, a 12-year-old girl, underwent surgical repair of the aneurysm and was given intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks. She was doing well at the 6-week follow-up visit. This case is unusual because of the patient's young age at presentation, the absence of predisposing factors, and the isolation of a nonvaccine serotype 21, which revealed the epidemiologic changes of invasive pneumococcal disease. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of endocarditis caused by this S. pneumoniae serotype.

  10. Gigantic unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm presenting as an incidental murmur.

    PubMed

    Yagoub, Hatim; Srinivas, Bhanu Prakash; McCarthy, James; Kiernan, Thomas John

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old man referred by his family physician with an asymptomatic cardiac murmur. Trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) suggested an unruptured right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA) causing extrinsic compression of the right ventricular outflow tract. This was confirmed with an ECG-gated cardiac CT showing a large right SVA measuring 35×37×42 mm in size. Coronary angiography demonstrated non-obstructive coronary artery disease. Ascending thoracic anterior in the right anterior oblique view delineated the right SVA. The patient underwent aortic valve sparing surgical repair of the aneurysm with an excellent result. Echocardiography confirmed obliteration of the aneurysm and normal aortic valve function postoperatively. PMID:23008378

  11. Deadly case of Pasteurella multocida aortitis and mycotic aneurysm following a cat bite

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dennis Dane; Berliner, Yaniv; Carr, David

    2016-01-01

    Animal bites are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). Aortitis leading to mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare and potentially deadly complication of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) following an animal bite. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who presented to the ED after falling at home. He complained of weakness and abdominal pain. He was in septic shock and was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous fluids. He reported previous antibiotic treatment of a cellulitis secondary to a cat bite injury to his right thumb four weeks prior. Abdominal ultrasound and subsequent computed tomography scan revealed a leaking mycotic abdominal aneurysm that was surgically repaired. Blood cultures and aortic wall tissue cultures grew P. multocida. Given how common animal bite presentations are in the ED, this case highlights the need to consider aortitis and mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm in an unwell patient with an animal bite. PMID:27326399

  12. Successful treatment of endoleak Type I with uncovered EX-L stent after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair†

    PubMed Central

    Buz, Semih; Zipfel, Burkhart; D'Ancona, Guiseppe; Hetzer, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of endoleaks after thoracic endovascular repair remains challenging, particularly when the proximal landing zone is small and partly includes the origin of the neck vessels. We report a Type Ia endoleak, occurring after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair, which was successfully treated with a novel uncovered nitinol stent. With this success, we were able to avoid a conventional surgery to treat the endoleak. PMID:23255527

  13. Risk assessment and risk scores in the management of aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Von Meijenfeldt, Gerdine C I; Van Der Laan, Maarten J; Zeebregts, Clark J; Balm, Ron; Verhagen, Hence J M

    2016-04-01

    The decision whether to operate a patient or not can be challenging for a clinician for both ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) as well as elective AAAs. Prior to surgical intervention it would be preferable that the clinician exactly knows which clinical variables lower or increase the chances of morbidity and mortality postintervention. To help in the preoperative counselling and shared decision making several clinical variables can be identified as risk factors and with these, risk models can be developed. An ideal risk score for aneurysm repair includes routinely obtained physiological and anatomical variables, has excellent discrimination and calibration, and is validated in different geographical areas. For elective AAA repair, several risk scores are available, for ruptured AAA treatment, these scores are far less well developed. In this manuscript, we describe the designs and results of published risk scores for elective and open repair. Also, suggestions for uniformly reporting of risk factors and their statistical analyses are described. Furthermore, the preliminary results of a new risk model for ruptured aortic aneurysm will be discussed. This score identifies age, hemoglobin, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and preoperative systolic blood pressure as risk factors after multivariate regression analysis. This new risk score can help to identify patients that would not benefit from repair, but it can also potentially identify patients who would benefit and therefore lower turndown rates. The challenge for further research is to expand on validation of already existing promising risk scores in order to come to a risk model with optimal discrimination and calibration.

  14. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  15. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  16. Hepatic artery mycotic aneurysm of tubercular aetiology.

