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Sample records for anfengshan basalts subducted

  1. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle.

  2. Heterogeneous source components of intraplate basalts from NE China induced by the ongoing Pacific slab subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huan; Xia, Qun-Ke; Ingrin, Jannick; Deloule, Etienne; Bi, Yao

    2017-02-01

    The subduction of oceanic slabs is widely accepted to be a main reason for chemical heterogeneities in the mantle. However, determining the contributions of slabs in areas that have experienced multiple subduction events is often difficult due to possible overlapping imprints. Understanding the temporal and spatial variations of source components for widespread intraplate small volume basalts in eastern China may be a basis for investigating the influence of the subducted Pacific slab, which has long been postulated but never confirmed. For this purpose, we investigated the Chaihe-aershan volcanic field (including more than 35 small-volume Quaternary basaltic volcanoes) in NE China and measured the oxygen isotopes and water content of clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. The water content of magma was then estimated based on the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and the basaltic melt. The δ18O of cpx phenocrysts (4.28‰ to 8.57‰) and H2O content of magmas (0.19 wt.%-2.70 wt.%) show large variations, reflecting the compositional heterogeneity of the mantle source. The δ18O values and H2O content within individual samples also display considerable variation, suggesting the mixing of magmas and that the magma mixing occurred shortly before the eruption. The relation between the δ18O values of cpx phenocrysts and the H2O/Ce ratio, Ba/Th ratio and Eu anomaly of whole rocks demonstrates the contributions of three components to the mantle source (hydrothermally altered upper oceanic crust and marine sediments, altered lower gabbroic oceanic crust, and ambient mantle). The proportions of these three components have varied widely over time (∼1.37 Ma to ∼0.25 Ma). The Pacific slab is constantly subducted under eastern Asia and continuously transports recycled materials to the deep mantle. The temporal heterogeneity of the source components may be caused

  3. Mineral chemistry and density of subducted basaltic crust at lower-mantle pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesson, S. E.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Shelley, J. M. G.

    1994-12-01

    SUBDUCTED slabs are less dense than the surrounding mantle near the base of the transition zone (˜660 km depth) because of the survival of garnet in former basaltic crust: by this depth mantle peridotite has transformed to denser perovskitite1'2. The buoyancy of the former basaltic crust may contribute to the observed accu-mulation or horizontal displacement of many slabs at the base of the transition zone3. Here we report experimental confirmation of the widely held belief that the basaltic crust of slabs eventually transforms to a dense perovskititic lithology, stable in the lower mantle. Synthetic mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORE) glass subjected to pressures of 45, 80 and 100 GPa in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell transforms to an assemblage of aluminous Mg,Fe silicate perovskite, non-quenchable CaSiO3 perovskite, stishovite and a sodic, aluminous phase with the Ca-ferrite structure (Fig. 1). Per-ovskititic MORE is about 0.06 g cm-3 more dense than a model lower mantle (PREM) derived from seismological data. Thus even thermally equilibrated perovskititic slabs should encounter no sig-nificant hindrance to subduction and convection in the lower mantle.

  4. Niobium-enriched basalts from the Wabigoon subprovince, Canada: evidence for adakitic metasomatism above an Archean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, D. A.; Ayer, J. A.; Devaney, J. R.

    2000-06-01

    Late Archean niobium-enriched basalts from the Central Sturgeon Lake assemblage and Neepawa group of the western Wabigoon subprovince have mantle-normalized Nb/La between 0.8 and 1.3 and Zr/Y between 4 and 7. They are compositionally similar to basalts attributed to adakite metasomatism of mantle wedge regions in Cenozoic subduction zones [Sajona et al., J. Petrol. 37 (1996) 693-726]. In detail, their Sc-REE systematics suggest the Archean basalts were generated above the garnet stability field. An association with adakite-like volcanic rocks, an absence of komatiites and the arc-like attributes of their host sequences suggest a subduction-related origin for the basalts. If current models of adakite and Niobium-enriched basalt genesis are valid, then additional examples of these rocks should be relatively common in other Archean greenstone belts.

  5. Did Tholeiitic Basalts Erupt First After Initiation of Subduction in the IBM System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Reagan, M. K.; Osamu, I.; Kelley, K.; Ohara, Y.; Bloomer, S.; Fryer, P.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Ishii, T.; Kimura, J.

    2008-12-01

    Manned submersible Shinkai 6500 diving in 2006 and 2008 (cruises YK06-12 and YK08-08 of the R/V Yokosuka) in the Mariana fore-arc southeast of Guam discovered extensive outcroppings of tholeiitic pillow basalt and diabase. Such rocks appear to be the most abundant lithology in this region between 6500 and 2000 m depth. Similar basalts were found during Shinkai 6500 diving in the Bonin forearc (Debari et al., 1999), dredging and diving on the Hahajima Seamount (Ishwatari et al., 2006.), and drilling at DSDP sites 458 and 459 in the central Mariana forearc. In both the 2006-2008 dive area and at site 458, these basalts underlie boninites. Based on their position in the fore-arc, and their unique petrographic and geochemical characteristics, we have given these lavas the name "fore-arc basalts" (FAB). The FAB differ petrographically from the back-arc basin and mid-ocean ridge basalts in that phenocrysts are rare in FAB, and typically are only iddingsitized euhedral olivine. Pillow lava interiors mostlyconsist of quench-textured intergrowths of acicular to skeletal plagioclase less than a few tenths of a millimeter long and finer acicular augite with granular Fe-Ti oxides. Some samples lack vesicles but others have as much as 20 percent vesicles. FAB diabases consist of intergrown acicular to lath-shaped plagioclase partially surrounded by anhedral to subhedral augite and Fe-Ti oxides. FAB are characterized by MORB-like REE and high field strength (HFS) element concentrations. Their large-ion lithophile (LIL) element concentrations range from MORB-like to somewhat LREE-enriched. Some LIL enrichment resulted from alteration. However, the most LIL-enriched samples of FAB are those at the base of DSDP site 458, which are fresh glasses that were analyzed by LA- ICPMS. Ti/V ratios are lower in FAB than in MORB and most back-arc basin lavas but are similar to Ti/V in arc basalts. The low Ti/V ratios in subduction-related lavas have been attributed to oxidation of mantle

  6. Volatiles in a Subduction-Related Primitive Basaltic Cinder Cone: Investigating Volcan Jorullo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Wallace, P.; Granados, H. D.

    2004-12-01

    To investigate volatiles in primitive subduction-related basaltic magmas, we have analyzed volatile (H2O, CO2, Cl, S) concentrations in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the 1759-1774 eruption of Jorullo volcano in the central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). Jorullo's earliest lavas are primitive (9.3 wt% MgO, Fo86-90 olivine), and lava compositions evolved over time as a result of crystal fractionation (Luhr and Carmichael, 1985, CMP). Tephra samples were collected from a 5-meter-thick proximal ash fall sequence. Olivine crystals from the base of the section are fractured and contain clusters and chains of Cr-spinel inclusions in addition to melt inclusions. Samples from the top of the section have more euhedral crystals with solitary Cr-spinel inclusions and fewer melt inclusions. Melt inclusions from the basal tephra have variable H2O (<1-4.8 wt%) and CO2 (34-770 ppm), corresponding to crystallization pressures of <100 bars to 3.7 kbars. This indicates that olivine crystallized over a wide range of depths, trapping variably degassed melts during magma ascent. Melt inclusions from the upper sample have lower H2O (0.2-1.4 wt%) and no detectable CO2, suggesting shallow crystallization of degassed magma toward the end of the violent-Strombolian-style eruptions. For Jorullo melt inclusions, the maximum H2O contents (4-5 wt%), which should most closely represent primary values, compare with values of ˜4 wt% H2O at nearby Paricutin (Luhr, 2001, CMP) and 1.3-5.2 wt% in cinder cones in the Chichinautzin volcanic field to the east (Cervantes and Wallace, 2003, Geology). Relatively high Ba/Nb in Jorullo lavas shows that the underlying mantle wedge in this region of the TMVB has been enriched by a subduction-derived component. Ratios of H2O to incompatible trace elements follow similar patterns to those observed for Chichinautzin cinder cones, and thus further demonstrate a link between H2O and trace element enrichment in the mantle wedge. The high H2O in Jorullo

  7. Back arc basalts from Patagonia: sediment input in a distal subduction domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, A.; Mandeville, C.; Varekamp, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Cinder cones and lava flows from the Loncopue graben in N Patagonia (37 S) were sampled over a 180 km N-S transect. These mainly basaltic and trachybasaltic lava flows carry olivine with Cr-Al-rich spinel inclusions, while some more evolved flows carry clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Most of these rocks have between 5-8 percent MgO, and show highly variable K and LIL trace element concentrations. The rocks have up to 180 ppm Ni and 250 ppm Cr. Relative trace element abundance diagrams show negative Ta-Nb anomalies in most rocks, although their depths vary strongly. The REE patterns show LREE enrichment and most rocks have no Eu anomalies, indicating the absence of significant plagioclase fractionation. The basalts have constant U/Th values (~0.25) that are similar to those found in the nearby Copahue-Caviahue arc volcanics. Microprobe analyses of the main phases show olivine with Mg # of 80-87 and up to 2600 ppm Ni. Simulations with the Melts-pMelts programs and application of mineral-melt geothermometers suggest that most olivine phenocrysts crystallized at ~8-10 kbar pressure at temperatures of 1170-1220 oC and with 1-3 percent H2O in the melt. The Sr isotope compositions of 9 samples show a range from 0.7033 - 0.7043, which are negatively correlated with Nd isotope ratios (0.51273- 0.51292). Surprisingly, the most MgO-rich basalt has the most radiogenic Sr isotope ratio. The Pb isotope ratios, well outside the DMM range, correlate very poorly with either Sr isotope ratios or in Pb-Pb isotope graphs. The lack of correlation between degree of evolution and Sr isotope ratios as well as the primitive nature of the rocks and crystals suggest that crustal assimilation was not a major process impacting the composition of these small magma volumes. Incompatible trace element patterns of several samples resemble those of detrital sediment samples from the Pacific, which together with the isotopic data suggest that these magmas may carry a subducted sediment component

  8. Along-arc Variations in Subduction Inputs and Mantle Source in Cascadia: Insights from Basaltic Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; DeBari, S. M.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cascade arc spans ~1300 km from northern California into southern British Columbia, and basaltic magmas have erupted throughout the arc. The compositions of arc basalts are particularly useful in discerning mantle origins and inputs to the magmatic system, as basalts have undergone less differentiation en route to the surface. This presentation will draw on both existing datasets and new research to summarize our knowledge of Cascades arc basalt geochemistry and explore along-arc variability in mantle compositions and subduction recycling (oceanic crust and sediment). Cascades basalts are highly variable in composition; at least five types of primitive basalts erupt in the arc, with calc-alkaline basalts (CAB) and low-K tholeiites (LKT, also called high-alumina olivine tholeiites) being the most common. Such variability has been suggested to correlate with mantle heterogeneities and/or mantle melting processes, with CAB originating from fluid-fluxing of the mantle and LKT representing decompression melts (e.g., Leeman et al., 1990; Schmidt et al., 2008). However, recent work has suggested that, at least in some localities, CAB and LKT magmas could originate from a common mantle source (Mullen et al., 2014). A compilation of published primitive (>7 wt% MgO) basaltic magma compositions illustrates potential mantle heterogeneity along the arc, as well as variations in subduction recycling. Increases in melt H2O contents, radiogenic isotopes, oxygen isotopes, and LILE from north to south along the arc commonly suggest an increase in the amount of subduction component added to the mantle beneath the southern Cascades. The origin of the subduction component (crust vs. sediment) appears variable as well. With recent work on the seafloor sediments offshore of the north Cascades (Carpentier et al., 2010, 2013, 2014), researchers have been able to model the contributions of subducted sediment and crust to the north Cascades arc magmas and have suggested that sediment

  9. Role of Subducted Basalt in the Genesis Island Arc Magmas: Evidence from Western Aleutian Seafloor Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Brown, S. T.; Kelemen, P. B.; Vervoort, J. D.; Hoernle, K.; Portnyagin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Western Aleutian seafloor lavas define a highly calc-alkaline series, with Mg numbers (Mg#, Mg/Mg+Fe) greater than 0.65 in dacitic lavas with 2-4% MgO at 63-70% SiO2. These lavas have uniformly radiogenic Hf and Nd and variable, but relatively unradiogenic, Sr and Pb, at the MORB-like end of the spectrum of island-arc lavas. Andesites and dacites have high Sr >1000 ppm, fractionated trace element patterns (Sr/Y=50-350, La/Yb=8-35, Dy/Yb=2-3.5), and low relative abundances of Nb and Ta (La/Ta=100-300), consistent with an enhanced role for residual or cumulate garnet + rutile. MORB-like isotope compositions and high MgO and Mg# relative to silica, rule out an origin for the andesites and dacites by fractional crystallization from basalt, except perhaps, by a process of melt-rock reaction with peridotite. The most fractionated trace element patterns are in western seafloor rhyodacites (69-70% SiO2), which were dredged from volcanic cones built on Bering Sea oceanic lithosphere, where the crust is probably no more than 10 km thick, and so unlikely to produce garnet during crustal melting. We interpret the western seafloor andesites and dacites to have been produced by melting of subducted MORB-like basalt in the eclogite facies, followed by interaction of the resulting high-silica melt with mantle peridotite. This interpretation is consistent with the tectonic setting in the western Aleutians, which is dominated by oblique convergence, capable of producing a relatively hot subducting plate. Western seafloor lavas define an end-member composition with MORB-like isotope compositions and fractionated trace element ratios, which falls at the end of the continuum of compositions for all Aleutian lavas. The end-member character of western seafloor lavas is clearest in plots highlighting their radiogenic Hf, Nd and strong relative depletions in Ta and Yb. The western seafloor lavas also define an end-member composition for Pb isotopes and Ce/Pb (Miller et al., Nature, 1994

  10. Subduction of hydrated basalt of the oceanic crust: Implications for recycling of water into the upper mantle and continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Subduction zones are presently the dominant sites on Earth for recycling and mass transfer between the crust and mantle; they feed hydrated basaltic oceanic crust into the upper mantle, where dehydration reactions release aqueous fluids and/or hydrous melts. The loci for fluid and/or melt generation will be determined by the intersection of dehydration reaction boundaries of primary hydrous minerals within the subducted lithosphere with slab geotherms. For metabasalt of the oceanic crust, amphibole is the dominant hydrous mineral. The dehydration melting solidus, vapor-absent melting phase relationships; and amphibole-out phase boundary for a number of natural metabasalts have been determined experimentally, and the pressure-temperature conditions of each of these appear to be dependent on bulk composition. Whether or not the dehydration of amphibole is a fluid-generating or partial melting reaction depends on a number of factors specific to a given subduction zone, such as age and thickness of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, the rate of convergence, and the maturity of the subduction zone. In general, subduction of young, hot oceanic lithosphere will result in partial melting of metabasalt of the oceanic crust within the garnet stability field; these melts are characteristically high-Al2O3 trondhjemites, tonalites and dacites. The presence of residual garnet during partial melting imparts a distinctive trace element signature (e.g., high La/Yb, high Sr/Y and Cr/Y combined with low Cr and Y contents relative to demonstrably mantle-derived arc magmas). Water in eclogitized, subducted basalt of the oceanic crust is therefore strongly partitioned into melts generated below about 3.5 GPa in 'hot' subduction zones. Although phase equilibria experiments relevant to 'cold' subduction of hydrated natural basalts are underway in a number of high-pressure laboratories, little is known with respect to the stability of more exotic hydrous minerals (e.g., ellenbergite) and

  11. The halogen cycle in subduction zones: insight from back-arc basin basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavrit, Deborah; Ruzie, Lorraine; Burgess, Ray; Hilton, David; Sumino, Hirochika; Sinton, John; Ballentine, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The extent to which the subduction process preserves the volatile elements signature of the downgoing slab and the mechanisms by which these elements are transferred into the mantle wedge are not well understood. Halogens (Cl, Br, I) are good candidates to trace these processes, due to their incompatibility and their relatively high concentrations in seawater and marine sediments. A technique developed at the University of Manchester allows the high precision measurements of these elements on neutron-irradiated samples using noble gas mass spectrometry. To better constrain the cycle of halogens in subduction zones, we analyzed the halogens in 15 volcanic glasses (BABB) from three back-arc basins which are known to contain slab-derived components viz Manus basin, Lau basin and Mariana trough. The three back-arc basins have relatively constant Br/Cl weight ratios (4.0±0.4×10-3) which are 2x higher than the mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) value. The I/Cl weight ratios (0.9 to 7.1×10-5) range from values close to seawater to MORB values. These results suggest that the halogen composition of the BABB mantle source is affected by a slab-derived component. However, the I/Cl ratios positively correlate with Ba/Nb ratios that are between 5-33 (weight), which reflect the extent of the slab contribution. Thus, it indicates the presence of an unknown end member with a MORB-like Ba/Nb ratio and with low I/Cl and high Br/Cl ratios. It is notable that the halogen ratios of this component are similar to that of the fluid phases trapped in altered oceanic crust. Another component with higher Ba/Nb, higher I/Cl and lower Br/Cl ratios, is consistent with the presence of a sedimentary-derived component. The possible origins of the signature of the halogen BABB mantle source will be discussed by comparing with the different components characterizing the subducted oceanic crust.

  12. Geodynamics of paleo-Pacific plate subduction constrained by the source lithologies of Late Mesozoic basalts in southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Gang; He, Zhen-Yu; Li, Zhen; Xu, Xi-Sheng; Chen, Li-Hui

    2016-10-01

    Widespread Late Mesozoic volcanic magmatism in southeastern China is generally thought to represent products in response to the subduction of paleo-Pacific plate; however, it remains unclear when this process began to affect the mantle and the related magmatism. Here we present a systematic study on the source lithology of Late Mesozoic basalts in this area to highlight a link between lithological variations of mantle and subduction process of paleo-Pacific plate. Late Mesozoic basalts can be subdivided into four groups based on their erupted ages: 178 172 Ma, approximately 150 Ma, 137 123 Ma, and 109 64 Ma. The primary source lithology of these rocks is pyroxenite rather than peridotite, and this mafic lithology can be formed by either ancient or young recycled crustal components. Notably, the source lithology of the approximately 150 Ma and 137 123 Ma basalts is primarily SiO2-rich pyroxenite, and the former is carbonated. The discovery of carbonated, SiO2-rich pyroxenite reflects the influence of a recently recycling event in the mantle. The subduction of paleo-Pacific plate is the most appropriate candidate and can be responsible for the mantle-derived magmatism after approximately 150 Ma in southeastern China. Therefore, we suggest a paleo-Pacific slab rollback with increased dip angle as a possible model to control the lithological variations of Late Mesozoic mantle beneath southeastern China.

  13. Hf Isotope Evidence for Subducted Basalt and Sediment Contributions to the Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Tuena, A. G.; Capra, L.; Straub, S. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Magmas generated at thick crust continental arcs often have enriched continental crust-like trace element patterns and Pb-Sr-Nd isotope ratios that are intermediate to both upper mantle and crustal compositions. Thus it is difficult to distinguish between contributions from (a) the subducted basalt and the upper mantle wedge, and (b) subducted sediment and the continental crust. These issues have been the focus of major controversy. Here we show evidence for subduction contributions to lavas in a classic thick crust environment. In Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the upper continental crust is 30 km to 45 km thick. However, primitive mafic lavas erupt on many sites across the arc. We have analyzed the subducting sediments as represented by DSDP 487, located seaward of the trench, where the lower third of the sediment column has strongly hydrothermal pelagic features and the upper two-thirds is composed of terrigenous sediments. The pelagic sediments have distinctive features that could be used to identify a subduction component in the volcanics, including high REE/Hf, negative Ce anomalies, and Nd-Hf isotopes that lie on the "seawater array" and offset from the "mantle-crust" array. We have focused on a unique series of lavas from volcano Nevado de Toluca, located southwest of Mexico City. These lavas show negative Ce anomalies coupled with low REE/Hf and Zr/Nd ratios. Hf-Nd isotope ratios show a shallow trend compared to the mantle-crust array, consistent with a pelagic component. In addition, Hf isotopes show a striking positive correlation with Ce anomalies that trend toward the pelagic sediment compositions. These and other observations provide clear evidence for a component from subducted sediment in the lavas. In addition, there is a negative correlation of Lu/Hf and Hf isotopes that requires a mixing endmember with MORB-like Hf isotope ratios but with lower than MORB Lu/Hf. This indicates a melt from eclogitic subducted basalt. Compared to other

  14. Compositional diversity of Late Cenozoic basalts in a transect across the southern Washington Cascades: Implications for subduction zone magmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Leeman, W.P. ); Smith, D.R. ); Hildreth, W. ); Palacz, Z.; Rogers, N. )

    1990-11-10

    Major volcanoes of the Southern Washington Cascades (SWC) include the large quaternary stratovolcanoes of Mount St. Helens (MSH) and Mount Adams (MA) and the Indian Heaven (IH) and Simcoe Mountain (SIM) volcanic fields. There are significant differences among these volcanic centers in terms of their composition and evolutionary history. The authors conclude that subducted fluids and sediments do not play an essential role in producing these magmas. Rather, they infer that they formed by variable degree melting of a mixed mantle source consisting mainly of heterogeneously distributed OIB and mid-ocean ridge basalt source domains. Relatively minor occurrences of high field strength element (HFSE) depleted arclike basalts may reflect the presence of a small proportion of slab-metasomatized subarc mantle. The juxtaposition of such different mantle domains within the lithospheric mantle is viewed as a consequence of (1) tectonic mixing associated with accretion of oceanic and island arc terranes along the Pacific margin of North America prior to Neogene time, and possibly (2) a seaward jump in the locus of subduction at about 40 Ma. The Cascades arc is unusual in that the subducting oceanic plate is very young and hot. They suggest that slab dehydration outboard of the volcanic front resulted in a diminished role of aqueous fluids in generating or subsequently modifying SWC magmas compared to the situation at most convergent margins. Furthermore, with low fluid flux conditions, basalt generation is presumably triggered by other processes that increase the temperature of the mantle wedge (e.g., convective mantle flow, shear heating, etc.).

  15. Lithium isotope evidence for subduction-enriched mantle in the source of mid-ocean-ridge basalts.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Tim; Thomas, Alex; Jeffcoate, Alistair; Niu, Yaoling

    2006-10-05

    'Recycled' crustal materials, returned from the Earth's surface to the mantle by subduction, have long been invoked to explain compositional heterogeneity in the upper mantle. Yet increasingly, problems have been noted with this model. The debate can be definitively addressed using stable isotope ratios, which should only significantly vary in primitive, mantle-derived materials as a consequence of recycling. Here we present data showing a notable range in lithium isotope ratios in basalts from the East Pacific Rise, which correlate with traditional indices of mantle heterogeneity (for example, 143Nd/144Nd ratios). Such co-variations of stable and radiogenic isotopes in melts from a normal ridge segment provide critical evidence for the importance of recycled material in generating chemical heterogeneity in the upper mantle. Contrary to many models, however, the elevated lithium isotope ratios of the 'enriched' East Pacific Rise lavas imply that subducted ocean crust is not the agent of enrichment. Instead, we suggest that fluid-modified mantle, which is enriched during residency in a subduction zone, is mixed back into the upper mantle to cause compositional variability.

  16. Olivine and melt inclusion chemical constraints on the source of intracontinental basalts from the eastern North China Craton: Discrimination of contributions from the subducted Pacific slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Yan; Xu, Yi-Gang; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Huang, Xiao-Long; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Guo, Hua; Ning, Zhen-Guo

    2016-04-01

    Contributions from fluid and melt inputs from the subducting Pacific slab to the chemical makeup of intraplate basalts erupted on the eastern Eurasian continent have long been suggested but have not thus far been geochemically constrained. To attempt to address this question, we have investigated Cenozoic basaltic rocks from the western Shandong and Bohai Bay Basin, eastern North China Craton (NCC), which preserve coherent relationships among the chemistries of their melt inclusions, their hosting olivines and their bulk rock compositions. Three groups of samples are distinguished: (1) high-Si and (2) moderate-Si basalts (tholeiites, alkali basalts and basanites) which were erupted at ∼23-20 Ma, and (3) low-Si basalts (nephelinites) which were erupted at <9 Ma. The high-Si basalts have lower alkalies, CaO and FeOT contents, lower trace element concentrations, lower La/Yb, Sm/Yb and Ce/Pb but higher Ba/Th ratios, and lower εNd and εHf values than the low-Si basalts. The olivines in the high-Si basalts have higher Ni and lower Mn and Ca at a given Fo value than those crystallizing from peridotite melts, and their corresponding melt inclusions have lower CaO contents than peridotite melts, suggesting a garnet pyroxenitic source. The magmatic olivines from low-Si basalts have lower Ni but higher Mn at a given Fo value than that of the high-Si basalts, suggesting more olivine in its source. The olivine-hosted melt inclusions of the low-Si basalts have major elemental signatures different from melts of normal peridotitic or garnet pyroxenitic mantle sources, pointing to their derivation from a carbonated mantle source consisting of peridotite and garnet pyroxenite. We propose a model involving the differential melting of a subduction-modified mantle source to account for the generation of these three suites of basalts. Asthenospheric mantle beneath the eastern NCC, which entrains garnet pyroxenite with an EM1 isotopic signature, was metasomatized by carbonatitic

  17. Across-arc variations of isotope and trace element compositions from Quaternary basaltic volcanic rocks in northeastern Japan: Implications for interaction between subducted oceanic slab and mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Eizo

    1997-04-01

    Isotopic compositions of Pb, Sr, and Nd and concentrations of trace elements were determined for Quaternary island arc basaltic rocks from northeastern Japan. Sr and Pb isotopic ratios decrease, and Nd isotopic ratios increase from the volcanic front toward the back arc. The isotopic compositions nearest the back arc side are nearly identical to those of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). The high field strength elements and heavy rare earth elements show homogeneous and MORB-like characteristics. These observations indicate that the mantle wedge beneath northeastern Japan originally had a MORB-type mantle composition that was homogeneous across the arc. Pb isotope compositions show a mixing relationship between mantle wedge and oceanic sediments reflecting the introduction of subduction component into the mantle wedge, Across-arc isotopic variations were caused by interaction between MORB-type mantle wedge and the subducting slab, and the amount of subduction component correlates with the depth to the slab. The isotopic compositions of subduction component are expressed by bulk mixing of 15 wt % of oceanic sediment and 85 wt % of altered MORB. Inversion analyses of isotopic compositions using two-component mixing relationships show that the Sr/Nd and Pb/Nd ratios in subduction component decrease with increasing depth to the slab, while the Sr/Pb ratio is nearly constant. These changes can be explained only by a preferential discharge of the elements into the wedge mantle associated with continuous dehydration of the subducting slab. The present study further demonstrates that a very wide range of isotopic and elemental compositions in island arc magmas is a consequence of the interaction between subducting slab and mantle wedge without the involvement of an oceanic island basalts component, and the slab can carry water and supply a subduction component as a fluid to the overlying mantle wedge to depths exceeding 150 km.

  18. Paleoproterozoic arc basalt-boninite-high magnesian andesite-Nb enriched basalt association from the Malangtoli volcanic suite, Singhbhum Craton, eastern India: Geochemical record for subduction initiation to arc maturation continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanikanta Singh, M.; Manikyamba, C.; Ganguly, Sohini; Ray, Jyotisankar; Santosh, M.; Dhanakumar Singh, Th.; Chandan Kumar, B.

    2017-02-01

    The Singhbhum Craton of eastern India preserves distinct signatures of ultramafic-mafic-intermediate-felsic magmatism of diverse geodynamic affiliations spanning from Paleo-Mesoarchean to Proterozoic. Here we investigate the 2.25 Ga Malangtoli volcanic rocks that are predominantly clinopyroxene- and plagioclase-phyric, calc-alkaline in nature, display basalt-basaltic andesite compositions, and preserve geochemical signatures of subduction zone magmatism. Major, trace and rare earth element characteristics classify the Malangtoli volcanic rocks as arc basalts, boninites, high magnesian andesites (HMA) and Nb enriched basalts (NEB). The typical LILE enriched-HFSE depleted geochemical attributes of the arc basalts corroborate a subduction-related origin. The boninitic rocks have high Mg# (0.8), MgO (>25 wt.%), Ni and Cr contents, high Al2O3/TiO2 (>20), Zr/Hf and (La/Sm)N (>1) ratios with low (Gd/Yb)N (<1) ratio, TiO2, and Zr concentrations. The HMA samples are marked by moderate SiO2 (>54 wt.%), MgO (>6 wt.%), Mg# (0.47) with elevated Cr, Co, Ni and Th contents, depleted (Nb/Th)N, (Nb/La)N, high (Th/La)N and La/Yb (<9) ratio, moderate depletion in HREE and Y with low Sr/Y. The NEBs have higher Nb contents (6.3-24 ppm), lower magnitude of negative Nb anomalies with high (Nb/Th)pm = 0.28-0.59 and (Nb/La)pm = 0.40-0.69 and Nb/U = 2.8-34.4 compared to normal arc basalts [Nb = <2 ppm; (Nb/Th)pm = 0.10-1.19; (Nb/La)pm 0.17-0.99 and Nb/U = 2.2-44 respectively] and HMA. Arc basalts and boninites are interpreted to be the products of juvenile subduction processes involving shallow level partial melting of mantle wedge under hydrous conditions triggered by slab-dehydrated fluid flux. The HMA resulted through partial melting of mantle wedge metasomatized by slab-dehydrated fluids and sediments during the intermediate stage of subduction. Slab-melting and mantle wedge hybridization processes at matured stages of subduction account for the generation of NEB. Thus, the arc basalt

  19. Effects of Compositional Variation of Basalt on Subducting Slabs over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, B.; Shim, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    In much of Earth history, basaltic crust has been injected into the mantle due to its high density. In Archean, downwelling basaltic crust is thought to be much more mafic (Mg/Si=0.72) than that of the modern mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) (Mg/Si=0.25). This difference in composition may result in different behaviors of basaltic crust in the mantle with time. We have studied the two compositions of ancient basalt: x=0.8 (Mg/Si=0.72) and x=0.4 (Mg/Si=0.54). The former represents a composition at 3.5 Ga. The glass starting materials were mixed with gold (10 wt%) for internal pressure scale and loaded into the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (LHDAC) together with a Ne or Ar medium. We have conducted in-situ X-ray diffraction at APS up to 34 GPa and 2200 K. The recovered samples have been analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in aberration-corrected electron microscopy (ACEM) at ASU. The previous study of the modern MORB reported the post-garnet transition occurs at 26-27 GPa and 1800 K. The same transition was observed at a similar pressure range within 2 GPa for both compositions. The post-spinel transition was observed in x=0.8 at 24±2 GPa, while it does not exist in x=0.4 and modern MORB due to the absence of ringwoodite. At 34 GPa and 2200 K, mineralogy of x=0.8 consists of 82% of bridgmanite (bm), 16% of Ca perovskite (CaPv), and 2% of stishovite (stv), while the modern MORB consists of 30% of stv, 26% of CaPv, 23% of bm, and 22% of aluminous phases (in mole fraction). The mineralogy of x=0.4 is similar to x=0.8 with different proportions, but still different from that of modern MORB. The unit-cell volumes of quenched bm at 1 bar and 300 K for x=0.8 and 0.4 were 166.05(5) and 165.69(6) Å3, respectively, which are smaller than bm in modern MORB (170.0(1) Å3). At high pressures, the unit-cell volume of CaPv is greater in the x=0.4 and 0.8 compositions. The compositions of bm and CaPv in x=0.8 show less Al, but more Mg than those found in

  20. The Oxidation State of Global Subduction Zone Basalts and its Relationship to Volatiles, Magmatic Processes, and Source Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.

    2008-12-01

    Oxidation state is a central variable in magmatic systems. In subduction zones, the mantle wedge is exposed to hydrous fluids from an oxidized subducting plate, potentially driving a fundamental shift in the oxidation states of arc and back-arc basin magmas and their sources. Despite its importance, however, magmatic oxidation state and its relationship to conditions in the mantle source can be difficult to constrain. Here, we present new, in-situ μ-XANES analyses of Fe+3/ΣFe ratios, as an indicator of melt oxidation state, in natural, primitive pillow glasses from the Mariana, Lau, and Manus back-arc basins (MgO>6 wt.%; n=31) and a global suite of olivine-hosted arc melt inclusions (MI; MgO>4 wt.%; n=16). These new data show that back-arc basin basalts preserve Fe+3/ΣFe ratios of 0.14-0.21, more oxidized than MORB (Fe+3/ΣFe=0.11-0.17), and arc basalts range to even higher ratios of 0.17-0.36. Analysis of MI equilibrium with host olivine compositions indicates that either post-entrapment crystallization or outward Fe+2 diffusion may have occurred in the MI's studied, but the magnitude of these effects is small (9±5% change in FeO; see also Cottrell & Kelley, this mtg.). Coupled with new and existing major element, volatile (H2O±CO2, S, Cl, F), and trace element data, we also test the variation of melt oxidation state with indicators of extent of crystal fractionation and of mantle source composition. The arc and back-arc glasses capture a full range of natural, undegassed magmatic H2O concentrations (0.1-5.3 wt.%), and show a general, global increase in Fe+3/ΣFe with increasing H2O content, although the Mariana trough defines a trend distinct from the Manus and Lau basins. The Fe+3/ΣFe ratio does not correlate with Mg#, suggesting that the melt oxidation states are not controlled by the extent of crystal fractionation. In the Mariana trough, Fe+3/ΣFe does increase with increasing Ba and Sr concentrations, suggesting a direct link between melt oxidation

  1. No slab-derived CO2 in Mariana Trough back-arc basalts: Implications for carbon subduction and for temporary storage of CO2 beneath slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, Colin G.; Hilton, David R.; Hammerschmidt, Konrad

    2010-11-01

    The Southern Mariana Trough is particularly well suited to study mass balance in subduction zones because the flux of material recycled from the subducted slab has been shown to diminish to negligible levels in the southernmost part of the area. We present new He and Ar concentration and isotopic data for 16 back-arc basaltic glasses and combine these with previously published CO2 and H2O concentration and δ13C data to explore the recycling of carbon and light noble gases in the Mariana back arc. Degassing has affected all samples and is particularly extensive in more water-rich samples, i.e., those containing the largest recycled component. The degassing history features three stages: (1) deep degassing which commenced when the melt reached saturation of CO2 and noble gases in the mantle, (2) preeruptive degassing during storage in the crust-mantle transition zone which involved addition of extraneous CO2 to the vapor phase, and (3) eruption. CO2 released during stage 1 was, at least partially, incorporated into wall rock and subsequently remobilized during stage 2 degassing of later magma batches. Reconstructed parental values for 3He/4He, δ13C, CO2/3He, and CO2/40Ar* are indistinguishable from those of mid-ocean ridge basalt. This implies that there is negligible recycling of subducted carbon, helium, or argon into the source of Mariana Trough basalt.

  2. Subduction zone mantle enrichment by fluids and Zr-Hf-depleted crustal melts as indicated by backarc basalts of the Southern Volcanic Zone, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Paul M.; Søager, Nina; Alfastsen, Mads; Bertotto, Gustavo W.

    2016-10-01

    We aim to identify the components metasomatizing the mantle above the subducting Nazca plate under part of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ). We present new major and ICP-MS trace element and Sr, Nd and high-precision Pb isotope analyses of primitive olivine-phyric alkali basalts from the Northern Segment Volcanic Field, part of the Payenia province in the backarc of the Transitional SVZ. One new 40Ar-39Ar age determination confirms the Late Pleistocene age of this most northerly part of the province. All analysed rocks have typical subduction zone type incompatible element enrichment, and the rocks of the Northern Segment, together with the neighbouring Nevado Volcanic Field, have isotopic compositions intermediate between adjacent Transitional SVZ arc rocks and southern Payenia OIB-type basaltic rocks. Modelling the Ba-Th-Sm variation we demonstrate that fluids as well as 1-2% melts of upper continental crust (UCC) enriched their mantle sources, and La-Nb-Sm variations additionally indicate that the pre-metasomatic sources ranged from strongly depleted to undepleted mantle. Low Eu/Eu* and Sr/Nd also show evidence for a UCC component in the source. The contribution of Chile Trench sediments to the magmas seems insignificant. The Zr/Sm and Hf/Sm ratios are relatively low in many of the Northern Segment rocks, ranging down to 17 and 0.45, respectively, which, together with relatively high Th/U, is argued to indicate that the metasomatizing crustal melts were derived by partial melting of subducted UCC that had residual zircon, in contrast to the UCC melts added to Transitional SVZ arc magmas. Mixing between depleted and undepleted mantle, enriched by UCC and fluids, is suggested by Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes of the Northern Segment and Nevado magmas. The metasomatized undepleted mantle south of the Northern Segment is suggested to be part of upwelling OIB-type mantle, whereas the pre-metasomatically depleted mantle also can be found as a component in some arc

  3. A Strongly Calc-alkaline Suite in the Midst of the Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province: Implications for Generating the Calc-alkaline Trend Without Subduction Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-Miocene lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics (SV), distributed over 3,400 km2 in NE Oregon, comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The volcanic suite is mainly composed of calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, yet tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The SV lies in the heart of nearly coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province of the Pacific Northwest. The unique combination of strongly CA rocks of the SV in a non-subduction setting provide an excellent opportunity to study controls on inducing CA evolution in the midst of a TH province and independent of processes taking places at an active subduction zone. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate CA basaltic andesites to andesites of the SV erupted at least from 14.78±0.13 Ma to 12.44±0.12 Ma demonstrating that CA magmatism of the SV was ongoing during the eruptions of the tholeiitic Wanapum Basalt member of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). This range will likely be extended to even older ages in the future because existent age dates did not include samples from near the base of the SV. Thickness of intermediate lavas flows of the SV range from 15 m to as thin as 2 m and lavas are characterized by mostly phenocryst poor lithologies. When phenocrysts are abundant they are very small suggesting growth late during eruption. Single lava flow sections can include on the order of 30 conformable flows, testifying to a vigorous eruption history. The thickest andesitic sections are located in the glacially carved mountains of the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness (i.e. Strawberry Mountain, High Lake, and Slide Lake) where several vent complexes are exposed, which are delineated by dikes and plugs with finely interlocking plutonic textures, cross-cutting SV lava flows. Dikes generally strike NW-SE. Subtle variations in major and trace element compositions exist between TH and CA lavas of the SV. The CA lavas of the SV are

  4. The effect of anhydrite saturation on the fate of sulfur during fluid-present melting of subducting basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jego, S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2012-12-01

    The apparent sulfur enrichment of sub-arc mantle is thought to derive from an oxidized downgoing slab, and it has been suggested that the slab-derived sulfate species is responsible for oxidizing the mantle wedge [1]. However, the conditions and extent of sulfur transfer from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge are poorly understood. In particular, the relative mobility of sulfur as a function of oxygen fugacity (fO2) is unconstrained at sub-arc depths. To add to our recent study on sulfur mobility during fluid-present melting of a sulfide-bearing basaltic crust [2], here we constrain the fate of sulfur during similar melting at relatively oxidizing conditions, i.e., at sulfate saturation. Experiments were performed using a piston cylinder device at P = 2-3 GPa, T = 950-1050 °C. A synthetic MORB + 6.8 wt.% H2O doped with 1 wt% S (added as pyrite) was contained in AuPd inner capsules and hematite-magnetite (HM: ~FMQ+3.9 to +4.6) mixture used as fO2 buffer was housed in Pt outer capsules, following the recently proposed design of ref. [3]. Sulfur concentration in quenched silicate glasses, the major element phase compositions, and fO2 of the experiments based on dissolved Fe contents in AuPd and added Pt sensor [4, 5], were determined using EPMA. All experiments contain silicate melt, cpx, garnet, anhydrite, rutile and/or Ti-magnetite, and are fluid saturated. The partial melt compositions are rhyolitic to rhyodacitic with increasing T and melting degree. Sulfur contents in the melt range from ~700 to 3000 ppm, and increase with increasing P and T, in agreement with published SCAS models [6, 7]. Mass balance calculations show that the proportion of sulfur dissolved in silicate melt can be >13% of the bulk sulfur at 1050 °C. However, at slab surface (<900 °C), the major part of the bulk sulfur present in the slab is dissolved in the aqueous fluid phase, the rest being stored as anhydrite crystals. Moreover, our results suggest that sulfur partition coefficient

  5. Early Late Triassic Subduction in the Northern Branch of Neotethys?: Petrological and Paleontological Constraints from the middle Carnian basalts in the Lycian Nappes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayit, K.; Göncüoglu, M. C.; Tekin, U. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Lycian Nappes, SW Anatolia, are represented by a stack of thrust sheets derived from the northern branch of Neotethys (i.e. Izmir-Ankara Ocean) and the northern margin of the Tauride-Anatolide platform. The Turunç Unit, which is now preserved within a tectonic slice of the Lycian Nappes, includes among others the Neotethys-derived basalt blocks with pelagic intra-pillow carbonate infillings of middle Carnian age (early Late Triassic). Here, we focus on the geochemistry of the Turunç basalts to shed light into their petrogenetic evolution within the Neotethyan framework. Immobile trace element systematics indicate that the Turunç lavas are sub-alkaline basalts, with geochemical signatures resembling to those generated above subduction zones. Detailed examination of the Turunç volcanics reveals two chemical groups. Both groups are variably enriched in Th and La relative to Nb, and exhibit depleted Zr and Hf contents relative to N-MORB. Of the two groups, however, Group 2 is more enriched in Th, but with a similar Nb content, which results in higher Th/Nb ratios (0.21-0.27) compared to those of Group 1 (0.08-0.11). Both groups reflect similar REE systematics; they display marked enrichment in LREE relative to HREE ([La/Yb]N = 4.8-8.9). Trace element characteristics of the Turunç basalts indicate that their mantle source has been modified by slab-derived component(s). Taking into account that the Turunc Unit includes no continent-derived detritus, we suggest that the Turunç lavas represent fragments of a Late Triassic island arc formed on the Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere. This may further imply that the Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere had already been formed by the early Late Triassic, thus suggesting a pre-early Late Triassic oceanization of the northern branch of Neotethys.

  6. Basalts erupted along the Tongan fore arc during subduction initiation: Evidence from geochronology of dredged rocks from the Tonga fore arc and trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meffre, Sebastian; Falloon, Trevor J.; Crawford, Tony J.; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Duncan, Robert A.; Bloomer, Sherman H.; Wright, Dawn J.

    2012-12-01

    A wide variety of different rock types were dredged from the Tonga fore arc and trench between 8000 and 3000 m water depths by the 1996 Boomerang voyage. 40Ar-39Ar whole rock and U-Pb zircon dating suggest that these fore arc rocks were erupted episodically from the Cretaceous to the Pliocene (102 to 2 Ma). The geochemistry suggests that MOR-type basalts and dolerites were erupted in the Cretaceous, that island arc tholeiites were erupted in the Eocene and that back arc basin and island arc tholeiite and boninite were erupted episodically after this time. The ages generally become younger northward suggesting that fore arc crust was created in the south at around 48-52 Ma and was extended northward between 35 and 28 Ma, between 9 and 15 Ma and continuing to the present-day. The episodic formation of the fore arc crust suggested by this data is very different to existing models for fore arc formation based on the Bonin-Marianas arc. The Bonin-Marianas based models postulate that the basaltic fore arc rocks were created between 52 and 49 Ma at the beginning of subduction above a rapidly foundering west-dipping slab. Instead a model where the 52 Ma basalts that are presently in a fore arc position were created in the arc-back arc transition behind the 57-35 Ma Loyalty-Three Kings arc and placed into a fore arc setting after arc reversal following the start of collision with New Caledonia is proposed for the oldest rocks in Tonga. This is followed by growth of the fore arc northward with continued eruption of back arc and boninitic magmas after that time.

  7. Hf-Nd Isotopes in West Philippine Basin Basalts: Results from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site U1438 and Implications for the Early History of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Subduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Hocking, B.; Bizimis, M.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Ishizuka, O.; Bogus, K.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Drilling at IODP Site U1438, located immediately west of Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), the site of IBM subduction initiation, penetrated 1460 m of volcaniclastic sedimentary rock and 150 m of underlying basement. Biostratigraphic controls indicate a probable age for the oldest sedimentary rocks at around 55 Ma (51-64 Ma - Arculus et al., Nat Geosci in-press). This is close to the 48-52 Ma time period of IBM subduction initiation, based on studies in the forearc. There, the first products of volcanism are tholeiitic basalts termed FAB (forearc basalt), which are more depleted than average MORB and show subtle indicators of subduction geochemical enrichment (Reagan et al., 2010 - Geochem Geophy Geosy). Shipboard data indicate that Site U1438 basement basalts share many characteristics with FABs, including primitive major elements (high MgO/FeO*) and strongly depleted incompatible element patterns (Ti, Zr, Ti/V and Zr/Y below those of average MORB). Initial results thus indicate that FAB geochemistry may have been produced not only in the forearc, but also in backarc locations (west of the KPR) at the time of subduction initiation. Hf-Nd isotopes for Site 1438 basement basalts show a significant range of compositions from ɛNd of 7.0 to 9.5 and ɛHf of 14.5 to 19.8 (present-day values). The data define a well-correlated and steep array in Hf-Nd isotope space. Relatively radiogenic Hf compared to Nd indicates an Indian Ocean-type MORB source, but the dominant signature, with ɛHf >16.5, is more radiogenic than most Indian MORB. The pattern through time is from more-to-less radiogenic and more variable Hf-Nd isotopes within the basement section. This pattern culminates in basaltic andesite sills, which intrude the lower parts of the sedimentary section. The sills have the least radiogenic compositions measured so far (ɛNd ~6.6, ɛHf ~13.8), and are similar to those of boninites of the IBM forearc and modern IBM arc and reararc rocks. The pattern within the basement

  8. Paleo-Asian oceanic subduction-related modification of the lithospheric mantle under the North China Craton: evidence from peridotite xenoliths in the Datong basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Liu, Y.; Min, N.; Zong, K.; Hu, Z.; Gao, S.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ major and trace elements and Sr isotopic compositions of peridotite xenoliths carried by the Datong Quaternary alkaline basalt were analyzed. These peridotite xenoliths were classified into three groups. The type 1 peridotites preserve depleted trace element and Sr isotopic signatures and record the lowest temperature (930 - 980 °C). Clinopyroxenes in these peridotites exhibit LREE-depleted REE patterns, and have the lowest 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70243 - 0.70411. The types 2 and 3 peridotites are featured by enriched trace element and Sr isotopic signatures and record a higher temperature (1003 - 1032 °C). Clinopyroxenes in the type 2 peridotite have U-shaped REE patterns and relatively higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70418 - 0.70465. Clinopyroxenes in the type 3 peridotite have concave-downward REE patterns and unusually high 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70769 - 0.70929. Carbonatitic veinlets are found in the type 1 peridotites. They show steep LREE-enriched REE patterns with enrichments in LILE and depletions in HFSE, and have the highest 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.71147 - 0.71285. The types 2 and 3 peridotites suffered latter cryptic carbonatitic metasomatism, as indicated by the decreased Ti/Eu and increased Zr/Hf and CaO/Al2O3 ratios of clinopyroxenes. The carbonatitic veinlets have generally consistent trace element patterns and Sr isotopic ratios with the calculated melts being equilibrated with the clinopyroxenes in the type 3 peridotite, and may represent the metasoamtic agent solidified in the relatively cold and shallow mantle. The negative Eu anomalies (0.37 - 0.61) and high 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the calculated melts indicate a crustal sedimentary origin. It is speculated that the REE-rich and high-87Sr/86Sr metasoamtic agent should be carbonatitic melt derived from the carbonated pelite carried by the subducted PAOP, which could have contributed to the transformation of the lithospheric mantle beneath the NCC.

  9. Devonian Nb-enriched basalts and andesites of north-central Tibet: Evidence for the early subduction of the Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the North Qiangtang Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongrui; Yang, Tiannan; Hou, Zengqian; Bian, Yeke

    2016-07-01

    The early evolution of the Tethyan Ocean in north-central Tibet is currently poorly constrained. A sequence of volcanic rocks ranging from basic to intermediate in composition has been identified in the Zaduo area of the North Qiangtang Block. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircons from a sample of Zaduo andesite suggests an eruption age of Late Devonian ( 380 Ma). The Zaduo volcanic rocks exhibit geochemical characteristics similar to those of typical Nb-enriched basalts, with relatively high Nb, Ta, and Zr contents, resulting in high Nb/La ratios (0.70-1.08) and Nb/U ratios (10.57-34.37). The relative enrichment in high field strength elements, together with positive εNd(t) values of + 4.6 to + 5.8 and low (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios of 0.70367-0.70532, indicates the Zaduo volcanic rocks were derived from a depleted mantle source metasomatized by silicate melts of a subducted oceanic slab. The occurrence of Nb-enriched volcanic rocks in the North Qiangtang Block suggests that the subduction of Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust was initiated in the Late Devonian. Available geochronological data from ophiolites surrounding the North Qiangtang Block suggest that the subducted slab is most likely the Longmucuo-Shuanghu Paleo-Tethyan oceanic crust.

  10. Geochemical variations in Japan Sea back-arc basin basalts formed by high-temperature adiabatic melting of mantle metasomatized by sediment subduction components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Yuka; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Senda, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toshiro; Chang, Qing; Vaglarov, Bogdan S.; Sato, Takeshi; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2015-05-01

    The Yamato Basin in the Japan Sea is a back-arc basin characterized by basaltic oceanic crust that is twice as thick as typical oceanic crust. Two types of ocean floor basalts, formed during the opening of the Japan Sea in the Middle Miocene, were recovered from the Yamato Basin during Ocean Drilling Program Legs 127/128. These can be considered as depleted (D-type) and enriched (E-type) basalts based on their incompatible trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions. Both types of basalts plot along a common mixing array drawn between depleted mantle and slab sediment represented by a sand-rich turbidite on the Pacific Plate in the NE Japan fore arc. The depleted nature of the D-type basalts suggests that the slab sediment component is nil to minor relative to the dominant mantle component, whereas the enrichment of all incompatible elements in the E-type basalts was likely caused by a large contribution of bulk slab sediment in the source. The results of forward model calculations using adiabatic melting of a hydrous mantle with sediment flux indicate that the melting conditions of the source mantle for the D-type basalts are deeper and hotter than those for the E-type basalts, which appear to have formed under conditions hotter than those of normal mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB). These results suggest that the thicker oceanic crust was formed by greater degrees of melting of a hydrous metasomatized mantle source at unusually high mantle potential temperature during the opening of the Japan Sea.

  11. Understanding cratonic flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Paul G.; Behn, Mark D.; Kelley, Katherine; Schmitz, Mark; Savage, Brian

    2006-05-01

    The origin of continental flood basalts has been debated for decades. These eruptions often produce millions of cubic kilometers of basalt on timescales of only a million years. Although flood basalts are found in a variety of settings, no locale is more puzzling than cratonic areas such as southern Africa or the Siberian craton, where strong, thick lithosphere is breached by these large basaltic outpourings. Conventionally, flood basalts have been interpreted as melting events produced by one of two processes: 1) elevated temperatures associated with mantle plumes and/or 2) adiabatic-decompression melting associated with lithospheric thinning. In southern Africa, however, there are severe problems with both of these mechanisms. First, the rifting circumstances of several well-known basaltic outpourings clearly reflect lithospheric control rather than the influence of a deep-seated plume. Specifically, rift timing and magmatism are correlated with stress perturbations to the lithosphere associated with the formation of collisional rifts. Second, the substantial lithospheric thinning required for adiabatic decompression melting is inconsistent with xenolith evidence for the continued survival of thick lithosphere beneath flood basalt domains. As an alternative to these models, we propose a new two-stage model that interprets cratonic flood basalts not as melting events, but as short-duration drainage events that tap previously created sublithospheric reservoirs of molten basalt formed over a longer time scale. Reservoir creation/existence (Stage I) requires long-term (e.g. ≫ 1 Ma) supersolidus conditions in the sublithospheric mantle that could be maintained by an elevated equilibrium geotherm (appropriate for the Archean), a slow thermal perturbation (e.g. thermal blanketing or large-scale mantle upwelling), or a subduction-related increase in volatile content. The drainage event (Stage II) occurs in response to an abrupt stress change in the lithosphere, which

  12. Links between fluid circulation, temperature, and metamorphism in subducting slabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinelli, G.A.; Wang, K.

    2009-01-01

    The location and timing of metamorphic reactions in subducting lithosph??re are influenced by thermal effects of fluid circulation in the ocean crust aquifer. Fluid circulation in subducting crust extracts heat from the Nankai subduction zone, causing the crust to pass through cooler metamorphic faci??s than if no fluid circulation occurs. This fluid circulation shifts the basalt-to-eclogite transition and the associated slab dehydration 14 km deeper (35 km farther landward) than would be predicted with no fluid flow. For most subduction zones, hydrothermal cooling of the subducting slab will delay eclogitization relative to estimates made without considering fluid circulation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  14. Recycled dehydrated lithosphere observed in plume-influenced mid-ocean-ridge basalt.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jacqueline Eaby; Leist, Loretta; Langmuir, Charles; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2002-11-28

    A substantial uncertainty in the Earth's global geochemical water cycle is the amount of water that enters the deep mantle through the subduction and recycling of hydrated oceanic lithosphere. Here we address the question of recycling of water into the deep mantle by characterizing the volatile contents of different mantle components as sampled by ocean island basalts and mid-ocean-ridge basalts. Although all mantle plume (ocean island) basalts seem to contain more water than mid-ocean-ridge basalts, we demonstrate that basalts associated with mantle plume components containing subducted lithosphere--'enriched-mantle' or 'EM-type' basalts--contain less water than those associated with a common mantle source. We interpret this depletion as indicating that water is extracted from the lithosphere during the subduction process, with greater than 92 per cent efficiency.

  15. A late-Carboniferous to early early-Permian subduction-accretion complex in Daqing pasture, southeastern Inner Mongolia: Evidence of northward subduction beneath the Siberian paleoplate southern margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianfeng; Li, Jinyi; Chi, Xiaoguo; Qu, Junfeng; Hu, Zhaochu; Fang, Shu; Zhang, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    A subduction-accretion complex is identified from previously defined late-Carboniferous and early-Permian strata in Daqing pasture, southern Xiwuqi, Inner Mongolia. The subduction-accretion complex is composed of a matrix of siltstone and exotic blocks of bioclastic limestone, pillow basalt, foliated basalt, chert and asbestos. The pillow basalt possesses the geochemical characteristics of mid-ocean ridge basalt (N-MORB), whereas the foliated basalt displays the geochemical characteristics of island arc basalt (IAB), indicating that these basalts are of different origins. U-Pb (zircon) dating indicates that the foliated basalt formed in the late-Carboniferous (314.5 to 318.4 Ma) and the bioclastic limestone formed in the early early-Permian. Combined with regional geological data, the subduction-accretion complex and coeval calc-alkaline granitic belt to the north constitute the essential elements of the late-Carboniferous to early early-Permian subduction zone on the southern margin of the Siberian paleoplate. The zircon εHf(t) values of the foliated basalt are positive (+ 14.4 to + 23.9), suggesting that this basalt originated directly from depleted mantle. The temporal-spatial distribution of the subduction-accretion complex and ophiolite belts in southeastern Inner Mongolia indicates that there was significant lateral crustal growth on the southern margin of the Siberian paleoplate in the late Paleozoic.

  16. CO2 content of andesitic melts at graphite-saturated upper mantle conditions with implications for redox state of oceanic basalt source regions and remobilization of reduced carbon from subducted eclogite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, James; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2017-03-01

    We have performed experiments to determine the effects of pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity on the CO2 contents in nominally anhydrous andesitic melts at graphite saturation. The andesite composition was specifically chosen to match a low-degree partial melt composition that is generated from MORB-like eclogite in the convective, oceanic upper mantle. Experiments were performed at 1-3 GPa, 1375-1550 °C, and fO2 of FMQ -3.2 to FMQ -2.3 and the resulting experimental glasses were analyzed for CO2 and H2O contents using FTIR and SIMS. Experimental results were used to develop a thermodynamic model to predict CO2 content of nominally anhydrous andesitic melts at graphite saturation. Fitting of experimental data returned thermodynamic parameters for dissolution of CO2 as molecular CO2: ln( K 0) = -21.79 ± 0.04, Δ V 0 = 32.91 ± 0.65 cm3mol-1, Δ H 0 = 107 ± 21 kJ mol-1, and dissolution of CO2 as CO3 2-: ln (K 0 ) = -21.38 ± 0.08, Δ V 0 = 30.66 ± 1.33 cm3 mol-1, Δ H 0 = 42 ± 37 kJ mol-1, where K 0 is the equilibrium constant at some reference pressure and temperature, Δ V 0 is the volume change of reaction, and Δ H 0 is the enthalpy change of reaction. The thermodynamic model was used along with trace element partition coefficients to calculate the CO2 contents and CO2/Nb ratios resulting from the mixing of a depleted MORB and the partial melt of a graphite-saturated eclogite. Comparison with natural MORB and OIB data suggests that the CO2 contents and CO2/Nb ratios of CO2-enriched oceanic basalts cannot be produced by mixing with partial melts of graphite-saturated eclogite. Instead, they must be produced by melting of a source containing carbonate. This result places a lower bound on the oxygen fugacity for the source region of these CO2-enriched basalts, and suggests that fO2 measurements made on cratonic xenoliths may not be applicable to the convecting upper mantle. CO2-depleted basalts, on the other hand, are consistent with mixing between

  17. Evolution of the Archaean crust by delamination and shallow subduction.

    PubMed

    Foley, Stephen F; Buhre, Stephan; Jacob, Dorrit E

    2003-01-16

    The Archaean oceanic crust was probably thicker than present-day oceanic crust owing to higher heat flow and thus higher degrees of melting at mid-ocean ridges. These conditions would also have led to a different bulk composition of oceanic crust in the early Archaean, that would probably have consisted of magnesium-rich picrite (with variably differentiated portions made up of basalt, gabbro, ultramafic cumulates and picrite). It is unclear whether these differences would have influenced crustal subduction and recycling processes, as experiments that have investigated the metamorphic reactions that take place during subduction have to date considered only modern mid-ocean-ridge basalts. Here we present data from high-pressure experiments that show that metamorphism of ultramafic cumulates and picrites produces pyroxenites, which we infer would have delaminated and melted to produce basaltic rocks, rather than continental crust as has previously been thought. Instead, the formation of continental crust requires subduction and melting of garnet-amphibolite--formed only in the upper regions of oceanic crust--which is thought to have first occurred on a large scale during subduction in the late Archaean. We deduce from this that shallow subduction and recycling of oceanic crust took place in the early Archaean, and that this would have resulted in strong depletion of only a thin layer of the uppermost mantle. The misfit between geochemical depletion models and geophysical models for mantle convection (which include deep subduction) might therefore be explained by continuous deepening of this depleted layer through geological time.

  18. The thermal effect of fluid circulation in the subducting crust on slab melting in the Chile subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Glenn A.; Wada, Ikuko; He, Jiangheng; Perry, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fluids released from subducting slabs affect geochemical recycling and melt generation in the mantle wedge. The distribution of slab dehydration and the potential for slab melting are controlled by the composition/hydration of the slab entering a subduction zone and the pressure-temperature path that the slab follows. We examine the potential for along-strike changes in temperatures, fluid release, and slab melting for the subduction zone beneath the southern portion of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) in south central Chile. Because the age of the Nazca Plate entering the subduction zone decreases from ∼14 Ma north of the Guafo Fracture Zone to ∼6 Ma to the south, a southward warming of the subduction zone has been hypothesized. However, both north and south of Guafo Fracture Zone the geochemical signatures of southern SVZ arc lavas are similar, indicating 3-5 wt.% sediment melt and little to no contribution from melt of subducted basalt or aqueous fluids from subducted crust. We model temperatures in the system, use results of the thermal models and the thermodynamic calculation code Perple_X to estimate the pattern of dehydration-derived fluid release, and examine the potential locations for the onset of melting of the subducting slab. Surface heat flux observations in the region are most consistent with fluid circulation in the high permeability upper oceanic crust redistributing heat. This hydrothermal circulation preferentially cools the hottest parts of the system (i.e. those with the youngest subducting lithosphere). Models including the thermal effects of fluid circulation in the oceanic crust predict melting of the subducting sediment but not the basalt, consistent with the geochemical observations. In contrast, models that do not account for fluid circulation predict melting of both subducting sediment and basalt below the volcanic arc south of Guafo Fracture Zone. In our simulations with the effects of fluid circulation, the onset of sediment

  19. Crustal growth in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    There is a broad interest in understanding the physical principles leading to arc magmatisim at active continental margins and different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the composition and evolution of the continental crust. It is widely accepted that water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle allowing for "flux melting" of the hydrated mantle. However, relamination of subducted crustal material to the base of the continental crust has been recently suggested to account for the growth and composition of the continental crust. We use petrological-thermo-mechanical models of active subduction zones to demonstrate that subduction of crustal material to sublithospheric depth may result in the formation of a tectonic rock mélange composed of basalt, sediment and hydrated /serpentinized mantle. This rock mélange may evolve into a partially molten diapir at asthenospheric depth and rise through the mantle because of its intrinsic buoyancy prior to emplacement at crustal levels (relamination). This process can be episodic and long-lived, forming successive diapirs that represent multiple magma pulses. Recent laboratory experiments of Castro et al. (2013) have demonstrated that reactions between these crustal components (i.e. basalt and sediment) produce andesitic melt typical for rocks of the continental crust. However, melt derived from a composite diapir will inherit the geochemical characteristics of its source and show distinct temporal variations of radiogenic isotopes based on the proportions of basalt and sediment in the source (Vogt et al., 2013). Hence, partial melting of a composite diapir is expected to produce melt with a constant major element composition, but substantial changes in terms of radiogenic isotopes. However, crustal growth at active continental margins may also involve accretionary processes by which new material is added to the continental crust. Oceanic plateaus and other

  20. Geoscience: Subduction undone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Kip V.

    2017-03-01

    Rocks are subjected to increased pressure as they are buried during subduction. Contrary to general belief, a study suggests that peak pressures recorded in subducted rocks might not reflect their maximum burial depths.

  1. Metamorphic Perspectives of Subduction Zone Volatiles Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    Field study of HP/UHP metamorphic rocks provides "ground-truthing" for experimental and theoretical petrologic studies estimating extents of deep volatiles subduction, and provides information regarding devolatilization and deep subduction-zone fluid flow that can be used to reconcile estimates of subduction inputs and arc volcanic outputs for volatiles such as H2O, N, and C. Considerable attention has been paid to H2O subduction in various bulk compositions, and, based on calculated phase assemblages, it is thought that a large fraction of the initially structurally bound H2O is subducted to, and beyond, subarc regions in most modern subduction zones (Hacker, 2008, G-cubed). Field studies of HP/UHP mafic and sedimentary rocks demonstrate the impressive retention of volatiles (and fluid-mobile elements) to depths approaching those beneath arcs. At the slab-mantle interface, high-variance lithologies containing hydrous phases such as mica, amphibole, talc, and chlorite could further stabilize H2O to great depth. Trench hydration in sub-crustal parts of oceanic lithosphere could profoundly increase subduction inputs of particularly H2O, and massive flux of H2O-rich fluids from these regions into the slab-mantle interface could lead to extensive metasomatism. Consideration of sedimentary N concentrations and δ15N at ODP Site 1039 (Li and Bebout, 2005, JGR), together with estimates of the N concentration of subducting altered oceanic crust (AOC), indicates that ~42% of the N subducting beneath Nicaragua is returned in the corresponding volcanic arc (Elkins et al., 2006, GCA). Study of N in HP/UHP sedimentary and basaltic rocks indicates that much of the N initially subducted in these lithologies would be retained to depths approaching 100 km and thus available for addition to arcs. The more altered upper part of subducting oceanic crust most likely to contribute to arcs has sediment-like δ15NAir (0 to +10 per mil; Li et al., 2007, GCA), and study of HP/UHP eclogites

  2. Earth's first stable continents did not form by subduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tim E; Brown, Michael; Gardiner, Nicholas J; Kirkland, Christopher L; Smithies, R Hugh

    2017-03-09

    The geodynamic environment in which Earth's first continents formed and were stabilized remains controversial. Most exposed continental crust that can be dated back to the Archaean eon (4 billion to 2.5 billion years ago) comprises tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite rocks (TTGs) that were formed through partial melting of hydrated low-magnesium basaltic rocks; notably, these TTGs have 'arc-like' signatures of trace elements and thus resemble the continental crust produced in modern subduction settings. In the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia, low-magnesium basalts of the Coucal Formation at the base of the Pilbara Supergroup have trace-element compositions that are consistent with these being source rocks for TTGs. These basalts may be the remnants of a thick (more than 35 kilometres thick), ancient (more than 3.5 billion years old) basaltic crust that is predicted to have existed if Archaean mantle temperatures were much hotter than today's. Here, using phase equilibria modelling of the Coucal basalts, we confirm their suitability as TTG 'parents', and suggest that TTGs were produced by around 20 per cent to 30 per cent melting of the Coucal basalts along high geothermal gradients (of more than 700 degrees Celsius per gigapascal). We also analyse the trace-element composition of the Coucal basalts, and propose that these rocks were themselves derived from an earlier generation of high-magnesium basaltic rocks, suggesting that the arc-like signature in Archaean TTGs was inherited from an ancestral source lineage. This protracted, multistage process for the production and stabilization of the first continents-coupled with the high geothermal gradients-is incompatible with modern-style plate tectonics, and favours instead the formation of TTGs near the base of thick, plateau-like basaltic crust. Thus subduction was not required to produce TTGs in the early Archaean eon.

  3. Stability of hydrous phases in subducting oceanic crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Bohlen, S.R.; Ernst, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments in the basalt-H2O system at 600-950??C and 0.8-3.0 GPa, demonstrate that breakdown of amphibole represents the final dehydration of subducting oceanic tholeiite at T ??? 650??C; the dehydration H2O occurs as a free fluid or in silicate melt co-existing with an anhydrous eclogite assemblage. In contrast, about 0.5 wt% of H2O is stored in lawsonite at 600??C, 3.0 GPa. Our results suggest that slab melting occurs at depths shallower than 60 km for subducting young oceanic crust; along a subduction zone with an average thermal gradient higher than 7??C/km, H2O stored in hydrated low-potassium, metabasaltic layers cannot be subducted to depths greater than 100 km, then released to generate arc magma.

  4. Water sources for subduction zone volcanism: new experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Pawley, A R; Holloway, J R

    1993-04-30

    Despite its acknowledged importance, the role of water in the genesis of subduction zone volcanism is poorly understood. Amphibole dehydration in subducting oceanic crust at a single pressure is assumed to generate the water required for melting, but experimental constraints on the reaction are limited, and little attention has been paid to reactions involving other hydrous minerals. Experiments on an oceanic basalt at pressure-temperature conditions relevant to subducting slabs demonstrate that amphibole dehydration is spread over a depth interval of at least 20 kilometers. Reactions involving other hydrous minerals, including mica, epidote, chloritoid, and lawsonite, also release water over a wide depth interval, and in some subduction zones these phases may transport water to deep levels in the mantle.