    PubMed

    Beeresha; Ghotekar, L H; Dutta, T K; Verma, S K; Elangovan, S

    2000-02-01

    Hepatic artery aneurysm caused by tuberculosis is extremely rare, the commonest being atherosclerosis and vasculitis. A 13 year boy admitted with suspected disseminated tuberculosis had a hepatic bruit. Patient died of aneurysmal rupture before antemortem etiological diagnosis could be established. Postmortem examination revealed widespread tubercular lesions in the chest and abdomen and hepatic artery aneurysm.

  17. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  18. Intramyocardial dissection with concomitant left ventricular aneurysm as a rare complication of myocardial infarction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Wang, Liang-Shan; Su, Zhao-Ping; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 60-year-old woman suffering from intramyocardial dissection and left ventricular aneurysm secondary to acute myocardial infarction. A rare form of ventricular septal rupture resulted from intramyocardial dissection deterioration, which was identified during echocardiographic follow-up. Surgical repair under beating-heart cardiopulmonary bypass was successful.

  19. Intramyocardial dissection with concomitant left ventricular aneurysm as a rare complication of myocardial infarction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cheng; Wang, Liang-Shan; Su, Zhao-Ping; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Cheng-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    We describe a rare case of a 60-year-old woman suffering from intramyocardial dissection and left ventricular aneurysm secondary to acute myocardial infarction. A rare form of ventricular septal rupture resulted from intramyocardial dissection deterioration, which was identified during echocardiographic follow-up. Surgical repair under beating-heart cardiopulmonary bypass was successful. PMID:27605945

  20. Variables that affect the expansion rate and outcome of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cronenwett, J L; Sargent, S K; Wall, M H; Hawkes, M L; Freeman, D H; Dain, B J; Curé, J K; Walsh, D B; Zwolak, R M; McDaniel, M D

    1990-02-01

    Seventy-three patients with small (less than 6 cm in diameter) abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) were selected for nonoperative management and followed up with sequential ultrasound size measurements. Fifty-four men and 19 women, 51 to 89 years of age (mean 70 years), had an initial mean AAA size of 4.1 cm (anteroposterior) x 4.3 cm (lateral) diameter, with a calculated elliptic cross-sectional area of 14.3 cm2. After a mean of 37 months of follow-up, AAA area increased at a mean rate of 20% per year (3 cm2 yr; 0.4 to 0.5 cm/yr diameter). Expansion rate was not affected by initial aneurysm size. During follow-up, only 3 patients (4%) required urgent operation (1 died), 26 patients (36%) died of non-AAA causes, and 26 patients (36%) underwent elective AAA repair because of progressive size increase (1 died). Elective operations were performed at the rate of 10% per year, when mean AAA size had increased to 22 cm2 (5.1 cm in diameter). Multiple regression analysis of clinical parameters available at presentation indicated that subsequent elective AAA repair was predicted by younger age at diagnosis and larger initial aneurysm size. As anticipated, patients who underwent surgery had more rapid aneurysm expansion (5.3 cm2/yr) compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (1.6 cm2/yr; p less than 0.05). This difference was caused by more rapid expansion during later follow-up intervals among patients selected for operation and was not predicted by the change in aneurysm size observed during initial ultrasonographic follow-up. Final aneurysm size was predicted by initial size, duration of follow-up, and both systolic and diastolic pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Endovascular Repair of a Secondary Aorto-Appendiceal Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, Donald M. L.; Thompson, Andrew R. A.; Perkins, Jeremy; Bratby, Mark J.; Anthony, Susan; Uberoi, Raman

    2011-10-15

    Aortoenteric fistula (AEF) is an uncommon but serious complication occurring after aortic surgery and may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract, with the duodenum being the most common. Conventional surgical repair of secondary AEF has high mortality, whereas endovascular repair has emerged as an alternative treatment despite concerns about persistent or recurrent infection. We report the case of a 91-year old man who was admitted with rectal bleeding from an aorto-appendiceal fistula 9 years after open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This rare site for AEF was diagnosed on computed tomography, and we present the first case of endovascular treatment of this uncommon complication.

  2. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up.

  3. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up. PMID:23080212

  4. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  5. Alternative splicing impairs soluble guanylyl cyclase function in aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Golunski, Eva; Laing, Susan T; Estrera, Anthony L; Sharina, Iraida G

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key regulator of several important vascular functions and is important for maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and vascular plasticity. Diminished sGC expression and function contributes to pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. However, the processes that control sGC expression in vascular tissue remain poorly understood. Previous work in animal and cell models revealed the complexity of alternative splicing of sGC genes and demonstrated its importance in modulation of sGC function. The aim of this study was to examine the role of alternative splicing of α1 and β1 sGC in healthy and diseased human vascular tissue. Our study found a variety of α1 and β1 sGC splice forms expressed in human aorta. Their composition and abundance were different between samples of aortic tissue removed during surgical repair of aortic aneurysm and samples of aortas without aneurysm. Aortas with aneurysm demonstrated decreased sGC activity, which correlated with increased expression of dysfunctional sGC splice variants. In addition, the expression of 55-kDa oxidation-resistant α1 isoform B sGC (α1-IsoB) was significantly lower in aortic samples with aneurysm. The α1-IsoB splice variant was demonstrated to support sGC activity in aortic lysates. Together, our results suggest that alternative splicing contributes to diminished sGC function in vascular dysfunction. Precise understanding of sGC splicing regulation could help to design new therapeutic interventions and to personalize sGC-targeting therapies in treatments of vascular disease.

  6. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  7. Position dependent right ventricular dysfunction caused by a giant right coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mora, Bruno; Urbanek, Bernhard; Loewe, Christian; Grimm, Michael; Dworschak, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We describe an instructive case of a 79-year-old patient with a giant coronary aneurysm and a second smaller aneurysm with an uncommon symptomatology. Giant coronary artery aneurysms (>2 cm diameter) are rare pathologic entities with a prevalence of 0.02%. They either can be congenital malformations or are atherosclerotic in origin. Although spontaneous rupture of giant coronary artery aneurysms has been reported, they generally remain silent or induce myocardial ischemia. Our patient, however, showed no signs of myocardial malperfusion but transient position-dependent pre-syncope. The cardiologic work-up and the intraoperative considerations regarding patient management are described. During surgery, manipulation of the giant coronary artery aneurysm caused impairment of right ventricular function and regional wall hypokinesia, as assessed by transesophageal echocardiography. Venous cannulation of the right atrium was thus abandoned and extracorporeal circulation was established via the femoral vein. Subsequent dissection and surgical repair were uneventful and further recovery of the elderly patient was uncomplicated. This case underlines that once the diagnosis is established, proper perioperative management enables successful surgical treatment even of patients of advanced age. PMID:21253776

  8. [Stagewise treatment of a giant false paraanastomotic aneurysm of the abdominal aorta].

    PubMed

    Ignatyev, I M; Volodyukhin, M Yu; Zanochkin, A V; Rafikov, A Yu; Khairullin, R N

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with a case report concerning successful stagewise treatment of a patient presenting with a giant false abdominal aortic paraanastomotic aneurysm having developed 2 months after an operation of linear prosthetic repair for a juxtarenal aneurysm with reimplantation of the left renal artery. The secondary operation was carried out 3 months after aortic reconstruction. The first stage consisted in performing endovascular prosthetic repair of the abdominal aortic paraanastomotic pseudoaneurysm by means of a bifurcated stent graft Endurant II (Medtronic), with the second stage being laparotomy with the removal of the retroperitoneal haematoma. The postoperative period turned out uneventful. The patient was discharged from hospital on the 8th day after the second operation. The patient was examined 2 months later, presenting no complaints and returning to his previous work. According to the findings of the check-up duplex scanning, the graft was patient, with no evidence of a paraanastomotic aneurysm. This is followed by discussion of the problems regarding the use of surgical and endovascular technologies in treatment of paraanastomotic aortic aneurysms. PMID:27336337

  9. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  10. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy.

  11. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  13. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  14. Current endovascular treatment of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kokkosis, Angela A; Abramowitz, Steven; Malik, Rajesh K; Ellozy, Sharif H; Faries, Peter L; Marin, Michael L

    2012-12-01

    The paradigm in elective surgical management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has quickly shifted from major open surgical repairs to less invasive, endovascular procedures. In the last few years, there have been numerous advancements to commercially available devices making the endovascular approach more attractive and efficacious. This review serves to detail the similarities, differences, advantages, and disadvantages of currently available endovascular stent-grafts as well as preview future and emerging technologies in endovascular aortic therapies.