  5. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  6. Water in Mantle Sources of Oceanic Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    This talk will review estimates of water partitioning during subduction as determined by studies of mantle- derived melts. A major uncertainty in the earth's water cycle is the effect of subduction and recycling of hydrated lithosphere on deep mantle water concentrations. The problem with quantifying the variablility of mantle volatiles is that their concentrations are easily modified by shallow crystallization and degassing processes. Careful examination of volatile data from submarine basalts is required to select only those that have not degassed water. For example, even basalts collected deep on a submarine rift zone are not immune because basaltic volcanoes that have breached the sea surface are like champagne bottles; once the cork is popped, the entire bottle goes flat (e.g., Dixon et al., 1991). Once degassing effects have been eliminated, mantle water concentrations show systematic variations. Mantle sources for mid-ocean ridge basalts contain about 120 ppm water, with the most depleted MORB end-member having about 60 ppm. Source regions for mantle plumes are wetter than MORB sources. The wettest mantle is found in plumes dominated by the "common mantle plume component" (FOZO; 700 to 800 ppm H2O, H2O /Ce=210 to 300). Mantle sources for plumes enriched in recycled lithosphere (EM1, EM2, LOMU, and HIMU) have about half as much water (300 to 400 ppm H2O) and lower ratios of water to similarly incompatible elements (H2O/Ce<=100). High H2O /Ce in FOZO plumes cannot be derived from recycled lithosphere; therefore, a significant amount of water must be juvenile, left over from planetary accretion. Thus, dehydration during subduction effectively partitions water into the exosphere (mantle wedge, crust, ocean, atmosphere) resulting in time-integrated depletion of water relative to other incompatible elements in recycled (deeply subducted) lithosphere and sediments and, ultimately, the majority of the mantle. These results are consistent with a global water cycle

  7. Decoupling of Pacific subduction zone guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction zone guided wave arrivals have been observed in many circum Pacific subduction zones and have been attributed to the presence of a low velocity layer (LVL) in the subducting slab. This LVL acts as a waveguide for the high frequency energy, while lower frequency energy is not retained and travels in the higher velocity surrounding mantle. This leads to the characteristic dispersion of seismic waves observed. The commonly accepted model for the LVL is the persistence of basaltic oceanic crust to a depth of greater than 150 km. This basaltic oceanic crust has not yet undergone phase transformation to eclogite due to kinetic hindering, and so still has a distinguishably lower velocity than the surrounding mantle. It has been shown that guided waves are only seen from events that occur in or near to the low velocity layer. Similarly it would be expected that guided waves are only seen when the receiver is on the wave guide. However in a subduction zone setting it has been shown that guided wave energy is decoupled from the waveguide, due to the bend of the slab (Martin et al., 2003). Therefore high frequency guided wave energy escapes the waveguide and so can be observed at receivers placed in specific positions on the overriding plate. This decoupling mechanism allows guided waves from intermediate and deep Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes to be observed. We use a two dimensional finite difference model to investigate the decoupling of wave guide energy due to the geometry of various Pacific subduction zones in order to predict the occurrence of guided wave arrivals along up-dip and along-strike propagation paths. The slab geometry is inferred from the USGS slab contour model slab 1.0. An explosive source is used so that frequency effects of the source do not complicate the results. The thickness of the LVL is inferred from published observations of Pacific subduction zone guided waves. For the along-strike profile we concentrate on the observations of guided

  8. Slab pull and the seismotectonics of subducting lithosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spence, William

    1987-01-01

    earthquakes of northern Japan. The slab pull model explains the lower layer of double seismic zones as due to tension from the deeper, sinking plate and the upper layer as due to localized in-plate compression, as plate motion is resisted by the bounding mantle. Just downdip of the interface thrust zone, there occurs an aseismic 20°–50° dip increase of subducted plate. This slab bend reflects the summed slab pull force of deeper plate and probably is at the crustal basalt to eclogite phase change. Resistance to subduction provided by a continually developing slab bend may be an important factor in the size of slab pull force delivered to an interface thrust zone.

  9. Role of the subduction filter in mantle recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, J. I.; Skora, S. E.; Gill, J.; Van Keken, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction modifies the descending basaltic and sedimentary oceanic crust and generates felsic arc materials and continental crust. Studies of element mass balances in the subduction zone therefore reveal the evolution of the Earth's two major geochemical reservoirs: the continent crust and mantle. We use the Arc Basalt Simulator ver.4 (ABS4) to model the geochemical mass balance during dehydration by prograde metamorphism and melting of the slab followed by subsequent flux melting of the wedge mantle caused by the addition of slab-derived liquids. The geochemistry of high-Mg andesite or adakite formed in a hot subduction zone is akin to the present-day bulk continental crust and to the Archean (>2 Ga) Tonalite-Trondjhemite-Granodiorite composition. Therefore, the residual slab and the metasomatized mantle wedge at hot subduction zones should be the most plausible sources for materials recycled back into the deep mantle. Model calculations of isotopic growth in the residual slab and mantle formed in hot subduction zones reproduce fairly well the EM1-FOZO-HIMU isotope arrays found in ocean island basalts (OIBs) of deep mantle plume origin, although FOZO with high 3He/4He is not generated by this slab recycling process. The recycled materials are bulk igneous ocean crust for HIMU and metasomatized mantle wedge peridotite for EM1. In contrast, the EM2-FOZO array can be generated in a cold subduction zone with igneous oceanic crust for FOZO and sediment for EM2 sources. Necessary residence time are ~2 Ga to form HIMU-FOZO-EM1 and ~1 Ga to form EM2-FOZO. The subducted oceanic crust (forming HIMU) and mantle wedge peridotite (forming EM1) may have travelled in the mantle together. They then melted together in an upwelling mantle plume to form the EM1-FOZO-HIMU isotopic variations found frequently in OIBs. In contrast, the less frequent EM2-FOZO array suggests a separate source and recycling path. These recycling ages are consistent with the change in the mantle potential

  10. Geochemical constraints on possible subduction components in lavas of Mayon and Taal Volcanoes, Southern Luzon, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castillo, P.R.; Newhall, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Mayon is the most active volcano along the east margin of southern Luzon, Philippines. Petrographic and major element data indicate that Mayon has produced a basaltic to andesitic lava series by fractional crystallization and magma mixing. Trace element data indicate that the parental basalts came from a heterogeneous mantle source. The unmodified composition of the mantle wedge is similar to that beneath the Indian Ocean. To this mantle was added a subduction component consisting of melt from subducted pelagic sediment and aqueous fluid dehydrated from the subducted basaltic crust. Lavas from the highly active Taal Volcano on the west margin of southern Luzon are compositionally more variable than Mayon lavas. Taal lavas also originated from a mantle wedge metasomatized by aqueous fluid dehydrated from the subducted basaltic crust and melt plus fluid derived from the subducted terrigenous sediment. More sediment is involved in the generation of Taal lavas. Lead isotopes argue against crustal contamination. Some heterogeneity of the unmodified mantle wedge and differences in whether the sediment signature is transferred into the lava source through an aqueous fluid or melt phase are needed to explain the regional compositional variation of Philippine arc lavas. ?? Oxford University Press 2004; all rights reserved.

  11. Melt Inclusions as Windows on Subduction Zone Processes - A Retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.

    2002-12-01

    A.T. (Fred) Anderson, in a series of papers in the interval 1972-1984, presented evidence from melt inclusions for high dissolved water and Cl concentrations in many subduction zone basalts through andesites. His observations, subsequently shown to be correct, were not widely accepted because (1) phase equilibrium experiments on Paricutin and Mount Hood andesites indicated moderate water concentrations, and some workers reasoned that potentially parental basalts would have been drier still, (2) common basalts lack hydrous phenocrysts, and (3) water content estimates were indirect (water-by-difference) or involved difficult, unfamiliar measurements (single inclusion manometry) and thus were discounted. Subsequent development of techniques for the direct and precise measurement of water and CO2 in melt inclusions (SIMS, FTIR), new hydrous phase-equilibrium studies on arc basalts through rhyolites, and wider appreciation of the diversity of arc magmatic suites changed this situation. Melt inclusion evidence shows that subduction zone basalts can have pre-eruptive dissolved water concentrations as high as ~6 wt% (Sisson and Layne 1993 EPSL; Roggensack et al. 1997 Science), confirming predictions from phase-equilibrium experiments (Sisson and Grove 1993a,b CMP), and supporting the now standard model of water-fluxed melting to drive arc magmatism. An important discovery, presaged in the original Anderson data, is that there is a wide range of pre-eruptive water contents in arc basalts, with some as dry as MORB (Sisson and Bronto 1998 Nature). Nearly dry arc basalts can erupt at the volcanic front (Galunggung, Java) and sporadically along the arc axis over distances of hundreds of km (Cascades, USA), in some cases in proximity to demonstrably water-rich magmatic centers (Mt. Shasta, Crater Lake). To produce dry primitive basalts requires upwelling and pressure-release melting of peridotite in the mantle wedge at temperatures (~1300° C) well above those predicted by

  12. Subduction-derived solute-rich fluid contributions to lavas of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaGatta, A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Martin, A.; Carrasco-Nunez, G.; Cai, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Comparison of the chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of calcalkaline lavas of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), with subducted sediments (DSDP Site 487) and East Pacific Rise (EPR) basalts, elucidates the effects of solute rich fluids from the subducted ocean crust and sediments on volcanic front lavas. DSDP Site 487 contains a lower unit of hydrothermally affected Mn-rich sediment, and an upper unit of terrigenous detritus. Both sediment types and the subducted EPR basalts have chemical and isotopic distinctions that can be traced to the TMVB lavas, despite the thick continental crust. All these subduction components contribute across the arc, and they contribute most of the Pb and Sr (~50-80%) in the calcalkaline lavas. However, there is an along-arc variation in their contributions. In the western TMVB (e.g. Colima) an aqueous rich melt from subducted EPR basalt predominates (characterized by high Pb/Ce and low Pb and Sr isotope ratios). The central and eastern TMVB (Toluca to Pico de Orizaba) also sees the influence of an aqueous rich melt mixture from the Mn-rich sediment (characterized by high Pb/Ce and high seawater-like Sr isotope ratios, and low Sr isotope ratios), along with increasing contributions eastward from terrigenous sediment (showing higher Pb isotope ratios). Crustal assimilation also becomes more important eastwards (especially in Pico de Orizaba), but never masks the subduction contributions. The Mexican subduction component shows the fluid-mobile (e.g. Sr and Pb) and immobile LILE elements (e.g. Th and La) moving together in their enrichment, suggesting the nature of this component is a solute rich fluid or hydrous silicate melt. Alkali basalts in the TMVB showing 'ocean island basalt-like' trace element patterns for most elements are another important end member for TMVB lavas. The calcalkaline lavas appear to be mixtures of components from the subduction package and the depleted melt-residues of these (high Nb) alkali basalts

  13. Shallow subduction, ridge subduction, and the evolution of continental lithosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Helmstaedt, H.; Dixon, J.M.; Farrar, E.; Carmichael, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere beneath continental crust at a shallow angle has occurred throughout the Phanerozoic Eon. Ridge subduction often follows shallow subduction and causes bimodal volcanism and crustal rifting, forming back-arc basins. Recent models for Archean plate tectonics propose very fast rates of spreading (400-800 km/Ma) and convergence, and sinking rates comparable to or slower (<10 km/Ma) than those of today. As faster convergence and slower sinking correspond to subduction at shallower angles, shallow subduction and ridge subduction must have been ubiquitous during the Archean permobile regime. This is compatible with a back-arc-basin origin for Archean greenstone belts. The common coexistence of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline igneous rocks in Archean greenstone belts, also implies ridge subduction. The authors envisage a transition, between 2.4 and 1.8 Ga., from a regime dominated by shallow subduction and repeated ridge subduction to one of normal plate tectonics with steeper subduction. Spreading rates decreased; continental plates became larger and stable shelves could develop at trailing margins. Shallow subduction became the exception, restricted to episodes of abnormally fast convergence; nevertheless, the long span of post-Archean time makes it unlikely that any part of the continental crust has escaped shallow subduction and ridge subduction. These processes recycle much volatile-rich oceanic crust into the sub-continental upper mantle, thereby underplating the crust, effecting upper-mantle metasomatism and affecting intraplate magmatism.

  14. Voluminous granitic magmas from common basaltic sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Ratajeski, K.; Hankins, W.B.; Glazner, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Granitic-rhyolitic liquids were produced experimentally from moderately hydrous (1.7-2.3 wt% H2O) medium-to-high K basaltic compositions at 700 MPa and f O2 controlled from Ni-NiO -1.3 to +4. Amount and composition of evolved liquids and coexisting mineral assemblages vary with fO2 and temperature, with melt being more evolved at higher fO2s, where coexisting mineral assemblages are more plagioclase- and Fe-Ti oxide-rich and amphibole-poor. At fO2 of Ni-NiO +1, typical for many silicic magmas, the samples produce 12-25 wt% granitic-rhyolitic liquid, amounts varying with bulk composition. Medium-to-high K basalts are common in subduction-related magmatic arcs, and near-solidus true granite or rhyolite liquids can form widely, and in geologically significant quantities, by advanced crystallization-differentiation or by low-degree partial remelting of mantle-derived basaltic sources. Previously differentiated or weathered materials may be involved in generating specific felsic magmas, but are not required for such magmas to be voluminous or to have the K-rich granitic compositions typical of the upper continental crust. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  15. Continental crustal formation and recycling: Evidence from oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, A. D.; Tarney, J.; Norry, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the wealth of geochemical data for subduction-related magma types, and the clear importance of such magmas in the creation of continental crust, there is still no concensus about the relative magnitudes of crustal creation versus crustal destruction (i.e., recycling of crust into the mantle). The role of subducted sediment in the formation of the arc magmas is now well documented; but what proportion of sediment is taken into the deeper mantle? Integrated isotopic and trace element studies of magmas erupted far from presently active subduction zones, in particular basaltic rocks erupted in the ocean basins, are providing important information about the role of crustal recycling. By identifying potential chemical tracers, it is impossible to monitor the effects of crustal recycling, and produce models predicting the mass of material recycled into the mantle throughout long periods of geological time.

  16. 3D Numerical simulations of oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, C.; Gerya, T.; Scambelluri, M.; Crispini, L.; Federico, L.; Capponi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the past 2D numerical studies (e.g. Gerya et al., 2002; Gorczyk et al., 2007; Malatesta et al., 2012) provided evidence that during intraoceanic subduction a serpentinite channel forms above the downgoing plate. This channel forms as a result of hydration of the mantle wedge by uprising slab-fluids. Rocks buried at high depths are finally exhumed within this buoyant low-viscosity medium. Convergence rate in these 2D models was described by a trench-normal component of velocity. Several present and past subduction zones worldwide are however driven by oblique convergence between the plates, where trench-normal motion of the subducting slab is coupled with trench-parallel displacement of the plates. Can the exhumation mechanism and the exhumation rates of high-pressure rocks be affected by the shear component of subduction? And how uprise of these rocks can vary along the plate margin? We tried to address these questions performing 3D numerical models that simulate an intraoceanic oblique subduction. The models are based on thermo-mechanical equations that are solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010). In most of the models a narrow oceanic basin (500 km-wide) surrounded by continental margins is depicted. The basin is floored by either layered or heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere with gabbro as discrete bodies in serpentinized peridotite and a basaltic layer on the top. A weak zone in the mantle is prescribed to control the location of subduction initiation and therefore the plate margins geometry. Finally, addition of a third dimension in the simulations allowed us to test the role of different plate margin geometries on oblique subduction dynamics. In particular in each model we modified the dip angle of the weak zone and its "lateral" geometry (e.g. continuous, segmented). We consider "continuous" weak zones either parallel or increasingly moving away from the continental margins

  17. Inside the Subduction Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, John

    Subduction zones helped nucleate and grow the continents, they fertilize and lubricate the earth's interior, they are the site of most subaerial volcanism and many major earthquakes, and they yield a large fraction of the earth's precious metals. They are obvious targets for study—almost anything you learn is likely to impact important problems—yet arriving at a general understanding is notoriously difficult: Each subduction zone is distinct, differing in some important aspect from other subduction zones; fundamental aspects of their mechanics and igneous processes differ from those in other, relatively well-understood parts of the earth; and there are few direct samples of some of their most important metamorphic and metasomatic processes. As a result, even first-order features of subduction zones have generated conflict and apparent paradox. A central question about convergent margins, for instance—how vigorous magmatism can occur where plates sink and the mantle cools—has a host of mutually inconsistent answers: Early suggestions that magmatism resulted from melting subducted crust have been emphatically disproved and recently just as emphatically revived; the idea that melting is fluxed by fluid released from subducted crust is widely held but cannot explain the temperatures and volatile contents of many arc magmas; generations of kinematic and dynamic models have told us the mantle sinks at convergent margins, yet strong evidence suggests that melting there is often driven by upwelling. In contrast, our understanding ofwhy volcanoes appear at ocean ridges and "hotspots"—although still presenting their own chestnuts—are fundamentally solved problems.

  18. Petrogenesis of pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Chun; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-04-01

    .9-21.0 versus 26.0-33.5), and Dy/Yb (~2.7 versus 2.97-3.62) with higher Lu/Hf (~0.056 versus ~0.045). Based on model calculations, the eastern Guangdong basalts represent mixtures containing large proportions (> 90%) of melt generated by < 2% melting from a source with residual garnet and small proportions (< 10%) of low degree melts (< 1%) from spinel lherzolite. The Baolai basalts are explained as involving higher proportions (10-20%) of melt from spinel lherzolite by higher degrees (2-3%) of partial melting. The unusually high Nb/La ratio of > 1.6 in the Baolai basalts is best explained as reflecting a component in the recycled dehydrated residues, indicating derivation from asthenospheric mantle source that involves subduction components. It is inferred that the subduction components are associated with the subduction of paleo-Pacific Ocean. If this is the case, a relatively high mantle circulation rate (i.e., 1 cm/yr; Wang et al., 2013) is required. Smith and Lewis (2007), International Geology Review 49, 1-13. Wang et al. (2013), Earth and Planetary Science Letters 377-378, 248-259.

  19. Pliocene Basaltic Volcanism in The East Anatolia Region (EAR), Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    East Anatolia Region (EAR) is one of the high Plateau which is occurred with north-south compressional regime formed depending on continent-continent collision between Eurasia and Arabia plates (Şengör and Kidd, 1979). Recent studies have revealed that last oceanic lithosphere in the EAR have completely depleted to 20 million years ago based on fission track ages (Okay et al. 2010). Our initial studies suggest that extensively volcanic activity in the EAR peaked in the Pliocene and continued in the same productivity throughout Quaternary. Voluminous basaltic lava plateaus and basaltic lavas from local eruption centers occurred as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal variations in Pliocene basaltic volcanism and to reveal isotopic composition, age and petrologic evolution of the basaltic volcanism, we have started to study basaltic volcanism in the East Anatolia within the framework of a TUBITAK project (project number:113Y406). Petrologic and geochemical studies carried out on the Pliocene basaltic lavas indicate the presence of subduction component in the mantle source, changing the character of basaltic volcanism from alkaline to subalkaline and increasing the amount of spinel peridotitic melts (contributions of lithospheric mantle?) in the mantle source between 5.5-3.5 Ma. FC, AFC and EC-AFC modelings reveal that the while basaltic lavas were no or slightly influenced by crustal contamination and fractional crystallization, to more evolved lavas such as bazaltictrachyandesite, basalticandesite, trachybasalt might have been important processes. Results of our melting models and isotopic analysis data (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, 18O) indicate that the Pliocene basaltic rocks were derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources with different melting degrees ranging between 0.1 - 4 %. The percentage of spinel seems to have increased in the mantle source of the basaltic

  20. Subduction modelling with ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cédric; Spakman, Wim; Quinquis, Matthieu; Buiter, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion) is a promising new code designed for modelling thermal convection in the mantle (Kronbichler et al. 2012). The code uses state-of-the-art numerical methods, such as high performance solvers and adaptive mesh refinement. It builds on tried-and-well-tested libraries and works with plug-ins allowing easy extension to fine-tune it to the user's specific needs. We make use of the promising features of ASPECT, especially Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR), for modelling lithosphere subduction in 2D and 3D geometries. The AMR allows for mesh refinement where needed and mesh coarsening in regions less important to the parameters under investigation. In the context of subduction, this amounts to having very small grid cells at material interfaces and larger cells in more uniform mantle regions. As lithosphere subduction modelling is not standard to ASPECT, we explore the necessary adaptive grid refinement and test ASPECT with widely accepted benchmarks. We showcase examples of mechanical and thermo-mechanical oceanic subduction in which we vary the number of materials making up the overriding and subducting plates as well as the rheology (from linear viscous to more complicated rheologies). Both 2D and 3D geometries are used, as ASPECT easily extends to three dimensions (Kronbichler et al. 2012). Based on these models, we discuss the advection of compositional fields coupled to material properties and the ability of AMR to trace the slab's path through the mantle. Kronbichler, M., T. Heister and W. Bangerth (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29.

  1. Early Paleozoic subduction initiation volcanism of the Iwatsubodani Formation, Hida Gaien belt, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Koshi; Gantumur, Onon; Nuramkhaan, Manchuk

    2017-01-01

    In placing Japanese tectonics in an Asian context, variation in the Paleozoic geological environment is a significant issue. This paper investigates the geochemistry of the lower Paleozoic basalt formation (Iwatsubodani Formation) in the Hida Gaien belt, Japan, to consider its tectonic setting. This formation includes the following two types of rock in ascending order: basalt A with sub-ophitic texture and basalt B with porphyritic texture. Basalt A has a high and uniform FeO*/MgO ratio, moderate TiO2, high V, and low Ti/V. The HFSE and REE are nearly the same as those in MORB, and all the data points to basalt A being the "MORB-like fore-arc tholeiitic basalt (FAB)" reported, for example, from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. By contrast, basalt B has a low FeO*/MgO ratio, low TiO2, and low V and Ti/V. It has an LREE-enriched trend and a distinct negative Nb anomaly in the MORB-normalized multi-element pattern and a moderately high LREE/HREE. All these factors suggest that basalt B is calc-alkaline basalt. It is known that FAB is erupted at the earliest stage of arc formation—namely, subduction initiation—and that boninitic/tholeiitic/calc-alkaline volcanism follows at the supra-subduction zone (SSZ). Thus, the occurrence of basalts A (FAB) and B (calc-alkaline rock) is strong evidence of early Paleozoic arc-formation initiation at an SSZ. Evidence for an early Paleozoic SSZ arc is also recognized from the Oeyama, Hayachine-Miyamori, and Sergeevka ophiolites. Hence, both these ophiolites and the Iwatsubodani Formation probably coexisted in a primitive SSZ system in the early Paleozoic.

  2. Plate Interface Rheology, Mechanical Coupling and Accretion during Subduction Infancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Yamato, P.; Mathieu, S.; Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Plunder, A.; Dubacq, B.; Monie, P.; Chauvet, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding subduction rheology in both space and time has been a challenge since the advent of plate tectonics. We herein focus on "subduction infancy", that is the first ~1-5 My immediately following subduction nucleation, when a newly born slab penetrates into the upper plate mantle and heats up. The only remnants of this critical yet elusive geodynamic step are thin metamorphic soles, commonly found beneath pristine, 100-1000 km long portions of oceanic lithosphere emplaced on continents (i.e., ophiolites). Through the (i) worldwide compilation of pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole formation augmented by pseudosection thermodynamic modeling, (ii) calculations of the viscosity of materials along the plate interface and (iii) generic numerical thermal models, we provide a conceptual model of dynamic plate interface processes during subduction infancy (and initiation s.l.). We show in particular how major rheological switches across the subduction interface control slab penetration, and the formation of metamorphic soles. Due to the downward progression of hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge with cooling, the lower plate (basalt, sediment) and the upper plate (mantle wedge) rheologies equalize and switch over a restricted temperature-time-depth interval (e.g., at ~800°C and ~1 GPa, during 0.1-2 My, for high-temperature metamorphic sole formation). These switches result in episodes of maximum interplate mechanical coupling, thereby slicing the top of the slab and welding pieces (basalt, sediment) to the base of the mantle wedge. Similar mechanical processes likely apply for the later, deeper accretion and exhumation of high-temperature oceanic eclogites in serpentinite mélanges, or for the accretion of larger tectonic slices. This model provides constraints on the effective rheologies of the crust and mantle and general understanding, at both rock and plate scale, for accretion processes and early slab dynamics.

  3. On the initiation of subduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Steve; Phillips, Roger J.

    1991-01-01

    Estimates of shear resistance associated with lithospheric thrusting and convergence represent lower bounds on the force necessary to promote trench formation. Three environments proposed as preferential sites of incipient subduction are investigated: passive continental margins, transform faults/fracture zones, and extinct ridges. None of these are predicted to convert into subduction zones simply by the accumulation of local gravitational stresses. Subduction cannot initiate through the foundering of dense oceanic lithosphere immediately adjacent to passive continental margins. The attempted subduction of buoyant material at a mature trench can result in large compressional forces in both subducting and overriding plates. This is the only tectonic force sufficient to trigger the nucleation of a new subduction zone. The ubiquitous distribution of transform faults and fracture zones, combined with the common proximity of these features to mature subduction complexes, suggests that they may represent the most likely sites of trench formation if they are even marginally weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  4. On the initiation of subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S.; Phillips, R.J. )

    1991-01-10

    Estimates of shear resistance associated with lithospheric thrusting and convergence represent lower bounds on the force necessary to promote trench formation. Three environments proposed as preferential sites of incipient subduction are investigated: passive continental margins, transform faults/fracture zones, and extinct ridges. None of these are predicted to convert into subduction zones simply by the accumulation of local gravitational stresses. Subduction cannot initiate through the foundering of dense oceanic lithosphere immediately adjacent to passive continental margins. The attempted subduction of buoyant material at a mature trench can result in large compressional forces in both subducting and overriding plates. This is the only tectonic force sufficient to trigger the nucleation of a new subduction zone. The ubiquitous distribution of transform faults and fracture zones, combined with the common proximity of these features to mature subduction complexes, suggests that they may represent the most likely sites of trench formation if they are even marginally weaker than normal oceanic lithosphere.

  5. Numerical modelling of seismic wave propagation along the plate contact of the Hellenic Subduction Zone-the influence of a deep subduction channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essen, Katja; Braatz, Mandy; Ceranna, Lars; Friederich, Wolfgang; Meier, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    We model seismic wave propagation from intermediate depth earthquakes in a subduction zone using a 2-D Chebyshev pseudospectral method. Particular attention is directed to the influence of a deep, low-viscosity subduction channel on top of the plate contact where metamorphic rocks may be exhumed by forced return flow. The study is motivated by observations of complicated dispersive and high-amplitude P- and S-wave trains in the forearc of the Hellenic Subduction Zone. The basic model is a subducted slab with a thin oceanic crust forming a low-velocity layer. Our model setup closely follows recent results on the structure of the Hellenic Subduction Zone obtained from receiver functions and surface wave studies. They exhibit an abrupt change of the dip of the downgoing slab at about 70 km depth. The subduction channel is modelled as a thin, wedge-shaped layer of intermediate seismic velocity above a slower oceanic crust and below a faster overlying mantle wedge. We also look into the effects of a continuous phase transition from basalt to eclogite in the subducted oceanic crust and near-surface crustal structures. In all models, wave propagation is characterized by dispersive guided channel waves trapped in the low-velocity subducted crust. They produce high-amplitude arrivals in the forearc. A fast guided wave train (gP) originates from the direct P wave and a slower one (gS) from the direct S wave. Guided waves are radiated into the overlying mantle where the dip of the slab is abruptly changing. Seismogram sections for models without a subduction channel typically show two spatially separated guided wave trains, one following the oceanic crust and one travelling more steeply towards the forearc high. A subduction channel above the plate contact enhances the radiation effect of gP waves at the slab bend due to the weaker velocity contrast and inhibits the separation of the wave trains. In models with additional near-surface crustal structures the wave field is

  6. Introduction: Subduction's sharpest arrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John C.

    In the center of the 6000-km reach of Kurile-Kamchatka-Aleutian-Alaska subduction is arguably Earth's most remarkable subduction cusp. The Kamchatka-Aleutian junction is a sharp arrowhead mounted on the shaft of the Emperor Seamount Chain. This collection of papers provides context, definition, and suggestions for the origin of the junction, but a comprehensive understanding remains elusive, in part because of the newness of international collaborations. Necessary cross-border syntheses have been impeded by the adversarial international relations that characterized the 20th century. For much of this period, Kamchatka and the Kurile Islands were part of the Soviet Union, a mostly closed country. The entire region was swept by World War II, abundant remnants of which are wrecked ships and planes, unexploded ordnance, and Rommel stakes.

  7. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  8. Earth’s first stable continents did not form by subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tim E.; Brown, Michael; Gardiner, Nicholas J.; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Smithies, R. Hugh

    2017-02-01

    The geodynamic environment in which Earth’s first continents formed and were stabilized remains controversial. Most exposed continental crust that can be dated back to the Archaean eon (4 billion to 2.5 billion years ago) comprises tonalite–trondhjemite–granodiorite rocks (TTGs) that were formed through partial melting of hydrated low-magnesium basaltic rocks; notably, these TTGs have ‘arc-like’ signatures of trace elements and thus resemble the continental crust produced in modern subduction settings. In the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia, low-magnesium basalts of the Coucal Formation at the base of the Pilbara Supergroup have trace-element compositions that are consistent with these being source rocks for TTGs. These basalts may be the remnants of a thick (more than 35 kilometres thick), ancient (more than 3.5 billion years old) basaltic crust that is predicted to have existed if Archaean mantle temperatures were much hotter than today’s. Here, using phase equilibria modelling of the Coucal basalts, we confirm their suitability as TTG ‘parents’, and suggest that TTGs were produced by around 20 per cent to 30 per cent melting of the Coucal basalts along high geothermal gradients (of more than 700 degrees Celsius per gigapascal). We also analyse the trace-element composition of the Coucal basalts, and propose that these rocks were themselves derived from an earlier generation of high-magnesium basaltic rocks, suggesting that the arc-like signature in Archaean TTGs was inherited from an ancestral source lineage. This protracted, multistage process for the production and stabilization of the first continents—coupled with the high geothermal gradients—is incompatible with modern-style plate tectonics, and favours instead the formation of TTGs near the base of thick, plateau-like basaltic crust. Thus subduction was not required to produce TTGs in the early Archaean eon.

  9. Geochemistry of rare high-Nb basalt lavas: Are they derived from a mantle wedge metasomatised by slab melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Minifie, Matthew J.; Millar, Ian L.

    2011-09-01

    Compositionally, high-Nb basalts are similar to HIMU (high U/Pb) ocean island basalts, continental alkaline basalts and alkaline lavas formed above slab windows. Tertiary alkaline basaltic lavas from eastern Jamaica, West Indies, known as the Halberstadt Volcanic Formation have compositions similar to high-Nb basalts (Nb > 20 ppm). The Halberstadt high-Nb basalts are divided into two compositional sub-groups where Group 1 lavas have more enriched incompatible element concentrations relative to Group 2. Both groups are derived from isotopically different spinel peridotite mantle source regions, which both require garnet and amphibole as metasomatic residual phases. The Halberstadt geochemistry demonstrates that the lavas cannot be derived by partial melting of lower crustal ultramafic complexes, metasomatised mantle lithosphere, subducting slabs, continental crust, mantle plume source regions or an upper mantle source region composed of enriched and depleted components. Instead, their composition, particularly the negative Ce anomalies, the high Th/Nb ratios and the similar isotopic ratios to nearby adakite lavas, suggests that the Halberstadt magmas are derived from a compositionally variable spinel peridotite source region(s) metasomatised by slab melts that precipitated garnet, amphibole, apatite and zircon. It is suggested that high-Nb basalts may be classified as a distinct rock type with Nb > 20 ppm, intraplate alkaline basalt compositions, but that are generated in subduction zones by magmatic processes distinct from those that generate other intraplate lavas.

  10. Friction and stress coupling on the subduction interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E.; Lavier, L.; van Avendonk, H.

    2011-12-01

    At a subduction zone, the down-going oceanic plate slides underneath the overriding plate. The frictional resistance to the relative motion between the plates generates great earthquakes along the subduction interface, which can cause tremendous damage in the civil life and property. There is a strong incentive to understand the frictional strength of the subduction interface. One fundamental question of mechanics of subuction is the degree of coupling between the plates, which is linked to the size of earthquakes. It has been noted that the trench-parallel (along-strike) gravity variation correlates positively with the trench-parallel topography anomaly and negatively with the activity of great earthquake (Song and Simons, 2003). Regions with a negative trench-parallel gravity anomaly are more likely to have great earthquakes. The interpretation of such correlation is that strong coupling along subduction interface will drag down the for-arc region of the overriding plate, which generates the gravity and topography anomalies, and could store more strain energy to be released during a great earthquake. We developed a 2D numerical thermo-mechanical code for modeling subduction. The numerical method is based on an explicit finite element method similar to the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC) technique. The constitutive law is visco-elasti-plastic with strain weakening. The cohesion and friction angle are reduced with increasing plastic strain after yielding. To track different petrologic phases, Lagrangian particles are distributed in the domain. Basalt-eclogite, sediment-schist and peridotite-serpentinite phase changes are included in the model. Our numerical models show that the degree of coupling negatively correlates with the coefficient of friction. In the low friction case, the subduction interface has very shallow dipping angle, which helps to elastically couple the downing plate with the overriding plate. The topography and gravity anomalies of the

  11. Metamorphic Devolatilization in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Subduction Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrick, D.; Connolly, J.

    2002-12-01

    Metamorphic devolatilization in subduction zones is essential to arc magmatism, seismicity and volatile recycling. Our premise is that realistic modeling of metamorphic devolatilization of subducted lithologies is only possible for chemical systems that closely approximate actual bulk compositions. Volatile components are introduced into subduction zones by three contrasting lithologies: marine sediments, and hydrothermally altered mantle ultramafic rocks (serpentinites) and oceanic metabasalts. Using free energy minimization (Perplex programs: erdw.ethz.ch/~jamie/perplex), phase equilibria were computed to 6 GPa (~160 km) to quantify the evolution of CO2 and H2O by prograde metamorphism of marine sediments and oceanic metabasalts entering the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) subduction system. Major oxide compositions for these protoliths (from sites 801 and 1149 ODP cores) were utilized as input for our computations. Assuming that the IBM system is a relatively cool subduction zone, we quantified devolatilization for the P-T path along the top of the subducted slab. Major dehydration of pelagic clays in sites 801 and 1149, and volcaniclastic turbidites in site 801, are predicted to occur in the subarc. The subjacent hyrothermally altered basalts in sites 801 and 1149 will undergo little devolatilization for cool geotherms. With the unsubstantiated assumption that serpentinites exist in the upper mantle of the subducted slab, this lithology would also provide a significant subarc H2O source. With serpentinite included in the subducted slab, and assuming a fluid-assisted embrittlement mechanism for earthquakes, metamorphic dehydration could account for the distribution of hypocenters along the top of the subucted slab of the IBM system. Serpentinite as a major H2O source for the Isu arc is compatible with the strong depletion in trace element concentrations of the arc volcanics [1]. Trace element signatures in the Mariana arc magmas [2] are consistent with subducted

  12. The seismic structure of the Rivera subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, S. P.; Yang, T.; Wilson, D.; Guzman Speziale, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, J.; Dominguez Reyes, T.; Ni, J.

    2007-12-01

    The subduction zone of western Mexico is a unique region on Earth where microplate capture and overriding plate disruption are occurring today. The small Rivera plate is subducting beneath western most Mexico primarily beneath Jalisco state while to the east it is the Cocos plate that is subducting. Above the Rivera plate the Jalisco block of Mexico is bounded by the north trending Colima Rift and the northwest trending Tepic-Chapala Rift and may form a microplate in its own right. Magmatism is present throughout the region and is unusual for a subduction zone in that geochemical analyses indicate an ocean island basalt component to some of the lavas. Also, Colima volcano is offset trenchward from other volcanoes in the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Little is known of the subducting Rivera plate geometry due to the paucity of seismicity within the plate yet the geometry of the Rivera and Cocos plates at depth are likely critical for understanding the tectonic evolution of western Mexico. The MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) project consists of the deployment of 50 broadband seismometers covering the Jalisco block from the coast to the Tepic-Chapala rift in the north and about 150 km to the west of the Colima rift. The instruments were deployed in January, 2006 and removed in June, 2007. The goal of the project is to seismically image the subducting Rivera and Cocos plates at depth as well as the mantle wedge above the plates. We present the results of a P-wave tomography inversion using teleseisms recorded by MARS. The inversion used 10,495 residuals and finite frequency theory to back project the kernels through the model. At shallow depths it is difficult to discern the subducting Cocos and Rivera plates but at depths deeper than about 80 km both plates are clearly imaged in the tomography model. Below a depth of 150 km, a clear gap between the Rivera and Cocos slabs is apparent that increases in size at further depths. The images indicate that the deeper

  13. A possible source of water in seismogenic subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, J.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kimura, G.; Iodp Exp. 322 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    Recent works on the subduction megathrusts have emphasized the mechanical function of fluids contributing dynamic slip-weakening. Basalt-hosting fault zones in on-land accretionary complexes present several textures of seismic slip under fluid-assisted condition such as implosion breccia with carbonate matrix and decrepitation of fluid inclusion. In order to clarify initiation and evolution processes of such fault zones as well as possible source of fluid in the seismogenic subduction zone, we examined a mineralogical/geochemical feature of basaltic basement recovered by IODP Exp. 322 at C0012, that is a reference site for subduction input in the Nankai Trough. A total of 10 samples (about 4 m depth interval from the basement top) were analyzed in this study. XRD analyses indicate that all of the samples contain considerable amount of smectite. The smectite does not appear as a form of interstratified phase with illite or chlorite. Preliminary chemical analyses by EDS in TEM suggest that the smectite is trioctahedral saponite with Ca as a dominant interlayer cation. To determine the saponite content quantitatively, cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bulk samples was measured. The samples show almost similar CEC of around 30 meq/100g, implying that bulk rock contains about 30 wt% of saponite, considering a general CEC of 100 meq/100g for monomineralic saponite. Such abundance of saponite might be a result from intense alteration of oceanic crust due to sea water circulation at low temperature. Previous experimental work suggests that saponite might be highly hydrated (two to three water layer hydration form) at the seismogenic P-T condition. Hence, altered upper oceanic crust is a possible water sink in the seismogenic zone. The water stored in the smectite interlayer region will be expelled via smectite to chlorite transition reaction, that might contribute to the dynamic weakening of the seimogenic plate boundary between the basement basalt and overlying

  14. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N.; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H2O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones. PMID:21536910

  15. Slab melting versus slab dehydration in subduction-zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Mibe, Kenji; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Fei, Yingwei; Ono, Shigeaki

    2011-05-17

    The second critical endpoint in the basalt-H(2)O system was directly determined by a high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray radiography technique. We found that the second critical endpoint occurs at around 3.4 GPa and 770 °C (corresponding to a depth of approximately 100 km in a subducting slab), which is much shallower than the previously estimated conditions. Our results indicate that the melting temperature of the subducting oceanic crust can no longer be defined beyond this critical condition and that the fluid released from subducting oceanic crust at depths greater than 100 km under volcanic arcs is supercritical fluid rather than aqueous fluid and/or hydrous melts. The position of the second critical endpoint explains why there is a limitation to the slab depth at which adakitic magmas are produced, as well as the origin of across-arc geochemical variations of trace elements in volcanic rocks in subduction zones.

  16. Deep melting of recycled crust from stagnant slab and genesis of alkaline basalts in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Hofmann, A. W.; Zeng, G.; Yu, X.

    2013-12-01

    Recycled oceanic crust from the core-mantle boundary has been widely accepted as important components in the sources of many hot spot-associated basalts. However, other than the core-mantle boundary, the mantle transition zone may be the other ';graveyard' for subducted crust, because the subducted slabs are usually stagnant there. To date, whether and how such recycled crust of stagnant slab contributes to the genesis of intraplate basalts is still poorly understood. In eastern China, the subducted Pacific slab is stagnant as a high-velocity anomaly in the mantle transition zone, and Cenozoic alkaline basalts are widely distributed as typical intraplate basalts in continental background, which provide a chance to explore this question. Here we found that alkaline basalts from Shandong, a province just above the eastern front of the stagnant Pacific slab in central eastern China, can be mainly produced by mixing of two endmember components. The two components are represented by two kinds of alkaline basalts which have similar (and moderately depleted) isotopic compositions but complementary (sub-mantle and super-mantle) incompatible element ratios of K/U, Ba/Th, and Ti/Gd. These complementary geochemical signatures are accordant with those of carbonatitic melts and solid residue from recycled young oceanic crust, respectively. This observation supports that recycled crust from the stagnant slab has experienced recent low-degree melting in deep upper mantle, possibly in an adiabatic process induced by a kind of edge flow at the eastern front of the stagnant slab, and feed the shallow sources of alkaline basalts with two kinds of components, carbonatitic liquids and eclogitic residues, respectively.

  17. Does subduction zone magmatism produce average continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellam, R. M.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether present day subduction zone magmatism produces material of average continental crust composition, which perhaps most would agree is andesitic, is addressed. It was argued that modern andesitic to dacitic rocks in Andean-type settings are produced by plagioclase fractionation of mantle derived basalts, leaving a complementary residue with low Rb/Sr and a positive Eu anomaly. This residue must be removed, for example by delamination, if the average crust produced in these settings is andesitic. The author argued against this, pointing out the absence of evidence for such a signature in the mantle. Either the average crust is not andesitic, a conclusion the author was not entirely comfortable with, or other crust forming processes must be sought. One possibility is that during the Archean, direct slab melting of basaltic or eclogitic oceanic crust produced felsic melts, which together with about 65 percent mafic material, yielded an average crust of andesitic composition.

  18. Low velocity layer (LVL) in subduction zones: elasticity of lawsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantel, J.; Mookherjee, M.; Frost, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    As the oceanic plates subduct, they undergoes a series of phase transformations. The hydrated oceanic crust undergoes dehydrations and eventually transforms to eclogite. However, in cold subduction zones such transformations are kinetically hindered. Eclogite is dense, and its elastic properties are similar to the normal peridotitic mantle. On the other hand, the seismic wave speeds in basalts are 10-15% slower than harzburgite. In certain subduction zones, including southern Japan, a 5-10 km think low velocity layer (LVL) has been observed. The LVL is around 5-7% slower than the surrounding mantle and cannot be readily explained by the presence of meta-stable basalts. Instead, a metamorphic rock such as lawsonite-blueschist is a likely candidate for explaining the observed LVL. We have conducted high-pressure ultrasonic interferometric measurements to gain insight into the elastic properties of lawsonite [CaAl2(Si2O7)(OH)2.H2O]. In addition, we have also computed the full elastic constant tensor at elevated pressures, using electronic structure calculations. The bulk and shear modulus obtained from theory and experiments are in good agreement with an adiabatic bulk (K) and shear (G) moduli of 126.2 ± 0.3 GPa and 52.7 ± 0.2 GPa respectively. The pressure derivaitive of bulk modulus (K’) and shear modulus (G’) are 3.5 and 1.1 respectively. Indeed, lawsonite has unusually low shear modulus and might be a suitable candidate phase to explain the observed LVL in subduction zones.

  19. Propagation of back-arc extension in the arc of the southern New Hebrides Subduction Zone (South West Pacific) and possible relation to subduction initiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M. J.; Fournier, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor allows us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone where it bends 90° eastward along the Hunter Ridge. As shown by GPS measurements and earthquake slip vectors systematically orthogonal to the trench, this 90° bend does not mark a transition from subduction to strike slip as usually observed at subduction termination. Here the convergence direction remains continuously orthogonal to the trench notwithstanding its bend. Multibeam bathymetric data acquired in the North Fiji Basin reveals active deformation and fragmentation of the upper plate. It shows the southward propagation of a N-S back-arc spreading ridge into the pre-existing volcanic arc, and the connection of the southern end of the spreading axis with an oblique active rift in the active arc. Ultimately the active arc lithosphere is sheared as spreading progressively supersedes rifting. Consequently to such incursion of back-arc basin extension into the arc, peeled off and drifted pieces of arc crust are progressively isolated into the back-arc basin. Another consequence is that the New Hebrides arc is split in two distinct microplates, which move independently relative to the lower plate, and thereby define two different subduction systems. We suggest arc fragmentation could be a consequence of the incipient collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides Arc. We further speculate that this kinematic change could have resulted, less than two million year ago, in the initiation of a new subduction orthogonal to the New Hebrides Subduction possibly along the paleo STEP fault. In this geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a sheared volcanic arc, a particularly wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas have been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction

  20. The source of the subduction component in convergent margin magmas: Trace element and radiogenic isotope evidence from Eocene boninites, Mariana forearc

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, R.J. ); Morris, J. ); Bloomer, S.H. ); Hawkins, J.W Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Boninites are generally accepted as being melts from mixtures of depleted harzburgite and a water- and incompatible element-enriched component thought to be derived from the subducted plate (the subduction component). From calculations in this study, Mariana boninites are inferred to obtain 70-90% of Sr, 60-95% of Pb, and 0-80% of Nd from the subduction component, and so provide unique insights into the composition and source of this material as sampled early in the development of the arc. Nd-, Pb-, and Sr-isotopic compositions of Eocene boninites from three dredge sites in the Mariana forearc indicate that this subduction component is isotopically indistinguishable from mantle sources responsible for the generation of typical, northern hemisphere ocean-island basalt. Initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr {epsilon}-Nd-, and Pb-isotopic compositions fall within the Sr-Nd mantle array and along the NHRL for Pb-isotopic compositions. The values for the Eocene boninites are very similar to those of modern Mariana arc lavas, indicating that the subduction component is isotopically homogeneous in time and space. If the depleted endmember in boninite petrogenesis is assumed to be a MORB-source, subducted sediments cannot be significant sources of the subduction component. Instead, the subduction component identified for these boninites must have been derived from dehydration of subducted basaltic crust or via re-equilibration of fluids - and cations - released from the dehydrating slab with the overlying mantle wedge.

  1. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-03-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  2. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  3. Elemental responses to subduction-zone metamorphism: Constraints from the North Qilian Mountain, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Niu, Yaoling; Song, Shuguang; Davidson, Jon; Liu, Xiaoming

    2013-02-01

    Subduction zone metamorphism (SZM) and behaviors of chemical elements in response to this process are important for both arc magmatism and mantle compositional heterogeneity. In this paper, we report the results of our petrographic and geochemical studies on blueschist and eclogite facies rocks of sedimentary and basaltic protoliths from two metamorphic sub-belts with different metamorphic histories in the North Qilian Mountain, Northwest China. The protolith of low-grade blueschists is basaltic in composition and is most likely produced in a back-arc setting, while the protoliths of high-grade blueschists/eclogites geochemically resemble the present-day normal and enriched mid-oceanic ridge basalts plus some volcanic arc rocks. The meta-sedimentary rocks, including meta-graywacke, meta-pelite, meta-chert and marble, show geochemical similarity to global oceanic (subducted) sediments. Assuming that high field strength elements (HFSEs) are relatively immobile, the correlated variations of rare earth elements (REEs) and Th with HFSEs suggest that all these elements are probably also immobile, whereas Pb and Sr are mobile in rocks of both basaltic and sedimentary protoliths during SZM. Ba, Cs and Rb are immobile in rocks of sedimentary protoliths and mobile in rocks of basaltic protolith. The apparent mobility of U in rocks of basaltic protolith may be inherited from seafloor alterations rather than caused by SZM. On the basis of in situ mineral compositional analysis (both major and trace elements), the most significant trace element storage minerals in these subduction-zone metamorphic rocks are: lawsonite, pumpellyite, apatite, garnet and epidote group minerals for REEs, white micas (both phengite and paragonite) for large ion lithophile elements, rutile and titanite for HFSEs. The presence and stability of these minerals exert the primary controls on the geochemical behaviors of most of these elements during SZM. The immobility of REEs, Th and U owing to their

  4. Timing of subduction and exhumation in a subduction channel: Evidence from slab melts from La Corea Mélange (eastern Cuba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Quintero, I. F.; Rojas-Agramonte, Y.; García-Casco, A.; Kröner, A.; Mertz, D. F.; Lázaro, C.; Blanco-Moreno, J.; Renne, P. R.

    2011-11-01

    High pressure igneous rocks (tonalites), generated by partial melting of subducted basaltic rocks accreted to the mantle wedge, are present in the La Corea serpentinite-matrix mélange (eastern Cuba) as centimeter- to meter-sized blocks and as concordant to crosscutting veins within high-pressure parent amphibolite blocks. The slab melts have adakitic signatures, in agreement with formation after partial melting of metabasite. Thermobarometric calculations indicate 620-680 °C and 13-15 kbar during crystallization of tonalites and down to 250-300 °C, 6 kbar during retrogression, indicating counter-clockwise P-T paths (hot subduction-cool exhumation). Free water required for melting of amphibolite at moderate temperature (700-750 °C) and moderate pressure (13-16 kbar) close to the wet basaltic solidus is inferred to have been provided after dehydration of sediments, altered basaltic crust and serpentinite of the subducting Proto-Caribbean lithosphere. Single zircon (SHRIMP) and phengite 40Ar/39Ar age data constrain the P-T-t evolution of the mélange from the timing of crystallization of melts at ~ 110-105 Ma to cooling at ~ 87-84 Ma, ca. 350 °C, ca. 9 kbar. These figures are consistent with subduction of an oblique ridge, shortly before 115 Ma. Furthermore, our data indicate very slow exhumation (ca. 1 mm/yr) in the subduction channel during the oceanic convergence stage (120-70 Ma) until final fast exhumation to the surface occurred at 70-65 Ma during a regional arc-platform collision event.

  5. Seismic structure of the Rivera subduction zone - the MARS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, S. P.; Yang, T.; Sudharja, S.; Wilson, D.; Guzman Speziale, M.; Gomez Gonzalez, J.; Leon-Soto, G.; Ni, J.; Dominguez Reyes, T.

    2007-05-01

    The subduction zone of western Mexico is a unique region on Earth where microplate capture and overriding plate disruption are occurring today. The small Rivera plate is subducting beneath western most Mexico primarily beneath Jalisco state while to the east it is the Cocos plate that is subducting. Above the Rivera plate the Jalisco block of Mexico is bounded by the north trending Colima Rift and the northwest trending Tepic-Chapala Rift and may form a microplate in its own right. Magmatism is present throughout the region and is unusual for a subduction zone in that geochemical analyses indicate an ocean island basalt component to some of the lavas. Also, Colima volcano is offset trenchward from other volcanoes in the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Little is known of the subducting Rivera plate geometry due to the paucity of seismicity within the plate yet the geometry of the Rivera and Cocos plates at depth are likely critical for understanding the tectonic evolution of western Mexico. The MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) project consists of the deployment of 50 broadband seismometers covering the Jalisco block from the coast to the Tepic-Chapala rift in the north and about 150 km to the west of the Colima rift. The instruments were deployed in January, 2006 and will be removed in June, 2007. The goal of the project is to seismically image the subducting Rivera and Cocos plates at depth as well as the mantle wedge above the plates. A number of different analyses of MARS data are underway including teleseismic tomography, receiver function analysis, and shear wave splitting analysis. The preliminary tomography results clearly show both subducting plates with a sharp change in dip to the east of the Colima rift probably indicating a tear between the two plates along a trend more eastward than the trend of the rift. The images also show extremely slow shallow mantle velocities beneath the Tepic-Chapala rift but not beneath the Colima rift. Receiver functions

  6. Subduction Zone Redox and the Deep Earth Cycles of Sulfur and Chalcophile Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canil, D.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction at convergent plate margins is a return flux to the mantle of rocks influenced by weathering, hydrothermal activity, atmospheric exchange, or bio-mineralization in the exosphere. The latter exogenic processes modify the long-term abundance and behaviour of certain elements in the deeper earth that can be traced over time in the chemistry of mantle-derived magmas. The redox budget of subduction is controlled by the flux of oxidized versus reduced forms of Fe, S, H, or C, and impacts the long-term evolution of oxygen on the planet, critical for life in the exosphere. In particular, the sulfur cycle is specifically tied to the evolution of oxygen on Earth's surface over time and critical to biogeochemical cycles on the surface. The behaviour of sulfur in the exogenic system is well-studied and fairly well understood using sedimentary records. An originally sulfidic ocean on Earth gave way with time and oxygenation to one that is sulfate dominated over the last two billion years. In contrast, far less is known of the deep earth cycle of S, and more so its history. The record of the endogenic cycle can only be monitored via what comes out of the mantle (magmas and their gases), or what goes down via subduction (hydrothermally-altered or weathered subducted lithosphere). Interest in the endogenic cycle of S is not new but several outstanding conundrums remain for sulfur in arc magmas that point to the importance of the subduction process. A hitherto ignored component of the paradox of the sulfur cycle is the sedimentary veneer that sits atop the subducted oceanic basalt crust. Compilations show only 0.12 wt% S in altered ocean basalt crust, but up to 10 times that amount in oceanic sediments, tied to their Fe content (in pyrite). These abundances may seem trivial, but the behaviour of this small amount of S in subduction is not fully appreciated and its oxidation potential in the arc mantle is enormous. The conversion of subducted sulfide to sulfate is a 8

  7. The origin of Cenozoic continental basalts in east-central China: Constrained by linking Pb isotopes to other geochemical variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Cenozoic continental basalts in east-central China are characterized by OIB-like trace element patterns with more depleted to less enriched Sr-Nd isotope compositions. Such geochemical signatures are attributable to variable contributions to their mantle sources from crustal components in the oceanic subduction zone. A combined study of basalt Pb isotope variations with other geochemical variables indicates that four mantle and crustal components were involved in the basalt petrogenesis. Model calculations verify the geochemical transfer from the subducted crustal components to the mantle sources. The depleted MORB mantle component is indicated by the depleted Sr-Nd isotope compositions of basalts. Relatively high 206Pb/204Pb and low Δ8/4 ratios are ascribed to contributions from the igneous oceanic crust with high U/Pb and low Th/U ratios, low 206Pb/204Pb and high Δ8/4 ratios are ascribed to the lower continental crust, and high 206Pb/204Pb and high Δ8/4 ratios are linked to the seafloor sediment. This generates different compositions of mantle sources for these OIB-like continental basalts. The basalts with the most depleted Sr-Nd isotope compositions show Pb isotope compositions distinct from Pacific MORB but similar to Indian MORB, suggesting the occurrence of Indian type asthenospheric mantle beneath the continental lithosphere of eastern China. The depleted MORB mantle would be metasomatized by the three crustal components at the slab-mantle interface in oceanic subduction channel, generating the mantle sources that are enriched in melt-mobile incompatible trace elements and their pertinent radiogenic isotopes. Nevertheless, the crustal components were not directly incorporated in the forms of crustal rocks into the mantle sources, but underwent partial melting to produce the felsic melts that predominate the composition of those trace elements and their pertinent radiogenic isotopes in the basalts. As such, the depleted MORB mantle component was

  8. Evidence for pressure-release melting beneath magmatic arcs from basalt at Galunggung, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bronto, S.

    1998-01-01

    The melting of peridotite in the mantle wedge above subduction zones is generally believed to involve hydrous fluids derived from the subducting slab. But if mantle peridotite is upwelling within the wedge, melting due to pressure release could also contribute to magma production. Here we present measurements of the volatile content of primitive magmas from Galunggung volcano in the Indonesian are which indicate that these magmas were derived from the pressure-release melting of hot mantle peridotite. The samples that we have analysed consist of mafic glass inclusions in high-magnesium basalts. The inclusions contain uniformly low H2O concentrations (0.21-0.38 wt%), yet relatively high levels of CO2 (up to 750 p.p.m.) indicating that the low H2O concentrations are primary and not due to degassing of the magma. Results from previous anhydrous melting experiments on a chemically similar Aleutian basalts indicate that the Galunggung high-magnesium basalts were last in equilibrium with peridotite at ~1,320 ??C and 1.2 GPa. These high temperatures at shallow sub-crustal levels (about 300-600 ??C hotter than predicted by geodynamic models), combined with the production of nearly H2O- free basaltic melts, provide strong evidence that pressure-release melting due to upwelling in the sub-are mantle has taken place. Regional low- potassium and low-H2O (ref. 5) basalts found in the Cascade are indicate that such upwelling-induced melting can be widespread.

  9. Fluid processes in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Peacock, S A

    1990-04-20

    Fluids play a critical role in subduction zones and arc magmatism. At shallow levels in subduction zones (<40 kilometers depth), expulsion of large volumes of pore waters and CH(4)-H(2)O fluids produced by diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic reactions affect the thermal and rheological evolution of the accretionary prism and provide nutrients for deep-sea biological communities. At greater depths, H(2)O and CO(2) released by metamorphic reactions in the subducting oceanic crust may alter the bulk composition in the overlying mantle wedge and trigger partial melting reactions. The location and conse-quences of fluid production in subduction zones can be constrained by consideration of phase diagrams for relevant bulk compositions in conjunction with fluid and rock pressure-temperature-time paths predicted by numerical heat-transfer models. Partial melting of subducting, amphibole-bearing oceanic crust is predicted only within several tens of million years of the initiation of subduction in young oceanic lithosphere. In cooler subduction zones, partial melting appears to occur primarily in the overlying mantle wedge as a result of fluid infiltration.

  10. Is the Venusian lithosphere subducting?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Using data collected by the Magellan spacecraft, we are exploring the hypothesis that the cooler and more rigid outer layer of Venus (i.e., the lithosphere) is sinking (subducting) into the interior of Venus. If this process is occurring, it provides a mechanism for cooling the interior of Venus and also for recycling the lighter crustal rocks back into the interior. In addition, since subduction zones drive the plate tectonic motion on the Earth, evidence for lithospheric subduction on Venus raises the possibility of limited plate tectonic-like activity on Venus.

  11. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  12. Crust recycling induced compositional-temporal-spatial variations of Cenozoic basalts in the Trans-North China Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Liu, Yongsheng; Wang, Xiaohong; Zong, Keqing; Hu, Zhaochu; Chen, Haihong; Zhou, Lian

    2017-03-01

    It has been advocated that the stagnant Pacific slab within the mantle transition zone played a critical role in the genesis of the Cenozoic basalts in the eastern part of the North China Craton (NCC); however, it is not clear whether this recycled oceanic crust contributed to the chemical makeup of the Cenozoic basalts in the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO, the central zone of the NCC). Here, we show that Cenozoic basalts from the TNCO are featured by low CaO contents, high TiO2 and FeOT contents and high Fe/Mn and Zn/Fe ratios, indicating a mantle source of pyroxenite. Temporally, these basalts evolved from alkali basalts of Late Eocene-Oligocene age to coexisting alkali and tholeiitic basalts of Late Miocene-Quaternary age. Spatially, their isotopic and chemical compositions vary symmetrically from the center to both the north and the south sides along the TNCO, i.e., SiO2 contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios increase, FeOT contents and 143Nd/144Nd, Sm/Yb and Ce/Pb ratios decrease. The estimated average melting pressure of the TNCO tholeiitic basalts ( 3 GPa) agrees well with the present lithosphere thickness beneath the north region of the TNCO ( 90-120 km). The temporal and spatial chemical variations of Cenozoic basalts in the TNCO suggest that the recycled oceanic crust in the mantle of the TNCO is mainly related to the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate and the northward subduction of the Tethyan ocean plate. The westward subduction of Pacific slab may not have contributed much than previously thought.

  13. Evolution of a Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Van Hoolst, Tim; Dehant, Veronique

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand how Earth's surface might have evolved with time and to examine in a more general way the initiation and continuance of subduction zones and the possible formation of continents on an Earth-like planet. Plate tectonics and continents seem to influence the likelihood of a planet to harbour life, and both are strongly influenced by the planetary interior (e.g. mantle temperature and rheology) and surface conditions (e.g. stabilizing effect of continents, atmospheric temperature), but may also depend on the biosphere. Employing the Fortran convection code CHIC (developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium), we simulate a subduction zone with a pre-defined weak zone (between oceanic and continental crust) and a fixed plate velocity for the subducting oceanic plate (Quinquis et al. in preparation). In our study we first investigate the main factors that influence the subduction process. We simulate the subduction of an oceanic plate beneath a continental plate (Noack et al., 2013). The crust is separated into an upper crust and a lower crust. We apply mixed Newtonian/non-Newtonian rheology and vary the parameters that are most likely to influence the subduction of the ocanic plate, as for example density of the crust/mantle, surface temperature, plate velocity and subduction angle. The second part of our study concentrates on the long-term evolution of a subduction zone. Even though we model only the upper mantle (until a depth of 670km), the subducted crust is allowed to flow into the lower mantle, where it is no longer subject to our investigation. This way we can model the subduction zone over long time spans, for which we assume a continuous inflow of the oceanic plate into the investigated domain. We include variations in mantle temperatures (via secular cooling and decay of radioactive heat sources) and dehydration of silicates (leading to stiffening of the material). We investigate how the mantle environment influences

  14. The Sulfur Cycle at Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moor, M. J.; Fischer, T. P.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present sulfur (S) isotope data for magmatic gases emitted along the Central American (CA) Arc (oxidizing conditions ΔQFM ~+ 1.5) and at the East African Rift (reduced conditions ΔQFM ~0). The results are interpreted through mass balance calculations to characterize the S cycle through subduction zones with implications for the redox conditions of arc magmas. Voluminous gas emissions from Masaya, an open vent basaltic volcano in Nicaragua, represent >20% of the SO2 flux from the CA arc [1]. Samples from the Masaya plume have S isotope compositions of + 4.8 × 0.4 ‰ [2]. Degassing fractionation modeling and assessment of differentiation processes in this oxidized volcano suggest that this value is close to that of the source composition. High T gas samples from other CA volcanoes (Momotombo, Cerro Negro, Poas, Turrialba) range from + 3 ‰ (Cerro Negro) to + 7 ‰ (Poas; [3]). The high δ34S values are attributed to recycling of subducted oxidized sulfur (sulfate ~ + 20 ‰) through the CA arc. The δ34S values of the more reduced samples from East African Rift volcanoes, Erta Ale - 0.5 × 0.6 ‰ [3] and Oldoinyo Lengai -0.7 ‰ to + 1.2 ‰) are far lower and are probably sourced directly from ambient mantle. The subduction of oxidized material at arcs presents a likely explanation for the oxidized nature of arc magmas relative to magmas from spreading centers. We observe no distinguishable change in melt fO2 with S degassing and attribute these differences to tectonic setting. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that subducted crust (sediments, altered oceanic crust, and serpentinized lithospheric mantle) delivers ~7.7 × 2.2 x 1010 mols of S with δ34S of -1.5 × 2.3‰ per year into the subduction zone. The total S output from the arc is estimated to be 3.4 × 1.1 x 1010 mols/yr with a δ34S value similar to that of Masaya gas (+5 × 0.5 ‰). Considering δ34S values for ambient upper mantle (0 ‰ [4]) and slab-derived fluids (+14 ‰ [5]) allows calculation

  15. Near-Primary Oxidized Basalts from the Submarine Vanuatu Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentes, Z.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Near-primary melt compositions (i.e., in equilibrium with >Fo89 olivine) are rare in arc systems. Yet, such melts provide essential views of mantle-derived melts, without further modification by fractional crystallization or other crustal processes, and reveal the diversity of melt compositions that exist in the arc mantle wedge. Here, we present new measurements of naturally glassy, near-primary olivine-hosted melt inclusions from one dredge of Evita seamount (SS07/2008 NLD-02) in the southern Vanuatu arc system. Two distinct basalt types were identified in hand sample upon collection, based on contrasting phenocryst assemblage (Type 1: 1% phenocrysts; Type 2: 15% phenocrysts). We selected melt inclusions from each type and determined major elements, S, and Cl by EMP, H2O and CO2 by FTIR, trace elements by LA-ICP-MS, and Fe3+/∑Fe ratios by XANES. Melt inclusions from both lava types show equilibrium with ≥Fo90 olivine, consistent with host olivine compositions, and thus are near-primary melt compositions that have escaped major modification since departing the mantle wedge. Both have similar maximum dissolved H2O (~2.3 wt.%), high Mg# (48-75), and are basalt to basaltic andesite (SiO2 49-55 wt.%). However, the two lava types have very different major and trace element compositions. Inclusions from Type 1 show relatively flat REE patterns and classic negative anomalies in Nb and Ta, and positive anomalies in Pb and Sr typical of normal arc basalts, and have Fe3+/∑Fe ratios similar to global arc basalts (~0.24). In contrast, melt inclusions from Type 2 exhibit steeply sloped REE patterns with strong depletions in the HREE that suggest garnet in the source lithology for these magmas, either in the subducting slab or the mantle wedge. Moreover, the Type 2 inclusions have high La/Yb (29.5-43) and Sr/Y (50-58), which are classically attributed to partial melting of the basaltic slab, although these inclusions are basaltic, not andesitic. Type 2 inclusions also

  16. Seismicity and the subduction process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1980-01-01

    There is considerable variation between subduction zones in the largest characteristic earthquake within each zone. Assuming that coupling between downgoing and upper plates is directly related to characteristic earthquake size, tests for correlations between variation in coupling and other physical features of subduction zones are conducted: the lateral extent and penetration depth of Benioff zones, age of subducting lithosphere, convergence rate, and back-arc spreading. Using linear multivariate regression, coupling is correlated with two variables: convergence rate and lithosphere age. Secondary correlations within the data set are penetration depth versus lithosphere age, and lateral extent versus convergence rate. Taken together, the observed correlations suggest a simple qualitative model where convergence rate and lithosphere age determine the horizontal and sinking rates, respectively, of slabs: these parameters influence the seismic coupling in the subduction zone. In the limit of a fast sinking rate and slow convergence rate, back-arc spreading occurs and thereby appears to be a passive process.

  17. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  18. Water and the Oxidation State of Subduction Zone Magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, K.; Cottrell, E

    2009-01-01

    Mantle oxygen fugacity exerts a primary control on mass exchange between Earth's surface and interior at subduction zones, but the major factors controlling mantle oxygen fugacity (such as volatiles and phase assemblages) and how tectonic cycles drive its secular evolution are still debated. We present integrated measurements of redox-sensitive ratios of oxidized iron to total iron (Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe), determined with Fe K-edge micro-x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, and pre-eruptive magmatic H{sub 2}O contents of a global sampling of primitive undegassed basaltic glasses and melt inclusions covering a range of plate tectonic settings. Magmatic Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios increase toward subduction zones (at ridges, 0.13 to 0.17; at back arcs, 0.15 to 0.19; and at arcs, 0.18 to 0.32) and correlate linearly with H{sub 2}O content and element tracers of slab-derived fluids. These observations indicate a direct link between mass transfer from the subducted plate and oxidation of the mantle wedge.

  19. Water and the oxidation state of subduction zone magmas.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Katherine A; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2009-07-31

    Mantle oxygen fugacity exerts a primary control on mass exchange between Earth's surface and interior at subduction zones, but the major factors controlling mantle oxygen fugacity (such as volatiles and phase assemblages) and how tectonic cycles drive its secular evolution are still debated. We present integrated measurements of redox-sensitive ratios of oxidized iron to total iron (Fe3+/SigmaFe), determined with Fe K-edge micro-x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, and pre-eruptive magmatic H2O contents of a global sampling of primitive undegassed basaltic glasses and melt inclusions covering a range of plate tectonic settings. Magmatic Fe3+/SigmaFe ratios increase toward subduction zones (at ridges, 0.13 to 0.17; at back arcs, 0.15 to 0.19; and at arcs, 0.18 to 0.32) and correlate linearly with H2O content and element tracers of slab-derived fluids. These observations indicate a direct link between mass transfer from the subducted plate and oxidation of the mantle wedge.

  20. Plate interface rheological switches during subduction infancy: Control on slab penetration and metamorphic sole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Yamato, P.; Soret, M.; Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Plunder, A.; Dubacq, B.; Chauvet, A.; Monié, P.

    2016-10-01

    Subduction infancy corresponds to the first few million years following subduction initiation, when slabs start their descent into the mantle. It coincides with the transient (yet systematic) transfer of material from the top of the slab to the upper plate, as witnessed by metamorphic soles welded beneath obducted ophiolites. Combining structure-lithology-pressure-temperature-time data from metamorphic soles with flow laws derived from experimental rock mechanics, this study highlights two main successive rheological switches across the subduction interface (mantle wedge vs. basalts, then mantle wedge vs. sediments; at ∼800 °C and ∼600 °C, respectively), during which interplate mechanical coupling is maximized by the existence of transiently similar rheologies across the plate contact. We propose that these rheological switches hinder slab penetration and are responsible for slicing the top of the slab and welding crustal pieces (high- then low-temperature metamorphic soles) to the base of the mantle wedge during subduction infancy. This mechanism has implications for the rheological properties of the crust and mantle (and for transient episodes of accretion/exhumation of HP-LT rocks in mature subduction systems) and highlights the role of fluids in enabling subduction to overcome the early resistance to slab penetration.

  1. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-09

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition.