  15. Parent Artery Occlusion for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lishan; Peng, Qiang; Ha, Wenbo; Zhou, Dexiang; Xu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Summary Peripheral cerebral aneurysms are difficult to treat with preservation of the parent arteries. We report the clinical and angiographic outcome of 12 patients with cerebral aneurysms located peripherally. In the past five years, 12 patients, six females and six males, presented at our institution with intracranial aneurysms distal to the circle of Willis and were treated endovascularly. The age of our patients ranged from four to 58 years with a mean age of 37 years. Seven of the 12 patients had subarachnoid and/or intracerebral hemorrhage upon presentation. Two patients with P2 dissecting aneurysms presented with mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia, one patient with a large dissecting aneurysm complained of headaches and two patients with M3 dissecting aneurysms had mild hemiparesis and hypoesthesia of the right arm. Locations of the aneurysms were as follows: posterior cerebral artery in seven patients, anterior inferior cerebellar artery in two, posterior inferior cerebellar artery in one, middle cerebral artery in two. Twelve patients with peripheral cerebral aneurysms underwent parent artery occlusion (PAO). PAO was performed with detachable coils. No patient developed neurologic deficits. Distally located cerebral aneurysms can be treated with parent artery occlusion when selective embolization of the aneurysmal sac with detachable platinum coils or surgical clipping cannot be achieved. PMID:20465914

  16. Initial experience in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysmal disease with a thoracic aortic endograft at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Apple, Jeffrey; McQuade, Karen L.; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Shutze, William P.

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent endovascular repair of thoracic aneurysms and of other thoracic aortic pathology with the thoracic aortic endograft (Gore Medical, Flagstaff, AZ) from June 2005 to July 2007 was performed. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months (range, 2–25 months). Indications for thoracic endografting included descending thoracic aneurysms (n = 18), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (n = 3), traumatic aortic injuries (n = 3), penetrating aortic ulcers (n = 2), and contained rupture of a type B dissection (n = 1). One patient died during the procedure, for an overall mortality rate of 3.7%. The average length of stay was 8.1 days, with an average stay in the intensive care unit of 4.2 days. If patients with traumatic aortic injuries were excluded, the average overall and intensive care unit length of stay were 5.6 and 1.8 days, respectively. There was one incident of spinal cord ischemia (3.7%). There were five type I or type III endoleaks, three of which required revision (11.1%). In conclusion, thoracic endografting is a safe and viable option for the repair of descending thoracic aneurysms and other aortic pathologies. We have found it to be less invasive, even in conjunction with preoperative debranching procedures, with a shorter recovery time, decreased perioperative morbidity and blood loss, and decreased peri-operative mortality compared with standard open repair. PMID:18382748

  17. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  18. Mechanics of left ventricular aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, S; Ghista, D N; Jayaraman, G

    1986-01-01

    When a coronary artery is significantly occluded, the left ventricular myocardial segment, which is perfused by that coronary artery, will become ischaemic and even irreversibly infarcted. An acute infarct has very low stiffness and if it involves the entire wall there is a risk of rupture; however, in the absence of such a critical situation, fibrous tissue is laid into the infarcted myocardial segment. Such an infarcted fibrotic myocardial segment will not be able to contract, and so generate tensile stress. The surrounding intact myocardium will contract and generate wall stress, thereby developing a high intra-chamber systolic pressure; the chronically infarcted and fibrotic segment will have to sustain this high chamber pressure. Its loss of contractility and the resulting reduced systolic stiffness relative to the intact segment, will cause it to deform into a bulge; this is an aneurysm. When a left ventricular chamber with an aneurysm contracts during the systolic phase, some blood also goes into the aneurysm, and this decreases the stroke volume; since the aneurysm wall is passive, stagnant blood flow prevails in the aneurysm itself, which in turn can give rise to the formation of a mural thrombus. These serious consequences provide a justification for the analysis of an infarcted left ventricular chamber, in order to predict the size of the aneurysmic bulge. Such an analysis is presented in this paper. To determine the left ventricular wall deformation, and the stress arising from infarction of a wall segment (which leads to a ventricular aneurysm) the left ventricle is modelled here as a pressurized ellipsoidal shell. Deformations of infarcted wall segments are computed for several damaged wall-thicknesses in left ventricles of different shapes. The analysis involves a derivation of equations for wall-stress equilibrium with the chamber pressure, and myocardial incompressibility before and after infarct formation. The equations are solved by the Newton

  19. Aneurysmal dilatation of the Contegra bovine jugular vein conduit after reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Delmo-Walter, Eva Maria; Alexi-Meskishvili, Vladimir; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Meyer, Rudolf; Hetzer, Roland

    2007-02-01

    An aneurysm of a 14-mm Contegra bovine conduit 5 years after a total repair of tetralogy of Fallot was confirmed by echocardiography, angiography, and magnetic resonance tomography. The conduit was replaced. Histologic examination of the explanted conduit revealed an acellular homogenous material with occasional elastic fibers, fragile, diffuse and complex collagenization throughout the conduit and mild foreign body reaction. Pannus formed over the top of all commissures and on the conduit wall, with extensive mineralization. Close follow-up is seen as mandatory for early detection of the bovine vein conduit aneurysm, particularly in patients in whom small-sized conduits are implanted. PMID:17258016

  20. Aneurysms of the mid axillary artery in major league baseball pitchers--a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Todd, G J; Benvenisty, A I; Hershon, S; Bigliani, L U

    1998-10-01

    True aneurysms of the axillary artery and its branches are rarely identified. Our recent experience with successful repairs of symptomatic aneurysms of the axillary arteries at the origin of the circumflex humeral arteries in 2 major league baseball pitchers suggests a condition that may be more common than recognized previously. We report this unique experience with baseball pitchers to focus attention on a condition that should be considered in all athletes with hand pain, numbness, or signs of digital ischemia. In addition, a schedule of rehabilitation and the timing of an appropriate return to competition is presented.

  1. Craniosynostosis repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... will be asleep and will not feel pain. Traditional surgery is called open repair. It includes these ... helps keep the swelling down. Talking, singing, playing music, and telling stories may help soothe your child. ...

  2. Pregnancy-related rupture of arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J M; Van Hooydonk, J E; Boehm, F H

    1982-09-01

    Over 50 per cent of ruptured arterial aneurysms in women under the age of 40 are pregnancy-related. The hemodynamic and endocrine changes of pregnancy appear to be the cause of arterial alterations which may lead to new aneurysm formation and/or weakening of preexisting aneurysms. The most commonly reported arteries to have aneurysms rupture during pregnancy are the aorta, cerebral arteries, splenic artery, renal artery, coronary artery, and ovarian artery. In many instances, the rupture of an arterial aneurysm will initially simulate other less serious disease processes, thus delaying the correct diagnosis until a catastrophic event occurs. Early diagnosis and treatment of a ruptured arterial aneurysm are imperative in order to give optimal chances of survival to the mother and fetus.

  3. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Orriols, Mar; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Aguiló, Silvia; Dilmé, Jaume; Camacho, Mercedes; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I), 4 and 7 (both class IIa) in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22) compared with those from donors (n=14). Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE(-/-) mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568) improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression.

  4. Induction of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in human abdominal aortic aneurysm: therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Galán, María; Varona, Saray; Orriols, Mar; Rodríguez, José Antonio; Aguiló, Silvia; Dilmé, Jaume; Camacho, Mercedes; Martínez-González, José; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is currently limited to elective surgical repair because an effective pharmacotherapy is still awaited. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity could be a promising therapeutic option in cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to characterise HDAC expression in human AAA and to evaluate the therapeutic potential of class I and IIa HDAC inhibitors in the AAA model of angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry evidenced an increased expression of HDACs 1, 2 (both class I), 4 and 7 (both class IIa) in abdominal aorta samples from patients undergoing AAA open repair (n=22) compared with those from donors (n=14). Aortic aneurysms from Ang-II-infused ApoE−/− mice exhibited a similar HDAC expression profile. In these animals, treatment with a class I HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) or a class IIa inhibitor (MC-1568) improved survival, reduced the incidence and severity of AAA and limited aneurysmal expansion evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. These beneficial effects were more potent in MC-1568-treated mice. The disorganisation of elastin and collagen fibres and lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration were effectively reduced by both inhibitors. Additionally, HDAC inhibition attenuated the exacerbated expression of pro-inflammatory markers and the increase in metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity induced by Ang II in this model. Therefore, our data evidence that HDAC expression is deregulated in human AAA and that class-selective HDAC inhibitors limit aneurysm expansion in an AAA mouse model. New-generation HDAC inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic approach to overcome human aneurysm progression. PMID:26989193