  2. Origin of low δ26Mg Cenozoic basalts from South China Block and their geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; Li, Shu-Guang; Xiao, Yilin; Ke, Shan; Li, Wang-Ye; Tian, Ye

    2015-09-01

    Origin of low δ26Mg basalts is a controversial subject and has been attributed to interaction of isotopically light carbonatitic melts derived from a subducted oceanic slab with the mantle (Yang et al., 2012), or alternatively, to accumulation of isotopically light ilmenite (FeTiO3) in their mantle source (Sedaghatpour et al., 2013). To study the origin of low δ26Mg basalts and evaluate whether Mg isotope ratios of basalts can be used to trace deeply recycled carbon, high-precision major and trace element and Mg isotopic analyses on the Cenozoic alkaline and tholeiitic basalts from the South China Block (SCB), eastern China have been carried out in this study. The basalts show light Mg isotopic compositions, with δ26Mg ranging from -0.60 to -0.35. The relatively low TiO2 contents (<2.7 wt.%) of our basalts, roughly positive correlations between δ26Mg and Ti/Ti∗ and their constant Nb/Ta ratios (16.4-20) irrespective of variable TiO2 contents indicate no significant amounts of isotopically light ilmenite accumulation in their mantle source. Notably, the basalts display negative correlations between δ26Mg and the amounts of total alkalis (i.e., Na2O + K2O) and incompatible trace elements (e.g., Ti, La, Nd, Nb, Th) and trace element abundance ratios (e.g., Sm/Yb, Nb/Y). Generally, with decrease of δ26Mg values, their Hf/Hf∗ and Ti/Ti∗ ratios decrease, whereas Ca/Al and Zr/Hf ratios increase. These features are consistent with incongruent partial melting of an isotopically light carbonated mantle, suggesting that large variations in Mg isotope ratios occurred during partial melting of such carbonated mantle under high temperatures. The isotopically light carbonated mantle were probably formed by interaction of the mantle with low δ26Mg carbonatitic melts derived from the deeply subducted low δ26Mg carbonated eclogite transformed from carbonate-bearing oceanic crust during plate subduction. As only the Pacific slab has an influence on both the North China

  3. Back-arc basalts from the Loncopue graben (Province of Neuquen, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, J. C.; Hesse, A.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2010-11-01

    Young basaltic back-arc volcanoes occur east of the main Andes chain at about 37.5°-39°S in the Loncopue graben, Province of Neuquen, Argentina. These olivine-rich basalts and trachybasalts have up to 8% MgO, with high Ni and Cr contents, but highly variable incompatible element concentrations. Mafic lava flows and cinder cones at the southern end of the graben lack phenocrystic plagioclase. The northern samples have relative Ta-Nb depletions and K, Pb and LREE enrichment. These samples strongly resemble rocks of the nearby arc volcanoes Copahue and Caviahue, including their Fe-Ti enrichment relative to the main Andes arc rocks. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios show that the source regions of these back-arc basalts are enriched in subducted components that were depleted in the aqueous mobile elements such as Cs, Sr and Ba as a result of prior extractions from the subducted complex below the main arc. Some mafic flows show slightly low 206Pb/ 204Pb and 143Nd/ 144Nd values as well as incompatible trace element ratios similar to southern Patagonia plateau back-arc basalts, suggesting contributions from an EM1 mantle source. Geothermometry and barometry suggest that the basalts crystallized and fractionated small amounts of olivine and spinel at ˜ 35 km depth at temperatures of 1170-1220 °C, at about QFM + 0.5 to QFM + 1 with 1-2% H 2O, and then rose rapidly to the surface. The Loncopue graben back-arc basalts are transitional in composition between the South Patagonia back-arc plateau basalts and the Caviahue and Copahue arc volcanoes to the northwest. The EM1 source endmember is possibly the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Strong variations in incompatible element enrichment and isotopic compositions between closely spaced cinder cones and lava flows suggest a heterogeneous mantle source for the Loncopue graben volcanics.

  4. Chlorine in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. J.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the lunar magma ocean (LMO) model, it is anticipated that chlorine (and other volatiles) should have been concentrated in the late-stage LMO residual melts (i.e., the dregs enriched in incompatible elements such as K, REEs, and P, collectively called KREEP, and in its primitive form - urKREEP, [1]), given its incompatibility in mafic minerals like olivine and pyroxene, which were the dominant phases that crystallized early in the cumulate pile of the LMO (e.g., [2]). When compared to chondritic meteorites and terrestrial rocks (e.g., [3-4]), lunar samples often display heavy chlorine isotope compositions [5-9]. Boyce et al. [8] found a correlation between delta Cl-37 (sub Ap) and bulk-rock incompatible trace elements (ITEs) in lunar basalts, and used this to propose that early degassing of Cl (likely as metal chlorides) from the LMO led to progressive enrichment in remaining LMO melt in Cl-37over Cl-35- the early degassing model. Barnes et al. [9] suggested that relatively late degassing of chlorine from urKREEP (to yield delta Cl-37 (sub urKREEP greater than +25 per mille) followed by variable mixing between KREEPy melts and mantle cumulates (characterized by delta Cl-370 per mille) could explain the majority of Cl isotope data from igneous lunar samples. In order to better understand the processes involved in giving rise to the heavy chlorine isotope compositions of lunar samples, we have performed an in situ study of chlorine isotopes and abundances of volatiles in lunar apatite from a diverse suite of lunar basalts spanning a range of geochemical types.

  5. Pre-subduction metasomatic enrichment of the oceanic lithosphere induced by plate flexure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilet, S.; Abe, N.; Rochat, L.; Kaczmarek, M.-A.; Hirano, N.; Machida, S.; Buchs, D. M.; Baumgartner, P. O.; Müntener, O.

    2016-12-01

    Oceanic lithospheric mantle is generally interpreted as depleted mantle residue after mid-ocean ridge basalt extraction. Several models have suggested that metasomatic processes can refertilize portions of the lithospheric mantle before subduction. Here, we report mantle xenocrysts and xenoliths in petit-spot lavas that provide direct evidence that the lower oceanic lithosphere is affected by metasomatic processes. We find a chemical similarity between clinopyroxene observed in petit-spot mantle xenoliths and clinopyroxene from melt-metasomatized garnet or spinel peridotites, which are sampled by kimberlites and intracontinental basalts respectively. We suggest that extensional stresses in oceanic lithosphere, such as plate bending in front of subduction zones, allow low-degree melts from the seismic low-velocity zone to percolate, interact and weaken the oceanic lithospheric mantle. Thus, metasomatism is not limited to mantle upwelling zones such as mid-ocean ridges or mantle plumes, but could be initiated by tectonic processes. Since plate flexure is a global mechanism in subduction zones, a significant portion of oceanic lithospheric mantle is likely to be metasomatized. Recycling of metasomatic domains into the convecting mantle is fundamental to understanding the generation of small-scale mantle isotopic and volatile heterogeneities sampled by oceanic island and mid-ocean ridge basalts.

  6. Late Cenozoic volcanism, subduction, and extension in the Lassen region of California, Southern Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect

    Guffanti, M. ); Clynne, M.A.; Smith, J.G.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Bullen, T.D. )

    1990-11-10

    The authors identify 537 volcanic vents younger than 7 Ma, and they classify these into five age intervals and five compositional categories based on SiO{sub 2} content. Maps of vents by age and composition illustrate regionally representative volcanic trends. Most mafic volcanism is calcalkaline basalt and basaltic andesite. However, lesser volume of low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT), a geochemically distinctive basalt type found in the northern Basin and Range province, also has erupted throughout the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc since the Pliocene. Normal faults and linear groups of vents are evidence of widespread crustal extension throughout most of the Lassen region. NNW alignments of these features indicate NNW orientation of maximum horizontal stress (ENE extension), which is similar to the stress regime in the adjacent northwestern Basin and Range and northern Sierra Nevada provinces. They interpret the western limit of the zone of NNW trending normal faults as the western boundary of the Basin and Range province where it overlaps the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc. The Lassen volcanic region occurs above the subducting Gorda North plate but also lies within a broad zone of distributed extension that occurs in the North American lithosphere east and southeast of the present Cascadia subduction zone. The scarcity of volcanic rocks older than 7 Ma suggests that a more compressive lithospheric stress regime prior to the late Miocene extensional episode may have suppressed volcanism, even though subduction probably was occurring beneath the Lassen region.

  7. Continuous supply of recycled Pacific oceanic materials in the source of Cenozoic basalts in SE China: the Zhejiang case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shao-Chen; Xia, Qun-Ke; Choi, Sung Hi; Deloule, Etienne; Li, Pei; Liu, Jia

    2016-12-01

    Various enriched recycled oceanic components in the source of Cenozoic intra-plate alkaline basalts from eastern China were identified by previous studies. Due to the existence of a stagnant subducted Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone beneath eastern China, it is logical to connect the stagnant slab to the recycled oceanic materials. However, the recycled oceanic materials could also result from ancient subduction events (e.g., Paleo-Tethyan, Paleo-Asian or Izanagi plate subduction) because enriched geochemical signatures of a recycled slab can be preserved in the mantle for longer than 1 Gyr. Investigating the temporal variations of the recycled oceanic materials in the mantle source is a useful way to trace the origin of the basalts. In this article, we have conducted a detailed geochemical study, including major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, on two alkaline basalt groups from Zhejiang, SE China, which erupted 26-17 Ma and after 11 Ma, respectively. In particular, we recovered the H2O content of the initial magmas based on the H2O content of the clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts and the partition coefficients of H2O between cpx and basaltic melts. The H2O contents of the Zhejiang basalts range from 1.3 to 2.6 (wt.%), which fall within the range of back-arc basin or island arc basalts. The older basalts are more alkaline and have lower Si and Al contents; higher trace element concentrations; higher La/Yb, Ce/Pb and Nb/La ratios; lower H2O/Ce and Ba/Th ratios; and stronger negative K, Pb, Hf and Ti anomalies than the younger ones. The co-relationships between Ba/La, H2O/Ce, Nb/La, Ce/Pb and Ba/Th in the two groups of the Zhejiang basalts indicate that a recycled dehydrated oceanic alkaline basalt component is needed in the source of the older rocks, along with a depleted mantle component. Meanwhile, an additional recycled dehydrated sediment component was required in the source of the younger rocks. The temporal change in the recycled oceanic

  8. Low H2O/Ce in Icelandic basalts as evidence for crustal recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neave, David; Shorttle, Oliver; Hartley, Margaret; Maclennan, John

    2016-04-01

    The generation of new crust at mid-ocean ridges is balanced by the subduction of partially hydrothermally altered basaltic material back into the mantle. This subducted material may then be recycled and returned via mantle plumes to the Earth's surface at hot spots. Long-identified isotopic and trace element signatures of oceanic crust recycling in ocean island basalts (OIBs) have been recently supplemented by evidence of major element, i.e. lithological, heterogeneity in the melting region. For example, combined major and trace element systematics from Iceland suggest that the mantle source contains at least 5% recycled basalt. Observations of high water (H2O) contents in subglacially quenched basalts from Iceland have previously been attributed to the incorporation of wet recycled material into the mantle source. However, when combined with trace element analyses, recent volatile analyses from the Laki-Grímsvötn and Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn systems in the Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) of Iceland suggest that the underlying mantle is comparatively depleted in H2O for its degree of major and trace element enrichment. Correlations between H2O and cerium (Ce) within individual mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) suites reveal that these elements partition similarly prior to H2O degassing at low pressures; H2O/Ce remains constant during melting and fractionation, and hence reflects the average H2O/Ce of the melting region. MORBs from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland have a mean H2O/Ce value of 304±48 at a mean La/Yb of 2.1±1.5. In contrast, basalts from the EVZ have a lower mean H2O/Ce of 180±20 at a higher mean La/Yb of 3.1±0.5. Thus, despite coming from an enriched section of the Mid-Atlantic ridge in terms of trace element content, basalts from the EVZ have the lowest H2O/Ce values known from the ridge, and are hence comparatively depleted in H2O. Given that H2O/Ce from un-degassed basalts is considered to represent mantle source values, we suggest that low H

  9. Numerical experiments for evolution of backarc basins and melting processes at the Mariana subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Chung, S.; Kuo, B.

    2009-12-01

    Backarc basin basalts can be characterized as fertile, MORB-like end-member mixed with water-rich, previously depleted, arc-like components in various proportions. In addition, an enriched component might also contribute to the magma generation. A number of melting processes have been proposed to account for the chemical systematics of the backarc basin basalts. Previous numerical model experiments for circulation and thermal evolution in the subduction zones generally consider a steady spreading center, corresponding to mature stages. In this study we attempt to better understand the roles of different melting mechanisms and magma sources using a series of thermomechemical models of evolution of backarc basins. In the models the effects of rifting-spreading transition, ridge migration and asymmetric spreading on the thermal field, fluid distribution and melting history are incorporated. We focused on the evolution of the Mariana subduction system because the Mariana subduction zone is one of the best sampled region and its tectonic environment and history are relatively simple. Furthermore, the variations along the strike of the Mariana trough represent the sequence of the evolution of a backarc basin from rifting to mature stages of spreading. The effects of modeling parameters including slab geometry, spreading rate, velocity of subducting slab, lithospheric rheology and crustal thickness have been investigated. How the melting regimes and magma sources may evolve with time in the Mariana arc-basin system will be presented.

  10. Geochemistry of basalts from small eruptive centers near Villarrica stratovolcano, Chile: Evidence for lithospheric mantle components in continental arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey-Vargas, R.; Sun, M.; Holbik, S.

    2016-07-01

    In the Central Southern Volcanic Zone (CSVZ) of the Andes, the location of stratovolcanoes and monogenetic small eruptive centers (SEC) is controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ), a trench-parallel strike-slip feature of over 1000 km length. The geochemistry of basalts from SEC is different from those of stratovolcanoes, and are termed Type 2 and Type 1 basalts, respectively. In the region of Villarrica stratovolcano, contemporaneous SEC are more MgO-rich, and have greater light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment, lower 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, and lower ratios of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) to LREE and high field strength elements (HFSE). A unique finding in this region is that basalts from one SEC, San Jorge, has Type 1 character, similar to basalts from Villarrica stratovolcano. Type 1 basalts from Villarrica and San Jorge SEC have strong signals from time-sensitive tracers of subduction input, such as high 10Be/9Be and high (238U/230Th), while Type 2 SEC have low 10Be/9Be and (238U/230Th) near secular equilibrium. Based on new trace element, radiogenic isotope and mineral analyses, we propose that Type 1 basaltic magma erupted at San Jorge SEC and Villarrica stratovolcano forms by melting of the ambient actively subduction-modified asthenosphere, while Type 2 SEC incorporate melts of pyroxenite residing in the supra-subduction zone mantle lithosphere. This scenario is consistent with the close proximity of the volcanic features and their inferred depths of magma separation. The pyroxenite forms from arc magma produced during earlier episodes of subduction modification and magmatism, which extend back >300 Ma along this segment of the western South American margin. Type 2 basaltic magmas may reach the surface during LOFZ-related decompression events, and they may also be a normal but episodic part of the magma supply to large stratovolcanoes, resulting in cryptic geochemical variations over time. The presence and mobilization of stored

  11. Crust and subduction zone structure of Southwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhardja, Sandy Kurniawan; Grand, Stephen P.; Wilson, David; Guzman-Speziale, Marco; Gomez-Gonzalez, Juan Martin; Dominguez-Reyes, Tonatiuh; Ni, James

    2015-02-01

    Southwestern Mexico is a region of complex active tectonics with subduction of the young Rivera and Cocos plates to the south and widespread magmatism and rifting in the continental interior. Here we use receiver function analysis on data recorded by a 50 station temporary deployment of seismometers known as the MARS (MApping the Rivera Subduction zone) array to investigate crustal structure as well as the nature of the subduction interface near the coast. The array was deployed in the Mexican states of Jalisco, Colima, and Michoacan. Crustal thickness varies from 20 km near the coast to 42 km in the continental interior. The Rivera plate has steeper dip than the Cocos plate and is also deeper along the coast than previous estimates have shown. Inland, there is not a correlation between the thickness of the crust and topography indicating that the high topography in northern Jalisco and Michoacan is likely supported by buoyant mantle. High crustal Vp/Vs ratios (greater than 1.82) are found beneath the trenchward edge of magmatism including below the Central Jalisco Volcanic Lineament and the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field implying a new arc is forming closer to the trench than the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Elsewhere in the region, crustal Vp/Vs ratios are normal. The subducting Rivera and Cocos plates are marked by a dipping shear wave low-velocity layer. We estimate the thickness of the low-velocity layer to be 3 to 4 km with an unusually high Vp/Vs ratio of 2.0 to 2.1 and a drop in S velocity of 25%. We postulate that the low-velocity zone is the upper oceanic crust with high pore pressures. The low-velocity zone ends from 45 to 50 km depth and likely marks the basalt to eclogite transition.

  12. Why Archaean TTG cannot be generated by MORB melting in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hervé; Moyen, Jean-François; Guitreau, Martin; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2014-06-01

    Until recently it was assumed that the Archaean continental crust (made of TTGs: tonalites, trondhjemites, and granodiorites) was generated through partial melting of MORB-like basalts in hot subduction environments, where the subducted oceanic crust melted at high pressure, leaving a garnet-bearing amphibolitic or eclogitic residue. However, recent geochemical models as well as basalt melting experiments have precluded MORB as a plausible source for TTGs. Rather, geochemical and experimental evidences indicate that formation of TTG required a LILE-enriched source, similar to oceanic plateau basalts. Moreover, subduction is a continuous process, while continental growth is episodic. Several “super-growth events” have been identified at ~ 4.2, ~ 3.8, ~ 3.2, ~ 2.7, ~ 1.8, ~ 1.1, and ~ 0.5 Ga, which is inconsistent with the regular pattern that would be expected from a subduction-driven process. In order to account for this periodicity, it has been proposed that, as subduction proceeds, descending residual slabs accumulate at the 660-km seismic discontinuity. When stored oceanic crust exceeds a certain mass threshold, it rapidly sinks into the mantle as a cold avalanche, which induces the ascent of mantle plumes that in turn produce large amounts of magmas resulting in oceanic plateaus. However, melting at the base of thick oceanic plateaus does not appear to be a realistic process that can account for TTG genesis. Modern oceanic plateaus contain only small volumes (≤ 5%) of felsic magmas generally formed by high degrees of fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas. The composition of these felsic magmas drastically differs from that of TTGs. In Iceland, the interaction between a mantle plume and the mid-Atlantic ridge gives rise to an anomalously (Archaean-like) high geothermal gradient resulting in thick basaltic crust able to melt at shallow depth. Even in this favorable context though, the characteristic Archaean TTG trace element signature is not being

  13. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma.

  14. Geochemistry characteristics of Seamounts in the Tonga arc : Influence of subduction component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myeong, B.; Kim, J. H.; Woo, H.; Jang, Y. D.

    2015-12-01

    Located in the southwest Pacific ocean, The seamounts, from TA07 seamount to TA26, in the Tonga arc are located from 20 °S to 25 °S. At 25 °S, the Tonga trench is intersected by the Louisville ridge, a ~4,300-km-long chain of seamounts and the Osbourn trough, a paleo-spreading center. For this reason, magma which created these seamounts may have various origin. Based on this, the seamounts which forming the Tonga arc are divided into three groups; including group 1(region that the earliest Louisville ridge subduction arised, correspond to TA07-12), group 2(region that the second Louisville ridge subduction arised, correspond to TA14-24); and group 3(region that the Louisville ridge and the Osbourn trough are subducting, correspond to TA25-26). These seamounts are mostly stratovolcanoes with caldera. Rocks recovered by dredging have been identified as pumice, dacite, andesite, basaltic andesites and basalts(most abundant). Major element concentrations are constant, trace element concentrations are enriched LILE, depleted HFSE compared with MORB. The Tonga arc is affected by subduction components divided into the shallow and deep subduction components. Related to subduction components, variables include mantle source, AOC(altered oceanic crust), PS(pelagic sediment), LSC(Louisville seamount chain) and OS(Osbourn trough). In the case of shallow subduction component, it tends to have higher contents in group 1, 3 and lower contents in group 2. Thus, comparatively speaking, it seems that group 1, 3 have been heavily influenced by the fluid. However, origin of the fluid seems to be different, since its locations are not continuous. In the case of deep subduction component, it shows similar range in the group 1, 2, and shows a significantly lower ratio in the group 3. The reason why its values are similar is that it is effected by the melt during the Louisville ridge was subducting and the reason why the ratio in the group 3 shown lower is because of the fluid effect

  15. Flood basalts and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. Jason

    1988-01-01

    There appears to be a correlation between the times of flood basalts and mass-extinction events. There is a correlation of flood basalts and hotspot tracks--flood basalts appear to mark the beginning of a new hotspot. Perhaps there is an initial instability in the mantle that bursts forth as a flood basalt but then becomes a steady trickle that persists for many tens of millions of years. Suppose that flood basalts and not impacts cause the environmental changes that lead to mass-extinctions. This is a very testable hypothesis: it predicts that the ages of the flows should agree exactly with the times of extinctions. The Deccan and K-T ages agree with this hypothesis; An iridium anomaly at extinction boundaries apparently can be explained by a scaled-up eruption of the Hawaiian type; the occurrence of shocked-quartz is more of a problem. However if the flood basalts are all well dated and their ages indeed agree with extinction times, then surely some mechanism to appropriately produce shocked-quartz will be found.

  16. Thickness of western mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehon, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An isopach map of the basalt thickness in the western mare basins is constructed from measurements of the exposed external rim height of partially buried craters. The data, although numerically sparse, is sufficiently distributed to yield gross thickness variations. The average basalt thickness in Oceanus Procellarum and adjacent regions is 400 m with local lenses in excess of 1500 m in the circular maria. The total volume of basalt in the western maria is estimated to be in the range of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power cu km. The chief distinction between the eastern and western maria appears to be one of basalt volumes erupted to the surface. Maximum volumes of basalt are deposited west of the central highlands and flood subjacent terrain to a greater extent than on the east. The surface structures of the western maria reflect the probability of a greater degree of isostatic response to a larger surface loading by the greater accumulation of mare basalt.

  17. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: The Subduction Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penniston-Dorland, S.; Stern, R. J.; Edwards, B. R.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate fundamental results from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. Three Subduction Factory (SubFac) mini-lessons were developed as part of this project. These include hands-on examinations of data sets representing 3 key components of the subduction zone system: 1) Heat transfer in the subducted slab; 2) Metamorphic processes happening at the plate interface; and 3) Typical magmatic products of arc systems above subduction zones. Module 1: "Slab Temperatures Control Melting in Subduction Zones, What Controls Slab Temperature?" allows students to work in groups using beads rolling down slopes as an analog for the mathematics of heat flow. Using this hands-on, exploration-based approach, students develop an intuition for the mathematics of heatflow and learn about heat conduction and advection in the subduction zone environment. Module 2: "Subduction zone metamorphism" introduces students to the metamorphic rocks that form as the subducted slab descends and the mineral reactions that characterize subduction-related metamorphism. This module includes a suite of metamorphic rocks available for instructors to use in a lab, and exercises in which students compare pressure-temperature estimates obtained from metamorphic rocks to predictions from thermal models. Module 3: "Central American Arc Volcanoes, Petrology and Geochemistry" introduces students to basic concepts in igneous petrology using the Central American volcanic arc, a MARGINS Subduction Factory focus site, as an example. The module relates data from two different volcanoes - basaltic Cerro Negro (Nicaragua) and andesitic Ilopango (El Salvador) including hand sample observations and major element geochemistry - to explore processes of mantle and crustal melting and differentiation in arc volcanism.

  18. Enrichment of trace elements in garnet amphibolites from a paleo-subduction zone: Catalina schist, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, S.S. ); Grossman, J.N. )

    1989-12-01

    The abundance, P-T stability, solubility, and element-partitioning behaviour of minerals such as rutile, garnet, sphene, apatite, zircon, zoisite, and allanite are critical variables in models for mass transfer from the slab to the mantle wedge in deep regions of subduction zones. The influence of these minerals on the composition of subduction-related magmas has been inferred (and disputed) from inverse modelling of the geochemistry of island-arc basalt, or by experiment. Although direct samples of the dehydration + partial-melting region of a mature subduction zone have not been reported from subduction complexes, garnet amphibolites from melanges of circumpacific and Caribbean blueschist terranes reflect high T (>600{degree}C) conditions in shallower regions. Such rocks record geochemical processes that affected deep-seated, high-T portions of paleo-subduction zones. In the Catalina Schist, a subduction-zone metamorphic terrane of southern California, metasomatized and migmatitic garnet amphibolites occur as blocks in a matrix of meta-ultramafic rocks. This mafic and ultramafic complex may represent either slab-derived material accreted to the mantle wedge of a nascent subduction zone or a portion of a shear zone closely related to the slab-mantle wedge contact, or both. The trace-element geochemistry of the complex and the distribution of trace element among the minerals of garnet amphibolites were studied by INAA, XRF, electron microprobe, and SEM.

  19. Osmium Recycling in Subduction Zones

    PubMed

    Brandon; Creaser; Shirey; Carlson

    1996-05-10

    Peridotite xenoliths from the Cascade arc in the United States and in the Japan arc have neodymium and osmium isotopic compositions that are consistent with addition of 5 to 15 percent of subducted material to the present-day depleted mantle. These observations suggest that osmium can be partitioned into oxidized and chlorine-rich slab-derived fluids or melts. These results place new constraints on the behavior of osmium (and possibly other platinum group elements) during subduction of oceanic crust by showing that osmium can be transported into the mantle wedge.

  20. Separation of supercritical slab-fluids to form aqueous fluid and melt components in subduction zone magmatism

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kanzaki, Masami; Mibe, Kenji; Ono, Shigeaki

    2012-01-01

    Subduction-zone magmatism is triggered by the addition of H2O-rich slab-derived components: aqueous fluid, hydrous partial melts, or supercritical fluids from the subducting slab. Geochemical analyses of island arc basalts suggest two slab-derived signatures of a melt and a fluid. These two liquids unite to a supercritical fluid under pressure and temperature conditions beyond a critical endpoint. We ascertain critical endpoints between aqueous fluids and sediment or high-Mg andesite (HMA) melts located, respectively, at 83-km and 92-km depths by using an in situ observation technique. These depths are within the mantle wedge underlying volcanic fronts, which are formed 90 to 200 km above subducting slabs. These data suggest that sediment-derived supercritical fluids, which are fed to the mantle wedge from the subducting slab, react with mantle peridotite to form HMA supercritical fluids. Such HMA supercritical fluids separate into aqueous fluids and HMA melts at 92 km depth during ascent. The aqueous fluids are fluxed into the asthenospheric mantle to form arc basalts, which are locally associated with HMAs in hot subduction zones. The separated HMA melts retain their composition in limited equilibrium with the surrounding mantle. Alternatively, they equilibrate with the surrounding mantle and change the major element chemistry to basaltic composition. However, trace element signatures of sediment-derived supercritical fluids remain more in the melt-derived magma than in the fluid-induced magma, which inherits only fluid-mobile elements from the sediment-derived supercritical fluids. Separation of slab-derived supercritical fluids into melts and aqueous fluids can elucidate the two slab-derived components observed in subduction zone magma chemistry. PMID:23112158

  1. Separation of supercritical slab-fluids to form aqueous fluid and melt components in subduction zone magmatism.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Kanzaki, Masami; Mibe, Kenji; Matsukage, Kyoko N; Ono, Shigeaki

    2012-11-13

    Subduction-zone magmatism is triggered by the addition of H(2)O-rich slab-derived components: aqueous fluid, hydrous partial melts, or supercritical fluids from the subducting slab. Geochemical analyses of island arc basalts suggest two slab-derived signatures of a melt and a fluid. These two liquids unite to a supercritical fluid under pressure and temperature conditions beyond a critical endpoint. We ascertain critical endpoints between aqueous fluids and sediment or high-Mg andesite (HMA) melts located, respectively, at 83-km and 92-km depths by using an in situ observation technique. These depths are within the mantle wedge underlying volcanic fronts, which are formed 90 to 200 km above subducting slabs. These data suggest that sediment-derived supercritical fluids, which are fed to the mantle wedge from the subducting slab, react with mantle peridotite to form HMA supercritical fluids. Such HMA supercritical fluids separate into aqueous fluids and HMA melts at 92 km depth during ascent. The aqueous fluids are fluxed into the asthenospheric mantle to form arc basalts, which are locally associated with HMAs in hot subduction zones. The separated HMA melts retain their composition in limited equilibrium with the surrounding mantle. Alternatively, they equilibrate with the surrounding mantle and change the major element chemistry to basaltic composition. However, trace element signatures of sediment-derived supercritical fluids remain more in the melt-derived magma than in the fluid-induced magma, which inherits only fluid-mobile elements from the sediment-derived supercritical fluids. Separation of slab-derived supercritical fluids into melts and aqueous fluids can elucidate the two slab-derived components observed in subduction zone magma chemistry.

  2. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    or channel bends that exposes more core lava to cooling than simply that of the shear zones. Thus the channel geometry plays a major role in the thermal history of a flow. As lava flows rarely flow through pre-existing channels of prescribed geometry, we have performed an additional set of analog laboratory experiments to determine the relationship between flow rate, slope, and channel formation in solidifying flows. All flows develop stable uniform channels within solidified levees except when the flow rate is sufficiently low to permit flow front solidification, inflation, and tube formation. On constant slopes, increasing flow rates result in increases in both the rate of flow advance rate and the channel width, and a decrease in levee width. At constant flow rates, both channel width and levee width decrease with increasing slope while flow advance rate increases. Limited data on the geometry of basaltic lava channels indicate that experimental data are consistent with field observations, however, both additional field data and scaling relationships are required to fully utilize the laboratory experiments to predict channel development in basaltic lava flows.

  3. Subduction & orogeny: Introduction to the special volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Bosch, D.; Guillot, S.; de Sigoyer, J.; Martinod, J.; Agard, P.; Yamato, P.

    2016-05-01

    Subduction processes play a major role in plate tectonics and the subsequent geological evolution of Earth. This special issue focuses on ongoing research in subduction dynamics to a large extent (oceanic subduction, continental subduction, obduction…) for both past and active subduction zones and into mountain building processes and the early evolution of orogens. It puts together various approaches combining geophysics (imaging of subduction zones), petrology/geochemistry (metamorphic analysis of HP-UHP rocks, fluid geochemistry and magmatic signal, geochronology), seismology and geodesy (present-day evolution of subduction zones, active tectonics), structural geology (structure and evolution of mountain belts), and numerical modelling to provide a full spectrum of tools that can be used to constrain the nature and evolution of subduction processes and orogeny. Studies presented in this special issue range from the long-term (orogenic cycle) to short-term (seismic cycle).

  4. Possible Terrestrial Basaltic Analogs for Highly Magnetized Martian Crustal Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, K. J.; Brown, L.

    2008-05-01

    With the discovery of crustal rock with high magnetic remanence by the MAG/ER on the Mars Global Surveyor, two of the prominent questions have been how did these Martian rocks become so magnetized, and, after what is assumed to be billions of years, how do they retain their magnetism? Modeling of the observed anomalies requires remanence values of 20 A/m, an order of magnitude greater than common remanences on earth. Images and spectral data show that basalt is a prevalent rock type on the surface of Mars; andesitic and layered rocks have also been found on Mars, but are much less common. Geochemical plots of alkalis versus silica indicate samples from Gusev Crater area (measured by the SPIRIT Rover) have alkaline compositions, while readings made by Pathfinder and MGS-TES surface measurements indicate subalkaline compositions. While only rare rocks on Earth have been found with a similar high magnetic remanence to those observed on Mars, are there terrestrial basalts with greater remanences, or with the possibility of enhanced composition to provide such remanences? To this end we are investigating the details of magnetic character of terrestrial basalts over a range of compositions. Average natural remanent magnetization for lava flows range from 1 to 4 A/m, with susceptibilities of approximately 0.1 SI, corresponding to roughly 3% magnetite content. We are studying mineralogy, grain size, magnetic remanence, magnetic susceptibility, and magnetic coercivity of basalt samples from different sources with the emphasis on the range of characteristics and the possibility of producing high remanences. Samples include those taken from arrange of tectonic environments on earth including hot spots (Hawaii, Easter Island), continental rift (New Mexico), subduction (Chile), slab window (southern Argentina) and continental platform (Arizona).

  5. Origin of arc-like continental basalts: Implications for deep-Earth fluid cycling and tectonic discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan-Ce; Wilde, Simon A.; Xu, Bei; Pang, Chong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Continental basalts generally display enrichment of fluid-mobile elements and depletion of high-field-strength elements, similar to those that evolved in the subduction environment, but different from oceanic basalts. Based on the continental flood basalt database for six large igneous provinces, together with rift-related basalt data from the Basin and Range Province, this study aimed to test the validity of geochemical tectonic discrimination diagrams in distinguishing arc-like intra-continental basalts from arc basalts and to further investigate the role of deep-Earth water cycling in producing arc-like signatures in large-scale intra-continental basalts. Our evaluation shows that arc-like intra-continental basalts can be distinguished from arc basalts by integrating the following factors: (1) the FeO, MgO, and Al2O3 concentrations of the primary melt; (2) Tisbnd V, Zrsbnd Zr/Y, Zrsbnd Ti, and Ti/Vsbnd Zr/Smsbnd Sr/Nd discrimination diagrams; (3) the coexistence of arc-like and OIB-like subtype basalts within the same province; (4) primitive mantle-normalized trace element distribution patterns. The similarity of enrichment in fluid-mobile elements (Ba, Rb, Sr, U, and K) between arc-like and true arc basalts suggests the importance of water flux melting in producing arc-like signatures in continental basalts. Experimentally determined liquid lines of descent (LLD) imply high magma water concentrations for continental flood basalts (CFBs) and the Basin and Range basalts. Furthermore, estimates based on the Al2O3-LLD method indicates 4.0-5.0 wt% pre-eruptive magma H2O concentration for CFBs and the Basin and Range basalts. The tight relationships between H2O/Ce and Ba/La, Ba/Nb and Rb/Nb based on global arc basalt data were further used to estimate the primary H2O concentrations. With the exception of the Emeishan CFBs (mainly containing 4.0-5.6 wt% H2O), all other CFBs investigated have similar estimated primary H2O contents, with values ranging from 1.0 to 2

  6. Thrust-type subduction-zone earthquakes and seamount asperites: A physical model for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Cloos, M. )

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-type subduction-zone earthquake of M{sub W} 7.6 ruptures an area of {approximately}6,000 km{sup 2}, has a seismic slip of {approximately}1 m, and is nucleated by the rupture of an asperity {approximately}25km across. A model for thrust-type subduction-zone seismicity is proposed in which basaltic seamounts jammed against the base of the overriding plate act as strong asperities that rupture by stick-slip faulting. A M{sub W} 7.6 event would correspond to the near-basal rupture of a {approximately}2-km-tall seamount. The base of the seamount is surrounded by a low shear-strength layer composed of subducting sediment that also deforms between seismic events by distributed strain (viscous flow). Planar faults form in this layer as the seismic rupture propagates out of the seamount at speeds of kilometers per second. The faults in the shear zone are disrupted after the event by aseismic, slow viscous flow of the subducting sediment layer. Consequently, the extent of fault rupture varies for different earthquakes nucleated at the same seamount asperity because new fault surfaces form in the surrounding subducting sediment layer during each fast seismic rupture.

  7. Building a Subduction Zone Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Bodin, Paul; Bourgeois, Jody; Cashman, Susan; Cowan, Darrel; Creager, Kenneth C.; Crowell, Brendan; Duvall, Alison; Frankel, Arthur; Gonzalez, Frank; Houston, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Kelsey, Harvey; Miller, Una; Roland, Emily C.; Schmidt, David; Staisch, Lydia; Vidale, John; Wilcock, William; Wirth, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Subduction zones contain many of Earth’s most remarkable geologic structures, from the deepest oceanic trenches to glacier-covered mountains and steaming volcanoes. These environments formed through spectacular events: Nature’s largest earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions are born here.

  8. Fluid pathways in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegelman, M. W.; van Keken, P. E.; Hacker, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    A large amount of water captured in the oceanic crust and mantle is recycled in subduction zones. Upon compaction and heating most fluids are expelled, but a significant amount of water can be carried in hydrated mineral phases and point defects. While the qualitative role of volatiles and dehydration reactions is well appreciated in the mechanisms for intermediate depth seismicity, mantle wedge melting and arc volcanism, the quantitative details of the metamorphic reactions and the pathways of fluids and melts in the slab are poorly understood. We provide finite element models, combined with thermodynamic and mineralogical constraints, to estimate the water release and migration from the subducting slab to overlying arc. We use models from a selection of warm (e.g., Cascadia), cold (Central Honshu) and intermediate (Nicaragua) subduction zones, using slab geometries constrained from seismological observations. The fluid release is predicted from the breakdown of hydrated phases in sediments, oceanic crust and slab mantle. We use newly developed high resolution models for the flow of these released fluids that take into account permeability and compaction pressures. While the detailed structure depends on the chosen rheology and permeability, we find that for reasonable assumptions of permeability, a significant amount of fluids can travel through the wedge along nearly vertical pathways at rates and paths, consistent with geochronological and geochemical constraints. For models considered to date, we find that the principal source of fluids that feed the wedge come from the hydrated oceanic crust and particularly the hydrated slab mantle. Fluids released from the sediments and shallow crust, tend to travel along high permeability zones in the subducting slab before being released to hydrate the cold corner of subduction zones, suggesting that the cold and hydrated forearc region that is imaged in many subduction zones is maintained by an active hydrological cycle

  9. The production of Barberton komatiites in an Archean Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Grove, T. L.; Dann, J. C.

    Based upon their geochemical similarity, we propose that the 3.5 Ga Barberton basaltic komatiites (BK) are the Archean equivalents of modern boninites, and were produced by the same melting processes (i.e. hydrous melting in a subduction zone). The Barberton komatiites also share some geochemical characteristics with boninites, including petrologic evidence for high magmatic H2O contents. Experimental data indicates that the Archean sub-arc mantle need only be 1500-1600°C to produce hydrous komatiitic melts. This is considerably cooler than estimates of mantle temperatures assuming an anhydrous, plume origin for komatiites (up to 1900°C). The depleted mantle residue that generates the Barberton komatiites and BK will be cooled and metasomatised as it resides beneath the fore-arc, and may represent part of the material that formed the Kaapvaal cratonic keel.

  10. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  11. Subduction Drive of Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, W. B.

    2003-12-01

    Don Anderson emphasizes that plate tectonics is self-organizing and is driven by subduction, which rights the density inversion generated as oceanic lithosphere forms by cooling of asthenosphere from the top. The following synthesis owes much to many discussions with him. Hinge rollback is the key to kinematics, and, like the rest of actual plate behavior, is incompatible with bottom-up convection drive. Subduction hinges (which are under, not in front of, thin leading parts of arcs and overriding plates) roll back into subducting plates. The Pacific shrinks because bounding hinges roll back into it. Colliding arcs, increasing arc curvatures, back-arc spreading, and advance of small arcs into large plates also require rollback. Forearcs of overriding plates commonly bear basins which preclude shortening of thin plate fronts throughout periods recorded by basin strata (100 Ma for Cretaceous and Paleogene California). This requires subequal rates of advance and rollback, and control of both by subduction. Convergence rate is equal to rates of rollback and advance in many systems but is greater in others. Plate-related circulation probably is closed above 650 km. Despite the popularity of concepts of plumes from, and subduction into, lower mantle, there is no convincing evidence for, and much evidence against, penetration of the 650 in either direction. That barrier not only has a crossing-inhibiting negative Clapeyron slope but also is a compositional boundary between fractionated (not "primitive"), sluggish lower mantle and fertile, mobile upper mantle. Slabs sink more steeply than they dip. Slabs older than about 60 Ma when their subduction began sink to, and lie down on and depress, the 650-km discontinuity, and are overpassed, whereas younger slabs become neutrally buoyant in mid-upper mantle, into which they are mixed as they too are overpassed. Broadside-sinking old slabs push all upper mantle, from base of oceanic lithosphere down to the 650, back under

  12. Back-arc basin basalt systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Brian; Martinez, Fernando

    2003-05-01

    The Mariana, east Scotia, Lau, and Manus back-arc basins (BABs) have spreading rates that vary from slow (<50 mm/yr) to fast (>100 mm/yr) and extension axes located from 10 to 400 km behind their island arcs. Axial lava compositions from these BABs indicate melting of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like sources in proportion to the amount added of previously depleted, water-rich, arc-like components. The arc-like end-members are characterized by low Na, Ti and Fe, and by high H 2O and Ba/La; the MORB-like end-members have the opposite traits. Comparisons between basins show that the least hydrous compositions follow global MORB systematics and an inverse correlation between Na8 and Fe8. This is interpreted as a positive correlation between the average degree and pressure of mantle melting that reflects regional variations in mantle potential temperatures (Lau/Manus hotter than Mariana/Scotia). This interpretation accords with numerical model predictions that faster subduction-induced advection will maintain a hotter mantle wedge. The primary compositional trends within each BAB (a positive correlation between Fe8, Na8 and Ti8, and their inverse correlation with H 2O(8) and Ba/La) are controlled by variations in water content, melt extraction, and enrichments imposed by slab and mantle wedge processes. Systematic axial depth (as a proxy for crustal production) variations with distance from the island arc indicate that compositional controls on melting dominate over spreading rate. Hydrous fluxing enhances decompression melting, allowing depleted mantle sources just behind the island arc to melt extensively, producing shallow spreading axes. Flow of enriched mantle components around the ends of slabs may augment this process in transform-bounded back-arcs such as the east Scotia Basin. The re-circulation (by mantle wedge corner flow) to the spreading axes of mantle previously depleted by both arc and spreading melt extraction can explain the greater depths and thinner

  13. The effect of a realistic thermal diffusivity on numerical model of a subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierova, P.; Steinle-Neumann, G.; Cadek, O.

    2010-12-01

    A number of numerical studies of subducting slab assume simplified (constant or only depth-dependent) models of thermal conductivity. The available mineral physics data indicate, however, that thermal diffusivity is strongly temperature- and pressure-dependent and may also vary among different mantle materials. In the present study, we examine the influence of realistic thermal properties of mantle materials on the thermal state of the upper mantle and the dynamics of subducting slabs. On the basis of the data published in mineral physics literature we compile analytical relationships that approximate the pressure and temperature dependence of thermal diffusivity for major mineral phases of the mantle (olivine, wadsleyite, ringwoodite, garnet, clinopyroxenes, stishovite and perovskite). We propose a simplified composition of mineral assemblages predominating in the subducting slab and the surrounding mantle (pyrolite, mid-ocean ridge basalt, harzburgite) and we estimate their thermal diffusivity using the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. The resulting complex formula for the diffusivity of each aggregate is then approximated by a simpler analytical relationship that is used in our numerical model as an input parameter. For the numerical modeling we use the Elmer software (open source finite element software for multiphysical problems, see http://www.csc.fi/english/pages/elmer). We set up a 2D Cartesian thermo-mechanical steady-state model of a subducting slab. The model is partly kinematic as the flow is driven by a boundary condition on velocity that is prescribed on the top of the subducting lithospheric plate. Reology of the material is non-linear and is coupled with the thermal equation. Using the realistic relationship for thermal diffusivity of mantle materials, we compute the thermal and flow fields for different input velocity and age of the subducting plate and we compare the results against the models assuming a constant thermal diffusivity. The importance of the

  14. Geodynamics of flat subduction: Seismicity and tomographic constraints from the Andean margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Spakman, Wim; Bijwaard, Harmen; Engdahl, E. Robert

    2000-10-01

    The cause and geodynamic impact of flat subduction are investigated. First, the 1500 km long Peru flat slab segment is examined. Earthquake hypocenter data image two morphologic highs in the subducting Nazca Plate which correlate with the positions of subducted oceanic plateaus. Travel time tomographic images confirm the three-dimensional slab geometry and suggest a lithospheric tear may bound the NW edge of the flat slab segment, with possible slab detachment occurring down dip as well. Other flat slab regions worldwide are discussed: central Chile, Ecuador, NW Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, southern Alaska, SW Japan, and western New Guinea. Flat subduction is shown to be a widespread phenomenon, occuring in 10% of modern convergent margins. In nearly all these cases, as a spatial and temporal correlation is observed between subducting oceanic plateaus and flat subduction, we conclude that flat subduction is caused primarily by (1) the buoyancy of thickened oceanic crust of moderate to young age and (2) a delay in the basalt to eclogite transition due to the cool thermal structure of two overlapping lithospheres. A statistical analysis of seismicity along the entire length of the Andes demonstrates that seismic energy release in the upper plate at a distance of 250-800 km from the trench is on average 3-5 times greater above flat slab segments than for adjacent steep slab segments. We propose this is due to higher interplate coupling and the cold, strong rheology of the overriding lithosphere which thus enables stress and deformation to be transmitted hundreds of kilometers into the heart of the upper plate.

  15. Saline Fluids in Subduction Channels and Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, T.; Hertwig, A.; Schertl, H. P.; Maresch, W. V.; Shigeno, M.; Mori, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2015-12-01

    Saline fluids can transport large-ion-lithophile elements and carbonate. Subduction-zone fluids contain salts with various amounts of NaCl equivalent similar to that of the present and/or Phanerozoic seawater (about 3.5 wt% NaCl). The salinity of aqueous fluids in the mantle wedge decreases from trench side to back-arc side, although available data have been limited. Such saline fluids from mantle peridotite underneath Pinatubo, a frontal volcano of the Luzon arc, contain 5.1 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kawamoto et al., 2013 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA] and in Ichinomegeta, a rear-arc volcano of the Northeast Japan arc, contain 3.7 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kumagai et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2014]. Abundances of chlorine and H2O in olivine-hosted melt inclusions also suggest that aqueous fluids to produce frontal basalts have higher salinity than rear-arc basalts in Guatemala arc [Walker et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2003]. In addition to these data, quartz-free jadeitites contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 7 wt% NaCl equivalent and quartz-bearing jadeitite with 4.6 wt% NaCl equivalent in supra-subduction zones in Southwest Japan [Mori et al., 2015, International Eclogite Conference] and quartz-bearing jadeitite and jadeite-rich rocks contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 4.2 wt% NaCl equivalent in Rio San Juan Complex, Dominica Republic [Kawamoto et al., 2015, Goldschmidt Conference]. Aqueous fluids generated at pressures lower than conditions for albite=jadeite+quartz occurring at 1.5 GPa, 500 °C may contain aqueous fluids with higher salinity than at higher pressures.

  16. Mantle upwelling and trench-parallel mantle flow in the northern Cascade arc indicated by basalt geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; Weis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Cascadia offers a unique perspective on arc magma genesis as an end-member ';hot' subduction zone in which relatively little water may be available to promote mantle melting. The youngest and hottest subducting crust (~5 Myr at the trench) occurs in the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, at the northern edge of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate [1]. Geochemical data from GVB primitive basalts provide insights on mantle melting where a slab edge coincides with high slab temperatures. In subduction zones worldwide, including the Cascades, basalts are typically calc-alkaline and produced from a depleted mantle wedge modified by slab input. However, basalts from volcanic centers overlying the northern slab edge (Salal Glacier and Bridge River Cones) are alkalic [2] and lack a trace element subduction signature [3]. The mantle source of the alkalic basalts is significantly more enriched in incompatible elements than the slab-modified depleted mantle wedge that produces calc-alkaline basalts in the southern GVB (Mt. Baker and Glacier Peak) [3]. The alkalic basalts are also generated at temperatures and pressures of up to 175°C and 1.5 GPa higher than those of the calc-alkaline basalts [3], consistent with decompression melting of fertile, hot mantle ascending through a gap in the Nootka fault, the boundary between the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and the nearly stagnant Explorer microplate. Mantle upwelling may be related to toroidal mantle flow around the slab edge, which has been identified in southern Cascadia [4]. In the GVB, the upwelling fertile mantle is not confined to the immediate area around the slab edge but has spread southward along the arc axis, its extent gradually diminishing as the slab-modified depleted mantle wedge becomes dominant. Between Salal Glacier/Bridge River and Glacier Peak ~350 km to the south, there are increases in isotopic ratios (ɛHf = 8.3 to13.0, ɛNd = 7.3 to 8.5, and 208Pb*/206*Pb* = 0.914 to 0.928) and trace element indicators of slab

  17. Lithospheric-folding-based understanding on the origin of the back-arc basaltic magmatism beneath Jeju volcanic island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Shin, Y.; CHOI, K.; Koh, J.; Nakamura, E.; Na, S.

    2012-12-01

    Jeju Island is an intraplate volcanic island located at the eastern margin on the East Asia behind the Ryukyu Trench, the collisional/subduction boundary between the Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. It is a symmetrical shield volcano, having numerous monogenetic cinder cones, over 365, on the Mt. Halla volcanic edifice. The basement rock mainly consists of Precambrian gneiss, Mesozoic granite and volcanic rocks. Unconsolidated sedimentary rock is found between basement rock and surface lava. The lava plateau is composed of voluminous basaltic lava flows, which extend to the coast region with a gentle slope. Based on the evidence obtained from volcanic stratigraphy, paleontology, and geochronology, the age of the Jeju basalts ranges from the early Pleistocene to Holocene(Historic). The alkaline and tholeiitic basalts exhibits OIB composition from intraplate volcanism which is not associated with plate subduction, while the basement xenolith contained in the volcanic rock indicates that there were volcanic activities associated with the Mesozoic plate subduction. The Geochemical characteristics have been explained with the plume model, lithospheric mantle origin, and melting of shallow asthenosphere by the rapid change of stress regimes between the collision of the India-Eurasia plates and subduction of the Pacific plate, while there has not been any geophysical investigation to disclose it. Compression near collisional plate boundaries causes lithospheric folding which results in the decrease of pressure beneath the ridge of the fold while the pressure increases beneath trough. The decompression beneath lithosphere is likely to accelerate basaltic magmatism along and below the ridge. We investigate the subsurface structure beneath Jeju volcanic island, South Korea and its vicinity and propose an alternative hypothesis that the basaltic magma beneath the island could be caused by episodic lithospheric folding. Unlike the prevailing hypothesis of the

  18. The Southern Mariana Forearc: An Active Subduction Initiation (SI) Analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.; Bloomer, S. H.; Brounce, M. N.; Ishii, T.; Ishizuka, O.; Kelley, K. A.; Martinez, F.; Ohara, Y.; Pujana, I.; Reagan, M. K.; Ribeiro, J.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to understand how new subduction zones form. Some subduction zones begin spontaneously, with sinking of dense oceanic lithosphere adjacent to a lithospheric weakness. The Eocene evolution of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana convergent margin is the type example of this process, with an increasingly well-documented evolution including results from IODP 352 drilling. A lack of any active examples of spontaneous SI hinders our understanding, but our studies of the evolution of the southernmost Mariana convergent margin provides important insights. Here the Mariana Trough backarc basin terminates against the Challenger Deep trench segment, where it has opened ~250 km in the past ~4 Ma. This corresponds to GPS opening rate of ~4.5cm/y at the latitude of Guam (Kato et al., 2003). This newly formed and rapidy widening margin faces the NW-converging Pacific plate and causes it to contort and tear. Pacific plate continues to move NW but the upper plate response is illustrative of a newly formed subduction zone. Slab-related earthquakes can be identified to ~200 km deep beneath this margin; with convergence rate of 3cm/yr, this may reflect no more than 7 Ma of subduction. The usual well-defined magmatic arc is missing; its position ~100 km above the subducted slab is occupied by the magma-rich (inflated) Malaguana-Gadao Ridge (MGR), and hydrous MORB-like basalts with ~2 wt. % H2O have erupted unusually close to the trench where they overly mantle peridotites ~6 km water depth. HMR-1 sonar backscatter mapping reveals a chaotic fabric that is at a high angle to the trend of the MGR to the east but is concordant to the west. This unusual spreading fabric may have formed by chaotic upper plate extension in response to rapid rollback of the short, narrow Pacific slab in a manner similar to that thought to occur during SI. Further interdisciplinary studies are needed to understand this rapidly-evolving tectono-magmatic province and what it can teach us about SI.

  19. Earthquake hazards on the cascadia subduction zone

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, T.H.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1987-04-10

    Large subduction earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone pose a potential seismic hazard. Very young oceanic lithosphere (10 million years old) is being subducted beneath North America at a rate of approximately 4 centimeters per year. The Cascadia subduction zone shares many characteristics with subduction zones in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, where comparably young oceanic lithosphere is also subducting. Very large subduction earthquakes, ranging in energy magnitude (M/sub w/) between 8 and 9.5, have occurred along these other subduction zones. If the Cascadia subduction zone is also storing elastic energy, a sequence of several great earthquakes (M/sub w/ 8) or a giant earthquake (M/sub w/ 9) would be necessary to fill this 1200-kilometer gap. The nature of strong ground motions recorded during subduction earthquakes of M/sub w/ less than 8.2 is discussed. Strong ground motions from even larger earthquakes (M/sub w/ up to 9.5) are estimated by simple simulations. If large subduction earthquakes occur in the Pacific Northwest, relatively strong shaking can be expected over a large region. Such earthquakes may also be accompanied by large local tsunamis. 35 references, 6 figures.

  20. Earthquake hazards on the cascadia subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Heaton, T H; Hartzell, S H

    1987-04-10

    Large subduction earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone pose a potential seismic hazard. Very young oceanic lithosphere (10 million years old) is being subducted beneath North America at a rate of approximately 4 centimeters per year. The Cascadia subduction zone shares many characteristics with subduction zones in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, where comparably young oceanic lithosphere is also subducting. Very large subduction earthquakes, ranging in energy magnitude (M(w)) between 8 and 9.5, have occurred along these other subduction zones. If the Cascadia subduction zone is also storing elastic energy, a sequence of several great earthquakes (M(w) 8) or a giant earthquake (M(w) 9) would be necessary to fill this 1200-kilometer gap. The nature of strong ground motions recorded during subduction earthquakes of M(w) less than 8.2 is discussed. Strong ground motions from even larger earthquakes (M(w) up to 9.5) are estimated by simple simulations. If large subduction earthquakes occur in the Pacific Northwest, relatively strong shaking can be expected over a large region. Such earthquakes may also be accompanied by large local tsunamis.

  1. Geochemical consequences of thermomechanical plumes in subduction zones. Implications for crustal making processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, K.; Castro, A.; Gerya, T.

    2011-12-01

    Crustal growth rates and geochemical consequences of composite plumes formed in subduction zones have been analysed using a thermo-mechanical numerical model of an oceanic-continental subduction zone. This model includes dehydration of subducted crust, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting and melt emplacement. Subduction of crustal material to sublithospheric depth results in the formation of tectonic rock melanges composed of basalts and sediments, which may trigger Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities atop the slab. Composite plumes are formed that rise through the mantle transporting subducted crustal materials (of varying composition) towards hotter zones of the mantle wedge. We have investigated the composition and the geochemical evolution of liquids derived from composite plumes by analysing the differing proportions of the endmembers in the source, i.e. basalts and sediments. Our results show that the proportions of the components are limited to short range variations over an interval of Xb(basalt/basalt+sediment) = 0.4 - 0.8 that allows for granodioritic melt production [1]. We have further calculated Sr and Nd isotopic initial ratios of the melange at any time during the simulations, based on the fraction of the components in the melange. Liquids derived from composite plumes inherit the geochemical characteristics of the parental magma and show distinct temporal variations of radiogenic isotopes. The decoupling between radiogenic isotopes and major elements is an interesting result, and may explain short range variations observed in some batholiths along the Cordillera. Batholiths formed along active continental margins display homogeneous major element composition but substanstial variation in radiogenic isotopic compositions, suggesting widely varying proportions of mantle and crustal components in their source that may be explained by melts derived from composite plumes. [1] Castro A., Gerya, T., García-Casco, A., Fernández, C., Díaz Alvarado, J

  2. Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

    2010-08-29

    The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the

  3. Reconciling the shadow of a subduction signature with rift geochemistry and tectonic environment in Eastern Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMasurier, Wesley E.; Choi, Sung Hi; Hart, Stanley R.; Mukasa, Sam; Rogers, Nick

    2016-09-01

    Basalt-trachyte volcanoes in the Marie Byrd Land (MBL) Cenozoic province lie along the Amundsen Sea coast on the north flank of the West Antarctic rift. Basalts here are characterized by OIB-like geochemistry, restricted ranges of 87Sr/86Sr (0.702535-0.703284) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512839-0.513008) and a wide range of 206Pb/204Pb (19.357-20.934). Basalts at three MBL volcanoes display two anomalies compared with the above and with all other basalts in West Antarctica. They include 143Nd/144Nd (0.512778-0.512789) values at Mt. Takahe and Mt. Siple that are 2σ lower than other West Antarctic basalts, and Ba/Nb, Ba/La, and Ba/Th values at Mt. Murphy and Mt. Takahe that are 3-8 times higher than normal OIB. Isotope and trace element data do not support crustal and lithospheric mantle contamination, or the presence of residual mantle amphibole or phlogopite as explanations of these anomalies. The apparent coincidence of these anomalies with the site of a pre-Cenozoic convergence zone along the Gondwanaland margin suggests a subduction influence. Major episodes of subduction and granitic plutonism took place in MBL during the Devonian, Permian, and Late Cretaceous. Relicts in the source region, of components from these subducted slabs, provide a credible explanation for the uncoupling of Ba from other large ion lithophile elements (LILE), for its erratic distribution, and for the anomalously low 143Nd/144Nd at Mt. Takahe. The last episode of subduction ended 85 Ma, and was followed by continental break-up, rifting and lithospheric attenuation that produced the West Antarctic rift as we know it today. Thus, the enigmatic geochemical signatures in these three volcanoes seem to have been preserved roughly 61-85 m.y. after subduction ended. New calculations of source melting depth and a new determination of lithospheric thickness suggest that the source of the anomalies resides in a fossil mélange diapir that rose from the Cretaceous subducting slab, became attached to the

  4. Boundary layer theory and subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, A.C.

    1993-12-01

    Numerical models of thermally activated convective flow in Earth`s mantle do not resemble active plate tectonics because of their inability to model successfully the process of subduction, other than by the inclusion of artificial weak zones. Here we show, using a boundary layer argument, how the `rigid lid` style of convection favored by thermoviscous fluids leads to lithospheric stresses which may realistically exceed the yield stress and thus cause subduction ot occur through the visoc-plastic failure of lithospheric rock. An explicit criterion for the failure of the lid is given, which is sensitive to the internal viscosity eta(sub a) below the lid. For numbers appropriate to Earth`s mantle, this criterion is approximately eta(sub a) greater than 10(exp 21) Pa s.

  5. Evidence for pressure-release melting beneath magmatic arcs from basalt at Galunggung, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Bronto, S.

    1998-02-01

    The melting of peridotite in the mantle wedge above subduction zones is generally believed to involve hydrous fluids derived from the subducting slab. But if mantle peridotite is upwelling within the wedge, melting due to pressure release could also contribute to magma production. Here we present measurements of the volatile content of primitive magmas from Galunggung volcano in the Indonesian arc which indicate that these magmas were derived from the pressure-release melting of hot mantle peridotite. The samples that we have analysed consist of mafic glass inclusions in high-magnesium basalts. The inclusions contain uniformly low H2O concentrations (0.21-0.38wt%), yet relatively high levels of CO2 (up to 750p.p.m.) indicating that the low H2O concentrations are primary and not due to degassing of the magma. Results from previous anhydrous melting experiments on a chemically similar Aleutian basalts indicate that the Galunggung high-magnesium basalts were last in equilibrium with peridotite at ~1,320°C and 1.2GPa. These high temperatures at shallow sub-crustal levels (about 300-600°C hotter than predicted by geodynamic models,), combined with the production of nearly H2O-free basaltic melts, provide strong evidence that pressure-release melting due to upwelling in the sub-arc mantle has taken place. Regional low-potassium and low-H2O (ref. 5) basalts found in the Cascade arc indicate that such upwelling-induced melting can be widespread.

  6. Geochemical insights into the role of metasomatic hornblendite in generating alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Li-Qun; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2014-10-01

    petrology suggested the role of hornblendite in generating alkali basalt. This mechanism is confirmed by an integrated study of major-trace elements and radiogenic isotopes for Mesozoic alkali basalts from the Qinling orogen in China. The alkali basalts have high contents of MgO (4.8-11.1 wt %, Mg# = 47-69), Na2O + K2O (2.9-5.4 wt %), TiO2 (2.0-3.1 wt %) but low content of SiO2 (41.4-49.6 wt %), which are generally silica-undersaturated with normative minerals of nepheline and olivine. They exhibit OIB-like trace element distribution patterns, with enrichment of LILE and LREE but no depletion of HFSE relative to the primitive mantle. They also show relatively depleted Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions, with low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7028-0.7058, positive ɛNd(t) values of 4.0-9.8 and ɛHf(t) values of 8.8-13.5 for whole-rock, and positive ɛHf(t) values of 5.2-16.4 for zircon. Such element and isotope features indicate their origination from the juvenile subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) source with involvement of crustal components. The alkali basalts generally have high K2O/Na2O ratios, and high K2O and TiO2 contents, suggesting their derivation from partial melting of hornblendite-rich mantle lithology. They also exhibit variable K/La and Ti/La ratios that are correlated with (La/Yb)N ratios, indicating a geochemical heterogeneity of the SCLM source. Taken together, all the above geochemical features can be accounted for by partial melting of a hornblendite-rich SCLM source. The hornblendite would be generated by reaction of the juvenile SCLM wedge peridotite with hydrous felsic melts derived from subducted Palaeotethyan oceanic crust at the slab-mantle interface in the subduction channel. Therefore, orogenic alkali basalts record recycling of the subducted fossil oceanic crust, and the metasomatic hornblendite is an important lithology in local SCLM domains above fossil subduction channels.

  7. Sediment-derived fluids in subduction zones: Isotopic evidence from veins in blueschist and eclogite of the Franciscan Complex, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.K. )

    1991-10-01

    Isotopic analyses of minerals from veins that cut high-grade blueschist and eclogite blocks in the central belt of the Franciscan Complex provide constraints on the chronology of metamorphic events and on the origin and movement of fluids within the subduction zone. A Rb-Sr age of 153 {plus minus}1 Ma obtained for minerals from veins and open cavities that formed contemporaneously with retrograde blueschist facies metamorphism is a minimum age for the prograde metamorphism. The veining precedes the last episode of sedimentary-matrix melange formation by a minimum 15 to 20 Ma, during which time the blocks must have been stored within the subduction complex at low temperatures and without undergoing penetrative deformation. Initial Nd-isotope compositions ({epsilon}{sub Nd}) of the vein minerals range from +10.8 to {minus}2.4, indicating that some fluids were derived predominantly from dehydration of subducted mid-ocean ridge basalt, but that other fluids had a component derived from subducted sediment. The provenance of the subducted sediment was within old continental crust, thus associating the Franciscan paleo-subduction complex with a continental craton by the time of vein formation.

  8. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  9. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  10. Geochemistry and genesis of behind-arc basaltic lavas from eastern Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoušek, V.; Erban, V.; Holub, F. V.; Magna, T.; Bellon, H.; Mlčoch, B.; Wiechert, U.; Rapprich, V.

    2010-05-01

    The petrology and chemistry of the Behind the Volcanic Front (BVF) lavas from eastern mainland Nicaragua and the adjacent Great Corn Island in the Caribbean Sea illustrate the complex nature of sources and processes operating in such a tectonic setting. The older, Early Miocene (˜ 17 Ma) group of low-Ti (< 1 wt.%) basalts-andesites is characterized by a strong LILE/HFSE depletion. The low-Ti lavas from El Rama and El Bluff areas are interpreted as relics of Early Miocene volcanic arc, largely analogous to the nowadays extinct Coyol arc further west. However, these rocks differ in some parameters from the modern volcanic front lavas, most notably in having lower δ7Li values, Ba/Yb ratios and lower U contents. The younger high-Ti (Ti > 1.5%) lavas, rich in other HFSE as well, are represented both by alkaline (Quaternary trachybasalts: Volcán Azul and Kukra Hill) and subalkaline (basalts-basaltic andesites: Late Miocene, ˜ 11 Ma Great Corn Island and Quaternary, Pearl Lagoon) volcanic rocks. The Late Miocene and Quaternary high-Ti BVF lavas probably represent small-volume decompression melts of a source similar to that of the OIB-like magmas, most likely upwelling asthenosphere having a strong Galápagos mantle imprint. The positive Sr-Nd isotopic correlation indicates an interaction between this OIB component and a depleted lithospheric mantle modified by a subduction-related influx of Sr and, to a lesser extent, other hydrous fluid-mobile elements. However, the rocks show no recognizable influence of the modern subduction. The feeble trace-element (e.g., slightly elevated Ba, K, and Sr at some localities) and a more pronounced Sr-Li isotopic subduction-related signal stems most likely from the Miocene convergence episode. Subduction of the Galápagos hot-spot tracks in Costa Rica produces magmas that can be readily recognized by their elevated Sr isotopic ratios due to seafloor alteration; the Nd isotopic signature remains unaffected. Such a component with

  11. A correlation between mid-ocean-ridge basalt chemistry and distance to continents.

    PubMed

    Humler, Eric; Besse, Jean

    2002-10-10

    To fully understand the structure and dynamics of the Earth's convecting mantle, the origins of temperature variations within the mantle need to be resolved. Different hypotheses have been proposed to account for these temperature variations: for example, heat coming from the decay of radioactive elements or heat flowing out of the Earth's core. In addition, theoretical studies suggest that the thermal properties of continental masses can affect mantle convection, but quantitative data that could allow us to test these models are scarce. To address this latter problem, we have examined the chemistry of mid-ocean-ridge basalt--which reflects the temperature of the source mantle--as a function of the distance of the ridge from the closest continental margin. No correlation is observed for oceanic ridges close to subduction zones or hotspots; subduction zones probably inhibit thermal transfer between the mantle beneath continents and ocean, whereas hotspots influence the major-element chemistry of ridge basalts, which makes their interpretation with respect to mantle temperature more difficult. However, we do observe a significant correlation for mid-oceanic basalts from the Atlantic and Indian oceans. From this, we conclude that the location of continental masses relative to active ridges influences the large-scale thermal structure of the mantle and we estimate that the mantle cools by 0.05 to 0.1 degrees C per kilometre from the continental margins.

  12. Modeled Temperatures and Fluid Source Distributions for the Mexico Subduction Zone: Effects of Hydrothermal Cooling and Implications for Plate Boundary Seismic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. R.; Spinelli, G. A.; Wada, I.

    2014-12-01

    In subduction zones, spatial variations in pore fluid pressure are hypothesized to control the distribution and nature of slip behavior (e.g., "normal" earthquakes, slow slip events, non-volcanic tremor, very low frequency earthquakes) on the plate boundary fault. A primary control on the pore fluid pressure distribution in subduction zones is the distribution of fluid release from hydrous minerals in the subducting sediment and rock. The distributions of these diagenetic and metamorphic fluid sources are controlled by the pressure-temperature paths that the subducting material follows. Thus, constraining subduction zone thermal structure is required to inform conceptual models of seismic behavior. Here, we present results of thermal models for the Mexico subduction zone, a system that has received recent attention due to observations of slow-slip events and non-volcanic tremor. We model temperatures in five margin-perpendicular transects from 96 ˚W to 104 ˚W. In each transect, we examine the potential thermal effects of vigorous fluid circulation in a high permeability aquifer within the basaltic basement of the oceanic crust. In the transect at 100˚W, hydrothermal circulation cools the subducting material by up to 140 ˚C, shifting peak slab dehydration landward by ~100 km relative to previous estimates from models that do not include the effects of fluid circulation. The age of the subducting plate in the trench increases from ~3 Ma at 104 ˚W to ~18 Ma at 96 ˚W; hydrothermal circulation redistributes the most heat (and cools the system the most) where the subducting plate is youngest. For systems with <20 Ma subducting lithosphere, hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust should be considered in estimating subduction zone temperatures and fluid source distributions.