  5. A review of the surgical management of right-sided aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barr, James G; Sepehripour, Amir H; Jarral, Omar A; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Kourliouros, Antonios; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms and dissections of the right-sided aortic arch are rare and published data are limited to a few case reports and small series. The optimal treatment strategy of this entity and the challenges associated with their management are not yet fully investigated and conclusive. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all patients who underwent surgical or endovascular intervention for right aortic arch aneurysms or dissections. The search was limited to the articles published only in English. We focused on presentation and critically assessed different management strategies and outcomes. We identified 74 studies that reported 99 patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention for a right aortic arch aneurysm or dissection. The median age was 61 years. The commonest presenting symptoms were chest or back pain and dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery with only 11 patients having the mirror image variant of a right aortic arch. The commonest pathology was aneurysm arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum occurring in over 50% of the patients. Twenty-eight patients had dissections, 19 of these were Type B and 9 were Type A. Eighty-one patients had elective operations while 18 had emergency procedures. Sixty-seven patients underwent surgical treatment, 20 patients had hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures and 12 had totally endovascular procedure. There were 5 deaths, 4 of which were in patients undergoing emergency surgery and none in the endovascular repair group. Aneurysms and dissections of a right-sided aortic arch are rare. Advances in endovascular treatment and hybrid surgical and endovascular management are making this rare pathology amenable to these approaches and may confer improved outcomes compared with conventional extensive repair techniques.

  6. Pathomechanisms and treatment of pediatric aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Krings, Timo; Geibprasert, Sasikhan; terBrugge, Karel G

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are rare diseases distinct from classical adult aneurysms and therefore require different treatment strategies. Apart from saccular aneurysms that are more commonly found in older children, three major pathomechanisms may be encountered: trauma, infection, and dissection. The posterior circulation and more distal locations are more commonly encountered in children compared to adults, and there is an overall male predominance. Clinical findings are not only confined to subarachnoid hemorrhage but may also comprise mass effects, headaches or neurological deficits. In traumatic aneurysms, the skull base and distal anterior communicating artery are commonly affected, and the hemorrhage occurs often delayed (2-4 weeks following the initial trauma). Infectious aneurysms are mostly bacterial in origin, and hemorrhage occurs early after a septic embolic shower. Dissecting aneurysms are the most often encountered aneurysm type in children and can lead to mass effect, hemorrhage, or ischemia depending on the fate of the intramural hematoma. Treatment strategies in pediatric aneurysms include endosaccular coil treatment only for the "classical berry-type" aneurysms; in the other instances, parent vessel occlusion, flow reversal, surgical options, or a combined treatment with bypass and parent vessel occlusion have to be contemplated.

  7. Clipping techniques in cerebral aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Acciarri, Nicola; Toniato, Giovanni; Raabe, Andreas; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of cerebral aneurysm surgery owes a great tribute to the tenacity of pioneering neurosurgeons who designed and developed the clips used to close the aneurysms neck. However, until the beginning of the past century, surgery of complex and challenging aneurysms was impossible due to the lack of surgical microscope and commercially available sophisticated clips. The modern era of the spring clips began in the second half of last century. Until then, only malleable metal clips and other non-metallic materials were available for intracranial aneurysms. Indeed, the earliest clips were hazardous and difficult to handle. Several neurosurgeons put their effort in developing new clip models, based on their personal experience in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Finally, the introduction of the surgical microscope, together with the availability of more sophisticated clips, has allowed the treatment of complex and challenging aneurysms. However, today none of the new instruments or tools for surgical therapy of aneurysms could be used safely and effectively without keeping in mind the lessons on innovative surgical techniques provided by great neurovascular surgeons. Thanks to their legacy, we can now treat many types of aneurysms that had always been considered inoperable. In this article, we review the basic principles of surgical clipping and illustrate some more advanced techniques to be used for complex aneurysms. PMID:26657306

  8. Fenestrated stent grafts for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysm disease: A mature treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Antoniou, George A; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Lazarides, Miltos K; Moll, Frans L

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of fenestrated stent grafts (SGs) to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with short proximal necks began in 1999. Nowadays, the whole visceral aorta can be treated totally by endovascular means. The established use of fenestrated devices to treat complex AAAs as a first-line management option has been previously reported. An up-to-date evaluation of the literature was performed including all types of publications regarding the use of fenestrated technology to repair complex AAAs. Fenestrated repair is now an established alternative to hybrid/chimney/snorkel repairs. However, specific criteria and prerequisites are required for the use and improvement of this method. Multiple device morphologies have been used incorporating the visceral arteries in various combinations. This modular strategy connects different devices (bridging covered stents and bifurcated SGs) with the aortic main body, thus excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. Precise deployment of the fenestrated SG is mandatory for successful visceral vessel revascularization. Accurate SG sizing and customization, a high level of technical skill, and facilities with modern imaging techniques including 3D road mapping and dedicated hybrid rooms are required. Most experience has been with the custom-made Zenith Cook platform, although off-the-shelf devices have been recently implanted. More complex repairs have been performed over the last few years, but device complexity has also increased. Perioperative, mid-term, and a few recently reported long-term results are encouraging. Secondary interventions remain the main problem, similar to that observed after traditional endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). PMID:27013644

  9. Fenestrated stent grafts for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysm disease: A mature treatment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Antoniou, George A; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Lazarides, Miltos K; Moll, Frans L

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of fenestrated stent grafts (SGs) to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) with short proximal necks began in 1999. Nowadays, the whole visceral aorta can be treated totally by endovascular means. The established use of fenestrated devices to treat complex AAAs as a first-line management option has been previously reported. An up-to-date evaluation of the literature was performed including all types of publications regarding the use of fenestrated technology to repair complex AAAs. Fenestrated repair is now an established alternative to hybrid/chimney/snorkel repairs. However, specific criteria and prerequisites are required for the use and improvement of this method. Multiple device morphologies have been used incorporating the visceral arteries in various combinations. This modular strategy connects different devices (bridging covered stents and bifurcated SGs) with the aortic main body, thus excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. Precise deployment of the fenestrated SG is mandatory for successful visceral vessel revascularization. Accurate SG sizing and customization, a high level of technical skill, and facilities with modern imaging techniques including 3D road mapping and dedicated hybrid rooms are required. Most experience has been with the custom-made Zenith Cook platform, although off-the-shelf devices have been recently implanted. More complex repairs have been performed over the last few years, but device complexity has also increased. Perioperative, mid-term, and a few recently reported long-term results are encouraging. Secondary interventions remain the main problem, similar to that observed after traditional endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).

  10. Pectus excavatum repair

    MedlinePlus

    Funnel chest repair; Chest deformity repair; Sunken chest repair; Cobbler's chest repair; Nuss repair; Ravitch repair ... There are two types of surgery to repair this condition -- open surgery ... surgery is done while the child is in a deep sleep and pain- ...

  11. Pulmonary artery aneurysm with patent arterial duct: resection of aneurysm and ductal division.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Endale; Teodori, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Congenital or acquired aneurysm of the pulmonary artery (PA) is rare. Although aneurysms are described following surgical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), occurrence of this lesion in association with PDA without previous surgery is extremely uncommon. An eight-year-old patient with PDA and aneurysm of the main PA is described in this report. Clinical diagnosis of PDA was made upon presentation. Diagnosis of PA aneurysm was suspected on chest x-ray and was confirmed on transthoracic echocardiography. Successful surgical resection of the aneurysm and division of the duct were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient did well on follow-up both from clinical and echocardiographic point of view.

  12. Endovascular management of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aneurysm-damage control with superior mesenteric artery snorkel and thoracic stent-graft exclusion.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Reeves, James G; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of a large ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, which was stabilized with endovascular aortic exclusion and snorkel bypass of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). An 80-year-old African American woman with multiple medical comorbidities and previous open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with a ruptured 10.7 × 7.3 cm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm involving the origins of the renal and mesenteric vessels. The patient underwent emergent endovascular aortic repair with placement of a covered stent into the SMA coursing parallel to the aortic endograft. This technique was initially successful in clinically stabilizing the patient; however; 3 weeks after the initial procedure, she presented with recurrent rupture necessitating proximal extension of her snorkeled SMA bypass and aortic endograft into the mid-descending thoracic aorta. The patient stabilized and was successfully discharged home.