  13. Archean Subduction or Not? The Archean Volcanic Record Re-assessed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian; Peate, David; Smithies, Hugh

    2013-04-01

    Methods of identification of volcanic arc lavas may utilize: (1) the selective enrichment of the mantle wedge by 'subduction-mobile' elements; (2) the distinctive preconditioning of mantle along its flow path to the arc front; (3) the distinctive combination of fluid-flux and decompression melting; and (4) the effects of fluids on crystallization of the resulting magma. It should then be a simple matter uniquely to recognise volcanic arc lavas in the Geological Record and so document past subduction zones. Essentially, this is generally true in the oceans, but generally not on the continents. Even in recent, fresh lavas and with a full battery of element and isotope tools at our disposal, there can be debate over whether an arc-like geochemical signature results from active subduction, an older, inherited subduction component in the lithosphere, or crustal contamination. In the Archean, metamorphism, deformation, a different thermal regime and potential non-uniformitarian tectonic scenarios make the fingerprinting of arc lavas particularly problematic. Not least, the complicating factor of crustal contamination is likely to be much greater given the higher magma and crustal temperatures and higher magma fluxes prevailing. Here, we apply new, high-resolution immobile element fingerprinting methods, based primarily on Th-Nb fractionation, to Archean lavas. In the Pilbara, for example, where there is a volcanic record extending for over >500 m.y., we note that lavas with high Th/Nb (negative Nb anomalies) are common throughout the lava sequence. Many older formations also follow a basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite (BADR) sequence resembling present-day arcs. However, back-extrapolation of their compositions to their primitive magmas demonstrates that these were almost certainly crustally-contaminated plume-derived lavas. By contrast, this is not the case in the uppermst part of the sequence where even the most primitive magmas have significant Nb anomalies. The

  14. B isotopes of Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the Tuha basin mirror a transition from subduction to intraplate setting in Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Quan; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wei, Gang-Jian; Wei, Jing-Xian; Yang, Fan; Chen, Xuan-Yu; Liu, Liang; Wei, Xun

    2016-11-01

    Controversies remain as to the Permian tectonic setting in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), in particular, regarding the triggering of Permian magmatism. To address this issue, we carried out a geochemical study on Dananhu volcanics from the Tuha basin, southwestern CAOB. 40Ar/39Ar analyses for feldspar separates yield a Carboniferous age of 321.2 ± 9.8 Ma for the andesites and a Permian age of 278.9 ± 4.2 Ma for the basalts. Both the andesites and basalts geochemically resemble subduction-related magmas in aspects of their trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition, but they may differ in petrogenesis. The andesites are typical adakites. Their high Cr and Ni contents, and low heavy rare earth element contents, and positive correlation between B/Nb ratios and δ11B values suggest that they were generated by interaction between slab-derived melts/fluids and the mantle wedge. The Permian basalts are subdivided into two subgroups: alkali and tholeiitic basalts. High Ba/La and Ba/Zr ratios indicate that the source of the alkali basalts has been metasomatized by fluids/melts derived from altered oceanic crust. In contrast, a volatile-free source metasomatized by sediment-derived fluids/melts is inferred for the tholeiitic basalts given their high Th/Zr and Th/Ce ratios. Negative correlation between B/Nb and δ11B for the Permian basalts imply that the arc signatures were imposed by previous subduction events, and no direct slab-derived fluids/melts participated in their petrogenesis. These geochemical characteristics alongside regional geologic records collectively suggest a tectonic shift in the southwestern CAOB from subduction-related setting during the Late Carboniferous to an intraplate setting during the Early Permian.

  15. Lithological nature of the subduction channel: Insights from the Karabakh suture zone (Lesser Caucasus) and general comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hässig, Marc; Rolland, Yann; Sosson, Marc; Avagyan, Ara

    2016-05-01

    The lithological nature of major interplate boundaries is estimated by a field analysis of a well preserved exhumed subduction channel in the Caucasus Karabakh region. From this field example the subduction channel is a narrow geological object of about 500 m width formed at approximate depth of 10 km along an Andean-type subduction zone. It is comprised by an upper 'sedimentary' channel formed by an upper section of detrital and volcanic rocks thrusted on top of pelagic sediments scrapped off the oceanic floor. This sedimentary mélange is thrusted on top of an intensely deformed tectonic mélange. The tectonic mélange comprises blocks of basalt from the oceanic floor and a focussed deformation zone 50-100 m in width. This zone is mainly formed by mud-supported conglomerates exhibiting a chlorite + carbonate matrix with blocks of basalt, cross-cut by numerous chlorite-carbonate-epidote-albite veins. It overlies an undeformed ocean floor section. Superposed chlorite- and calcite-bearing veins in the mélange evidence high fluid:rock ratios of 0.3-2.3, with varied δ18O and δ13C isotopic ratios (+17 < δ18O < +25‰; -7 < δ13C < +4‰), which agrees with fluid mixing between pelagic sediments and a hydrothermal component at temperatures ranging from 120 to 400 °C, and thus mixing between deep and shallow reservoirs along the subduction interface. These data show that the several fluid reservoirs situated along the interplate boundary could have been connected by high-magnitude co-seismic displacements along the subduction zone. These subduction channel features are confronted to other similar fossil examples and current settings, such as the Andes accretionary prism to propose a reconstructed geometry of the interplate contact zone from the surface to the base of the crust.

  16. Large-scale subduction of continental crust implied by India-Asia mass-balance calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, Miquela; Rowley, David B.; Currie, Brian; Colman, Albert S.

    2016-11-01

    Continental crust is buoyant compared with its oceanic counterpart and resists subduction into the mantle. When two continents collide, the mass balance for the continental crust is therefore assumed to be maintained. Here we use estimates of pre-collisional crustal thickness and convergence history derived from plate kinematic models to calculate the crustal mass balance in the India-Asia collisional system. Using the current best estimates for the timing of the diachronous onset of collision between India and Eurasia, we find that about 50% of the pre-collisional continental crustal mass cannot be accounted for in the crustal reservoir preserved at Earth's surface today--represented by the mass preserved in the thickened crust that makes up the Himalaya, Tibet and much of adjacent Asia, as well as southeast Asian tectonic escape and exported eroded sediments. This implies large-scale subduction of continental crust during the collision, with a mass equivalent to about 15% of the total oceanic crustal subduction flux since 56 million years ago. We suggest that similar contamination of the mantle by direct input of radiogenic continental crustal materials during past continent-continent collisions is reflected in some ocean crust and ocean island basalt geochemistry. The subduction of continental crust may therefore contribute significantly to the evolution of mantle geochemistry.

  17. Resistivity logging of fractured basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Stefansson, V.; Axelsson, G.; Sigurdsson, O.

    1982-01-01

    A lumped double porosity model was studied in order to estimate the effect of fractures on resistivity - porosity relations. It is found that the relationship between resistivity and porosity for fractured rock is in general not simple and depends both on the amounts of matrix porosity as well as the fracture orientation. However, when fractures dominate over matrix porosity the exponent is close to 1.0. Resistivity-porosity relations have been determined for large amounts of basaltic formations in Iceland. An exponent close to 1.0 is found in all cases investigated. This is interpreted as fractures constitute a considerable part of the porosity of the basalts. In the IRDP-hole in Eastern Iceland it is found that the ratio of fracture porosity to total porosity decreases with depth.

  18. Genetic interpretation of lead-isotopic data from the Columbia River basalt group, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lead-isotopic data for the high-alumina olivine plateau basalts and most of the Colombia River basalt group plot within the Cascade Range mixing array. The data for several of the formations form small, tight clusters and the Nd and Sr isotopic data show discrete variation between these basalt groups. The observed isotopic and trace-element data from most of the Columbia River basalt group can be accounted for by a model which calls for partial melting of the convecting oceanic-type mantle and contamination by fluids derived from continental sediments which were subducted along the trench. These sediments were transported in the low-velocity zone at least 400 km behind the active arc into a back-arc environment represented by the Columbia Plateau province. With time, the zone of melting moved up, resulting in the formation of the Saddle Mt basalt by partial melting of a 2600 m.y.-old sub-continental lithosphere characterized by high Th/U, Th/Pb, Rb/Sr and Nd/Sm ratios and LREE enrichment. Partial melting of old sub-continental lithosphere beneath the continental crust may be an important process in the formation of continental tholeiite flood basalt sequences world-wide. -L.di H.

  19. Middle Miocene near trench volcanism in northern Colombia: A record of slab tearing due to the simultaneous subduction of the Caribbean Plate under South and Central America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, M.; Cardona, A.; Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; De La Parra, F.; Espitia, D.; López-Martínez, M.

    2013-08-01

    Field, geochemical, geochronological, biostratigraphical and sedimentary provenance results of basaltic and associated sediments northern Colombia reveal the existence of Middle Miocene (13-14 Ma) mafic volcanism within a continental margin setting usually considered as amagmatic. This basaltic volcanism is characterized by relatively high Al2O3 and Na2O values (>15%), a High-K calc-alkaline affinity, large ion lithophile enrichment and associated Nb, Ta and Ti negative anomalies which resemble High Al basalts formed by low degree of asthenospheric melting at shallow depths mixed with some additional slab input. The presence of pre-Cretaceous detrital zircons, tourmaline and rutile as well as biostratigraphic results suggest that the host sedimentary rocks were deposited in a platform setting within the South American margin. New results of P-wave residuals from northern Colombia reinforce the view of a Caribbean slab subducting under the South American margin. The absence of a mantle wedge, the upper plate setting, and proximity of this magmatism to the trench, together with geodynamic constraints suggest that the subducted Caribbean oceanic plate was fractured and a slab tear was formed within the oceanic plate. Oceanic plate fracturing is related to the splitting of the subducting Caribbean Plate due to simultaneous subduction under the Panama-Choco block and northwestern South America, and the fast overthrusting of the later onto the Caribbean oceanic plate.

  20. Global systematics of formation conditions of subduction zone magmas and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, I.; Ozawa, K.

    2009-12-01

    magmas and melting conditions. We have applied this method to basalt-basaltic andesite from more than 30 frontal volcanoes of 13 subduction zones. From the estimated melting conditions, we have the following important results. (1) Volcanoes from a specific subduction zone show consistent melting conditions particular for the arc. (2) The degree of melting and melting pressure show a good positive global correlation. (3) The melting temperature and melting pressure also show a good positive global correlation. (4) The degree of melting and H2O content in the mantle show a positive global correlation at low melting degree, but significant scatter at higher melting degree. The positive correlation between degree of melting and melting pressure suggest that the melting in the wedge mantle is primarily controlled by decompressional melting of mantle with various potential temperatures as in the case of MORB generation suggested by the similar global systematics. Comparison of the results with tectonic parameters suggests that subduction zones where a hot mantle upwells easily show higher degree of melting. It is concluded that the return flow induced by the slab subduction might be the most critical factor that controls subduction zone magmatism.

  1. Flood basalts and extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The largest known effusive eruptions during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic Eras, the voluminous flood basalts, have long been suspected as being associated with major extinctions of biotic species. Despite the possible errors attached to the dates in both time series of events, the significance level of the suspected correlation is found here to be 1 percent to 4 percent. Statistically, extinctions lag eruptions by a mean time interval that is indistinguishable from zero, being much less than the average residual derived from the correlation analysis. Oceanic flood basalts, however, must have had a different biological impact, which is still uncertain owing to the small number of known examples and differing physical factors. Although not all continental flood basalts can have produced major extinction events, the noncorrelating eruptions may have led to smaller marine extinction events that terminated at least some of the less catastrophically ending geologic stages. Consequently, the 26 Myr quasi-periodicity seen in major marine extinctions may be only a sampling effect, rather than a manifestation of underlying periodicity.

  2. Mars Crust: Made of Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    By combining data from several sources, Harry Y. (Hap) McSween (University of Tennessee), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawaii) and Michael B. Wyatt (Brown University) show that the surface of Mars is composed mostly of basalt not unlike those that make up the Earth's oceanic crust. McSween and his colleagues used data from Martian meteorites, analyses of soils and rocks at robotic landing sites, and chemical and mineralogical information from orbiting spacecraft. The data show that Mars is composed mostly of rocks similar to terrestrial basalts called tholeiites, which make up most oceanic islands, mid-ocean ridges, and the seafloor beneath sediments. The Martian samples differ in some respects that reflect differences in the compositions of the Martian and terrestrial interiors, but in general are a lot like Earth basalts. Cosmochemistst have used the compositions of Martian meteorites to discriminate bulk properties of Mars and Earth, but McSween and coworkers' synthesis shows that the meteorites differ from most of the Martian crust (the meteorites have lower aluminum, for example), calling into question how diagnostic the meteorites are for understanding the Martian interior.

  3. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  4. Crustal recycling by subduction erosion in the central Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Susanne M.; Gómez-Tuena, Arturo; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Bolge, Louise L.; Brandl, Philipp A.; Espinasa-Perena, Ramón; Solari, Luigi; Stuart, Finlay M.; Vannucchi, Paola; Zellmer, Georg F.

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of upper plate crust in subduction zones, or 'subduction erosion', is a major mechanism of crustal destruction at convergent margins. However, assessing the impact of eroded crust on arc magmas is difficult owing to the compositional similarity between the eroded crust, trench sediment and arc crustal basement that may all contribute to arc magma formation. Here we compare Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf and trace element data of crustal input material to Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-He-O isotope chemistry of a well-characterized series of olivine-phyric, high-Mg# basalts to dacites in the central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). Basaltic to andesitic magmas crystallize high-Ni olivines that have high mantle-like 3He/4He = 7-8 Ra and high crustal δ18Omelt = +6.3-8.5‰ implying their host magmas to be near-primary melts from a mantle infiltrated by slab-derived crustal components. Remarkably, their Hf-Nd isotope and Nd/Hf trace element systematics rule out the trench sediment as the recycled crust end member, and imply that the coastal and offshore granodiorites are the dominant recycled crust component. Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope modeling shows that the granodiorites control the highly to moderately incompatible elements in the calc-alkaline arc magmas, together with lesser additions of Pb- and Sr-rich fluids from subducted mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB)-type altered oceanic crust (AOC). Nd-Hf mass balance suggests that the granodiorite exceeds the flux of the trench sediment by at least 9-10 times, corresponding to a flux of ⩾79-88 km3/km/Myr into the subduction zone. At an estimated thickness of 1500-1700 m, the granodiorite may buoyantly rise as bulk 'slab diapirs' into the mantle melt region and impose its trace element signature (e.g., Th/La, Nb/Ta) on the prevalent calc-alkaline arc magmas. Deep slab melting and local recycling of other slab components such as oceanic seamounts further diversify the MVB magmas by producing rare, strongly fractionated high-La magmas and a minor population of

  5. Modelling stress accumulation and dissipation in subducting lithosphere and the origins of double and triple seismic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, A.; Kusznir, N. J.; Rietbrock, A.; Dabrowski, M.; Podladchikov, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Stress accumulation within subducting lithosphere responsible for intermediate depth Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity is generated by the interaction of many contributions including slab pull from negative buoyancy, slab resistance, thermal stresses, slab bending and unbending, and the basalt to eclogite transformation. These in turn are influenced by subduction convergence rate, slab dip, slab age, subduction roll back, mantle viscosity structure and the deeper mantle phase transitions. The resulting patterns of seismicity are complex, leading to double and triple seismic zones, and transitions in the polarity of down-dip stress. We examine the accumulation and dissipation of stress within the subducting lithospheric slab responsible for intermediate depth seismicity using (i) a 2D thermo-viscous finite element model and (ii) a 1D viscoelastic model. Our 2D thermo-viscous model uses coupled finite element thermal and mechanical solvers. The rheology is temperature and stress dependent and incorporates yield stress. The model has externally applied convergence and roll-back velocities but has dynamic internal body forces. We investigate the development of stress within the subducting slab and its sensitivity to megathrust geometry and dip, convergence velocity, roll back velocity, and slab age. The model generates observed magnitudes of trench dynamic topography and predicts down dip changes in stress polarity in the subducting slab. Our 1D model represents a vertical segment of oceanic lithosphere in a Lagrangian manner as it is subducted. The viscoelastic formulation assumes infinitesimal layered Maxwell viscoelastic rheology which is temperature and stress dependent, and includes stress advection and memory during subduction. A simple finite difference scheme couples this viscoelasticity with kinematic thermal conditions. The model determines stresses arising from slab pull, slab bending and unbending, the basalt-eclogite transition and thermal stresses, and

  6. Devonian magmatism in the Timan Range, Arctic Russia - subduction, post-orogenic extension, or rifting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, V.; Scarrow, J. H.; Silva, I. G. Nobre; Cambeses, A.

    2016-11-01

    Devonian mafic magmatism of the northern East European Craton (EEC) has been variously linked to Uralian subduction, post-orogenic extension associated with Caledonian collision, and rifting. New elemental and isotopic analyses of Devonian basalts from the Timan Range and Kanin Peninsula, Russia, in the northern EEC constrain magma genesis, mantle source(s) and the tectonic process(es) associated with this Devonian volcanism to a rift-related context. Two compositional groups of low-K2O tholeiitic basalts are recognized. On the basis of Th concentrations, LREE concentrations, and (LREE/HREE)N, the data suggest two distinct magma batches. Incompatible trace elements ratios (e.g., Th/Yb, Nb/Th, Nb/La) together with Nd and Pb isotopes indicate involvement of an NMORB to EMORB 'transitional' mantle component mixed with variable amounts of a continental component. The magmas were derived from a source that developed high (U,Th)/Pb, U/Th and Sm/Nd over time. The geochemistry of Timan-Kanin basalts supports the hypothesis that the genesis of Devonian basaltic magmatism in the region resulted from local melting of transitional mantle and lower crust during rifting of a mainly non-volcanic continental rifted margin.

  7. Flood Basalts and Neoproterozoic Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, G. P.; Cox, G. M.; Kunzmann, M.; Strauss, J. V.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs), which are commonly associated with supercontinental break-up, are the product of the emplacement of >106 km3 of mafic rocks in less than a few million years. LIP magmatism, in particular continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism, perturbs global climate on shorter time scales through the radiative effects of degassed SO2 and CO2. On longer time scales, CFBs alter climate through the effect of the high weatherabilty of mafic rocks (5-10 times greater than average continental crust) on global silicate weathering. A link between flood basalt weathering, Rodinia break-up, and Neoproterozoic snowball glaciation has been postulated. Here we present a new compilation of Nd isotope data on Neoproterozoic mudstones from Laurentia, Australia, and South China along with a new seawater strontium isotope record from well preserved carbonates that support this hypothesis. These datasets are consistent with an outsized role of basalt weathering on the global silicate weathering budget during the second half of the Tonian period (~850 to 725 Ma). Along with Os isotope data, they also suggest that an additional pulse of basalt weathering at the end of the Tonian may have initiated the Sturtian snowball glaciation. CFBs have relatively high concentrations of phosphorous. Hence, the drawdown in atmospheric CO2 required to trigger the Sturtian snowball Earth was likely accomplished through a combination of increased silicate weathering rates and enhanced biological productivity driven by greater nutrient supply to the oceans. CFBs were also the likely source of the iron in Neoproterozoic iron formation (IF), all significant occurrences of which are restricted to Sturtian-aged glacial successions. Dramatic declines in ɛNd following the Cryogenian snowball glaciations are mirrored by stepwise increases in 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting the scouring of the continents by global ice sheets. This continental resurfacing removed the extensive basalt carapace as well as

  8. Geochemistry of metamorphosed pillow basalts of the Chara Zone, NE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, N. I.; Khlestov, V. V.; Sukhorukov, V. P.; Khlestov, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical study of the metamorphosed pillow lavas of the Chara Zone revealed that their protoliths have N-MORB compositions. Elevated concentrations of K, Rb, Cs, and lower Ca may be related not to blueschist metamorphism, but rather they may be inherited from underwater alteration of parental basalts. Comparative analysis of the compositions of massive glaucophanites and vein rocks demonstrated the relative mobility of Sr, U, P, Ba, Rb, K, Cs, Ca, and LREEs, at least on the local scale. Their mobility has been provided by fluids circulating in the subduction zone, where the fluids have been generated through slab dehydratation processes. These studies of metamorphosed pillow lavas of the Chara Zone displayed only local alterations in the bulk composition of their protoliths, which evidences a low intensity of fluid flows: this allowed preservation of the geochemistry of oceanic basalts.

  9. Partial separation of halogens during the subduction of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, Bastian; Pawley, Alison; Lyon, Ian; Henkel, Torsten; Clay, Patricia L.; Ruzié, Lorraine; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2014-05-01

    Incompatible elements, such as halogens, have the potential to act as key tracers for volatile transport processes in Earth and planetary systems. The determination of halogen abundances and ratios in different mantle reservoirs gives us the ability to better understand volatile input mechanisms into the Earth's mantle through subduction of oceanic crust. Halogen partition coefficients were experimentally determined between forsterite, orthopyroxene and silicate melt at pressures ranging from 1.0 to 2.3 GPa and temperatures ranging from 1500-1600°C, thus representing partial melting conditions of the Earth's mantle. Combining our data with results of recent studies (Beyer et al. 2012; Dalou et al. 2012) shows that halogen partitioning between forsterite and melt increases by factors of about 1000 (fluorine) and 100 (chlorine) between 1300°C and 1600°C and does not show any pressure dependence. Chlorine partitioning between orthopyroxene and melt increases by a factor of about 1500 for a temperature increase of 100°C (anywhere between 1300°C and 1600°C), but decreases by a factor of about 1500 for a pressure increase of 1.0 GPa (anywhere between 1.0 GPa and 2.5 GPa). At similar P-T conditions, a comparable effect is observed for the fluorine partitioning behaviour, which increases by 500-fold for a temperature increase of 100°C and decreases with increasing pressure. Halogen abundances in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB; F=3-15, Cl=0.5-14ppm) and ocean island basalts (OIB; F=35-65, Cl=21-55 ppm) source regions were estimated by combining our experimentally determined partition coefficients with natural halogen concentrations in oceanic basalts (e.g. Ruzié et al. 2012). The estimated chlorine OIB source mantle concentration is in almost perfect agreement with primitive mantle estimates (Palme and O'Neill 2003). If we expect an OIB source mantle slightly depleted in incompatible elements, this suggests that at least small amounts of chlorine are recycled deep

  10. Rutile-Melt Partitioning of High Field Strength Elements: New Constraints on the Nature of the Subduction Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, G. A.

    2005-12-01

    A compositional feature that distinguishes subduction-related lavas from oceanic basalts is depletion of the high field strength elements (HFSE), such as Ti, Zr, Nb, and Ta [1,2]. Similar depletions also characterize many continental basalts [3,4], and have been inferred for the bulk continental crust [5,6]. Because the HFSE are compatible in rutile (TiO2), it has been posited that their depletion in island arc basalts (IAB) is due to its presence as a residual phase, either in the subducted oceanic crust or the mantle wedge. Here I present results from new experiments that investigate the influences of pressure, temperature, and composition on the partitioning of Zr4+, Nb5+, Hf4+, and Ta5+ between rutile and silicate melt. These results demonstrate that low-degree partial melting of rutile-bearing subducted oceanic crust would produce significant, identifiable fractionations among the HFSE, providing a test for the nature of the subduction component. Experiments were carried out on 2 SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O base melt compositions (rhyodacite; basalt). Rutile saturation was achieved by adding 10-40 wt% TiO2. Each starting composition was doped with ZrO2, Nb2O5, HfO2, and Ta2O5. Low-pressure experiments were carried out using sealed Pt capsules in a vertical quenching furnace. High pressure experiments were carried out in graphite capsules using a solid-medium piston-cylinder device. The major element composition of glass and rutile, as well as the trace element content of the rutile, were determined by electron microprobe. The trace element content of the glass was determined SIMS. At 1 bar and temperatures of 1250 ° to 1450 °C the concentration of TiO2 at rutile saturation is significantly higher in the basalt (17-38 wt%) than the rhyodacite (5-12 wt%). Rutile-melt partition coefficients for the HFSE are higher for the rhyodacite than for the basalt by a factor of ~2-5. Partition coefficients for Nb5+ and Ta5+ are larger than those for Zr4+ and Hf4+ in all

  11. Variability of South Pacific Tropical Water Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Fine, R. A.; Qu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Collection of Argo data provides an opportunity to carefully examine South Pacific Tropical Water (SPTW) subduction rate variability. SPTW is characterized by a vertical salinity maximum exceeding 36.2 psu centered at 20°S and 120°W and lying in the upper thermocline between 24.0 and 25.0 σθ. Subduction rates for SPTW for two different periods are calculated using two methods. Monthly one degree by one degree Argo data covering the South Pacific are used to calculate subduction rates from September 2005 to August 2013, also lateral induction and vertical pumping are calculated. There are two spatial subduction maxima, and the lateral induction process dominates in both maxima. Subduction rates from Argo data vary from 15 to 26 m/yr +/- 7.5% during the 8 year period. Subduction rates are shown to be positively and highly correlated with Southern Oscillation Index. Additionally, using CFC-12 data from the 1990s World Ocean Circulation Experiment, average subduction rate is calculated to be 35 +/- 16.5 m/yr. Some of the difference between Argo and tracer rates is due to a difference in the methods, and some difference may be due to decadal variability. Thus, SPTW subduction rates are shown to vary on interannual and possible decadal time scales.

  12. Filamentous microbial fossil from low-grade metamorphosed basalt in northern Chichibu belt, central Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, M.; Sugawara, H.; Tsuji, T.; Ikehara, M.

    2014-05-01

    The past two decades have seen the reporting of microbial fossils within ancient oceanic basalts that could be identical to microbes within modern basalts. Here, we present new petrographic, mineralogical, and stable isotopic data for metabasalts containing filamentous structures in a Jurassic accretionary complex within the northern Chichibu Belt of the Yanadani area of central Shikoku, Japan. Mineralized filaments within these rocks are present in interstitial domains filled with calcite, pumpellyite, or quartz, and consist of iron oxide, phengite, and pumpellyite. δ13CPDB values for filament-bearing calcite within these metabasalts vary from -2.49‰ to 0.67‰. A biogenic origin for these filamentous structures is indicated by (1) the geological context of the Yanadani metabasalt, (2) the morphology of the filaments, (3) the carbon isotope composition of carbonates that host the filaments, and (4) the timing of formation of these filaments relative to the timing of low-grade metamorphism in a subduction zone. The putative microorganisms that formed these filaments thrived between eruption (Late Paleozoic) and accretion (Early Jurassic) of the basalt. The data presented here indicate that cryptoendolithic life was present within water-filled vesicles in pre-Jurassic intraplate basalts. The mineralogy of the filaments reflects the low-grade metamorphic recrystallization of authigenic microbial clays similar to those formed by the encrustation of prokaryotes in modern iron-rich environments. These findings suggest that a previously unusual niche for life is present within intraplate volcanic rocks in accretionary complexes.

  13. What lies below the Columbia River Basalt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidel, S.; Kauffman, J.; Garwood, D.; Bush, J.

    2006-12-01

    More than 200,000 sq km of the Pacific Northwest are covered by the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRB). The lavas were erupted onto a complex structural setting dominated by cratonic rocks, and accreted terranes at a convergent plate margin. Few boreholes penetrate the basalt so the sub-basalt structure must be deduced from geophysical data, the surrounding area and structures within the basalt. In Oregon (OR) and Idaho (ID) the eastern edge of the basalt follows the boundary between the craton and accreted terranes but the suture zone becomes lost beneath the basalt in eastern WA. In northern OR and Washington (WA), a thick basalt sequence in the western part of the province overlies an early Tertiary basin with kms of sediment fill which, in turn, overlies accreted terranes. In eastern WA and western ID, a much thinner basalt sequence overlies cratonic and accreted terrane rocks without thick intervening Tertiary sediments. This basin began in the Eocene and continued into the present; the sediment now controls the location of the Yakima fold belt (YFB). Prior to basalt eruptions, a rugged mountainous terrane existed in eastern WA and ID that probably extended to the west. NW faults and folds (e.g. the Orofino fault zone ID, and Chiwaukum graben and White River-Naches River fault zone, Cascade Range) dominate the prebasalt rocks and must extend under the basalt. Remanents of this NW trend are present in YFB (e.g. Rattlesnake-Wallula fault zone) but these are less prominent than the large basalt anticlinal folds that are decoupled from the basement. CRB dikes have a NW to N trend and are thought to reflect a basement structural weakness. In the basalt province many folds and faults follow this dike trend. Major NE trending faults in the basalts do not have major counterparts beyond the basalt. One fault, the Hite Fault, must form a significant sub-basalt boundary. Dikes to the east of the Hite fault trend N-N20W whereas dikes to the west trend N40-50W

  14. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Though there is no plate tectonics per se on Venus, recent Magellan radar images and topographic profiles of the planet suggest the occurrence of the plate tectonic processes of lithospheric subduction and back-arc spreading. The perimeters of several large coronae (e.g., Latona, Artemis, and Eithinoha) resemble Earth subduction zones in both their planform and topographic profile. The planform of arcuate structures in Eastern Aphrodite were compared with subduction zones of the East Indies. The venusian structures have radii of curvature that are similar to those of terrestrial subduction zones. Moreover, the topography of the venusian ridge/trench structures is highly asymmetric with a ridge on the concave side and a trough on the convex side; Earth subduction zones generally display the same asymmetry.

  15. Subduction dynamics: Constraints from gravity field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadoo, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Satellite systems do the best job of resolving the long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field. Over the oceans, satellite-borne radar altimeters such as SEASAT provide the best resolution observations of the intermediate wavelength components. Satellite observations of gravity contributed to the understanding of the dynamics of subduction. Large, long wavelength geoidal highs generally occur over subduction zones. These highs are attributed to the superposition of two effects of subduction: (1) the positive mass anomalies of subducting slabs themselves; and (2) the surface deformations such as the trenches convectively inducted by these slabs as they sink into the mantle. Models of this subduction process suggest that the mantle behaves as a nonNewtonian fluid, its effective viscosity increases significantly with depth, and that large positive mass anomalies may occur beneath the seismically defined Benioff zones.

  16. Sulfur in Hydrous, Oxidized Basaltic Magmas: Phase Equilibria and Melt Solubilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichavant, M.; Scaillet, B.; di Carlo, I.; Rotolo, S.; Metrich, N.

    2006-05-01

    Basaltic magmas from subduction zone settings are typically S-rich and may be the ultimate source of sulfur in vapor phases emitted during eruptions of more silicic systems. To understand processes of sulfur recycling in subduction zones, the behaviour of S in hydrous, oxidized, mafic arc magmas must be known. Although experimental data on S-bearing basaltic melts are available for dry conditions, and under both reduced and oxidized fO2, no study has yet examined the effect of S in hydrous mafic melts. In this work, 3 starting compositions were investigated, a basaltic andesite, a K basalt and a picritic basalt. For each composition, experimental data for S-added (1 wt % elemental sulfur) and S-free charges were obtained under similar P-T- H2O-fO2. All experiments were performed at 4 kbar and at either 950 ° C (basaltic andesite), 1100 ° C (K basalt) or 1150 ° C (picritic basalt). These were carried out in an internally heated vessel pressurized with Ar-H2 mixtures and fitted with a drop-quench device, and lasted for between 15 and 99 h. Either Au (950 ° C) or AuPd alloys (1100 and 1150 ° C) were used as containers. These latter perform satisfactorily under strongly oxidizing conditions, i.e., for fO2 above NNO+1 at 1100 and 1150 ° C. Below NNO+1, Pd- Au-S-Fe phases appear in the charges, suggesting extensive interaction between S and the capsule material. Experimental redox conditions, determined from Ni-Pd-O sensors, ranged between NNO+1.3 to +4.1 (basaltic andesite), +0.6 to +2.0 (K basalt), and +0.3 to +3.6 (picritic basalt). H2O concentrations in melt ranged from 8.2 wt % (basaltic andesite), decreasing to 2.2-3.9 wt % (K basalt) and 2.5-5.0 wt % (picritic basalt). All 3 compositions studied crystallize anhydrite and Fe-Ni-S-O sulphide as saturating S-bearing phases, anhydrite at high fO2 and sulphide at lower fO2, although melt composition also influences their stability. Anhydrite is present at a fO2 as low as NNO+1.5 in the K basalt. In the picritic

  17. Flat Subduction and Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dávila, F. M.; Eakin, C. M.; Crameri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle dynamics manifests at the surface via the horizontal motions of plates and the vertical deflections that influence topography and the non-hydrostatic geoid. The pioneering work of Mitrovica et al. (1989) and Gurnis (1990) on this dynamic topography revolutionized our understanding of sedimentary basin formation, sea level changes and continental flooding. The temporal evolution of subduction can explain the migration of basins and even the drainage reversal of the Amazon (Shephard et al., 2012; Eakin et al., 2014). Until recently, flat subduction has been seen as enhancing downward deflection of the overriding plate and increasing flooding. However, this interpretation depends crucially on the details of the morphology and density structure of the slab, which controls the loci and amplitude of the deflection. We tend to ignore morphological details in mantle dynamics because flow can smooth out short wavelength variations. We have shown instead that details matter! Using South America as a natural laboratory because of the large changes in morphology of the Nazca slab along strike, we show that downward deflection of the overriding plate and hence basin formation, do not occur over flat segments but at the leading edge, where slabs plunge back into the mantle. This is true in both Argentina and Peru. The temporal evolution from a 'normally' dipplng slab to a flat slab leads to uplift over flat segments rather than enhanced subsidence. Critical for this result is the use of a detailed morphological model of the present-day Nazca slab with a spatial resolution of 50-100 km and based on relocated seismicity and magnetotelluric results. The density structure of the slab, due to age and the presence of overthickened crust from aseismic ridge subduction is essential. Overthickened crust leads to buoyant slabs. We reproduce formation and deposition of the Acres-Solimoes basin and the evolution of the Amazon drainage basin in Peru as well as the Mar Chiquita

  18. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  19. The Use of Basalt, Basalt Fibers and Modified Graphite for Nuclear Waste Repository - 12150

    SciTech Connect

    Gulik, V.I.; Biland, A.B.

    2012-07-01

    New materials enhancing the isolation of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are continuously being developed.. Our research suggests that basalt-based materials, including basalt roving chopped basalt fiber strands, basalt composite rebar and materials based on modified graphite, could be used for enhancing radioactive waste isolation during the storage and disposal phases and maintaining it during a significant portion of the post-closure phase. The basalt vitrification process of nuclear waste is a viable alternative to glass vitrification. Basalt roving, chopped basalt fiber strands and basalt composite rebars can significantly increase the strength and safety characteristics of nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel storages. Materials based on MG are optimal waterproofing materials for nuclear waste containers. (authors)

  20. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  1. Inferring Mantle From Basalt Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stracke, A.

    2014-12-01

    Isotope ratios in oceanic basalts, first reported by Gast and co-workers 50 years ago, are unique tracers of mantle composition, because they are expected to mirror the composition of their mantle sources. While the latter is certainly true for homogeneous sources, the plethora of studies over the last 50 years have shown that mantle sources are isotopically heterogeneous on different length scales. Isotopic differences exist between basalts from different ocean basins, volcanoes of individual ocean islands, lava flows of a single volcano, and even in μm sized melt inclusions in a single mineral grain. Diffusion, which acts to homogenize isotopic heterogeneity over Gyr timescales, limits the length scale of isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle to anywhere between several mm to 10s of meters. Melting regions, however, are typically several 100 km wide and up to 100 km deep. The scale of melting is thus generally orders of magnitude larger than the scale of isotopic heterogeneity. How partial melts mix during melting, melt transport, and melt storage then inevitably influences how isotopic heterogeneity is conveyed from source to melt. The isotopic composition of oceanic basalts hence provides an integrated signal of isotopically diverse melts. Recent mixing models and observed isotopic differences between source (abyssal peridotites) and melts (MORB) show that the range of isotopic heterogeneity of erupted melts need NOT directly reflect that of their source(s), nor need observed isotopic endmembers in source and melts be congruent. Many geochemical models, however, implicitly assume equivalence of source and melt composition. Especially when attempting to infer spatial patterns of isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle from those observed in erupted melts, or for linking isotopic diversity to geophysical structures in the mantle requires a more profound understanding to what extent erupted melts represent the isotopic composition of their mantle sources.

  2. Mantle Heterogeneities and Crustal Processes of the Cascade Arc Represented by Basalts of the Poison Lake Chain, Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenner, J. M.; Teasdale, R.; Hiebing, M. S.; Lenz, Q. A.; Kroeninger, K.

    2013-12-01

    Basalts in the Poison Lake chain (PLC) include eight chemically distinct groups of primitive calc-alkaline basalts (defined by major element geochemistry and mineralogy). Located east of the Lassen Volcanic Center, PLC primitive basalts span the range of basalt compositions exposed throughout the entire Cascade arc (e.g. Ba: 100-1000 ppm; (Sr/P)n: 1.3 - 3.8; La/Yb: 4-26). PLC groups have trace-element and isotope ratios that show little evidence of direct genetic relationships among groups or a common source. Major, trace element and isotope ratios show evidence of contributions from multiple mantle sources including MORB, fluid rich subduction component and subduction-related sediment. Some groups record compositional variations from multiple mantle sources with minimal crustal processing. Similarly, preliminary probe data for olivine-spinel pairs suggest that some PLC groups are derived from heterogeneous mantle sources. Geochemical evidence indicates that other groups have petrogenetic histories that include crustal processes such as fractional crystallization, mixing or crustal contamination. Isotope ratios, major and trace element compositions and crystal compositions provide insights into the extent of source heterogeneities versus the degree of crustal processing. The broad range of compositional variations in basalts of PLC provides the opportunity to examine the extent of mantle heterogeneities and crustal processing in a small geographic area (50km2) for rocks that are nearly the same age (100-110 ka). The diverse primitive compositions erupted in the constrained time and space of the Poison Lake chain and the lack of genetic relationship among groups make it the ideal place to investigate the small scale nature of mantle domains and the roles of subduction and modification processes in the generation of basaltic compositions in arcs such as the Cascades, Mexico, Japan.

  3. Fluids escape in subduction zones: new constraints from 3-D microtomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, V.; Gaetani, G. A.; Slaugenwhite, J.; Miller, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large amounts of H2O are carried into trenches via subduction of the sediments, basaltic crust and uppermost mantle that make up the oceanic lithosphere. A major question is how much of this subducted H2O is released into the overlying mantle wedge, promoting melting, and how much is carried deeper into the mantle. This depends, at least in part, on whether H2O is able to form an interconnected network among the mineral grains that make up the rock down to very low fluid fractions. In order to achieve connectivity and allow the fluid phase to escape, a minimum amount of fluid (critical porosity) is required when dihedral angles are more than 60 degrees. We investigated the distribution of seawater in simplified sediment analogs (i.e. quartz for siliceous sediments; calcite for carbonate sediments), in natural clays (kaolinite and montmorillonite) and in bulk eclogite. Experiments were performed in a piston-cylinder apparatus at 2 GPa and 650°C. Fluid fractions ranged from ~10% to ~1% to determine the porosity at which connectivity of the seawater network is lost for each rock type. We used synchrotron X-ray microtomographic techniques (at Argonne National Laboratory, IL) to obtain 3-D images of the pore space network in order to constrain the grain scale distribution of fluids in a subducted slab. This nondestructive 3-D imaging technique has a spatial resolution of 0.7 μm and provides quantitative information on geometrical parameters of fluid topology, such as porosity, dihedral angle distribution, fluid channel sizes and connectivity. The geometrical parameters were extracted using the VSG Avizo software. This study lays the groundwork for determining the 3-D grain scale distribution of fluids in a range of subducted lithologies. Results from this study provide important new insights into the amount of fluid that can be transported into the deep mantle by subduction.

  4. Foundering lithosphere triggers transient basins and backarc magmatism at subduction zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Currie, C. A.; DeCelles, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Many upper-plate processes at subduction zones cannot be directly explained by traditional subduction mechanisms. In the Central Andes, the crust is shortened and thickened by the subduction of Nazca plate, but the lower lithosphere is anomalously thin at present. Within the plateau, localized, transient basins have formed since the Miocene. These basins have experienced subsidence, internal shortening, and then inversion. One hypothesis is these basins are related to the formation and foundering of dense eclogite rocks in the lithosphere. Along the eastern plateau, there are sites of basaltic magmatism which show a gradual westward migration. Geochemistry studies suggest that these magmas are mainly caused by upwelling asthenosphere, indicating lithosphere thinning beneath this area. However, the magmas are landward of the basins, and therefore the formation and removal of the dense anomaly is spatially and temporally offset from the region of lithosphere thinning. In this study, 2D numerical models are used to investigate lithosphere removal within a subduction zone. A dense root is placed in lower crust of the upper plate to simulate the eclogitization process and initiate gravitational removal. The model evolves in three phases: 1) As the root becomes denser, the overlying surface subsides and a basin forms; 2) once the root is denser than mantle, it sinks and decouples from the upper plate. During this period, the basin inverts and uplifts. 3) Meanwhile, the mantle lithosphere landward of the root is sheared by the corner flow in the mantle wedge. As the lithosphere is carried trenchward, a gap forms at the landside of plateau which widens over time. Hot asthenosphere upwells to fill the gap and undergoes decompression melting. The model results are consistent with observations from the Central Andes and could have implications for other subduction regions with enigmatic transient basins and backarc magmatism, such as those in North America and Eastern China.

  5. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  6. Petrology of the Basalt of Summit Creek: A [Slab] Window into Pacific Northwest Tectonics during the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, L. B.; Tepper, J. H.; Nelson, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    Variation in composition of basalts within the Cascade arc reflects the regional effects of subducting slab windows. The earliest preserved Tertiary manifestation of this process is the 55-44 Ma Basalt of Summit Creek (BSC), located southeast of Mount Rainier. At the base of this steeply dipping 2000 m section of subaerial lavas are basalts / diabases with arc traits (e.g., HFSE depletions, 1.0-1.2 wt. % K2O) and isotopic compositions (207Pb/204Pb > 15.58; ɛNd = +5.8 to +6.7) that overlap those of modern Cascade arc rocks. Conformably overlying these arc rocks (and separated by ~35m of shale, sandstone and conglomerate) are tholeiitic basalts with OIB affinities (<0.4 wt. % K2O, Y/Nb = 1.1-2.3, concave spidergram profiles) and isotopic signatures of a more depleted mantle source (207Pb/204Pb < 15.56; ɛNd = +7.1 to +7.8). In major element, trace element, and isotopic composition the upper BSC lavas are broadly similar to the voluminous Crescent Formation basalts on the Olympic Peninsula, which are coeval with the BSC but located ~100 km farther west. Compositional diversity within the upper BSC section (Mg# 66-30) appears to reflect both fractional crystallization and source heterogeneity. Modeling with MELTS (Ghiroso and Sack, 1995) indicates that differentiation dominated by removal of clinopyroxene and plagioclase took place at mid crustal depths (P = 5 kbar) and that the parent magma had <0.2 wt. % water. However, this process cannot account for all incompatible element data, which indicate the existence of two distinct magma series that differ most notably in Sr, Zr, and K2O contents. Arc basalts of the lower BSC may represent the southernmost extension of the Cretaceous-Tertiary North Cascades arc (Miller et al., 2009); however, basalts higher in the section have OIB traits and reflect a different tectonic setting. We propose that the transition from arc to OIB magmatism in the BSC records the arrival beneath the arc of a slab window produced by subduction

  7. Origin and Role of Recycled Crust in Flood Basalt Magmatism: Case Study of the Central East Greenland Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Continental flood basalts (CFB) are extreme manifestations of mantle melting derived from chemically/isotopically heterogeneous mantle. Much of this heterogeneity comes from lithospheric material recycled into the convecting mantle by a range of mechanisms (e.g. subduction, delamination). The abundance and petrogenetic origins of these lithologies thus provide important constraints on the geodynamical origins of CFB magmatism, and the timescales of lithospheric recycling in the mantle. Basalt geochemistry has long been used to constrain the compositions and mean ages of recycled lithologies in the mantle. Typically, this work assumes the isotopic compositions of the basalts are the same as their mantle source(s). However, because basalts are mixtures of melts derived from different sources (having different fusibilities) generated over ranges of P and T, their isotopic compositions only indirectly represent the isotopic compositions of their mantle sources[1]. Thus, relating basalts compositions to mantle source compositions requires information about the melting process itself. To investigate the nature of lithologic source heterogeneity while accounting for the effects of melting during CFB magmatism, we utilize the REEBOX PRO forward melting model[2], which simulates adiabatic decompression melting in lithologically heterogeneous mantle. We apply the model to constrain the origins and abundance of mantle heterogeneity associated with Paleogene flood basalts erupted during the rift-to-drift transition of Pangea breakup along the Central East Greenland rifted margin of the North Atlantic igneous province. We show that these basalts were derived by melting of a hot, lithologically heterogeneous source containing depleted, subduction-modified lithospheric mantle, and <10% recycled oceanic crust. The Paleozoic mean age we calculate for this recycled crust is consistent with an origin in the region's prior subduction history, and with estimates for the mean age of

  8. Trace-element and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotopic composition of Pliocene and Quaternary alkali basalts of the Patagonian Plateau lavas of southernmost South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, C.R.; Frey, F.A.; Futa, K.; Zartman, R.E.; Peng, Z.; Kurtis, Kyser T.

    1990-01-01

    The Pliocene and Quaternary Patagonian alkali basalts of southernmost South America can be divided into two groups. The "cratonic" basalts erupted in areas of Cenozoic plateau volcanism and continental sedimentation and show considerable variation in 87Sr/86Sr (0.70316 to 0.70512), 143Nd/144Nd (e{open}Nd) and 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratios (18.26 to 19.38, 15.53 to 15.68, and 38.30 to 39.23, respectively). These isotopic values are within the range of oceanic island basalts, as are the Ba/La, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, K/Rb, and Cs/Rb ratios of the "cratonic" basalts. In contrast, the "transitional" basalts, erupted along the western edge of the outcrop belt of the Pliocene and Quaternary plateau lavas in areas that were the locus of earlier Cenozoic Andean orogenic arc colcanism, have a much more restricted range of isotopic composition which can be approximated by 87Sr/86Sr=0.7039??0.0004, e{open}Nd, 206Pb/204Pb=18.60??0.08, 207Pb/204Pb=15.60??0.01, and 208Pb/204Pb=38.50??0.10. These isotopic values are similar to those of Andean orogenic are basalts and, compared to the "cratonic" basalts, are displaced to higher 87Sr/86Sr at a given 143Nd/144Nd and to higher 207Pb/204Pb at a given 208Pb/204Pb. The "transitional" basalts also have Ba/La, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, and Cs/Rb ratios higher than the "cratonic" and oceanic island basalts, although not as high as Andean orogenic are basalts. In contrast to the radiogenic isotopes, ??18O values for both groups of the Patagonian alkali basalts are indistinguishable and are more restricted than the range reported for Andean orogenic are basalts. Whole rock ??18O values calculated from mineral separates for both groups range from 5.3 to 6.5, while measured whole rock ??18O values range from 5.1 to 7.8. The trace element and isotopic data suggest that decreasing degrees of partial melting in association with lessened significance of subducted slabderived components are fundamental factors in the west to east transition from arc

  9. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a "depositionary forearc," a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  10. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli; Kluesner, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a “depositionary forearc,” a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  11. Modeling Central American basalts using the Arc Basalt Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, M.; Carr, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have used the Arc Basalt Simulator (ABS), developed by JI Kimura, to explore the conditions and components of melting beneath the Central American volcanic front. ABS is a comprehensive forward model that incorporates slab dehydration and melting and mantle wedge fluxing and melting using realistic P-T conditions and experimentally determined phase relations. We have applied ABS versions 3 and 4 to model representative magma types in Nicaragua, which span a broad geochemical range including proximal high- and low-Ti lavas in Nicaragua. Sr-Nd-Pb data require appropriate selection of previously identified sources, including: separate carbonate and hemipelagic sediments, DMM, an enriched mantle isotopically similar to the alkaline basalts of Yojoa, a Himu-influenced mantle derived from Galapagos material and altered oceanic crust (AOC) derived from both MORB and Galapagos seamounts. Following the dry solidus, the dominant arc basalts, exemplified by Cerro Negro lavas, can be generated at about 80-90 km where lawsonite and zoisite break down, releasing LILEs into a hydrous fluid that travels into the wedge. The fluid-triggered melting occurs just above the garnet stability field in the wedge to fit the HREEs. Below 90 Km, slab melting begins and the AOC component dominates, generating a fluid with little or no HFSE depletions, consistent with the unusual high-Ti lavas found in Nicaragua. However, the isotopic data require a much lower sediment input for the high-Ti lavas (consistent with 10Be results on the high-Ti lavas) and an enriched component for the AOC and/or mantle wedge. Following the wet solidus, fits to the Cerro Negro magma only occur in the absence of phengite in the AOC and with the presence of HFSE attracting minerals, rutile, zircon and allanite. The depth of the best fit is 135 km, consistent with current best estimates of the depth to the seismic zone beneath Cerro Negro. Below 150 km, the high-Ti lavas can be generated if the HFSE retaining

  12. Seismic anisotropy above a subducting plate

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, X.R.; Meyer, R.P. ); Schneider, J.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Shear-wave splitting observed in northeastern Colombia has provided evidence of seismic anisotropy in a shear zone immediately above a subducting plate. In an upper mantle composed mainly of olivine (57%) and orthopyroxene (17%), the splitting can be interpreted by wave propagation in an anisotropic medium of orthorhombic symmetry that results from alignment of these intrinsically anisotropic minerals. The mechanism of alignment is most likely the shearing associated with the subduction, aided by fluids migrating from the subducting plate when the plate exceeds 100 km in depth.

  13. Reconciling the Shadow of a Subduction Signature with Rift Geochemistry and Tectonic Environment in Eastern Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeMasurier, W. E.; Choi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Basalt-trachyte volcanoes in the Marie Byrd Land (MBL) Cenozoic province lie along the Amundsen Sea coast on the north flank of the West Antarctic rift. In the province as a whole, the basalts are characterized by OIB-like geochemistry, restricted ranges of 87Sr/86Sr (0.70254 - 0.70368) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.51286 - 0.51368) and a wide range of 206Pb/204Pb (19.50 - 20.69). Basalts at three volcanoes in central and eastern MBL, of Miocene and Quaternary age, display a variety of geochemical anomalies compared with the above. These include low 143Nd/144Nd (0.51276 - 0.51281), very high Ba (e.g. 1398ppm) associated with low K and low Th, slightly depressed Nb and Ta, and elevated EM2 signatures. These are only erratically displayed, from one volcano to another, and even from one sample locality to another in the same volcano. In some cases, anomalous sample localities lie above or below sample localities with relatively 'normal' characteristics. Furthermore, the whole complement of anomalies is rarely displayed in a single sample. These characteristics suggest a subduction influence, but one that seems to have been filtered, or partly masked. Major episodes of subduction and granite plutonism in MBL took place in the late Devonian, Permian, and late Cretaceous. The last of these ended ~90 Ma, and was followed by continental break-up, rifting and lithospheric attenuation that produced the West Antarctic rift as we know it today. Thus, the enigmatic geochemical signatures in these three volcanoes may have been acquired 80-90 m.y. after subduction ended, and following the subsequent tectonic reorganization to a rift environment. We suspect that the sublithospheric source was heterogeneously and incompletely metasomatized by fluids that originated with slab dewatering during the subduction episodes. Interestingly, pelagic rocks, probably similar to those that were subducted, have geochemical characteristics that seem to be reflected in the geochemical anomalies of the

  14. Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-03-31

    Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the

  15. Volcanogenic trace element volatiles in basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, S.; Reed, G.W. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Br, Hg, As, Se, Sb, Zn, and Cu were measured in samples of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and ocean island basalt. To assess sea-water effects glassy rinds and crystalline interiors of pillow basalts were measured as was subaerial glass from Kilauea volcano. Preliminary results are reported. 6 references, 3 figures. (ACR)

  16. Construction of an Oceanic Plateau: Stratigraphic and Geochemical Perspectives from the Accreted Triassic Wrangellia Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoates, J. S.; Greene, A. R.; Weis, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    supported by major-element modeling indicating that the picrites on Vancouver Island formed by extensive melting (23-27%) of anomalously hot mantle (~1500°C). The low-Ti basalts involved a HFSE-depleted, high- ɛHf component that is distinct from OIB and MORB and was only involved during the early phase of this major melting event. Intrusion or erosion of the lithosphere by an impinging plume head initially led to melting of subduction-modified mantle or interaction of plume-derived melts and arc material, whereafter melting occurred mostly within the plume to produce the voluminous high-Ti basalts that dominate the stratigraphy of the upper parts of the plateau. The combined Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic compositions of the Wrangellia high-Ti basalts indicate a common, Pacific plume-type mantle source, with some similarities to the source of basalts from the Ontong Java and Caribbean Plateaus.

  17. Quantifying the lithological and thermal properties of the mantle using basalt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O. C.; Lambart, S.; Maclennan, J.

    2013-12-01

    As the primary flux of material from the mantle to the surface, the basalts erupted at mid-ocean ridges (MORB) are a key resource for investigating the mantle's chemical composition. However, despite the large volumes of oceanic lithosphere returned to the mantle by subduction, it has proven difficult using basalt chemistry alone to quantify this material's involvement in melt production. Even more enigmatic is the signal of refractory material in the source, which may barely melt if other more fusible lithologies are present and so be difficult to identify from many common chemical tracers. Here we demonstrate how combining thermodynamic models of melting, the density of phase assemblages at high pressure and geochemical observations, can allow the proportion of refractory and enriched material in the mantle source to be estimated and place limits on mantle potential temperature. We focus on determining the abundance of recycled material in the mantle beneath Iceland, where we have excellent geophysical and geochemical constraints on the melting process and the chemical variability in the mantle. Firstly, the lithologies contributing to melting are identified by quantitative comparison of the major element composition of erupted basalts to a database of experimental partial melts (Shorttle and Maclennan, 2011). Secondly, a mass balance is calculated between the endmember basalt compositions and the fully mixed melt to obtain the relative proportion, by mass, of enriched and depleted melts. A three-lithology melting model is then developed (peridotite-harzburgite-basalt), which uses the appropriate melting parametrisations to account for the differences in productivity between each lithology. The melting model enables the calculated abundance of the different endmember melt compositions to be projected back into mass fractions of solid mantle domains. Applying this method to Iceland demonstrates that ~10% of the source is recycled basaltic material and at least 20

  18. Petrological insights into intermediate-depths of a subduction plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, Samuel; Agard, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Understanding processes acting along the subduction interface is crucial to assess lithospheric scale coupling between tectonic plates, exhumation of deep-seated rocks and mechanisms causing intermediate-depth seismicity. Yet, despite a wealth of geophysical studies aimed at better characterizing the subduction interface, we still lack critical petrological data constraining such processes as intermediate-seismicity within oceanic subduction zones. This contribution reviews recent findings from two major localities showing deeply subducted ophiolitic remnants (Zermatt-Saas, Monviso), which crop out in the classic, well-preserved fossil subduction setting of the Western Alps. We herein show that both ophiolite remnants represent large, relatively continuous fragments of oceanic lithosphere (i.e., several km-thick tectonic slices across tens of km) exhumed from ~80 km depths and thereby provide important constraints on interplate coupling mechanisms. In both fragments (but even more so in the Zermatt-Saas one) pervasive hydrothermal processes and seafloor alteration, promoting fluid incorporation in both mafic and associated ultramafic rocks, was essential, together with the presence of km-thick serpentinite soles, to decrease the density of the tectonic slices and prevent them from an irreversible sinking into the mantle. The Monviso case sudy provides further insights into the subduction plate interface at ~80 km depths. The Lago Superiore Unit, in particular, is made of a 50-500 m thick eclogitized mafic crust (associated with minor calcschist lenses) overlying a 100-400 m thick metagabbroic body and a km-thick serpentinite sole, and is cut by two 10 to 100m thick eclogite-facies shear zones, respectively located at the boundary between basalts and gabbros, and between gabbros and serpentinites (the Lower Shear Zone: LSZ). The LSZ gives precious information on both seismicity and fluid flow: (1) Eclogite breccias, reported here for the first time, mark the locus

  19. Shock metamorphism of lunar and terrestrial basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Lonar Crater (India) basalt and lunar basalt 75035 were shock loaded under controlled laboratory conditions up to 1000 kbar, generally in a CO/CO2 (1:1) environment evacuated to 10 to the minus seventh power torr. The Kieffer et al. (1976) classification scheme of progressive shock metamorphism is found to apply to lunar basalts. The major shock features of the five classes that span the range 0 to 1000 kbar are described. Only three out of 152 basalt specimens show shock effects in their natural state as severe as Class 2 features. The scarcity of shocked basalt hand samples in contrast to the abundance of shock-produced agglutinates and homogeneous glass spheres in the lunar regolith indicates the dominant role of micrometeorite impact in the evolution of the lunar regolith. The overall glass content in asteroidal and Mercurian regoliths is considered.

  20. Flow Zone Isolation in Sedimentary Inputs to the Nankai Trough Subduction Zone, IODP Expedition 322 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, B.; Torres, M. E.; Destrigneville, C.; Heuer, V.; Underwood, M. B.; Saito, S.; Iodp Expedition 322 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2010-12-01

    contribution is inferred from proportional reversals in all major cation concentrations (e.g., Na, K, Ca and Mg) and the presence of sulfate. This seawater source may be linked to a flow system within the upper basaltic basement and the overlying volcaniclastic sandstones. This deeper seawater flux must be separate and isolated from the sulfate-depleted, hydrocarbon-gas-bearing fluids migrating from the subduction zone. Permeability data and lithologic variability are used to define flow pathways and flow barriers that facilitate the existence of these flow systems and prevent their mixing.

  1. Structure, metamorphism and timing of an exhumed Cretaceous subduction zone beneath the Oman Ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, M. P.; Warren, C. J.; Waters, D. J.; Parrish, R. R.

    2003-12-01

    The Semail ophiolite in Oman was emplaced from NE to SW at least 200 km over the Arabian passive margin, probably over 450 km in total, during the late Cretaceous (95-70 Ma). The first phase of obduction involved NE-directed subduction of Triassic-Jurassic basalt at least 45-50 km beneath the ophiolite, whilst the crustal sequence was forming (U-Pb zircons from plagiogranites, ca. 95 Ma). Amphibolites accreted beneath the mantle sequence peridotites have P-T conditions of 840-870§C and 10-12 kbar with 40Ar/39Ar hornblende cooling ages of 95-92 Ma. During the later stages of obduction the leading edge of the continental margin was subducted to depths where carpholite-bearing rocks (6-8 kbar), blueschist (12-15 kbar) and eclogite (ca. 20 kbar) facies metamorphism formed in a ductile deforming NE-dipping subduction zone. Five concordant U-Pb ages from the As Sifah eclogites constrain the HP metamorphic peak at 79.1ñ0.3 Ma. Detailed structural mapping and restoration of the continental margin, combined with P-T and U-Pb geochronology confirms the model of one protracted phase of ophiolite obduction along a NE-dipping subduction zone, at convergence rates of ca. 17 mm/a-1. NE-directed extensional crenulation schistosity and NNE oriented stretching lineations in the eclogite and blueschist facies rocks are consistent with SW-directed exhumation of footwall HP rocks. NE facing folds and spectacular sheath folds with greatly attenuated limbs in the upper plate sediments are interpreted as antithetic backfolds, with shortening in the upper plate balanced by the subduction of the lower plate, consistent with a NE-directed subduction of the continental margin rocks beneath the SW-obducting ophiolite, Haybi and Hawasina thrust sheets. Recent suggestions of a nascent SW-directed subduction beneath the Oman margin are not consistent with the sedimentary evolution of the shelf and slope carbonates, the geological structure of Saih Hatat, or the U-Pb geochronology of the

  2. Subduction signature in backarc mantle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. R.; Snow, J. E.; Brandon, A. D.; Ohara, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Abyssal peridotites exposed during seafloor extension provide a rare glimpse into the processes occurring within the oceanic mantle. Whole rock and mineral-scale major element data from abyssal peridotites record processes intimately associated with melt-depletion and melt-rock interaction occurring just prior to exposure of the mantle at the surface. Isotopic data, however, can provide insight into the long-term evolution of the oceanic mantle. A number of studies of mantle material exposed along mid-ocean ridges have demonstrated that abyssal peridotites from Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Gakkel Ridge, and Southwest Indian Ridge commonly display a range of whole rock Os isotopic ratios (187Os/188Os = 0.118- 0.130; Brandon et al., 2000; Standish et al., 2002; Alard et al., 2005; Harvey et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008). The range of isotopic values in each region demonstrates that the oceanic mantle does not melt uniformly over time. Instead, anciently depleted regions (187Os/188Os ≈ 0.118) are juxtaposed against relatively fertile regions (187Os/188Os ≈ 0.130) that are isotopically similar to established primitive mantle values (187Os/188Os = 0.1296; Meisel et al. 2001). Abyssal peridotites from the Godzilla Megamullion and Chaotic Terrain in the backarc Parece Vela Basin (Philippine Sea) display a range of Os isotopic values extending to similar unradiogenic values. However, some of the backarc basin abyssal peridotites record more radiogenic 187Os/188Os values (0.135-0.170) than mid-ocean ridge peridotites. Comparable radiogenic signatures are reported only in highly weathered abyssal peridotites (187Os/188Os ≤ 0.17, Standish et al., 2002) and subduction-related volcanic arc peridotites (187Os/188Os ≤ 0.16, Brandon et al., 1996; Widom et al., 2003). In both the weathered peridotites and arc peridotites, the 187Os/188Os value is negatively correlated with Os abundance: the most radiogenic value has the lowest Os abundance (< 1 ppb) making them highly susceptible to

  3. The earthquake cycle in subduction zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Fleitout, L.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified model of a subduction zone is presented, which incorporates the mechanical asymmetry induced by the subducted slab to anchor the subducting plate during post-seismic rebound and thus throw most of the coseismic stream release into the overthrust plate. The model predicts that the trench moves with respect to the deep mantle toward the subducting plate at a velocity equal to one-half of the convergence rate. A strong extensional pulse is propagated into the overthrust plate shortly after the earthquake, and although this extension changes into compression before the next earthquake in the cycle, the period of strong extension following the earthquake may be responsible for extensional tectonic features in the back-arc region.

  4. Red Sea rift-related Quseir basalts, central Eastern Desert, Egypt: Petrogenesis and tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Esam S.; Ali, Shehata; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Mineral and whole-rock chemistry of Red Sea rift-related Tertiary basalts from south Quseir city, central Eastern Desert of Egypt is presented to investigate their petrogenesis and relationship to tectonic processes. The south Quseir basalts (SQB) are classified as high-Ti (TiO2 >2 wt.%) subalkaline transitional lava emplaced in an anorogenic tectonic setting. Their Mg# varies from 48 to 53 indicating the evolved nature of the SQB. Pearce element ratios suggest that the SQB magmas evolved via fractional crystallization of olivine + clinopyroxene ± plagioclase, but the absence of Eu anomalies argues against significant plagioclase fractionation. Clinopyroxene compositions provide evidence for polybaric fractionation of the parental mafic magmas. Estimated temperatures of crystallization are 1015 to 1207 °C for clinopyroxene and 1076 to 1155 °C for plagioclase. These values are interpreted to result from early stage crystallization of clinopyroxene followed by concurrent crystallization of clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The incompatible trace element signatures of the SQB (La/Ba = 0.08-0.10 and La/Nb = 0.89-1.04) are comparable to those of ocean island basalts (OIB) generated from an asthenospheric mantle source unaffected by subduction components. Modeling calculations indicate that the SQB primary magmas were derived from 4-5% partial melting of a garnet-bearing lherzolite mantle source. The NE Egyptian basaltic volcanism is spatially and temporally related to Red Sea rifting and to the local E-W striking faults, confirming a relationship to tectonic activity. Our results suggest that the extensional regime associated with Red Sea rifting controlled the generation of the Egyptian basalts, likely as a result of passive upwelling of asthenospheric mantle.

  5. Effects of decarbonation on elemental behaviors during subduction-zone metamorphism: Evidence from a titanite-rich contact between eclogite-facies marble and omphacitite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Niu, Yaoling; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Wang, Kuo-Lung; Iizuka, Yoshiyuki; Lin, Jinyan; Tan, Yulong; Xu, Yongjiang

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we show the effects of subducted carbonates on geochemical processes during subduction-zone metamorphism (SZM) through the study of an eclogite-facies marble coexisting with metabasite from the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic belt of the Chinese Western Tianshan orogen. Between the marble and metabasite is a titanite-rich contact resulting from fluid-facilitated metamorphic reactions between the two lithologies, and recording elemental changes of geodynamic significance. Because this titanite-rich contact is dominated by titanite (an important host for high field strength elements, HFSEs) without white micas (an important host for large ion lithophile elements, LILEs), HFSEs are largely conserved in titanite whereas LILEs are moved away. This observation emphasizes the potential significance of subducting carbonate in retaining HFSEs in the slab through the formation and stabilization of titanite, contributing to the characteristic "arc signature" unique to subduction-zone magmatism (i.e., high LILEs, low HFSEs). The implicit assumption in this interpretation is that the observed lithological assemblage represents residues of subducting oceanic crust that has undergone major episodes of dehydration. Subducted carbonates also have significant implications for the origin of mantle isotopic heterogeneity as revealed from oceanic basalts.

  6. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.

    2012-09-01

    The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, still we lack substantial information about the abundance, diversity, and consequence of its biosphere. The last two decades have involved major research accomplishments within this field and a change in view of the ocean crust and its potential to harbour life. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (∼50-200 µm in diameter) body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate-forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few µm to ∼20 µm in diameter) are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma.

  7. 2D Numerical simulations of intraoceanic subduction: the case study of the Ligurian Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, Cristina; Gerya, Taras; Federico, Laura; Scambelluri, Marco; Crispini, Laura; Capponi, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Intraoceanic subduction is an important part of the present and past subduction systems, and some features of such process are not yet fully understood. We therefore studied intraoceanic subduction zones with the help of 2D numerical models, analyzing the parameters influencing their evolution in time and space. We applied the finite differences method on a rectangular grid, to calculate properties such as pressure, temperatures and velocities inside the models solving a set of equations. The latter comprise the Stokes equation of motion, the continuity equation and the heat transport equation. Temperature and velocities are computed on the nodes of the grid whereas pressures are calculated for the geometrical centers of the cells. We defined material properties such as density or viscosity on marker points, initially positioned on a regular rectangular grid. The markers and therefore the material properties are moved through the mesh according to the velocity field using the forth order Runge-Kutta method (Gerya et al. 2002). Subduction is forced to begin at a weak zone in the lithospheric mantle within an oceanic basin of prescribed width. The effect of different arrangements of rock bodies inside the subducting lithosphere on the evolution of the process was carefully analyzed. In particular we reproduced two distinct structures of the oceanic lithosphere: i) the layered oceanic crust made up of a stratified succession typical of fast-spreading ridges and ii) the oceanic lithosphere typical of slow and ultra-slow spreading centers, where an incomplete sequence is observable. The latter structure lacks a sheeted dike complex, has a low volume of gabbros and basalts and gabbros form discrete intrusions in variably serpentinized peridotites (Lagabrielle et al., 1997; Mével, 2003). Such an "heterogeneous" structure is characteristic of the Alpine and Appennine ophiolites that characterized the Mesozoic Ligurian Tethys located between Europe and Adria. The depth of

  8. Origin of magmas in subduction zones: a review of experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Kushiro, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the origin of magmas in subduction zones, particularly in the Japanese island arc, have been significantly advanced by petrological, geochemical, geophysical and experimental studies during last 50 years. Kuno’s original model1) for magma generation in the Japanese island arc, that tholeiite magmas are formed at relatively shallow levels in the mantle on the Pacific Ocean side whereas alkali basalt magmas are formed in deeper levels on the Japan Sea side, stimulated subsequent studies, particularly high-pressure experimental studies in which the author participated. Recent seismic tomographic studies of regions beneath the Japanese island arc demonstrate that seismic low-velocity zones where primary magmas are formed have finger-like shapes and rise obliquely from the Japan Sea side toward the Pacific Ocean side. Based on experimental studies, it is suggested that the compositions of primary magmas depend mainly on the H2O content and degree of melting in the melting zones, and that primary tholeiite magmas are formed by 10–25% melting of the source mantle containing less than 0.2 wt.% H2O. High-alumina basalt and alkali basalt magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle, whereas primary boninite magmas are formed by more than 20% melting of the source mantle with more than 0.2 wt.% H2O, and finally, high-magnesia andesite magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle. PMID:24019580

  9. Origin of magmas in subduction zones: a review of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Ikuo

    2007-02-01

    Studies of the origin of magmas in subduction zones, particularly in the Japanese island arc, have been significantly advanced by petrological, geochemical, geophysical and experimental studies during last 50 years. Kuno's original model(1)) for magma generation in the Japanese island arc, that tholeiite magmas are formed at relatively shallow levels in the mantle on the Pacific Ocean side whereas alkali basalt magmas are formed in deeper levels on the Japan Sea side, stimulated subsequent studies, particularly high-pressure experimental studies in which the author participated. Recent seismic tomographic studies of regions beneath the Japanese island arc demonstrate that seismic low-velocity zones where primary magmas are formed have finger-like shapes and rise obliquely from the Japan Sea side toward the Pacific Ocean side. Based on experimental studies, it is suggested that the compositions of primary magmas depend mainly on the H2O content and degree of melting in the melting zones, and that primary tholeiite magmas are formed by 10-25% melting of the source mantle containing less than 0.2 wt.% H2O. High-alumina basalt and alkali basalt magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle, whereas primary boninite magmas are formed by more than 20% melting of the source mantle with more than 0.2 wt.% H2O, and finally, high-magnesia andesite magmas are formed by smaller degrees of melting of similar mantle.