  13. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  14. Undescended testicle repair

    MedlinePlus

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  15. Superior mesenteric artery dissection as a complication of an endovascular attempt to treat aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arteries.

    PubMed

    Dzieciuchowicz, Łukasz; Snoch-Ziółkiewicz, Magdalena; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Frankiewicz, Maciej

    2015-10-01

    A case of iatrogenic dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) in a 42-year old woman during an attempt of endovascular treatment of aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arteries coexisting with a stenosis of the coeliac trunk is presented. The dissection occurred most probably during insertion of an introducer sheath into the SMA. The patient at that moment reported a short-lasting abdominal pain and after that remained asymptomatic. Due to technical difficulties, the attempt of endovascular management of pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms was abandoned. The completion angiography revealed the occlusion of the SMA. The patient underwent an emergency laparotomy; pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms were excised and SMA dissection was repaired with endarterectomy and a patch closure. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and the patient remained asymptomatic during a 30-month follow-up. The case underscores the importance of completion angiography after endovascular interventions in the SMA since the early period of its occlusion may be asymptomatic.

  16. Pulmonary mycotic pseudo-aneurysm with a prior history of ventricular septal defect. Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Walasangikar, Vishal; Kumar Dey, Amit; Sharma, Rajaram; Murumkar, Vivek; Gadewar, Rohit; Hira, Priya; Mittal, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    In general aneurysms of the pulmonary arteries are less frequent than intracranial, aortic or other vascular locations. Infectious causes include bacteria such as Staphylococcus sp and Streptococcus sp, mycobacteria, Treponema pallidium (syphilis) and rarely fungi. We report a 7 year old female with two right-sided parahilar pseudo-aneurysm of fungal origin with a prior history of ventricular septal defect. Pulmonary mycotic pseudo-aneurysms are very rare and require a high suspicion to diagnose. If a patient is still symptomatic for fever and cough for a long time, and consolidation on x-ray is not improving on antibiotics, contrast-enhanced computed tomography is indicated. It can be suspected that the "friable mass attached to ventricular septal defect patch" was a source of fungeal emboli to pulmonary arteries thus giving weight to the infective endocarditis etiology. A prior history of ventricular septal defect repair could favour fungal endocarditis. PMID:27238181

  17. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  18. Endovascular Treatment of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysms: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Rui Manuel; Rego, Duarte Nuno Cunha; de Oliveira, Pedro Nuno Ferreira Pinto; de Almeida, Rui Manuel Gonçalves Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Objective Internal iliac artery aneurysms (IIAA) are rare, representing only 0.3% of aortoiliac aneurysms. Its treatment with open surgery is complex and associated with high morbidity and mortality, which led to increasing application of endovascular solutions. In this study, we aimed to evaluate outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of IIAA in one institution. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all cases of IIAA treated with endovascular techniques between 2003 and 2014. Endpoints were morbidity, mortality, freedom from pelvic ischemic symptoms (buttock claudication, ischemic colitis, and spinal cord injury), and need for reintervention. Results There were 16 patients, 13 males and 3 females, with mean age of 75.1±7 years. A total of 20 IIAA (4 cases were bilateral), with mean diameter of 37.9 mm, were treated. EVAR was performed in 13 (81.3%) patients, with associated internal iliac artery's outflow occlusion in 2. Iliac branch device was used in one patient. Two patients underwent endovascular IIAA embolization alone. One patient underwent percutaneous, transgluteal, IIAA embolization. IIAA flow preservation in at least one internal iliac artery was possible in 9 (56.3%) patients. Early mortality was 7% (1 case). Early morbidity was 18.8%. Pelvic ischemic complications occurred in 1 (7%) patient with buttock claudication. Late reintervention was needed in 3 patients, none of them for IIAA related complications. Conclusion Endovascular treatment of IIAA is technically feasible and durable. Although overall morbidity is relatively high, major complications are infrequent and perioperative mortality is low. internal iliac artery flow preservation is technically challenging and, in a significant number of cases, not possible at all. PMID:27556311

  19. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jou, Liangder; Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  20. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981