  10. High water contents in basaltic magmas from Irazú Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Ezra R.; Plank, Terry; Wade, Jennifer A.; Kelley, Katherine A.; Hauri, Erik H.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.

    2007-11-01

    Irazú volcano, in Costa Rica, erupts magmas unusually enriched in incompatible trace elements (e.g., K, REE) relative to most other arc volcanoes worldwide. Previous studies place this enrichment in the mantle, with minimal inputs from the subducting slab. In order to test the subduction vs. mantle hypotheses, we present here the first published measurements of the pre-eruptive volatile content of Irazú magmas. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from basaltic-andesite scoria from the 1723 eruption are volatile-rich, containing > 3 wt.% H 2O, > 200 ppm CO 2, > 2500 ppm S, > 2200 ppm Cl and > 1800 ppm F. The average composition of the 1723 melt inclusions is very similar to that of the host scoria (SiO 2 = 54% SiO 2), although inclusions include more mafic (48% SiO 2) and felsic (57% SiO 2) compositions. The 1723 melt inclusions have the same trace element characteristics (e.g., Ba/La) as the host scoria, ruling out exotic crustal or mantle sources. Together, the melt inclusions and their host olivines (Fo 87-79) define a closed-system ascent path (150-20 MPa) of coupled degassing, crystallization, and cooling (1075-1045 °C). The maximum H 2O measured in the melt inclusions and the shape of the degassing path together constrain the pre-eruptive H 2O content to 3.2-3.5 wt.%, significantly higher than in ocean island basalts, but typical of arc magmas. The high H 2O in Irazú melts, coupled with their high Cl/K 2O, are inconsistent with enriched mantle with minimal slab fluid addition. We propose instead that subducting input is the dominant contributor to Irazú's geochemical compositions. Galapagos-derived seamounts and volcaniclastics are currently entering the trench near Irazú, and provide to the Irazú source both volatiles (from seafloor hydration and chlorination) and ocean-island-type trace elements and isotopes. A few percent of subducted Galapagos volcanics added to MORB mantle can create Irazú compositions quantitatively, provided elements are further

  11. Petrochemistry and genesis of olivine basalts from small monogenetic parasitic cones of Bazman stratovolcano, Makran arc, southeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Saeed; Stern, Charles R.

    2011-07-01

    Small monogenetic Quaternary parasitic cones around Bazman stratovolcano, located at the western edge of the Makran arc, southeastern Iran, erupted low-Ti subalkaline olivine basalts with MgO (3.8-8.6 wt.%) and Al2O3 (16.5-18.6 wt.%). Positive correlation of decreasing MgO, Ni and Cr indicates that formation of low MgO basalts involved limited crystal-liquid fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene, the common phenocrysts. The basalts have variable 87Sr/86Sr (0.704177-0.705139) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512689-0.512830) ratios, within the range of OIB-like intra-plate alkaline basalts erupted in eastern Iran north of the Makran arc. This, and the lack of correlation between Sr content and Sr-isotopic ratio, suggest that upper crustal contamination was not significant in their formation, consistent with the relatively thin crust (≤ 40 km) in the area. Enrichment of large-ion-lithophile elements (LILE) relative to light rare-earth-elements (LREE; Ba/La = 9-25), and depletions in Nb relatively to LILE (Ba/Nb = 12-35; La/Nb = 0.8-2.1), are similar in most cases to other convergent plate boundary arc basalts, suggesting that the Bazman basalts formed by melting of subcontinental mantle modified by dehydration of subducted Oman Sea oceanic lithosphere. Pb isotopic ratios of the basalts define a linear trend above the Northern Hemisphere Line, consistent with their derivation from mantle contaminated by Pb derived from subducted sediment. Trace element contents and ratios (LaN = 10-25; YbN = 3-6; (La/Yb)N = 3-8) suggest that these basalts formed as a result of low (~ 10%) degrees of partial melting of subarc mantle modified only moderately by subducted components. Relatively low Ba/Nb < 15, La/Nb < 1.5 and Ba/La < 15 ratios for some basalts confirm only limited contamination of the source of these samples, consistent with observations in other arcs that parasitic cones tap sources less affected by slab-derived fluids than the larger stratovolcanoes they surround. Comparison

  12. An alternative model for within plate basalts generation suggested by their major elements, trace elements and Pb-Sr-Nd isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashima, H.

    2003-12-01

    Based on geochemistry, the recent favor model for within-plate basalts (WPB) is plumes with eclogite originally formed by inversion of basaltic oceanic crust into eclogite in subduction zones (e.g. Hauri, 1996). Melting experiments of basalt/peridotie hybrids (Kogiso and Takahashi, 1998), however, have demonstrated that the hybrid source model could not explain major element features of WPB, such as FeO* enrichment and Al2O3 depletion compared with MORB. Melting experiments of peridotites and basalt/peridotite hybrids indicate that the sources of WPB are peridotites abnormally enriched in FeO*. Such Fe-rich sources could not be formed by extraction of basalt melt from typical peridotite or mixing of basalt and typical peridotite. A potential candidate for the abnormally Fe-rich source is Archean peridotitic komatiite (APK) which is enriched in FeO* compared with typical peridotite. Attractive features of the recycled APK melting model are as follows: 1) It explains why within-plate basalts are FeO*-rich and Al2O3-poor relative to MORB because of large proportion of cpx in APK. 2) Moderate partial melting of APK forms LREE-enriched partial melts because of selective fusion of cpx. 3) It explains near bulk earth Nd isotope compositions because of relatively flat REE patterns of APK. 4) Archean age of APK is consistent with Pb isotope ofWPB suggesting their sources have Archean age. 5) Compositional spectrum of Archean komatiite suites ranging from peridotitic komatiite to basalts explains that of WPB from silica-under saturated basalt to silica-oversaturated andesite.

  13. Geochemistry of Early Middle Palaeozoic basalts in the Hodgkinson Province: a key to tectono-magmatic evolution of the Tasman Fold Belt System in northeastern Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, I. M. A.; Bierlein, F. P.; Webb, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Palaeozoic Hodgkinson Province in northeastern Queensland, Australia, is host to Late Ordovician to Devonian rock assemblages that contain tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalts. These basalts occur as massive fault-bounded units interspersed with marine sedimentary rocks and limestones that are metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies in the Ordovician Mulgrave, Silurian Chillagoe and Devonian Hodgkinson formations, respectively. The petrogenetic and Sm Nd isotope characteristics of these mafic volcanic rocks were investigated to constrain the tectonic setting in which they erupted. Major, trace and rare earth element analyses were carried out on samples from these formations and intrusive dolerites. The mafic rocks can be classified as basalts and basaltic andesites with distinct MORB characteristics. Furthermore, the basalts are characterized by a slight to moderate enrichment in Th and concomitant depletion in Nb, both of which become less pronounced with basalt evolution through time. These features are consistent with decreasing volcanic arc affinity of Silurian and Devonian MORB-type basalts in the Hodgkinson Province. Sm Nd isotope characteristics of these basalts indicate a change in source region from dominantly sub-continental lithospheric mantle in the Silurian to asthenospheric input in the Devonian. Collectively, the geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the Hodgkinson Province basalts are interpreted to reflect deposition in an evolving back-arc basin setting. The onset of basin extension was initiated in the Silurian. Accelerated basin subsidence occurred throughout the Devonian and was halted by basin inversion in the Late Devonian. Basin evolution was controlled by an eastward stepping subduction zone outboard of the Australian Craton.

  14. The Interdependence of Plate Coupling Processes, Subduction Rate, and Asthenospheric Pressure Drop across Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royden, L.; Holt, A.; Becker, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    One advantage of analytical models, in which analytic expressions are used for the various components of the subduction system, is the efficient exploration of parameter space and identification of the physical mechanisms controlling a wide breadth of slab kinematics. We show that, despite subtle differences in how plate interfaces and boundary conditions are implemented, results for single subduction from a 3-D semi-analytical model for subduction FAST (Royden & Husson, 2006; Jagoutz et al., 2015) and from the numerical finite-element model CitcomCU (Moresi & Gurnis, 1996, Zhong et al., 2006) are in excellent agreement when plate coupling (via shear stress on the plate interface) takes place in the FAST without the development of topographic relief at the plate boundary. Results from the two models are consistent across a variety of geometries, with fixed upper plate, fixed lower plate, and stress-free plate ends. When the analytical model is modified to include the development of topography above the subduction boundary, subduction rates are greatly increased, indicating a strong sensitivity of subduction to the mode of plate coupling. Rates of subduction also correlate strongly with the asthenospheric pressure drop across the subducting slab, which drives toroidal flow of the asthenosphere around the slab. When the lower plate is fixed, subduction is relatively slow and the pressure drop from below to above the slab is large, inhibiting subduction and slab roll-back. When the upper plate is fixed and when the plate ends are stress-free, subduction rates are approximately 50% faster and the corresponding asthenospheric pressure drop from below to above the slab is small, facilitating rapid subduction. This qualitative correlation between plate coupling processes, asthenospheric pressure drop, and rates of subduction can be extended to systems with more than one subduction zone (Holt et al., 2015 AGU Fall Abstract). Jagoutz, O., Royden, L., Holt, A. & Becker, T. W

  15. Depth variations in seismic velocity in the subducting crust: Evidence for fluid-related embrittlement for intermediate-depth earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiina, Takahiro; Nakajima, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Toru; Toyokuni, Genti; Kita, Saeko

    2017-01-01

    We investigated seismic wave velocity in the subducting crust of the Pacific slab beneath eastern Hokkaido, northern Japan. To detect depth-dependent properties of the seismic velocities in the crust, we analyzed guided waves that propagate in the crust and estimated P wave velocity (Vp) of 6.5-7.5 km/s and S wave velocity (Vs) of 3.6-4.2 km/s at depths of 50-100 km. The results show that the obtained Vp and Vs are 10-15% lower than those expected for the fully hydrated mid-ocean ridge basalt, suggesting the existence of aqueous fluids by 1 vol % in the crust at this depth range. Our observations suggest that overpressurized fluids channeled in the subducting crust plays as a dominant factor for facilitating the genesis of crustal earthquakes at intermediate depths.

  16. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  17. Trace element signature of subduction-zone fluids, melts and supercritical liquids at 120-180 km depth.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Ronit; Schmidt, Max W; Ulmer, Peter; Pettke, Thomas

    2005-09-29

    Fluids and melts liberated from subducting oceanic crust recycle lithophile elements back into the mantle wedge, facilitate melting and ultimately lead to prolific subduction-zone arc volcanism. The nature and composition of the mobile phases generated in the subducting slab at high pressures have, however, remained largely unknown. Here we report direct LA-ICPMS measurements of the composition of fluids and melts equilibrated with a basaltic eclogite at pressures equivalent to depths in the Earth of 120-180 km and temperatures of 700-1,200 degrees C. The resultant liquid/mineral partition coefficients constrain the recycling rates of key elements. The dichotomy of dehydration versus melting at 120 km depth is expressed through contrasting behaviour of many trace elements (U/Th, Sr, Ba, Be and the light rare-earth elements). At pressures equivalent to 180 km depth, however, a supercritical liquid with melt-like solubilities for the investigated trace elements is observed, even at low temperatures. This mobilizes most of the key trace elements (except the heavy rare-earth elements, Y and Sc) and thus limits fluid-phase transfer of geochemical signatures in subduction zones to pressures less than 6 GPa.

  18. Effect of Fluorine on Near-Liquidus Phase Equilibria of Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Wood, Justin; Loan, Le; Dasgupta, Rajdeep; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Treiman, Allan H.

    2010-01-01

    Volatile species such as H2O, CO2, F, and Cl have significant impact in generation and differentiation of basaltic melts. Thus far experimental work has primarily focused on the effect of water and carbon dioxide on basalt crystallization, liquid-line of descent, and mantle melting [e.g., 1, 2] and the effects of halogens have received far less attention [3-4]. However, melts in the planetary interiors can have non-negligible chlorine and fluorine concentrations. Here, we explore the effects of fluorine on near-liquidus phase equilibria of basalt. We have conducted nominally anhydrous piston cylinder experiments using graphite capsules at 0.6 - 1.5 GPa on an Fe-rich model basalt composition. 1.75 wt% fluorine was added to the starting mix in the form of AgF2. Fluorine in the experimental glass was measured by SIMS and major elements of glass and minerals were analyzed by EPMA. Nominally volatile free experiments yield a liquidus temperature from 1330 C at 0.8GPa to 1400 at 1.6GPa and an olivine(Fo72)-pyroxene(En68)-liquid multiple saturation point at 1.25 GPa and 1375 C. The F-bearing experiments yield a liquiudus temperature from 1260 C at 0.6GPa to 1305 at 1.5GPa and an ol(Fo66)-pyx(En64)-MSP at 1 GPa and 1260 C. This shows that F depresses the basalt liquidus, extends the pyroxene stability field to lower pressure, and forces the liquidus phases to be more Fe-rich. KD(Fe-Mg/mineral-melt) calculated for both pyroxenes and olivines show an increase with increasing F content of the melt. Therefore, we infer that F complexes with Mg in the melt and thus increases the melt s silica activity, depressing the liquidus and changing the composition of the crystallizing minerals. Our study demonstrates that on a weight percent basis, the effect of fluorine is similar to the effect of H2O [1] and Cl [3] on freezing point depression of basalts. But on an atomic fraction basis, the effect of F on liquidus depression of basalts is xxxx compared to the effect of H. Future

  19. Apollo 17 KREEPy basalt - A rock type intermediate between mare and KREEP basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Apollo 17 KREEPy basalt is a unique lunar volcanic rock, observed only as clasts in the light friable breccia matrix (72275) of Boulder 1, Station 2 at Taurus-Littrow. Its status as a volcanic rock is confirmed by the absence of any meteoritic contamination, a lack of cognate inclusions or xenocrystal material, and low Ni contents in metal grains. The basalt was extruded 4.01 + or - 0.04 b.y. ago, approximately contemporaneously with the high-alumina mare basalts at Fra Mauro; shortly afterwards it was disrupted, probably by the Serenitatis impact, and its fragments emplaced in the South Massif. The basalt, which is quartz-normative and aluminous, is chemically and mineralogically intermediate between the Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the high-alumina mare basalts in most respects. It consists mainly of plagioclase and pigeonitic pyroxene in approximately equal amounts, and 10-30% of mesostatis.

  20. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  1. Three-dimensional numerical modeling of temperature and mantle flow fields associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea plate, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yingfeng; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Takumi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated temperature and mantle flow distributions associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) plate beneath southwest Japan, by constructing a three-dimensional parallelepiped model incorporating a past clockwise rotation, the bathymetry of the Philippine Sea plate, and distribution of the subducting velocity within its slab. The geometry of the subducting plate was inferred from contemporary seismic studies and was used as a slab guide integrated with historical plate rotation into the 3-D simulation. Using the model, we estimated a realistic and high-resolution temperature field on the subduction plate interface, which was constrained by a large number of heat flow data, and attempted to clarify its relationship with occurrences of megathrust earthquakes, long-term slow slip events (L-SSEs), and nonvolcanic low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). Results showed that the oblique subduction coupled with the 3-D geometry of subducting PHS plate was a key factor affecting the interplate and intraplate temperature distributions, leading to a cold anomaly in the plate interface beneath western Shikoku, the Bungo Channel, and the Kii Peninsula. Temperatures in the slab core in these regions at a depth near the continental Moho were nearly 200°C lower than that in eastern Shikoku, indicating a high thermal lateral heterogeneity within the subducting plate. The geothermal control of the LFEs beneath western Shikoku was estimated to be within a range from 400 to 700°C, and the interplate temperature for the L-SSEs with a slip larger than 15 cm beneath the Bungo Channel was estimated to be approximately 350-500°C. A large horizontal temperature gradient of 2.5 ~ °C/km was present where the LFEs occurred repeatedly. The steep temperature change was likely to be related to the metamorphic phase transformation from lawsonite or blueschist to amphibolite of hydrous minerals of the mid-ocean ridge basalt of the subducting PHS plate.

  2. Stability of Basalt plus Anhydrite plus Calcite at HP-HT: Implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-01-01

    "Canali" observed at Venus surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding the temperature at Venus surface. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 which are alteration products of basalts melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials might release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle) . Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we performed piston

  3. Stability of basalt+anhydrite+calcite at HP-HT: implications for Venus, the Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    “Canali” observed at Venus’ surface by Magellan are evidence for very long melt flows, but their composition and origin remain uncertain. The hypothesis of water-rich flow is not reasonable regarding Venus’ surface temperature. The length of these channels could not be explained by a silicate melt composition but more likely, by a carbonate-sulfate melt which has a much lower viscosity (Kargel et al 1994). One hypothesis is that calcite CaCO3 and anhydrite CaSO4 - which are alteration products of basalts - melted during meteorite impacts. A famous example recorded on the Earth (Chicxulub) produced melt and gas rich in carbon and sulfur. Calcite and sulfate evaporites are also present on Mars surface, associated with basalts. An impact on these materials may release C- and S-rich melt or fluid. Another type of planetary phenomenon (affecting only the Earth) might provoke a high pressure destabilization of basalt+anhydrite+calcite. Very high contents of C and S are measured in some Earth’s magmas, either dissolved or in the form of crystals (Luhr 2008). As shown by the high H content and high fO2 of primary igneous anhydrite-bearing lavas, the high S content in their source may be explained by the subduction of an anhydrite-bearing oceanic crust, either directly (by melting followed by eruption) or indirectly (by release of S-rich melt or fluid that metasomatize the mantle). Calcite is a major product of oceanic sedimentation and alteration of the crust. Therefore, sulfate- and calcite-rich material may be subducted to high pressures and high temperatures (HP-HT) and release S- and C-rich melts or fluids which could influence the composition of subduction zone lavas or gases. Both phenomena - meteorite impact and subduction - imply HP-HT conditions - although the P-T-time paths are different. Some HP experimental/theoretical studies have been performed on basalt/eclogite, calcite and anhydrite separately or on a combination of two. In this study we

  4. Melt Inclusion Evidence for Subduction-modified Mantle Beneath the Woodlark Spreading Center, Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, J.; Turner, A.; Collins, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Woodlark Spreading Center (WSC) to the east of Papua New Guinea separates the Indo-Australian plate and Solomon Sea microplate. At its eastern terminus, the WSC is being subducted at the New Britain trench, forming a triple junction near the New Georgia Group arc in the Solomon Islands. Previous studies have shown that lavas recovered from greater than 100 km from the trench on the WSC are N-MORB, but closer to the trench they have arc-like Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios, enrichments in LILE, and depletions in HFSE. In the complex triple junction area of the WSC on the Simbo and Ghizo Ridges, island arc tholeiites to medium-K calc-alkaline andesites and dacites have been recovered, many with trace element and isotopic characteristics that are similar to the true arc lavas in the New Georgia Group on the other side of the trench. We suggest that subduction-modified arc mantle migrates through slab windows created by the subduction of the WSC as the plates continue to diverge after subduction. This transfer of mantle across the plate boundary leads to variable mixing between arc and N-MORB end-members, forming the hybrid to arc-like lavas recovered on the WSC. To test this hypothesis and to characterize the end-member compositions, we have analyzed melt inclusions in olivine, pyroxene, and plagioclase phenocrysts in Simbo and Ghizo Ridge lava samples. Major elements were analyzed using the electron microprobe facility at Fayetteville State University and volatiles were analyzed on the ion probe facility at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The melt inclusions show a wide diversity of magmas from basalts to dacites, and mixing modeling shows that most Woodlark Spreading Center lava compositions are explained by mixing between the most extreme mafic (MORB) and felsic (arc) inclusion compositions.

  5. Boron-cycling by subducted lithosphere; insights from boron-isotope compositions of the Kokchetav tourmalines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Moriguti, T.; Nakamura, E.

    2007-12-01

    ]. As high- pressure stability limits of serpentines[7] are comparable to the peak metamorphic pressure of the Kokchetav diamond-grade rocks, the fluids derived from serpentine-breakdown in the lithospheric mantle would ascend to accelerate the partial melting of overlying crustal rocks. The serpentine-breakdown is the first, major dehydration reaction in subducting lithospheric mantle, the fluids from serpentine-breakdown should have retained the heavy B-isotope ratios, differing from subducting crustal rocks that have already experienced the isotope fractionation through dehydration reactions. Consequently, we conclude that the heavy B-isotope signature would be inherited from serpentinites in subducted lithospheric mantle, hydrated prior to subduction. The subducted lithospheric mantle is also an essential reservoir for the geochemical recycling of surficial materials, as implied by recent studies with radiogenic and stable isotopes in oceanic island basalts. [1]Shimizu & Ogasawara (2005) Mitt Öterr Miner Ges 150:141 [2]Palmer & Slack (1989) 103:434-451 [3]Korsakov et al.(2004) Terra Nova 16:146-151; Korsakov & Hermann (2006) EPSL 241:104-118 [4]Spivack & You (1997) EPSL 152:113-122 [5]Spivack & Edmond (1987) GCA 51:1033-1043; Benton et al.(2001) EPSL 187:273-282 [6]Peacock (2001) Geology 29:299-302 [7]Ulmer & Trommsdroff (1995) Science 268:858-861; Wunder & Schreyer (1997) Lithos 41:213-227 u.ac.jp/eng/

  6. Controls on the Migration of Fluids in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. R.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Van Keken, P. E.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hacker, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Arc volcanism associated with subduction is generally considered to be caused by the transport in the slab of hydrated minerals to sub-arc depths. In a qualitative sense it appears clear that progressive dehydration reactions in the down-going slab release fluids to the hot overlying mantle wedge, causing flux melting and the migration of melts to the volcanic front. However, the quantitative details of fluid release, migration, melt generation and transport in the wedge remain poorly understood. In particular, there are two fundamental observations that defy quantitative modeling. The first is the location of the volcanic front with respect to intermediate depth earthquakes (e.g. 100+/-40 km; England et al., 2004, Syracuse and Abers, 2006) which is remarkably robust yet insensitive to subduction parameters. This is particularly surprising given new estimates on the variability of fluid release in global subduction zones (e.g. van Keken et al. 2011) which show great sensitivity of fluid release to slab thermal conditions. Reconciling these results implies some robust mechanism for focusing fluids and/or melts toward the wedge corner. The second observation is the global existence of thermally hot erupted basalts and andesites that, if derived from flux melting of the mantle requires sub-arc mantle temperatures of 1300 degrees C over shallow pressures of 1-2 GPa which are not that different from mid-ocean ridge conditions. These observations impose significant challenges for geodynamic models of subduction zones, and in particular for those that do not include the explicit transport of fluids and melts. We present a range of high-resolution models that include a more complete description of coupled fluid and solid mechanics (allowing the fluid to interact with solid rheological variations) together with rheologically consistent solution for temperature and solid flow. Focusing on end-members of a global suite of arc geometries and thermal histories we discuss how

  7. Shock metamorphism of granulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Thompson, T. D.; Hoerz, F.; Bauer, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an extensive series of shock-recovery experiments performed on both nonporous crystalline basalt and its granulated and sieved counterpart to study the role of porosity and grain size in shock motomorphic effects under otherwise identical conditions. Shocked samples are compared with unshocked starting material in terms of textural and mineralogical modifications attributable to shock. A comparative petrographic and chemical characterization is presented of pulverized and sieved lunar basalt 75035 shocked between 6 and 75 GPa in comparison with holocrystalline disks of the same basalts shocked in 10 earlier experiments. Specifically, a petrographic classification of shock features is given, along with an estimation of relative amounts of shock glasses and a chemical characterization of shock glasses in each shocked granular basalt.

  8. Reduction of mare basalts by sulfur loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic Fe content and S abundance are inversely correlated in mare basalts. Either S volatilization from the melt results in reduction of Fe2+ to Fe0 or else high S content decreases Fe0 activity in the melt, thus explaining the correlation. All considerations favor the model that metallic iron in mare basalts is due to sulfur loss. The Apollo 11 and 17 mare basalt melts were probably saturated with S at the time of eruption; the Apollo 12 and 15 basalts were probably not saturated. Non-mare rocks show a positive correlation of S abundance with metallic Fe content; it is proposed that this is due to the addition of meteoritic material having a fairly constant Fe0/S ratio. If true, metallic Fe content or S abundance in non-mare rocks provides a measure of degree of meteoritic contamination. ?? 1976.

  9. Basalts Dredged from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Engel, A E

    1963-06-21

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. In addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic theoleiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. The distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope.

  10. Mechanisms of Basalt-plains Ridge Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, T. R.; Maxwell, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The morphologic similarities between the Columbia Plateau ridges and ridges on the Moon, Mercury and Mars form a strong basis for the interpretation of basalt-plains ridges as compressional folds. The basalt-plains ridges appear to have formed on competent flood basalt units deformed at the surface with essentially no confining pressure. Estimates of compressive strain for planetary ridges range from a few tenths of a percent on the Moon to up to 0.4% on Mars, to as high as 35% for Columbia Plateau folds with associated thrust faults. Such values have strong implications for both deformational mechanisms as well as for the source of stress. Deformational mechanisms that will attempt to account for the morphology, fold geometry, possible associated thrust faulting and regular spacing of the basalt-plains ridges on the terrestrial planets are under investigation.

  11. Basalts dredged from the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, C.G.; Engel, A.E.J.

    1963-01-01

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. in addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic tholeiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. the distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope.

  12. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, I noted that the nomenclature of lunar mare basalts was inconsistent, complicated, and arcane. I suggested that this reflected both the limitations of our understanding of the basalts, and the piecemeal progression made in lunar science by the nature of the Apollo missions. Although the word "classification" is commonly attached to various schemes of mare basalt nomenclature, there is still no classification of mare basalts that has any fundamental grounding. We remain basically at a classification of the first kind in the terms of Shand; that is, things have names. Quoting John Stuart Mill, Shand discussed classification of the second kind: "The ends of scientific classification are best answered when the objects are formed into groups respecting which a greater number of propositions can be made, and those propositions more important than could be made respecting any other groups into which the same things could be distributed." Here I repeat some of the main contents of my discussion from a decade ago, and add a further discussion based on events of the last decade. A necessary first step of sample studies that aims to understand lunar mare basalt processes is to associate samples with one another as members of the same igneous event, such as a single eruption lava flow, or differentiation event. This has been fairly successful, and discrete suites have been identified at all mare sites, members that are eruptively related to each other but not to members of other suites. These eruptive members have been given site-specific labels, e.g., Luna24 VLT, Apollo 11 hi-K, A12 olivine basalts, and Apollo 15 Green Glass C. This is classification of the first kind, but is not a useful classification of any other kind. At a minimum, a classification is inclusive (all objects have a place) and exclusive (all objects have only one place). The answer to "How should rocks be classified?" is far from trivial, for it demands a fundamental choice about nature

  13. The Origin of Noble Gas Isotopic Heterogeneity in Icelandic Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Honda, M.; McDougall, I.

    2001-01-01

    Two models for generation of heterogeneous He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios in Icelandic basalts are evaluated using a mixing model and the observed noble gas elemental ratios in Icelandic basalts,Ocean island Basalt (OIBs) and Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORBs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Graphite formation by carbonate reduction during subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Matthieu E.; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Benzerara, Karim; Chaduteau, Carine; Malvoisin, Benjamin; Malavieille, Jacques

    2013-06-01

    Carbon is transported from Earth's surface into its interior at subduction zones. Carbonates in sediments overlying hydrothermally altered rocks (including serpentinites) within the subducted slab are the main carriers of this carbon. Part of the carbon is recycled back to the surface by volcanism, but some is transferred to the deep Earth. Redox transformations during shallow subduction control the transfer and long-term fate of carbon, but are poorly explored. Here we use carbon stable isotopes and Raman spectroscopy to analyse the reduction of carbonate in an exhumed serpentinite-sediment contact in Alpine Corsica, France. We find that highly crystalline graphite was formed during subduction metamorphism and was concentrated in the sediment, within a reaction zone in direct contact with the serpentinite. The graphite in this reaction zone has a carbon isotopic signature (δ13C) of up to 0.8+/-0.1‰, similar to that of the original calcite that composed the sediments, and is texturally associated with the calcium-bearing mineral wollastonite that is also formed in the process. We use mass-balance calculations to show that about 9% of the total carbonaceous matter in the sedimentary unit results from complete calcite reduction in the reaction zone. We conclude that graphite formation, under reducing and low-temperature conditions, provides a mechanism to retain carbon in a subducting slab, aiding transport of carbon into the deeper Earth.

  15. What really causes flat slab subduction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Manea, M.

    2014-12-01

    How flat slab geometries are generated has been long debated. It has been suggested thattrenchward motion of thick cratons in some areas of South America and Cenozoic NorthAmerica progressively closed the asthenospheric wedge and induced flat subduction. Here wedevelop time-dependent numerical experiments to explore how trenchward motion of thickcratons may result in flat subduction. We find that as the craton approaches the trench andthe wedge closes, two opposite phenomena control slab geometry: the suction between oceanand continent increases, favoring slab flattening, while the mantle confined within the closingwedge dynamically pushes the slab backward and steepens it. When the slab retreats, as inthe Peru and Chile flat slabs, the wedge closure rate and dynamic push are small and suctionforces generate, in some cases, flat subduction. We model the past 30 m.y. of subduction in theChilean flat slab area and demonstrate that trenchward motion of thick lithosphere, 200-300km, currently ~700-800 km away from the Peru-Chile Trench, reproduces a slab geometrythat fits the stress pattern, seismicity distribution, and temporal and spatial evolution ofdeformation and volcanism in the region. We also suggest that varying trench kinematics mayexplain some differing slab geometries along South America. When the trench is stationaryor advances, the mantle flow within the closing wedge strongly pushes the slab backward andsteepens it, possibly explaining the absence of flat subduction in the Bolivian orocline.

  16. Crustal Accretion at Subduction Initiation Along Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc and the Link to SSZ Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Tani, K.; Reagan, M. K.; Kanayama, K.; Umino, S.; Harigane, Y.; Sakamoto, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) forearc preserves the earliest arc magmatic history from subduction initiation to the establishment of the arc. Recent investigations have established a bottom to top igneous stratigraphy of: 1) mantle peridotite, 2) gabbroic rocks, 3) a sheeted dyke complex, 4) basaltic pillow lavas (forearc basalts: FAB), 5) boninites and magnesian andesites, 6) tholeiites and calcalkaline arc lavas. This stratigraphy has many similarities to supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites. One of the most important common characteristics between the SSZ ophiolites and the forearc crust is the occurrence of MORB-like basaltic lavas underlying or accompanying boninites and early arc volcanic suites. A key observation from the IBM forearc is that FAB differs from nearby back-arc lavas in chemical characteristics, including a depletion in moderately incompatible elements. This indicates that FAB is not a pre-existing oceanic basement of the arc, but the first magmatic product after subduction initiation. Sheeted dikes of FAB composition imply that this magmatism was associated with seafloor spreading, possibly triggered by onset of slab sinking. Recognition of lavas with transitional geochemical characteristics between the FAB and the boninites strongly implies genetic linkage between these two magma types. The close similarity of the igneous stratigraphy of SSZ ophiolites to the IBM forearc section strongly implies a common magmatic evolutionary path, i.e., decompressional melting of a depleted MORB-type mantle is followed by melting of an even more depleted mantle with the addition of slab-derived fluid/melt to produce boninite magma. Similarity of magmatic process between IBM forearc and Tethyan ophiolites appears to be reflected on common characteristics of upper mantle section. Peridotite from both sections show more depleted characteristics compared to upper mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges. Age determinations reveal that first magmatism at the IBM arc

  17. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio < 1.7) with disequilibrium textures and low Ba/Sr ratios while Population Two is elongate (aspect ratio > 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic

  18. Basaltic Soil of Gale Crater: Crystalline Component Compared to Martian Basalts and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schmidt, M.; Downs, R. T.; Stolper, E. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Farmer, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Rampe, E. B.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.; Anderosn, R. C.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of the soil of the Rocknest dune is crystalline and is consistent with derivation from unweathered basalt. Minerals and their compositions are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument on MSL Curiosity. Basalt minerals in the soil include plagioclase, olivine, low- and high-calcium pyroxenes, magnetite, ilmenite, and quartz. The only minerals unlikely to have formed in an unaltered basalt are hematite and anhydrite. The mineral proportions and compositions of the Rocknest soil are nearly identical to those of the Adirondack-class basalts of Gusev Crater, Mars, inferred from their bulk composition as analyzed by the MER Spirit rover.

  19. Numerical simulation of earthquake rupture sequences on the Manila thrust fault: Effects of seamount subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Liu, Y.; Ning, J.; He, C.; Zhang, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Manila subduction zone is located at the convergent boundary between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Sunda/Eurasian Plate from offshore Taiwan to northern Luzon of Philippines, where only infrequent M7 earthquakes were observed in modern seismological instrumentation history. The lack of great events (M8+) indicates the subduction fault is either aseismically slipping or is accumulating strain energy toward rapid release in a great earthquake. Here we conduct numerical simulations of earthquake rupture sequences in the framework of rate-state-friction along the 15-19.5ºN segment of the 3D plate boundary with subducted seamounts. Rate-state frictional properties are constrained by laboratory friction experiments conducted on IODP Expedition 349, South China Sea (SCS), drilling samples from the basaltic basement rock under 100ºC - 600ºC, effective normal stress of 50 MPa and pore pressure of 100 MPa. During the modeled 2000-year period, the maximum magnitude of earthquakes is Mw7. Each sequence repeats every ~200 years and is consisted of three sub-events, event 1 (Mw7) that can overcome the barrier, where dip angle changes most rapidly along the strike, to rupture the entire fault. Events 2 (Mw 6.4) and 3 (Mw 5.7) are of smaller magnitudes and result in north-south segmented rupture pattern. We further quantify the potential of earthquake nucleation by the S-ratio (lower S ratio means the initial stress is closer to peak strength, hence more likely to nucleate an earthquake). The subducted seamount shows higher S-ratios than its surroundings mostly, implying an unlikely nucleate area. Our results are qualitatively similar to 2D subduction earthquake modeling by Herrendörfer et al. (2015, 2-3 events per supercycle and median long-term S is 0.5-1). Finally, we plan to use our coseismic rupture model results as inputs for a tsunami propagation model in SCS. Compared to the kinematic seafloor deformation input, our physics-based earthquake source model and its

  20. Demise of Flat-slab Subduction at the end of the Laramide Orogeny (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, E.

    2013-12-01

    absence of major change in California subduction presumably indicates that while the flat slab fell off of North America east of California, it remained at the base of California. More recently, the arrival of Yellowstone beneath S. Oregon triggered a delamination of the flat slab remaining beneath N. Oregon, drawing flood basalt activity north.

  1. Geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope variations within Cretaceous continental flood-basalt suites of the Canadian High Arctic, with a focus on the Hassel Formation basalts of northeast Ellesmere Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Solveig

    2015-11-01

    Early- to mid-Cretaceous flood-basalt suites of the northeast Canadian High Arctic assigned to a High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP) were studied for their whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopes. Data from basalt flows within the upper Albian to lower Cenomanian Hassel Formation of northeast Ellesmere Island are compared with former published data and new inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry data of the stratigraphic equivalent Strand Fiord basalts and the older, late Hauterivian to Aptian Isachsen basalts from Axel Heiberg Island. The transitional to mildly alkaline aphyric Hassel basalts, with ocean island basalt (OIB)-like geochemical signatures in parts, have an Ar-Ar whole-rock age of on average 96.4 ± 1.6 Ma. They represent two geochemically different flow units without a fractional crystallization relationship: the high-phosphorous (HP) and low-phosphorous (LP) basalts. The Hassel HP basalts differ from the LP basalts by additionally higher Ba, K, Rb, Th and LREE contents, a pronounced positive Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 1.74-1.76), as well as lower Ta, Nb, Zr and Hf concentrations. The Nd and Sr isotope ratios of the Hassel HP basalts [ ɛ Nd( t) of -1.3 to -1.4, 87Sr/86Sr( t) of 0.70706-0.70707] and the LP basalts [ ɛ Nd( t) of 4.5-4.9, 87Sr/86Sr( t) of 0.7038-0.7040] indicate an origin from different mantle sources. The geochemically similar tholeiitic Isachsen (ca. 130-113 Ma) and Strand Fiord basalts (ca. 105-95 Ma) are also incompatible element enriched relative to the primitive mantle, however, with negative Sr-P anomalies as well as partially negative K, Ta and Nb anomalies. In terms of incompatible element ratios (Zr/Nb, Nb/Th), several mantle components are involved in the formation of the flood-basalt suites: a component with primitive mantle composition, an OIB-like component (probably subducted and recycled oceanic crust) and an enriched lithospheric component. The latter component, probably metasomatized subcontinental

  2. Age and geochemical characteristics of Paleogene basalts drilled from western Taiwan: Records of initial rifting at the southeastern Eurasian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Chung, S.; Lo, Y.; Lo, C.; Yang, H.; Shinjo, R.; Lee, T.; Wu, J.; Huang, S.

    2013-12-01

    The southeastern Eurasian continental margin has been characterized by formation of rift basins associated with intraplate basaltic volcanism since early Cenozoic time. In contrast to Paleogene volcanic rocks that occur sporadically in the basins, Neogene basalts are more widespread on land as lava flows and pyroclastics in the Taiwan Strait (Penghu Islands) and northwestern Taiwan. To better understand the tectonomagmatic evolution, in particular the initial rifting record, this study reports new age, major- and trace-elemental, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data of volcanic rocks drilled from several locations in the Taiwan Strait and western Taiwan. 40Ar/39Ar dating results show two main episodes of volcanic activities: ~56-38 Ma (Eocene) and ~11-8 Ma (late Miocene). The volcanic rocks are composed dominantly of basalts and basaltic andesites, and subordinately of dacites and rhyolites of Eocene age. The two episodes of basaltic volcanism have distinct geochemical characteristics. Comparatively, the Eocene basalts are more depleted in basaltic components such as Ca, Fe and Ti, but have higher Al content. They are also more enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE), and show depletions in high field strength elements (HFSE). Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the late Miocene basalts are relatively more uniform and unradiogenic (ɛNd = +6.0 to +3.8), similar to those of Miocene basalts from NW Taiwan and Penghu Islands, and broadly coeval OIB-type basalts from the South China Sea. However, the Eocene basalts have a wider range in isotope ratios (e.g., ɛNd(T) = +5.6 to -3.2) pointing towards an enriched mantle source. The overall geochemical characteristics suggest two distinct mantle sources: (1) a more refractory mantle source metasomatized by subduction-related processes to generate the Eocene basalts and (2) a fertile but isotopically depleted mantle source for the late Miocene basalts. These two source components are proposed

  3. Age and geochemical characteristics of Paleogene basalts drilled from western Taiwan: Records of initial rifting at the southeastern Eurasian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuo-Lung; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lo, Yi-Ming; Lo, Ching-Hua; Yang, Huai-Jen; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Lee, Tung-Yi; Wu, Jong-Chang; Huang, Shiuh-Tsann

    2012-12-01

    The southeastern Eurasian continental margin has been characterized by formation of rift basins associated with intraplate basaltic volcanism since early Cenozoic time. In contrast to Paleogene volcanic rocks that occur sporadically in the basins, Neogene basalts are more widespread on land as lava flows and pyroclastics in the Taiwan Strait (Penghu Islands) and northwestern Taiwan. To better understand the tectonomagmatic evolution, in particular the initial rifting record, this study reports new age, major- and trace-elemental, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data of volcanic rocks drilled from several locations in the Taiwan Strait and western Taiwan. 40Ar/39Ar dating results show two main episodes of volcanic activities: ~ 56-38 Ma (Eocene) and ~ 11-8 Ma (late Miocene). The volcanic rocks are composed dominantly of basalts and basaltic andesites, and subordinately of dacites and rhyolites of Eocene age. The two episodes of basaltic volcanism have distinct geochemical characteristics. Comparatively, the Eocene basalts are more depleted in basaltic components such as Ca, Fe and Ti, but have higher Al content. They are also more enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE), and show depletions in high field strength elements (HFSE). Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the late Miocene basalts are relatively more uniform and unradiogenic (ɛNd = + 6.0 to + 3.8), similar to those of Miocene basalts from NW Taiwan and Penghu Islands, and broadly coeval OIB-type basalts from the South China Sea. However, the Eocene basalts have a wider range in isotope ratios (e.g., ɛNd(T) = + 5.6 to -3.2) pointing towards an enriched mantle source. The overall geochemical characteristics suggest two distinct mantle sources: (1) a more refractory mantle source metasomatized by subduction-related processes to generate the Eocene basalts and (2) a fertile but isotopically depleted mantle source for the late Miocene basalts. These two source components are

  4. Petrology of basaltic sills from ocean drilling program sites 794 and 797 in the Yamato Basin of the Japan Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The basaltic sills from ocean drilling program sites 794 and 797 in the Yamato Basin of the Japan Sea are characterized petrographically on the basis of a detailed study of the composition of relict phenocryst and groundmass phases. The systematic variation in the rock compositions is discussed. Results of 1-atm melting experiments on a relatively primitive basalt from site 797 are reported. The sills are found to constitute two distinct groups of suites: primitive, olivine-bearing suites with low potassium and primitive olivine-bearing to evolved, olivine-free suites with relatively high potassium. A pseudoinvariant reaction relationship between olivine and augite and magnetite is inferred. Complex magmatic and tectonic evolutions in the region, perhaps reflecting a transitional stage between subduction zone activity and back arc spreading, are suggested.

  5. Subduction, collision and initiation of hominin dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, Uri; Lazar, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Subduction is the main driving force of plate tectonics controlling the physiography of the Earth. The northward subduction of the Sinai plate was interrupted during the Early Pleistocene when the Eratosthenes Seamount began to collide with the Cyprian arc. A series of synchronous structural deformations was triggered across the entire eastern Mediterranean, and local topography was drastically accentuation along the Levantine corridor - one of the main pathways of hominin dispersal out of Africa. However, the choice of this preferred pathway and timing of dispersal has not been resolved. Though causes for dispersal out of Africa are in debate, we show that the transition from subduction to collision in the eastern Mediterranean set the route.

  6. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  7. Predicting the Isotopic Composition of Subduction-Filtered Subducted Oceanic Crust and Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, W. M.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical and isotopic character of mantle plumes, which produce oceanic island volcanoes, are widely thought to reflect the presence of recycled oceanic crust and sediment. Isotopic systematics suggest the “cycle time” for this process is 1 Ga or longer, but it should be possible to use a simple mass balance approach to discern how the presently operating subduction zone filter affects the ratios of radioactive parent to radiogenic daughter isotopes. Simple uniformitarian assumptions can then be used to predict the present isotopic composition of anciently subducted lithosphere. Our underlying assumption in deciphering the subduction zone filter is that the flux of an element into the deep mantle is simply equal to the flux of element into the subduction zone less the flux of that element into subduction zone magmas. The former is readily calculated from published data. The latter can be calculated by estimating parental magma compositions, arc accretion rates, and the assumption that arc magma compositions differ from MORB only because of material derived from subducting crust and sediment. Using this approach for 8 intra-oceanic subduction zones, we find 73% of Th and Pb, 79% of U, 80% of Rb and Sr, 93% of Nd and 98% of Sm survive the subduction zone filter. The subduction zone filter systematically increases Sm/Nd ratios in all subduction zones, but the effect is small, with a weighted mean increase of 1.5%. The effect of subduction is to decrease the Sm/Nd of the mantle, but only slightly. The effect of subduction is to increase the Rb/Sr of the mantle, but the subduction zone filter does not have a systematic effect on Rb/Sr ratios: it significantly increases in Rb/Sr in 3 subduction zones and significantly decreases it in one; the weighted mean shows no significant change. The effect of the subduction zone filter on U/Pb is also not systematic. U/Pb ratios in the mantle fluxes are bimodal, with values equal to or lower than the bulk Earth value in 4

  8. Subduction trench migration since the Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Flament, N. E.; Müller, D.; Butterworth, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Much of our knowledge about subduction zone processes is derived from analyzing present-day Earth. Several studies of contemporary plate motions have investigated the balance between retreating and advancing trenches and shown that subduction zone kinematics are sensitive to the choice of Absolute Plate Motion (APM) model (or "reference frame"). For past times, the absolute motions of the lithospheric plates relative to the Earth's deep interior over tens of millions of years are commonly constrained using observations from paleomagnetism and age-progressive seamount trails. In contrast, a reference frame linking surface plate motions to subducted slab remnants mapped from seismic tomography has recently been proposed. APM models derived using different methodologies, different subsets of hotspots, or differing assumptions of hotspot motion, have contrasting implications for parameters that describe the long term state of the plate-mantle system, such as the balance between advance and retreat of subduction zones, plate velocities, and net lithospheric rotation. Here we quantitatively compare the subduction zone kinematics, net lithospheric rotation and fit to hotspot trails derived the last 130 Myr for a range of alternative reference frames and a single relative plate motion model. We find that hotspot and tomographic slab-remnant reference frames yield similar results for the last 70 Myr. For the period between 130 and 70 Ma, when hotspot trails become scarce, hotspot reference frames yield a much more dispersed distribution of slab advance and retreat velocities, which is considered geodynamically less plausible. By contrast, plate motions calculated using the slab-remnant reference frame, or using a reference frame designed to minimise net rotation, yield more consistent subduction zone kinematics for times older than 70 Ma. Introducing the global minimisation of trench migration rates as a key criterion in the construction of APM models forms the foundation

  9. How was the Iapetus infected with subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, John; Schofield, David; Brendan Murphy, J.; Thomas, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The history of the Iapetus Ocean is the archetype for the "Wilson cycle". The most poorly understood part of the Wilson cycle is the transition between ocean opening and ocean closing. It is often assumed that subduction is initiated by subsidence of old, cold ocean floor at passive margins. However, in the best modern analogue, Atlantic margins formed at ~180 Ma are still passive, suggesting that some other mechanism is required to initiate subduction. In most tectonic reconstructions of the Appalachian-Caledonide orogen, the continental blocks (Laurentia, Baltica, and Amazonia - West Africa), which separated to form the Iapetus during the breakup of Rodinia, are the same three continents that subsequently collided during closure, making the Iapetus a test case for models of subduction initiation. The margin of Laurentia underwent protracted rifting from ~615 Ma to at least 550 Ma, and perhaps later. The earliest "drift" successions on the Newfoundland margin are as young as ~515 Ma. Subduction, recorded by arc volcanics preserved in the orogen, began relatively early in the history of the new ocean at ~515-505 Ma, and the earliest collisional events are recorded almost simultaneously in peri-Laurentian and peri-Gondwanan microcontinents around 490-480 Ma. However, the stable passive margin of Laurentia survived until after 470 Ma before being converted to an active margin. Closure of the ocean between Avalonia and Laurentia was complete by ~425 Ma. These relationships are difficult to reconcile with a classic Wilson cycle in which subduction is initiated by inversion of an extensional margin. It is much more likely that closure was initiated at a subduction zone migrating westward into the Iapetus, analogous to the eastward Mesozoic-Cenozoic entry of the Caribbean and Scotia plates into the Atlantic realm. This process was probably initiated at a transform boundary between the "internal" ocean formed during the breakup of Rodinia, and "external" Panthalassan

  10. Endeavour basalt geology and petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, J. B.; Stakes, J.; Ramos, F.; Michael, P.; Stakes, D.

    2005-12-01

    We report major and trace element and isotope data from 250 basalt samples recently collected by submersible from the axial valley and flanks of the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Off-axis volcanism is abundant on both flanks which are mirror images of one another geologically. Axial valley walls up to 1 km off axis appear to be steps of in tact but variably fractured sheet, lobate, and hackly lava flows similar to the youngest lavas seen in collapse features in the axis. Coverage by pillow terrane increases with distance off axis and coverage becomes complete after 1 km. The similarity of the two flanks suggests that the currently asymmetric axial magma chamber (van Ark et al., 2004) may be shorter-lived than the off-axis volcanism. MgO contents range from 6.0-8.5% and generally are lower on the flanks consistent with consistently cooler chamber edges there. La/Yb ratios vary 3-fold within 100 m in the axial valley, with normalized La/Sm = 0.8-2.5 in contrast to constant Sr and Nd isotopes. However, Th/U and 230Th/232Th ratios vary only slightly in the axial valley, which may enable dating of off-axis samples. H2O/Ce is less than 170, typical of values throughout much of the Pacific. Variations in depth and degree of melting, and in source composition, are implied. At times, these heterogeneities escaped homogenization in axial magma chambers. Cl concentrations and Cl/K ratios are surprisingly low considering the active hydrothermal systems in close proximity and the potential for brine incorporation into the magma chamber.

  11. Origin of ophiolite complexes related to intra-oceanic subduction initiation: implications of IODP Expedition 352 (Izu-Bonin fore arc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Avery, Aaron; Carvallo, Claire; Christeson, Gail; Ferré, Eric; Kurz, Walter; Kutterolf, Steffen; Morgan, Sally; Pearce, Julian; Reagan, Mark; Sager, William; Shervais, John; Whattam, Scott; International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 352 (Izu-Bonin-Mariana Fore Arc), the Scientific Party of

    2015-04-01

    Ophiolites, representing oceanic crust exposed on land (by whatever means), are central to the interpretation of many orogenic belts (e.g. E Mediterranean). Based mostly on geochemical evidence, ophiolites are widely interpreted, in many but by no means all cases, as having formed within intra-oceanic settings above subduction zones (e.g. Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus). Following land geological, dredging and submersible studies, fore arcs of the SW Pacific region became recognised as likely settings of supra-subduction zone ophiolite genesis. This hypothesis was tested by recent drilling of the Izu-Bonin fore arc. Four sites were drilled, two on the outer fore arc and two on the upper trench slope. Site survey seismic data, combined with borehole data, indicate that three of the sites are located in fault-controlled sediment ponds that formed in response to dominantly down-to the-west extensional faulting (with hints of preceding top-to-the-east compressional thrusting). The sediments overlying the igneous basement, of maximum Late Eocene to Recent age, document ash and aeolian input, together with mass wasting of the fault-bounded sediment ponds. At the two more trenchward sites (U1440 and U1441), mostly tholeiitic basalts were drilled, including massive and pillowed lavas and hyaloclastite. Geochemically, these extrusives are of near mid-oceanic ridge basalt composition (fore arc basalts). Subtle chemical deviation from normal MORB can be explained by weakly fluid-influenced melting during decompression melting in the earliest stages of supra-subduction zone spreading (not as 'trapped' older MORB). The remaining two sites, c. 6 km to the west (U1439 and U1442), penetrated dominantly high-magnesian andesites, known as boninites, largely as fragmental material. Their formation implies the extraction of highly depleted magmas from previously depleted, refractory upper mantle in a supra-subduction zone setting. Following supra-subduction zone spreading, the active

  12. Volcanic Markers of the Post-Subduction Evolution of Baja California and Sonora, Mexico: Slab Tearing Versus Lithospheric Rupture of the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmus, Thierry; Pallares, Carlos; Maury, René C.; Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Bellon, Hervé; Benoit, Mathieu; Michaud, François

    2011-08-01

    The study of the geochemical compositions and K-Ar or Ar-Ar ages of ca. 350 Neogene and Quaternary lavas from Baja California, the Gulf of California and Sonora allows us to discuss the nature of their mantle or crustal sources, the conditions of their melting and the tectonic regime prevailing during their genesis and emplacement. Nine petrographic/geochemical groups are distinguished: "regular" calc-alkaline lavas; adakites; magnesian andesites and related basalts and basaltic andesites; niobium-enriched basalts; alkali basalts and trachybasalts; oceanic (MORB-type) basalts; tholeiitic/transitional basalts and basaltic andesites; peralkaline rhyolites (comendites); and icelandites. We show that the spatial and temporal distribution of these lava types provides constraints on their sources and the geodynamic setting controlling their partial melting. Three successive stages are distinguished. Between 23 and 13 Ma, calc-alkaline lavas linked to the subduction of the Pacific-Farallon plate formed the Comondú and central coast of the Sonora volcanic arc. In the extensional domain of western Sonora, lithospheric mantle-derived tholeiitic to transitional basalts and basaltic andesites were emplaced within the southern extension of the Basin and Range province. The end of the Farallon subduction was marked by the emplacement of much more complex Middle to Late Miocene volcanic associations, between 13 and 7 Ma. Calc-alkaline activity became sporadic and was replaced by unusual post-subduction magma types including adakites, niobium-enriched basalts, magnesian andesites, comendites and icelandites. The spatial and temporal distribution of these lavas is consistent with the development of a slab tear, evolving into a 200-km-wide slab window sub-parallel to the trench, and extending from the Pacific coast of Baja California to coastal Sonora. Tholeiitic, transitional and alkali basalts of subslab origin ascended through this window, and adakites derived from the partial

  13. Seismic Characterization of the Transition from Continental to Oceanic Subduction along the western Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, F. D.; Rondenay, S.; Zhang, H.; Sachpazi, M.; Charalampakis, M.; Royden, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Hellenic subduction zone is located in the east-central Mediterranean region and exhibits large variations in convergence rate along its western edge. Differences in the lithosphere entering the subduction zone are believed to drive the different rates of convergence. While seismic reflection data has shown a transition from continental to oceanic lithosphere along the foreland, no detailed images of the mantle-wedge structure have been available to test this hypothesis. Here, we use high-resolution seismic images across northern and southern Greece to investigate differences in the subducted crust along the western Hellenic subduction zone. We deployed 40 broadband seismometers from the IRIS PASSCAL pool across Greece in a northern line (NL, across Northern Greece) and southern line (SL, across Peloponnesus, Attica, and Evia), each roughly perpendicular to the trench axis. We recorded over 50 high-quality teleseismic events with good azimuthal coverage from each line. We processed them using a 2D teleseismic migration algorithm based on the Generalized Radon Transform and a 3D receiver function algorithm that includes dipping interfaces. In addition, we constructed a 3D velocity model by applying double-difference tomography to ~5000 local earthquakes. The 3D velocity model was used to construct an optimal background model for the teleseismic imaging. Migration and RF images reveal N60E dipping low-velocity layers beneath both NL and SL. From high-resolution migration images, we interpret an ~8 km thick low-velocity layer beneath SL as subducted oceanic crust and a ~20 km thick low-velocity layer beneath NL as subducted continental crust. Relocated earthquakes show that the NL subducted crust is seismically active near the foreland down to 50 km depth presumably as a result of slab flexure. Beyond this region, the subducted crust is aseismic until its signal disappears at ~70 km depth. In contrast, the SL subducted crust is marked by seismicity that extends

  14. Implications of Subduction Rehydration for Earth's Deep Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruepke, L. H.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Dixon, J.

    2006-12-01

    The presence of liquid water is the principle difference between our Earth and other planets in the solar system. The global ocean is the obvious surface expression of this. The 'standard model' for the genesis of the oceans is that they are exhalations from Earth's deep interior continually rinsed through surface rocks by the global hydrologic cycle. The question of how much water resides within the Earth's deep interior remains unresolved and is a matter of vigorous ongoing scientific debate. We have addressed the question of water distribution between the exosphere and the mantle throughout Earth's history with simple mass balance considerations. In our model, water is outgassed from the mantle into the exosphere (atmosphere + continental crust) during pressure-release melting at mid-ocean ridges and hotspots. Plate subduction may transport water back from the surface into the deeper mantle thereby 'closing' the global geologic water cycle. In series of some 5000 model runs we have thoroughly explored the mutual effect of model parameters. All models correctly predict the formation of the present-day oceans but differ in their predicted sea-level changes through time and in the amount of water in the present-day mantle. To distinguish which model runs are the most realistic we use geochemical constraints and observed sealevel changes during the Phanerozoic. Recently Dixon et al. [2002] estimated water concentrations for some of the major mantle components and concluded that the most primitive (FOZO) are significantly wetter than the recycling associated EM or HIMU mantle components and the even drier depleted mantle source that melts to form MORB. Sealevel changes over hundreds of million of years are notoriously bad constrained. But a maximum drop in sealevel of 400-600m appears to be an upper bound. We find that only those model runs are consistent with these constraints in which deep water subduction is limited and in which the present-day mantle is

  15. Rapid time scales of basalt to andesite differentiation at Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Mark; Tepley, Frank J.; Gill, James B.; Wortel, Matthew; Hartman, Brian

    2005-08-01

    We present comprehensive U-series data ( 238U- 234U- 230Th- 226Ra- 210Pb- 210Po and ( 230Th)/( 232Th)) for an andesite from an oceanic arc. The juvenile Anatahan andesite has U-Th systematics colinear with other historical Mariana volcanic rocks, and is most similar to those of the other volcano in the Mariana arc with a significant proportion of silicic andesite: Uracas. Like Uracas, the parental basalt for the Anatahan andesite was generated by relatively low degrees of flux melting from a source previously enriched in a sediment component from the subducting slab. However, the Anatahan andesite is much more strongly enriched in 226Ra over 230Th than Uracas lavas, and has one of the highest ( 226Ra)/( 232Th) ratios of siliceous andesites globally. The long-lived disequilibria between 238U- 230Th- 226Ra in the Anatahan andesite are inherited from basalt genesis, not created during differentiation or eruption. Thus, the time between genesis of the parental basalt and eruption of andesite at Anatahan is shorter than for Uracas. Moreover, the near-equilibrium ( 210Pb)/( 226Ra) value indicates that the magma body did not persistently lose or gain 222Rn for more than 2 years before eruption. This permits differentiation of the parental basalt to form andesite within this 2-year time period, although a differentiation time period between 100 and a few thousand years also is possible. The relative activities between 210Po and 210Pb suggest erupted scoria degassed Po less than most lavas despite eruption plume heights of ˜10 km, which further suggests an unusually rapid ascent before eruption. These data also show that juvenile material was ejected from the first day of the eruption. Phreatomagmatic ejecta overlying the main Anatahan scoria is strongly enriched in 210Po over 210Pb, indicating that a significant proportion of the Po degassed from rising magmas sublimes in its shallow fumarolic conduit system.

  16. Wrangellia flood basalts in Alaska: A record of plume-lithosphere interaction in a Late Triassic accreted oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Andrew R.; Scoates, James S.; Weis, Dominique

    2008-12-01

    The Wrangellia flood basalts are part of one of the best exposed accreted oceanic plateaus on Earth. They provide important constraints on the construction of these vast submarine edifices and the source and temporal evolution of magmas for a plume head impinging beneath oceanic lithosphere. Wrangellia flood basalts (˜231-225 Ma) extend ˜450 km across southern Alaska (Wrangell Mountains and Alaska Range) where ˜3.5 km of mostly subaerial flows are bounded by late Paleozoic arc volcanics and Late Triassic limestone. The vast majority of the flood basalts are light rare earth element (LREE) -enriched high-Ti basalt (1.6-2.4 wt % TiO2) with uniform ocean island basalt (OIB) -type Pacific mantle isotopic compositions (ɛHf(t) = +9.7 to +10.7; ɛNd(t) = +6.0 to +8.1; t = 230 Ma). However, the lowest ˜400 m of stratigraphy in the Alaska Range is LREE-depleted low-Ti basalt (0.4-1.2 wt % TiO2) with pronounced negative high field strength element (HFSE) anomalies and Hf isotopic compositions (ɛHf(t) = +13.7 to +18.4) that are decoupled from Nd (ɛNd(t) = +4.6 to +5.4) and displaced well above the OIB mantle array (ΔɛHf = +4 to +8). The radiogenic Hf of the low-Ti basalts indicates involvement of a component that evolved with high Lu/Hf over time but not with a correspondingly high Sm/Nd. The radiogenic Hf and HFSE-depleted signature of the low-Ti basalts suggest pre-existing arc lithosphere was involved in the formation of flood basalts that erupted early in construction of part of the Wrangellia plateau in Alaska. Thermal and mechanical erosion of the base of the lithosphere by the impinging plume head may have led to melting of arc lithosphere or interaction of plume-derived melts and subduction-modified mantle. The high-Ti lavas dominate the main phase of construction of the plateau and were derived from a depleted mantle source distinct from the source of MORB and with compositional similarities to that of ocean islands (e.g., Hawaii) and plateaus (e.g., Ontong

  17. Rare-earth element geochemistry and the origin of andesites and basalts of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.W.; Cashman, K.V.; Rankin, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of basalt (a high-Al basalt associated with the rhyolitic centres north of Taupo and a "low-Al" basalt erupted from Red Crater, Tongariro Volcanic Centre) and five types of andesite (labradorite andesite, labradorite-pyroxene andesite, hornblende andesite, pyroxene low-Si andesite and olivine andesite/low-Si andesite) occur in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), North Island, New Zealand. Rare-earth abundances for both basalts and andesites are particularly enriched in light rare-earth elements. High-Al basalts are more enriched than the "low-Al" basalt and have values comparable to the andesites. Labradorite and labradorite-pyroxene andesites all have negative Eu anomalies and hornblende andesites all have negative Ce anomalies. The former is probably due to changing plagioclase composition during fractionation and the latter to late-stage hydration of the magma. Least-squares mixing models indicate that neither high-Al nor "low-Al" basalts are likely sources for labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. High-Al basalts are considered to result from fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene from a garnet-free peridotite at the top of the mantle wedge. Labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites are mainly associated with an older NW-trending arc. The source is likely to be garnet-free but it is not certain whether the andesites result from partial melting of the top of the subducting plate or a hydrated lower portion of the mantle wedge. Pyroxene low-Si andesites probably result from cumulation of pyroxene and calcic plagioclase within labradorite-pyroxene andesites, and hornblende andesites by late-stage hydration of labradorite-pyroxene andesite magma. Olivine andesites, low-Si andesites and "low-Al" basalts are related to the NNE-trending Taupo-Hikurangi arc structure. Although the initial source material is different for these lavas they have probably undergone a similar history to the labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. All lavas show evidence

  18. Are flood basalt eruptions monogenetic or polygenetic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental classification of volcanoes divides them into "monogenetic" and "polygenetic." We discuss whether flood basalt fields, the largest volcanic provinces, are monogenetic or polygenetic. A polygenetic volcano, whether a shield volcano or a stratovolcano, erupts from the same dominant conduit for millions of years (excepting volumetrically small flank eruptions). A flood basalt province, built from different eruptive fissures dispersed over wide areas, can be considered a polygenetic volcano without any dominant vent. However, in the same characteristic, a flood basalt province resembles a monogenetic volcanic field, with only the difference that individual eruptions in the latter are much smaller. This leads to the question how a flood basalt province can be two very different phenomena at the same time. Individual flood basalt eruptions have previously been considered monogenetic, contrasted by only their high magma output (and lava fluidity) with typical "small-volume monogenetic" volcanoes. Field data from Hawaiian shield volcanoes, Iceland, and the Deccan Traps show that whereas many feeder dykes were single magma injections, and the eruptions can be considered "large monogenetic" eruptions, multiple dykes are equally abundant. They indicate that the same dyke fissure repeatedly transported separate magma batches, feeding an eruption which was thus polygenetic by even the restricted definition (the same magma conduit). This recognition helps in understanding the volcanological, stratigraphic, and geochemical complexity of flood basalts. The need for clear concepts and terminology is, however, strong. We give reasons for replacing "monogenetic volcanic fields" with "diffuse volcanic fields" and for dropping the term "polygenetic" and describing such volcanoes simply and specifically as "shield volcanoes," "stratovolcanoes," and "flood basalt fields."

  19. Nickel and Cobalt Partitioning Between Spinel and Basaltic Melt: Applications to Planetary Basalt Suites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2002-01-01

    New experimental spinel/melt partition coefficients for Ni and Co have been measured in basalt samples with natural levels of Ni and Co, are lower than previous high doping experiments, and are applied to several planetary basalt suites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Recycle and fractionation of U and K in the mantle via slab subduction; noble gas isotopic evidence from Polynesian HIMU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyu, Takeshi; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki; Kimura, Jun-Ichi

    2013-04-01

    The abundance and distribution of U and K in the Earth are critical not only for isotope and noble gas geochemistry but also for internal heat production in the mantle. While the concentration of U in bulk silicate Earth (BSE) has been estimated from the chondritic value, K concentration in BSE is poorly constrained. K concentration in BSE has been estimated using U concentration in BSE multiplied by the canonical K/U ratio (13000) on the ground that crustal and mantle-derived rocks show uniform K/U. However, such theory might be uncertain if the subducted slab had fractionated K/U and it remained isolated as a hidden reservoir. We present He-Ne-Ar isotopic compositions for Polynesian HIMU lavas with radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. It has been widely accepted that the HIMU lavas are sourced from subducted ancient oceanic crust. K/U of the HIMU reservoir is constrained using the relative abundances of radiogenic and nucleogenic noble gases, because 40Ar/36Ar evolves by decay of 40K while production of 4He and 21Ne is related with U and Th decay. In 4He/40Ar*-4He/21Ne* space (asterisks denote radiogenic component), the HIMU lavas define a trend that is parallel to, but offset from the trend previously observed for other ocean island basalts. Using 4He/21Ne* as a monitor of elemental fractionation of noble gasses, fractionation-corrected 4He/40Ar* is higher than that expected for the mantle with the canonical K/U of 13000. K/U of the HIMU reservoir converted from 4He/40Ar* is approximately 3000. Low K/U of the HIMU reservoir is best explained by a model where this reservoir originates from subducted oceanic crust that preferentially lost K relative to U via dehydration during its subduction. Since the HIMU reservoir, involving subducted oceanic crust, is enriched in U, but not in K, previous estimates of K/U and K concentrations for BSE, that did not take this reservoir into consideration, will be too high. The mass balance calculation, considering continental

  1. Lunar mare versus terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts - Planetary constraints on basaltic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Bence, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Major differences which exist between terrestrial midocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and lunar mare basalts reflect the different planetary characteristics of earth and moon. MORBs are enriched in aluminum and have higher Mg/(Mg + Fe(2+)). These features reflect a more aluminum- and magnesium-rich mantle source for MORBs. Mare basalts are depleted in sodium and potassium relative to MORBs and, consequently, mare feldspars are depleted in the albite component relative to MORB feldspars; these features are a reflection of the alkali-depleted nature of the moon relative to earth. The oxygen fugacities that obtained during MORB petrogenesis follow the quartz-magnetite-fayalite buffer curve very closely, while those of mare basalts are several orders of magnitude lower. This results in reduced valence states for Fe, Cr, and Ti in mare basalts, which, in turn, has a significant effect on mineral-melt partitioning.

  2. Subduction of the South Chile active spreading ridge: A 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, E.; Arnaud, N.; Guivel, C.; Lagabrielle, Y.; Scalabrino, B.; Espinoza, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4-3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  3. The Death of Slabs and Segregation of Basalt at the Core Mantle Boundary: Influence of Crustal Thickness, Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.

    2012-04-01

    Segregation of subducted mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) at the CMB has been identified as a potentially important mechanism in the long-term evolution of the mantle and core, which may lead to the accumulation of dense piles that explain seismically-observed LLSVPs. Tackley [2011] presented three-dimensional (3-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) simulations of a compositionally-stratified slab reaching the CMB, which will be summarised and extended here. The goals are to characterise the resulting thermo-chemical-phase structures for comparison with seismic studies, and to quantify the fraction of MORB that is able to segregate and remain near the CMB. Compositional stratification of the slab results in a strong torque due to the relatively high density of basalt and low density of harzburgite, which tends to rotate the slab such that the basalt side faces down. Slab-CMB interaction is characterised by heating up of the slab followed by separation of the basalt and harzburgite layers, with harzburgite rising in vigorous plumes. Plumes form at the edges and sides of slabs at the CMB as well as in their interiors (as previously observed for purely thermal slabs) with plume heads dominated by depleted harzburgitic material (sometimes with small amounts of entrained basalt), while plume tails entrain basaltic material. Segregation of basalt depends strongly on the presence or absence of a preexisting dense layer at the CMB, dimensionality, the thickness of the basaltic layer, and the viscosity and thermal conductivity. Two modes of basalt segregation are observed for slabs that land basalt side-up (i) hot harzburgite extruding from the sides and edges and (ii) hot, harzburgite-rich plumes bursting through the basalt layer (as previously observed in laboratory experiments), whereas for a slab that lands basalt side down (iii) hot basalt can peel off from its underside, displaying fingering instabilities in 3-D. Furthermore, basalt-harzburgite segregation is sometimes observed

  4. Stress orientations in subduction zones and the strength of subduction megathrust faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Subduction zone megathrust faults produce most of the world’s largest earthquakes. Although the physical properties of these faults are difficult to observe directly, their frictional strength can be estimated indirectly by constraining the orientations of the stresses that act on them. A global investigation of stress orientations in subduction zones finds that the maximum compressive stress axis plunges systematically trenchward, consistently making a 45°-60° angle to the subduction megathrust fault. These angles indicate that the megathrust fault is not substantially weaker than its surroundings. Together with several other lines of evidence, this implies that subduction zone megathrusts are weak faults in a low-stress environment. The deforming outer accretionary wedge may decouple the stress state along the megathrust from the constraints of the free surface.

  5. Stress orientations in subduction zones and the strength of subduction megathrust faults.

    PubMed

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L

    2015-09-11

    Subduction zone megathrust faults produce most of the world's largest earthquakes. Although the physical properties of these faults are difficult to observe directly, their frictional strength can be estimated indirectly by constraining the orientations of the stresses that act on them. A global investigation of stress orientations in subduction zones finds that the maximum compressive stress axis plunges systematically trenchward, consistently making an angle of 45° to 60° with respect to the subduction megathrust fault. These angles indicate that the megathrust fault is not substantially weaker than its surroundings. Together with several other lines of evidence, this implies that subduction zone megathrusts are weak faults in a low-stress environment. The deforming outer accretionary wedge may decouple the stress state along the megathrust from the constraints of the free surface.

  6. Radionuclide reactions with groundwater and basalts from Columbia River basalt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, G.S.

    1981-06-01

    Chemical reactions of radionuclides with geologic materials found in Columbia River basalt formations were studied. The objective was to determine the ability of these formations to retard radionuclide migration from a radioactive waste repository located in deep basalt. Reactions that can influence migration are precipitation, ion-exchange, complexation, and oxidation-reduction. These reactions were studied by measuring the effects of groundwater composition and redox potential (Eh) on radionuclide sorption on fresh basalt surfaces, a naturally altered basalt, and a sample of secondary minerals associated with a Columbia River basalt flow. In addition, radionuclide sorption isotherms were measured for these materials and reaction kinetics were determined. The radionuclides studied were /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, /sup 75/Se, /sup 95m/Tc, /sup 237/Np, /sup 241/Am, /sup 226/Ra and /sup 237/Pu. The Freundlich equation accurately describes the isotherms when precipitation of radionuclides does not occur. In general, sorption increased in the order: basalt < altered basalt < secondary minerals. This increase in sorption corresponds to increasing surface area and cation exchange capacity. The Eh of the system had a large effect on technetium, plutonium, and neptunium sorption. Technetium(VII), Pu(VI), and Np(V) are reduced to Tc(IV), Pu(IV), and Np(IV), respectively, under Eh conditions expected in deep basalt formations. The kinetics of radionuclide sorption and basalt-groundwater reactions were observed over a period of 18 weeks. Most sorption reactions stabilized after about four weeks. Groundwater composition changed the least in contact with altered basalt. Contact with secondary minerals greatly increased Ca, K, and Mg concentrations in the groundwater.

  7. Geochemical diversity of shergottite basalts: Mixing and fractionation, and their relation to Mars surface basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Filiberto, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The chemical compositions of shergottite meteorites, basaltic rocks from Mars, provide a broad view of the origins and differentiation of these Martian magmas. The shergottite basalts are subdivided based on their Al contents: high-Al basalts (Al > 5% wt) are distinct from low-Al basalts and olivine-phyric basalts (both with Al < 4.5% wt). Abundance ratios of highly incompatible elements (e.g., Th, La) are comparable in all the shergottites. Abundances of less incompatible elements (e.g., Ti, Lu, Hf) in olivine-phyric and low-Al basalts correlate well with each other, but the element abundance ratios are not constant; this suggests mixing between components, both depleted and enriched. High-Al shergottites deviate from these trends consistent with silicate mineral fractionation. The "depleted" component is similar to the Yamato-980459 magma; approximately, 67% crystal fractionation of this magma would yield a melt with trace element abundances like QUE 94201. The "enriched" component is like the parent magma for NWA 1068; approximately, 30% crystal fractionation from it would yield a melt with trace element abundances like the Los Angeles shergottite. This component mixing is consistent with radiogenic isotope and oxygen fugacity data. These mixing relations are consistent with the compositions of many of the Gusev crater basalts analyzed on Mars by the Spirit rover (although with only a few elements to compare). Other Mars basalts fall off the mixing relations (e.g., Wishstone at Gusev, Gale crater rocks). Their compositions imply that basalt source areas in Mars include significant complexities that are not present in the source areas for the shergottite basalts.

  8. Earth's oldest mantle fabrics indicate Eoarchaean subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Reddy, Steven M.; Nutman, Allen P.; Friend, Clark R. L.; Bennett, Vickie C.

    2016-02-01

    The extension of subduction processes into the Eoarchaean era (4.0-3.6 Ga) is controversial. The oldest reported terrestrial olivine, from two dunite lenses within the ~3,720 Ma Isua supracrustal belt in Greenland, record a shape-preferred orientation of olivine crystals defining a weak foliation and a well-defined lattice-preferred orientation (LPO). [001] parallel to the maximum finite elongation direction and (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane define a B-type LPO. In the modern Earth such fabrics are associated with deformation of mantle rocks in the hanging wall of subduction systems; an interpretation supported by experiments. Here we show that the presence of B-type fabrics in the studied Isua dunites is consistent with a mantle origin and a supra-subduction mantle wedge setting, the latter supported by compositional data from nearby mafic rocks. Our results provide independent microstructural data consistent with the operation of Eoarchaean subduction and indicate that microstructural analyses of ancient ultramafic rocks provide a valuable record of Archaean geodynamics.

  9. Earth's oldest mantle fabrics indicate Eoarchaean subduction

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Reddy, Steven M.; Nutman, Allen P.; Friend, Clark R. L.; Bennett, Vickie C.

    2016-01-01

    The extension of subduction processes into the Eoarchaean era (4.0–3.6 Ga) is controversial. The oldest reported terrestrial olivine, from two dunite lenses within the ∼3,720 Ma Isua supracrustal belt in Greenland, record a shape-preferred orientation of olivine crystals defining a weak foliation and a well-defined lattice-preferred orientation (LPO). [001] parallel to the maximum finite elongation direction and (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane define a B-type LPO. In the modern Earth such fabrics are associated with deformation of mantle rocks in the hanging wall of subduction systems; an interpretation supported by experiments. Here we show that the presence of B-type fabrics in the studied Isua dunites is consistent with a mantle origin and a supra-subduction mantle wedge setting, the latter supported by compositional data from nearby mafic rocks. Our results provide independent microstructural data consistent with the operation of Eoarchaean subduction and indicate that microstructural analyses of ancient ultramafic rocks provide a valuable record of Archaean geodynamics. PMID:26879892

  10. The role of viscoelasticity in subducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, R. J.; Moresi, L.-N.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-11-01

    of tectonic plates into Earth's mantle occurs when one plate bends beneath another at convergent plate boundaries. The characteristic time of deformation at these convergent boundaries approximates the Maxwell relaxation time for olivine at lithospheric temperatures and pressures, it is therefore by definition a viscoelastic process. While this is widely acknowledged, the large-scale features of subduction can, and have been, successfully reproduced assuming the plate deforms by a viscous mechanism alone. However, the energy rates and stress profile within convergent margins are influenced by viscoelastic deformation. In this study, viscoelastic stresses have been systematically introduced into numerical models of free subduction, using both the viscosity and shear modulus to control the Maxwell relaxation time. The introduction of an elastic deformation mechanism into subduction models produces deviations in both the stress profile and energy rates within the subduction hinge when compared to viscous only models. These variations result in an apparent viscosity that is variable throughout the length of the plate, decreasing upon approach and increasing upon leaving the hinge. At realistic Earth parameters, we show that viscoelastic stresses have a minor effect on morphology yet are less dissipative at depth and result in an energy transfer between the energy stored during bending and the energy released during unbending. We conclude that elasticity is important during both bending and unbending within the slab hinge with the resulting stress loading and energy profile indicating that slabs maintain larger deformation rates at smaller stresses during bending and retain their strength during unbending at depth.

  11. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  12. Earth's oldest mantle fabrics indicate Eoarchaean subduction.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix; Reddy, Steven M; Nutman, Allen P; Friend, Clark R L; Bennett, Vickie C

    2016-02-16

    The extension of subduction processes into the Eoarchaean era (4.0-3.6 Ga) is controversial. The oldest reported terrestrial olivine, from two dunite lenses within the ∼3,720 Ma Isua supracrustal belt in Greenland, record a shape-preferred orientation of olivine crystals defining a weak foliation and a well-defined lattice-preferred orientation (LPO). [001] parallel to the maximum finite elongation direction and (010) perpendicular to the foliation plane define a B-type LPO. In the modern Earth such fabrics are associated with deformation of mantle rocks in the hanging wall of subduction systems; an interpretation supported by experiments. Here we show that the presence of B-type fabrics in the studied Isua dunites is consistent with a mantle origin and a supra-subduction mantle wedge setting, the latter supported by compositional data from nearby mafic rocks. Our results provide independent microstructural data consistent with the operation of Eoarchaean subduction and indicate that microstructural analyses of ancient ultramafic rocks provide a valuable record of Archaean geodynamics.

  13. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  14. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered. PMID:23676779

  15. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered.

  16. Thermochemistry and melting properties of basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Besson, P.; Courtial, P.; Gérardin, C.; Navrotsky, A.; Richet, P.

    2007-06-01

    The heat capacities of the liquid, glassy and crystalline phases of an alkali basalt have been determined from relative enthalpies measured between 400 and 1,800 K. Values given by available models of calculation generally agree to within 2% of these results. As derived from the new data and the enthalpy of vitrification measured at 973 K by oxide-melt drop solution calorimetry for the same sample, the enthalpy of fusion of this basalt increases from 15.4 kJ/mol at 1,000 K to 33.6 kJ/mol at 1,800 K. Comparisons between the enthalpies of fusion of basalt and model compositions confirm the small magnitude of the enthalpy of mixing between the molten mineral components of the liquids. Minor variations in the chemical composition have only a small effect in the heat capacity and the enthalpy of melting of basalt. The enthalpies of formation at 298 K from the oxides of the crystallized and glass phases of this alkali basalt are -112.2 and -98.5 kJ/mol, respectively, for a gram formula weight based on one mole of oxide components.

  17. Subduction Initiation at Oceanic Detachment Faults and the Origin of Supra-subduction Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, M.; Thieulot, C.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Morris, A.; Spakman, W.; Plümper, O.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction initiation is a critical link in the plate tectonic cycle. Intra-oceanic subduction zones can form along transform faults and fracture zones, but how subduction nucleates parallel to mid-ocean ridges, as in e.g. the Neotethys Ocean during the Jurassic, remains a matter of debate. In recent years, extensional detachment faults have been widely documented adjacent to slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges where they cut across the oceanic lithosphere. These structures are extremely weak due to widespread occurrence of serpentine and talc resulting from hydrothermal alteration, and can therefore effectively localize deformation. Here, we show geochemical, tectonic, and paleomagnetic evidence from the Jurassic ophiolites of Albania and Greece for a subduction zone formed in the western Neotethys parallel to a spreading ridge along an oceanic detachment fault. With 2-D numerical modeling exploring the evolution of a detachment-ridge system experiencing compression, we show that serpentinized detachments are always weaker than spreading ridges. We conclude that, owing to their extreme weakness, oceanic detachments can effectively localize deformation under perpendicular far-field forcing, providing ideal conditions to nucleate new subduction zones parallel and close to (or at) spreading ridges. Direct implication of this, is that resumed magmatic activity in the forearc during subduction initiation can yield widespread accretion of supra-subduction zone ophiolites at or close to the paleoridge. Our new model casts the enigmatic origin of regionally extensive ophiolite belts in a novel geodynamic context, and calls for future research on three-dimensional modeling of subduction initiation and how upper plate extension is associated with that.

  18. Subducted sediment thickness and Mw 9 earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    2017-01-01

    I measure the thickness of subducted sediment (Δss) beneath the décollement in the fore-arc wedge and show that the average value of Δss over a subduction zone segment (Δss>¯) is greater than 1.3 km in segments where Mw ≥ 9 earthquakes have occurred and less than 1.2 km in segments without such large earthquakes. In a previous study, I showed that the stress drop (Δσ) of large earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7) averaged over a subduction zone segment (Δσ>¯) is larger in segments where Mw ≥ 9 earthquakes have occurred than in segments without such an event. It has also been shown that Δσ>¯ is linearly related to 1 - λ (λ = the pore fluid pressure ratio in the interplate megathrust). In this study, I revise the previous estimates of Δσ>¯ and λ and show that there is a positive correlation between Δss>¯, Δσ>¯, and 1 - λ. I present a model that relates Δss to 1 - λ based on the porous flow of H2O in the subducted sediments, which gives a theoretical basis for the correlation between Δss>¯ and Δσ>¯. The combination of these parameters thus provides a better indicator for identifying segments where Mw ≥ 9 earthquakes may occur. Based on this, I propose that the tectonic environments where such huge events are likely to occur are (1) near collision zones, (2) near subduction of spreading centers, and (3) erosive margins with compressional fore arcs. Near the Japanese islands, SE Hokkaido is prone to such an event, but the Nankai Trough is not.

  19. Observations at convergent margins concerning sediment subduction, subduction erosion, and the growth of continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Huene, R.; Scholl, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    At ocean margins where two plates converge, the oceanic plate sinks or is subducted beneath an upper one topped by a layer of terrestrial crust. This crust is constructed of continental or island arc material. The subduction process either builds juvenile masses of terrestrial crust through arc volcanism or new areas of crust through the piling up of accretionary masses (prisms) of sedimentary deposits and fragments of thicker crustal bodies scraped off the subducting lower plate. At convergent margins, terrestrial material can also bypass the accretionary prism as a result of sediment subduction, and terrestrial matter can be removed from the upper plate by processes of subduction erosion. Sediment subduction occurs where sediment remains attached to the subducting oceanic plate and underthrusts the seaward position of the upper plate's resistive buttress (backstop) of consolidated sediment and rock. Sediment subduction occurs at two types of convergent margins: type 1 margins where accretionary prisms form and type 2 margins where little net accretion takes place. At type 2 margins (???19,000 km in global length), effectively all incoming sediment is subducted beneath the massif of basement or framework rocks forming the landward trench slope. At accreting or type 1 margins, sediment subduction begins at the seaward position of an active buttress of consolidated accretionary material that accumulated in front of a starting or core buttress of framework rocks. Where small-to-mediumsized prisms have formed (???16,300 km), approximately 20% of the incoming sediment is skimmed off a detachment surface or decollement and frontally accreted to the active buttress. The remaining 80% subducts beneath the buttress and may either underplate older parts of the frontal body or bypass the prism entirely and underthrust the leading edge of the margin's rock framework. At margins bordered by large prisms (???8,200 km), roughly 70% of the incoming trench floor section is

  20. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  1. Hf-Nd Isotopic and Trace-Element Geochemistry of Global Subducting Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, J. D.; Plank, T.; Patchett, P. J.

    2001-12-01

    Ferromanganese nodules, crusts, and associated metalliferous clays have long been known to have anomalously high Lu/Hf ratios and highly radiogenic Hf relative to Nd (Patchett et al., 1984; White et al., 1986). These oceanic sediments are some of the few terrestrial materials where Hf and Nd isotopes deviate from the crust-mantle array. This distinctive isotopic signature, therefore, has the potential to trace the fate of oceanic sediments through the subduction zone and into the mantle. It has recently been suggested, for example, that pelagic sediments can be detected in some Hawaiian basalts (Blichert-Toft et al., 1999) and in volcanic rocks from the Luzon arc (Marini et al., 2000) based on their Hf-Nd isotopic compositions. The weak link in this approach, however, is that we do not know, in any quantitative way, how widespread this anomalous signature is in oceanic sediments, what compositions are responsible for this signature, or how volumetrically important these compositions are in terms of the total sediment flux into subduction zones and the mantle. Most marine sediments analyzed thus far have been collected on or near the ocean floor and constitute an incomplete and unrepresentative inventory of the sediment column bound for the subduction zone. There is some reason to suspect that much of the sediment flux is not particularly anomalous, either in terms of Lu/Hf ratios or Hf and Nd isotopic compositions. The most dominant sediment types entering many subduction zones (terrigenous and other continentally derived sediments), have normal Lu/Hf ratios and Hf-Nd isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from the crust-mantle array. An examination is needed of the Hf-Nd isotopic composition of oceanic sediments, the major and trace-element geochemistry of global sediment flux, how such compositions may relate to Hf-Nd isotopic behavior, and potential Lu/Hf and Nd/Hf fractionation in subduction zones. In addition, the origin of the high Lu/Hf and

  2. Post-Subduction Pleistocene Volcanism in Tahoe City Area, Northern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeier, W. T.; Farmer, G.; Schweickert, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Geochemical and isotopic analyses of Pleistocene volcanic rocks in the northwestern part of the Lake Tahoe basin are used to define sources and triggering mechanism(s) of post-subduction magmatism. From field and geochronologic data the volcanic rocks include an older (2.0 Ma to 2.3 Ma) set of trachybasalts and trachybasaltic andesites and a set of ~0.92 Ma trachyandesites. The 2.0-2.3 Ma set shows a range of wt% SiO2 from 48.7 to 55.5, high wt% K2O (1.3-2.3), and high Ni and Cr contents (31-207 ppm and 80-350 ppm respectively). The 0.92 Ma trachyandesites have 56.4-61.3 wt% SiO2; high Al2O3 (17.4-18.7 wt%), Na2O (4.2-4.7 wt%), Sr (907-1950 ppm), La (39.2-48.2 ppm) and other LREE; and low Y (10.6-16.9 ppm), and Yb (1.0-1.6 ppm). Both sets of volcanic rocks have high LILE/HFSE ratios, and higher (La/Yb)N and Sr/Y ratios than older, subduction related "calc-alkaline" volcanic rocks in this region. Chemical data preclude direct derivation of the 0.92 Ma trachyandesite from 2.0-2.3 Ma trachybasaltic andesites, and it is difficult to link the two sets of volcanic rocks to a common parental magma by fractional crystallization alone. Trace and rare earth element data for both sets of volcanic rocks indicate melting of the source in the presence of garnet and amphibole and in the absence of plagioclase. Compositionally similar volcanic rocks occur in other post-subduction continental margin settings, including Baja California, where "bajaites" overlap the compositions of older basaltic andesites and low-Si adakites. Bajaite is typically interpreted as the product of melting of asthenospheric mantle wedge metasomatized by high Sr/Y melts of underlying oceanic crust, prior to cessation of subduction. However, both sets of volcanic rocks discussed here have low ɛNd (+2 to -4.0), and samples with the highest Sr/Y have the lowest ɛNd(0) values. These data suggest that melt could not have been derived from recently subducted oceanic lithosphere. Instead, mafic and ultramafic

  3. Basaltic Volcanism and Ancient Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to decipher the origin of rocks which form the ancient lunar crust. Our goal is to better understand how the moon evolved chemically and, more generally, the processes involved in the chemical fractionation of terrestrial planetoids. This research has implications for other planetary bodies besides the Moon, especially smaller planetoids which evolved early in the history of the solar system and are now thermally stable. The three main areas focused on in our work (lunar mare basalts, KREEP basalts, and plutonic rocks of the lunar highlands) provide complementary information on the lunar interior and the processes that formed it.

  4. Analog Modeling of Continental Lithosphere Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingshofer, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Luth, S.; Beekman, F.; Cloetingh, S.

    2012-12-01

    Lithospheric-scale analog modeling sheds light on the consequences of decoupling within the continental lithosphere and along plate interfaces during continental collision. The model results provide valuable information in terms of strain localization, deformation of the subducting slab and the evolution and architecture of the overlying mountain belt and its topography. A weak layer has been implemented in three-layer models to simulate decoupling along the plate interface and at different levels of the lithosphere (brittle-ductile transition, entire lower crust, crust-mantle boundary). Additionally, varying the strength of the mantle lithosphere of both the upper as well as the lower plate regulated the degree of plate coupling. Plate boundaries were orthogonal to the convergence direction. All models emphasize that strong decoupling at the plate interface is a pre-requisite for the subduction of continental lithosphere. In addition, deformation of the subducting slab was found to be sensitive to the strength contrast between the subduction zone and the mantle lithosphere of the downgoing as well as the upper plate. As such, a low strength contrast between the plate interface and the lower plate leads to deformation of the subducting slab by thickening and the development of a shallow slab. Conversely, when the strength contrast is high, deep slabs evolve which undergo relatively less deformation. Furthermore, the level of decoupling in the downgoing plate governs how much continental crust is subducted together with the mantle lithosphere. Shallow decoupling, at the brittle-ductile transition, results in subduction of the lower crust whereas small amounts of lower crust are subducted when decoupling occurs at the level of the Moho. Weak plate coupling and a weak lower crust of the lower plate steer the evolution of mountain belts such that deformation propagates outward, in the direction of the incoming plate, by successive imbrication of upper crustal thrust

  5. Slab and sediment melting during subduction initiation: granitoid dykes from the mantle section of the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, Hugh

    2015-09-01

    New geochemical data are presented for a suite of tonalites, granodiorites, trondhjemites and granites intrusive into depleted mantle harzburgites of the Oman-UAE ophiolite. A detailed field, petrological and geochemical examination suggests that these `mantle granitoids' are the product of three processes: (a) the mixing of melts derived from both mafic and metasedimentary sources, (b) interaction with the mantle harzburgite host and (c) the fractional crystallisation of plagioclase, hornblende ± accessory phases. Geochemical data are used to characterise the identity of the protolith(s) by first screening the data for those samples which have experienced fractional crystallisation during emplacement. The resultant `reduced' data set has moderately fractionated REE, with small negative Eu anomalies and fractionated primitive mantle-normalised trace element patterns with high concentrations of fluid mobile elements and lower concentrations of HFS elements and with positive peaks for Rb and Pb and negative troughs for Ba, Nb, Sr and Ti. The character of the protolith was quantified using a melting model based upon a MORB-type basalt similar in composition to the Oman Geotimes lavas and a model using the MUQ (MUd from Queensland) global sediment composition (Kamber et al. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 69:1041-1058, 2005) both with an amphibolite/granulite facies mineralogy. The two compositions bracket the mantle granitoid data set with partial melts of the MORB source yielding trace element compositions lower than the granitoids, whereas melts of the MUQ source yield melts with compositions higher than the granitoids. Mixing of the calculated melt compositions indicates that the measured granitoid compositions represent between 10 and 30 % mixing of a metasedimentary melt into the melt of a mafic source. Current petrological, structural and geochronological data suggest a model for the origin of the Oman ophiolite in which it is formed by spreading above a subduction zone

  6. Modelling Subduction Dynamics: The South American Salsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, A. J.; Shephard, G.; Müller, D.; Liu, L.; Gurnis, M.

    2009-12-01

    Plate kinematic and seismic tomography models imply a gradual overriding of the Phoenix and Farallon slabs by the westward movement of the South American plate. This westward translation over the subducted slabs, and the currently subducting Nazca Plate, is expected to generate a dynamic surface topography effect, leading to time-progressive vertical motions and tilting of sedimentary basins and their hinterlands. We have set up a workflow to model these processes including ground-truthing with geological and geophysical data. A combination of geodynamic modelling software, CitcomS, GPlates (gplates.org) software and the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) facilitates the modelling and visualisation of linked plate kinematics and mantle convection processes. The CitcomS software also allows us to alternatively use forward models, backward models, or combined forward and adjoint models. Forward models are driven by an imposed plate kinematic model and assumed initial subdution structure, whereas backwards models use mantle tomography as an input and run the model backwards by reversing the gravity field. Similarly, adjoint models use tomography as input, but iterate backwards and forwards in time to reach convergence upon present-day mantle structures. Model outputs include time-dependent mantle temperature, viscosity, and surface dynamic topography. Forward model results show that slab evolution under South America are strongly driven by the age of the subducting lithosphere. Hence, we can simulate flat-slab subduction and in regions close to the Chile triple junction we see a slab window developing, detaching older slab material from more recently subducted material. However, the forward model relies on an accurate description of the initial slab geometry at 140Ma to generate the initial slab pull. Forward and adjoint model results both suggest an alternative mechanism for major Miocene changes in paleo-Amazon river drainage. An eastward-sweeping negative dynamic

  7. Constraints From the Rock Record, and Complementary Speculation, on Subduction and the Evolution of the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.

    2006-12-01

    process igneous or metamorphic enriches ridge and ophiolite peridotites in Pb relative to U and Th (Godard et al Eos 05). Sequestration of such a low U/Pb and Th/Pb component could help explain global Pb isotope systematics. (c) Some residual peridotites recirculate in the mantle washing machine, emerging as depleted peridotites on the seafloor with little igneous crust. (3) What is the fate of partial melts of subducted basaltic eclogite, when they react with mantle peridotite above subduction zones and beneath ocean islands? Variable time scales, permeability and melt viscosity suggest three possible scenarios: (a) much eclogite melt is trapped within a carapace of pyroxenite, and hydrofracture extracts this melt; (b) eclogite melt reacts to form solid pyroxenite, which then re-melts (Sobolev et al Nature 04); (c) eclogite melt reacts to form pyroxene-rich peridotite plus modified melt in equilibrium with olivine (Kelemen et al EPSL 98).

  8. Hydrogeological responses to incoming materials at the erosional subduction margin, offshore Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, Jun; Harris, Robert N.; Shimizu, Mayuko; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Tsutsumi, Akito; Ikehara, Minoru; Uno, Masaoki; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hamada, Yohei; Namiki, Yuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2015-09-01

    Bulk mineral assemblages of sediments and igneous basement rocks on the incoming Cocos Plate at the Costa Rica subduction zone are examined by X-ray diffraction analyses on core samples. These samples are from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 334 reference Site U1381, ˜ 5 km seaward of the trench. Drilling recovered approximately 100 m of sediment and 70 m of igneous oceanic basement. The sediment includes two lithologic units: hemipelagic clayey mud and siliceous to calcareous pelagic ooze. The hemipelagic unit is composed of clay minerals (˜50 wt.%), quartz (˜5 wt.%), plagioclase (˜5 wt.%), calcite (˜15 wt.%) and ˜30 wt.% of amorphous materials, while the pelagic unit is mostly made up of biogenic amorphous silica (˜50 wt.%) and calcite (˜50 wt.%). The igneous basement rock consists of plagioclase (˜50-60 wt.%), clinopyroxene (˜>25 wt.%), and saponite (˜15-40 wt.%). Saponite is more abundant in pillow basalt than in the massive section, reflecting the variable intensity of alteration. We estimate the total water influx of the sedimentary package is 6.9 m3/yr per m of trench length. Fluid expulsion models indicate that sediment compaction during shallow subduction causes the release of pore water while peak mineral dehydration occurs at temperatures of approximately ˜100°C, 40-30 km landward of the trench. This region is landward of the observed updip extent of seismicity. We posit that in this region the presence of subducting bathymetric relief capped by velocity weakening nannofossil chalk is more important in influencing the updip extent of seismicity than the thermal regime.

  9. Petrogenesis of dacite in an oceanic subduction environment: Raoul Island, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ian E. M.; Worthington, Timothy J.; Price, Richard C.; Stewart, Robert B.; Maas, R.

    2006-09-01

    Raoul Volcano in the northern Kermadec arc is typical of volcanoes in oceanic subduction systems in that it is composed mainly of low-K high-Al basalts and basaltic andesite. However, during the last 4 ka Raoul Volcano has produced mainly dacite magma in pyroclastic eruptions associated with caldera formation. The rocks produced in these episodes are almost aphyric containing only sparse crystals of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and magnetite. These apparent phenocrysts have chemical compositions that suggest that they did not crystallise from melts with the chemical composition of their host rocks. Rather they are xenocrysts and only their rims show evidence for crystallisation from their host melt. Chemical compositions of samples of the dacites show that each eruption has tapped a distinct magma batch. Compositional variations through the analysed suite cannot be accommodated in any reasonable model of fractional crystallisation from likely parental magma compositions. The hypothesis that best fits the petrology of Raoul Island dacites is one of crustal anatexis. This model requires heating of the lower crust by a magma flux to the point where dehydration melting associated with amphibole breakdown produces magma from a preconditioned source. It is suggested that Raoul is passing through an adolescent stage of development in which siliceous melts are part of an open system in which felsic and mafic magmas coexist.

  10. Modeling the effects of geological heterogeneity and metamorphic dehydration on slow slip and shallow deformation in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Robert M.

    Slow slip and tectonic tremor in subduction zones take place at depths (˜20 - 50 km) where there is abundant evidence for distributed shear over broad zones (˜10 - 103 m) composed of rocks with marked differences in mechanical properties and for near lithostatic pore pressures along the plate interface where the main source of fluids must be attributed to chemical dehydration reactions. In Chapter II, I model quasi-dynamic rupture along faults composed of material mixtures characterized by different rate-and-state-dependent frictional properties to determine the parameter regime capable of producing slow slip in an idealized subduction zone setting. Keeping other parameters fixed, the relative proportions of velocity-weakening (VW) and velocity-strengthening (VS) materials control the sliding character (stable, slow, or dynamic) along the fault. The stability boundary between slow and dynamic is accurately described by linear analysis of a double spring-slider system with VW and VS blocks. In Chapter III, I model viscoelastic compaction of material subducting through the slow slip and tremor zone in the presence of pressure and temperature-dependent dehydration reactions. A dehydration fluid source is included using 1) a generalized basalt dehydration reaction in subducting oceanic crust or 2) a general nonlinear kinetic reaction rate law parameterized for an antigorite dehydration reaction. Pore pressures in excess of lithostatic values are a robust feature of simulations that employ parameters consistent with the geometry of the Cascadia subduction margin. Simulations that include viscous deformation uniformly generate traveling porosity waves that transport increased fluid pressures within the slow slip region. Slow slip and tremor also occur in shallow (< 10 km depth) accretionary prism sections of subduction zones. In Chapter IV, I examine how geologic heterogeneities affect the mechanics of accretionary prisms in subduction zones by showing how spatial

  11. Late Cretaceous-Early Eocene Climate Change Linked to Tectonic Eevolution of Neo-Tethyan Subduction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, O. E.; Royden, L.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we demonstrate that the two tectonic events in the late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary triggered the two distinct cooling events that followed the Cretaceous Thermal Maximum (CTM). During much of the Cretaceous time, the northern Neo Tethyan ocean was dominated by two east-west striking subduction system. Subduction underneath Eurasia formed a continental arc on the southern margin of Eurasia and intra oceanic subduction in the equatorial region of the Neo Tethys formed and intra oceanic arc. Beginning at ~85-90 Ma the western part of the TTSS collided southward with the Afro-Arabian continental margin, terminating subduction. This resulted in southward obduction of the peri-Arabian ophiolite belt, which extends for ~4000 km along strike and includes the Cypus, Semail and Zagros ophiolites. At the same time also the eastern part of the TTS collided northwards wit Eurasia. After this collisional event, only the central part of the subduction system remained active until it collided with the northern margin of the Indian continent at ~50-55 Ma. The collision of the arc with the Indian margin, over a length of ~3000 km, also resulted in the obduction of arc material and ophiolitic rocks. Remnants of these rocks are preserved today as the Kohistan-Ladakh arc and ophiolites of the Indus-Tsangpo suture zone of the Himalayas. Both of these collision events occurred in the equatorial region, near or within the ITCZ, where chemical weathering rates are high and are contemporaneous with the onset of the global cooling events that mark the end of the CTM and the EECO. The tectonic collision events resulted in a shut down of subduction zone magmatism, a major CO2 source and emplacement of highly weatherable basaltic rocks within the ITCZ (CO2 sink). In order to explore the effect of the events in the TTSS on atmospheric CO2, we model the potential contribution of subduction zone volcanism (source) and ophiolite obduction (sink) to the global atmospheric CO2

  12. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  13. Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.; Phillips, S.; Alexander, J.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurement activities. The objective was to show that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was established by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping was used to establish major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is located northwest of the INEL, was chosen for this study due to the similarity of this surface outcrop geology to that of the underlying bedrock fracture system found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This study showed that hydraulic conductivity of basalt can be reduced through pressure grouting of cementitious material.

  14. Basalt-Block Heat-Storage Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Concept for storage of solar heat for later use based on use of basalt, cast into blocks and stacked in inflatable gas-tight enclosure serving as heat-storage chamber. Heat flows to blocks from solar collector during day and from blocks to heat engine at night.

  15. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  16. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Utilization of lunar ilmenite: Basalt or regolith?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawatra, S. K.; Delao, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    A critical discussion of whether lunar basalt or regolith should be used as a resource for mineral processing schemes on the lunar surface, with pros and cons for each argument is presented. A literature review has shown that the majority of authors feel that mining the lunar basalt, crushing it, and then processing to remove the desired minerals, would be the route to take. The argument that this method would not be a sound mineral processing practice is presented. Mining and crushing are difficult propositions even on Earth; to attempt such processes in the hostile lunar environment would be a phenomenal task. It would be better to start with a simpler scheme, such as processing the regolith, which can be adapted to the multitude of unknowns facing the first lunar production plant. If, however, the lunar mining trend is followed, it must be kept in mind that mining and processing technology which is radically different from what is currently available and used on Earth will have to be developed. Podnieks and Roepke (1987) and Lindroth and Podnieks (1987) have summarized the new technology that may be applicable, but this technology is very similar to the current, 99 percent inefficient technology used on Earth. One such possible technique is sodium vapor fragmentation of basalt. Initial testwork was conducted at Michigan Technological University on terrestrial basalt with extremely promising results, though much time and effort will be needed to fully develop this process.

  18. Equilibration of Leachants with Basalt Rock for Repository Simulation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-07-02

    In a nuclear waste repository in basalt, the groundwater will have a low redox potential (Eh) which may affect the leach rate of SRP waste glass. Accurate laboratory simulations of conditions in a basalt reposition must maintain low Eh values throughout the course of the experiment. In this report, important parameters affecting the ability of basalt to maintain appropriate Eh-pH conditions are examined, in particular basalt type and groundwater simulation.

  19. The petrology of the Apollo 12 pigeonite basalt suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, W. S.; Beaty, D. W.; Hill, S. M. R.; Albee, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the petrology of the Apollo 12 pigeonite basalt samples 12011, 12043, and 12007 is presented. In this suite, the abundances of olivine and Cr-spinel decrease with increasing grain size, while the abundances of plagioclase and ilmenite increase. The petrochemical and textural variations indicate that the pigeonite basalts were derived from the olivine basalts, but the compositional gap between the olivine and pigeonite basalts indicates that they could not have crystallized together from a single, initially homogeneous magma body.

  20. Ubiquitous radiogenic Os in Miocene to recent basalts from diverse mantle domains beneath the Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlieder, T.; Reid, M. R.; Widom, E.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2015-12-01

    The source of magmatism and mechanisms responsible for the observed geochemical signatures in Miocene to Recent Colorado Plateau (CP) basalts has been a renewed focus of investigation in light of Earthscope results. We report new Os and Nd isotopic data for magnesian basalts (Mg#=62-72) and interpret them in light of previously reported Hf isotope data to help constrain contributions from olivine-poor source lithologies and subduction-derived metasomatism in the genesis of recent CP volcanism. The basalts studied span a large range in Hf isotope compositions and represent melts last equilibrated at a variety of depths beneath the Colorado Plateau and its transition zones. We distinguished at least three mantle domains on the basis of paired Hf-Nd isotope, other isotopic, and geochemical characteristics of CP lavas. Domain 1 likely represents a depleted, variably metasomatized, lithospheric source, with relatively radiogenic ɛHf (+5.2 to +11.8) and highly variable ɛNd (-6.2 to +6.2). Domain 2 could represent either ancient or Farallon subduction-modified mantle and is displaced above the Hf-Nd mantle array (ɛHf=+1.0 to +7.3; ɛNd=-6.1 to -3.5). Domain 3 may be melts of pyroxenite/mica-rich veins or layers within lithospheric mantle and is characterized by unradiogenic Hf and Nd (ɛHf=-12.9 to +0.6; ɛNd=-10.0 to -2.9). The isotopic variability in CP-related lavas can largely be attributed to contributions from these mantle domains. Preliminary Os isotope data show no correlation with proxies for differentiation or crustal contamination. Osmium and Hf isotope compositions are negatively correlated between domains 1 and 2 (187Os/188Os=0.31 to 0.59), whereas the Os isotope ratios in two domain 3 basalts have both lower and higher values (187Os/188Os=0.25 and 0.68). Significantly, Os isotope signatures are highly radiogenic (vs. values of <0.12 for SW US peridotite xenoliths [1]), overlapping and extending the range for inferred melts of pyroxene- and mica-rich veins

  1. Effects of Prolonged Flat Subduction on the Miocene Magmatic Record of the Central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, L.; Gomez-Tuena, A.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Temporal modifications in the chemical compositions of middle to late Miocene rocks from the central Trans- Mexican Volcanic Belt elucidate how a process of prolonged flat subduction influences arc magmatism. These are recorded in the Palo Huerfano-La Joya-Zamorano Volcanic Complex (PH-LJ-Z; 16-9 Ma), a group of andesitic to dacitic stratovolcanoes located at ~500 km from the current trench, and in the Queretaro Volcanic Succession (QVS; 9-6 Ma), a basaltic to basaltic-andesitic plateau which stratigraphically overlies the stratovolcanoes. The two rock groups have typical arc-like trace element patterns, but the PH-LJ-Z suite has higher Sr/Y and LREE(MREE)/HREE ratios with MORB-like Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions; geochemical features that are typical of experimental and natural slab melts. In contrast, rocks from the QVS have an overall weaker subduction signature, do not show slab melt signals, and have higher FeO^{tot} and MgO contents at equivalent Na2O and Mg# (40-70) than the PH-LJ-Z suite. Since Fe in arc magmas is a sensitive proxy of melting pressure and/or water contents (Gaetani &Grove, CMP, 1998), and Na could be either sensitive to slab melt additions (Kelemen et al., Tr. Geoch., 2003) or to the thickness of the mantle column that controls the extent of melting (Plank &Langmuir, EPSL, 1998), the overall chemical differences of both rock suites can only be reconciled if they equilibrated with the mantle wedge at the same pressures but with different amounts of dissolved water. The geochemical evidence thus indicates that the compositional differences between the two magmatic episodes are mainly related to different mechanisms of element recycling that occurred without major changes in the local tectonic configuration. The slab melt features of PH- LJ-Z rocks, and their emplacement at a large distance from the trench, are consistent with a sub-horizontal subduction geometry which favors slab melting at relatively low pressures (Gutscher et al

  2. Relationships between subducting bathymetric ridges and significant subduction earthquakes from global geophysical data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R.; Landgrebe, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The subduction of linear bathymetric asperities has been linked with the location and rupture characteristics of significant subduction earthquakes in many regions. This suggests that earthquake occurrence is biased toward the subduction of particular types of ocean floor fabric that has formed over 10's or 100's of millions of years, but has only recently been transported into the subduction coupling zone as a consequence of long-term plate tectonic processes. Open-access geophysical data sets offer the opportunity to carry out global investigations of the spatial association between significant earthquakes and well-defined subducting bathymetric features including volcanic ridges, fracture zones and seamount chains. We filter a global significant earthquake database to separate events from the subduction coupling zone only. The coupling zone is established by integrating recent 3-dimensional models of subducting slabs and the lithospheric thickness of overriding plates. A statistical methodology is used to compare spatial associations between subducting linear asperities and significant earthquakes with randomly chosen coupling zone locations to establish sensitivity/specificity relationships as a function of proximity, ruling out random effects and establishing meaningful spatial interpretations for hazard analysis. Our association analysis reveals that significant earthquakes are significantly biased towards localities involving both subducting fracture zones and volcanic ridges/chains. Fracture zone intersections are found to exhibit a stronger association within 50km proximity that rapidly diminishes with increasing distance from the targeted regions, whereas volcanic ridges/chains demonstrate a smaller but broader effect. Fracture zone intersections also display strong relationships with earthquakes with moment magnitudes greater than or equal to 8.5, whereas the opposite is the case for volcanic ridges/seamount chains, associated strongly only with events

  3. A new view into the Cascadia subduction zone and volcanic arc: Implications for earthquake hazards along the Washington margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Trehu, A.M.; Luetgert, J.H.; Miller, K.; Kilbride, F.; Wells, R.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Flueh, E.; ten Brink, U.S.; Christensen, N.I.

    1998-01-01

    In light of suggestions that the Cascadia subduction margin may pose a significant seismic hazard for the highly populated Pacific Northwest region of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Research Center for Marine Geosciences (GEOMAR), and university collaborators collected and interpreted a 530-km-long wide-angle onshore-offshore seismic transect across the subduction zone and volcanic arc to study the major structures that contribute to seismogenic deformation. We observed (1) an increase in the dip of the Juan de Fuca slab from 2??-7?? to 12?? where it encounters a 20-km-thick block of the Siletz terrane or other accreted oceanic crust, (2) a distinct transition from Siletz crust into Cascade arc crust that coincides with the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, supporting the idea that the mafic Siletz block focuses seismic deformation at its edges, and (3) a crustal root (35-45 km deep) beneath the Cascade Range, with thinner crust (30-35 km) east of the volcanic arc beneath the Columbia Plateau flood basalt province. From the measured crustal structure and subduction geometry, we identify two zones that may concentrate future seismic activity: (1) a broad (because of the shallow dip), possibly locked part of the interplate contact that extends from ???25 km depth beneath the coastline to perhaps as far west as the deformation front ???120 km offshore and (2) a crustal zone at the eastern boundary between the Siletz terrane and the Cascade Range.

  4. Evaluation of crustal recycling during the evolution of Archean-age Matachewan basaltic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Dennis O.

    1989-01-01

    The simplest model for the Matachewan-Hearst Dike (MHD) magmas is assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC), presumably occurring at the base of the crust during underplating. Subduction zone enriched mantle sources are not required. Trace elements suggest that the mantle sources for the MHD were depleted, but possessed a degree of heterogeneity. Rates of assimilation were approximately 0.5 (= Ma/Mc); the contaminant mass was less than 20 percent. The contaminant was dominated by tonalites-randodiorites, similar to xenoliths and rocks in the Kapuskasing Structural Zone (KSZ). Assimilation of partial melts of light-rare earth and garnet-bearing basaltic precursors may have produced some the MHD magmas. Apparently, previous underplating-AFC processes had already produced a thick crust. The silicic granitoid assimilant for the MHD magmas was probably produced by earlier processing of underplated mafic crust (4, 5, 10, 21 and 30). Calculations suggest that the derived silicic rocks possess negative Ta and Ti anomalies even though they were not the product of subduction.

  5. Subducting slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, Christelle; Braun, Jean; Husson, Laurent; Le Carlier de Veslud, Christian; Thieulot, Cedric; Yamato, Philippe; Grujic, Djordje

    2010-08-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  6. Subducting Slabs: Jellyfishes in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiselet, C.; Braun, J.; Husson, L.; Le Carlier de Veslud, C.; Thieulot, C.; Yamato, P.; Grujic, D.

    2010-12-01

    The constantly improving resolution of geophysical data, seismic tomography and seismicity in particular, shows that the lithosphere does not subduct as a slab of uniform thickness but is rather thinned in the upper mantle and thickened around the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle. This observation has traditionally been interpreted as evidence for the buckling and piling of slabs at the boundary between the upper and lower mantle, where a strong contrast in viscosity may exist and cause resistance to the penetration of slabs into the lower mantle. The distribution and character of seismicity reveal, however, that slabs undergo vertical extension in the upper mantle and compression near the transition zone. In this paper, we demonstrate that during the subduction process, the shape of low viscosity slabs (1 to 100 times more viscous than the surrounding mantle) evolves toward an inverted plume shape that we coin jellyfish. Results of a 3D numerical model show that the leading tip of slabs deform toward a rounded head skirted by lateral tentacles that emerge from the sides of the jellyfish head. The head is linked to the body of the subducting slab by a thin tail. A complete parametric study reveals that subducting slabs may achieve a variety of shapes, in good agreement with the diversity of natural slab shapes evidenced by seismic tomography. Our work also suggests that the slab to mantle viscosity ratio in the Earth is most likely to be lower than 100. However, the sensitivity of slab shapes to upper and lower mantle viscosities and densities, which remain poorly constrained by independent evidence, precludes any systematic deciphering of the observations.

  7. Nonvolcanic tremors in the Mexican subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payero, J. S.; Kostoglodov, V.; Mikumo, T.; Perez-Campos, X.; Iglesias, A.; Clayton, R.

    2007-05-01

    Nonvolcanic low frequency tremors (NVT) have been discovered and studied recently in Japan and Cascadia subduction zones and deep beneath the San Andreas Fault. The tremors activity is increasing during so-called silent earthquakes (SQ) in Japan and Cascadia. NVT clusters also migrate following the propagation of the SQ. The origin of the NVT is still unclear. The studies of NVT and SQ in different subduction zones are required to understand the cause for these phenomena. We discovered a number of NVT from daily spectrograms of continuous broad band records at seismic stations of Servicio Seismológico Nacional (SSN) an MASE project. The analyzed data cover a period of 2001-2004 (SSN) when in 2002 a large SQ has occurred in the Guerrero- Oaxaca region, and a steady-state interseismic epoch of 2005 and a new large SQ in 2006 (MASE). NVT occurred in the central part of the Mexican subduction zone (Guerrero) at approximately 200 km from the coast. We can not accurately localize the tremors because of sparse station coverage in 2001-2004. The MASE data of 2005-2006 show that NVT records in Mexico are very similar to those obtained in Cascadia subduction zone. The tremors duration is of 10-60 min, and they appear to travel at S-wave velocities. More than 100 strong NVT were recorded by most of the MASE stations with the epicenters clustered in the narrow band of ~40x150 km to the south of Iguala city and parallel to the coast line. NVT depths are poorly constrained but seem to be less than 40 km deep. We noticed a some increase of NVT activity during the 2001-2002 and 2006 SQs compared with an NVT activity for the "SQ quiet" period of 2003-2004 nevertheless. A lack of NVT for the period of 2-3 months after the SQ is apparent in 2002 and 2006.

  8. The Dynamics of Double Slab Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L. H.; Becker, T. W.

    2017-01-01

    We use numerical models to investigate the dynamics of two interacting slabs with parallel trenches. Cases considered are: a single slab reference, outward dipping slabs (out-dip), inward dipping slabs (in-dip), and slabs dipping in the same direction (same-dip). Where trenches converge over time (same-dip and out-dip systems), large positive dynamic pressures in the asthenosphere are generated beneath the middle plate, and large trench-normal extensional forces are transmitted through the middle plate. This results in slabs that dip away from the middle plate at depth, independent of trench geometry. The single slab, the front slab in the same-dip case, and both out-dip slabs undergo trench retreat and exhibit stable subduction. However, slabs within the other double subduction systems tend to completely overturn at the base of the upper mantle, and exhibit either trench advance (rear slab in same-dip), or near-stationary trenches (in-dip). For all slabs, the net slab-normal dynamic pressure at 330 km depth is nearly equal to the slab normal force induced by slab buoyancy. For double subduction, the net outward force on the slabs due to dynamic pressure from the asthenosphere is effectively counterbalanced by the net extensional force transmitted through the middle plate. Thus, dynamic pressure at depth, inter-plate coupling, and lithospheric stresses are closely linked and their effects cannot be isolated. Our results provide insights into both the temporal evolution of double slab systems on Earth and, more generally, how the various components of subduction systems, from mantle flow/pressure to inter-plate coupling, are dynamically linked.

  9. Eocene to Quaternary mafic-intermediate volcanism in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico: The transition from Farallon plate subduction to intra-plate continental magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Tristán-González, Margarito; de Jesús Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo; López-Doncel, Rubén A.; Bellon, Hervé; Martínez-Esparza, Gilberto

    2014-04-01

    The San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field (SLPVF) of central Mexico includes volcanic sequences of felsic, intermediate and basic compositions that were erupted as discrete episodes from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Volcanism was dominated by widespread and voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites of the mid-Tertiary Ignimbrite Flare-up. However, the complete volcanic history must consider basaltic and andesitic Eocene-Pleistocene volcanic successions that provide key evidence for understanding the geochemical evolution of the volcanism in the SLPVF during this time span. Five sequences are recognized according to their geochemical characteristics, each comprising a volcano-tectonic episode. The first episode comprises basaltic andesites and andesites erupted during three intervals, 45-42 Ma, 36-31 Ma, and 31-30 Ma. The oldest was derived from subduction magmatism, whereas the youngest has an intra-plate magmatic signature and this represents the transition from the end of a long lasting subduction regime of the Farallon plate to the initiation of intra-plate continental extension in the North American plate. The second episode, at 29.5-28 Ma, comprises a bimodal succession of high-silica rhyolites and alkaline basalts (hawaiites) that are interpreted as magmatism generated in an intra-plate continental extension regime during the Basin and Range faulting. The third episode, at 21 Ma, is characterized by trachybasalts and trachyandesites that represent mantle basaltic melts that were contaminated through assimilation of the lower crust during advanced stage of intra-plate extension that started at Oligocene. The fourth episode includes 12 Ma alkaline basalts and andesites that were erupted from fissures. These mantle derived magmas evolved to andesites by crustal anatexis and crystal fractionation within a continued, extensional, intra-plate regime. Lastly, the fifth episode comprises 5.0 to 0.6 Ma alkaline basalts (basanites) containing mantle xenoliths, that were erupted

  10. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  11. Structural Responses to the Chile Ridge Subduction, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E. E.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Gallego, A.; Murdie, R.; Comte, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary, the Chile spreading ridge, subducts beneath South America, forming the northward-migrating Chile Triple Junction (CTJ), now at ~46.5°S, where an actively spreading segment is currently in the Nazca trench. Ridge subduction is associated with diachronously developed variable structure and magmatism of overriding South America. To assess the effects of ridge subduction, we deployed a network of 39 broadband seismometers in southern Chile between 43 - 49°S and 71 - 76°W from Dec. 2004 - Feb. 2007, recording 102 earthquakes suitable for receiver function analyses, i.e., M > 5.9, of various backazimuths, and at epicentral distances of 30 - 90°. The network encompassed onland portions of the current triple junction and ridge subduction, areas to the south of the CTJ where ridge segments subducted during the last 6 m.y., and regions north of the CTJ not yet affected by ridge subduction, allowing the assessment of the effects of ridge subduction on crustal structure of overriding South America. We constructed 551 teleseismic receiver functions to estimate crustal thicknesses, H, and average compressional to shear wave velocity ratios, Vp/Vs = k, using the iterative time deconvolution method of Ligorria and Ammon (1999). H and k were calculated using the grid search method of Zhu and Kanamori (2000). Beneath stations closest to the trench, where the Nazca plate subducts, we found Moho depths between 28 and 55 km, thickening northward. At the locus of current ridge subduction, in the Taitao Pennisula, thinner crust ranges from 27 - 36 km. H is 36-38 km where the Antarctic plate subducts and the Chile ridge recently subducted. The direct effect of the subducting ridge on South America can be seen in H differences between forearc regions that have sustained ridge subduction versus those that have not. South American forearc crust above the subducted Nazca plate is as much as 28 km thicker than forearc crust recently affected by ridge

  12. Coatings on Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Coatings on Gusev Plains Basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings on Gusev Plains basalt have been observed and may contain hematite and nanophase Fe-oxides along with enrichments in P, S, Cl, and K relative to the underlying rock. The Gusev coatings may be derived from the dissolution of adhering soil and/or parent rock along with the addition of S and Cl from outside sources. Transient water for dissolution could be sourced from melting snow during periods of high obliquity, acid fog, and/or ground water (Haskin et al., 2005). Coatings on basalt in the hyper-arid (less than 2mm y(sup -1)) Atacama Desert may assist in understanding the chemistry, mineralogy and formation mechanisms of the Gusev basalt coatings. The Atacama Desert climate is proposed to be analogous to a paleo-Mars climate that was characterized by limited aqueous activity when the Gusev coatings could have formed. The objectives of this work are to (i) determine the chemical nature and extent of surface coatings on Atacama Desert basalt, and (ii) assess coating formation mechanisms in the Atacama Desert. Preliminary backscattered electron imaging of Atacama basalt thin-sections indicated that the coatings are as thick as 20 m. The boundary between the coating and the basalt labradorite, ilmenite, and augite grains was abrupt indicating that the basalt minerals underwent no chemical dissolution. The Atacama coatings have been added to the basalt instead of being derived from basalt chemical weathering. Semi-quantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy shows the coatings to be chemically homogeneous. The coating is depleted in Ca (0.9 wt% CaO) and enriched in K (1.3 wt.% K2O) and Si (69.1 wt.% SiO2) relative to the augite and labradorite grains. A dust source enriched in Si (e.g., poorly crystalline silica) and K and depleted in Ca appears to have been added to the basalt surface. Unlike the Gusev coatings, no P, S, and Cl enrichment was observed. However, Fe (3.2 wt.% FeO) was present in the Atacama coatings suggesting the present of Fe

  13. Earth Sphericity Effects on Subduction Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, G.; Chatelain, P.; Tackley, P.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present here the first application in Geodynamics of a Multipole accelerated Boundary Element Method (FMM- BEM) for Stokes Flow. The approach offers the advantage of a reduced number of computational elements and linear scaling with the problem size. We show that this numerical mehod can be fruitfully applied to the simulation of several geodynamic systems at the planetary scale in spheical coordinates and we suggest a general appraoch for modeling combined mantle convection and plate tectonics. The potentialities of the approach are shown investigating the effect played by Earth sphericity on the subduction of a very wide oceanic lithosphere , comparing the morphology of the subducted lithosphere in a spherical and in flat setting. The results show a striking difference between the two models: while the slab on a "flat Earth" shows slight undulation, the same subducting plate on a spherical Earth-like setting presents a distinct folding below the trench far from the edges, with wavelength of (1000km-2000km) as Pacific trenches.

  14. Volcanism and Subduction: The Kamchatka Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John; Gordeev, Evgenii; Izbekov, Pavel; Kasahara, Minoru; Lees, Jonathan

    The Kamchatka Peninsula and contiguous North Pacific Rim is among the most active regions in the world. Kamchatka itself contains 29 active volcanoes, 4 now in a state of semi-continuous eruption, and I has experienced 14 magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes since accurate recording began in 1962. At its heart is the uniquely acute subduction cusp where the Kamchatka and Aleutian Arcs and Emperor Seamount Chain meet. Volcanism and Subduction covers coupled magmatism and tectonics in this spectacular region, where the torn North Pacific slab dives into hot mantle. Senior Russian and American authors grapple with the dynamics of the cusp with perspectives from the west and east of it, respectively, while careful tephrostratigraphy yields a remarkably precise record of behavior of storied volcanoes such as Kliuchevskoi and Shiveluch. Towards the south, Japanese researchers elucidate subduction earthquake processes with unprecedented geodetic resolution. Looking eastward, new insights on caldera formation, monitoring, and magma ascent are presented for the Aleutians. This is one of the first books of its kind printed in the English language. Students and scientists beginning research in the region will find in this book a useful context and introduction to the region's scientific leaders. Others who wish to apply lessons learned in the North Pacific to their areas of interest will find the volume a valuable reference.

  15. Enrichment of trace elements in garnet amphibolites from a paleo-subduction zone: Catalina Schist, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance, P-T stability, solubility, and element-partitioning behavior of minerals such as rutile, garnet, sphene, apatite, zircon, zoisite, and allanite are critical variables in models for mass transfer from the slab to the mantle wedge in deep regions of subduction zones. The influence of these minerals on the composition of subduction-related magmas has been inferred (and disputed) from inverse modelling of the geochemistry of island-arc basalt, or by experiment. Although direct samples of the dehydration + partial-melting region of a mature subduction zone have not been reported from subduction complexes, garnet amphibolites from melanges of circumpacific and Caribbean blueschist terranes reflect high T (>600??C) conditions in shallower regions. Such rocks record geochemical processes that affected deep-seated, high-T portions of paleo-subduction zones. In the Catalina Schist, a subduction-zone metamorphic terrane of southern California, metasomatized and migmatitic garnet amphibolites occur as blocks in a matrix of meta-ultramafic rocks. This mafic and ultramafic complex may represent either slab-derived material accreted to the mantle wedge of a nascent subduction zone or a portion of a shear zone closely related to the slab-mantle wedge contact, or both. The trace-element geochemistry of the complex and the distribution of trace elements among the minerals of garnet amphibolites were studied by INAA, XRF, electron microprobe, and SEM. In order of increasing alteration from a probable metabasalt protolith, three common types of garnet amphibolite blocks in the Catalina Schist are: (1) non-migmatitic, clinopyroxene-bearing blocks, which are compositionally similar to MORB that has lost an albite component; (2) garnet-amphibolite blocks, which have rinds that reflect local interaction between metabasite, metaperidotite, and fluid; and (3) migmatites that are extremely enriched in Th, HFSE, LREE, and other trace elements. These trace-element enrichments

  16. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  17. Plume-subduction interaction in southern Central America: Mantle upwelling and slab melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hoernle, Kaj; Carr, Michael J.; Herzberg, Claude; Saginor, Ian; den Bogaard, Paul van; Hauff, Folkmar; Feigenson, Mark; Swisher, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic front in southern Central America is well known for its Galapagos OIB-like geochemical signature. A comprehensive set of geochemical, isotopic and geochronological data collected on volumetrically minor alkaline basalts and adakites were used to better constrain the mantle and subduction magma components and to test the different models that explain this OIB signature in an arc setting. We report a migration of back-arc alkaline volcanism towards the northwest, consistent with arc-parallel mantle flow models, and a migration towards the southeast in the adakites possibly tracking the eastward movement of the triple junction where the Panama Fracture Zone intersects the Middle America Trench. The adakites major and trace element compositions are consistent with magmas produced by melting a mantle-wedge source metasomatized by slab derived melts. The alkaline magmas are restricted to areas that have no seismic evidence of a subducting slab. The geochemical signature of the alkaline magmas is mostly controlled by upwelling asthenosphere with minor contributions from subduction components. Mantle potential temperatures calculated from the alkaline basalt primary magmas increased from close to ambient mantle (~ 1380-1410 °C) in the Pliocene to ~ 1450 °C in the younger units. The calculated initial melting pressures for these primary magmas are in the garnet stability field (3.0-2.7 GPa). The average final melting pressures range between 2.7 and 2.5 GPa, which is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ~ 85-90 km. We provide a geotectonic model that integrates the diverse observations presented here. The slab detached after the collision of the Galapagos tracks with the arc (~ 10-8 Ma). The detachment allowed hotter asthenosphere to flow into the mantle wedge. This influx of hotter asthenosphere explains the increase in mantle potential temperatures, the northwest migration in the back-arc alkaline lavas that tracks the passage of the

  18. 3-D numerical modeling of plume-induced subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Marzieh; Gerya, taras; Sobolev, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of mechanisms involved in formation of a new subduction zone can help us to better understand plate tectonics. Despite numerous previous studies, it is still unclear how and where an old oceanic plate starts to subduct beneath the other plate. One of the proposed scenarios for nucleation of subduction is plume-induced subduction initiation, which was investigated in detail, using 2-D models, by Ueda et al. (2008). Recently. Gerya et al. (2015), using 3D numerical models, proposed that plume-lithosphere interaction in the Archean led to the subduction initiation and onset of plate tectonic. In this study, we aim to pursue work of Ueda et al. (2008) by incorporation of 3-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate conditions leading to oceanic subduction initiation as a result of thermal-chemical mantle plume-lithosphere interaction in the modern earth. Results of our experiments show four different deformation regimes in response to plume-lithosphere interaction, that are a) self-sustaining subduction initiation where subduction becomes self-sustained, b) freezing subduction initiation where subduction stops at shallow depths, c) slab break-off where subducting circular slab breaks off soon after formation and d) plume underplating where plume does not pass through the lithosphere but spreads beneath it (failed subduction initiation). These different regimes depend on several parameters such as plume's size, composition and temperature, lithospheric brittle/plastic strength, age of the oceanic lithosphere and presence/absence of lithospheric heterogeneities. Results show that subduction initiates and becomes self-sustained when lithosphere is older than 10 Myr and non-dimensional ratio of the plume buoyancy force and lithospheric strength above the plume is higher than 2.

  19. Slab Detachment, Flat Subduction and Slab Rollback in Central Mexico: Fitting the Neogene Evolution of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt into the History and Dynamics of Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, L.

    2001-12-01

    seismic slab is short. The slab detached from the Gulf of California toward the ESE from ~12 to 7.5 Ma producing a migrating mafic pulse along the propagating tear. Once deprived by its deeper part the slab started to decrease its dip, due to the buoyancy of the young crust. This is the most likely cause for flat subduction of the Cocos plate. No oceanic plateau is obvious on the mirror image on the Pacific plate and the absence of a subducted thickened crust explains why there is no seismic coupling between the two plates and no shortening occurred in the upper plate. The ~9 to 3.5 to volcanic gap in the central TMVB marks the period of flat subduction of the Cocos plate. Indeed, Pacific-Cocos relative motion decrease by 70% after 10 Ma. Flat subduction delays the basalt/gabbro to eclogite transition for some Ma. However the resuming of volcanism in late Pliocene indicate that the leading edge of the Cocos plate completed its transformation to eclogite and started to rollback. The slab rollback enhances the advection of geochemically enriched material into the mantle wedge, which is the most likely cause for the occurrence of intraplate-type volcanism in the TMVB.

  20. Changes in Pacific Absolute Plate Motion and Formation of Oceanic Flood Basalt Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, L. W.; Wessel, P.

    2006-12-01

    The origin of the large oceanic flood basalt plateaus that are prominent features of the central western Pacific Basin remains unclear. Major changes in Pacific Absolute Plate Motion (APM) have been identified as occurring at 145, 125, 96, and 47 Ma. Formation of the Shatsky Rise (~145 Ma), the Ontong Java Plateau (122+ Ma), the Southern Hess Rise (95±5 Ma), and the Louisiade Plateau (~48 Ma) appear to coincide with these changes. A smaller, but still prominent change in Pacific APM also occurred at 110 Ma when the Northern Hess Rise formed. Although these concurrent events may simply be chance occurrences, initiation of plate tectonic reorganizations upon arrival of mantle plume heads also was proposed by Ratcliff et al. (1998), who suggested that the mantle plume head delivery of hot material to produce flood basalts also had the potential to trigger reorganizations of plate motions. It should be noted, however, that Pacific Rim subduction zone development also coincides with these APM changes, and that the actual cause and effect of each change in APM has yet to be clearly established. Here we present a modified Pacific APM model that uses several older seamount chains (Musicians, Ratak-Gilbert-Ellice, the Wake trails, and the Liliuokalani trails) to constrain the oldest Pacific plate motion using the hybrid technique of Wessel et al (2006).

  1. High water contents in basaltic melt inclusions from Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, J. A.; Plank, T.; Hauri, E. H.; Melson, W. G.; Soto, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    Despite the importance of water to arc magma genesis, fractionation and eruption, few quantitative constraints exist on the water content of Arenal magmas. Early estimates, by electron microprobe sum deficit, suggested up to 4 wt% H2O in olivine-hosted basaltic andesite melt inclusions (MI) from pre-historic ET-6 tephra (Melson, 1982), and up to 7 wt% H2O in plagioclase and orthopyroxene-hosted dacitic MI from 1968 lapilli (Anderson, 1979). These high water contents are consistent with abundant hornblende phenocrysts in Arenal volcanics, but inconsistent with geochemical tracers such as 10Be and Ba/La that suggest a low flux of recycled material (and presumably water) from the subduction zone. In order to test these ideas, and provide the first direct measurements of water in mafic Arenal magmas, we have studied olivine-hosted MI from the prehistoric (900 yBP; Soto et al., 1998) ET3 tephra layer. MI range from andesitic (> 58% SiO2) to basaltic compositions (< 50% SiO2), the latter of which are similar to the most primitive whole rocks analyzed from Arenal. SIMS analyses yield up to 4 wt% H2O in the basaltic MI, and water declines systematically (to 1-2 wt%) with increasing silica content. Water also correlates strongly with sulfur (up to 2500 ppm S) and CO2 (up to 300 ppm). H2O and CO2 in the MI define a closed-system degassing path that begins at 2 kb. Chlorine ( ˜ 2000 ppm) and fluorine ( ˜ 400 ppm) show less variation, as expected from their higher solubilities in these melts. The high sulfur contents ( ˜ 2000 ppm on average for basaltic MI) would provide more than enough "petrologic" sulfur to balance recent (1982, 1995, and 1996; Williams-Jones et al., 2001) COSPEC measurements. Although host olivines are quite evolved (< Fo76), the high CO2 and sulfur contents indicate that their inclusions are not highly degassed. The high water contents (> 4 wt%) found here for Arenal basaltic MI support the semi-quantitative data from earlier studies, but are somewhat

  2. Magnesium Isotopic Composition of Subducting Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Teng, F. Z.; Plank, T. A.; Huang, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subducted marine sediments have recently been called upon to explain the heterogeneous Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg, ‰) found in mantle wehrlites (-0.39 to +0.09 [1]) in the context of a homogeneous mantle (-0.25 ± 0.07 [2]). However, no systematic measurements of δ26Mg on marine sediments are currently available to provide direct support to this model. To characterize the Mg inputs to global subduction zones, we measured δ26Mg data for a total of 90 marine sediments collected from 12 drill sites outboard of the world's major subduction zones. These sediments span a 1.73‰ range in δ26Mg. The detritus-dominated sediments have δ26Mg (-0.59 to +0.53) comparable to those of weathered materials on continents (e.g. -0.52 to +0.92 [3]), while the calcareous oozes yield δ26Mg (as light as -1.20) more similar to the seawater value (-0.83 [4]). The negative correlation between δ26Mg and CaO/Al2O3 in these sediments indicates the primary control of mineralogy over the Mg isotopic distribution among different sediment types, as carbonates are enriched in light Mg isotopes (-5.10 to -0.40 [5]) whereas clay-rich weathering residues generally have heavier δ26Mg (e.g. up to +0.65 in saprolite [6]). In addition, chemical weathering and grain-size sorting drive sediments to a heavier δ26Mg, as indicated by the broad positive trends between δ26Mg with CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration [7]) and Al2O3/SiO2, respectively. Collectively, the arc systems sampled in this study represent ~30% of global arc length and the extrapolated global Mg flux of subducting marine sediments accounts for ~9% of the yearly Mg riverine input with a flux-weighted average δ26Mg at -0.26. Subduction of these heterogeneous sediments may not cause significant mantle heterogeneity on a global scale, but the highly variable Mg fluxes and δ26Mg of sediments delivered to different trenches are capable of producing local mantle variations. Volcanic rocks sourced from these mantle domains are thus

  3. Subduction zone guided waves in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, Thomas; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Guided wave dispersion is observed in subduction zones as high frequency energy is retained and delayed by low velocity structure in the subducting slab, while lower frequency energy is able to travel at the faster velocities associated with the surrounding mantle material. As subduction zone guided waves spend longer interacting with the low velocity structure of the slab than any other seismic phase, they have a unique capability to resolve these low velocity structures. In Northern Chile, guided wave arrivals are clearly observed on two stations in the Chilean fore-arc on permanent stations of the IPOC network. High frequency (> 5 Hz) P-wave arrivals are delayed by approximately 2 seconds compared to the low frequency (< 2 Hz) P-wave arrivals. Full waveform finite difference modelling is used to test the low velocity slab structure that cause this P-wave dispersion. The synthetic waveforms produced by these models are compared to the recorded waveforms. Spectrograms are used to compare the relative arrival times of different frequencies, while the velocity spectra is used to constrain the relative amplitude of the arrivals. Constraining the waveform in these two ways means that the full waveform is also matched, and the low pass filtered observed and synthetic waveforms can be compared. A combined misfit between synthetic and observed waveforms is then calculated following Garth & Rietbrock (2014). Based on this misfit criterion we constrain the velocity model by using a grid search approach. Modelling the guided wave arrivals suggest that the observed dispersion cannot be solely accounted for by a single low velocity layer as suggested by previous guided wave studies. Including dipping low velocity normal fault structures in the synthetic model not only accounts for the observed strong P-wave coda, but also produces a clear first motion dispersion. We therefore propose that the lithospheric mantle of the subducting Nazca plate is highly hydrated at intermediate

  4. Seismicity of the eastern Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruestle, A.; Kueperkoch, L.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.; Friederich, W.; Egelados Working Group

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) is the seismically most active region of Europe. The African plate is subducting beneath the Aegean lithosphere with a relative velocity of 4 cm per year. A detailed picture of the microseismicity of the eastern HSZ was obtained by the recordings of the temporary networks CYCNET (September 2002 - September 2005) and EGELADOS (October 2005 - March 2007). In total, nearly 7000 earthquakes were located with a location uncertainty of less than 20 km. The SE Aegean is dominated by (1) shallow intraplate seismicity within the Aegean plate, by (2) interplate seismicity at the plate contact and by (3) intermediate deep seismicity along the subducting African slab. Strong shallow seismicity in the upper plate is observed along the Ptolemy graben south of Crete extending towards the Karpathos Basin, indicating intense recent deformation of the forearc. In contrary, low shallow seismicity around Rhodes indicates only minor seismic crustal deformation of the upper plate. An almost NS-striking zone of microseismicity has been located, running from the Karpathos basin via the Nisyros volcanic complex towards the EW striking Gökova graben. In the SE Aegean the geometry of the Wadati-Benioff-Zone (WBZ) within the subducting African plate is revealed in detail by the observed microseismicity. Between about 50 to 100 km depth a continuous band of intermediate deep seismicity describes the strongly curved geometry of the slab. From the central to the eastern margin of the HSZ, the dip direction of the WBZ changes from N to NW with a strong increase of the dip angle beneath the eastern Cretan Sea. The margin of the dipping African slab is marked by an abrupt end of the observed WBZ beneath SW Anatolia. Below 100 km depth, the WBZ of the eastern HSZ is dominated by an isolated cluster of intense intermediate deep seismicity (at 100-180 km depth) beneath the Nisyros volcanic complex. It has an extension of about 100x80 km and is build up of 3 parallel

  5. Subduction Variability Along the Active Chilean Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, C. J.; Barckhausen, U.; Bartsch, H.; Block, M.; Boennemann, C.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.; Flueh, E. R.; Delisle, G.; Gaedicke, C.; Kopp, H.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Kus, J.; Ladage, S.; Ranero, C.; Schreckenberger, B.; Stoll, J. B.; Urbina, O.; Wiedicke-Hombach, M.

    2002-12-01

    The presence of different subduction modes in the convergence process between the Nazca and South-American plates along the Chilean margin is known from previous investigations. In order to study this variability in detail a comprehensive combined off- and onshore geo-scientific survey (SPOC) was recently conducted between Coquimbo and Valdivia in collaboration between a number of German and Chilean institutions. Major focus was also put on the structure of the sedimentary forearc basins and the distribution of gas hydrates along the slope. SPOC is the successor project to a similar experiment named CINCA that was earlier performed in the far north of Chile between Arica and Taltal. The SPOC results clearly show a change in subduction mode at about 33 deg S where the Juan Fernandez Ridge presently strikes the margin. North of that latitude, structural features such as extensional fracturing of the continental slope, very little or almost no sedimentary trench fill, intensive block faulting of the oceanic crust, a missing accretionary wedge, a very narrow shelf and other facts provide evidence for subduction erosion in that region. South of 33 deg S, we observed significantly steeper frontal slope angles and much less inclination of the oceanic crust toward the trench. In general, the topography of the oceanic crust is relatively smooth with the exception of several seamounts and fracture zones. Moreover, the width of the trench and of the shelf significantly widens toward the south, and pronounced forearc basins developed. Compared to the thick sedimentary trench fill of up to 2 km a very narrow accretionary wedge was encountered. Preliminary mass balancing combined with the assumption that the high present convergence rate occurred also in the past suggests that the bulk of the trench sediments is removed by subduction. Thus, accretionary processes can play only a subordinate or intermittent role. Geological seafloor samples support the assumption that small- to

  6. Reply to the comment on 'Boron content and isotopic composition of oceanic basalts: Geochemical and cosmochemical implications'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussidon, Marc; Jambon, Albert

    1994-12-01

    Chen-Feng You questions some of our interpretations of the B contents and delta B-11 values of oceanic basalts. His comments can be summarized in three points: (1) He emphasizes the importance of sediments as a B carrier, which should be taken into account in any budget calculation. He suggests that our estimated amount of boron subducted into the mantle is incorrect. (2) He quotes unpublished experimental results indicating that sedimentary boron is partly leached from a hemi-pelagic sediment at moderate temperatures (T less than or = 150 C) leaving a B-depleted residue isotopically fractionated to low delta B-11 values. (3) He further argues that Boron abundance and delta B-11 values at both Hawaii and the Halmahera arc could be explained by the incorporation of such fluids (i.e., released during subduction). Although we do think that the type of experiment described by You is effectively lacking at the moment and is of great potential for the understanding of B geochemical cycle, we also think that: (1) the experiments of You are insufficient to elucidate the behavior of B during subduction; and (2) two points of our work were misunderstood. We discuss successively the three points raised by You.

  7. Modeling the effects of 3-D slab geometry and oblique subduction on subduction zone thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; He, J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we revisit the effects of along-strike variation in slab geometry and oblique subduction on subduction zone thermal structures. Along-strike variations in slab dip cause changes in the descending rate of the slab and generate trench-parallel pressure gradients that drive trench-parallel mantle flow (e.g., Kneller and van Keken, 2007). Oblique subduction also drives trench-parallel mantle flow. In this study, we use a finite element code PGCtherm3D and examine a range of generic subduction geometries and parameters to investigate the effects of the above two factors. This exercise is part of foundational work towards developing detailed 3-D thermal models for NE Japan, Nankai, and Cascadia to better constrain their 3-D thermal structures and to understand the role of temperature in controlling metamorphic, seismogenic, and volcanic processes. The 3-D geometry of the subducting slabs in the forearc and arc regions are well delineated at these three subduction zones. Further, relatively large compilations of surface heat flow data at these subduction zones make them excellent candidates for this study. At NE Japan, a megathrust earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011; at Nankai and Cascadia, there has been a great effort to constrain the scale of the next subduction thrust earthquake for the purpose of disaster prevention. Temperature influences the slip behavior of subduction faults by (1) affecting the rheology of the interface material and (2) controlling dehydration reactions, which can lead to elevated pore fluid pressure. Beyond the depths of subduction thrust earthquakes, the thermal structure is affected strongly by the pattern of mantle wedge flow. This flow is driven by viscous coupling between the subducting slab and the overriding mantle, and it brings in hot flowing mantle into the wedge. The trench-ward (up-dip) extent of the slab-mantle coupling is thus a key factor that controls the thermal structure. Slab-mantle decoupling at shallow

  8. Slab Rollback and Subduction Erosion Model for the North Pamir - Alai Intracontinental Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, E. R.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Chen, J.; Thiede, R. C.; Stockli, D. F.; Sudo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Cenozoic convergence between the North Pamir and the Tien Shan is thought to have been primarily accommodated along the south-dipping intracontinental Alai subduction zone. The North Pamir has moved ~300 km north with respect to stable Asia along the surface trace of this subduction, the Main Pamir Thrust (MPT) system, subducting the basin now represented only by the Alai Basin and the westernmost portion of the Tarim Basin. As there is no evidence that the Tien Shan has moved southward during the late Cenozoic, we suggest that significant northward motion of the North Pamir is best explained as a consequence of slab rollback in a contractile setting. The ca. 500 km along-strike width of the North Pamir is extremely short for a subduction zone; the belt is highly concave. Published compilations show that short plate segments are characterized by strong curvature and rapid slab rollback rates. The MPT system has previously been treated as a large overthrust. The hanging wall of such a large structure should have experienced significant exhumation. However, new and previously published thermochronologic data show that the North Pamir experienced only minor late Cenozoic exhumation. If the North Pamir is viewed as the overriding plate in a subduction zone, the lack of significant exhumation may be explained by subduction erosion, which can remove material from the toe of the overriding plate without causing significant crustal thickening. Subduction erosion is common in slab rollback settings. In our model, early-middle Miocene north-south extension in the E-W trending Central Pamir domes is related to back-arc extension, while the 11 Ma Taxkorgan alkali complex and subsequent east-west extension in the N-S trending Kongur detachment are related to slab rollback edge effects. Published studies of the deformation history of the Alai Basin, westernmost Tarim, and Tien Shan suggest two main periods of Cenozoic deformation: in the Oligo-Miocene and since the mid

  9. Subduction recycling of continental sediments and the origin of geochemically enriched reservoirs in the deep mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.P.; Irifune, T.; Shimizu, N.; Nishiyama, N.; Norman, M.D.; Inoue, T.

    2008-10-08

    Isotopic and trace element geochemical studies of ocean island basalts (OIBs) have for many years been used to infer the presence of long-lived ({approx} 1-2 Ga old) compositional heterogeneities in the deep mantle related to recycling of crustal lithologies and marine and terrigenous sediments via subduction [e.g., Zindler, A., Hart, S.R., 1986. Chemical geodynamics. Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 14, 493-571; Weaver, B.L., 1991. The origin of ocean island basalt end-member compositions: trace element and isotopic constraints. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 104, 381-397; Chauvel, C., Hofmann, A.W., Vidal, P., 1992. HIMU-EM: the French Polynesian connection. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 110, 99-119; Hofmann, A.W., 1997. Mantle geochemistry: the message from oceanic volcanism. Nature 385, 219-229; Willbold, M., Stracke, A., 2006. Trace element composition of mantle end-members: Implications for recycling of oceanic and upper and lower continental crust. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. Q04004. 7, doi:10.1029/2005GC001005]. In particular, models for the EM-1 type ('enriched mantle') OIB reservoir have invoked the presence of subducted, continental-derived sediment to explain high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, low {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios, and extreme enrichments in incompatible elements observed in OIB lavas from, for example, the Pitcairn Island group in the South Pacific [Woodhead, J.D., McCulloch, M.T., 1989; Woodhead, J.D., Devey, C.W., 1993. Geochemistry of the Pitcairn seamounts, I: source character and temporal trends. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 116, 81-99; Eisele, J., Sharma, M., Galer, S.J.G., Blichert-Toft, J., Devey, C.W., Hofmann, A.W., 2002. The role of sediment recycling in EM-1 inferred from Os, Pb, Hf, Nd, Sr isotope and trace element systematics of the Pitcairn hotspot. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 196, 197-212]. More recently, ultrapotassic, mantle-derived lavas (lamproites) from Gaussberg, Antarctica have been interpreted as the product

  10. High-alumina basalts from the Bogda Mountains suggest an arc setting for Chinese Northern Tianshan during the Late Carboniferous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Xu, Yi-Gang; Chen, Yi-Bing; Luo, Zhen-Yu; Hong, Lu-Bing; Ma, Liang; Liu, Hai-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Considerable debate persists as to the tectonic setting of the Tianshan Orogen during the Late Paleozoic, with active subduction system and intraplate large igneous provinces as two dominant schools. With aims of providing constraints on this issue, geochronological and geochemical analyses have been carried out on the Late Carboniferous high-Al basaltic lava (HAB) from the Bogda Mountains. These lavas, in conformable contact with the felsic rocks, belong to the Upper Carboniferous Liushugou Group. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating of two felsic ignimbrites further suggest that they were mainly erupted during 315-319 Ma. The Bogda basaltic lava is classified as HAB given their high Al contents > 16% and their chemical resemblance to those from modern arcs such as Aleutian and Kamchatka. They are characterized by strong enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), strong negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies, and distinct positive Pb anomalies. Hence, they are significantly different from the mantle plume-related basalts, as exemplified by those from Siberian, Emeishan, and Tarim large igneous provinces. Instead, their MORB-like Nd-Hf-Pb isotopes and arc-like trace elements indicate that the Bogda HABs may have been generated from a mantle wedge metasomatized by sediment-derived melts. The sector and oscillatory zoning in clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the Bogda HABs is attributable to rapid dynamic crystallization during magma ascent. High Al content is due to delayed plagioclase nucleation likely by the high crystallization pressure rather than water content. Collectively, our data lend support to an island arc environment during the Late Paleozoic, probably related to southward subduction of the Paleo-Tianshan Ocean.

  11. Velocities of Subducted Sediments and Continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; van Keken, P. E.; Abers, G. A.; Seward, G.

    2009-12-01

    The growing capability to measure seismic velocities in subduction zones has led to unusual observations. For example, although most minerals have VP/ VS ratios around 1.77, ratios <1.7 and >1.8 have been observed. Here we explore the velocities of subducted sediments and continental crust from trench to sub-arc depths using two methods. (1) Mineralogy was calculated as a function of P & T for a range of subducted sediment compositions using Perple_X, and rock velocities were calculated using the methodology of Hacker & Abers [2004]. Calculated slab-top temperatures have 3 distinct depth intervals with different dP/dT gradients that are determined by how coupling between the slab and mantle wedge is modeled. These three depth intervals show concomitant changes in VP and VS: velocities initially increase with depth, then decrease beyond the modeled decoupling depth where induced flow in the wedge causes rapid heating, and increase again at depth. Subducted limestones, composed chiefly of aragonite, show monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.63 to 1.72. Cherts show large jumps in VP/ VS from 1.55-1.65 to 1.75 associated with the quartz-coesite transition. Terrigenous sediments dominated by quartz and mica show similar, but more-subdued, transitions from ~1.67 to 1.78. Pelagic sediments dominated by mica and clinopyroxene show near-monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.74 to 1.80. Subducted continental crust that is too dry to transform to high-pressure minerals has a VP/ VS ratio of 1.68-1.70. (2) Velocity anisotropy calculations were made for the same P-T dependent mineralogies using the Christoffel equation and crystal preferred orientations measured via electron-backscatter diffraction for typical constituent phases. The calculated velocity anisotropies range from 5-30%. For quartz-rich rocks, the calculated velocities show a distinct depth dependence because crystal slip systems and CPOs change with temperature. In such rocks, the fast VP direction varies from slab

  12. Oligocene and Miocene arc volcanism in northeastern California: evidence for post-Eocene segmentation of the subducting Farallon plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, J.P.; Egger, A.E.; John, D.A.; Cousens, B.; Fleck, R.J.; Henry, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Warner Range in northeastern California exposes a section of Tertiary rocks over 3 km thick, offering a unique opportunity to study the long-term history of Cascade arc volcanism in an area otherwise covered by younger volcanic rocks. The oldest locally sourced volcanic rocks in the Warner Range are Oligocene (28–24 Ma) and include a sequence of basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows overlain by hornblende and pyroxene andesite pyroclastic flows and minor lava flows. Both sequences vary in thickness (0–2 km) along strike and are inferred to be the erosional remnants of one or more large, partly overlapping composite volcanoes. No volcanic rocks were erupted in the Warner Range between ca. 24 and 16 Ma, although minor distally sourced silicic tuffs were deposited during this time. Arc volcanism resumed ca. 16 Ma with eruption of basalt and basaltic andesite lavas sourced from eruptive centers 5–10 km south of the relict Oligocene centers. Post–16 Ma arc volcanism continued until ca. 8 Ma, forming numerous eroded but well-preserved shield volcanoes to the south of the Warner Range. Oligocene to Late Miocene volcanic rocks in and around the Warner Range are calc-alkaline basalts to andesites (48%–61% SiO2) that display negative Ti, Nb, and Ta anomalies in trace element spider diagrams, consistent with an arc setting. Middle Miocene lavas in the Warner Range are distinctly different in age, composition, and eruptive style from the nearby Steens Basalt, with which they were previously correlated. Middle to Late Miocene shield volcanoes south of the Warner Range consist of homogeneous basaltic andesites (53%–57% SiO2) that are compositionally similar to Oligocene rocks in the Warner Range. They are distinctly different from younger (Late Miocene to Pliocene) high-Al, low-K olivine tholeiites, which are more mafic (46%–49% SiO2), did not build large edifices, and are thought to be related to backarc extension. The Warner Range is ∼100 km east of the

  13. Geochemistry of Kauai volcanics and a mixing model for the origin of Hawaiian alkali basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, Mark D.

    1984-09-01

    A comprehensive model is developed to explain the major, trace element and strontium and neodymium isotopic characteristics of alkali basalts from Hawaii. The model is similar to that of Chen and Frey (1983) in that it requires mixing of a small melt fraction of MORB-source material with another component to generate the alkalic suite of a particular Hawaiian volcano. It differs from the Chen and Frey model in that the other end-member must be different from primitive mantle if it is to be consistent with both trace element and isotopic data. Alkali basalts and tholeiites from Kauai analyzed in this study show a nearly complete transition in Sr and Nd isotopes. There is a relatively well-constrained array on a Nd-Sr isotope correlation plot that can be explained by two-component mixing of Kauai tholeiite magma and a small amount of melt of East Pacific Rise source rock. After corrections are made for fractional crystallization (involving primarily clinopyroxene and olivine), the Sr and Ba concentrations of Kauai lavas plot along mixing curves defined by the above sources, providing positive tests of the mixing hypothesis. Implications of this model are: (1) the main source of Hawaiian shield-building tholeiites is a mixture of subducted crust, primitive mantle and depleted asthenosphere that has been homogenized prior to melting, (2) early alkalic volcanism (as at Loihi seamount) will be characterized by greater isotopic heterogeneity than will late-stage alkali basalt production, and (3) there are two fundamentally distinct types of alkalic lavas erupted towards the end of magmatism at a given Hawaiian volcano. One represents smaller degrees of melting of the same source that generated shield-building tholeiites (Kohala-type); the other derives from the mixed source discussed in this paper (Haleakala-, Kauai-type).

  14. The Siberian Flood Basalts: Connecting the Mantle, the Continental Crust, and the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Arndt, N.; Black, B. A.; Fristad, K. E.; Kiehl, J. T.; Lamarque, J.; Meyer, K. M.; Payne, J.; Planke, S.; Shields, C. A.; Svensen, H.

    2012-12-01

    Around 252 million years ago the Siberian flood basalts intruded into and erupted onto the Siberian craton. At that time the craton was at about its present latitude, and was a part of Pangaea, with inward-dipping subduction on several sides. The flood basalt event is among several possible causes for the end-Permian extinction, the largest extinction in Earth history. Our team hypothesizes that the magmas caused the injection of sufficient volatiles into the atmosphere to produce global climate change. These volatiles were in part sweated out of the crustal rocks by the chambered magmas, and in part assimilated from the crust by the magmas and released upon eruption. The magmas intruded a 12-km-deep evaporate basin containing hydrocarbon reservoirs. The complex interactions of heat and rock with silicate, hydrous, and hydrocarbon fluids produced rich ore bodies, a variety of magmatic rocks including carbonatites, and significant volumes of carbon, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine-bearing volatiles. We will present an overview of our results to date, including paleomagnetic data on rates of eruption, dynamic models of plume-lithosphere interaction, isotopic evidence of the changes in ocean chemistry, field and laboratory data on volatile release in intrusive aureoles, melt inclusion measurements of magmatic volatile loads, and early climate model results. Because of its volume and the specific crustal region it passed through, the magmatic event produced significant chemical and heat transfer between Earth's interior and its surface. Though other continental flood basalts are similarly sized, the Siberian event interacted with particularly toxic crustal rocks and is a likely candidate for triggering the end-Permian global climate change and mass extinction.

  15. Origin of Columbia River flood basalt controlled by propagating rupture of the Farallon slab.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Stegman, Dave R

    2012-02-15

    The origin of the Steens-Columbia River (SCR) flood basalts, which is presumed to be the onset of Yellowstone volcanism, has remained controversial, with the proposed conceptual models involving either a mantle plume or back-arc processes. Recent tomographic inversions based on the USArray data reveal unprecedented detail of upper-mantle structures of the western USA and tightly constrain geodynamic models simulating Farallon subduction, which has been proposed to influence the Yellowstone volcanism. Here we show that the best-fitting geodynamic model depicts an episode of slab tearing about 17 million years ago under eastern Oregon, where an associated sub-slab asthenospheric upwelling thermally erodes the Farallon slab, leading to formation of a slab gap at shallow depth. Driven by a gradient of dynamic pressure, the tear ruptured quickly north and south and within about two million years covering a distance of around 900 kilometres along all of eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. This tear would be consistent with the occurrence of major volcanic dikes during the SCR-Northern Nevada Rift flood basalt event both in space and time. The model predicts a petrogenetic sequence for the flood basalt with sources of melt starting from the base of the slab, at first remelting oceanic lithosphere and then evolving upwards, ending with remelting of oceanic crust. Such a progression helps to reconcile the existing controversies on the interpretation of SCR geochemistry and the involvement of the putative Yellowstone plume. Our study suggests a new mechanism for the formation of large igneous provinces.

  16. Water in Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts: Evidence for a Wet Recycled Crustal Component in the Jan Mayen Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, C.; Monsalve, M. L.; Dixon, J. E.; Kingsley, R.; Schilling, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present H2O concentrations in fresh mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses dredged from 3 contiguous Arctic MAR ridge segments (Kolbeinsey, Mohns, and Knipovich Ridges) to determine the volatile content of the Jan Mayen plume end-member within this low 3He/4He region. Water concentrations (0.15-1.30 wt%) correlate with other indicators of mantle enrichment. H2O/Ce ratios vary from 208 to 428, consistent with high H2O/Ce of North Atlantic basalts (regional means of 240-280±50; Michael, EPSL, 131, 1995), but extend to values higher than previously reported. Previous Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf-H isotope studies of basalts from the Mohns Ridge confirm a strong binary mixing relationship along this ridge segment, grading from the Jan Mayen platform (enriched) eastward to the Greenland FZ where the Mohns Ridge meets the more depleted Knipovich Ridge. We model trace element concentrations in these basalts as binary mixing between depleted mantle and an enriched Jan Mayen component, followed by 7% batch melting of the mixed source using variable mineralogies. Depleted compositions are consistent with melting of a spinel lherzolite mantle, whereas the most enriched Jan Mayen lavas are best modeled by deeper melting of a mantle assemblage richer in clinopyroxene (>50%) and garnet suggesting involvement of a recycled crustal (eclogite) component. Moderately enriched lavas require intermediate mineralogies. Involvement of a recycled crustal component is consistent with the positive Nb and Ta and negative Pb anomalies in enriched samples. Water concentration in the Jan Mayen mantle component is estimated to be ~3000 ppm, significantly higher than previous estimates of water in other mantle plumes. The H2O/Ce of melts derived from melting of this component is ~300. A possible origin for the enriched component is subducted oceanic lithosphere retained in the shallow mantle during formation of the Caledonian suture at ~410-410 Ma as proposed for Iceland by Foulger and others (JVGR, 141, 2005

  17. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  18. Physical and chemical evolution of subduction-related eclogites: Interplay of inheritance, alteration, deformation and metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, F. M.; Sorensen, S. S.; Philippot, P.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical fluxes in subduction zone settings ultimately determine the chemistry of arc volcanism, as well as modification of the composition of the upper mantle. To constrain such fluxes, it is required that details of the physical and chemical evolution of the rocks that enter the system at the subduction zone are understood. Subduction-related eclogites are products of igneous, metamorphic, fluid-rock, and tectonic processes acting on ocean floor basalt for 10s of millions of years. These rocks preserve evidence for changes in bulk rock and mineral chemistry, mineral assemblages and microstructures resulting from these processes. We characterize and compare the textures and major and trace element chemistry of blueschist and eclogite from three subduction complexes to evaluate how these processes interact and to assess to what extent chemical and physical changes may be preserved during a complex P-T-t-D history. Coronitic and mylonitic eclogite and blueschist samples from subduction complexes in the Franciscan (CA, U.S.A.), Monviso (Western Alps) and Gruppo di Voltri (Ligurian Alps) represent different depths of subduction, and degrees of deformation and metamorphism, as well as a variable degree of retrogression. Textural observations and the trace element composition of talc inclusions in omphacite suggest that gabbroic rocks preserve some primary magmatic mineral domains through the entire subduction-exhumation cycle. Full recrystallization has obscured all primary domains in finer-grained rocks. There is great variability in the extent to which evidence of metamorphic episodes is preserved. Bulk major and trace element chemistry analysis indicates that all samples are enriched in most trace elements compared to MORB, and at each locality, deformed rocks are more enriched than undeformed samples. Enrichment of the fluid-mobile elements (LILE, and Th, U) is particularly strong in the Franciscan samples. Trace element distributions within minerals testify to

  19. Geochemistry of apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    PubMed

    Schnetzler, C C; Philpotts, J A; Nava, D F; Schuhmann, S; Thomas, H H

    1972-01-28

    Major and trace element concentrations have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area; trace element concentrations have also been determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Basalt 15555 most closely resembles in composition the Apollo 12 olivine-rich basalts. The concentrations of lithium, potassium, rubidium, barium, rare-earth elements, and zirconium in basalt 15555 are the lowest, and the negative europium anomaly is the smallest, reported for lunar basalts; this basalt might be the least differentiated material yet returned from the moon. Crystallization and removal of about 6 percent of plagioclase similar to that contained in the basalt would account for the observed europium anomaly; if plagioclase is not on the liquidus of this basalt, a multistage origin is indicated. Mineral data indicate that plagioclase and pyroxene approached quasi-equilibrium. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 would be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88 percent basalt, 6 percent KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) and 6 percent plagioclase (anorthosite?).

  20. Mission Immiscible: Distinct subduction components generate two primary magmas of Pagan Volcano, Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Stern, R. J.; Nunokawa, A.; Shukuno, H.; Kawabata, H.; Hirahara, Y.; Chang, Q.; Miyazaki, T.; Kimura, J.; Embley, R. W.; Bloomer, S. H.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Pagan is one of the largest (2,160 km3; Bloomer et al., 1989) volcanoes along the Mariana arc magmatic front. Pagan has a maximum elevation of 570 m (Mt. Pagan), but its submarine flanks descend to 2,000-3,000 m, and most of the volcano is submarine and unexplored. Bathymetric mapping and ROV Hyper-Dolphin (HPD1147) dive on the NE submarine flank of Pagan were carried out during NT10-12 (R/V Natsushima) in July 2010. There are no systematic differences between subaerial and submarine lavas with > 52 wt % SiO2, suggesting derivation from the same magmatic system. Twenty least-fractionated basalts (48.5-50 wt % SiO2) extend to higher MgO (10-11 wt %) and Mg# (66-70) than subaerial lavas. Compositions of olivine (up to Fo94) and spinels (Cr# up to 0.8) suggest that Pagan primitive magmas formed from high degrees of mantle melting. Two geochemical groups of basalts can be distinguished at similar 10-11 wt % MgO; these erupted about the same time, 500 m apart. Both contain clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, thus, these two groups are referred to as COB1 and COB2. Lower TiO2, FeO, Na2O, K2O, incompatible trace element abundances, and Nb/Yb suggest that COB1 formed from higher degrees of mantle melting. In addition, LREE-enrichment and higher Th/Nb in COB2 contrast with LREE-depletion and lower Th/Nb in COB1. Higher Ba/Th and Ba/Nb and lower Th/Nb indicate that main subduction addition in COB1 was dominated by hydrous fluid, whereas that in COB2 was dominated by sediment melt. Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes are also consistent with this scenario. Importantly, the subduction addition, that caused more melting of the COB1 source was mostly hydrous fluid. In contrast to Pagan, we observed two primary magmas (COB and POB) in the NW Rota-1 volcano (NWR1), ~40 km behind the volcanic front. NWR1 COB has a greater subduction component, both hydrous fluid and sediment melt, than POB, perhaps reflecting that the subducting slab below NWR1 is > 100 km deeper than that beneath Pagan. At

  1. Molybdenum mobility and isotopic fractionation during subduction at the Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymuth, Heye; Vils, Flurin; Willbold, Matthias; Taylor, Rex N.; Elliott, Tim

    2015-12-01

    The fate of crustal material recycled into the convecting mantle by plate tectonics is important for understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the planet. Marked isotopic variability of Mo at the Earth's surface offers the promise of providing distinctive signatures of such recycled material. However, characterisation of the behaviour of Mo during subduction is needed to assess the potential of Mo isotope ratios as tracers for global geochemical cycles. Here we present Mo isotope data for input and output components of the archetypical Mariana arc: Mariana arc lavas, sediments from ODP Sites 800, 801 and 802 near the Mariana trench and the altered mafic, oceanic crust (AOC), from ODP Site 801, together with samples of the deeper oceanic crust from ODP Site 1256. We also report new high precision Pb isotope data for the Mariana arc lavas and a dataset of Pb isotope ratios from sediments from ODP Sites 800, 801 and 802. The Mariana arc lavas are enriched in Mo compared to elements of similar incompatibility during upper mantle melting, and have distinct, isotopically heavy Mo (high 98Mo/95Mo) relative to the upper mantle, by up to 0.3 parts per thousand. In contrast, the various subducting sediment lithologies dominantly host isotopically light Mo. Coupled Pb and Mo enrichment in the Mariana arc lavas suggests a common source for these elements and we further use Pb isotopes to identify the origin of the isotopically heavy Mo. We infer that an aqueous fluid component with elevated [Mo], [Pb], high 98Mo/95Mo and unradiogenic Pb is derived from the subducting, mafic oceanic crust. Although the top few hundred metres of the subducting, mafic crust have a high 98Mo/95Mo, as a result of seawater alteration, tightly defined Pb isotope arrays of the Mariana arc lavas extrapolate to a fluid component akin to fresh Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts. This argues against a flux dominantly derived from the highly altered, uppermost mafic crust or indeed from an Indian

  2. Fe-XANES analyses of Reykjanes Ridge basalts: Implications for oceanic crust's role in the solid Earth oxygen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, Oliver; Moussallam, Yves; Hartley, Margaret E.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Murton, Bramley J.

    2015-10-01

    The cycling of material from Earth's surface environment into its interior can couple mantle oxidation state to the evolution of the oceans and atmosphere. A major uncertainty in this exchange is whether altered oceanic crust entering subduction zones can carry the oxidised signal it inherits during alteration at the ridge into the deep mantle for long-term storage. Recycled oceanic crust may be entrained into mantle upwellings and melt under ocean islands, creating the potential for basalt chemistry to constrain solid Earth-hydrosphere redox coupling. Numerous independent observations suggest that Iceland contains a significant recycled oceanic crustal component, making it an ideal locality to investigate links between redox proxies and geochemical indices of enrichment. We have interrogated the elemental, isotope and redox geochemistry of basalts from the Reykjanes Ridge, which forms a 700 km transect of the Iceland plume. Over this distance, geophysical and geochemical tracers of plume influence vary dramatically, with the basalts recording both long- and short-wavelength heterogeneity in the Iceland plume. We present new high-precision Fe-XANES measurements of Fe3+ / ∑ Fe on a suite of 64 basalt glasses from the Reykjanes Ridge. These basalts exhibit positive correlations between Fe3+ / ∑ Fe and trace element and isotopic signals of enrichment, and become progressively oxidised towards Iceland: fractionation-corrected Fe3+ / ∑ Fe increases by ∼0.015 and ΔQFM by ∼0.2 log units. We rule out a role for sulfur degassing in creating this trend, and by considering various redox melting processes and metasomatic source enrichment mechanisms, conclude that an intrinsically oxidised component within the Icelandic mantle is required. Given the previous evidence for entrained oceanic crustal material within the Iceland plume, we consider this the most plausible carrier of the oxidised signal. To determine the ferric iron content of the recycled component ([Fe2O

  3. Microbial Diversity in the Columbia River Basalt Group and the Context for Life in Subsurface Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalleur, H. J.; Smith, A.; Fisk, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.

    2012-12-01

    Large igneous provinces constitute a sizable volume of porous and fractured materials in the Earth's crust and many of these environments exist within the boundaries of survival for subsurface life. The results of microbiological studies of basalts and other igneous materials in subsurface settings hint at the types of microbes that dwell in these environments. We investigated the microbes in aquifers in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and also considered the microbial communities in subsurface basalts more broadly to determine if there are recurrent themes in the types of microbes and the nature of diversity present in these geological systems. Bacteria and Archaea collected from five intervals in the CRBG were examined using high-throughput DNA sequencing directed at the 16S rRNA genes. The highest bacterial biomass and the highest bacterial diversity were observed in the deepest samples (>1018 meters below land surface) whereas the highest archaeal diversity was detected in the shallowest samples (<449 mbls). Microbes classified as Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria dominated the aquifers. These findings are generally consistent with earlier cultivation- and clone library-based studies performed on microbes from the CRBG and the Snake River Plain aquifer. Microbes associated with marine basalts are similar to those found in terrestrial settings and include Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, candidate division bacterium OP1, Euryarchaeota, and Crenarchaeota. Based on 16S rRNA sequence similarities to known microbes, both basaltic regions have taxa with representative physiologies likely to include hydrogen oxidation, iron and sulfur metabolism, acetogenesis, and hydrocarbon metabolism. Research on the microbiology of basalt rich provinces on the planet has informed our understanding of biogeochemical cycling where igneous rocks dominate. The knowledge gained in these investigations also promotes our ability to verify the remediation of contaminants

  4. Diapiric flow at subduction zones: a recipe for rapid transport.

    PubMed

    Hall, P S; Kincaid, C

    2001-06-29

    Recent geochemical studies of uranium-thorium series disequilibrium in rocks from subduction zones require magmas to be transported through the mantle from just above the subducting slab to the surface in as little as approximately 30,000 years. We present a series of laboratory experiments that investigate the characteristic time scales and flow patterns of the diapiric upwelling model of subduction zone magmatism. Results indicate that the interaction between buoyantly upwelling diapirs and subduction-induced flow in the mantle creates a network of low-density, low-viscosity conduits through which buoyant flow is rapid, yielding transport times commensurate with those indicated by uranium-thorium studies.

  5. Source Evolution After Subduction Initiation as Recorded in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Fore-arc Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Shimizu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Drilling in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc during IODP Expedition 352 and DSDP Leg 60 recovered consistent stratigraphic sequences of volcanic rocks reminiscent of those found in many ophiolites. The oldest lavas in these sections are "fore-arc basalts" (FAB) with ~51.5 Ma ages. Boninites began eruption approximately 2-3 m.y. later (Ishizuka et al., 2011, EPSL; Reagan et al., 2013, EPSL) and further from the trench. First results from IODP Expedition 352 and preliminary post-cruise data suggest that FAB at Sites U1440 and U1441 were generated by decompression melting during near-trench sea-floor spreading, and that fluids from the subducting slab were not involved in their genesis. Temperatures appear to have been unusually high and pressures of melting appear to have been unusually low compared to mid-ocean ridges. Spreading rates at this time appear to have been robust enough to maintain a stable melt lens. Incompatible trace element abundances are low in FAB compared to even depleted MORB. Nd and Hf Isotopic compositions published before the expedition suggest that FAB were derived from typical MORB source mantle. Thus, their extreme deletion resulted from unusually high degrees of melting immediately after subduction initiation. The oldest boninites from DSDP Site 458 and IODP Sites U1439 and U1442 have relatively high concentrations of fluid-soluble elements, low concentrations of REE, and light depleted REE patterns. Younger boninites, have even lower REE concentrations, but have U-shaped REE patterns. Our first major and trace element compositions for the FAB through boninite sequence suggests that melting pressures and temperatures decreased through time, mantle became more depleted though time, and spreading rates waned during boninite genesis. Subduction zone fluids involved in boninite genesis appear to have been derived from progressively higher temperatures and pressures over time as the subducting slab thermally matured.

  6. Northwest Africa 5298: A Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Brandon, Alan; Shafer, John

    2009-01-01

    NWA 5298 is a single 445 g meteorite found near Bir Gandouz, Morocco in March 2008 [1]. This rock has a brown exterior weathered surface instead of a fusion crust and the interior is composed of green mineral grains with interstitial dark patches containing small vesicles and shock melts [1]. This meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite [2]. A petrologic study of this Martian meteorite is being carried out with electron microprobe analysis and soon trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Oxygen fugacity is calculated from Fe-Ti oxides pairs in the sample. The data from this study constrains the petrogenesis of basaltic shergottites.

  7. Total nitrogen content of deep sea basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, T. L.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1982-01-01

    An estimate of the total nitrogen content of the earth's mantle, aimed at furnishing a further constraint for earth atmosphere origin and evolution models, was attempted through thermal neutron activation analysis via N-14(n,p)C-14 for the case of deep sea basalt glasses from the East Pacific Rise, the Mid-Atlantic Rift, and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The increased nitrogen abundance of matrix material from the same samples as the glasses may be due to the incorporation of chemically-bound nitrogen from sea water, rather than dissolved molecular nitrogen. A discussion is presented of factors affecting observed basalt nitrogen content and its interpretation in terms of mantle nitrogen abundance. A 2 ppm N lower limit is estimated for the mantle.

  8. Sources of oceanic basalts: radiogenic isotopic evidence

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.M.

    1985-02-01

    Oceanic basalts can be subdivided into five distinct groupings on the basis of their Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope composition. These classes, represented by mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and St. Helena, Kerguelen, the Society Islands, and the Hawaiian Islands, may represent different but internally heterogeneous mantle reservoirs or merely distinct groups within which chemical evolution has proceeded in a similar manner. Little systematic geographic distribution of volcanism tapping these sources is apparent. Depletion has been most important in the evolution of the MORB-type reservoirs, whereas crustal recycling has dominated the evolution of sources of the Kerguelen and Society types. Primitive mantle is identifiable in the Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotope characteristics of the Hawaiian source only. The evolution of St. Helena-type sources remains enigmatic. 33 references, 2 figures.

  9. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  10. Channelized Fluid Flow and Eclogite-Facies Metasomatism Along the Subduction Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Monviso ophiolite Lago Superiore Unit (LSU; Western Alps) constitutes a well-preserved, largely coherent fragment of eclogitic upper oceanic lithosphere subducted to ca. 80 km depth (between 50 and 40 Ma) and exhumed along the subduction interface. Within-slab, 10 to 100 m thick, eclogite-facies shear zones cut this section; the Intermediate Shear Zone (ISZ) follows the boundary between gabbroic and basaltic eclogites (associated with minor calcschist lenses), and the Lower Shear Zone (LSZ) marks the contact between gabbroic eclogites and the antigorite serpentinite sole. Up to 10 m fragments of mylonitic gabbroic eclogites were transported within serpentinite schists from the LSZ during eclogite-facies deformation. Metasomatic rinds, formed on these fragments during peak to early retrograde lawsonite-eclogite facies metamorphism (ca. 550 °C / 2.6 GPa), document episodic, prominent rock-fluid interaction along intra-slab, channelized fluid migration pathways associated with deformation. We present new petrological and geochemical data on hydrous eclogites (talc-, chlorite-, lawsonite- and phengite-bearing eclogites) and serpentinite-derived ultrabasic schists from block rinds. Bulk-rock compositions, LA-ICP-MS mineral analyses and X-ray Cr/Mg maps of garnet and clinopyroxene demonstrate that these samples underwent significant enrichments in Mg, Cr, Ni, ± Large Ion Lithophile Elements and prominent depletions in Fe and V during eclogite-facies metasomatism. Boron isotopic data of phengite, clinopyroxene and chlorite, and antigorite suggest that metasomatic block rinds formed during interaction with serpentinite-derived fluids. These compositional patterns point to focused, fluid-mediated element transfer through the subducted slab. Serpentinite-derived fluids via antigorite breakdown some 15-20 km deeper than the maximum depth reached by these eclogites thereby equilibrate with fluids derived from oceanic crust and/or sedimentary material. While slab

  11. Degassing-driven crystallisation in basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Tuffen, H.; James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2013-01-01

    Syn-eruptive crystallisation can drastically increase magma viscosity, with profound implications for conduit dynamics, lava emplacement and volcanic hazards. There is growing evidence that crystallisation is not only cooling-driven, but can also occur almost isothermally during decompression-induced degassing on ascent from depth. Here we review field and experimental evidence for degassing-driven crystallisation in a range of magma compositions. We then present new results showing, for the first time, experimental evidence for this process in basaltic magma. Our experiments use simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS) to monitor degassing patterns and thermal events during heating and cooling of porphyritic basaltic samples from Mt. Etna, Italy. The partly degassed samples, which contained 0.39-0.81 wt.% total volatiles in the glass fraction, were subjected to two cycles of heating from ambient to 1250 °C. On the first heating, TGA data show that 30-60% of the total volatiles degassed slowly at < 1050 °C, and that the degassing rate increased rapidly above this temperature. DSC data indicate that this rapid increase in the degassing rate was closely followed (≤ 3.4 min) by a strongly exothermic event, which is interpreted as crystallisation. Enthalpies measured for this event suggest that up to 35% of the sample crystallises, a value supported by petrographic observations of samples quenched after the event. As neither degassing nor crystallisation was observed at high temperature during the second heating cycle we infer that the events on first heating constitute degassing-driven crystallisation. The rapidity and magnitude of the crystallisation response to degassing indicates that this process may strongly affect the rheology of basaltic magma in shallow conduits and lava flows, and thus influence the hazards posed by basaltic volcanism.

  12. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  13. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region.

  14. Effects of subduction parameters on geothermal gradients in forearcs with an application to Franciscan subduction in California

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, T.A. )

    1991-01-10

    Geothermal gradients in forearcs are often suppressed below normal values because of the cooling effect of the relatively cold downgoing plate. In this paper, finite difference thermal modeling is used to evaluate the influence on forearc gradients of variations in six potentially important subduction zone parameters: radiogenic heat production; thermal conductivity of forearc rocks; subduction angle; subduction rate; frictional heat production; and presubduction geothermal gradients. Pressure-temperature conditions of blueschist-facies metamorphism in the Franciscan subduction complex of California are easily explained with typical subduction rates and slab ages with plate contact shear stresses of the order of 10 MPa, but stresses within the range zero to a few tens of megapascals are probably permitted by the thermal constraints. Speculative application of the modeling results assuming a shear stress of 4% of lithostatic pressure to plate motion reconstructions for the Franciscan forearc suggests that forearc gradients were about 8C/km around 85 Ma when the subducting slab was perhaps 145 m.y. old and the subduction rate was perhaps 95 km/m.y. Gradients increased moderately through the latest Cretaceous to middle Tertiary as subduction became slower and the subducting slab became younger, reaching about 16C/km at 28 Ma when the slab age was about 11 m.y. and the subduction rate was about 48 km/m.y. The slab age, subduction rate, and forearc gradient then remained fairly constant until 5 Ma, when subduction slowed to about 32 km/m.y. and the slab age decreased to about 8 m.y., causing gradients to rise to about 20C/km.

  15. Subduction zone tectonic studies to develop concepts for the occurrence of sediment subduction (Phase I). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hilde, T.W.C.

    1984-08-01

    The objective was to determine the fate of sediments at convergent lithospheric plate boundaries. The study focuses on the structures of the Circum-Pacific trenches and shallow portions of the associated subduction zones. Sediment distribution and the nature of sediment deformation was defined through the various stages of plate convergence to determine if the sediments are subducted or accreted. The controlling factors for sediment subduction and/or accretion were determined. 50 figs. (ACR)

  16. Petrogenesis of Middle-Late Triassic volcanic rocks from the Gangdese belt, southern Lhasa terrane: Implications for early subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Ding, Lin; Zhang, Li-Yun; Kapp, Paul; Pullen, Alex; Yue, Ya-Hui

    2016-10-01

    The Gangdese belt is dominantly composed of igneous rocks that formed during the northward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere beneath the Lhasa terrane and has played a crucial role in understanding the pre-collisional evolution of southern Tibet. This paper presents new geochronological and geochemical (whole-rock major and trace element and Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotope) data for recently identified volcanic rocks exposed in Changguo area, southernmost part of the Lhasa terrane. Zircon U-Pb dating from six samples yields consistent ages of 237.1 ± 1.1 Ma to 211.7 ± 1.5 Ma for magma emplacement through volcanic eruption, showing the Middle-Late Triassic magmatic activity in the southernmost Gangdese Belt. The Changguo volcanic rocks are mainly composed of basaltic and andesitic rocks and exhibit LILE enrichment and HFSE depletion. They also exhibit relatively uniform Nd-Hf isotopic compositions (εNd(t) = + 5.20 to + 7.74 and εHf(t)zircon = + 10.2 to + 15.9). The basaltic magmas were likely sourced from partial melting of sub-arc mantle wedge that was metasomatized by not only the aqueous fluid derived from subducting altered oceanic crust but also hydrous melt derived from subducting seafloor sediments, and subsequently experienced fractional crystallization and juvenile crustal contamination during ascent. The andesitic magmas were generated by partial melting of mafic-ultramafic metasomes through melt/fluid-peridotite reaction at slab-mantle interface. Taking into account the temporal and spatial distribution of the Early Mesozoic magmatic rocks and regional detrital zircon data, we further propose that the northward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere beneath the Lhasa terrane commenced by Middle Triassic.

  17. Imaging segmentation along the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Hawley, W. B.; Martin-Short, R.

    2015-12-01

    As we learn more about the Cascadia subduction zone, there is clear evidence for segmentation in the character of the many physical processes along its 1000 km length. There is segmentation in the arc magmas, in the seismicity, episodic tremor and slip, crustal structure and mantle structure all the way down to ~400 km depth. What is striking is the fact that the segment boundaries for these processes at depths of a few kilometers to hundreds of kilometers align. We must determine if this is coincidence, or if not, what the causative process is. The seismic deployments of the Cascadia Initiative onshore and offshore allow us to image the structure of the subduction zone, including the incoming Juan de Fuca plate, with unprecedented resolution. We use data from three one-year deployments of 70 ocean bottom seismometers across the Juan de Fuca plate, along with hundreds of onshore stations from the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, the Earthscope Transportable Array, and smaller temporary seismic deployments. Our 3D tomographic models show significant variation in the structure of the subducting slab along its length. It extends deepest in the south (the Gorda section) where the plate is youngest, and shallows to the north across southern Oregon. There is a gap in the slab beneath northern Oregon, which appears to correlate with the geochemistry of the arc magmas. The slab is then visible again beneath Washington. We also constrain mantle flow paths using shear-wave splitting measurements at the offshore and onshore seismic stations. Beneath the Juan de Fuca plate the flow is sub-parallel to the motion of the plate. However, beneath the Gorda section of the Juan de Fuca place the flow is sub-parallel to the motion of the Pacific plate, not the Juan de Fuca plate. We are thus beginning to image a complex mantle flow pattern that may also play a role in the observed segmentation.

  18. Petrology of the crossite schist from Fru\\vska Gora Mts (Yugoslavia), relic of a subducted slab of the Tethyan oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragan; Marchig, Vesna; Stevan, Karamata

    1995-11-01

    The mineral assemblage formed during the main stage of metamorphic recrystallization in the crossite schist from the Fru\\vska Gora Mts corresponds to the epidote-blueschist subfacies or high- T epidote-bearing segment of blueschist facies ( P = 7-9 kbar and T = ± 400 °C). Geochemical investigations indicate a primary alkaline character of the crossite schist, which suggests a volcanic arc or mid ocean ridge basalt tectonic setting. These rocks most probably represent a small relic of the former Mezozoic Tethyan oceanic crust, a discrete slice of mafic rocks which was metamorphosed under subducting conditions in the Early Cretaceous.

  19. Lunar sample studies. [breccias basalts, and anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Lunar samples discussed and the nature of their analyses are: (1) an Apollo 15 breccia which is thoroughly analyzed as to the nature of the mature regolith from which it derived and the time and nature of the lithification process, (2) two Apollo 11 and one Apollo 12 basalts analyzed in terms of chemistry, Cross-Iddings-Pirsson-Washington norms, mineralogy, and petrography, (3) eight Apollo 17 mare basalts, also analyzed in terms of chemistry, Cross-Iddings-Pirsson-Washington norms, mineralogy, and petrography. The first seven are shown to be chemically similar although of two main textural groups; the eighth is seen to be distinct in both chemistry and mineralogy, (4) a troctolitic clast from a Fra Mauro breccia, analyzed and contrasted with other high-temperature lunar mineral assemblages. Two basaltic clasts from the same breccia are shown to have affinities with rock 14053, and (5) the uranium-thorium-lead systematics of three Apollo 16 samples are determined; serious terrestrial-lead contamination of the first two samples is attributed to bandsaw cutting in the lunar curatorial facility.

  20. How thick are lunar mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.

    1978-01-01

    It is argued that De Hon's estimates of the thickness of lunar mare basalts, made by analyzing 'ghost' craters on mare surfaces, were inflated as the result of the crater morphometric data of Pike (1977) to reconstruct rim heights of degraded craters. Crater rim heights of 82 randomly selected highland craters of various states of degradation were determined, and median rim height was compared to that of corresponding fresh impact structures. Results indicate that the thickness estimates of De Hon may be reduced by a factor of 2, and that the total volume of mare basalt produced throughout lunar history could be as little as 1-2 million cubic kilometers. A survey of geochemical and petrographic evidence indicates that lateral transport of regolith components over distances of much greater than 10 km is relatively inefficient; it is suggested that vertical mixing of a highland substrate underlying the basaltic fill may have had a primordial role in generating the observed mare width distributions and high concentrations of exotic components in intrabasin regoliths.

  1. The origin of Cenozoic basalts from central Inner Mongolia, East China: The consequence of recent mantle metasomatism genetically associated with seismically observed paleo-Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Pengyuan; Niu, Yaoling; Sun, Pu; Ye, Lei; Liu, Jinju; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yue-xing; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-01-01

    We present new major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope data on Cenozoic basalts from central Inner Mongolia (CIM) in eastern China to study the origin of the incompatible-element enriched component in these basalts by testing whether or not the paleo-Pacific plate lying in the mantle transition zone beneath eastern China is the immediate cause. The Cenozoic CIM basalts have a large variation in major element, trace element and isotope compositions. Fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene can readily explain much of the major element compositional variation, while trace element and isotope ratio variation largely reflect source heterogeneities and source histories. The variably low 87Sr/86Sr, high εNd, high εHf and elevated ratios of high field strength element over large ion lithophile element (HFSE/LILE, e.g., Nb/U, Nb/La) indicate that the CIM basalts are of asthenospheric origin, which is characterized by mixing between DMM and EM1. However, the CIM basalts are enriched in incompatible elements and enriched in the progressively more incompatible elements (e.g., variably high [La/Sm]N = 1.66-3.38), suggesting that the magma source(s) must have been enriched prior to the major episode of the magmatism. Participation of subducted ocean crust in the mantle source region of these basalts is recognized, but cannot be the major source material because the subducted ocean crust is expectedly too depleted in incompatible elements (e.g., [La/Sm]N ≪ 1) to produce magmas highly enriched in incompatible elements with [La/Sm]N ≫ 1. With the new data, we consider that low mass fraction (low-F) melt metasomatism in the seismic low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath eastern China as the most likely process to generate incompatible-element enriched source(s) for mantle melts parental to the Cenozoic CIM basalts. The low-F metasomatic agent most likely resulted from dehydration melting of the transition-zone paleo-Pacific slab, which has been taking place

  2. Depths and Temperatures of Mantle Melt Extraction in the Southern Cascadia Subduction Zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C.; Grove, T. L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Carlson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Plagioclase and spinel lherzolite thermometry and barometry applied to an extensive suite of <10.5 Ma primitive basaltic lavas (most Mg#>0.70) containing variable H2O contents (<<1 to ~4 wt%) suggests these melts were extracted from the mantle at 40-58 km below Oregon's High Lava Plains, 41-51 km below California's Modoc Plateau, and 37-60 km below the central-southern Cascades volcanic arc. Of the 155 basalt samples investigated, 33 are calc-alkaline basalts (CAB) and the remainder are high alumina olivine tholeiites (HAOT) or mildly alkaline basalts (MAB). All 33 of the CAB are from the subduction-influenced volcanic centers of Lassen, Mt. Shasta, Three Sisters, Medicine Lake, and Newberry in the present-day Cascades arc or rear arc. All of these volcanic centers also erupted HAOT or MAB. Olivine-plagioclase hygrometry for a representative subset of the 20 CAB from Newberry indicates they contained ~4 wt% H2O prior to eruption. Water contents for the remaining CAB were approximated using the H2O-melt composition scaling relationship developed by Ruscitto et al. [2010, EPSL 298(1-2), 153-161] yielding ≤1-3 wt% H2O. The calculated pressures and temperatures of last equilibration with mantle lherzolite for all 33 CAB were adjusted for the effects of H2O following Till et al. [2012, JGR 117(B06206)] and are on average 50×15°C (1s) cooler and 1.65×0.27 km deeper than their calculated temperatures and depths for anhydrous conditions. The minimum depths of melt extraction calculated for all basalts considered (including the CAB) are close to the Moho, as determined by regional geophysical studies. Thus, our results suggest that the geophysical Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary are located in close proximity to one another (within 5-10 km). The basalts originated at 1185-1383°C and the presence of both wet and dry basalts that were generated at such different temperatures at similar times, depths, and geographic locations in the Cascades arc and rear arc

  3. Mid-Tertiary magmatism in western Big Bend National Park, Texas, U.S.A.: Evolution of basaltic source regions and generation of peralkaline rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Don F.; Ren, Minghua; Adams, David T.; Tsai, Heng; Long, Leon E.

    2012-07-01

    then descended as magmatism died out. Variation within Burro Mesa Rhyolite is best explained by fractional crystallization of a mix of alkali feldspar, fayalite and Fe-Ti oxide. Comendite of the Burro Mesa Rhyolite evolved from trachyte as batches in relatively small independent magma systems, as suggested by widespread occurrence of trachytic magma enclaves within Burro Mesa lava and results of fractionation modeling. Trachyte may have been derived by fractional crystallization of intermediate magma similar to that erupted as part of Bee Mountain Basalt. ɛNdt values of trachyte lava (0.745) and two samples of Burro Mesa Rhyolite (- 0.52 and 1.52) are consistent with the above models. In all, ~ 5 wt.% comendite may be produced from 100 parts of parental trachybasalt. Negative Nb anomalies in some Bee Mountain, Tule Mountain Trachyte and Burro Mesa incompatible element plots may have been inherited from lithospheric mantle rather than from a descending plate associated with subduction. Late phase basalts lack such a Nb anomaly, as do all of our Alamo Creek analyses but one. Even if some slab fluids partially metasomatized lithospheric mantle, these igneous rocks are much more typical of continental rifts than continental arcs. We relate Big Bend magmatism to asthenospheric mantle upwelling accompanying foundering of the subducted Farallon slab as the convergence rate between the North American and the Farallon plates decreased beginning about 50 Ma. Upwelling asthenosphere heated the base of the continental lithosphere, producing the Alamo Creek series; magmatism climaxed with main phase magmatism generated within middle continental lithosphere, and then, accompanying regional extension, gradually died out by 18 Ma.

  4. The petrology, phase relations and tectonic setting of basalts from the taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand and the Kermadec Island arc - havre trough, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John A.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Graham, Ian J.; Peter Kokelaar, B.; Cole, James W.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    1990-10-01

    Volcanism in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) and the Kermadec arc-Havre Trough (KAHT) is related to westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Indo-Australian Plate. The tectonic setting of the TVZ is continental whereas in KAHT it is oceanic and in these two settings the relative volumes of basalt differ markedly. In TVZ, basalts form a minor proportion (< 1%) of a dominant rhyolite (97%)-andesite association while in KAHT, basalts and basaltic andesites are the major rock types. Neither the convergence rate between the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates nor the extension rates in the back-arc region or the dip of the Pacific Plate Wadati-Benioff zone differ appreciably between the oceanic and continental segments. The distance between the volcanic front and the axis of the back-arc basin decreases from the Kermadec arc to TVZ and the distance between trench and volcanic front increases from around 200 km in the Kermadec arc to 280 km in TVZ. These factors may prove significant in determining the extent to which arc and backarc volcanism in subduction settings are coupled. All basalts from the Kermadec arc are porphyritic (up to 60% phenocrysts) with assemblages generally dominated by plagioclase but with olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. A single dredge sample from the Havre Trough back arc contains olivine and plagioclase microphenocrysts in glassy pillow rind and is mildly alkaline (< 1% normative nepheline) contrasting with the tholeiitic nature of the other basalts. Basalts from the TVZ contain phenocryst assemblages of olivine + plagioclase ± clinopyroxene; orthopyroxene phenocrysts occur only in the most evolved basalts and basaltic andesites from both TVZ and the Kermadec Arc. Sparsely porphyritic primitive compositions (Mg/(Mg+Fe 2) > 70) are high in Al 2O 3 (>16.5%), and project in the olivine volume of the basalt tetrahedron. They contain olivine (Fo 87) phenocrysts and plagioclase (> An 60) microphenocrysts. These magmas have ratios of

  5. Subduction Stability: Lithospheric Strength and Roll-back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P. I.; Lavier, L.; Grand, S.

    2007-12-01

    In exploring the issue of subduction zone stability, we ran a series of simulations representing subduction systems consisting of simple 2D representations of oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath continental lithosphere. Our modelling software utilizes temperature dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheologies as well as a few proxies for significant chemical processes such as ecologitization and hydration. With externally imposed convergence rates, these models evolve from a contrived subduction initiation state to "normal-looking" subduction within approximately 10 million years. The simulations are then allowed to continue to evolve for up to 30 million more years. From our early results, we note that while most systems start with similar subduction geometries, they may deviate from each other over time. Notably, subduction initiated at "cooler" (and therefore stronger) junctures tend to form very stable subduction zones which maintain normal-looking geometries throughout the life of the simulation. However, subduction initiated at warmer margins tend to result in slab rollback relatively quickly. Systems with junctures of intermediate temperature also tend to subduct stably for a substantial amount of time, yet they too eventually result in rollback as the subducting slab entrains and removes some of the cooler lithosphere near the juncture, allowing hotter asthenospheric material into the contact region between the plates. The hot, low-viscosity material sharply reduces the fluid-dynamically derived suction force that partially supports the stable subduction geometry, facilitating the retreat of the subducting slab as well as the rifting of the over-riding slab. These simulations incorporate a variety of approximations and assumptions which may not reflect the actual conditions within the Earth. However, they do offer a chance to observe how a system that at least appears geometrically similar to observed Earth systems may behave when subjected to varying

  6. Deep view of the Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault in the Calabrian Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maesano, Francesco Emanuele; Tiberti, Mara Monica; Basili, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The Calabrian Subduction Zone plays a key role in the evolution of the central Mediterranean in the framework of the convergence between Africa and Europe. Here, the remnants of the World's oldest oceanic crust form a narrow NW-dipping slab passively subducting beneath the Calabrian Arc. Recently published high-resolution seismic profiles and bathymetric data of the western Ionian Sea highlight the presence of a NNW-SSE faulting system connected with a series of Plio-Pleistocene syn-tectonic basins. These features are correlated with the recent activity of a major NNW-SSE deformation zone confining the active subduction to the SW and interpreted as a Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault. The goal of this work is to jointly reconstruct the geometry of the STEP fault and the subduction interface in its surroundings. We use multichannel seismic profiles acquired in the southwestern part of the Calabrian accretionary wedge to focus on the STEP fault geometry at depth and to analyse its relationships with shallow deformation features. The quantitative analysis and enhancement of seismic data provided an accurate image of the internal structure of the accretionary wedge at various depths, showing growth strata in the Plio-Pleistocene succession and major discontinuities in the lower crust. Our results depict a main subvertical, slightly east-dipping, lithospheric fault cutting the oceanic crust down to the Moho, and a rich set of associated secondary synthetic and antithetic faults. This picture also provides new insights on the STEP fault propagation mechanism. In addition, the tridimensional correlation of the STEP fault occurrences in various seismic profiles provides a preliminary scheme of its segmentation and highlights the relationships of this master fault with other main structural elements of the Calabrian Arc and Eastern Sicily, including some of the faults deemed to be responsible for major historical earthquakes in the area.

  7. Identification of Mineral Phases on Basalt Surfaces by Imaging SIMS.

    PubMed

    Ingram, J C; Groenewold, G S; Olson, J E; Gianotto, A K; McCurry, M O

    1999-05-01

    A method for the identification of mineral phases on basalt surfaces utilizing secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with imaging capability is described. The goal of this work is to establish the use of imaging SIMS for characterization of the surface of basalt. The basalt surfaces were examined by interrogating the intact basalt (heterogeneous mix of mineral phases) as well as mineral phases that have been separated from the basalt samples. Mineral separates from the basalt were used to establish reference spectra for the specific mineral phases. Electron microprobe and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used as supplemental techniques for providing additional characterization of the basalt. Mineral phases that make up the composition of the basalt were identified from single-ion images which were statistically grouped. The statistical grouping is performed by utilizing a program that employs a generalized learning vector quantization technique. Identification of the mineral phases on the basalt surface is achieved by comparing the mass spectra from the statistically grouped regions of the basalt to the mass spectral results from the mineral separates. The results of this work illustrate the potential for using imaging SIMS to study adsorption chemistry at the top surface of heterogeneous mineral samples.

  8. Making rhyolite in a basalt crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has long attracted the attention of those concerned with the origin of rhyolitic magmas and indeed of granitic continental crust, because it presents no alternative for such magmas other than deriving them from a basaltic source. Hydrothermally altered basalt has been identified as the progenitor. The fact that rhyolite erupts as pure liquid requires a process of melt-crustal separation that is highly efficient despite the high viscosity of rhyolite melt. Volcanoes in Iceland are foci of basaltic magma injection along the divergent plate boundary. Repeated injection produces remelting, digestion, and sometimes expulsion or lateral withdrawal of material resulting in a caldera, a "crucible" holding down-dropped and interlayered lava flows, tephras, and injected sills. Once melting of this charge begins, a great deal of heat is absorbed in the phase change. Just 1% change in crystallinity per degree gives a melt-present body an effective heat capacity >5 times the subsolidus case. Temperature is thus buffered at the solidus and melt composition at rhyolite. Basalt inputs are episodic ("fires") so likely the resulting generation of rhyolite by melting is too. If frequent enough to offset cooling between events, rhyolite melt extractions will accumulate as a rhyolite magma reservoir rather than as discrete crystallized sills. Evidently, such magma bodies can survive multiple firings without themselves erupting, as the 1875 eruption of Askja Caldera of 0.3 km3 of rhyolite equilibrated at 2-km depth without previous leakage over a ten-millennium period and the surprise discovery of rhyolite magma at 2-km depth in Krafla suggest. Water is required for melting; otherwise melting cannot begin at a temperature lower than that of the heat source. Because the solubility of water in melt is pressure-dependent and almost zero at surface pressure, there must be a minimum depth at which basalt-induced melting can occur and a rhyolite reservoir sustained. In practice, the

  9. Development of Forearcs of Intraoceanic Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, Neil

    1983-02-01

    The uplifted Costa Rican forearc landward of the Middle America Trench and the Mariana forearc drilled on IPOD leg 60 both lack the thick clastic sequences, complex deformation, and abundant evidence of accretion which characterize more widely known forearcs that border continents. Both regions contain significant in situ accumulations of pelagic and hemipelagic sediments in place of thick trench and trench slope basin sequences composed of terrigenous turbidites. The Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica contains no significant melange terranes. Deformation of the mafic igneous basement and its thin cover of pelagic, hemipelagic, and first-cycle volcanogenic material is mild overall, with discrete zones of intense deformation disrupting otherwise well-preserved stratigraphic sections. Intraoceanic subduction zones lacking longitudinal trench feed are sites of little or no accretion of sediments, and recently suggested experimental and theoretical models of subduction zone processes involving flow melanges are inappropriate for intraoceanic forearcs. Intraoceanic forearcs generally lack high-grade exotic components such as blueschist and eclogite tectonically incorporated as blocks in lower-grade matrix, although uplift and erosion of the forearc basement may provide detritus of amphibolite and ultramafic rock to the trench and trench slope.

  10. Driving forces: Slab subduction and mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    Mantle convection is the mechanism ultimately responsible for most geological activity at Earth's surface. To zeroth order, the lithosphere is the cold outer thermal boundary layer of the convecting mantle. Subduction of cold dense lithosphere provides tha major source of negative buoyancy driving mantle convection and, hence, surface tectonics. There are, however, importnat differences between plate tectonics and the more familiar convecting systems observed in the laboratory. Most important, the temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of mantle rocks makes the thermal boundary layer mechanically strong, leading to nearly rigid plates. This strength stabilizes the cold boundary layer against small amplitude perturbations and allows it to store substantial gravitational potential energy. Paradoxically, through going faults at subduction zones make the lithosphere there locally weak, allowing rapid convergence, unlike what is observed in laboratory experiments using fluids with temperature dependent viscosities. This bimodal strength distribution of the lithosphere distinguishes plate tectonics from simple convection experiments. In addition, Earth has a buoyant, relatively weak layer (the crust) occupying the upper part of the thermal boundary layer. Phase changes lead to extra sources of heat and bouyancy. These phenomena lead to observed richness of behavior of the plate tectonic style of mantle convection.

  11. Earthquake nucleation in weak subducted carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzawski, Robert M.; Stipp, Michael; Niemeijer, André R.; Spiers, Christopher J.; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean-floor carbonate- and clay-rich sediments form major inputs to subduction zones, especially at low-latitude convergent plate margins. Therefore, knowledge of their frictional behaviour is fundamental for understanding plate-boundary earthquakes. Here we report results of mechanical tests performed on simulated fault gouges prepared from ocean-floor carbonates and clays, cored during IODP drilling offshore Costa Rica. Clay-rich gouges show internal friction coefficients (that is, the slope of linearized shear stress versus normal stress data) of μint = 0.44 - 0.56, irrespective of temperature and pore-fluid pressure (Pf). By contrast, μint for the carbonate gouge strongly depends on temperature and pore-fluid pressure, with μint decreasing dramatically from 0.84 at room temperature and Pf = 20 MPa to 0.27 at T = 140 °C and Pf = 120 MPa. This effect provides a fundamental mechanism of shear localization and earthquake generation in subduction zones, and makes carbonates likely nucleation sites for plate-boundary earthquakes. Our results imply that rupture nucleation is prompted by a combination of temperature-controlled frictional instability and temperature- and pore-pressure-dependent weakening of calcareous fault gouges.

  12. Effect of Fluorine on Near-Liquidus Phase Equilibria of Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, J.; Wood, J.; Le, L.; Dasgupta, R.; Shimizu, N.; Treiman, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Volatile species, such as H2O, CO2, F, and Cl, are important in the generation and differentiation of basaltic melts. Thus far, experimental work has focused primarily on the effects of water and carbon dioxide on basalt crystallization, liquid-line of descent, and mantle melting [e.g., 1, 2]; the effects of halogens have received far less attention [3-4]. However, melts in the planetary interiors can have non-negligible chlorine and fluorine concentrations. Here, we explore the effects of fluorine on near-liquidus phase equilibria of a basalt. We have conducted nominally anhydrous piston cylinder experiments, in graphite capsules, at 0.6 - 1.5 GPa on an Fe-rich model basalt composition. 1.75 wt% fluorine was added to the starting mix as AgF2. Fluorine abundances in the experimental glass were measured by SIMS, and major element abundances in glass and minerals were analyzed by EPMA. Nominally volatile free experiments yield liquidus temperatures from 1330 °C at 0.8 GPa to 1400 °C at 1.6 GPa with an olivine (Fo72)-pyroxene (En68)-liquid multiple saturation at 1.25 GPa and 1375°C. The F-bearing experiments yield liquidus temperatures from 1260 °C at 0.6 GPa to 1305 °C at 1.5 GPa with an olivine (Fo66)-pyroxene (En64)-MSP at 1 GPa and 1260°C. This shows that F depresses the basalt liquidus, extends the pyroxene stability field to lower pressure, and forces the liquidus phases to be more Fe-rich. Mineral-melt Fe2+-Mg KD calculated for both pyroxenes and olivines increase with increasing F content of the melt. Therefore, we infer that F complexes with Mg in the melt and thus increases the melt’s silica activity, depresses the liquidus, and changes the composition of the crystallizing minerals. Our study demonstrates that on a weight percent basis, the effect of fluorine is similar to those of H2O [1] and Cl [3] on freezing point depression of basalts. But on an atomic percent basis, the effect of F on liquidus depression of basalts is 1.5-2 times greater than

  13. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  14. Middle Triassic back-arc basalts from the blocks in the Mersin Mélange, southern Turkey: Implications for the geodynamic evolution of the Northern Neotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayit, Kaan; Bedi, Yavuz; Tekin, U. Kagan; Göncüoglu, M. Cemal; Okuyucu, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    The Mersin Mélange is a tectonostratigraphic unit within the allochthonous Mersin Ophiolitic Complex in the Taurides, southern Turkey. This chaotic structure consists of blocks and tectonic slices of diverse origins and ages set in a clastic matrix of Upper Cretaceous age. In this study, we examine two blocks at two different sections characterized by basaltic lava flows alternating with radiolarian-bearing pelagic sediments. The radiolarian assemblage extracted from the mudstone-chert alternation overlying the lavas yields an upper Anisian age (Middle Triassic). The immobile element geochemistry suggests that the lava flows are predominantly characterized by sub-alkaline basalts. All lavas display pronounced negative Nb anomalies largely coupled with normal mid-ocean basalt (N-MORB)-like high field strength element (HFSE) patterns. On the basis of geochemical modelling, the basalts appear to have dominantly derived from spinel-peridotite and pre-depleted spinel-peridotite sources, while some enriched compositions can be explained by contribution of garnet-facies melts from enriched domains. The overall geochemical characteristics suggest generation of these Middle Triassic lavas at an intra-oceanic back-arc basin within the northern branch of Neotethys. This finding is of significant importance, since these rocks may represent the presence of the oldest subduction zone found thus far from the Neotethyan branches. This, in turn, suggests that the rupturing of the Gondwanan lithosphere responsible for the opening of the northern branch of Neotethys should have occurred during the Lower Triassic or earlier.

  15. Effects of Two Subducting Slabs on the Temperature Distribution Along the Subduction Faults in the Kanto Region, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; He, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the thermal effects of subduction of two oceanic plates in the Kanto region of Japan, using a 3-D numerical thermal model. The Kanto region lies in the forearc of a subduction system, where the Pacific (PAC) plate and the Philippine Sea (PHS) plate subduct beneath the North American (NA) plate. In a typical subduction setting with one subducting slab, the motion of the slab drives solid-state mantle flow in the overlying mantle wedge, and the flow brings in hot mantle from the backarc towards the forearc. In the Kanto region, however, the presence of the PHS plate between the overlying NA plate and the subducting PAC plate prevents a typical mantle flow pattern. We developed a 3-D thermal model for the Kanto region to simulate the pattern of mantle wedge flow and to quantify its effect on the thermal structure. The model incorporates realistic slab geometries that were delineated from seismological studies. Mantle wedge flow between the PHS slab and the overlying NA plate is expected to be subdued due to the small space and the relatively slow subduction of the PHS slab. We simplify the model by incorporating the results of a 2-D thermal modeling for the subduction of the PHS slab as part of boundary conditions in the 3-D model to approximate the effect of the subdued mantle wedge flow and the subduction of the PHS slab. We use geophysical observations as constraints for the 3-D thermal model and estimate the temperature distributions along the subduction plate interfaces. The model predicts a particularly cold condition in the central part of the Kanto region where the PAC and PHS slabs are in contact with one another, consistent with the observed deeper extent of seismicity along the subduction faults compared to the neighboring regions.

  16. Link between ridge subduction and gold mineralization in southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, Peter J.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Goldfarb, Richard; Snee, Lawrence W.; Taylor, Cliff D.

    1995-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals that turbidite-hosted gold deposits in the southern Alaska accretionary prism are the same age as nearby near-trench plutons. These early Tertiary plutons and gold lodes formed above a slab window during subduction of an oceanic spreading center. Ridge subduction is a previously unrecognized tectonic process for the generation of lode gold.

  17. GPS Monitoring of Subduction Zone Deformation in Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The subduction of the Cocos plate beneath Costa Rica is among the highest convergence rates in the world. The high subduction rate and nearness of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica to the Middle America Trench (MAT) provide a unique opportunity to map variations in interseismic strain of the crust above the seismogenic zone in response to variations in seismic coupling.

  18. Re-Os Isotopes Distinguish Crust vs. Slab Inputs to Northern Cascade Arc Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; Gannoun, A.; Nauret, F.; Schiano, P.; Weis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Delineating the relative contributions of mantle, slab, and crust to arc magmas is particularly challenging in the Cascades where the continental crust is juvenile and contrasts little with magmas in traditional radiogenic isotope systems (Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb). The Re-Os isotope system offers a sensitive technique for evaluating these contributions because even young crust has significantly higher Os ratios than the mantle. We analyzed Re-Os isotope ratios in 33 primitive basalts from 9 volcanic centers of the northern Cascade Arc (Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, GVB). Although GVB basalts have mantle-like Sr-Pb-Nd-Hf ratios (Mullen & Weis, 2015, EPSL), the range in 187Os/188Os is very large (0.13-0.99) with [Os] of <1 to 17 ppt. Ten samples of subducting Cascadia Basin sediment and altered Juan de Fuca MORB are associated with high 187Os/188Os (0.68-0.92) and [Os] = 25-132 ppt. The GVB basalts define two groups: Group 1 (Cinder Cone/Mt. Garibaldi, Salal Glacier, Mt. Meager, Indian Pass/Glacier Peak) has low Os isotopic ratios (0.13-0.19), only slightly elevated relative to global mantle wedge peridotites (≤0.16), indicating minimal crustal contamination. Group 1 samples lie on Os-Sr isotope mixing curves indicating variable sediment input to the mantle. Os ratios of Group 2 basalts (Silverthrone, Bridge River, Elaho, Cheakamus, Mt. Baker, Glacier Peak) extend to extremely high values, up to 0.99, and lie on different Os-Sr mixing curves indicating addition of a crustal contaminant. Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic ratios cannot be used to identify this crustal input because Groups 1 and 2 are identical in these isotope systems. Interaction with a mafic underplate from older Cenozoic or accreted Mesozoic arcs is likely, and Re-Os analyses of basement samples (in progress) will provide a test of this hypothesis. This study reveals that most primitive magmas in the Cascades have suffered variable crustal contamination, but only the Re-Os isotope system has the potential to delineate the

  19. How the Ferric Iron Proportion in Basalts Changes Towards the Iceland Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O.; Moussallam, Y.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Murton, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Planetary differentiation has been driven by the Earth's giant convective system, which has been redistributing heat, volatile elements and myriad other chemical species for 4.5 billion years. A key exchange in this transport process is between the mantle and the atmosphere through the volcanic degassing of sulfur, carbon and hydrogen from silicate melts forming in the deep Earth. The speciation and mobility of volatile elements during silicate melting is modulated by the oceanic mantle's oxygen fugacity (fO2), which away from subduction zones has long been considered uniform. However, a recent study has challenged this paradigm with new measurements of ferric iron proportions (Fe3+/Fe) in glasses from mid-ocean ridge basalts (Cottrell & Kelley, 2013). These new results suggest mantle domains containing material recycled from the Earth's surface are more reducing than ambient mantle and contain high concentrations of carbon. The pervasive mantle heterogeneity well documented in other geochemical indices may therefore be systematically associated with changes in oxidation state In this study we have produced a dataset of combined XANES, volatile element (C, S, F, Cl, H, B) and boron isotope analyses of 65 basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland. These samples form a transect from 1000 km south of the Iceland plume to within 300 km of the plume centre, crossing into the zone experiencing the greatest geophysical and geochemical influence from the plume. Accordingly there are major changes in the isotopic and trace element composition of the basalts in this sample set, driven by both an increase in the proportion of recycled oceanic crustal components towards Iceland and a shift to a plume driven flow field. This suite of basalts therefore form an excellent test of the global correlations observed by Cottrell & Kelley (2013), where ferric iron contents anti-correlated with isotopic enrichment, with a high resolution regional dataset. By combining major

  20. H2O release in cold subduction zones: eclogitization vs. lawsonite stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale Brovarone, A.; Groppo, C.; Hetényi, G.; Compagnoni, R.

    2012-04-01

    Transition from blueschist to eclogite facies is considered as a major step of dehydration during subduction of oceanic crust. In cold subduction zones, this critical transitional field is characterized by the stability of lawsonite, which represents the major H2O carrier in HP basaltic rocks. Lawsonite-bearing eclogites are commonly associated with lawsonite-blueschist [1]. This association is commonly referred to prograde (i.e. from blueschist- to eclogite-facies conditions) or retrograde (i.e. from eclogite- to blueschist-facies conditions) incomplete re-equilibration. However, field, microstructural and petrological data indicate that the two assemblages can coexist over a wide PT field. In Alpine Corsica (France), deeply subducted metabasalts are well preserved as lawsonite-bearing eclogite (Law-Ecl) and lawsonite-bearing blueschist (Law-Bs), providing a unique access to these rocks rarely preserved elsewhere. The Corsican Law-Ecl, consisting of omphacite + lawsonite + garnet + phengite + titanite, commonly occur as single undeformed metabasaltic pillows surrounded by Law-Bs. Law-Bs are found as variably deformed metabasaltic pillows locally cross-cut by eclogitic veins and consist of glaucophane + actinolite + lawsonite + garnet + phengite + titanite. Field evidence and microstructures reveal that both Law-Ecl and Law-Bs are stable at the metamorphic peak in the lawsonite-eclogite stability field. Isochemical phase diagrams (pseudosections) calculated in the system MnNKCFMASH for representative Law-Ecl and Law-Bs samples indicate that both lithologies equilibrated at the same conditions of 520 ± 20 °C and 2.3 ± 0.1 GPa, in response of primary differences in the bulk rock compositions, probably acquired during igneous or seafloor metasomatic processes [2]. These PT estimates are comparable with and therefore representative of common PT values registered and preserved by exhumed rocks in HP orogenic belts. Despite the two rocks are omphacite-free (i.e. Law

  1. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts - Evidence of mantle metasomatism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; Bild, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge database, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, and 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and thus are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and interelement variations, it does not appear that the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized, and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the moon suggest that the moon was never totally molten.

  2. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1981-07-03

    The trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. The relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be estimated from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies most of the mantle above the 670 kilometer discontinuity. The source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that lost its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, whereas the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean.

  3. The basaltic volcanism of the Dumisseau Formation in the Sierra de Bahoruco, SW Dominican Republic: A record of the mantle plume-related magmatism of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Joubert, Marc; Abad, Manuel; Pérez-Valera, Fernando; Gabites, Janet

    2016-06-01

    The basaltic volcanism of the Dumisseau Fm in the Sierra de Bahoruco, SW Dominican Republic, offers the opportunity to study, on land, the volcanism of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP). It consists of an at least 1.5 km-thick sequence of submarine basaltic flows and pyroclastic deposits, intruded by doleritic dykes and sills. Three geochemical groups have been identified: low-Ti tholeiites (group I); high-Ti transitional basalts (group II); and high-Ti and LREE-enriched alkaline basalts (group III). These geochemical signatures indicate a plume source for all groups of basalts, which are compositionally similar to the volcanic rocks that make up various CLIP fragments in the northern region of the Caribbean Plate. Trace element modelling indicates that group I magmas are products of 8-20% melting of spinel lherzolite, group II magmas result 4-10% melting of a mixture of spinel and garnet lherzolite, and group III basalts are derived by low degrees (0.05-4%) of melting of garnet lherzolite. Dynamic melting models suggest that basalts represent aggregate melts produced by progressive decompression melting in a mantle plume. There is no compositional evidence for the involvement of a Caribbean supra-subduction zone mantle or crust in the generation of the basalts. Two 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock ages reflect the crystallisation of group II magmas at least in the late Campanian (~ 74 Ma) and the lower Eocene (~ 53 Ma). All data suggest that the Dumisseau Fm is an emerged fragment of the CLIP, which continues southward through the Beata Ridge

  4. Numerical Modeling of Continental Subduction In Apennines Style Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, G.; Burov, E.; Jolivet, L.

    We performed numerical experiments of early stages of continental subduction and slab detachment at the mantle scale, using a 2D thermo-mechanical model which ac- counts for brittle-elasto-ductile behaviour, phase changes and surface processes. Our goal is to study the influence of various parameters on subduction-related orogens (for instance the Apennines) such as density contrasts, convergence rate, thermal state, eclogitisation and intensity of surface processes. The model reproduces the subduction cycle from early stages to penetration of the slab to the 660 km boundary. Depending of the parameters' combination, the evolution of the initiated slab varies from rapid detachment, stagnation of the subduction to stable, oceanic type subduction. An im- portant feature of our experiments is the almost systematic occurrence of underplating of the lower plate crust beneath the upper plate, leading to formation of double-Moho like structures. It appears that the subducted upper crust and sediments may play a role of lubrification layer, like the low friction coefficients used in some previous models, The results show that the main controlling parameter of slab evolution is the density contrast between the slab, subducted crust, and surrounding asthenosphere : for in- stance, when the contrast between the slab and the asthenosphere is larger than 0.02, the sinking rate of the slab is high, and slab detachment can occur within the first mil- lion years after onset of subduction. For smaller contrasts, stable subduction occurs only in case of full crustal metamorphism. The rate of convergence appears to be a second-order parameter, a high rate being able to prevent detachment. The intensity of surface processes predominantly controls the surface topography, and also seems to be able to influence deep processes such as the sinking rate. Thus, the same topography can be maintained for completely different subduction scenarios.

  5. Thermal modeling of the southern Alaska subduction zone: Insight into the petrology of the subducting slab and overlying mantle wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Ponko, S.C.; Peacock, S.M.

    1995-11-10

    This report discusses a two-dimensional thermal model of the southern Alaska subduction zone. This model allows specfic predictions to be made about the pressure-temperature conditions and mineralogy of the subducting oceanic crust and the mantle wedge and assess different petrologic models for the generation of Alaskan arc magmas.

  6. Products of a Subglacial Flood Basalt Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorny, C. F.; White, J. D. L.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Snæbýlisheiði unit, SE Iceland, is a ca. 26 km³ elongate, flat-topped ridge of volcaniclastic debris coupled with and intruded by coherent basalt stretching over 34 km from the eruption site perpendicular to the rift fissure source. It formed from a single subglacial flood basalt eruption during a recent glaciation, and its elongation reflects glacial control on dispersal via the hydraulic potential gradient at the glacier's base, which drove towards the glacier terminus the meltwater+debris formed during the eruption by quenching and fragmentation. High magma discharge and outgassing drove segregation of magma into down-flow propagating intrusions. Edifice growth was mediated by the extent of ice melting, extent and efficiency of meltwater+debris drainage, and hydraulic gradients locally favoring meltwater accumulation. Eruption style reflected magma flux, edifice stability, and accessibility of water to the vent area via flooding or infiltration. Deposits reflect these competing factors in their chaotic internal organization and stratigraphy, limited lithofacies continuity, and diverse particle populations from multiple source vents. Linear growth of the ridge down-gradient from the eruption site was driven primarily by propagation and continuous fragmentation of shoaling intrusions that formed an interconnected intrusive complex with extensive peperites. Advance was along gently meandering and locally bifurcating sub-ice conduits within hyaloclastite with sheet-lobe levees and lobate fingered intrusions. Irregular dikes, apophyses, horns, and tendrils extended from the main body and generated voluminous lapilli tuff and contorticlasts while providing additional heat to the system. Prolonged transport and deposition of debris produced complexly bedded volcaniclastic deposits derived from and intruded by the basalt sheet. The bedding and depositional features of volcaniclastic debris and relationship to their adjacent intrusions suggest transport and

  7. Helium isotope ratios in Easter microplate basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poreda, R. J.; Schilling, J. G.; Craig, H.

    1993-09-01

    He-3/He-4 ratios in Easter Microplate basalt glasses show clear evidence of the effects of a mantle plume. The East Rift of the microplate between 26 and 28 deg S, identified by La/Sm, Sr and Pb isotopes and ridge crest elevation as the region of maximum plume influence, has He-3/He-4 ratios spanning the entire range from 7.5 to 11.7 R(sub A). The Easter Microplate is the only section of the entire East Pacific Rise that is associated with a known `hotspot' track (mantle plume) and has elevated He-3/He-4 ratios. Although most of the West Rift basalts contain MORB helium (8.0 - 8.7 (R sub A)), the basalt closest to the East Rift has an elevated He-3/He-4 ratio (11.3 R(sub A)), consistent with a significant plume component. The diversity in isotopic signatures also indicates that homogenization of isotopic anomalies does not occur, even in this region of `super-fast' spreading. The overall He-3/He-4-Pb-206/Pb-204 and He-3/He-4-Sr-87/Sr-86 trends have positive correlations, although the high between the He and Sr isotope distribution is modeled in the context of a plume source-migrating ridge sink. During channeling of the plume toward the ridge, helium if preferentially lost from the center of the channeled plume, resulting in lower He/Pb and He/Sr concentration ratios in the high He-3/He-4 component. Mixing trajectories in He-Sr isotopic space between a LILE depleted asthenosphere and a variably degassed plume component provide a reasonably good fit to the data and may explain the isotope systematics of plume-ridge interactions in the context of modern theories of plume dynamics.

  8. Subduction of the South-Chile active spreading ridge: a 17 Ma to 3 Ma magmatic record in central Patagonia (western edge of Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Arnaud, Nicolas; Guivel, Christèle; Lagabrielle, Yves; Scalabrino, Bruno; Espinoza, Felipe

    2010-05-01

    The Chile Triple Junction is a natural laboratory to study the interactions between magmatism and tectonics during the subduction of an active spreading ridge beneath a continent. The MLBA plateau (Meseta del Lago Buenos Aires) is one of the Neogene alkali basaltic plateaus located in the back-arc region of the Andean Cordillera at the latitude of the current Chile Triple Junction. The genesis of MLBA can be related with successive opening of slabs windows beneath Patagonia: within the subducting Nazca Plate itself and between the Nazca and Antarctic plates. Detailed 40Ar/39Ar dating and geochemical analysis of bimodal magmatism from the western flank of the MLBA show major changes in the back-arc magmatism which occurred between 14.5 Ma and 12.5 Ma with the transition from calc-alkaline lavas (Cerro Plomo) to alkaline lavas (MLBA) in relation with slab window opening. In a second step, at 4- 3 Ma, alkaline felsic intrusions were emplaced in the western flank of the MLBA coevally with the MLBA basalts with which they are genetically related. These late OIB-like alkaline to transitional basalts were generated by partial melting of the subslab asthenosphere of the subducting Nazca plate during the opening of the South Chile spreading ridge-related slab window. These basalts differentiated with small amounts of assimilation in shallow magma chambers emplaced along transtensional to extensional zones. The close association of bimodal magmatism with extensional tectonic features in the western MLBA is a strong support to the model of Patagonian collapse event proposed to have taken place between 5 and 3 Ma as a consequence of the presence of the asthenospheric window (SCR-1 segment of South Chile Ridge) below the MLBA area.

  9. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einen, J.; Kruber, C.; Øvreås, L.; Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.

    2006-03-01

    Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004). The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group of prosthecate oligotrophic

  10. Vesiculation of basaltic magma during eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Cashman, K.V.; Newman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Vesicle size distributions in vent lavas from the Pu'u "O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea volcano are used to estimate nucleation and growth rates of H2O-rich gas bubbles in basaltic magma nearing the earth's surface (???120 m depth). By using well-constrained estimates for the depth of volatile exsolution and magma ascent rate, nucleation rates of 35.9 events.cm-3.s-1 and growth rates of 3.2 ?? 10-4cm/s are determined directly from size-distribution data. The results are consistent with diffusion-controlled growth as predicted by a parabolic growth law. -from Authors

  11. Plagioclase mineralogy of olivine alkaline basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A geological and mineralogical study of the Potrillo volcanics is reported. The investigation consisted first of field mapping to establish and identify the different rock types and volcanic features in order to determine the geological history. Next, samples were collected and analyzed petrographically to determine suitable rocks from the various stratigraphic units for study of plagioclase. Samples selected for further study were crushed and the plagioclase extracted for the determination of composition and structural state. These results were then related to the petrology and crystallization of the basalt.

  12. The nomenclature of polymict basaltic achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaney, J. S.; Prinz, M.; Harlow, G. E.; Takeda, H.; Nehru, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The system of nomenclature for basaltic achondrite meteorites is discussed, and new classification criteria are proposed. Under the new system, all achondrites are divided intno the broad groupings 'monomict' and 'polymict' by the number of lithologies present. The monomicts are classified structurally as brecciated or unbreccciated and as eucrites, diogenites, or cumulate eucrites. The polymicts are classified using an arbitrary mineral-chemical standard based on the percentage content of diogenite (magnesium orthopyroxenite): diogenites have more than 90 percent, eucrites have less than 10 percent, and all other polymicts area howardites. Tables listing all known achondrites by classification are provided.

  13. Mare basalt genesis - Modeling trace elements and isotopic ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    Various types of mare basalt data have been synthesized, leading to the production of an internally consistent model of the mare basalt source region and mare basalt genesis. The model accounts for the mineralogical, major oxide, compatible siderophile trace element, incompatible trace element, and isotopic characteristics of most of the mare basalt units and of all the pyroclastic glass units for which reliable data are available. Initial tests of the model show that it also reproduces the mineralogy and incompatible trace element characteristics of the complementary highland anorthosite suite of rocks and, in a general way, those of the lunar granite suite of rocks.

  14. Geochemistry of Apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.; Philpotts, J. A.; Nava, D. F.; Schuhmann, S.; Thomas, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Data are presented on major and trace element concentrations determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area, as well as on trace element concentrations determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 could be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88% basalt, 6% KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus), and 6% plagioclase.

  15. Quantifying glassy and crystalline basalt partitioning in the oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Rachael; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2016-04-01

    The upper layers of the oceanic crust are predominately basaltic rock, some of which hosts microbial life. Current studies of microbial life within the ocean crust mainly focus on the sedimentary rock fraction, or those organisms found within glassy basalts while the potential habitability of crystalline basalts are poorly explored. Recently, there has been recognition that microbial life develops within fractures and grain boundaries of crystalline basalts, therefore estimations of total biomass within the oceanic crust may be largely under evaluated. A deeper understanding of the bulk composition and fractionation of rocks within the oceanic crust is required before more accurate estimations of biomass can be made. To augment our understanding of glassy and crystalline basalts within the oceanic crust we created two end-member models describing basalt fractionation: a pillow basalt with massive, or sheet, flows crust and a pillow basalt with sheeted dike crust. Using known measurements of massive flow thickness, dike thickness, chilled margin thickness, pillow lava size, and pillow lava glass thickness, we have calculated the percentage of glassy versus crystalline basalts within the oceanic crust for each model. These models aid our understanding of textural fractionation within the oceanic crust, and can be applied with bioenergetics models to better constrain deep biomass estimates.

  16. An estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Fabbi, Brent P.

    1971-01-01

    Sulfur analyses by X-ray fluorescence give an average content of 107 ppm for 9 samples of fresh subaerially-erupted oceanic basalt and 680 ppm for 38 samples of submarine erupted basalt. This difference is the result of retention of sulfur in basalt quenched on the sea floor and loss of sulfur in basalt by degassing at the surface. The outer glassy part of submarine erupted basalt contains 800??150 ppm sulfur, and this amount is regarded as an estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of the basalt melt from the mantle. The slower cooled interiors of basalt pillows are depleted relative to the rims owing to degassing and escape through surface fractures. Available samples of deep-sea basalts do not indicate a difference in original sulfur content between low-K tholeiite, Hawaiian tholeiite, and alkali basalt. The H2O/S ratio of analyzed volcanic gases is generally lower than the H2O/S ratio of gases presumed lost from surface lavas as determined by chemical differences between pillow rims and surface lavas. This enrichment of volcanic gases in sulfur relative to water may result from a greater degassing of sulfur relative to water from shallow intrusive bodies beneath the volcano. ?? 1971 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Variations in chemical composition of Apollo 15 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical analyses of 30 different Apollo 15 mare basalts were examined to evaluate the effects of closure on the pearson moment correlation coefficient. It is shown possible to describe the Apollo 15 mare basalts in terms of an opaque, an olivine/pyroxene, an anorthite, and a KREEP component, if significant correlations are identified using the expected correlations as null values. Using Q-mode cluster analysis and nonlinear mapping, it is possible to recognize three groups of the mare basalts, groups 1 and 2 belonging to the olivine normative basalt cluster and group 3 to the quartz normative cluster.

  18. Deformation and faulting of subduction overriding plate caused by a subducted seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Min; Lin, Jian

    2016-09-01

    We conducted numerical experiments to simulate elastoplastic deformation of the overriding plate caused by a subducted seamount. Calculations revealed development of a distinct pair of fault-like shear zones, including a landward dipping forethrust fault initiated from the seamount top and a seaward dipping backthrust fault from the landward base of the seamount. Significant dome-shaped surface uplift was predicted above the thrust faults. Lesser-developed seaward dipping backthrust faults were calculated to develop under certain conditions. The overriding plate was calculated to deform in two stages: In Stage I, elastic deformation leads to the formation of fault-like shear zones. After major faults have cut through the entire plate, plastic deformation on faults dominates Stage II. On the subduction interface, compressional normal stress was calculated to increase on the landward leading flank of the seamount and decrease on the seaward trailing flank. These changes, together with associated stress singularities at seamount edges, could affect earthquake processes.

  19. East Mariana Basin tholeiites: Cretaceous intraplate basalts or rift basalts related to the Ontong Java plume?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castillo, P.R.; Pringle, M.S.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns suggest the presence of Jurassic oceanic crust in a large area in the western Pacific that includes the East Mariana, Nauru and Pigafetta Basins. Sampling of the igneous crust in this area by the Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) allows direct evaluation of the age and petrogenesis of this crust. ODP Leg 129 drilled a 51 m sequence of basalt pillows and massive flows in the central East Mariana Basin. 40Ar 39Ar ages determined in this study for two Leg 129 basalts average 114.6 ?? 3.2 Ma. This age is in agreement with the Albian-late Aptian paleontologic age of the overlying sediments, but is distinctively younger than the Jurassic age predicted by magnetic anomaly patterns in the basin. Compositionally, the East Mariana Basin basalts are uniformly low-K tholeiites that are depleted in highly incompatible elements compared to moderately incompatible ones, which is typical of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) erupted near hotspots. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of the tholeiites ( 87Sr 86Srinit = 0.70360-0.70374; 143Nd 144Ndinit = 0.512769-0.512790; 206Pb 204Pbmeas = 18.355-18.386) also overlap with some Indian Ocean Ridge MORB, although they are distinct from the isotopic compositions of Jurassic basalts drilled in the Pigafetta Basin, the oldest Pacific MORB. The isotopic compositions of the East Mariana Basin tholeiites are also similar to those of intraplate basalts, and in particular, to the isotopic signature of basalts from the nearby Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus. The East Mariana Basin tholeiites also share many petrologic and isotopic characteristics with the oceanic basement drilled in the Nauru Basin at DSDP Site 462. In addition, the new 110.8 ?? 1.0 Ma 40Ar 39Ar age for two flows from the bottom of Site 462 in the Nauru Basin is indistinguishable from the age of the East Mariana Basin flows. Thus, while magnetic anomaly patterns predict that the igneous

  20. Viscosity of fluids in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Audétat, Andreas; Keppler, Hans

    2004-01-23

    The viscosities of aqueous fluids with 10 to 80 weight percent dissolved silicates have been measured at 600 degrees to 950 degrees C and 1.0 to 2.0 gigapascals by in situ observation of falling spheres in the diamond anvil cell. The viscosities at 800 degrees C range from 10(-4) to 10(0.5) pascal seconds. The combination of low viscosities with a favorable wetting angle makes silicate-rich fluid an efficient agent for material transport at low-volume fractions. Our results therefore suggest that there may be a direct relationship between the position of the volcanic front and the onset of complete miscibility between water and silicate melt in the subducting slab.

  1. The fate of metaclinopyroxenite during serpentinite subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, J. A.; Gómez-Pugnaire, M. T.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, V.; Garrido, C. J.; Marchesi, C.

    2012-04-01

    Subduction of the partially hydrated section of the lithosphere is widely accepted as the major water carrier to sub-arc depths. Geodynamic models and geochemical mass balances assume that this section is comprised almost exclusively by the maximum hydrated counterpart of harzburgite, i.e. antigorite-serpentinite. The common wisdom gained through the study of oceanic and continental lithospheric sequences indicates, however, that this assumption is an oversimplification and that the widespread occurrence of other lithologies, such as clinopyroxenites, should not be disregarded. It is obvious, however, that the role of these non-conventional lithologies in the subduction factory will also depend on their ability to record hydration and dehydration reactions. Here we report the textural and mineral assemblage evolution of clinopyroxene-tremolite bearing serpentinite, metaclinopyroxenite bodies and associated diopside-chlorite schists interlayered in serpentinites from the Cerro del Almirez (Betic Cordillera, Spain), the only place known where the high-pressure antigorite dehydration front is preserved (Trommsdorff et al., 1998; Padrón-Navarta et al., 2011). Cpx-Tr serpentinite bodies are unevenly distributed at the decametric scale in the serpentinite sequence and occurs as isoclinally foliated layers. Tremolite in these rocks was formed by the reaction: antigorite + diopside = tremolite + olivine + fluid [1] These rocks have been traditionally interpreted as strongly dismembered clinopyroxenite layers finely intermixed at the cm-scale with serpentinite. The following observations regarding the relationship between metaclinopyroxenite bodies and diopside-chlorite schists are, however, against this hypothesis. Detailed observations in almost undeformed coarse grained (cm-sized) metaclinopyroxenite bodies show that incipient transformation of mantle clinopyroxene occurs along former exsolution lamellae by the reaction: clinopyroxene + fluid = diopside + chlorite [2

  2. Multiple melting stages and refertilization as indicators for ridge to subduction formation: The New Caledonia ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Marc; Picard, Christian; Guillot, Stéphane; Chauvel, Catherine; Cluzel, Dominique; Meffre, Sébastien

    2010-03-01

    The origin of the New Caledonia ophiolite (South West Pacific), one of the largest in the world, is controversial. This nappe of ultramafic rocks (300 km long, 50 km wide and 2 km thick) is thrust upon a smaller nappe (Poya terrane) composed of basalts from mid-ocean ridges (MORB), back arc basins (BABB) and ocean islands (OIB). This nappe was tectonically accreted from the subducting plate prior and during the obduction of the ultramafic nappe. The bulk of the ophiolite is composed of highly depleted harzburgites (± dunites) with characteristic U-shaped bulk-rock rare-earth element (REE) patterns that are attributed to their formation in a forearc environment. In contrast, the origin of spoon-shaped REE patterns of lherzolites in the northernmost klippes was unclear. Our new major element and REE data on whole rocks, spinel and clinopyroxene establish the abyssal affinity of these lherzolites. Significant LREE enrichment in the lherzolites is best explained by partial melting in a spreading ridge, followed by near in-situ refertilization from deeper mantle melts. Using equilibrium melting equations, we show that melts extracted from these lherzolites are compositionally similar to the MORB of the Poya terrane. This is used to infer that the ultramafic nappe and the mafic Poya terrane represent oceanic lithosphere of a single marginal basin that formed during the late Cretaceous. In contrast, our spinel data highlights the strong forearc affinities of the most depleted harzburgites whose compositions are best modeled by hydrous melting of a source that had previously experienced depletion in a spreading ridge. The New Caledonian boninites probably formed during this second stage of partial melting. The two melting events in the New Caledonia ophiolite record the rapid transition from oceanic accretion to convergence in the South Loyalty Basin during the Late Paleocene, with initiation of a new subduction zone at or near the ridge axis.

  3. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  4. Evidence for Active Subduction Beneath Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, M.; Malod, J. A.; Rehault, J.; Contrucci, I. M.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Victor, L. M.; Spakman, W.

    2002-12-01

    The Gibraltar arc encompasses the Betic - Rif mountain belts with outward directed thrusting, surrounding a zone of strong Neogene subsidence and crustal thinning in the Western Alboran Sea. The SISMAR marine seismic survey conducted in April 2001 acquired over 3000 km of 360-channel seismic data with a 4.5 km long streamer and 1000 km of wide-angle data recorded by ocean bottom seismometers (OBS), completely spanning the actively deforming region between the margins of Portugal and northwest Morocco. We report on results from this seismic survey which reveal a thick chaotic sedimentary mass west of Gibraltar to be an actively deforming accretionary wedge, with east dipping thrust faults disrupting the seafloor and soleing out to an east dipping decollement. New travel-time tomographic results image a continuous east dipping body with high seismic velocities (i.e. a cold slab of oceanic lithosphere) descending from the Atlantic domain of the Gulf of Cadiz, passing through intermediate depth (60 - 120 km) seismicity beneath the Gibraltar Arc and Western Alboran Sea, and merging with a region of deep focus earthquakes 600 - 660 km below Granada Spain. Together these provide compelling evidence for an active east dipping subduction zone. Slab rollback towards the west provides a plausible mechanism for extension and subsidence in the Alboran Sea, while the associated westward advance of the Gibraltar Arc drives compressional deformation in the accretionary wedge where active mud volcanoes have recently been discovered. Active subduction beneath Gibraltar should be considered as a possible candidate for the source of the destructive Lisbon great earthquake (M 8.5-9) and tsunami of 1755 which ravaged the coast of the Gulf of Cadiz.

  5. Stresses Modelling Across The Andean Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, T.; Rebetsky, Yu.; Goetze, H.-J.

    A tectonophysical model, including geological-geophysical-tectonic structure, phys- ical properties of the medium (density and rheology), and its loading mechanism (boundary conditions on forces and movements) is constructed along a 21S profile. The model stresses and strains produced by separate plate motions and density inho- mogeneities and by their net effect. The inferred results are qualitatively compared with the stress state parameters of the medium, reconstructed from data on the earth- quake centroid moment tensor, and with the available tectonic, geological, and geo- physical data. The orientation analysis of the principal deviatoric axes of maximum compression and extension yields evidence for a few deformation mechanisms that function both along the subducting slab and in the junction zone of the oceanic and continental plates. The inferred intense rearrangement areas of the stress field indicate possible fragmentation zones in the oceanic plate. Focal mechanisms of earthquakes at depths below 70 km yield evidence of over-lithostatic tectonic dilatation; along with mathematical modeling results, this supports the idea of a more rapid motion of the lower denser part of the slab beneath South America as compared with its overlying portions. Plate motions directly control solely the stresses within the subducting slab and around its shallower (above 50 km) parts. The recent tectonics and stresses in the Andean mountain belt are dominated by density inhomogeneities. Stress distribution details caused by density inhomogeneities are shown to correlate well with large-scale geological features. Thus, the Pre-Cordilleran fault zone separating coastal zones from the Andean mountain belt distinctly correlates with the reorientation of the deviatoric compression-extension axes. The entire thickened crust of the belt is under conditions of over-lithostatic dilatation, and the inferred zones of the negative total isotropic pres- sure correlate with local dilatation

  6. Gravity and Flexure Modelling of Subducting Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. A.; Watts, A. B.; SO 215 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    The long-term strength of the lithosphere is determined by its flexural rigidity, which is commonly expressed through the effective elastic thickness, Te. Flexure studies have revealed a dependence of Te on thermal age. In the oceans, loads formed on young (70 Ma) seafloor. In the continents, loads on young (1000 Ma) lithosphere. Recent studies have questioned the relationship of Te with age, especially at subduction zones, where oceanic and continental lithosphere are flexed downwards by up to ~6 km over horizontal distances of up to ~350 km. We have therefore used free-air gravity anomaly and topography profile data, combined with forward and inverse modelling techniques, to re-assess Te in these settings. Preliminary inverse modelling results from the Tonga-Kermadec Trench - Outer Rise system, where the Pacific plate is subducting beneath the Indo-Australian plate, show large spatial variations in Te that are unrelated to age. In contrast to the southern end of the system, where Te is determined by the depth to the 600° C and 900° C isotherms, the northern end of the system shows a reduction in strength. Results also suggest a reduction in Te trenchward of the outer rise that is coincident with a region of pervasive extensional faulting visible in swath bathymetry data. In a continental setting, the Ganges foreland basin has formed by flexure of the Indo-Australian plate in front of the migrating loads of the Himalaya. Preliminary forward modelling results, using the Himalaya as a known surface topographic load, suggest that Te is high - consistent with the great age of Indian cratonic lithosphere. However, results from inverse modelling that solves for unknown loads (vertical shear force and bending moment) show significant scatter and display trade-offs between Te and these driving loads.

  7. Using 40Ar/39Ar ages of intercalated silicic tuffs to date flood basalts: Precise ages for Steens Basalt Member of the Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.; Benson, Thomas R.

    2017-02-01

    To establish causality between flood basalt eruptions and extinction events and global environmental effects recorded by isotopic excursions in marine sediments, highly accurate and precise ages for the flood basalts are required. But flood basalts are intrinsically difficult to date. We illustrate how 40Ar/39Ar feldspar ages for silicic tuffs intercalated with and overlying sections of Steens Basalt, the earliest lavas of the Middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in the northwestern United States, provide high-precision ages that, for the first time, make it possible to resolve age differences with stratigraphic position within a section of these flood lavas. The stratigraphically lowest rhyolitic tuff, a fall deposit, yielded an age of 16.592 ± ± 0.028 Ma (FCs = 28.02 Ma), and the uppermost, the alkali rhyolite ignimbrite Tuff of Oregon Canyon, is 16.468 ± ± 0.014 Ma. The argon and stratigraphic data indicate that Steens Basalt eruptions occurred from ∼16.64 to 16.43 Ma in the southern end of its distribution. We estimate that the Steens Mountain geomagnetic reversal occurred at 16.496 ± ± 0.028 Ma (±0.18 Ma total error). Our estimates of the timing for initiation of volcanism and volumetric eruptive rates do not seem to support volcanic forcing by the initial stages of Columbia River Basalt Group eruptions as an explanation for the abrupt warming and carbonate dissolution at the beginning of the Miocene Climatic Optimum.

  8. Crystal Stratigraphy of Two Basalts from Apollo 16: Unique Crystallization of Picritic Basalt 606063,10-16 and Very-Low-Titanium Basalt 65703,9-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Neal, C. R.; Stevens, R. E.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical survey of Apollo 16 regolith fragments found five basaltic samples from among hundreds of 2-4 mm regolith fragments of the Apollo 16 site. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalt (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria (approx. 200 km). Identification of basaltic samples at the site not from the ancient regolith breccia indicates input of material via lateral transport by post-basin impacts. The presence of basaltic rocklets and glass at the site is not unprecedented and is required to satisfy mass-balance constraints of regolith compositions. However, preliminary characterization of olivine and plagioclase crystal size distributions indicated the sample textures were distinct from other known mare basalts, and instead had affinities to impact melt textures. Impact melt textures can appear qualitatively similar to pristine basalts, and quantitative analysis is required to distinguish between the two in thin section. The crystal stratigraphy method is a powerful tool in studying of igneous systems, utilizing geochemical analyses across minerals and textural analyses of phases. In particular, trace element signatures can aid in determining the ultimate origin of these samples and variations document subtle changes occurring during their petrogenesis.

  9. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These `recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions.

  10. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Routine low-blank chemistry and 0.01-0.04% precision on the ratio 176Hf/177Hf allows study of Hf isotopic variations, generated by beta --decay of 176Lu, in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Normalized to 176Hf/177Hf = 0.7325, 176Hf/177Hf ranges 0.2828-0.2835, based on 24 basalt samples. 176Hf/177Hf is positively correlated with 143Nd/144Nd, and negatively correlated with 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb. Along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse, 176Hf/177Hf increases southwards. The coherence of Hf, Nd and Sr isotopes in the oceanic mantle allows an approximate bulk Earth 176Hf/177Hf of 0.28295 to be inferred from the bulk Earth 143Nd/144Nd. This requires the bulk Earth Lu/Hf to be 0.25, similar to that of the Juvinas eucrite. 60% of the Hf isotopic variation in oceanic basalts occurs among mid-ocean ridge samples. Lu-Hf fractionation probably decouples from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very depleted source regions, with high Lu/Hf, and consequent high 176Hf/177Hf ratios developing in mantle residual from partial melting. (Authors' abstract) -T.R.

  11. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  12. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P. )

    1997-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  13. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1998-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  14. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions.

    PubMed

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-07-28

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These 'recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions.

  15. Is Ishtar Terra a thickened basaltic crust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    1992-01-01

    The mountain belts of Ishtar Terra and the surrounding tesserae are interpreted as compressional regions. The gravity and surface topography of western Ishtar Terra suggest a thick crust of 60-110 km that results from crustal thickening through tectonic processes. Underthrusting was proposed for the regions along Danu Montes and Itzpapalotl Tessera. Crustal thickening was suggested for the entire Ishtar Terra. In this study, three lithospheric models with total thicknesses of 40.75 and 120 km and initial crustal thicknesses of 3.9 and 18 km are examined. These models could be produced by partial melting and chemical differentiation in the upper mantle of a colder, an Earth-like, and a hotter Venus having temperatures of respectively 1300 C, 1400 C, and 1500 C at the base of their thermal boundary layers associated with mantle convection. The effects of basalt-granulite-eclogite transformation (BGET) on the surface topography of a thickening basaltic crust is investigated adopting the experimental phase diagram and density variations through the phase transformation.

  16. The photometry of flat, basaltic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. R.; Meador, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A photometer was developed and successfully operated to obtain photometric measurements on several flat, particulate surfaces of basalt for coplanar scattering geometries. The test materials were two size ranges each of two different basalts with significantly different albedos. The measurements include a range of phase angles from 30 to 80 degrees and were obtained by varying the angles of incidence and emission such that the phase angle remained constant. The data were used elsewhere in the verification of the Meador-Weaver photometric function and are presented here in the form of Minnaert plots. In this form the data offered the first support for the accuracy of the Meador-Weaver photometric function because of a deviation of the data from a straight line trend at larger departures from the mirror point geometry. This trend is predicted by the Meador-Weaver function but not by the Minnaert function. The failure of photometric data to support the Minnaert function was not evident in earlier measurements because of the restriction of planetary data to small departures from the mirror point geometry and to small values of the phase angle.

  17. Kinetics of anorthite dissolution in basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Youxue; Chen, Yang; Xu, Zhengjiu

    2016-04-01

    We report convection-free anorthite dissolution experiments in a basaltic melt at 1280-1500 °C and 0.5 GPa on two different crystallographic surfaces, (1 2 1 bar) and (3 bar 0 2) to investigate dissolution kinetics. The anisotropy of the anorthite dissolution rate along these two surfaces is negligible. Time series experiments at ∼1280 °C show that anorthite dissolution is mainly controlled by diffusion in the melt within experimental uncertainty. Analytical solutions were used to model the dissolution and diffusion processes, and to obtain the diffusivities and the saturation concentrations of the equilibrium-determining component (Al2O3) for anorthite dissolution into the basaltic melt. For the first time, we are able to show the physical and chemical characteristics of quench growth effect on the near-interface melt using high spatial resolution (0.3 μm) EDS analyses. For anorthite (An# ⩾ 90) saturation in a melt with 39-53 wt% SiO2 and ⩽0.4 wt% H2O, the concentration of Al2O3 in wt% depends on temperature as follows:

  18. Identifying recycled ash in basaltic eruptions

    PubMed Central

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pompilio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Deposits of mid-intensity basaltic explosive eruptions are characterized by the coexistence of different types of juvenile clasts, which show a large variability of external properties and texture, reflecting alternatively the effects of primary processes related to magma storage or ascent, or of syn-eruptive modifications occurred during or immediately after their ejection. If fragments fall back within the crater area before being re-ejected during the ensuing activity, they are subject to thermally- and chemically-induced alterations. These ‘recycled' clasts can be considered as cognate lithic for the eruption/explosion they derive. Their exact identification has consequences for a correct interpretation of eruption dynamics, with important implications for hazard assessment. On ash erupted during selected basaltic eruptions (at Stromboli, Etna, Vesuvius, Gaua-Vanuatu), we have identified a set of characteristics that can be associated with the occurrence of intra-crater recycling processes, based also on the comparison with results of reheating experiments performed on primary juvenile material, at variable temperature and under different redox conditions. PMID:25069064

  19. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Diane T; Rutherford, Malcolm J; Jacobsen, Steven D; Hauri, Erik H; Saal, Alberto E

    2013-05-14

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential.

  20. Lithium Isotope Systematics in Azores Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Widom, E.; Qiu, L.; Rudnick, R.; Gelinas, A.; Franca, Z.

    2009-05-01

    Basalts from the Azores archipelago and MORB from the nearby Azores Platform exhibit extreme chemical and isotopic variations attributed to the influence of a heterogeneous mantle plume, with compositions ranging from depleted mantle (DMM) to strong HIMU, EMI and EMII signatures. In order to assess the utility of Li isotopes as a mantle source tracer and to better constrain the origin of heterogeneous mantle beneath the Azores, we have analyzed Li isotopes in a suite of young, fresh, MgO-rich basalts from São Miguel and three Central Group islands including Pico, Faial and Terceira. Despite large variations in radiogenic isotope signatures (e.g. 206Pb/204Pb = 19.3 to 20.1), δ7Li varies only slightly (3.1-4.7‰), and is within the range for global and North Atlantic MORB [1, 2]. More extreme δ7Li values such as those reported previously for some EMII, EMI and HIMU ocean island basalts (-17‰ to +10‰; [3-5]) were not observed. Nevertheless, basalts from the Central Group islands with EMI-type signatures are, on average, slightly heavier in δ7Li than the São Miguel samples, and they exhibit positive correlations with 87Sr/86Sr and negative correlations with 206Pb/204Pb, Nd, and Hf isotopes. Li isotopes do not correlate with indices of fractionation such as MgO, suggesting that the δ7Li correlations with radiogenic isotopes may represent subtle variations in mantle source signatures. Positive and negative correlations of δ7Li with 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, and relatively unradiogenic Os (187Os/188Os = 0.1244-0.1269), may reflect old, slab-fluid metasomatized mantle beneath the Central Group islands. In contrast, δ7Li signatures in the São Miguel basalts do not correlate with radiogenic isotopes. Rather, δ7Li is essentially constant despite extremely high 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb and low ΔɛHf signatures that have been attributed to 3.5 Ga recycled E-MORB or evolved oceanic crust [6; 7]. This suggests either that the São Miguel source

  1. Relamination of mafic subducting crust throughout Earth's history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunder, Ben; van Hunen, Jeroen; Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Earth has likely cooled by several hundred degrees over its history, which has probably affected subduction dynamics and associated magmatism. Today, the process of compositional buoyancy driven upwelling, and subsequent underplating, of subducted materials (commonly referred to as ;relamination;) is thought to play a role in the formation of continental crust. Given that Archean continental crust formation is best explained by the involvement of mafic material, we investigate the feasibility of mafic crust relamination under a wide range of conditions applicable to modern and early Earth subduction zones, to assess if such a process might have been viable in an early Earth setting. Our numerical parametric study illustrates that the hotter, thicker-crust conditions of the early Earth favour the upward relamination of mafic subducting crust. The amount of relaminating subducting crust is observed to vary significantly, with subduction convergence rate having the strongest control on the volume of relaminated material. Indeed, removal of the entire mafic crust from the subducting slab is possible for slow subduction (∼2 cm/yr) under Archean conditions. We also observe great variability in the depth at which this separation occurs (80-120 km), with events corresponding to shallower detachment being more voluminous, and that relaminating material has to remain metastably buoyant until this separation depth, which is supported by geological, geophysical and geodynamical observations. Furthermore, this relamination behaviour is commonly episodic with a typical repeat time of approximately 10 Myrs, similar to timescales of episodicity observed in the Archean rock record. We demonstrate that this relamination process can result in the heating of considerable quantities of mafic material (to temperatures in excess of 900 °C), which is then emplaced below the over-riding lithosphere. As such, our results have implications for Archean subduction zone magmatism, for

  2. Variable sediment flux in generation of Permian subduction-related mafic intrusions from the Yanbian region, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Hongxia; Fan, Weiming; Li, Jingyan; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Miwei

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents petrology, mineralogy, zircon U-Pb ages, and whole-rock major, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of four Permian (273-253 Ma) subduction-related mafic intrusions (including the Qinggoushan and Qianshan gabbros, and the Wangqing and Shuguang diorites) from the Yanbian region, NE China, with aims to understand the role of subducted sediment flux in generation of arc mafic cumulates. These intrusions have mineral assemblages crystallized in water-saturated parental magmas and show variable degrees of crystal accumulation as observed in mafic cumulates in subduction zones. Mass-balance consideration indicates that their parental magmas were calc-alkaline with arc-type trace element features (enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) and depletions in Nb-Ta). They also have Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions, i.e., 87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7029-0.7047, εNd(t) = + 0.9 + 6.8, εHf(t) = + 5.6 + 14.6, similar to modern arc basalts. The parental magmas were likely derived from a mantle wedge variably metasomatized by sediment melt and fluid from the subducting paleo-Asian Oceanic slab. Combined trace elemental and isotopic modeling results suggest that the parental magma of Qinggoushan gabbro was formed through 5-20% melting of the mantle wedge with 1% and 1.5% additions of sediment fluid and sediment melt, respectively; 5-10% melting of the mantle wedge through inputs of 1% sediment fluid and 2% sediment melt produced the Qianshan gabbro; 10-20% melting of the mantle wedge with additions of 1% sediment fluid and 3% sediment melt formed the Wangqing diorite; whereas 5-20% melting of the mantle wedge through an input of 1.5% sediment melt produced the Shuguang diorite. The Hf-Nd isotopic array of the Yanbian Permian mafic intrusions reflected the existence of an Indian Ocean-type mantle, which was isotopically distinct from the Pacific-type mantle during early Paleozoic in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

  3. Evaluation of late Permian mafic magmatism in the central Tibetan Plateau as a response to plume-subduction interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Ma, Chang-Qian; Guo, Pan; Sun, Yang; Gao, Ke; Guo, Yu-Heng

    2016-11-01

    An integrated study of the geochronology, mineralogy, geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope compositions of the upper Permian Yushu mafic rocks in the central Tibetan Plateau (CTP) was conducted to evaluate the interaction between the Emeishan mantle plume and the Paleo-Tethyan subduction system. These mafic rocks can be geochemically subdivided into three groups. Group 1 rocks yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 258 ± 2 Ma. They have relatively high TiO2, FeOt, Nb/Y and high εNd(t) values and display oceanic island basalts (OIB)-like rare earth and trace element patterns, with obvious enrichment of Nb and Ta. Group 2 and 3 rocks yield weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 258 ± 1 Ma and 257 ± 1 Ma, respectively. Both have relatively low TiO2, FeOt, Nb/Y and εNd(t) values and island arc tholeiites (IAT)-like rare earth and trace element patterns with obvious depletion of Nb and Ta. However, the Group 2 rocks have relatively low FeOt/MgO ratios, but high MgO, Mg#, Cr and Ni contents, resembling primitive magmas. They have lower light rare earth element (LREE), Nb, Ti and Zr contents and higher εNd(t) values than the Group 1 rocks. The geochemical and isotopic variations suggest that the Group 1 rocks might be derived from a plume-related mantle source, whereas Group 2 and Group 3 rocks originated from subduction-modified asthenospheric mantle and lithospheric mantle. Moderate degrees of olivine and clinopyroxene fractionation under low oxygen fugacities (fO2) appear to be responsible for the Fe-Ti enrichment in the Group 1 rocks. We propose a model involving plume-subduction interaction to explain the geodynamics and generation of the late Permian mafic magmatism in the CTP. The study region was rifted by the Emeishan mantle plume activity in association with rollback of Longmuco-Shuanghu oceanic lithosphere in late Permian times. Deep melting of the plume source led to the generation of the Group 1 plume-related magmas, whereas shallower melting of the subduction

  4. The alkali basaltic and picritic Magmatism in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin, geochemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Andrei; Ashchepkov, Igor; Rikhvanov, Leonid; Wald, Alexandr

    2015-04-01

    The alkali basalts and picrites are widely distributed within the Minusa depressions. They manifest quite different episodes of the magmatic activity and plumes. Some of them relate to late Devonian which are parallel to magmatism in Vilyui rift and Tungus basin as well as to Agul basaltic plateau in Sayan Foothills and in Kuznetsk Alatau (385 -360 Ma) and are mainly represented by the alkali basalts (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The others are close in time to the Late Devonian kimberlitic basaltic magmatism and camptonite dykes in West Sayan. The Early stage of the Permian -Triassic super plume in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin 250 -254 Ma (Rikhvanov et al., 1991). The major pulse of magmatic activity at 248 -245 MA was not appeared in southern margin. But the latest which is represented in Meimecha province Northern Siberia But the late or new Early Triassic stage at 230 -240 Ma was again manifested by the appearance of the alkali picrite ankaratrite dykes. The later alkaline magmatism in Late Jurassic - Cretaceaus stages which was appeared in the Northern Siberian provinces appeared in Southern Siberia were much less pronounced. The Latest episode of the Mezo- Cenozoic activity (Kutolin, Frolova, 1970; Ashchepkov et al., 1995) in the Kopiev uplift with the abundant mantle xenoliths in magma manifest another stages which possibly is related to the hydrous plumes. The trace elements of the magmas in the Minusa depression show rather high concentration if the incompatible elements in all stages which suggest primary enrichment in the metasomatic components probably due to the ancient subducted related magmatism starting from the Devonian stage (Vorontsov et al., 2013) which had the model ages of about 0.9 Ga (Vrublevskii et al., 2014 ). The high melting stages which should be followed by the depletion and homogenization of the source mantle at the Superplume stage and the erupted volcanic still demonstrated rather high La/Yb rations. An thus the alkali picrite volcanic of

  5. Deformation cycles of subduction earthquakes in a viscoelastic Earth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kelin; Hu, Yan; He, Jiangheng

    2012-04-18

    Subduction zones produce the largest earthquakes. Over the past two decades, space geodesy has revolutionized our view of crustal deformation between consecutive earthquakes. The short time span of modern measurements necessitates comparative studies of subduction zones that are at different stages of the deformation cycle. Piecing together geodetic 'snapshots' from different subduction zones leads to a unifying picture in which the deformation is controlled by both the short-term (years) and long-term (decades and centuries) viscous behaviour of the mantle. Traditional views based on elastic models, such as coseismic deformation being a mirror image of interseismic deformation, are being thoroughly revised.

  6. Early Cretaceous arc volcanic suite in Cebu Island, Central Philippines and its implications on paleo-Pacific plate subduction: Constraints from geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Santosh, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Philippine island arc system is a collage of amalgamated terranes of oceanic, continental and island arc affinities. Here we investigate a volcanic suite in Cebu Island of central Philippines, including basalt, diabase dike, basaltic pyroclastic rock and porphyritic andesite. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology of zircon grains from the porphyritic andesite and pyroclastic rock yielded ages of 126 ± 3 Ma and 119 ± 2 Ma, respectively, indicating an Early Cretaceous age. The age distribution of the detrital zircons from river sand in the area displays a peak at ca. 118 Ma, close to the age of the pyroclastic rock. The early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the central Philippines were previously regarded as parts of ophiolite complexes by most investigators, whereas the Cebu volcanics are distinct from these, and display calc-alkaline affinity and island arc setting, characterized by high LREE/HREE ratios and low HFSE contents. These features are similar to the Early Cretaceous arc basalts in the Amami Plateau and east Halmahera in the northernmost and southernmost West Philippine Basin respectively. Zircon Hf isotopes of the pyroclastic rocks show depleted nature similar to those of the Amami Plateau basalts, implying the subducted Pacific-type MORB as probable source. Zircon Hf isotopes of the porphyritic andesite show slight enrichment relative to that of the pyroclastic rocks and MORB, indicating subducted sediments as a minor end-member in the source. The Hf isotopic compositions of the volcanic rocks are also reflected in the detrital zircons from the river sands. We propose that the volcanic rocks of Cebu Island were derived from partial melting of sub-arc mantle wedge which was metasomatized by dehydration of subducted oceanic crust together with minor pelagic sediments. Within the tectonic environment of Southeast Asia during Early Cretaceous, the volcanic rocks in Cebu Island can be correlated to the subduction of paleo-Pacific plate. The Early Cretaceous

  7. Subduction Channel Thickening and Thinning: Implications for Interplate Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloos, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Reconciling the viscous behavior inferred along the plate interface zone in the subduction channel model with the global variations in subduction zone seismicity is a matter of geodynamic importance. Thermal modeling indicates that where subduction is slow (<2 cm/yr) or the incoming plate is very young (<5 Ma), 300°C temperatures are present at depths as shallow as 20 km. Consequently, intracrystalline creep dominates in the shear zone and earthquakes are limited to shallow depths. Where subduction is fast (> 4 cm/yr), the plate interface zone cools to great depth and interplate earthquakes occur to depths as great as 60 km. Thermal modeling and many petrological observations indicate temperature/depth trajectories near the plate interface can become as cold as 6°C/km. As first emphasized by Uyeda and Kanamori (1979), there is a wide range in the fraction of the plate convergence that manifests itself as thrust-type seismicity at rapidly convergent plate margins. They characterized the end-member behaviors as Mariana-type where only a small fraction of the plate convergence is evident from seismogenic movements and Chilean-type where a large fraction of the plate convergence is accomodated by slip during large earthquakes (M>7.5). Mariana-type margins are sites of subduction erosion because sediment supply is less than channel capacity, the shear zone is thin and shear stresses are high near the inlet. The long-term mechanical behavior of Chilean-type margins is accretionary because sediment supply is greater than channel capacity. Shear stresses are lower where the shear zone is thicker. The association of infrequent large earthquakes with thicker zones of subducting sediment is especially problematic if the build up of large elastic strains is attributed to friction along a planer interface (decollement) within compacting and metamorphosing sediments. The subduction channel concept postulates that the shear from convergence becomes distributed in the subducting

  8. Ambient Tremor, But No Triggered Tremor at the Northern Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiecki, Z.; Schwartz, S. Y.

    2010-12-01

    important factor is Costa Rica’s relatively cool subduction zone structure where temperatures required for the fluid generating basalt/ecloginte reaction are not reached until far below tremor producing depths.

  9. Post-Eocene Subduction Dynamics and Mantle Flow beneath Western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Zhou, Q.; Leonard, T.

    2015-12-01

    Both surface geology and mantle seismic images suggest a complex late Cenozoic history of mantle dynamics over western U.S. We try to understand this history by simulating the Farallon subduction since 40 Ma. Forward subduction models assimilating time dependent seafloor ages, plate kinematics and evolving plate boundaries suggest that the present-day 3D distribution of fast seismic anomalies below western U.S. mostly represent late Cenozoic slabs, which experienced multiple phases of segmentation during subduction because of their young age and small mechanical strength (Liu & Stegman, 2011). A major slab segmentation event occurred around mid-Miocene, with the resulting slab tear and induced asthenosphere upwelling correlating with the Steens-Columbia River flood basalts (SCRB) eruption both in space and in time (Liu & Stegman, 2012). This suggests that a mantle plume is not required for the formation of the SCRB. Segmentation of the Farallon slab generates rapid toroidal flows around the newly formed slab edges beneath the Cascadia arc. These mantle flows may affect both the pattern and composition of arc volcanism through transportation of oceanic asthenosphere material into the mantle wedge. Based on the forward model, we further test the influence of slow seismic anomalies on mantle dynamics. On the one hand, we explicitly input a deep hot anomaly to represent the putative Yellowstone plume. On the other hand, we develop a hybrid scheme that combines the adjoint inverse method with the high-resolution forward simulation approach, so that the present-day mantle seismic structure is entirely consistent with the convection model. Our preliminary results suggest that a hot plume could actively rise up only when it is several hundreds of kilometers away from the slabs, as is the case prior to 20 Ma. Subsequently, the plume is dominated by the surrounding slabs, resulting in an overall downwelling mantle flow. This suggests that a plume might have contributed to

  10. A Mechanical Model for the Michoacan Subduction Zone and Associated Intra-Arc Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Trans-Mexican volcanic belt is a subduction-related arc dissected by a field of seismically active normal faults clustered in its western part. This field of normal faults is an enigmatic feature of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt and the nature of the mechanism driving extension has been the subject of debate for more than 25 years. These faults form en echelon arrays and systems of nested faults aligned parallel to the axis of the volcanic belt with a characteristic width of 20 km. Fault arrays seldom exceed 30 km in length and examples include the Tepic-Zoacalco, Chapala, and Morelia-Acambay fault zones. Moreover, crosscutting relations with basalt flows indicate that these faults started to accrue displacement at 5-6 My during a period of high convergence rate between the North America and Rivera plates. The model consists of a 40 km-thick elastic plate (i.e., the North America plate) sitting on top of Newtonian incompressible fluid (upper mantle) forced in convection along the Wadati-Benioff zone. The plate is allowed to undergo plasticity when deviatoric stresses exceed the Mohr-Coulomb yield strength. The thermal state of the subduction zone is also incorporated in the model, given the strong dependence of the rehology of both mantle and crust on temperature. Boundary conditions of the model are consistent with heat-flow measurements, gravity modeling, convergence rates derived from sea-floor magnetic anomalies, as well as geological and seismological observations. Model shows that extension in the arc is the direct result of subduction due to viscous coupling between tectonic plates. Numerical solutions indicate that positive changes in momentum of the Rivera plate increase viscous drag along the base and leading edge of North America resulting in downward bending of the continental plate. This gives rise to tension 100-200 km inland from the trench in good agreement with the location of the active normal faults of the western Trans-Mexican volcanic

  11. Upper Cretaceous to Holocene magmatism and evidence for transient Miocene shallowing of the Andean subduction zone under the northern Neuquén Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Suzanne M.; Burns, W. Matthew; Copeland, Peter; Mancilla, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Evidence for a Miocene period of transient shallow subduction under the Neuquén Basin in the Andean backarc, and an intermittent Upper Cretaceous to Holocene frontal arc with a relatively stable magma source and arc-to-trench geometry comes from new 40Ar/39Ar, major- and trace-element, and Sr, Pb, and Nd isotopic data on magmatic rocks from a transect at ∼36°–38°S. Older frontal arc magmas include early Paleogene volcanic rocks erupted after a strong Upper Cretaceous contractional deformation and mid-Eocene lavas erupted from arc centers displaced slightly to the east. Following a gap of some 15 m.y., ca. 26–20 Ma mafic to acidic arc-like magmas erupted in the extensional Cura Mallín intra-arc basin, and alkali olivine basalts with intraplate signatures erupted across the backarc. A major change followed as ca. 20–15 Ma basaltic andesite–dacitic magmas with weak arc signatures and 11.7 Ma Cerro Negro andesites with stronger arc signatures erupted in the near to middle backarc. They were followed by ca. 7.2–4.8 Ma high-K basaltic to dacitic hornblende-bearing magmas with arc-like high field strength element depletion that erupted in the Sierra de Chachahuén, some 500 km east of the trench. The chemistry of these Miocene rocks along with the regional deformational pattern support a transient period of shallow subduction that began at ca. 20 Ma and climaxed near 5 Ma. The subsequent widespread eruption of Pliocene to Pleistocene alkaline magmas with an intraplate chemistry in the Payenia large igneous province signaled a thickening mantle wedge above a steepening subduction zone. A pattern of decreasingly arc-like Pliocene to Holocene backarc lavas in the Tromen region culminated with the eruption of a 0.175 ± 0.025 Ma mafic andesite. The northwest-trending Cortaderas lineament, which generally marks the southern limit of Neogene backarc magmatism, is considered to mark the southern boundary of the transient shallow subduction zone.

  12. Geodynamic models of a Yellowstone plume and its interaction with subduction and large-scale mantle circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Yellowstone is a site of intra-plate volcanism, with many traits of a classical "hotspot" (chain of age-progressive volcanics with active volcanism on one end; associated with flood basalt), yet it is atypical, as it is located near an area of Cenozoic subduction zones. Tomographic images show a tilted plume conduit in the upper mantle beneath Yellowstone; a similar tilt is predicted by simple geodynamic models: In these models, an initially (at the time when the corresponding Large Igneous Province erupted, ~15 Myr ago) vertical conduit gets tilted while it is advected in and buoyantly rising through large-scale flow: Generally eastward flow in the upper mantle in these models yields a predicted eastward tilt (i.e., the conduit is coming up from the west). In these models, mantle flow is derived from density anomalies, which are either inferred from seismic tomography or from subduction history. One drawback of these models is, that the initial plume location is chosen "ad hoc" such that the present-day position of Yellowstone is matched. Therefore, in another set of models, we study how subducted slabs (inferred from 300 Myr of subduction history) shape a basal chemically distinct layer into thermo-chemical piles, and create plumes along its margins. Our results show the formation of a Pacific pile. As subduction approaches this pile, the models frequently show part of the pile being separated off, with a plume rising above this part. This could be an analog to the formation and dynamics of the Yellowstone plume, yet there is a mismatch in location of about 30 degrees. It is therefore a goal to devise a model that combines the advantages of both models, i.e. a fully dynamic plume model, that matches the present-day position of Yellowstone. This will probably require "seeding" a plume through a thermal anomaly at the core-mantle boundary and possibly other modifications. Also, for a realistic model, the present-day density anomaly derived from subduction should

  13. Constructibility issues associated with a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.A.

    1981-12-04

    This report contains the text and slide reproductions of a speech on nuclear waste disposal in basalt. The presentation addresses the layout of repository access shafts and subsurface facilities resulting from the conceptual design of a nuclear repository in basalt. The constructibility issues that must be resolved prior to construction are described. (DMC)

  14. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts: Evidence of mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G.J.; Keil, T.K.; Bild, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge data base, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and, thus, are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and inter-element variations, it does not appear that the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. Elemental ratios in Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, green and orange glass, average basalts and KREEP suggest that incorporation of late accreting material into the source regions or interaction of the magmas with primitive undifferentiated material is not a likely cause for the observed Ge enrichments. We speculate that the most plausible explanation for these Ge enrichments is complexing and concentration of Ge by F, Cl or S in volatile phases. In this manner, the KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the Moon suggests that the Moon was never totally molten. 71 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  15. Investigation of Basalt Woven Fabrics for Military Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    or gray, fine-grained rock classified in the family of igneous rocks , formed by cooling of molten lava. It is commonly found in the Earth’s crust...Acronyms 18 Distribution List 19 iv List of Figures Figure 1. Basalt rock ...help in acquiring the info within. vi INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 1 1. Introduction Basalt rock (figure 1) is a black

  16. Basalt-Trachybasalt Fractionation in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, J. C.; Edwards, P. H.; Filiberto, J.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Gasda, P.; Wiens, R.

    2016-08-01

    A set of igneous float rocks in Gale Crater have been analysed by ChemCam. They are basalt-trachybasalts, 47 to 53 ± 5 wt% SiO2 and formed by ol-dominated crystal fractionation from an Adirondack type basalt, in magmatism with tholeiitic affinities.

  17. Submarine basalt from the Revillagigedo Islands region, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Ocean-floor dredging and submarine photography in the Revillagigedo region off the west coast of Mexico reveal that the dominant exposed rock of the submarine part of the large island-forming volcanoes (Roca Partida and San Benedicto) is a uniform alkali pillow basalt; more siliceous rocks are exposed on the upper, subaerial parts o